Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00218
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: September 29, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00218
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text









BIG MAC" rm ovinIt.
HIGH 89F
LOW 76F
S CLOUDS, SUN,
T-SHOWER


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.254


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


PRICE 500


Council members'

show of support

for Turnquest


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
SOME FNM council mem-
bers plan to block Hubert
Ingraham's return as party
leader by citing constitutional
issues.
At a council meeting today,
anti-Ingraham delegates are
expected to argue that a vote
on the party's leadership at
council level would contravene
the FNM's constitution.
While some contend that, in
extenuating circumstances, the
party's constitution allows for
a vote outside of convention,
others feel that with the con-
vention only two months away
this is not such a case.
Meanwhile, supporters of cur-
rent FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest are rallying behind him.
At Mr Turnquest's con-
stituency headquarters on
Thompson Boulevard yester-
day, eight delegates who will be
voting at the party's November
convention gathered to cast
eight symbolic ballots, seven
nullifying the votes of parlia-
mentarians expected to vote
against Mr Turnquest and one
to "tip the scales" in his favour.
The group said they wanted
to register disappointment and
"total disbelief" in the recent
actions of the MPs, who have
asked that Mr Turnquest step
aside for a possible return of
Mr Ingraham as leader.
"As we cast these ballots we
cast them as symbolic votes for
democracy, loyalty, decency,
commitment and fair play. We
wish to emphasise, Senator


Turnquest is (the) duly elected
leader of the Free National
Movement who must be com-
mended for a stellar job as par-
ty leader and deserves our full
support and encouragement to
continue to make us FNMs and
indeed our great country
proud," said party executive
member BJ Moss.
The delegates, however,
stressed that this exercise and
the debate surrounding the
leadership were not evidence
of dissension within the party.
"In the history of all political
parties there will always come a
juncture where the .leadership
will be contested and the race
will be very hot. This is not a
show of disunity, it is merely
accenting what is already in the
Free National Movement," said
Kevin Harris, chairman of pub-
lic relations.
In addition they said that if
another person be it Mr
Ingraham or leadership hope-
ful Dion Foulkes were to be
elected the next leader, he
would have the group's full sup-
port.
Their opposition was not so
much toward Mr Ingraham,
they said, but the method by
which persons were seeking to
have him installed as leader.
"The FNM is historic in doing
business in a very democratic
way. We believe in democracy.
If Mr Ingraham or anybody else
wishes to run for leader of the
Free National Movement, meet
us on the convention floor,"
said Ricardo Smith, council
SEE page 13


* EIGHT delegates who will be voting at the party's November convention gathered to cast eight symbolic ballots. Anti-Ingraham
delegates are expected to argue that a vote on the party's leadership at council level would contravene the FNM's constitution.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune Staff)


Union gives
government
ultimatum
to respond
to proposal

THE Airport Airline and
Allied Workers Union has giv-
en government a five-day ulti-
matum to respond to their pro-
posal for a new industrial agree-
ment or face industrial unrest.
The union added its voice to
the growing chorus of industri-.
al unrest in the country, claim-
ing that the government has not
responded to their proposal for
an industrial agreement.
According to union presi-
dent Nelerene Harding, the
union has given both Bahama-
sair and Nassau Flight Services
seven days to respond to their
claims and submit a proposal
so that the parties can resume
contract negotiations.
SEE Business


Butterfly
acquittal
leads to
morality
questions

AFTER the acquittal of
"strip dancers" at the But-
terfly Club, a group of reli-
gious leaders is questioning
the extent to which the moral
fabric of the Bahamas is
being stretched.
Stating that they are griev-
ously concerned that "open
season" has been called in
the Bahamas for prostitution
and other commercial forms
of lewd sexual activities, Pas-
tors Allan Lee, Lyall Bethel
and Cedric Moss yesterday
met at the Kingdom Life
Church to express concern.
On Wednesday, September
21, six Russian strip dancers,
their Russian manager and six
. SEE page 12


Government
may cut oil
company
margins and
duty on gas

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
PROFIT margins on gaso-
line for the three major oil
companies may be cut by
more than half as govern-
ment reviews proposals to
lower prices at the pumps.
The government is review-
ing a proposal by the Fuel
Usage Committee to signifi-
cantly reduce the margins of
fuel importers and retailers
as well as lower the duty rate
on gas.
Minister of Trade and
Industry Leslie Miller yes-
terday announced that the
proposal which is now on the
table calls for a cut of
importers' margins from 33
SEE page 13


School closed
after death
threats against
principal

* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Black Point all-age
school in Exuma was closed
yesterday as a result of death
threats against the school's
administrators.
The Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) secretary
general Belinda Wilson said a
town meeting was held with
parents, the Parent Teachers
Association president, teach-
ers, local government officials
and police.
It was reported on Tuesday
that two notes threatening
harm to the school's principal,
Ester Cooper, were found at
the school.
George Town police indi-
cated that one note was specif-
ically addressed to the princi-
pal.
The Tribune learnt yesterday
SEE page 12


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


BAHAM amS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


I I ~ _1Nassau and Bahama Islands' Leading NewspaperI


loc


Pan


a


ngr













Leslie Miller confident of




winning constituency seat


rTO^ )itlW~aB~W~pta^S~aB~lS~iaW ^i?^ .-"lliWWhl~i~ ni. w iuisiJP ^ s' -w W' *..'M-W''W


'' ~ ~ ': A! i ; ; *' ^


E By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
MP FOR Baillou Hills and
Minister of Trade and Indus-
try Leslie Miller says there is
"no doubt" that he will win
his constituency seat in the
next election.
Challenging Mr Miller again
will be FNM opposition mem-
ber and leadership-hopeful
Dion Foulkes, who Mr Miller
beat in 2002.
However, Mr Foulkes has
begun an aggressive campaign
for the constituency seat and
leadership position, which was
bolstered with the launch of
his personal website over the
weekend.
Mr Foulkes is challenging
current FNM leader Tommy
Turnquest for the top post and
the party's MP's have report-
edly launched a bid to bring
former prime minister Hubert
Ingraham back as leader.
Yesterday, on the Love 97
radio show Issues of the Day
with host Jeff Lloyd, Mr
Miller predicted another win
in Baillou Hills.
"There is no doubt, none,
that I will win again. I have
no concern about that at all,"
Mr Miller told The Tribune.

Concern
According to the minister,
Mr Foulkes' main concern
should not be the constituen-
cy, but rather "Ingraham and
Tommy".
Mr Miller went on to voice
his opinions about the leader-
ship prospects within the
opposition FNM party:
"When you talk about poli-
tics, can you imagine going to
bed knowing that Tommy or
Dion is at the wheels of this
country and that we can wake
up in the twilight zone?
"They don't know where
the hell they goin'. If I was on
that ship with them I would
be way up on the bow ready
to jump off," Mr Miller said.
Mr Foulkes told The Tri-
bune however that he is very
confident of his chances both
in the leadership race and in
Baillou Hills seat.
"I am very confident. Given
the record of the PLP they are
going to have a serious prob-
lem with most of their seats.


* BAILLOU HILLS MP
Leslie Miller


* FNM leadership hopeful
Dion Foulkes
Mr Miller is responsible for
the drastic increase in the
price of gag which he' has
promised over an over will go
down but it hasn't.
"I'm very active in the Bail-
lou Hills area and I feel
extremely good and quite
frankly, I know the residents
are totally fed up with the
PLP, as is the entire country,"
he said.


"Co mi -saw



"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


nit you're over thirty if you insure with us!
rates for drivers over thirty, plus emergency
and etched ID numbers on your windshield
fiction if your car is stolen. Call us for


Now"_


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


.. , rluiUNi-


Fmlck!ine Threads
MacPey St 393-5684 & Thompsoii 910 3128-1








THE TRI E T


8 STUDENTS outside of HO Nash junior gh
school yesterday as teachers continued their sit-out.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


HO Nash teachers

continue sit-out


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
TEACHERS at HO Nash
junior high school continued
their sit-out for a third day yes-
terday.
Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers (BUT) secretary general
Belinda Wilson said the teach-
ers are opposed to the
appointment of Shavanda
Darville as senior mistress of
the school.
"The teachers are opposed
to her appointment because
they feel as though they have
on their staff seasoned, expe-
rienced and qualified teachers


who have also applied and
they have been interviewed,"
she said.
Mrs Wilson explained that
the teachers will remain sitting
in the school's staff room until
their concerns are addressed.
Yesterday, the school was
dismissed early.
When The Tribune tried to
find out why the school closed,
an administrator declined to
comment.
He denied statements by
teachers, reported in The Tri-
bune on Tuesday, which
suggested that the senior mis-
tress was not sufficiently qual-
ified.


Sears calls for dialogue


over state of school system


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
EDUCATION Minister
Alfred Sears has called for
mature dialogue amidst calls for
his resignation.
Mr Sears said consultation
between education stakeholders
is needed if the current state of
the school system is to be
improved.
Since the 2005/2006 school
year opened at the beginning of
this month, teachers from schools
all over the country have staged
protests over a number of issues.
Most of the demonstrations
centred on the fact that neces-
sary repairs school facilities were
not completed during the sum-
mer break.
The most recent complaints
include those voiced by HO Nash
teachers, who have been sitting
out of class for three days to
protest the appointment of Sha-
vanda Darville as senior mistress.
At DW Davis, teachers have
vowed not to teach until repairs
are made.

Conditions
In Lowe Sound primary school
in Andros, angry parents also
have protested over school con-
ditions.
While Mr Sears acknowledged
that these are valid complaints
which need to be addressed, he
expressed concern about the
effect the stoppages are having.
on students.
"At this stage in our nation we
need to engage in mature dia-
logue and I am concerned that
in the absence of dialogue, to


stop the instruction of students
is compromising our national
development," Mr Sears said.
He added that he is calling for
constructive dialogue and action
by everyone concerned.
Mr Sears admitted that there
are valid concerns regarding the
state of schools and the fact that
many had not been fully repaired
during the summer break.

Consultation
He said that he has been in
constant consultation with the
Ministry of Works and said both
ministries will continue to work
expeditiously to ensure not only
that the work is done quickly, but
also that it is done in a way that
does not interfere with classes.
Mr Sears added that his min-
istry is trying to ensure that a
more proactive approach is taken
to repairs in the future, by
appointing persons to monitor
the conditions of schools year-
round.
He explained that Education
officials have been mandated to
carry out consultations on the
state of schools on a full scale
basis.
The ministry has also begun a
process of reorganisation and a
committee has been formed com-
prised of superintendents, senior
ministry officials, representatives
of the PTA and the union.
Mr Sears explained that these
stakeholders will be able work
with the ministry to address spe-
cific needs and will provide input
into how funds should be spent.
Tuesday, the Bahamas Union
of Teachers threatened to shut
down the Black Point, Exuma all


age school after two notes
threatening harm to principal
Ester Cooper.
Mr Sears told The Tribune yes-
terday that the ministry takes any
threat of violence against its staff
very seriously.
He said ministry officials were
ordered to conduct their own
internal investigations and that


the matter was immed-
iately reported to the
police.
He added that in the case of
Lowe Sound primary school,
ministry representative Cecil
Thompson went to Andros along
with an area superintendent
to hold a meeting with the teach-
ers.


BED & BATH LINENS


Nassau's Premier Store

For Gifts & Home Decor


Workers Party

emergency meeting
THE central committee of the Workers Party has announced that
it will be holding an emergency meeting at 8pm on Thursday, Sep-
tember 29 at the party headquarters on Heritage Road.
A number of topics will be discussed among them the question
of whether Hubert Ingraham should be allowed to return as the
Prime Minister of the Bahamas.
The meeting has been organised by Workers Party chairman
Allan Strachan.


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THE MOST THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB IS FREE!
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS,
Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.
Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone
Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
Restoration & Care

Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor
YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
www.prochenisystem.com www.stonetechpro.cm wwmvw.iicrc.org
psp@coralwave.com (


MANUELCA\


BAYPARL BUILDING on |
PARLIAMENT STREET|
Tel: 323-6145 Fax: 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121
email:pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com


1 SALE

BUY 2 YARDS AT REGULAR
PRICE & GET THE 3RD

ONE FOR It!!

LINEN COTTON
LAMOUR SILK
*BROADES CHIFFON
BRIDAL
SSPECAL OCCASION
TROPICAL FABRICS

e ALL SHEER & ANTIQUE SATIN
e ALL COTTON PRINTS
ALL JACQUARDS, BROCADES
e ALL WAVERLY FABRICS
ALL FABRICS FROM SPAIN



Sept. 15th-Oct. 01

1( SALE AT BOTH
Madeira & Robinson Rd. Stores


I:U I 8:1 I 1U: II


SERENITY NEW 1:00 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:55
FLIGHT PLAN 8 1:10 3:45 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:45
TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE T 1:30 3:50 N/A 6:30 8:40 10:50
ROLLBOUNCE A 1:00 3:40 A 6:00 820 1:40
CRY WOLF T 1:20 3:25 N/A 6:20 8:30 10:45
LORD OF WAR C 1:00 3:35 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:40
JUST LIKE HEAVEN B 1:10 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:25 10:35
THE EXORCISIM OF EMILY ROSE T 1:00 3:25 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:40
THE MAN C 1:15 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:25 140:55
TRANSPORTER 2 T 1:20 3:40 N/A 6:20 8:40 10:45

INTO THE BLUE NEW 1:10 3:35 6:00 8:15 10M30
FLIGHT PLAN B 1:00 3:25 6:30 8I35 1035
' '"n~r l ~nnr nlr r r .r -r


I'H LUGAE TOE


East Ave & Sixth Terrace
Opp Centreville Food Market
Tel: 328-1477


l


I^^H^^~rINPEX ^^


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


w
NOWss


IM


1w^R^^


I


M IT BURTONS CORPSE B E


1:30


u40


C15 1


R10in 1i:15









PAGE 4, HURSDAY, SEPTEMBER29,2005THEEDITORIHETIB


WE WERE talking recently with a
retired BEC pensioner, who doesn't under-
stand the unrest among today's Bahamas
Electricity Corporation staff a staff that
have excellent benefits and are among the
country's best paid workers.
,Our friend, who retired after 40 years of
service, has serious health problems. How-
ever, he says that his high medical bills cost
him almost nothing because of the excellent
medical plan afforded him by BEC.
Although now that he has retired he pays
about $160 a month to retain his BEC med-
ical plan, during the years that he was on
BEC's staff he paid nothing. BEC provides
non-contributory medical coverage for all of
its employees.
However, BEC continues to pay the full
non-contributory medical benefits for those
retirees whose pension is under $500 a
month.
Our friend said-he opted to retire after 40
years of service, although he had three more
years left before the retirement age of 60.
However, some of his friends, who decided
to stay on to complete their 43 years, have
an even better retirement-plan than he has
- because of salary increases and other
increments in their three extra years at
work.
Although BEC staff today have a bind-
ing contract until 2007, it is understood that
they would like to do some tweaking to
their pension plan so that they can rake in a
few more pennies.
We understand that although BEC and
BTC (the former BaTelCo) have similar
pension plans, BTC's formula is slightly
different from that of BEC. BEC workers
would now like a part not all of BTC's
formula grafted onto their formula so that
they can push their pension scheme even-
-highif-ih the world's top two per cent
bracket where it is now.
Again the pension is non-contributory.
Every month BEC pays 13 per cent ofeach
employee's salary into the fund. The
employee pays nothing. But the greedy
ones want more at a cost to Bahamian
taxpayers.
We were talking to another young civil
servant. This time someone who is
employed with Social Services. Envious of
BEC employees' benefits, he cannot under-
stand their dissatisfaction.


This young man, a graduate with a BSc
degree, joined Social Services about eight
years ago. His starting salary was about
$17,000. Let's compare him to a young man
just out of high school with no higher edu-
cation and no experience. Employed as a
handyman or general labourer at BEC, his
starting salary is $18,699. After eight years
with the corporation and still no improve-
ment in his education, he earns $24,931
with an increment of $770.
Now let's look at our young social work-
er also after eight years of service. He bare-
ly makes $20,000. Before he could move
up into the $20,000 salary bracket he had to
return to the College of the Bahamas for
another year to be certified. Yet it is the
handyman, and not the social worker wvho is
making the noise.
We have given an example of a Grade 1
BEC worker. Now let's move that worker
up to Grade 8. The lowest salary in Grade
8 is $31,287 more than an MP who is
paid about $28,000. After 12 years service
his basic salary is up to $46,931 and his
increment is $1303.66. He can double his
salary with overtime. Added to his many
other benefits are his medical and pension
plans to which he contributes nothing.
Janitresses would be on the same salary
scale as the handyman.
An entry level clerk's starting salary
would be $19,360.92 with a ceiling of
$29,040.85 again higher than a parlia-
mentarian.
These civil servants all a part of an
essential service -with better pay than
most Bahamians are willing to consider a
strike that will put the people who pay their
salaries in darkness, spoil their refrigerated
food, and wreck their electronic applianees-.
-W.h7afihmakes matters worse, they don't seem
to have a conscience about it.
They forget that the Bahamas is a small
country that cannot afford their unreason-
able demands. They have to understand
that the Bahamas has no money tree from
which to shake the millions every time they
want more.
It is now time to recognise that the
Bahamas could be far more successful if
staff like BEC put as much thought into
doing a good job as they do in figuring out
how to get more money out of the Public
Treasury.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., KM., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department- (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


as its

SEDITOR, The Tribune
TODAY I have seen a side
to FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest that I never believed
existed and it frightens me.
According to the report in him, M
The Tribune, his parliamentari- blind th
ans met with him in private ses- underst
sion Monday and told him FNMM
bluntly that if he remained as Turnque
leader the FNM could not win does no
the.2007 election. party lea
Apparently, he was told that the part
as FNM leader the PLP would want M
win by default, something that no mat
no one with any hope for'the Ingraha
future of the Bahamas wants to support
happen.- He was told that if he cannot f
remained as leader the party does not
could not raise sufficient funds In the
to conduct an election. quest fa
He was also told, even though his own
he had been given the oppor- elected
tunity, that he had not won the his crash
support of the FNM. He was he could
told that FNM supporters want- together
ed Mr Ingraham, a far more tion. The
seasoned and experienced Senate f
politician, to lead them. Mr, lead his
Turnquest was invited to step lous situ
down for the sake of his party was nee
and the country. He said "No". party lea
Apparently, he did not in the St
believe what he was hearing, failed.
The one straw that he was tight- Parlia
ly clutching was the belief that their o
Mr Ingraham would support Accord
him, and never contest his lead- report, ]
ership position. want Mr
Even though Mr Ingraham in the I
would probably like to support that Op


leader

USmith for the sake of party
and country has agreed to
step down. I also hear that Mr
Symonette, who is responsible
for the Opposition's business in
the House, will also step down
graham is not so so that the party can have one
1e can't hear and leader Mr Ingraham. And so
the message that when the House opens next
Eve delivered to Mr week we expect to see Mr
- Mr Turnquest just Ingraham as Opposition Leader
ve the support of in the House. If this is so,
3 or the majority of Bahamians can be assured of a
ank and file. They lively session.
raham back. And What frightens me about Mr
how strongly Mr Turnquest are the blinkers that
fight continue his he wears. Would Bahamians
Mr Turnquest, he have a leader who when told
him on a party that that a situation is green, would
it him. insist that it is red? Would
election Mr Turn- Bahamians have a leader who
to be re-elected in would refuse to take advice and
tituency. His party would insist on seeing the world
its leader, despite only from his point of view? For
he polls, to see how a man to dig his heels in, refuse
y the party faithful to take advice and recognise the
win the next elec- truth of a situation does not
)pointed him to the augur well for the future.
where he tried to. I say bring Mr Ingraham
y. It was a ridicu- back. Mr Turnquest, please go
n. His leadership back to the hustings and try to
in the House. As win a seat in the House before
he was ineffectual talking about becoming prime
e. The experiment minister.
Mr Ingraham and Mr Brent
itarians can elect Symonette would be an unbeat-
House leader, able ticket.
to The Tribune
[parliamentarians LET'S WIN THE
raham to lead them ELECTION
e. The report says Nassau
:ion Leader Alvin September 28 2004


Thrnquest is not the



right man for the job


EDITOR, The Tribune
I listened to the Jeff Lloyd
talk show this morning when
callers overwhelmingly sup ...
ported the return of Hubert
Ingraham as FNM leader, and
next pfimne minister.
Mr Lloyd kept returning to
the point of how passionately
Mr Ingraham had supported
Tommy Turnquest for leader;
how passionately he had foisted
Mr Turnquest onto the party at
the last FNM convention as the
person to succeed him and even
before that how he had pushed
the so-called dream team -
Turnquest and Foulkes to
take the FNM into the 2002
election.
This was one of the main rea-
sons for the FNM losing that
election. I admit that it was
because of this same "team",
that I -turned over in my bed
and went back to sleep on elec-
tion day. I couldn't vote PLP
and I refused to vote for a team
in which I had no confidence.
Mr Ingraham groomed Mr


STurnquest and has loyally sup-
ported him in the hopes that
the electorate would embrace
him as the next prime minister.
Mr Ingraham and the FNM
have given Mr Turnquest every
opportunity to win the hearts-
and minds of the people. The
fact that Mr Turnquest has
failed to do so is not Mr Ingra-
ham's fault.
I am certain that even today
Mr Ingraham would like to sup-
port Mr Turnquest. But if ever
there was a realist, Mr Ingra-
ham is that realist. He has had
to accept I understand under
much pressure and against his
will- that his prot6g6 has not
caught the people's imagina-
tion. This is not Mr Ingraham's
fault. Mr Turnquest is a nice
man, but unfortunately, in my
opinion, he is not a leader and,
certainly this time around, he
is not electable.
Mr Turnquest might think
that he is the right man for the
job; he might honestly believe
that in this country's hour of
crisis he is the best man to take


the Bahamian people across
Jordan, but if he cannot sell thit
belief to the voters he is a man
lost in the wilderness.
This is not about what one
man thinks of himself. This is
about-winning an election. Th'e
2007 election is a critical elec-
tion for this country. The
Bahamas needs strong leader-
ship; not leadership by commit-
tees that don't report. The
Bahamas is slipping badly
because there is no strong hand
at the tiller.
If Mr Turnquest were the
patriot that he says he is, for
the sake of his country he would
step aside and let his mentor
take over the Ship of State.
If the FNM are serious about
winning this election, then Mr
Ingraham is your man, not Mr
Turnquest.
This is all about winning an
election, not about catering to
personalities or egos.
CONCERNED
Nassau
September 27 2005


- 1


Rosetta St. Phone: 325-3336


B0


warranty!



4 ALL CARS IN
EXCELLENT
CONDITION!



>MONTAGU N

MOTORS LIMITED L cU 77
VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET


FNM needs





Ingraham


IE


r Ing
iat h
and
Ps ha
!st -
*t hav
aders
y's r
r Ing
ter 1
m m
for:
orce
t wan
e last
iled
cons
him
at th
I raill
r to
ey ap
from
part
uatio
eded
ader
enate
amen
)wn
ding
FNM
rIngi
House
posit


BEC workers still want more


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Rosetta St.


Phone: 325-3336










THEni TRIBUNE T|^H^IHURSAYSEPEMBRN2WS


CRIME IN BRIEF

RETIRED Chief Jus-
tice Joaquim Gonsalves
was reportedly robbed on
Tuesday evening.
According to police
reports, upon returning
home around 10.30pm, Mr
Gonsalves and his daugh-
ter were robbed of an
undetermined amount of
cash and some jewellery.

Around 1.45pm on
Tuesday two men were
arrested in the area of
Carmichael Road.
A .380 pistol and four
live rounds of ammunition
were retriPved from the
men, one a Peardale resi-
dent and the other a resi-
dent of Claridge Road.

At 3.40pm police
received a report of an
armed assault.
A woman said that two
men came to her home
with a gun. They reported-
ly forced her inside and
demanded money.
The woman told police
she was able to escape.

On Tuesday a resident
of Bethel Avenue and his
friend were robbed of a
wrist watch and some cash.
It was reported that
around 8.37pm both men
were standing in the yard
of Freddie Taylor's Bethel
Avenue home when they
were approached by three
armed men who robbed
them.

Around 9.13pm on
Tuesday a stabbing inci-
dent was reported to
police officials.
Jasmine Russell was
reportedly stabbed by
another woman while hav-
ing an altercation with a
man.
As of yesterday, she was
listed in serious but stable
condition at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.
Police are now question-
ing Erica Meadows of
Coral Habour in connec-
tion with the incident.
All these matters are
being investigated by
police.

Ftz Fungicide,

Pestt Con trol


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Missing teen is



returned safely



to her family


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE disappearance of a
teenage girl has been solved
as police returned ''7far-old
Trevina Thompson safely to
her family.
After being missing for two
days, Trevina was located by
the Central Detective Unit on
Tuesday at a friend's home.
Visiting The Tribune yester-
day, Trevina's mother Breann
Thompson said she is "very
excited" that her daughter has
returned home unharmed and
grateful to police for" all their
efforts.
On Monday, police launched
an investigation into the
teenager's disappearance.
According to the mother,
Trevina went missing on Sun-
day after her father Trevor
Thompson had dropped her
off at her place of employment
- the Curtsy Food Store on
Carmichael Road.


* SAFE: Trevina Thomp
Reports by Trevina's fi
had indicated that she
have gone off with
boyfriend Corado.


>son
riends
- may
her


Nurse testifies in scuba

diver's death inquiry

By KARAN MINNIS
THE Coroner's Court inquiry into the death of scuba diver William
Fountain continued yesterday.
According to Court dockets, Mr Fountain died at Doctor's Hospital
on September 9, 2001 after receiving medical treatment.
It was reported that during a diving expedition in the Berry Islands,
Mr Fountain was diving at a depth of 110 feet using a compressor
when he experienced dizziness.
He then reportedly collapsed while diving.
Mr Fountain was transported to Nassau, and was then by a Doctor's
Hospital ambulance from Montagu Beach Ramp.
Mr Fountain was then moved to the Lyford Cay Hyperberic Cham-
ber (LCHC).
Once at LCHC, Mr Fountain reportedly seemed to be progressing
but soon devetlped an adverse reaction while in the'''yperbedic cham-
ber. "y b '""c'
He was then transported back to Doctor's Hospital, where he later
died.
Yesterday Nurse Valerie Cooper, the Hyperberic chamber tender,
testified about her observations during Mr Fountain's treatment.
According to Mrs Cooper, her job was to "simply watch over
Mr'Fountain, observe his vital signs and provide assistance were need-
ed."

Chamber
She said that while at 60 feet in the chamber, Mr Fountain's vital signs
were normal and his symptoms had improved.
"He was able to move his toes, lift his right leg, roll is left leg from
side to side and was in no sign of distress," she said. "At 30 feet, he said
that he wanted to sit up and belch. He complained of stomach pains and
wanted to belch."
"He had difficulty breathing and had chest pains," she said.
Mrs Cooper said that as a result of her observations she told the
chamber operator what Mr Fountain was experiencing, and was told to
watch him for another five minutes.
"After that time past, I told Mr Bain (the operator) that he was has
worse and he called the doctor. The doctor then told Mr Bain to stop
the treatment and Mr Bain removed him from the chamber," she
said.
According to Mrs Cooper, she does not have the authority to rec-
ommend any course of actions for the clinic's patients, as she is the most
junior person there.
Also testifying yesterday was Dr Barret McCarthney, director of
anesthesiology at Doctor's Hospital.
According to Dr McCarthney, he was called around 4am on Sep-
tember 9 to assist with Mr Fountain because he had went into cardio-
arrest.
"When I got there Dr Mark Cooper was tending to him and they had
began rescission. After an hour and half we got a pulse and blood pres-
sure," he said. "Soon after we took him to the ICU, but once there he
had experienced another cardio-arrest."
"After many efforts including a pacemaker, he did not regain blood
pressure. He passed around am," he said.
According to Dr Mc McCarthney, every attempt was made to save
Mr Fountain.
The matter was later adjourned until December 1 at 10am


Yesterday, Mrs Thompson
explained that the CDU was
able to determine Trevina's
whereabouts by tracking calls
made from her daughter's cel-
lular phone.
"I gave the police my daugh-
ter's cell number and they got
her phone records, then found
out who she had been calling
in the past few days. That's
how they were able to find her
at her friend's house," she said.

Happy
At this time, Mrs Thompson
said, she is so happy that
Trevina is safe and back with
her family that she is not con-
cerned where her daughter had
spent the last few days.
"I don't know if she was
with a male or female friend. It
doesn't matter, I only thank
God she's alive. When police
told me that they had found
her I told them I don't care if
she wants to stay away from
home for a year as long as she
is alive and healthy," she said.
Mrs Thompson said she had
not yet talked to her daughter
about her disappearance as
she wanted to allow Trevina
some time to settle in at home
first.
"Right now I'm taking her
everywhere I go. We haven't
sat down and talked really. I
believe, however, it was free-
dom that was the problem.
"I think she felt that she did-
n't have enough freedom at
home. She's 17, a very difficult
age, and she has some things
she needs to work through,"
she said.
Mrs Thompson said she will
now strive to establish a better
relationship with Trevina to
. av 1,i,6lla1,c.nlden.t ,n
ifuture.,. ,, .. .,,
"I think we will have to talk
about a lot of things. Right
now we will concentrate on
making her happy at home and
finding her a new job," she
said.
Mrs Thompson said her
daughter does not wish to
return to the Curtsy Food
Store and is contemplating
going back to school.


Police warning
By KARAN MINNIS sioner Reginald Ferguson denied
that there has been a "rash of
POLICE are urging women to rapes" in the eastern area of New
exercise extreme caution and to Providence.
be aware of their surroundings at "We don't have any preda-
all times., tors," he said. "If we did, we
The warning comes after two would warn people, but we
reported attempted abductions always tell people to be careful."
on the eastern side of the island According to Mr Ferguson, the
and a sexual assault off Eastern last known case of sexual assault
Road. in the area occurred about three
Shortly after 6am on Saturday, weeks ago, when a tourist was
two women were nearly abducted raped.
within an hour of each other by He pointed out that someone
an unidentified man driving a has already been charged with
dark-coloured Nissan car. that incident and is awaiting trial
One incident happened at the in prison.
foot of the eastern Paradise Island Mr Ferguson said that sexual
bridge and the other near the assault cases are particularly dif-
Dunkin'-Donuts on East Street ficult for police, because persons
south, are often reluctant to report them.
Police report that on Monday a in the first place.
woman who lives near the East- "Because of the nature of the
ern Road area was sexually offence, girls don't want to talk
assaulted by an intruder, about it; because it is such a trau-
As of yesterday, police say they matising indecent," he said. "But
have no suspects. the improvement in policing and
Despite rumours to the con- law has tended to eliminate peo-
trary, Assistant Police Commis- pie's fears of reporting things."

Are you looking for clothing, hats, shoes
& handbags that's sure to turn heads?
omrne To

ORALEEI FASHIONS

Where The Latest Styles Meet Elegance & Class


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
,-- Harbour Bay Shopping Centre '-
\. Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 '


GO AHEAD...
MAKE YOUR NEIGHBOURS JEALOUS.


NASSAU: 325*2505 FAX: 325*1204 ROBINSON


NEW R RIVA
Mens awer SirsColas nd ans hitsSies151/ t 1


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, .,,


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE S, TUHSDA, SETEMBE 29,2005AHE TNBUN


SCHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
will hold
"THE ABUNDANT LIFE CRUSADE"
e with Evangelists,
Elders Elliott Neilly and Brentford Isaacs
I Sunday, October 9th -16th
I Sundays 7:00p.m. Weeknights 7:30p.m.


: "Come and find peace of mind and healing :
for the body and soul" I
mluI II I mI Ima muI i mI I II I ii


QUALITY ,,,
LIMITED
S,,..# SUTQ DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
E A, i St377.-t6i 1 325-3079
r soVur oomoiaul on as (repoa) Ltd te simla' dea5s.* wQeAsns Highway 35m2


Union anger at Royal


Oasis company action


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A Freeport
union official has expressed his
anger over the fact that the
Driftwood Group has been
allowed to operate businesses
in the Bahamas following the
Royal Oasis' closure.
Lloyd Cooper, second vice
president of the Bahamas Hotel
Catering Allied Workers
Union, believes Driftwood
should not be allowed to keep
the three hotels it now operates
in New Providence.
"We should really listen to
that word 'Driftwood' we
should never allow a driftwood
to come in the Bahamas
because a driftwood does exact-
ly what it says, drift," warned
Mr Cooper.
It has been a year since the
closure of the Royal Oasis
Resort and Casino in Freeport,
and the remaining 135 workers
that stayed on at the property
were laid off on Monday. --
The resort owes millions to
the government and to local
vendors on the island.
Last Friday, the power was
turned off at the property. It
was revealed that the resort had
accumulated an outstanding bill
of nearly $500,000.
The workers, who now join
the 1,000 former employees that
were initially laid off last Sep-
tember, are demanding their
severance payments from man-
agement.


* WORKERS are seen meeting with Lloyd Cooper, second vice president of BHCAWU (right)
and lawyer Carlson Shurland at Workers House
(Photos: Denise Maycock)


A group of former Royal
Oasis workers seeking assis-
tance met with Mr Cooper and
lawyer Carlson Shurland this
week at Workers House.
Some of them are calling on
the government for help.
Wellington Vincent, a security
officer who worked at the resort
for 34 years, was among those


that were laid off on Monday.
"It is unfair that we are being
denied our severance pay when
the (other) former employees
have received their payments.
Bernadette Johnson, a senior
housekeeping executive, said
the staff have been working on
half salary since last March.
"We are struggling and are
behind in our bills," said the
employee of 31 years.
"We are calling on the gov-
ernment to come to our aid
because we are hurting and
need assistance," she said.
TROPICAL

-UTEMIA .R


Under the Employment Act,
Mr Cooper said, in addition to
severance pay the employees
are entitled to notice pay
because they were terminated
without notice.
Although the union does not
represent the workers, Mr
Cooper said they will offer them
support.
"It is just terrible that they
have now put the remainvig
employees out of work without
pay," he said.
The union official also
expressed his disappointment
in Minister of Labour Vincent
Peet over his failure to meet
with the workers.
FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest said that although the
PLP promised voting Bahami-
ans a government of hope, the
people have yet to see concrete
evidence of this.


20%


Store


ide


Sale


Thursday September 29th

to Saturday October 1 st




the







,CENTER


HARBOUR BAY


(242) 394-7660


MARATHON MALL (242) 393-7979


Senior Construction Manager
Exurna based Development Company seeking
experienced Project Manager to oversee operations
for high-end multiunit residential construction. Must
have minimum 10 years experience in senior
management position. Attractive remuneration package,
accolfranodations and benefits offered. ,
Please.Ixyour cover letter and resunie in confidence
to the attention (?f': Antonio at 327-1569


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005







T S 2 20,AE


LOCL EW


m THE Mud in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, pictured after it was was devastated by Hurricane Frances
last year
(Photo: Felipe Major/ Tribune staff


Think tank is to



focus on Haitians


I .THE next meeting of
Bahamian Forum will examine
the Bahamian-Haitian crisis and
w at has been done to address
it,the think tank announced.
,At the meeting, Mr Billy
.ioberts will give a first-hand,
,'upto-date report on the issue as
It stands in Abaco.
He will discuss the origin of
't, e crisis, why it was allowed to
p elop, to the extent that it has


and what he feels is being done
and should be done about it.
Responding to Mr Roberts,
Bahamian Forum investigative
reporters Cassandra Bullard
and Beth Stewart will give an
update from the Haitian
Ambassador and Bahamian gov-
ernment on what is being done
and has to be done to establish
proper boundaries and mean-
ingful integration of Haitians


in the Bahamian society.
"Recognising this is a hot
issue we ask the audience to lis-
ten well and respond with the
decorum and rules of the
forum," the non-partisan think
tank said in a statement.
Bahamian Forum is spon-
sored by RBC Royal Bank of
Canada and Finco. Views pre-
sented at the forum do not rep-
resent the views of the sponsor.


It's no secret that employee satisfaction and successful business
results go hand in hand. In today's competitive market,
attracting performance driven, loyal and motivated personnel is
a challenge that all businesses face large or small. We believe
that helping your employees secure their financial future will
keep your employees yours!

British American Insurance Company provides top-notch
Corporate Pension Plan Solutions. We offer defined benefit,
defined contribution, saving plans, personal pensions, executive
pensions and annuities. We offer dynamic and flexible
investment options.

For more information on our Corporate Pension, Personal
Pensions, Annuities and Mortgage Services, call the
Financial Services And Investments Team at 461-1000


S920 .4 0


British American Insurance
Pension Services include:
) Dynamic & Flexible Design Options
) Investment Services
) Record Keeping and Administrative Services
) Receipt and Collection of Pension Contributions
) Trustee and Compliance Services
) Accounting Services and Actuary Reports
U Timely Employee Statements
) Employee Seminars & Consultations


LABRITISH
)AMERICAN

a strong link in your financial future
British American Insurance Company of The Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive, P.O. Box N-4815 Nassau, NP, The Bahamas
Tel (242) 461-1000 Fax (242) 361-2525
bafinancial@babinsurance,com


is pleased to

announce that




JULI DEAN ZANETTA, M.D.
a US Board Certified Ophthalmologist,

has recently joined our staff

Dr'Dean Zanetta served as
Chief of Ophthalmology at Nashville Metro
General Hospital at Meharry and an Assistant
Professor of Ophthalmology at Vanderbilt
University


Dr. Dean Zanetta specializes
in Small-Incision Cataract Surgery using the
latest Ultrasound Techniques
and
Diabetic Eye Disease


For Appointments call 393-8222


EYE WORLD is located on Soldier Road 1/4mile
south of the Village Road Round-A-Bout.



BPAHAMAS (MEDICAL
MALPRACTICE
COMPANY LTD.
The Bahamas Medical Malpractice Company Ltd
Continuing Medical Education Seminar
Obtaining Consent:
The Ethical & Legal Principles Governing Consent in Medicine
Lecturer:
Dr. Richard Veerapen, LLB, LLM (Medical Law), FRCS (Edinburgh & Glasgow)
Consultant Neurosurgeon, Director and Deputy Chairman of the Medical Defense
Organization of Malaysia.
The Medical Consent and the
Practice of Medicine in the Bahamas.
Lecturer
Dr. Dexter Reno Johnson M.B. B.S. FRCSC (Edinburgh)
L.E.C., LL.B. (Hons.)(U.W.I.) LL.M. (Distinction) (UKC) Lecturer UWI

Nassau:
Tuesday Oct 4th 2005, 6-9pm:
MAB House 6th Terrace Centerville / Madeira St. Nassau

Freeport, Grand Bahama:
Wednesday Oct 5th 2005, 6-9pm:
Chamber of Commerce Building Freeport Grand Bahama
Continuing Medical Education Seminar
The Practice of Medicine in the Bahamas, Issues of Patient Consent
Lecture 1:
Obtaining Consent: The Ethical & Legal Principles Governing Consent in Medicine
Lecture 2
The Medical Consent and the Practice of Medicine in the Bahamas

Please Print Clearly Attending Seminar in: Nassau [ ] or Freeport Grand Bahama [ ]

Last Name First Name M.I.__
Mailing Address *
City State Country_____.
Phone: Fax:
Email (Important): ___________
* The mailing address is where all correspondence will be sent.
Are you insured with Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. (Providence Channel SP2003B): YES [(] NO [ ]
Do you plan to join Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co: Ltd.: YES [] NO []
If yes indicate anticipated date:_______


Pn (ito appjial Mt pnM m

"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"




-Help your employees secure their financial fuiture...


with a BA Corporate Pension Plan.


Payment is required at the time of registration
Please Make Cheques Payable to Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. Ltd.
Seminar Registration fees = Free for Current Members. $200.00 for all others.
N.B. Non-Private Practice MDs / Hospital Employed MDs $50 Registration Fee
Pledging New Members: No Charge: Post dated cheque required
[] Cheque is enclosed [ ] Will Register at Venue
Contact us at:
Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. Ltd.
(An Affiliate Company of Physician Alliance Ltd)
Grosvenor Close #3, PO Box EE17022; Ph:326-4460/1; Fax: 326-8874
Oct 4th CME Seminar


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 7








PAGE THRSDA, SEPEMBE 29,2005AHE TIBUN


RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA



EasyAs 123

Residential


Property Loan


"y'~ .~'Z
~ ~K.


t~


* BAHAMAS consul General Alma Adams (left) and Transport and Aviation Minister Glenys
Hanna-Martin



Bahamas takes top



policing award


* By Bahamas Information
Services
MIAMI, Florida For the
second consecutive year, the
Bahamas' Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme captured the presti-
gious International Association
of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
award for success in community
policing.
And, Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson was selected
as chairman of the IACP's
World Regional Office with
responsibility for the Caribbean
and Central America.
The award was announced on
Tuesday during the IACP's
112th annual conference and
exposition at the Miami Beach
Convention Centre.
Urban Renewal in the
Englerston constituency, head-
ed by Inspector Bruce Arnett,
was hailed as "an example of
community policing's best prac-
tices", and took the ITT Indus-
tries Night Vision trophy.
Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin,
who represents Englerston, and
Bahamas Consul General Alma
Adams, were joined by nearly


100 officers and civilians from
the Bahamas for the event.
Last year, the Urban Renew-
al Programme in Grand
Bahama, headed by Inspector
Noel J Curry, was named the
IACP's best community polic-
ing project. There are 11 such
projects in the Bahamas.
Mrs Hanna-Martin lauded
the success of programme in
transforming her densely-pop-
ulated, inner-city constituency
for the better.
Located in mid-New Provi-
dence, Englerston is a commu-
nity of about 5,000 that faces
many challenges, including
housing shortages, poverty,
crime, unemployment and
teenage pregnancy.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said: "The
rate of crime has reduced dras-
tically, and partnerships with
diverse groupings have devel-
oped, each taking upon them-
selves responsibility for what
happens in the community."
The IACP is the world's old-
est and largest nonprofit mem-
bership organisation of police
executives, with more than
19,000 members in about 100
countries.


IACP president Joseph G
Estey lauded the "outstanding
job" Commissioner Farquhar-
son has done.
"It shows that the Royal
Bahamas Police Force is work-
ing extremely hard and are
judged by their peers to be a
superior organisation," he said.
'Commissioner Farquharson
told the conference that good
policing emanates from the
community.
"I don't think any police force
can be successful without the
community's support," he said.
The Englerston Urban
Renewal Project office on
Moore Avenue includes repre-
sentatives from the Ministry of
Health, the Department of
Environmental Health Services,
and the Social Services Depart-
ment.
"I can personally attest to the
transformation that is happen-
ing in Englerston," said Mrs
Hanna-Martin.
"I have seen many of even
the most cynical and suspicious
in the community come around
to accepting the fact that the
police ain't that bad .after all,",
she said.


Your dream home begins with a lot you can build
on. With our help, you can realise your dream, as
EASY AS 123!
* No commitment fees
* Competitive interest rates
* Flexible payment terms with up to 10 years to repay!

Call or visit any RBC Royal Bank of Canada branch today.
We'll help make your dreams come true EASY AS 12 3!


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean


Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canadar The Lion & Globe symbol
and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada


* FARM Road Urban Renewal co-ordinator ASP Stephen Dean (seated) and police liaison
officer Walter Evans check out the latest in patrol units.


QUALITY INSIDE

AND OUT


(M ----"bel_


RjM46- W


~""""'"'"I"~"`""'~~~""'~':""~"":?' "` '"; ;"~"::i":"':i"""


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


I I m


LOCALNW


SALE to REMEMBER


* COMMISSIONER of Police Paul Farquharson takes a bow


* COMMISSIONER Paul Farquharson and Englerston MP Glenys Hanna-Martin, the Minister
of Transport and Aviation, receives the IACP's top award for success in community policing from
IACP president Joseph G Estey (left).
(BIS photo: Gladstone Thurston)


VISA and Master Credit Cards Accepted
Prices good while supplies last [Photos shown may not be actual product]
John S. George Company Limited Main Branch, Palmdale Shopping Plaza, Madeira Street
Phone: 242-322-8421 Fax: 242-328-2067


Your car.

You r tr ust.


Our responsibility

rake Service Suspension l Alignmi t111181
Oil, Lube I Filler "GOODYEAR TIlES"

*Mmerica Imorted Cars Light Trucks Van ll SiUV's
* Complete Inspection 1 Estimaltes fore we sNat l he Iofrk


2 LOCATIONS TO SERIE YO
MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST S1
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-j


T.& SOLDIER RD
2940 or 356-2941


Open: Monday -Saturday
8am-5pm
ax 326-4865 P. 0. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas
AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS MI
"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


m













Ten important lessons I learned


P OLTICS is an interest-
ing affair to say the
least. Most people who partici-
pate in it meaningfully find it
thoroughly intriguing.
It is safe to say that politics is
perhaps the most engaging issue
in Bahamian life, if only to the
extent to which the public dis-
cusses it, relies upon it or par-
ticipates in it at election time. It
is probably more than two-


thirds of the content of daily
newspaper commentary and
seventy-five per cent of the con-
tent of radio talk shows in this
country. Most news stories cov-
er some aspect of it, either what
politicians are doing or what
they are not.
I spent the greater part of my
college life taken up with polit-
ical issues. It began for me with
my responsibilities as president
of the College of the Bahamas
Union of Students (COBUS)


and continued with my duties
as vice-president of the Acade-
mic Coalition for Equality
(ACE), which was a student
movement created to oppose a
professor at the University of
Western Ontario who published
a work that suggested that black
people were naturally less intel-
ligent than white people and
Asian people and that such
intelligence could be measured
by the size of one's forehead,
genitals and the like.


Pre-lnventory


CLEARANCE A



S


Upon graduation from col-
lege, I soon found myself
addressing political issues
through writing letters to the
editor and public addresses
throughout the country.
In 1992, I was called upon to
lead a campaign to encourage
young people to vote. I formed
a movement called Youth Who
Care, which organised a series
of efforts to inform young peo-
ple about the upcoming general
elections and hosted two meet-


STRAIGHT UP TALK,


Z H I VAR G
ings in Grand Bahama that for
the first time brought political
candidates from all sides togeth-
er to discuss issues with young
people.
I took a hiatus from politics
from 1992 to 1996 to develop


PROTECTION


WEATHER
iRetirictable awnings for
patios and decks
Si'gh.l aI100 colours and patterns
Also custom-made aliuminium
patio roofs, rooms and car
portS,

Call 32248219 Dn S-tainton sNC97
ox3264 (Protection) Limited


LAIN G;


my professional career and`
advance my education. Even'
then, however, I remained a'
keen observer of the political
happenings in The Bahamas'
and throughout the world, hav-'
ing the great vantage points at'
the Office of the Prime Minister
and the Embassy of The
Bahamas in Washington, DC,'
both places in which I worked.'
It was in 1997 that I was
recruited to offer for a seat in
the House of Assembly and the'
rest, as they say, is history.

I thoroughly enjoyed my.
experience in politics and
was careful to identify at all
times the important lessons that
I learned in it. I share these
lessons today with little com-
mentary, as they are self-
explanatory. The lessons are:
1) Politics, the science and
practice of government, is an
enormously useful human
enterprise;
2) Politics is most useful when
there is a critical mass of people
who are visionary, focused, stu-'
dious, honest, competent, indus-'
trious and given to serving oth-
ers genuinely;
3) Political parties perform:
best when they have honest,!
strong, decisive, intelligent,
articulate, charismatic and pur-
pose-driven leaders;
4) Winning an election must
go hand-in-hand with advand&
ing the nation and no political'
party does itself or its people
justice that sacrifices proper
attention to the requirements-
of effective governance for the
expedience of winning an elec-
tion;
5) Change is a constant in
politics and people can be fick?
le. The same people say 'yes'
today and 'no' tomorrow as well
as vote in and out;
6) Principles are more endur-
ing than interests but most peo-
ple in politics are bound togeth-
er by interests rather than prin-
ciples;


administered by the Pan American Health Organization
Regional Office of the World Health Organziation


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

CAREC, a Public Health Information, Service and Consulting organization serving 21 member
countries in the Caribbean, invites applications from suitably qualified, experienced and
dynamic persons to fill the posts listed below. These contracts are of limited duration with
an expiry date of September 30, 2006. An excellent opportunity to contribute to the
improvement of public health in the Caribbean region exists for the selected candidtates.

PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISER (HIV/AIDS/STI) JAMAICA

The HIV/AIDS/STI Advisor will be based at the PAHO/WHO Office in Jamaica and will
provide support for the strengthening of the National HIVAIDS/STI Strategy in Jamaica,
Bermuda and Cayman Islands, including the provision of technical and managerial support
to the National AIDS Program and other relevant agencies in theHealth Sector. Periodic
travel between Jamaica, Bermuda and Cayman Islands will be required.

PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISER (IIIV/AIDS/STI) BAHAMAS/TURKS & CAICOS
ISLANDS

The HIV/AIDS/STI Advisor will be based at the National HIV/AIDS Program Office in
Turks & Caicos and will provide support in strengthening the management and coordination
of the HIV/AIDS/STI programs in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Periodic travel between
Turks & Caicos and the Bahamas will be required.

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE
Masters Degree in public health, with focus on policy development or public
health administration plus post graduate training in epidemiology.
Five years experience at the national and/or sub-regional level in the area of
program management.
Certificate course in HIV/AIDS/STI or similar program
Experience and/or training in project managent
Two year experience in providing training/transfer of skills in program
management and cost analysis related to disease prevention and control programs at
sub-regional level, preferably related to HIV/AIDS/STI.

The closing date for application is October 7, 2005.

Applications or enquiries should be addressed to:

The Manager
Human Resources Department
Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC)
P.O. Box 164
Port of Spain, Trinidad
FAX: (868) 622-2792; email: hrdept@carec.paho.org


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005








THE TRIBUNE THUHouM, oL, ,I


in political life


7) The biggest blind spot in
politics, which is an enterprise
of service, is ego;
8) The positions many peo-
ple take in politics depend on
where they sit at the time, so
do not be surprised that some
people do the opposite in office
of what they said they would
*do out of office;
,9) It is better to lose in poli-
tics with your integrity intact
than to win with your charac-
ter impugned at every turn; and
10) The true statesman is he
who abandons the expediency
of the moment for the greater
excellence of the future.
These are by no means the
only lessons that I have learned
in politics. In fact, I have been
able to document at least 53
such lessons. However, these
are among the most important
that I have observed. While I
learned them in politics, they
are proving useful everywhere I
find myself in life.
DUERRE THOMAS' INSPI-
RATIONAL BOOK


I, n one of ,my recent
columns I wrote of a
young man who had the mis-
fortune of losing both his par-
ents at an early age. Under the
circumstances, one might have
expected him to fail in life but
he did not. He published a book
recently to which I wrote the
foreword. I am so proud of him
and happy for him that I want-
ed to share the foreword with
my readers.
-.People need dreams to pro-
mote their potential and inspire
their resolve. People with
enduring dreams live with


Principles are more enduring
than interests but most people
in politics are bound together
by interests rather than
principle


enduring hope. Duerre Thomas
has a message; it is a great mes-
sage. His message is simple but
profound: 'Do not allow your
dreams to be killed". This is a
message for every human being;
however, it is especially neces-
sary for the young people of our
world.



What
happens to
you in life
does not have
to dictate what
you ultimately
achieve in it



Duerre is qualified to deliver
this message because his life's
experiences gave him every rea-
son to let his dreams die. The
traumatic loss of his father as a
child could have given every
excuse to quit, to give up on


It is better to lose in politics
with your integrity in tact than
to win with your character
impugned at every turn


himself.
Instead, however, with faith
in God and a belief in the pow-
er of his dreams, he pressed for-
ward and is now impacting his
community through a dynamic
Christian ministry.
Now he has gone further; he
has laid out for all to read a
well-considered guide for keep-
ing one's dreams alive. He gives
inspirational words to encour-
age all of us to believe in our
potential and meet the chal-
lenges that life often places in
our way.
I am honoured to recom-
mend this personal develop-
ment guide to all. Its pros are
based on eternal principles and
deeply held convictions. It
comes from one who is gifted
and qualified to share the mes-
sage. It will positively influence
all who read it.
Dream the dreams of the
greatest and let the divine
Dream Giver grant you the
faith to make them real.
Copies of Duerre's book are
available in local bookstores in
Freeport, where he lives, and
will be in Nassau soon. Con-
gratulations to Duerre, who
demonstrates that what happens
to you in life does not have to
dictate what you ultimately
achieve in it.
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

O nly one thing is
more important
than learning from experience,
and that is not learning from
experience."


S: ~ ~ :~ : "i ":^- J:'_ohn M Tempieton


2.4L Automatic
Power Steering

Air Conditioning

Tilt Steering

Radio/ CD Player

Dule Air Bags


PRICE INCLUDES:

FIRST SERVICE LICENSE & INSPECTION
FULL TANK OF GAS FULL SET FLOOR MATS

P S S I A


-AL .


Lot 'J', Montague Bay
Estates Single Family
Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,368 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,405 sq. ft.
Appraised Value:
$208,000.00 / O.N.O
From the Eastern Road and
Johnson Road travel south
pn Johnson Road, then
take the first right, Bay
Estate Terrace and the
subject property is the first
on the right.


Lot #124 Foxdale Subd.
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 4,500 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,009 sq. ft
Appraised Value:
$100,000.00 / O.N.O
Enter Foxdale from Bernard
Road opposite Post Office
at "T" Junction turn right
turn 1st left property is on
corner of 1st street on right,
color of building bright and
light yellow trim with white
(Fenced in).

Lot #13 Frelia Subd.
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,641 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,203 sq. ft
Appraised Value:
$154,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Fire Trail Road and
Faith Avenue, travel east on
Faith Avenue, follow the
curve around to the right
(approximately 0.6 of a mile
east of Faith Avenue),
take the first left into Frelia
Subdivision and the subject
property is the 6th building
on the left.


Lot #1057, Pinewood
Gardens
Single.Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,990 sq.ft
)raised

Bamboo Boulevard /
Pinewood Drive (by the
South Beach Police
Station), travel east on
Bamboo Boulevard, take
the first left on to Thatch
Palm Avenue, then the
fourth right, Rosewood
Street, and the subject
property is the third on the
right.

Lot #3, Rockwell Estates
Subdivision
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,449 sq. ft.
Appraised Value:


$129,600.00 / O.N.O.
From Carmichael Road and
Mckinney Drive, travel north
on McKinney Drive, take
the sixth left, Rocky Pine
Road, then the third right
and the subject is the third
lot on left.


Lot #844, Golden Gates,
N.P.
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,580 sq. ft.
Appraised Value:
$156,104.00 / O.N.O.
From Carmichael Road and
Mermaid Boulevard East
(Golden Gates Assembly
Church), travelling south on
Mermaid Boulevard, go
around the bend, heading
west again, and the subject
property is the 7th house
on the right past the 7th
corner on the right fter the
curve.


Lot#2, Block #7, South
Beach Estates
Single Family Residence
3-Bedrooms, 2-Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,705 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,423 sq.ft
Appraised Value:
$160,708.00 /O.N.O.
From East Street South and
Bougainvillea travel west on
'Bougainvillea Blvd., turn
right at the T-junction, South
Beach Drive travel to the
end then turn right and the
subject building is the first
on the left after the turn


Lot of Land off Hanna Road
Single Family Residence :
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 8,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,010 sq. ft
Appraised Value:
$134,000.00 / O.N.O.
Enter Joe Farrington Road
from Marigold Farm Road
Son floht (2nd Prrer) turix
riqht on fian-ria
1st left off Hanna Road 1st
. right property is 2nd lot on
right house is yellow trim
white.

Lot#299, Garden Hills
Estate Single Family
Residence
Property Size:6,000 sq.ft.
Building Size:1,147 sq. ft
Appraised Value:
$148,400.00 / O.N.O
From Blue Hill Road and
Soldier Road, travel east on
Soldier Road, take the first.
right, Geranium Avenue,
and the subject property is
fourth on left past the third
corner on the left (Hyacinth


Avenue).

Lot #1397 Pinewood
Gardens
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,195 sq. ft.
Appraised Value:
$93,000.00 / O.N.O.
From East Street and
Bamboo
Boulevard/Pinewood Drive
(South Beach Police
Station) travel east on
Bamboo Blvd. take the
second left, Bay Geranium
Ave, then the first right,
Guinep Tree Street, and the
subject property is the sixth
on the left.


Lot #5 Carmichael Breezes
Subdivision
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft.
Building Size 1,064 sq.ft.
Appraised Value:
$126,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Fire Trail Road and
McKinney Drive, take the
first right Bellot Road, then
take the first right again,
unnamed road into
Carmichael Breeze
Subdivision, and the
subject property is the sixth
on the left.

Lot #355, Yamacraw Beach
Estates
Single Family Residence
3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,350 sq. ft.
Appraised Value:
$165,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Yamacraw Hill Road
and Fox Hill Road travel
east on Yamacraw Hill
Road, take a right on
Yamacraw Beach Drive
then take the first right, turn
fiht at t-junction. Follow the
road around the curve. The
subject property is house
I'


Lot of land Blueberry Hill
Road, N.R
Single Family Residence
(3) Bedrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 3,375 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,436 sq.ft
Appraised Value:
$78,700.00 / O.N.O.
From Fox Hill road and
Prnce Charles Drive, travel
north on Fox Hill road. Take
the third right, rolle Street
(Sugar Hill) then left at the
t-junction, Armbrister street,
then first right and the
subject property is the third
building (4th Lot) on the
right


VACANT LAND
Lot #6, Part of Lot 65, Malcolm Allotments and the subject property is the thirteenth on
i"Vacant Property the left.
Property Size: 8,802 sq. ft
Appraised Value: $63,200.00
Parcel of Land, Deadman's Cay Long Island
From junction of Soldier Road and an Vacant Property
unnamed road one block east of Soldier Road Property size 2 Acres
(Sugar Kid Bowe establishment on the corner) Appraised Value: $40,000.00 / O.N.O.
travel south on the unnamed road, go across Property Located in Cartwright's settlement
the cross-road and continue around the bend, off Queen's Highway

APARTMENTS/CONDOMUNIUMS
Lot #178, Colony Village Subdivision, N.P. Lot #4 Tall Pines off Carmich'ael Road
Split level six unit Apartments Duplex
1-2 Bedromms, 2-Bathrooms Units 2 Bedrooms, 1 bathroom each
1- 2 bedrooms, 1 -Bathrooms /1 -Bedroom, Building Size: 1,680 sq ft
1-Bathroom Property Size: 8,100 sq. ft.
3-Efficiency Units Appraised Value:$140,000.00 O.N.O.
Property Size:9,300 sq.ft From Gladstone Road and Fire Trail, travel
Building Size:3,152 sq.ft north on Gladstone. road take the second
Appraised Value: $305,000.00 right Pine Street (opposite the Catholic Loyola
Hall Auditorium) and the subject property is
the fourth on the left
Lot #30 & 31, Block #56, Nassau Village
Duplex
Each Unit 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms Lot #2, Colony Village
Property Size: 6,620 sq. ft. 4 Townhouse Apt .- 2 bedrooms, 11/2 bath
Building Size: 1,701 sq. ft. each
Appraised Value: $151,500.00 / O.N.O. 95% completed
From Taylor Street and Soldier Road (by Property Size: 9,943 sq. ft.
Lowes Wholesale), turn left at the cross roads, Building Size: 3,798 sq. ft.
Alexandria Boulevard, take the second Appraised Value: TBA 376000 0. N. 0.
right, Forbes Street, go left at the T-junction, Travelling east on Prince Charles Drive after
Catherine Avenue, take the first right, travel Elizabeth Estates and Colony Village Drive
to the end and go right at the T-junction and the subject property is the 2nd on the right
the subject property is the seventh lot on right hand side after Colony Village.
past the first corner on the left.

We providing financing to qualified buyers
CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre
Tel: 502-5170 or 502-5180


Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
TmThe Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


RBC
FINCO


SRBC
FINCO



DISTRESSED PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

HOUSES I







PAGE 2, TURSDA, SETEMBE 29,2005AHE TIBUN


Religious leaders


question morality


TIHE CHMSTIAN
BOOK SHOP

Your Full Service Christian
Book and Supply Store

CUSTOMER
20% cAP SAL
APPRECIATIONN SALE

CAfH & CARRN 0I
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
SEPTEMBER 29 OCTOBER 1


SPREADING THE LIGHT OF THE GOSPEL
THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS


FROM page one
staff members of The Butterfly
Club/Bahamas Cabaret Limit-
ed, all appeared before Magis-
trate Renee McKay on charges
ranging from indecent behav-
iour to abetting indecent behav-
iour.
Magistrate McKay ruled that
the prosecution did not prove
a case against them and acquit-
ted the group.
"We believe the ruling, as
handed down by Magistrate
McKay in favour of the strip
dancers and the operators of
The Butterfly Club, reveals a
serious weakness in our prose-
cutorial system in the magis-
trates' courts," he said.
"Further, we believe this rais-
es grave concerns for the future
impact upon the legal recourse
Christians and other morally
minded Bahamians may have
in combating the increasing
influx of morally degrading


Maranta MusicCentre


0 CUSTOMER
2 0% APPRECIATION


SALE

CAH+ & CARR? OTMi

+ OTHER ITEMS


50%


activities in the Bahamas." the case and believe that Mr
Also, the group claims the Munroe (Wayne Munroe) suc-
ruling will have serious nega- cessfully argued that prostitu-
tive effects on the morals of tion and other commercial forms
youth throughout the country. of lewd sexual activities done in
private are legal in the Bahamas,
Youth we hasten to say that the magis-
trate made no such ruling.
"Magistrate McKay's ruling
"We are strongly convinced only related to the charges
that the issues raised by this rul- before her court. According to
ing, and the way in which the her, the prosecution simply did
defence attorney publicised it, not prove the charges laid," a
will have serious negative press release read.
impact upon the morals of our "While we speak as pastors,"
youth and the Bahamian com- Pastor Moss added, "We
munity if not addressed imme- believe that it is incumbent
diately. This press conference upon the government, all
is our first step in seeking to decent-minded, law abiding cit-
address those issues. izens in all spheres of society,.
"We are being assisted by to actively do all they can to
lawyers in analysing the actual resist the efforts of a few per-
ruling of Magistrate McKay and sons who are driven by financial
therefore do not wish to corn- greed and who lack a moral
ment specifically about the compass and any regard for the
details of the case at this time. dignity of women and sexuality
"However, since some will no to continue to further erode the
doubt misread the outcome of moral fabric of our nation."


Death threats sent

to school principal


FROM page one
that Linda Phillips, the
school's senior mistress, was also
threatened.
"We are now deciding
whether school is going to con-
vene any more this week. We
are trying to make a decision
whether we are going to bring
the entire staff into New Provi-
dence, and close the school


down until we get a status
report from the police officer,"
said Mrs Wilson.
Minister of Education Alfred
Sears said the matter was imme-
diately turned over to police.:
"I am confident that the
police will conduct a thorough
investigation and if there is evi-
dence that merits prosecution,
that there will be a full enforce-
ment of the law," he said.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


JUMBLE SALE
Clothes, Toys, Housewares, Furniture, Fridge
Saturday 1st October 7-10a.m.

Trinity Methodist Church
Frederick Street & Trinity Place next to Central Bank

Look what's happening at

Nassau

gymNastics!

Mom & Tots Gym Classes (from 18 months)

"On the Move" Pre-School Program'
"Healthy Kids" Class (for overall fitness & weight loss)

All-Star Competitive Cheerleadingr
Adult Tumbling Class
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Class'

GYMNASTICS FOR CHILDREN
AGES 3 and UP
6 DAYS A WEEK!


Call now to schedule your FREE trial class!*


Nassau gymNastics Oakes Field
Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes
Nassau gymNastics Blake Road


ph & fax 356-7722
ph & fax 364-8423
ph & fax 356-7722


j www.nassaunastics.com
S nassaunastics(cvahoo.com

A proud member of the Gymnastics Federation of the Bahamas


*Restictions apply. Call for details.


BYST.32-16 OETAST 2544


UP TO


THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
SEPTEMBER 29 OCTOBER 1


_


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Sit EI








THETRBUE TURDA, EPTMBR 9,200, AG 1
PU


Government



considers



reducing oil



margins


FROM page one
cents a gallon to 15 cents, a
decrease of retailers' margins
from 44 cents to 30 cents, and a
reduction of the duty on gas
from $1.10 a gallon to 90 cents.
Mr Miller said this proposal is
part of an attempt by his min-
istry and the Fuel Usage Com-
mittee to reverse the trend of
increasing gas prices.
"We have the highest mar-
gins in the Americas. We have
the figures, we have facts that
what is presently being thrown
at the Bahamian people is
unfair, it is.a burden that they
should not be 'allowed to bear
any longer in this country," he
said.
Speaking as guest on Love
97's talk show Issues of the Day
yesterday, Mr Miller said he
feels the government should
take the lead by lowering duty
on gas.
A further proposal, said Mr
Miller, is the possibility of
introducing self-service at
Bahamian gas stations.
The minister said the
Bahamas should be looking at
the United States' example of
having customers pump their
own gas. This could save five to
seven cents on every gallon, he
said.
Mr Miller said a new oil refin-
ery in Grand Bahama could
contribute to significantly low-
ering the cost of gasoline.
"It would enable us to change
the overall spectrum of how we
get supply of our fuel in the
Bahamas," he said.
Mr Miller said that govern-
ment is also grappling with the
possibility of using other
avenues to offset duty charged


on gasoline.
"If and when government
approves an LNG re-gasifica-
tion terminal in the Bahamas,
some of the income that could
be derived from that terminal
should be able to off-set the
duty we charge on fuel," he
said.
Mr Miller said a possible
yearly revenue intake of $22
million from an LNG facility
could be used to contribute to
lowering the duty.
"Many countries do this.
Take from one source you did-
n't have before and assist the
Bahamian people," he said.
Mr Miller added that govern-
ment has "a whole basket of
proposals we are looking at."


Plan to

block

Ingraham

as leader

FROM page one
member for Bamboo Town.
Despite the group's
action, there are 184 council
members who will meet
today to discuss the leader-
ship and nearly 400 dele-
gates who will vote come
November.
* The question remains -
and it is one which can only
be answered by time and cir-
cumstance: Can the elec-
torate be inspired to support
Tommy Turnquest in 2007
if he emerges as leader?
Yesterday's grouping is
convinced and contends
that, despite the loss in 2002,
Mr Turnquest will be lead-
ing his party into an election
for the first time in 2007.
"It is the view of the
majority of Bahamians to
get rid of the PLP and
replace it with a team of
people led by Mr Turnquest
to take the Bahamas to
higher ground," said Mr
Smith.


NATIONAL
DENIyIAY.
a T r E A
10 YBAWEoSfWB


BRITISH
AMERICAN


/


BANKING IS OUR BUSINESS,
COMMUNITY IS OUR COMMITMENT!


RBC Royal Bank of

Canada Sets Sail with the

Bahamas Junior

Sailing Programme





















This summer students participated in The Bahamas Sailing
Association Junior Programme Summer Camp. The goal of the
sailing school is to further develop amateur sailing in The Bahamas.
The students were educated in various aspects of beginner boat
handling, safety, nautical terminology and equipment usage,
training on land and on the water. These kids were eager to
experience the thrill of sailing while building self-esteem and
discipline.
RBC Royal Bank of Canada is a proud silver sponsor for the first
ever Optimist Junior National Championships, which will beheld
in Montague Bay this September. Forty-five young sailors will.
be entered in this historic event.

Pictured are: Mrs. Deborah Zonicle, manager Marketing, RBC
Royal Bank of Canada, Mr. Jimmie Lowe, co-ordinator of the
Bahamas Junior Sailing Programme, along with some of the
students who participated in this year's Summer Camp.

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean RBC
Royal Bank
SRegistered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada of Canada-
SThe Lion & Globe and RBC are trade-marks of Royal Bank of Canada


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE







)AGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005 THELTRIBNUNE
E~allB^^B^^i~ll^^--il^l^^^--^^I^^^^^^ii^^^^i-i------^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S


I Share
I your
news
I lie Tribune wants to hear
Stim people who are
!i making news in their
" rw(ighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
Sfor improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
if so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Bank helps children's hostel


to acquire school supplies


RESIDENTS at the Chil-
dren's Emergency Hostel head-
ed back to school in style
thanks to a generous donation
by Commonwealth Bank.


The youngsters each
received $250 toward their uni-
forms, shoes and school sup-
plies.
Nikita Smith, administrative


assistant at the Children's
Emergency Hostel extended
heartfelt thanks to Common-
wealth Bank for the donations,
which she said exceeded her
expectations.
"We were in dire need of sup-
plies for the kids to get back to


school," she said. "We just
couldn't help them out and it
was a must that that they got
school gear. The uniforms were
too small and the books were
expensive."
"If Commonwealth Bank did-
n't respond, I don't think the


kids would have been ready in
time," said Smith. "I think it
was very generous to have their
assistance with the kids."
Commonwealth Bank, the
country's largest publicly-held
company, supports a wide range
of community efforts.


LOST
AT MAJOR-ROBINSON
WEDDING RECEPTION





REWARD OFFERED
TEL: 327-1716 / 456-1538


(Former Junkanoo Holiday BInn)
Nasa & Wes t S treet


M ANTHEA Cox,
vice-president of human
resources and training at
Commonwealth Bank
presents a cheque to Nikita
Smith, administrative assistant
at the Children's Emergency
Hostel. The funds assisted in
purchasing uniforms, shoes
and school supplies for
children at the hostel.


Ultimate Container Mix $14/cu.ft.
(Hanging Baskets and Outdoor Planters)
WATER SAVING GEL AND
CONTINUOUS PLANT FEEDING


Pro-Mix BX -
3.8cu.ft.
$34


Peat Moss
2.2cu.ft. & 6.0cu.ft.


$19


$47


ALSO
your supplier of


www,- -ind ...n
MONDAY-SATURDA:YTSIm Spn]


DISCOUNT WAREIIOUSE

Located on Bay Street
opposite the old straw market


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005









T T NH AYW SE


INDERMERE
hGRANDt) BAHAM-A.


* MAKING THE GRADE Former grade 6 student Leab Anderson and her classmates at the
Meridian School at Unicorn Village enter middle school equipped with the educational skills of
average 8th and 9th grade students, according to official results of an international test tlat placed
the Nassau school well above the American average percentile.




School's results put



it top of the class


WITH confidence and ease,
Zoe Galanis reads an 8th grade
level book during class at the
Meridian School at Unicorn
Village.
Earlier, Issa Saunders solved
an equation that might confuse
an average elementary student.
Like many others in their
class, both are capable of doing
work assigned to a grade 8 or
grade 9 class which would not
be unusual if Zoe and Issa were
actually in Grades 8 or 9.
What makes their story note-
worthy is that Zoe is in fifth,
Issa in sixth grade, each per-
forming at three grade levels
beyond their current status.
Their performance was
revealed in the 2005 Iowa Basic
Skills Tests (IBST) which
ranked the students of the
school located atop a hill on
JFK Boulevard in West Nassau
well above the national US
average percentile.
Official records showed 5th
grade students of the Meridian
School performing on an 8th
grade level in language arts,
while 6th graders scored at a
10th grade level on Sources and
Information.
As for the core subjects, the
6th grade results show that they
are nearly ready to tackle 8th
grade maths and 9th grade lan-
guage. Their overall core aver-
age nearly hit grade ;9 level.
Grade 5's math performance
was on par with students who
had been in the 6th grade for
at least a term. Overall, their
core subject performance was
at a 7th grade level.
These results were found to'
be especially encouraging in the
middle elementary grades,
which generally have lower
scores.
Head teacher of the school
with 76 students in primary
grades and 100 in pre-school
Lisa Goudie expressed delight
when she learned the results.
"It is a wonderful feeling to
know that what we are doing
here at the Meridian School is
fostering a high standard of edu-
cation and a genuine love of
learning amongst our students,"
she said. "I am so proud of each
and every one of them and
praise them all for their contin-
uing hard work, passion, and
dedication to school and their
studies."
The school's founder and
director, Lisa McCartney, was
so elated she immediately sent
e-mails and letters to parents to
share the news and in turn
was praised by the Calvert
School in Baltimore, Meridian's
curriculum partner.
"The staff at Calvert Educa-
tion Services is very encouraged
by the success of the Meridian
students and the resolve on the
part of the Meridian team of
administrators and faculty to
achieve results well beyond the
national averages in the acade-
mic year ahead," said Jean
Halle, Calvert Education Ser-
vices (CES) president and
CEO.
Also impressed with the
school's academic success was
Kelly Painter, director of acad-
emic Services at CES. She said:
"Throughout the school, it is
evident that the students are
acquiring a strong foundation
in reading, language, and math-
ematics; equally encouraging is
the evidence that the students
are mastering the basics in the
early grades and applying the
skills and concepts at the grade
appropriate levels."
Lisa McCartney said the test


results are a personal achieve-
ment as her "dream school"
enters its third year of elemen-
tary level, growing rapidly in
ways that exceed her expecta-
tions.
McCartney said she imple-
mented the Calvert system to
not only enhance the learning of
local students but to make sure
the international students who
make up 40 per cent of the stu-
dent body would be able to
return home on a level or ahead
of their peers.
"The system is about 100
years old and is regarded as one
of the highest recommended
and recognised names in home
schooling in the US," explained
McCartney. "Calvert is cutting
edge and the team of advors is
heavily qualified 3 :


The ITS measures skills and
achievements of students from
kindergarten through grade 8
and was developed at the Uni-
versity of Iowa.
Backed by more than 70
years of educational research
and test development experi-
ence, the ITS assesses compre-
hensive information about the
development of the students'
skills and ability to think criti-
cally in five core subjects includ-
ing Math and Language Arts.
"We still have a way to go
but we are very happy with the
results especially because we
are only two years old as an ele-
mentary school," said McCart-
ney.
"This is just the beginning but
it shows that our approach
Steward, iiipgijyswQrkg.'. :lg


~r~~~t~ia w


J5. Johnson & Company Limfted





IHI PREMIER 1 MEDICAL PLAN
offering the following advantages:

Free choice of doctors & hospitals WORLO /I
Guaranteed LIFETIME renewability
Free cover for TWO CHILDREN under 10yrs per family
MATERNITY COVERAGE for both married and unmarried women
Worldwide cover including BUSINESS and HOLIDAY TRAVEL
No maximum entry age limit
DIRECT PAYMENT to hospitals and 24-hour Emergency Service


insurance
danmark ala


JS Johnson can HANDLE ALL DETAILS for you
in the event of a planned hospitalization
NO EXCLUSIONS of any sporting activities
AIDS COVERAGE when caused by a blood transfusion received
after the commencement of the policy

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE danmark a/s
is a SOLID AND RELIABLE insurance company
whose activities are in compliance with the directions of
the European Supervision Authorities.


J.S. JOHNSON

INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS


NASSAU Collins Ave 322-2341 Thompson Blvd 325-8776 Mall at Marathon 393-6286
FAMILY ISLANDS Freeport 242-352-7119 Abaco 242-367-2688 Exuma 242-336-2420


AFFORDABLE IN-IOUSE

RNANCING AVAILABM1


Mr~~
~


o~


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE















BAA-


SCompany Limited First Annual Health &

Iosium & Exhibition and Fun Run/Walk-a-


healthy


-Thon. The


in its employees, the management of Bacardi & Company Limited designs
, this initiative, the Company hosted its first annual Health and Welfare Sy
h and Welfare Symposium & Exhibition was held on Thursday, September
Walk-a-Thon was held on Saturday, September 17th 2005.


ind Welfare Symposium & Exhibition was officially opened Mr. Ron Pinder, Parliamentary Secretary in The Min
event showcased a number of exhibitors from around New Providence who informed and educated the employ
s well as invited guests about the importance of health living. Some of the Companies who showcased their s
re The Culinary Arts Limited, the distributors of the well known and popular SaladMaster Cookware and juice
mnasium, The Diabetic Association of The Bahamas, Weight Watchers of The Bahamas, The Crisis Center, Do
tolesale Agencies, Symmetry Nutritional Products, Nutrition For Life, Restoring Quality of Life, and Mildred "M
nds. The event was hailed a great success by the employees of the company, particularly because in addition
there were also a number of invited guests speakers on the topic of men's and women's health. Dr. Judson Enm
Thompson, and Nurse Anita Cates were amongst the favourites,.

and Walk-a-Thon was held on Saturday past, and it tested the health and endurance of the participants in a six
te and back. There were trophies for first and second place runners and walkers in categories ranging from ui
. At the end of the event participants were welcomed at the finish with health drinks and treats provided by Th
ited, Bahamas Food Agency, Aquapure Company Limited and Thompson's Trading Company Limited. The evei
tailed as a great achievement of the management of Bacardi & Company Limited by its employees, however,! 1
lonth September 2005 could not have been possible without the great corporate assistance from the followin
presenters, sponsors, and private individuals in the local community:


CMilinary Arts Limited (SaladMasters)
Weight Watchers of The Bahamas
SunTee Bahamas Limited
he Diabetic Association of The Bahamas
D'Albenas Agency Limited
Thompso's Wholesale Trading
S Colinamerial Insurance
J.P.Morgan Trust Company Limited
S: The Crisis Center


The National Drug Council of The Bahamas
Sh'Ron Saunders
Bally Total Fitness & Gymnasium
MJB Optical
Doctor's Hospital
Nutrition For Life
Bahamas Food Services
Nassau Agencies
Higgs & Johnson Counsel & Attorneys


Bahamas Wholesale Agency
Mildred "Milley The Bush Tea Lady" Sands
Subway Sandwiches & Salads
Restoring Quality of Life
C.M.C Enterprises
Aquapure Company Limited
Bahamas Customs
The Bacardi & Company
Limited Employees and their families.


BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED


~a~W~a~E~a~~"c~~s~~~"~"~"~~""""~"~"~~~~~


IP~a~mq~Y~P~T~


i^>>ICn~fi

BY,












Mitchell thanks South




African government


N MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell, left, and Dr Nkosazana Diamini Zuma, Minister
of Foreign Affairs for the Republic of South Africa exchange the signed Joint Declaration of the Joint
Bilateral Commission between the Bahamas and South Africa. The Agreement was reached during
meetings in Freeport, Grand Bahama this past weekend.
(Photo: Derek Carroll)


* By DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
Services
FREEPORT Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
and South African Foreign Min-
ister Dr Nkosazana Diamini
Zuma cemented the bi-lateral
agreement between their coun-
tries that was signed in April
last year.
The original agreement estab-
lished the Joint Commission on
maintaining closer ties between
the Bahamas and the Republic
of South Africa.
i At a press briefing on Satur-
day, Mr Mitchell thanked the
government of South Africa for
consenting to the continuation
of the joint commission.
He explained that the com-
mission operates at an official
and political level in both coun-
tries and is headed by foreign
ministers and representatives
-from the- areas of culture,


sports, education, health and
trade and industry.
"And each of those ministries
were represented in the discus-
sions during the course of the
last two days from both the
South African side and from the
Bahamian side, and a number:
of issues have been discussed,"
Mr Mitchell said.
"From the Bahamas side in
foreign affairs, we have
exchanged views on Haiti. As
you know, President Aristide
of Haiti is now living in South
Africa, having been forced out
from Haiti, so they have a con-
tinuing interest in that."
"Secondly, there is the ques-
tion of visas for entering South
Africa. They have now pro-
posed the abolition of those
visas and asked -us whether we
would sign a visa abolition
agreement," Mr Mitchell said.
*"And then the South African
delegation had the opportuni-
ty while they were here to speak


to PharmaChem, producers of
ingredients of drugs that fight
HIV Aids which is a major issue
in South Africa.
Mr Mitchell added, "They
have been to the Container Port
and had an opportunity to see
the Port. As you know there are
ships that ply between
Capetown in South Africa and
Freeport, and they use the Con-
tainer Port. And this port is cer-
tainly the*best and offers the
best facilities in the region.. Our
main competitors are the port
of Kingston in Jamaica and a
port in the Dominican Repub-
lic.
"And with the coming of pre-
clearance for this port, this is
going to be quite a valuable
thing for the port, and so we
are interested in developing
trade links along those lines."
He turned to the areas of cul-
ture, sports and youth and the
question of exchanges on a peo-
ple-to-people-basis.


RUBIN
established 19 9


-Iiuds l01w y S# % ft cV t fartd& gift (fID te & li oft i sl" I


Modern life can demand more
than one car can deliver.

As your commitments grow and your life
becomes more demanding, one vehicle in
the family may not be enough to meet your
hectic schedule.


Perhaps you're looking for a second car for
your family to help make your life easier. Call
one of our Consumer Finance Specialists to
discuss how we make it possible with our
great terms and helpful advice.


Call or visit FirstCaribbean today
and let us help to get you there.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength, Your Finanrcial Partner.
FirstCaribbea Intermational Bank i, an Asociated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC,


Lan LoanHs ih icle LoanIIs re iEduciatiornIo I Ire1.Moage'sICe it ad


www.firstcaribbeanbank.com


w


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


i










E PETER Conlan, pro-
ject director for Logos I,4
an international mission
organisation, presents Gov-
ernor General Dame Ivy
Dumont with a document
on his organisation, as he
paid a courtesy call on her
at Government House on
Monday, September 26.
(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)


Opportunity


World Class Retailer


Esso, a market leader in fuels and
convenience retailing, is looking for
operators/ franchisees for its
service stations across the country.
Retails Sites immediately available
in New Providence.
If you have... ,
Successful experience in sales,
finance, or administration;,
A minimum of five years
successfully supervising a team
of workers;
A desire to provide superior
customer service;
Computer literacy;
Organisational discipline;
Access to capital and a .good
credit history ...
...We want to know you!


Application forms may be collected at
our Windsor Field Office (immediately
West of Nassau International Airport).
Completed forms should be addressed
and returned to:
Yorick Cox
Caribbean Sales
Support Co-ordinator
Esso Standard Oil S.A. Ltd.
Windsor Field Road
Nassau, NP
Bahamas

Applications should be submitted no
later than September 30 2005
!1A : .


We're drivers too,


SuPosr tu repedic
Support you trust. Comfort you'll love.T


AVAILABLE AT FINE FURNITURE STORES
THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS
Donald's Furniture 322-3875 Best Buy Furniture 394-2378
Roberts Furniture 322-8862 Palmdale Furniture 322-3703
The Sleep Gallery 327-5338 Home Furniture 322-8646
Wood You Furniture 325-9663 Bahama Beds 394-8015


PETER Co'lan, pro-
ject director for Logos II,
an International Mission
Organisation, paid a cour-
tesy call on the Governor
General Dame Ivy
Dumont at Government
House on Monday, Sep-
tember 26, 2005. Shown
from left are Duane Freed,
an executive at TH Prop-
erties of Pennsylvania,
USA; Mr Conlan; Dame
Ivy Dumont; Todd Hen-
dricks, businessman and
Randy Grebe, founder
Adventure Learning Cen-
tre.
(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)


9 A


We're making it easier for you to fulfil your dreams. Simply get in touch with anyone you know from FirstCaribbean,
or our customers, to get one of our special loan certificates, and you are on your way to making your dreams come true!

(That new car, second car, piece of land, home renovations, vacation
or higher education may be just a visit or phone call away!


* Applicable to new approved loans only


** Offer valid from August 1 st October 14th1 2005


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
Caribbean Pride. International Strength, Your Financial Partner.
FirstCarlbbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Batik PLC and CIBC,


www.firstcaribbeanbank.com


I


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








LOAL NEWS\


FEMALE overall winner of Bacardi's Fun/Rul/Walkathon being presented with her trophy and
prizes from Maria Stuart, assistant human resources manager at Bacardi (on left) and Bally repre-
sentative John Ellis II.



Bacardi and Co



make a push for



healthy living


IN Al effort to promote the
idea of healthy lifestyles to their
employees, the management of
Bacard and Company decided
to make September "Health
and Vrelfare Month".
Th. company hosted its first
Heath and Welfare Symposium
and Fun/Run/Walkathon to
inform and educate their
employees and the public on
the importance of healthy liv-
ing.
Bally Total Fitness was at the
symposium providing the latest
information on health and fit-
ness.
Bally representatives and per-
sonal trainers also conducted
free body fat testing and
demonstrated effective exercis-
es for those wanting to begin a
fitness programme.
According to Bally, studies
show that healthy active
employees are more productive,
have lower levels of stress, are
absent to work less, have more
energy and are more enthusi-
astic in their jobs.
Fit employees also decrease
healthcare costs because they
are not as sick as often, a Bally
representative pointed out.
One suggestion given to Bac-
ardi staff by Bally personal
trainer Carlos Albury was to
begin basic, by walking.
That is just what they did, as
the management and staff of


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Fun/run/walkathon

for employees


Bacardi participated in the
Fun/Run/Walkathon.
The event began 6.30am at
the Bacardi plant and contin-
ued to the Coral Harbour
round-a-bout and back to Bac-
ardi and Company Limited.
At 9am when the final walk-
ers returned to the plant, Bally
Total Fitness was there provid-
ing health and fitness informa-
tion and presenting prizes to the
winners
The top male and female
walker and top male and female


runner each received a free
month membership and a
sports bottle from Bally Total
Fitness,
Bally general manager Brian
Goudie said, "It's great to see
Bahamian companies take an
active interest in improving the
health of their employees".
Along with trophies from
Bacardi, each participant plac-
ing first, second or third also
received passes to Bally, where
they can continue working
towards their fitness goal.


END OF SUMMER SALE


4 DAYS ONLY
September 28th October 1st







2/00



WHILE SUPPLIES LAST ALL SALES FINAL, SORRY NO EXCHANGES OR REFUNDS
Sy*(.Mji' VALID FOR REGULAR PRICED ITEMS ONLY


BRANCHES
The Mall at Marathon
*Tel: 393-414718
Mon-. Fri, lam-.pm
Sat, lOam-9pm
Village Road Shopping Centre
STel: 393am .2S09 -
Mon.. Fri.: 9:3Oam-7pm Sat 8:30am. 7pm


MAIN STORE:
Rosetta Street
*Tel: 322-8596
STORE HOURS:
Mon Fri, 8:30am 6pm
a Sat. 8:30am 6pm


SHEET SETS
TOWELS
COMFORTERS
RUGS
THROW PILLOWS
SHOWER CURTAINS
TABLECLOTHS


LAUNDRY HAMPERS
GARBAGE BINS
BED TREYS
BED REST
BODY PILLOW
TEA KETTLES
SPACE SAVERS


Pay Less atlDiscoiint. Mart
l1., I 'A! AS10. 01A :1=] ,g I Tl5 -l i r o]:
WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


BED BATH & HOME
HOMeSSALe


RUGS
TOWELS
SHEET SETS
TABLECLOTHS '
THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS
SHOWER CURTAINS


BATHROOM ACCESSORIES
LAMPS
BLENDERS
FIGURINES
BAKEWARES


WALL CLOCKS
WALL PICTURES
PICTURE FRAMES
FLATWARE SETS
COOKWARE SETS
GLASSWARE SETS
DINNERWARE SETS


OFFERS GOOD MONDY, EPTMBR.2TH .STURAYOCTBE 1 T, 00


Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 )


C


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, f -. ., .GE 19


ThE TRIBUNE





W/D
PUPPY
FOOD
17 LB24
$0*249

POST
COCO OR FRUITY
PEBBELS
13 OZ


DELMAR
FLAKE TUNA
IN WATER
26 O
2/.990


NABISCO
CREAM OF
WHEAT
QUICK
14 OZ
8 229


TRIFTY MAID JBI
WHOLE KERNEL GREEN PIGEON PEAS
CORN IN COCONUT MILK
S 15 OZ
Sl 79 S $69


MAXWELL HOUSE
INSTANT
COFFEE.



JELLO
INSTANT
PUDDING
3 OZ
So 09


I I


CRYSTAL LIGHT
MIXES
ASSORTED
*469

ZEST
FACE SIZE
SOAP
I.2 -- O
2r$1 39


MIX-N-MATCHCEL *-I
GOLD & RED DELICIOUS APPLE CELLO LETTUCE
BARTLETT PEARS
EACH 49
39 EACH

LIMES BROCCOLI
EACH 99
EACH EACH
MIX-N-MATCH POTATOES
RED, WHITE SEEDLESS & GLO HITEPOLYLB
GRAPES WHITE POLY 5LB
*EACH EACH

WINN-DIXIE SUPER BRAND
SPREAD ==.p' a
SPREADYOFAT FREE
s I8as9 149ee
3-LB 8 OZ
KRAFT PILLSBURY
AMERICAN SINGLE CHEESE CRESCENwT
$5E9 ROLLSS
16-OZ *am


WID
CORN ON
THE COB
s2 49,A0
4 EAR
TOTINO'S
ASSTD PIZZA HAMBURGER,
SUPREME, 3 MEATS, CHEESE
10.9 OZ

JACK FROST


SUGAR
4 LBS
S1 29


HUGGIES

DIAPERS
40 CT



JUMEX
NECTARS
ASSORTED
355 ML
2/$ 4 49


MORNING FARM
BREAKFAST LINKS, PATTIES, BACON STRIPS,
GRILLERS 7 CHI PATTIES
8-OZ
W/D
JR SUNDAE CONES, FUDGE
CUPS VANILLA ICE CUPS
6-12 CT


DEVON



12 OZ



SNAPPLE
100%
JUICES
ASSORTED
11.5- OZ



AUNT JAMIMA
PANCAKE MIX
ASSORTED
32 OZ
$mm29


SUNCHY


100% APPLE & FRUIT
PUNCH JUICE s-11-o..................-2/.990
LIBBY'S
MIXED FRUIT OR
DICED PEACHES 4-ACK .................$3.69
ECKRICH
CHICKEN VIENNA
SAUSAGE s-oz ............................2/.99
CRACKING GOOD
BIG 60 ASSTD
COOKIES 24- oz ...........................$2.19
ORVILLE REDENBACKER
MICROWAVE POP CORN io.-oz .....$2.39
HILL
ASSORTED COOKIES e- oz ............690
LAYS
CHIPS SMALL -
NASSAU ONLY i-oz .........................2/.890
HICKORY
GLEN BEEF BOLOGNA 12-OZ...............$1.99


ARIEL
REGULAR
DETERGENT
400 GR
2/$ 050


TIDE W/I DOWNY
31 USE SOFT OCi MIST,
APRIL FRESH, CLEAN BREEZE
80 OZ



AUNT JAMIMA
PANCAKE
SYRUP
ASSORTED
24 OZ
$34


KRAFT
SALAD DRESSING
ASSORTED
8 OZ
2/$ 300


RALSTON
CEREALS, SIN BRAN, HONEY
SNUT, TASTEEOS, FRUIT RINGS
& CRISPY RICE
14-20 OZ



KRAFT KOOL-AID
HANDI SNACK GELS
ALL FLAVOURS
4 PACK
=1 79


kd


TURKEY
WINGS OR
DRUMSTICK
LB


MINI
PORK
RIBS

.97


MISCUT
CHICKEN
WINGS
*. LB


N.Z PIGS PORK OIN
LAMB FEET END CUT
SHOULDER EE CHOPS
CHOPS LBH
$189LB
1B .69t 1LB
CENTER CUT US USDA
PORKLOIN CHOICE CHOICE PRESTIGEBONELES
CHOP REGULAR PRESlGEBEEFT.BOE LOIN TIPROAST
$ 49 $Q9 LB
LB
1 LB LB $


DELI WHITE & YELLOW
FOUR STAR ROAST BEEF AMERICAN CHEESE
LLB
WHOLE PLAIN & SOUR
ROTISSERIE CHICKEN DOUGH ENGLISH
R OSERE MUFFINS
EACH-99$ 19o


DOWNY
FREE FABRIC
SOFTNER
ASSORTED
SCENTS
40 CT
$699


HORMEL
KIDS KITCHEN, CHEZ MAC& BEEF,
MINI RAVIOU, SPAGHETTil RINGS &
MEATBALLS, PIZZA WEDGES,
BEANS/ WEINERS, NOODLE RINGS/
CHICKEN, CHEZ MAC & FRANKS &
THREE CHEEZE PIZZA
2/$299


PASTA RONI

ALL FLAVOURS
4.6 OZ
2/$3 00
3 1


JOY
DISH LIQ
ALL SCE
25 O0



FESTIVE
MULl
CLEAN
33 0;
out s


VID
NTS
Z
a39


ri

ERS
Z


HEINZ
APPLE CIDER
VINEGAR (ONLY)
32 OZ
$2O9


I;


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
~ A op a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM Extra Extra! -SU
SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH & SA ACHEK S ecial!
HARRBOU RAYONLI AWIACY Spcil!


THE TRIBUNE






CONGRATULATIONS

WINNERS
of


Youngsters take

to the water
MORE pictures from the first Bahamas National Optimist
Championship sailed in Montagu Bay at the weekend, with 39
boats lined up to compete. See page 22 for more pictures and the
story.


South Beach
Lex Brown

Oaksfield
Valencia Laroda

Rosetta Street
Linda Moreley

Lyford Cay
/ Mariana Curtie


Cable Beach
Aaron Strachan

Seagrape
Sheree Minnis

Harbour Bay
Catherine Glinton

iE Eight Mile Rock
Paula Reily


Independence Hwy ls Seahorse
Jacklyn Johnson Shopping Plaza
Lonna Munroe
Village Road o' Down Town
Sherene Brown Shopping Plaza
Hazel Roach


EI I ~I ~i J1It-


CABLE BEACH'
M daShopping Centre
Westridge
Monday Saturday 9:00am to 6:00pm


* MATTRESSES
* WROUGH IRON
& BRASS BEDS
* BED LINEN


* LAMPS
* PILLOWS
* CUSHIONS
* DUVETS


I and other Bedroom Accessories...

RI HOLIDAY SA
upto 00/0f OFF on selected terns this
up to 9O FF IFdday and Saturday ONLY


PRESSURE RELIEVING
SWEDISH MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
ADJUSTABLE BEDS
IT'S FINALLY HERE!!! NOW YOU HAVEA CHOICE!!


_ ,., ~ ,=, I I


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 21


BC 2IICHfOL

COMUTR IV=AWA








Hful 22, THBI|^tA^HI', H^ TE 29,H 2005 ALTBWSHE TRI


Organisers hope



championships



will be regular.


TWELVE-year-old Christo-
pher Sands captured top hon-
ours in the first Bahamas
National Optimist Champi-
onship sailed in Montagu Bay at
the weekend.
At the awards presentation


at the Nassau Yacht Club on
Sunday evening, Minister of
Youth and Sports Neville Wis-
dom said he was thrilled that
the perception of racial and
class barriers once associated
with professional sailboat rac-


ing had been smashed.
Sands is expected to repre-
sent the Bahamas at the 2006
IODA World Championships
in Puerto Rico.
The championship drew the
largest number of boats from a
single class sailed locally at a
Bahamas national champi-
onship.
Fay Regan, a Miami sailing
instructor who has trained
Bahamian skippers over a peri-
od of many years, was delighted
with the regatta.
She was especially proud of
the Green Fleeters, beginners
ages eight to 13.
And Regan added: 'After this
weekend, how can you not keep
it going?'
The regatta was hosted by the
Bahamas Sailing Association,
the Nassau Yacht Club and the
Royal Nassau Sailing Club.
The Royal Bank of Canada
was the platinum sponsor and
the Ministry of Tourism also
was a major sponsor.
The Optimist programme is
particularly exciting 'because
it opens the door of opportu-
nity for youngsters to take
part in international sailing
events.
At the Athens Olympics,
more than 60 per ceit of skip-
pers and 70 per cent of the
medal winning skippers were
former Opti sailors.
Optimists are sailed in over
110 countries by 150,000 young
people.


o empower and educate women to
J actively participate in preventive health

practices, increase survival rates and improve the
quality of life of those diagnosed with breast

cancer and to enhance the public's awareness of
this disease.


Sister, Sister Breast Cancer
Support Group
Vision Statement


Breast cancer survmivor profiles featuring
members of the Sister, Sist6r
Breast C anoer Support Groip
October 1st-31st, 2005 in The Tribune


Columbus Isle
Club Med
160.-Usd /Day/ Person In Garden View
Accomodation, Seaview On Request*
Offer Valid Until October 30th
Full Board Treatment With Up To 3 Restaurants.
Total All Inclusive Bar And Snacking
(Champagne / Vsop*)

ACTIVITIES:
Tennis Archery Basket Ball *Beach Volley Ball
* Fitness -Snorkeling *Scuba Diving* *Massages
Facility*
With Extra Charge
Daily Flights With Bahamas Air Available
Contact Tel: 1-242-331-2000
Email: Colcplan01@Clubmed.com


PAGE 22, THURS~t; PTttMER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













New Orleans police chief




resigns four weeks after storm


-m -N o --ft
-~ S 40
- =, -o IDqb
,* -
4 -4 1r--
"D. NO- 40101
40-.f MOND- M- Udb
~ -.dD,
- -f-


FRESH AUTO

I #1 EAST STREET SOUTH U.


- -


- I0m


. -
.~ -


*
qo 4
40


f"Copyrighted Material I

-.. Jr Syndicated Contentt

Available from Commercial News Providers
- 0.. -M


q

- a- .w

o 10onm

m u
--.4


Mo -,--- a. qp







- q .- -
U 4w








mo- om o
-pw



4b- 4b- df
Gnaw 41b.-


09qe 4W o4004.o.64
b w d. *
O 04mb ** ** .
e... mmmpdwmg


aft -do


2005 ACURA SUV MDX.... $69,500.00
2001 HONDA ACCORD... $19,000.00
2003 SUZUKI GRAND VAT ., $18,500.00
2003 HYUNDAI ACCENT...... $14,500.00
2001 HYUNDAI GALLOPER..... $12,000.00
2000 FORD EXPLOBER.... $12,000.00
2002 NISSAN SENTRA ...... $11,200.00
2004 K RIO-BLUE/JENNEM..... $10,500.00
2004 SUZUKI INGNIS......... $10,400.00
2000 FORD EXPLORER.... $10,000.00
2002 KIA SPORTAGE ........ $9,600.00
2001 HONDA CIVIC-WT .... $8,400.00
1999 FORD EXPLORER ..... $8,100.00
2001 HYUNDAI ELANTRA.... $8,000.00
1994 LINCOIN TOWN CAR..... $7,500.00
2003 DAIHATSU SIREION.... $7,500.00
2003 NISSAN SENTRA...... $7,500.00
1998 HONDA CIVIC ......... $7,000.00
2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT ...... $7,000.00
2000 NISSAN SENTRA ...... $7,000.00
2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT...... $6,900.00
2000 NISSAN SENTRA ... $6,500.00
2000 DAIHATSU CHARADE....... $6,500.00
1999 NISSAN SENTRA ..:... $6,500.00
1997 TOYOTA COROLLA...,, $6,000.00
1999 NISSAN ALTIMA.:. $6;000.00
2001 DAIHAT TERIOUS ... $6,000.00
2001 KIA RIO-SILVER......... $5,500.0,00


2000 NISSAN SENTRA...... $5,500.00
2000 NISSAN SENTRA..... $5,400.00
2001 CHEVY CAVALIER....... $5,000.00
1994 TOYOTA WINDOM .. $5,000.00
2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT .... $5,000.00
2000 DAEWOO NUBIRA ........ $4,700.00
2000 HYUNDAI ELANTRA.... $4,500.00
1998 MITSUBISHI LANCER..... $4,200.00
1997 PLYMOUTH VOYAGE........ $4,000.00
2003 KIA SPECTRA-RED ... $4,000.00
2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT ... $3,900.00
1998 HYUNDAI COUPE ...... $3,800.00
2000 NISSAN SENTRA ..... $3,500.00
1997 NISSAN SENTRA..... $3,500.00
1996 HYUNDAI ELANTRA .... $3,500.00
1999 SUZUKI BALENO ..... $3,500.00
1995 NISSAN SUNNY ....... $3,000.00
2000 DAIHATSU APPLAUS .... $3,000.00
1997 MITSUBISHI MIRAGE..... $3,000.00
1995 TOYOTA COROLLA ...... $2,500.00
1995 NISSAN SUNNY ..... $2,500.00
1997 NISSAN BLUEBIRD .... $2,100.00
1995 NISSAN SUNNY ......,.. $2,000.00
2000 DAEWOO CIELO ..... $1,500.00
1997 N.ISSAN BLUEBIRD ..... $1,500.00
,2000 KIAAVELLA'SIL/SHAYVON..... $1,100.00
1998 KiA AVELLA .. ...., .. $1,000.00
1998 HYUNDAI ACCENT..... $1,100.00


www.freshautocentre.com


V.I.P. MOBILE BUDGET]
AUTO DETAILING $99000
$1800 AND UP
BRAKE SPECIAL 0
$4500 AND UP

HUB CAPS z.i j ,ii:
$3400AND UP

SEAT COVERS
M4A D $8995 AND UP
$1495 AND UP


S p.


" -


pb. -


TUNE-UP
AND UP
IL CHANGE
SPECIAL
$2590


COMPUTER
DIAGNOSTICS
$4000


COOLANT LEAKS
$3500

C.V. JOINT
WHEEL BEARINGS
$4900


9 and up

CD Players
$17900 AND UP


- a -
S


B- p~ 4
p


NOW IN STOCK


ability ProductsCorp.


Come see our showroom at
SCOTTDALE BEDDING CO. LTD.
Hill Top on the East West Highway
Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm* Telephone: 394-4147-50


I


!THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 23


W .
--.oft .1m 4
---NNM-mmqw


,d


-


o







24, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


INTERNATIONAL


India angers Iran by




'acking IAEA resolution


It uI sI t mc hclprdi % i A. trfn mut (*




n h~tn


~- too:..~


-mppd

= pla


--
4b l dd


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


promo


fp m


a -- -nmn. 4
- ,. -. mn l ,

o .a

-- - q l m~p
a 0- 4 -W



-MMp

a -mm *low- a
~Go&.4b


* ~ *


*



--- r -
- -


Enter as often
as you like!
Attach 6 labels of Campbell's Red
& White Condensed Soup (10.5oz)
So an entry form and place in the
; secially-marked boxes at
participating stores, at the
d'Albenas Agency on Madeira
Street or at Custom Computers in
'the Island Traders Building.
promotion ends October 28, 2005.


I Name:
Address:
Telephone:

"Campbell's
it'sg_t the g_ ds"


Transatlantic Queen Mary 2
New York-Southamptor (08 Oct.-20 Oct 01 Nov)
SoRahamptonew York (14 Oct- Oct 2- 20 Nov ge. Gratuities and air) Additional
Rates per person, double occupancy and subject to change. Gratuities and air. Additional


Reservations and sales through your local travel agent


LE


I N


a
a *


-------x~"~~~~"`"""~`~"


:


aw.






THE T NESP E 5 G


Cuba hits


out at


US


embargo
O *





* *S



0e
Vr.o


"Copyrighted Materia
Syndicated Contentwt
Available from Commercial News Providers"


o* -m e oas


fo


e or every ll
mewIL ome 4oYu

4 YvIntes M OI0re Yo~rbQal(
oo Vve


are providii
w *** 2. e afiStaolce to tho.e i e
:.Afl;^ t6e lltiv .


OVV


* -


- fte .


r7
- --
= a


M4


`): THE TRIBUNE


IHUg I-SABERPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 25


,7 iT


ng


o


by6v





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 26, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


save





SaV8eup to i





Thursday, Sertember 29- on
Saturday, October 8 selected


g


GET MORE FOR.LESS


clothing,
toys and
more*


som. no membership required
' *some restrictions apply all sales final see store for details


Oil Change
SPECIAL PRICF


Front Brake Job
SPECIAL PRI CE-


fA/C System'- Charge
(COMPLETE)T IF2
=Includes:
PR Labour
Leak Test
a 20iFron -1 o


F T-Tech Transmission
I Fluid Change ,


Includes
Labour ..,\ '
4 quarts of motor oil
* Oil Filterl


Drive Shaft Installation
SPECIAL PRICE: Includes:
S Labour for complete Drive Shaft


Includes .
- Labour
Ma chine .
* Machine
*14 quarts of Texaco Transmtission Fluid


We accept the
Bahmm Firmt Geal Imnurnce AutoSa AI.D.
Discount AR ~
Card Gram
CEr J WHw~


AI.D. Automotive & Industrial Distributors
Wulff Road, Nassau, The Bahamas / Phone: 393-7481 / Fax: 393-4258
www.aidbahamaislands.com
Freeport, Marsh Harbour, Rock Sound, Nicholl's Town, George Town,
d Bahama Abaco Eleuthera Andros Exuma
352-8071 367-2077 334-2060 329-4184 336-2780 8


SPECIAL PRICE:


~a~s~Pd~


I' -~L -`


Grand


i -,i









THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


BU s
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


MoeySae


Money Safe.
Money Fast.






. N*INA* q


Minister: No




more tax treaties


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government
will not change its
policy of refusing
to sign any more
Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEA), the minister of finan-
cial services told The Tribune
yesterday, as the Bahamas
"continues to struggle" with
national tax blacklists and the
OECD's related initiative.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson
said that in the meantime, the
Financial Services Consultative
Forum was exploring how the
financial services industry and
the wider Bahamian economy -
could be bolstered through
signing a "broad" variety of
treaties with other nations.
She explained: "The private
sector has been advocating for
quite some time that we look at
the possibility of using treaties
to increase the viability of the
Bahamas as an international
financial services centre and
for other services...........
"This is something the Con-
sultative Forum is examining
and will make recommenda-
tions [to the Government on]."
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
she was taking about bilateral
treaties "in the broadest sense",
not just restricting these possi-
bilities to investments treaties.
Thie Tribiue kliow'stfihat the
Government has long been
encouraged to establish a net-
work of bilateral investment
treaties between the Bahamas
and other countries, as this
would make this nation even
more attractive for foreign
direct investment.
In addition, the financial ser-
vices industry would also
receive a boost because such
treaties would make the
Bahamas attractive as a juris-
diction from which investors
could structure foreign invest-
ment into developing countries,
avoiding political risks attached
to their deals and the need for


Bahamian firm


Forum exploring bilateral

treaties to boost 'viability' of

Bahamian financial industry

and other services


I ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON


a sovereign risk insurance pol-
icy.
Investors in developing coun-
tries face risks that their invest-
ment might be seized by the
government, and that the repa-
triation of revenues and profits
may be difficult. Such treaties
are viewed as giving the
Bahamas a competitive advan-
tage against other internation-
al financial centres, especially


Clearing


in issuing bank House

talks for Visa


pre-paid cards
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
SHARPWORX
(Bahamas), the Freeport-
based company that has
become the Bahamian and
Caribbean distributor for
Secured eMail, yesterday
told The Tribune it was in
talks with Bahamian com-
mercial banks to find an
issuing partner for Visa pre-
paid debit cards.
Elvis Hepburn, the com-
pany's president and chief
executive, told The Tribune
that his company had
secured the licence for Visa
pre-paid cards in the
Bahamas in January
2004.
One an issuing agreement
with a Bahamian bank was
concluded, the company
aimed to introduce 30-
40,000 of these cards to this
market.
Mr Hepburn said: "We
have been in discussions
with several of the local
banks for our Visa pre-paid
credit cards.
"We are very, very close
to making that announce-
ment at the moment, per-
haps in the next week or so,
identifying the issuing
bank and other parties in
that."
He added that Visa pre-
paid debit cards could be
"used all over the world" in
a variety of currencies, and
also had uses as a payroll
card.


since insurance companies are
finding it increasingly difficult
to provide the needed cover-
age.
The Tribune revealed on
Monday how the Bahamas
faced the prospect of being
placed on more national tax
blacklists, inhibiting the flow


SEE page 6B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Ginn Development
Corporation's head is set to
meet with the Prime Minister
next month in a further bid to
get the company's proposed
$2.5 billion real estate devel-
opment for western Grand
Bahama back on track, The
Tribune can reveal, although
the project is not on the "front-
burner".
Bobby Ginn, its president
and chief executive, was yes-
terday said to ,have altered cer-
tain numbers for the project,
following a late August meet-
ing with Perry Christie.
A source familiar with the
situation told The Tribune yes-


terday: "Some months ago, Mr
Ginn had a meeting with the
Prime Minister. He has
reworked some figures, and
they have a tentative [meeting]
date set for early October."
Prospects
However, the prospects for a
Heads of Agreement being
concluded between the Gov-
ernment and the Ginn Corpo-
ration any time soon are under-
stood to be relatively dim. As a
.result, it is unlikely to provide a
much-needed boost to the
Grand Bahama economy,
which has been hit further by
135 redundancies stemming
from the closed Royal Oasis
resort releasing staff who were


kept on for maintenance.
The Tribune understands
that the Ginn Corporation felt
it had a'handshake' and verbal
agreement on a deal from the
Government earlier this year.
However, the Prime Minister's
minor stroke interrupted
progress, and in his absence it is
understood that government
officials failed to move forward.
"The momentum was lost,"
the source told The Tribune.
"They are expecting things will
get back on track, but they're
not close, close, close.
"It's not on the frontburner,
although the Government
would like if to be."

SEE page 48


Airline union's protestthreat


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Airport, Airline and Allied Workers
Union (AAAWU) is threatening industrial
action against, Bahamasair and Nassau Flight
Services (NFS), yesterday giving both com-
panies seven days to meet their initial
demands
The union is pushing the companies to sub-
mit counter-proposals on negotiations for an
expired industrial agreement. It also wants
them to enter into contract talks with union
leaders, and remove a proposed 20 per cent
pay cut, which amounts to some $28,000 and
is being asked of the 150 Nassau Flight Ser-
vices workers, from the table.
Bahamasair and Nassau Flight Services
officials were warned that failure to meet the
union's demands would result in demonstra-
tions.
AAAWU1,,presidentt,.Nelerene Harding,


said in a statement to Paul Major, Bahama-
sair's managing director, and Reginald Grand,
deputy general manager at Nassau Flight Ser-
vices: "Failing to respond by October 5, sev-
en days'from today's date, we will then allow
you both, based on the relationship we share
with ybu, to choose two consecutive days you
would like for the employees to take their
lunch hour unilaterally to demonstrate in
protest of the outstanding matters".
In a press conference held at the union's
headquarters, Ms Harding said the current
industrial agreement expired on June 30,
2004. During the months that followed, there
was a succession of discussions in regard to
management's involvement with the privati-
sation process, which appeared to place most
internal matters on hold.'
A proposed industrial agreement was sent

SEE page 7B


absence

holds up

Registrar

General
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Registrar General's
Department will be able to offer
all its services online by January
1, 2006, with the exception of
Internet payments, Allyson
Maynard-Gibson said yester-
day, the latter use being held
up by the absence of an Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH).
The minister of financial ser-
vices and investments said the
only thing missing from the
Registrar General's arsenal of
online services would be real-
time payments, although both
the Clearing Banks Association
and the Central Bank of the
Bahamas were working to bring
an ACH into being.
However, as The Tribune pre-
viously revealed, the commer-
cial banks have ended the ini-
tial bidding process for a con-
tract to manage and operate
the ACH, believing that none
of the three bidders came up
to scratch, and are now re-
evaluating the process.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson high-
lighted the progress being
made with the Registrar-Gen-
eral's Department's Deeds
and Documents section, say-

SEE page 4B


I I


G_ no


tIu








PAG 2BTURSAYSETEMERI9,200STHITIBUI


Corn


anies need Instant


essaging use policies


Instant Messaging
Explosion


nstant Messaging
(IM) technology was
initially designed to
be used for one-on-
one personal chats.
Over the past few years, how-
ever, it has invaded the work-


place, and many experts
believe it will eventually
replace e-mail as the primary
corporate communication
tool.
Pros and Cons
Many people choose IM
over phone calls or e-mails


Prime Office Suite for Immediate Occupancy
1,390 Sq.Ft. (additional 800 Sq.Ft. optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island
3 Parking Spaces included In Rental
Turnkey Fit-out Office Suite
24 Hr. Automatic Standby Generator
Two Elevators (wired for modem communication needs)
Separate Staff and Secured Client Parking
Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
24 Hr. Security Guards
24 Hr. Surveillance Systems (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed


To View Contact


Mr. Elmer I.G. Lowe
Bahamas Facility Management Ltd.
Telephone: (242) 328-BFMM or 322-7419
P.O. Box SS-19784
Nassau, Bahamas


because it is less intrusive than
a phone-call, but more imme-,
diate than e-mail. Another
key advantage of IM is that it
offers "presence awareness",
that is, you can see who is
available to answer your ques-
tion even before you pose it.
This combination of immedi-
acy and streamlined efficiency
in getting real-time feedback is
what sets IM apart as a com-
munications tool.
Unfortunately, Instant Mes-
saging also introduces a num-
ber of challenges. Like the
telephone, undisciplined
employees can waste a lot of
time using IM for personal
"chat" sessions. Additionally,
IM technology can present a
security risk if not set up prop-
erly, leaving corporate net-
works vulnerable to viruses
and hackers.
Widespread
Most significantly, despite
its widespread use, most com-
panies have been slow to "offi-
cially" embrace the use of
Instant Messaging, and even
slower to develop clear poli-
cies about its use or misuse in
the workplace.
That said, Instant Messag-
ing is not for everyone. Busi-
nesses that work in teams or
on projects will tend to bene-
fit more than retail businesses
or independent professionals,
for example. The reason for
this is that IM enhances col-
laboration and is not an
appropriate tool for initiating
new relationships.
Best Practices
Since many companies have
yet to' formalise their rules of'
"netiquette" as it relates to


Instant Messaging, an unsus-
pecting employee who uses
Instant Messaging can ehd up
in hot water. Whether you are
an ardent IM user, a business
owner or both, there are some
general standards and prac-
tices thatgovern the world of
Instant Messaging, Here is a
list of guidelines for you to
follow:
If you are a business own-
er, adopting a user policy for
Instant Messaging is a must.
Employees need to know
where the company stands
regarding the use of Instant
Messaging as a communica-
tion tool. For example, they
need to know if it is appropri-
ate to use IM when communi-
cating with customers or busi-
ness partners.
Personal

Never use IM to commu-
nicate personal, confidential
or sensitive information. IM
is best used to access quick
information such as project
updates.
Organise your contact list
the Way you would with your
e-mail contacts. Keep business


contacts and personal contact
in separate groups.
Excessive personal mes
aging at work should not be
allowed. Employees should bi
encouraged to exercise
restraint when having person
al chats, restraining them
selves to do so only on break
or during lunch.
Messages

IM messages can be saved
Most people may think tha
IM is great because you cai
make bold statements that wil
all be wiped away from the
record when you are done
This is not the case. Any one
of the other people in the con
versation is able to copy and
paste the entire conversation
into a Notepad or Word doc
ument.
Also, some IM services
offer the ability for its users
to save their entire conversa
tions. In short, be careful wha
you say as you may compro
mise your company's liability
as well as your own reputa
tion.
Be aware that there are
security risks involved when


using IM. Most IM services
allow users to transfer files
with your messages. IM mes-
sages with file attachments
penetrate firewalls with more
ease than with e-mail.
Professional

Keep it professional.
Instant Messages can get real-
ly lengthy and personal
because they offer such an
easy way to communicate.
s Know where to draw the line
between that which is perti-
nent and what is personal.
3-
e In a business environment,
e it is important to keep screen
e names consistent so as to not
- mislead your contacts.
s Businesses that are think-
ing of implementing Instant
Messaging technology should
ensure that they have policies
in place to guide users as to
what is acceptable. On the
. other hand, users should find
t out if their company has the
i applicable policies and adhere
1 to them, and if policies don't
e exist, be careful, and try not to
. push the envelope.
e To provide feedback on this
- column, please e-mail makin-
d gITwork@providencetg.com


s
s

t
y
' *

ti


About the Author:
Alvin Azeez is a technical
analyst at Providence Tech-
nology Group, one of the
leading IT firms in the
Bahamas. Providence Tech-
nology Group specialises in
networking solutions, con-
sulting and advisory services
and software solutions.


COMMONWEALTH BREWERY LIMITED
P.O.BOX N-3897 CLIFTON PIER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 362-4790/2, 302-2900, 302-2901/ FAX: (242) 362-4793

VACANCY NOTICE

A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of New Providence,
is presently seeking the following:

Finance Department

Position: Accounts Payable Officer

Duties Include:

> Processing of accounts payable documents.
,> Processing of periodic payment runs.
> Recpncilling payable and accrual accounts.
> Maintenance of freight expense account.
> Maintenance of prepayment schedules.
> Maintenance of miscellaneous excel reports.

Minimum Requirements:

> University Degree: Finance or Accounting;
> Two years Experience in financial arena;
> Strong communication, administrative, time management skills and
reporting skills;
> Excel spreadsheets usage at an advanced level a must;
> Proficiency in Word applications required;
> Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong commitment
to detail'and good analytical skills.

THE IDEAL CANDIDATE:

> Must be a team player that is willing to support the efforts of the team
or any team member.
> The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative with little supervision.
> Must have good communication skills

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available
to the successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to
the address below no'later than September 30th, 2005:

Human Resources Manager
Commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O.Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 1-242-362-4793


Making


ff Work


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, ,.ut,


-.ird a slion


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE head of a Bahamian
company that has just secured
Caribbean distribution rights
for an encrypted e-mail solu-
tion told The Tribune yesterday
that both the Ministry of Finan-
cial Services and Investments
and the National Insurance
Board (NIB) had received
licences for 10 people within
those organisations to use it.
Elvis Hepburn, president and
chief executive of Freeport-
based Sharpworx (Bahamas),
S'said the company had "made
'some arrangements, probably in
'the next couple of days", to vis-
it the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments and assess
how many persons needed to be
licensed to use the Secured
eMail AB Encryption Solution.
Mr Hepburn said the licences
granted to workers in both gov-
ernment departments could be
,"extended" to their counter-
,parts. In the case of the NIB,
this meant that e-mails sent
between that organisation and
large employers, such as the
main resorts, and which might
contain sensitive data on
employee and employer contri-
butions, were now secure and
protected from hackers.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services and
investments, yesterday invited
Mr Hepburn to submit the
.Secured eMail product to the


Government, with a view to
rolling it out through its various
departments.
Among the risks facing unse-
cured e-mails were that they can
be left sitting on servers around
the world years after they have
been sent. E-mail messages can
be read and modified by hack-
ers while on transit to their
destination, who can also
steal the login and password
used to access your e-mail sys-
tem.
. Mr Hepburn described oth-
er risks of unsecured e-mails as
including identity theft, eaves-
dropping, false messages and
unprotected backup.
The Secured eMail AB
Encryption Solution essential-
ly 'password protects' e-mails,
allowing only the intended
recipient to open them by using
a password.
It comes in four basic pack-
ages: the Home edition; the Pro-
fessional edition for small firms;
the Corporate edition, which
can be configured for 31-300
users; and the Enterprise edi-
tion for companies with up to
50,000 users.
Mr Hepburn yesterday told
The Tribune that Sharpworx
(Bahamas) had agreed to issue
1,000 free home versions of the
Secured eMail solution to
Bahamians.
These people would be able
to download it, use it and edit it
at home for free, getting the log-
on and the licence.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT


No. 328


Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF MERCANTILE BANK AND TRUST
COMPANY LIMITED (IN LIQUIDATION)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT
(CHAPTER 308)
Notice of Intended Fifth and Final Dividend

Rule 31 of The Companies (Winding-Up) Rules, 1975


Name of Company

Address of Registered
Office
Nature of Business
Court

Number of Matter
Liquidator's Name
Address


Mercantile Bank and Trust Company
Limited (In Liquidation)
International Building, West Mall,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Banking Company
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas Equity Side
328 of 1977
Juan Manuel Lopez
P.O. Box F-42558, Freeport, Bahamas


DATED this 28th day of September, A.D. 2005
JUAN MANUEL LOPEZ
Official Liquidator
P.O. Box F-42558
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Bahamas


THE VALK<
M E D I C A L C L I N I C


IN


at Collins Avenue


is looking for


FULL-TIME


GENERAL PRACTICIONERS
REGISTERED NURSES
LAB TECHNICIANS
MESSENGER/CLERK
(MUST HAVE DEPENDABLE TRANSPORTATION)


PART TIME

HOUSEKEEPER

Qualified service professionals must be
current licensed and locally registered.

Please deliver Curriculum Vitae to:

The Walk-in Medical Clinic
35 Collins Avenue
Attention: Mr. Dionisio Mycklewhyte


T iA ,A


FnanColAdvisors Ltd.
i-^ Financial Advisors Ltd.,Wi


) lI)11 I I


Pricing Information As Of:
28 September 2005

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Dlv $ PIE YIeld
1.10 0.80 Abaco-Markets 0.80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.452 0.340 6.9 3.40%
6.90 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.88 6.55 -0.33 1,000 0.561 0.330 11.7 5.04%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.126 0.060 11.1 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 4,790 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.06 6.94 Cable Bahamas 9.06 9.06 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.7 2.65%
2.20 1.69 Colina Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.10 7.05 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.20 3.85 Famguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 8.8 5.71%
10.70 9.50 Finco 10.70 10.70 0.00 0.695 0.510 15.4 4.77%
9.50 7.25 FirstCaribbean 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.24 8.31 Focol 9.24 9.24 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.50 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.2 6.59%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.58 5.58 0.00 0.122 0.000 45.7 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Veekly Vo EPS $ "Dv $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%

1.2521 1.1846 Colina Money Market Fund 1.252089*
2.4169 2.0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4169***
10.5576 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.5576"****
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.255981"
1.1347 1.0631 Colina Bond Fund 1.134722****

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100
- AS AT AUG. 31, 20051/ AS AT AUG 31, 2005
- AS AT SEPT. 9, 2005/ AS AT AUG. 31, 2005/ AS AT AUG. 31, 2005


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/Qui/00721
New Providence

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1959.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition
of Judd and Dale Rosen.

AND

IN THE MATTER of Lot No. 176, Phase Three,
Section One, Stella Maris Subdivision, Long Island,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Judd and Dale Rosen
are applying to the Supreme Court to have their Title
to the following investigated under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and extend thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the said Court in accordance with provisions
of the said Act.

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
176 of Phase Three, Section One of the Stella Maris
Subdivision situate on the Northeastern side of Skyview
Crescent in the vicinity of the Northeastern coast of
Long Island and bounded NORTHEASTWARDLY by
Lot No. 177 the property of the Petitioner and running
thereon One hundred and Eighty-one and Seventy-four
One hundredths (181.74) Feet SOUTHEASTWARDLY
by Lot No. 179 and running thereon One hundred and
Ten (110.00) Feet SOUTHWESTWARDLY by Lot No.
175 and running thereon One hundred arid Sixty and
Fifty-on One-hundredths (160.51) Feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by a road called Skyview
Crecent and running thereon One hundred and Eighty
(180.00) Feet".

Copies of the Plans may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street
North in the City of Nassau, N.P., Bahamas; or,

2. The Chambers of James M. Thompson,
Terrace House, First Terrace, Collins Avenue,
Centerville in the City of Nassau, aforesaid.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in he Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of his, her or its Claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed and served therewith by the
15th day of November, 2005. Failure of any such person
to file and serve a Statement of his, her or its Claim by
the 15th day of November, 2005 will operate as a bar
to such Claim.

ANDREW J. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONERS


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1977
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 328
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF MERCANTILE BANK AND TRUST
COMPANY LIMITED (IN LIQUIDATION)

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT
(CHAPTER 308)

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF INTENTION TO
DECLARE A FIFTH AND FINAL DIVIDEND

Rule 68 of The Companies (Winding-Up) Rules, 1975
To: All Creditors who have not filed a claim in the Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that a Fifth and Final Distribution
is intended to be made to all Creditors whose claims have been admitted
in the Liquidation. You are mentioned as a Creditor in the Statement
of Affairs, but have not yet proved your debt.

If you do not prove your debt by the 29th day of October,
2005 you will be excluded from sharing in this Fifth and Final Dividend.


DATED this 28th day of September, A.D. 2005

JUAN MANUEL LOPEZ
Official Liquidator
P.O. Box F-42558
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas


iii














Ginn not on 'frontburner', talks continue


FROM page one

In its initial form, the Ginn
project involved a hotel, two
18-hole golf courses, single
family lots, second homes,
three marinas and the re-
opening of the West End
Airport as a private non-
commercial airport. Govern-
ment officials have estimated
it would create more than
1,000 direct jobs, being situ-
ated on 2,500 acres of land,
which include the old Sam-
mons Estate.
The project was designed
to take advantage of the bur-
geoning demand for luxury
second homes in the
Bahamas.
The Tribune was the first
to reveal that the Ginn pro-
ject was in trouble. Mr Ginn
was earlier this year said to
have "taken his marbles and


moved on to Mexico", with
one source telling this news-
paper: "Ginn has walked
away. About two weeks ago
they conveyed to the Gov-
ernment that: 'We thought
we had a deal, we made cer-
tain commitments to you and
you made certain commit-
ments to us over a year ago'.
"They are selling their
equipment, packing up. They
got rid of the house they
were using and they are
gone. They have taken the
funds that would have be
used on the Bahamas project
and are investing in Mexico."
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments, during the
2005-2006 Budget debate
indicated that the lengthy
negotiations bver the Ginn
Corporation project were
due to the fact that the
investors were asking for


Ope n MErISPA

Featuring:
Dr. Chinyere-Carey-Bullard MD
AFMC Medical Director
* Canadian Board Certified Family Physician B m s
* Family Medicine graduate from the University of Western Ontario
in Canada
* Member of the American Academy of Anti-aging




In the Renaissance Medical Centre #153 Shirley St.
Opposite New Oriental Laundry
P.O.Box EE-16 236 Nassau, Bahamas

S"Determined to make your life longer,
Shealthier and happier"


incentives never previously
granted.
But a source told The Tri-
bune: "They never asked for
real property tax exemptions,
not even on the hotel prop-
erty. We're hoping for a
stamp tax exemption for sev-
en years and will be paying
real property tax on every-
thing. It's a billion dollar pro-
ject and we're asking for
$200 million back, but
that's wealth that [we] creat-
ed."
The Ginn Corporation ini-
tially proposed the creation
of a $10 million foundation
for the redevelopment of the
West End settlement in
Grand Bahama as part of its
Heads of Agreement with the
Government.
It has also included a pro-
vision for the revitalisation
of the West End community
that will begin with a $3 mil-


lion donation to the founda-
tion.
The proposal further stip-
ulates that the foundation
will continue to be funded by
part of the proceeds from the
sale of each residential lot,
with Ginn earmarking $2,000
on the occasion of each sale.
The foundation was expected
to total some $10 million
within its first five years.
Meanwhile, Irish property
developer Harcourt Devel-
opments is still said to be
interested in purchasing the
Royal Oasis, even though it
pulled out of talks with Drift-
wood and the property's ulti-
mate owner, Lehman Broth-
ers' private equity arm, ear-
lier this year.
One source told The Tri-
bune of Grand Bahama's
economy: "It hasn'tbeen this
bad for 30 years." They
pointed out that Freeport


E E U IVET fCollins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
EXECUTIVE Open: Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pm
T T D Sat 8am -12 noon 610
MOTORS LTD Tel: 322-6705/6 Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER Salesperson: Barry Pinder,
Parts and service guaranteed Pamn Palacious, Terrol Cash


was now effectively relying
on one large resort, the Sher-
aton and Westin at Our
Lucaya, with the Royal Oasis
closure.
The Isle of Capri casino at
the former resort is also said
to be mulling its future if it
does not obtain the market-
ing and casino tax conces-
sions being sought, some-
thing the Government may
find it difficult to grant if


they are not available to oth-
er Bahamas-based casino
operators.
The only good news on
Grand Bahama has come
from the start of filming for
Pirates of the Caribbean II
and III at the Bahamas Film
Studios.
The $250 million New
Hope Holdings project and
Old Bahama Bay expansion
are also bright spots.


Clearing House absence


holds up Registrar General

FROM page one

ing that those submitted for scanning, recording and indexing
after June 1, 2005, were now being returned to clients in 30
days.
This, she said, compared with a timeframe of as much as 28
months. And Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that once Beta testing
was completed, she hoped the 30-day turnaround time could be
reduced to two weeks for Nassau and three weeks for Freeport.
Speaking at Sharpwork (Bahamas) seminar on Secured eMail
-AB Encxyption Solution,_MrsMaynard-Gibson .said the Min-
istry of Financial Services and Investments was also being auto-
mated through enabling applications to the Investments Board to
be made online. The Ministry's databases were also being inte-
grated to aid information sharing with other government depart-
ments.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said: "The issue of e-mail security is at the
forefront of cyber security.
"Hacker attacks have morphed into a tremendous challenge for
those who are in the business of securing and managing important
information systems.
"This is particularly important given the spate of recent cyber
attacks on victim organisations' e-mail messaging and network
systems. Probably the biggest change is that cyber attackers who
used to do this to show off are now doing this for money.
"Small businesses are particularly challenged by this trend. The
threat to them is the same as large businesses but they do not
have the resources to fight back."
She added: "Sharpworx and its Bahamian partners, the Hepburns,
obviously recognise the need to stay on the cutting edge, and that
for businesses and government the effectiveness of a security pro-
gramme must be measurable not only in terms of actual security but
also as a return on investment.
"Workshops and product introductions like 'Secured eMail AB
Encryption Solution' shows that the Bahamas has increased its
awareness and visibility. It is also important for this meeting to take
place in the Bahamas for our local information security experts, as
they are able to meet, update anid share experience and knowledge
with international experts on the progress of information security
initiatives and activities."


29TH, 20

WETRDE:SAE (asu


All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 34,089 sq. ft., being lot #152,
of West Ridge Estates Subdivision, zoining
is single family residential with all utilities
avvailable. The subject property is on hilly
terrain at the top of a ridge that offers a
lovely view to the northeast. The grounds
are attractively landscaped with a grass
lawn, ornamental shrubs and flowering
plants. Other improvements include chain
link fencing along the sides and rear
boundaries, with a concrete block wall at
the front with asphalt paved driveway.


Appraisal: $1,049,788.90


There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house is located at the highest
point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate gross floor area of 4,8000 sq. ft., upstairs
consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each with a full bathroom), including a master bedroom suite,
an office with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living room, formal
dining area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)


I


PAGE 4.B,.THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 5B


M *ERT00


P R


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill overlooking the
Atlantic Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of two apartments.
One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom
one bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 6 feet wide on the upper level secured
with a wooden handrail. The garage area has been converted into
a efficiency apartment and now houses one bedroom/frontroom
in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments
could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency


Appraisal: $308,402.00

MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)
Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
ft., above sea level but below road level and would flood in a
severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft partly
of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section virtually
finished and occupied with blocks up to window level and floor
ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls
and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles. The
finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath, living/dining.
The occupied portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10
years old.


Appraisal: $80,498.00


EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200
sq. ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.
Appraisal: $141,716.40


ROCK SOUND
(ELEUTHERA)
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements having an
area of 22,800 sq ft situated on Fish Street in the vicinity of Rock
Sound Primary School on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. This
property is comprised of a 38 year old single storey residence
consisting of approximately 1,332.18 sq ft of enclosed living area
and inclusive of, living room, dining room, kitchen, 3 bed rooms,
two bathrooms and sitting room. The home is in fair condition,
there is also carport but in poor condition. The neighbourhood
is quiet and peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2
ft.


Appraisal: $57,853.95
The said piece parcel or lot of land and improvements is located in the settlement of Rock Sound, on the.
island of Eleuthera.

LOT 7, BLOCK 7 MILLARS HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)
All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft. being lot no 7
of the subdivision known as Millars Heights subdivision situated
S. in the south western district of new Providence. This property is
.;comprised of a 7 year old single family/multi family single storey
duplex consisting of approximately 1,533 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area inclusive of living room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms
S.. and 1 bathroom. Both apartments have a wall unit in one bedroom.
The building is well maintained and has an effective age of 3 years.
The land is on flat terrain and appear to be sufficiently elevated
above road to disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly maintained and
site improvements includes a grass lawn with fruit trees and a concrete paved driveway leading to the
carport. The yard is open along the front with its back and side boundaries enclosed with chain link fencing.

Appraisal: $231,806.40

Traveling west along Carmichael Road, take the third corner left after the Carmicheal Road Police Station
then the first right then first left again which is Margaret Street the subject property is the third property left
painted white trim green with green doors.

LOT NO 220 TWYNAM HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 9,595 sq. ft. being lot 220
of the subdivision known as Twynam Heights, situated in the
eastern district of New Providence this property is comprised of
a single family residence consisting of approximately 2,880 sq.
ft. of enclosed living area inclusive of porch, foyer, living room,
dining room, kitchen, breakfast room, family room, study utility
room, powder room, three bedrooms, three bathrooms and double
garage. Ventilation includes central air conditioning the land is
on a grade and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated above
road to disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with fairly maintained
lawn and low shrubs, yard enclosed with low wall with open drive way and walkway in front.

Appraisal: $238,400.00
Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just after Winton Super Value, take 1st
corner left the first left again, the subject property is the is the 4th property left painted yellow trim white
opposite unpainted house on the right.


HAMILTON'S
(LONG ISLAND).


0fl.. -=


Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house of
solid concrete floors, foundation column and belt course with
finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen, dining,
and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft., utilities available
are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00

CORAL VISTA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 7,500 sq. ft. being lot #61 and is situated on Blue Heron Cresent in the Coral Vista Subdivision a said subdivision situated In the
western district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is bounded on the north by Blue Hebron Cresent and running thereon 75 ft, on the west by lot #60 and running 100 ft on the south by portions of lots #72 & 73 and running thereon 75
ft, and on the east by lot #62 and running thereon 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available.

Appraisal: $69,300.00
Travelling from the Coral Harbour round about, (Coral Harbour Road), take 1st left (Central Drive East), go across the cross road turn right at Pink Coral Drive west turn 1st left (Blue Heron Drive) the subject property Is the 6th on the right side.
GROVE, WEST BAY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 12,000 sq ft being lot #17 block #20 and is situated on Bougainvilla Avenue in the Grove Subdivision situated In the
western district of New Providence, Bahamas. The property is retinacula in shape and is bounded on the north by lot #18 and running thereon 120 ft on the west by Bougainvilla Avenue and running 100 ft on the south by lot #16 and running 120
ft,. and on the east by lot #8 and running there on 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $153,300.00
Travelling west on West Bay Street, turn onto Bougainvilla Avenue, travel across the crossroad (Coral Drive) the subject property is the 4th on the left side with broken chain lik fence.
JOHNSON'S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION(ELEUTHERA), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 4,500 sq ft being lots 12E and 13W and is situated in JOhnson Harbour View Estates
Subdivision situated on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Measuring and bounded as follows, northwardly by 20' wide road reservation and running there on for a distance of 50 ft eastwardly by lot 13E and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft
southwardly by lot 30, and running thereon for a distance of 25 ft and continuing on lot 31 and running thereon a distance of 25 ft westwardly by lot 12W of the said subdivision and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft. This property is
well lanscaped and fenced in. This area is quiet and peaceful with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $47,250.00
The said pieces parcels or lot of land is situated in Johnson's Harbour View Estates Subdivision, Harbour Island, Eleuthera.
ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD(NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated in
the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services.

Appraisal: $1048,050.00
Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near the pond.

For0nd0to*sof sle ad oher nforatin*cotac


rented at $400 per month.


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex with a floor
area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section consist of a master
bedroom, bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms,
one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and
two efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning
on flat land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one hundred
feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley
Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to
T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN
(ABACO)
3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area for
a small shop. Age 12 years the land Is a portion of one of the
Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest Drive
to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and on the
lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle ropf and
L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft.,
2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet
rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.


Appraisal: $175,350.00
Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then
1st right, house is second on your right with garage.

NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft.
(77.5 x 100) situated in the southern district of New Providence
being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville of Malcolm Road
west. This property is spacious and can probably accommodate
another house at the rear. It is landscaped and enclosed by a wall
in front with fence on the side. The property consist of a single
story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room and dining rooms,
combined, family room and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof
covered front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $123,000.00
Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the right, the house is
the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.
LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land'having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194
of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated In the
central district of New Providence this property is comprised of a
35 year old single family, single story residence- encompassing
approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living area and inclusive
of separate living and dining rooms, and an average size kitchen,
three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an entry porch, of approximately
88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property
is at grade and level.with good drainage, landscaping is minimal,
consisting of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with wrought
iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading
to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring
of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $126,000.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right,
(Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim.


LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 15,403 sq. ft.
being lot 172 in the subdivision known as Blair Estates, this property
is comprised of a single family split level resident consisting of
approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with three
bedrooms, two bathrooms, on the second level and on the first a
living and dining room, kitchen, utility room, family room, bathroom,
an office, a rear uncovered porch, a covered door entry, walkway
and a driveway. Also located on the first level in a 616 sq. ft. one
bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room, rental unit. The building is in excellent condition with recent
renovation done, there is no signs of structural defects or termite infestation the building is adequately
ventilated with central air conditioning installed on the second floor and in the rental unit the land is rectangular
in shape and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block wail and fence enclosure
on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.

Appraisal: $642,222.00
Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner right into Blair Estates (St
Andrews Drive). Drive to the t-junction and make a left which is Commonwealth Street, continue traveling
to the 7th corner which is Clarence Street then drive to Richmond Road and make a right. The subject
property is the 1 st house on the left no 44 painted green trimmed white.


lo







PAGE B, TURSDA, SETEMBE 29,2005UHEITIBUN


Attention Food & Beverage
Professionals


Americas

Food & Bevernqe

Show and i Cfrece

is just around the corner!








REGISTER NOW

www.americasfoodandbe verage. com


International attendees who register early can take
advantage of special airline discounts.


For assistance, contact .
Emy Rodriguez at 305 871- 791 0 or at
erodriguez@worldtrade,o r.


^^^Why Atel^^^

The Aerica Food& Bevrage o S i lagesfoodgi
and be veage sh o in the mericO any't d O#-atedeven
for ^you bsness.^^B^BBH~j


Meet 400 exhibitors ^from 26 cou ntriei,''3B^^^^

Rj ceive VIP One-on-Ont e Appoi nfients, ii wwiiith E xibitorsn~B~i













Mamistheundisue Wo rkshpsto "MG'mricas



forutheuAmerica


Learn strategies for growing your business and increasing
your bottom line. Hear industry experts address issues such
as:

What are the Hot Trends for 2006?
What's New in Franchising?
Preparing for the Holidays: Finding New Ways to Maximize
Your Holiday Profits
Understanding FDA Rules: What You Need lo Know to Import
Your Product into the United States
Exporting to Latin America: A Case Study
New Concepts in Retailing: Publix Sabov
How US Exporters and Foreign Buyers (Cian Access US
Government Support
Supply Chain Management: Moving, Your m(iargo

For further information contact:


.i3'' A 0 .6'
** 5, 395 I ^^iIl


-


MIMIS!lM6 IlM!iM-


FROM page one
of new business to its financial.
services industry, if the Organ-
isation for Economic Co-Oper-
ation and Development's
(OECD) November summit on
'harmful tax practices' fails to
produce the progress its mem-
bers desire.
Michael Paton, the Bahamas
Financial Services Board's
(BFSB) deputy chairman, said
there was "potential for the
pressure to be ratcheted up"
on the Bahamas and other
international financial centres.
The Bahamas appears on the
national tax blacklists of
Argentina, Brazil, India, Mex-
ico, Portugal and Spain, being
specifically named as a so-
called 'tax haven' in those
countries' decrees, legislation
and regulations.
This nation is also named on
the 'informal' national tax
blacklists of Australia, France,
Germany and the US, mean-
ing that although the Bahamas
is named as a 'tax haven', there
are no formal legal conse-


quences for transactions going
through this jurisdiction.
Mexico and other nations
have indicated that the price
to be paid for escaping their
respective blacklists was for the
Bahamas to sign a TIEA with
them, much like the one agreed
with the US.
The Government's policy has
been that it will not even con-
template signing a TIEA with
another nation until there is a
'level playing field' on the
OECD initiative, which is
demanding greater trans-
parency and information
exchanges from international
financial centres such as the
Bahamas.
A 'level playing field' is still a
long way off, and Mrs May-
nard-Gibson reiterated yester-
day: "The Bahamas govern-
ment's policy, no matter what
the administration, is that we
will not sign another TIEA,
and the 'level playing field'
position has not changed."
She said all relevant govern-
ment agencies were "continu-
ing to advocate" for a 'level


playing field', pointing to the
Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) report
that described the national tax
blacklists as "arbitrary and dis-
criminatory".
Mrs Maynard-Gibson added:
"We continue as a jurisdiction
to struggle with this issue.".
The Attorney-General, Alfred
Sears, had called for a Global
Forum, supervised under the
aegis of the United Nations
(UN), as the Bahamas' pre-
ferred method for resolving the
'harmful tax practices' issue.. *
The minister yesterday allude
ed to the fact that by imped-
ing the cross-border flow of
financial services through their
national tax blacklists and oth-
er devices, the OECD coun-
tries were contravening the
General Agreement on Trade
in Services (GATS), which
comes under the World Trade
Organisation (WTO).
"We think this is the only fair
way to approach this matter,"
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said of
the UN route, "because trade
in services is the most, certain'
ly one of the most, significant
areas of international trade
today.
"All should be able to com-
pete fairly in the international
arena using an international
platform. It is somewhat unfor-
tunate to have agencies that
are not similar to the UN, and,
comprised of countries that'
have unfortunately attempted
to control the destinies and
futures of people in jurisdic-
tions such as the Bahamas, and;
in the region and around the
world.".


THE DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS
AVERAGE QUARTERLY PRICES FOR SELECTED
ITEMS; NEW PROVIDENCE:
SELECTED YEARS 2003 2005
$B
2003 2004 2005
ITEM UNIT 3rd QUARTER 3rd QUARTER 3rd QUARTER

Lettuce Each 2.32 1.92 2.34

Cabbages 1 lb 0.73 0.69 0.75
Sweet peppers 1 lb 2.36 2.31 2.28

Carrots 2 lbs 1.91 2.00 2.25

Onions 3 lb 2.41 1.98 2.20
Avocados Each 2.63 2.35 1.92
Plantains Each 0.68 0.69 0.71
Grapefruits 1 lb 1.09 1.14 1.31
Spare ribs 1 lb 1.88 2.01 2.07
Chicken (parts) lb 1.83 188 1.86
fresh & frozen


HIGHLIGHTS


Between the third quarters of 2003 and 2004, the average
price per head of lettuce decreased 17.24% but increased
21.88% during the third quarter of 2005, when compared
to the third quarter of 2004.

The average price of a 2 lb bag of carrots jumped 17.80%
in the third quarter of 2005 compared to the same period
in 2003.



The average price for an avocado decreased steadily
between the third quarters of 2003 and 2005 from $2.63
in 2003 to $2.35 in 2004 and $1.92 in 2005. Between the
third quarters of 2003 and 2005, prices plummeted 27%.


On the other hand, the average price for grapefruits
constantly increased between the above-mentioned
quarters. By the third quarter of 2005, the price rose to
1.31 or 20.18% when compared to the third quarter of
2003.


-:)
:- m


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 .
and share your story.


v",-.


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


I


I *


THE TRIBUNE


Forum exploring


bilateral treaties to boost


'viability' of Bahamian


financial industry


and other services













Airline union's protest threat


FROM page one

to Bahamasair officials on
April 8,2005, Ms Harding said.
It outlined salary increases over
the next five-year period that
would represent an increase of
11 per cent in the first year,
July 1, 2004, and an earned
increment at a rate of 3 per
cent for the following four
years of the agreement. The
union is also looking for
increased benefits for Family
Island staff.
The union proposas was
submitted with a view to start-
ing negotiations within two
weeks of that April 8 date.
However, Bahamasair man-
agement did not respond to
the communications.
"As of today's date we have
yet to receive any verbal or
written correspondence
acknowledging the reason for
the delay or any unforeseen
circumstances they may have
incurred", Ms Harding said.
She added that the union
had made a number of
inquiries to management
within the past five months,
but had not received any
response.
-As a result of this silence,
the union had filed a trade
dispute with the Department
of Labour on August 9. A
hearing was scheduled for
August 31, but both sides
were subsequently informed
that the Department of
Labour could no longer give a
ruling on trade disputes
regarding companies initially
entering into negotiations.
The department could only
enter into ongoing negotia-
tions. Bahamasair was also
accused by the union of being
in violation of Section 41 of
the Industrial Act.


Although the current agree-
ment has expired, a clause
allows both parties to contin-
ue to operate under the con-
tract for another two years if
no new agreement is put in
place. Ms Harding said the
agreement was binding, and
that even if Bahamasair is
sold in privatisation, the
new owner will have to rec-
ognize and abide by the con-
tract.

Reduce

Meanwhile, the manage-
ment of Nassau Flight Ser-
vices communicated to the
union on September 21, that
effective September 25
through October 29, 2005,
they would reduce the work
week and employee salaries
by 20 per cent, a move Ms
Harding claimed was a uni-
lateral variation of an employ-
ee's contract. Industrial law,
she added, dictated that such
a move was only legal when
the employee agrees to the
reduction.
The proposed pay reduc-
tion was suggested by man-
agement because of a reduc-
tion in flights to the Bahamas
by a major client over that
one-month period. The total
sum of the pay cuts was esti-
mated at $28,000, which th e
union said will never be
gained back by the affected
employees should they agree
to the reduction. Management
would not be required to par-
ticipate in the proposed pay
cut.
Ms Harding pointed out,
however, that although Nas-
sau Flight Services had always
experienced a "slow period"'
during the months of Sep-
tember and October, due to


the fact that its biggest client,
US Airways, decreased their
flight frequency into the
Bahamas, management had
never before asked workers
to take a pay cut.
With wages ranging from
$190 to $390 per week, the
union told Nassau Flight Ser-
vices management on Sep-
tember 26 that the employees
would not agree to the pay
cuts which, if put into effect,
would in some cases put them
below the minimum wage lev-
el.
The union also submitted
three recommendations which
they believe would possibly
gain additional revenue for
Nassau Flight Services over
the next fiscal year.
Among the recommenda-
tions, the union suggested
that Nassau Flight Services let
go the temporary staff during
the "slow period" and rehire
them after business picks up
again.

Consider
It added that if there was
sufficient work to demand the
use of temporary staff, man-
agement may need to consid-
er making some of these indi-
viduals permanent employees.
The union also suggested
that Nassau Flight Services
enter into talks with Spirit
Airways, which operates dai-
ly flights from Fort Laud-
erdale to Nassau, for the
option of a quick pack service
in regard to overnight or same
day delivery.
Ms Harding said there were
a number of small businesses
that can be targeted to help
increase the airline's revenue.
It was also suggested that
British Airways and Air


Canada be approached in
regard to a similar agreement,
with Nassau Flight Services
targeting offshore banks and
other international entities
that have ties in Europe
and the US, and which
might respond positively
to the opportunity to
ship documents in a timely
manner at a competitive
rate.
Ms Harding said that at an
average starting salary of
$11,000 to about $20,000,
union officials felt there is no
leeway for the AAAWU to
accept salary reductions at
either Bahamasair or Nassau
Flight Services.
"The on-going accusations
made by the Government
over the past three years that
unions are being irresponsi-
ble and are quick to challenge
the employer are a mere
smokescreen," Ms Harding
said.
"It is evident that over the
past three years every major
trade union in the Bahamas
that has had an expired indus-
trial agreement, had had to
demonstrate or take industri-
al action against the manage-
ment representing the Gov-
ernment just to sit down and
enter into talks regarding
their terms of conditions of
employment.
"Who, then, appears to be
unreasonable?"
According to the union
president, the AAAWU had
acted in good faith to all par-
ties, followed due process and
exercised patience over the
past year and four months
before coming to the conclu-
sion that industrial action may
be necessary to bring the mat-
ter to the attention of man-
agement officials and the
Government.


VACANCIES FOR PRISON OFFICERS
BAHAMAS PRISON SERVICE
OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
& MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
for enlistment as Prison Officers into the Bahamas
Prison Service, Office of the Deputy Prime Minister
& Ministry of National Security.

The applicant:

(a) MUST be a citizen of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas;
(b) MUST be between 18 and 36 years of age;

(c) MUST possess a clean Police Record and receive
a positive vetting report;

(d) MUST possess passes in at least five (5) BJC
subjects including English Language.

Applicants without at least the minimum required
qualifications would not be considered.

Successful applicants will be required to pass Medical/
Physical Assessments prior to undergoing a period
of training at the Correctional Training Institute, Her
Majesty's Prisons.

All persons recruited will be required to work on
a three-shift system as follows:


Mornings
Evenings
Nights


and as such will be required to work these shifts
on weekdays and weekends as a condition of service.
In this respect, candidates who are unwilling or
unable need not apply.

Applicants will initially be enlisted as Recruit Prison
Officers, Scale PR10 and will receive a salary of
$16,200 per annum. However upon satisfactory
completion of the required Training Programme, they
will be promoted to the rank of Prison Officer, Scale
PR9 and will receive a salary in the range of $19,200
x 600 $23,400. Entry point in the Scale will be
determined by qualifications.

-Application forms may be obtained from the Main
Gate at Her Majesty's Prisons, completed and returned
along with the following documents to the Human
Resources Unit, Her Majesty's Prisons, Nassau N
P Bahamas, no later than 14 October 2005:

> Copy of Birth Certificate or Affidavit
:>-Copy of-first four-pages of Passport
S> Copies of all Academic Qualifications
.> Police Record
> 2 Character References
> 2 Passport sized photographs

Superintendent of Prisons


- (6:00a.m. 2:00p.m.)
- (2:00p.m 10:00p.m.)
- (10:00p.m. 6:00am)


E B Pa Ta.



Baha Mar, a 50oo-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the single largest resort investment in
the history of The Bahamas. Phase one will include more than 2,ooo guest rooms across multiple, first-class
branded hotels, and the Caribbean's largest branded Las Vegas-style casino. Baha Mar Development owns
and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Radisson Cable Beach & Golf Resort, and Nassau Beach Hotel.
The, three properties, the 35,000 square-foot Crystal Palace Casino and adjoining i8-hole golf course were
recently acquired by Baha Mar, which is currently investing $x5 million in cross-property renovations.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Cable Beach Resorts, the operations arm of Baha Mar Development Company Ltd, seeks to hire
professional individuals for the following positions:

Director of Human Resources: Responsible for three resorts and casino, staffing qualified
personnel, ensuring employment statue compliance. Ability to create/develop various company-
wide programs including but not limited to: benefits, insurance, bonus incentive compensation,
pension and 40oK. Complete familiarity with,,and knowledge of the labor laws of The Bahamas,
unions and industrial relations. A graduate degree in Business Administration or Human Resources
with at least 5 years of progressive experience in the hotel industry is preferred.

Resort Manager: Responsible for guest satisfaction, cost control and hotel profitability. Focus is
general services, rooms division emphasis and integrity of the resort operation. Ability to evaluate
and select alternative courses quickly, identify and solve problems as well as handle complex,
matters in the workplace is required. A degree with 8-16 years of progressive experience in the hotel
industry including 3-4 years as Rooms Division Manager, Resident Manager or Assistant General
Manager, international experience and excellent housekeeping managerial skills are preferred.

Director of Food & Beverage: Responsible for coordinating, supervising and directing all property
food and beverage operations, including but not limited to restaurants, bars, catering, room service,
kitchens and culinary, purchasing, promotions and in-house merchandising. Achieves profitability
through increased sales, and payroll control, while maintaining high quality products and service
levels. An undergraduate degree or equivalent is preferred with at least 6 years of progressive.
experience in a hotel or related field.

Chief Engineer: Responsible for ensuring operations, repair, maintenance, and service of all
mechanical, electrical, and plumbing equipment, while supporting the resorts' goals of guest
satisfaction, cost control and quality workmanship. Oversees and participate in the Preventative
Maintenance program to ensure that all guest rooms, public space, meeting facilities, pool and
beach, landscaping and grounds meet required standards. A 4-year college degree or equivalent with
5 or more years of related experience is preferred, in addition to computer skills and current
certification and licensing.

Housekeeping' Manager: Responsible for ensuring the operation of the Housekeeping Department
in an attentive, friendly, efficient and courteous manner, providing all guests with quality service
and a clean and safe environment throughout their stay, while efficiently managing expenses and
maximizing service levels. A minimum of 2 years of progressive experience in a hotel or a related
field is required, or an undergraduate degree with I or more years of related experience.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae
with salary requirements under confidential cover to hr(acablebeachresorts.com no later than
October ro, 2oo5. All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


NASSAU
BEAC H
Hfcitr ,


CABLE BEACH &, OLF RESORT
NASSAU ttLA"AMAS


AM
WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT-
& CRWEAL PALACE .A5IN*c ..^^...


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 7B


Staff Opportunities

Baker's Bay Golf& Ocean Club is a $500 million development on
Guana Cay, centered around a championship golf course and a marina.
As part of our commitment to government to employ 200 Bahamians
in the development we are now looking to fill the following positions
with Bahamian Nationals:

Suos Chef

'Rooms/ Inn Manager
Yoga/Pilates Instructor
Fitness Trainer
Resident Butler

Assistant Marketing Manager
Salary and benefits will be in line with experience and will include
health benefits.
Applications to Carter Redd, General Manager at P.O. Box AB 20766,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, or credd@bakersbayclub.com.


_ ___ ___ _~____


I I I C ILI I- _


THE TRIBUNE .


Legal Notice



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000)


JARVIS MANAGEMENT CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, JARVIS
MANAGEMENT CORP., has been dissolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 23rd day of September, 2005.

Mr. Louis Oehri,
Kopferweg 229,
FL-9491 Ruggell/Liechtenstein
Liquidator







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 30, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

I* T Round- Whinghon NOW (N)A M u n Jou Ed Atues Roadshow Tomorrow's
S WPBT discussion. Week CC) R t (N) A (1950s-1970s)' Pop col-
(CC) (CC) e (CC)
The Insider (N) Ghost Whisperer Melinda helps a Threshold The Buring Molly and NUMB3RS 'Bettor or Worse' Store
B WFOR (CC) boy reassure his mother that his the Red Team search for an es- owner's family is kidnapped. (N) A
death was not her fault (N) (CC) caped psychiatric patient (N) (CC)
Access Holly- Dateline NBC (CC) Three Wishes'Clovis, New Mexico' Inconceivable 'Secrets and Thighs"
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) (N) 1 (CC) (N) A (CC)
S, Deco Ddve T BheBrnile Malcolm In the Killer Instinct FiveEasy Pieces' News(CC)
S WSVN eShow Celbrity Middle Buing (N) P (PA) (CC)
marathon. (N) Man festival. (N)
Je dy! (N) Superanny The wife of a National Hope & Faith (Season Premiere) 20/20 (CC)
WPLG (CC) Guardsman stationed in Iraq seeks Faith must choose between Lany
assistance. (N) (CC) and the Gooch. (N) A (CC)
American Jus- Biography Richard Pryor" Triumph Biography "Jeff Foxworthy: You Biography"Charles Ng and
A&E tice:Shattered andtragedy in Richard Pryor's ca- Might be a Comic If..." Comic Jeff LeonardLake" Serial killers docu-
Innocence reer. (CC)Foxworthy. (CC) ment their plans. (CC)
Hardtalk Extra BBC News World Business BBC News Explorations BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). 'Living on the (Latenight).
__ Edge
BET OBSTACLES (2000, Crime Drama) E-40, D-Shot. A BET Comedy Awards In Pasadena, Calif.
T cash-hungry student invades a drug dealer's turf. _
CBC Coronation ** PRIVATE BENJAMIN (1980) Goldie Hawn, Eileen Brennan. A brat CBC News (CC) Venture Worm;
Street (CC) is conned into the Army after her husband's death. (CC) Art Boy" (CC)
KCaKat : Crisis, Late Night With Conan O'Brien Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Recovery (N) n (CC)
CN 00)Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
Reno911! De- The Dally Show Comedy Central Presents "Dave Comedy Central Denis Leary: Lock and Load A
COM pamentcheats. th Jon Sttw ll" Dave Atel.(CC) Presents"Dane (CC)
(CC) art (CC) Cook"
COURT Cops Alleged The Investigators Clues lead to an Forensic Files Forensic Files Psychic Detectives
COURT sexual assault. assailant's conviction.
That's So Raven ** HOLES (2003, Adventure) Sigoumey Weaver, Jon Voight, Patricia Arquette. Juvenile Sister, Sister
DISN "Royal Treat- delinquents are forced to dig at detention camp.'PG' "Before There
men (CC) Was Hip Hop..."
DIY This Old House Weekend Me- Classc Car Classic Car Classic Rides Tricked Out Radio Control
DIY n (CC) chanic Restoration Restoration Hobbies
DW Euromaxx Journal: In Quadriga Journal: Made in Ger- Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth Tagestema many Depth
E! ElNews Filthy Rich: Cattle DriveThe trail The Girls Next The Girls Next The Soup (N) Taradise "Mona-
bosses abandon the teas. Door Door co"
ESPN (:00) MLB Baseball Teams to Be Announced. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (CC) Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
ESPNI Gol ESPN: Figure Skatin World Champi- UEFA Champi- Boxing Friday Night Fights. From June 2, 2000 in
ESP Fuera de Juego onships -- All- ccess. (N) (C) ons League Philadelphia. (CC)
EWTN daily Mass: Our The World Over Life Is Worth The Holy Rosary Defending Life Carpenter Shop
~" Laoy _Living
IT:00) FiTtTVs Fit Diet Doctor 'Perricone" Dr. Blane's Low Blaine'sLow FitNation "Generation Xtra Large"
FT TV Housecalls (CC) Nicholas Perricone. tP Carb Kitchen Carb Kitchen Measuring fat. A (CC)
FOX-NC ox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
OX-NC Shepar Smih O Susteren (Live) (CC)
F L 00) MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Around the Boxing: Best
FS FL Petersburg, Fla.(Live) Track DamnFight
GOLF Post Game Show Playing Lessons PGA Golf Champions Tour -- SAS Championship -- First Round. From
'_________ Cary, N.C.
GSN ungo (CC) Wantsto Be a Millionaire A The Amazing Race A (CC) The Amazing Race 1 (CC)
G4Tech (:0)Attack of X-Play Cheat Geist." Brainiac Brainiac G4TV.com (N) Electric Play-
t4Tech he Show! IIground (N)
00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker's for- THE LAST COWBOY (2003, Drama) Jennie Garth, Lance Henriksen,
HALL Texas Ranger mer partner is captured by the Mexi- Bradley Cooper. A woman and her estranged father try to salvage a
P. (CC) can crime syndicate. (CC) ranch. (CC)
Space For Liv- neat Children's House Invaders One Garden, This Small Weekend War- Love by Design
HGTV ing "Vancouver bedroom and Sprucing up a Two Looks A Space "A Few riors (CC) The Bi Chill
and Stockholm" playroom. (CC) home. ( (CC) (CC) Select Pieces" A (CC
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthropgh Jay Sekulow Missions Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Possess the
(CC) ".day Land with
Transformers Sabrina, the MyWife and My Wife and Friends Rachel Everybody Everybody
KTLA ybertron eenage Witch Kids Michael's Kids Janet gains hires a male nan-Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
Search" Sabrina's spells, hot ex-girlfriend. weight. ny. (CC) A (CC) P. (CC)
** NO ONE COULD PROTECT HER (1996) Joanna MOTHER KNOWS BEST (1997, Drama) Joanna Kems, Christine Elise,
LIFE Kems, Anthony John Denison. A serial rapist repeated- Grant Show. An unhappy mother plots murder after playing matchmaker.
ly terrorizes one of his victims. (CC) (CC)
MSNBC Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
NICK Catcratch (N) Avatar: The Last Danny Phantom The Adventures of Jimmy Neu- Full Housen Fresh Prince of
NC n Airbender n (CC) tron: Boy Genius A (CC) (CC) Bel-Air
Malcolm in the Kller Instinct Tive Easy Pieces" Threshold The Buming" (N) n News P (CC) News
'V Middle (N) (CC) (N) (PA) (CC) (CC)
Bill Dance Out- Buck TheWorldof Best & Worstof ack Roads Outfitter Journal Outdoor Adven-
OLN doors A (CC) Beetta Traedarta __tures
SPEED 00) Trackide NASCAR Racing Nextel Cup Series- UAW-Ford 500 Qualifying. From Talladega Super- Infield Hot Pass
SPEED Lt. (Live) speedway in Talladega, Ala.
Primary Focus Behind the Great Souls Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K. Praisethe Lord (CC)
TBN Scenes (CC) (CC) Price (CC)
Everybody * GLADIATOR (2000, Action) (PA) Russell Crowe, Joaquin Phoenix, Connie Nielsen. A fugitive general
TBS ves Raymond becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. (CC)
"Big Shots
(:00) What Not That YIn Yang Thing Cheerleading What Not to Wear: Wannabe Members of the team look for people who
TLC Wear "Court- squad. (N) want to replace them. (N)
ney' (CC)
(00) Law & Or- *** RUSH HOUR (1998, Action) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker, Tom **A THE WHOLE NINE YARDS
TNT der Harm") Wilkinson. Two detectives join forces in a kidnapping case. (CC) 2000, Comedy) Bruce Willis,
(CC) (DVS) Matthew Perry.
TOON Codename: Kids Camp Lazlo Grim Adven- Life & Times of Camp Lazlo Codename: Kids Bobobobo Bo-
Next Door tures Juniper Lee Next Door Bobo (N)
TV5 Thalassa Arte reportage TV5 Le Journal
(6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
S :00) Inocentede Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen AsEs... Gilber- Par de Ases
UNIV toGless
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent The Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Monk "Mr. Monk Gets Drunk"
USA der: Special Vl- discovery of anthrax intensifies de- "Serendipity" A dead newborn baby Crime-filled weekend for Monk. (CC)
times Unit tectives' murder probe. (CC) is found in a sewer.
VH1 Tomm Lee Tommy Lee Tommy Lee * WAYNE'S WORLD 2 (1993) Mike Myers, Dana Carvey. Premiere.
SGoes-College GoesCollege Goes-College A dead rock star tells Wayne to organize a big concert. Pn
(:00) America's **iA DEAD HEAT (2002, Suspense) Kiefer Sutherland, Anthony La- WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WGN Funniest Home Paglia, Radha Mitchell. Mobsters make a play for a retired cop's new
Videos P (CC) racehorse. P.
Everybody What I Like Twins Mitchee Reba Van buys Living With Fran WB11 News at Ten With Kaity.
W PIX Loves Raymond About You First demands respect an uninspected Allison's Sweet Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
P. (CC) fight. (N) (CC) from Alan. house. ( ) (CC) 16 party. & Mr. G (CC)
f:00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. From Fenway Park in Boston. Red Sox Postgame
WSBK (Live)

HBO-E 00) Inside the ** s S.W.A.T. (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson, Colin Farrell, Michelle Rome 'The Ram Has Touched the
HBO-E NFL (CC) Rodguez. A Los Angeles SWAT team must protect a criminal. P. 'PG- Wall" Caesar weighs Pompey's
____ _13'(CC) counteroffer. P (CC)
(5:45) **A * FIRST DAUGHTER (2004, Romance-Comedy) (:45) **, MURDER AT 1600 (1997, Suspense)
HBO-P COBB (1994) n Katie Holmes, Marc Blucas. The president's daughter Wesley Snipes, Diane Lane. The president's son is im-
'R' (CC) falls for a man at college. P 'PG' (CC) plicated in a secretary's death. P 'R' (CC)


(5:30) *** (:15) **v CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Comedy) Steve Martin, Inside the NFL ,' (CC)
HBO-W CONTACT Bonnie Hunt, Piper Perabo. A man must handle the chaos surrounding his
(1997) 'PG' (CC) 12 children. 1 'PG' (CC)
(:15) *** CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS (1989) The Comeback The Comeback * ANCHORMAN: THE LEG-
HBO-S Martin Landau, Woody Allen. Two white-collar profes- "Valerie Demands Valerie tries to END OF RON BURGUNDY (2004)
_sionals face crises in their lives. 'PG-13' (CC) Dignity" boost morale. Will Ferrell. P 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:1) ENVY * COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx, Jada* AMERICAN WEDDING (2003)
MAX-E (2004) Ben Pinkett Smith. A contract killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. P. 'R' (CC) Jason Biggs. Jim and Michelle pre-
Stiller. (CC) pare to get married.
(6:45) **% THE MATRIX REVOLUTIONS (2003, * FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX (2004, Adventure) Dennis Quaid, Gio-
MOMAX Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves. Neo, Morheus and vanni Ribisi, Tyrese Gibson. Plane-crash survivors endure hardships in
Trinity battle vicious machines. P 'R' (CC) the Gobi desert. P 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:05) *4 C.IA ** THE PUNISHER (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, Will Weeds The Pun- Weeds The Pun-
SHOW II TARGET Patton. TV. An FBI agent seeks revenge for his family's murder. P 'R' ishment Light" ishment Light"
ALEXA'R' (CC) (CC) (CC)
T 6:15**'A THE ** HALLOWEEN H20: 20 YEARS LATER (1998, *s HELLRAISER: HELLSEEKER (2002, Horror)
TMC cr EDGE Horror) Jamie Lee Curtis. Laurie Strode faces her psy- Dean Winters, Ashley Laurence. A former nemesis re-
(1992) choice brother once more. A 'R' (CC) turns to battle the evil Pinhead. n 'R' (CC)


Simply the Best" .j


vie Gift Cerifi

make great gift


Let Ckcirlie the
3ciamian Puppet cianid
kis sidekick DerP'ek pt L
some smiles 1 o your
kids's facces.



Biiin your child en to the

Mcl-Iappy low at fMcDonald's in

Palmdale eveiAy Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
moVtk of Septe-mber 2005.


Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun. I


i'm lovin' it"
i'm lovin' itf









THETRBUE USIES TURDAICSPTMBRP9,G00, AG-9


r-7


- -
' -C .q2 -


*mq


1- r
C *4


Cr A


* C


04


mA' VeJ


I


Si'


C -0





A~.

ad

*
C .
S


6%
D


ft 0 . o
o *ftvo 4


*I *


As


s a 0v -omw


~6


&em


* -
* -


aftdo. go ls
* -lC


-


L-


opyrighted Material


Svndicated Content


C
0q


amma





-=mm
C ,
sop-
o1=1 o
_ 5 --am

aco


P
--


ailable from Commercial News Provide
A RM9k* ,M I .W.


I


Av


- 4


0 d


C
C


I



K


m -


)I '


- C


rs"
4P 9


- m M *
* m
- C. *-



4



m o lo t* o



ftb aC
-wee b
- n o



- C


MW ~dj


S-- e *- - o -



*m* t *41)* **


m oo e ac 4100*


g: 3



* *

* *


**





i*
Bm:


C C C' C 6 -.
* 0


0e*


Coo....
L.


p


3:

S.
6.O


& -.-- TI-d


ke! Two .0-ot


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 9B


P.


am 10


O


. 4ow


9q


>.


14% -


^TL








PAE OB HUSDYSPTMBR29T205H TIBN


Bahamian athletes who





deserve to be recognised


TONIQUE Williams-
Darling Highway.
That's what Harrold Road
is expected to be renamed on
Monday when the Olympic
and World Championship
gold medalist returns home to
celebrate with her teammates.
It's quite an honour for the
woman who surged to the top
of the world in Athens,
Greece last year and stayed
there in Helsinki in August,
although some might think it's
a little premature.
Williams-Darling is not fin-
ished yet she already has her
eye on the World Indoor
Championships and the Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
Games next year.
And, to top it off, she wants
to become the first Bahami-
an to repeat as both the
Olympic and World Champi-
onship gold medal winner.
Without taking anything
away from her achievements,
which I have thoroughly
enjoyed watching from the
press booth at both events, I
think there are quite a few
athletes who are equally
deserving of the accolades for
their past accomplishments.
How about renaming the
Eastern Road the "Sir Dur-
ward Knowles Road?"
Sir Durward was the first
Bahamian to win, not one, but
two Olympic medals in sail-
ing as a skipper with crew


STUBBS


OPINION


members Cecil Cooke and
Sloane Farrington. Surely he
deserves some type of nation-
al recognition.
If that's not enough, how
about the "Frank Rutherford
Drive" to replace the existing
Prince Charles Drive?
The former resident of East-
ern Estate was the first
Bahamian to win a track and
field medal a bronze in the


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby .given that MARCIA MAY SANDS OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-55770, ,NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 29TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-ANGE MESIDOR OF
RAGGED ISLAND STREET, P.O. BOX CB-1299, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22ND day of SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JASON JOSEPH OF 2ND STREET,
THE GROVE, P.O. BOX N-5589, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
29TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ODONEL VALBRUN OF ANDROS
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


N TONIQUE WILLIAMS-DARLING is to be honoured.


men's triple jump at the 1992
Olympic Games in Barcelona,
Spain. He too should be hon-
oured nationally.
And how about the "Gold-
en Girls Straight?"
With the transformation of
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre, thanks to the $30 mil-
lion "gift" for the national sta-
dium by the Chinese Govern-
ment, there's expected to be
enough roads to get to and
from the venues that each
street could be named in hon-
our of Pauline Davis-Thomp-
son, Chandra Sturrup,


Sevatheda Fynes, Debbie Fer-
guson and Eldece Clarke-
Lewis.

T he five made history
collectively when they
captured the gold medal in the
women's 4 x 100 metre relay
at the 2000 Olympic Games
in Sydney, Australia. To date,
nothing of significance has
been named in their honour.
Gold medals are a rarity,
not just at the Olympics, but at
the World Championships, the
highest level of competition


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RONALD SYLVESTRE OF
BACARDI ROAD, BOX CR-56799, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
22ND day of SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MURGLEN REID STRACHAN,
CROOKED ISLAND ST., C/O BOX 3216, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, PATRICIA JOSEPH of
Golden Isles, intend to change my to PATRICIA DIROSIEL.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.


in the sport. Williams-Darling
has achieved that and she
stands out among the best of
the lot.
But there's some injustice
being done to those
gold medalists who set the
pace.
Even our first world boxing
champion Elisha Obed is still
overlooked. He can't even get
his picture on the Wall of
Fame at Nassau's Interna-
tional Airport with the rest of
our athletes.
Williams-Darling went out
and accomplished her feat in
two consecutive years.
Now she's getting her
reward.
Let's just hope that the
same can be done for our oth-
er stars.


Baptist

Sports

Council

softball

fixtures

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil will continue its 2005 soft-
ball season on Saturday at
the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex with the following
games: 10am Faith United vs
Calvary Bible (M); 11am
Golden Gates vs Faith Unit-
ed (15), Noon Golden Gates
vs Faith United (Co-ed),
1pm Macedonia vs Christ the
King (M), 2pm Calvary
Deliverance vs Jubilee (M),
3pm New Destiny vs New
Bethlehem (M), 4pm Trans-
figuration vs Golden Gates
(M).


-







o a


S __


"Copyrighted Material
Available fromCmn mercialesProviders"
fo -
0 - -
a4 -











a-
S - a~ -





- *
a
-

S- ae
a -
a -



S- d -
"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"



a D
e
ab


* -. . a


- --
- a .
- .- .





9bb





Sb -
-


a


a *


-


- 4


m o


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


S--


O"hio w








TRIBNE PORT THRSDA, SPTEBER 9, 005,PAGRTS


Federer and Hewitt


advance in


a 0--mo
--- .. .4 _11 W




qb O.gm, o

o 41b me Q


mow.--
44. upamodo












qb O db qp. ON
4=-Av n-l
W-M 4900- -ga 40
pmoo~o 4
4 .1wmm w 0 ol

do-

0-0 --0AWO


7.0A aia
"W ~ Pp


-


- ~









* 4

* -



p


Thailand


- .


- a


- p. -
m % 0-
- .- P
0~~ -.
* a
~0 P -
0
p.


:"Copyvrng :ecMater
low .10.



2~o pyrighe Mtr


f.' Syndicated Content


ble fromommercial News


Provid


* age* *
4moab fb-w md a


hbd k
(lab'

.tel


*--*B *






a..- *
p.



S

,.Go mm n




o O
4W D -M O







-a,=m mn ummo
40









o ,- o,4b
40 -o *
-5' wo






-=..am






e rs



omm
-m eo
dam bow


.e tting il ahead o


4 d*m

-swop-b O
p
-m m


- -
e*

oo





- -o
*b o m *
mw-




4- 14
- e-
* eg 0
* *0


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 11B


TRIBUNE SPORTS










THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


ThemTibBmunei


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


road named after her


THE Bahamas Golf Federation held a press conference yesterday to announce the upcom-
ing sixth annual Kerzner International Fred Hlggs Corporate Golf Classic. From left: Tim
Yavello, Neville Adderley, Agetha Delancy.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Golfers teed up for



Fred Higgs Classic


* GOLF
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE countdown is on for
the sixth annual Kerzner
International Fred Higgs Cor-
porate Golf Classic tee-off.
The golf classic will take
place Sunday, November 6th,
at the Ocean Club Golf
Course, with a shotgun start.
Although this is the sixth
tournament being hosted by
Kerzner International, the
event, played in the memory
of the late Fred Higgs, who is
affectionately known as the
'Godfather' of the sport in the
Bahamas, is actually in it's
11th year.
The classic is a major
fundraiser for the' Bahamas
Golf Federation (BGF) junior
development fund, which
assists with the federation's
scholarship fund.
As a result of this, the BGF
is hoping that this year's tour-
nament attracts some of the
top rated junior players, as
they try to target over 100
golfers.
These golfers will be split
into 25 teams, all vying for the


Jay Barry Farrington crystal
trophy.
The top finishers will also
be invited to play in the annu-
al Caribbean Classic, set for
next year in the Dominican
Republic.
Last year's winner, Com-
monwealth Bank, will be seek-
ing to reclaim top honours in
the tournament which will be
played in a netted format.
The Bahamas has captured
the Caribbean Classic tourna-
ment for two consecutive
years.

Sponsors
BGF President Neville
Adderley said: "I would like
to thank Kerzner Internation-
al for being the major spon-
sors for the tournament for
the last several years.
"They have offered us the
golf course, also allowing us
to keep all the proceeds.
"All of the proceeds from
this tournament will go into
the scholarship fund, which
was the dying wish of the tour-
nament's founder, Fred Hig-
gs."


More than 20 scholarships
were awarded from the tour-
nament's inception and,
according to Adderley, this
year's proceeds will allow the
federation to further assist
golfers.
The scholarship is designed
to assist young golfers attend-
ing colleges in the United
States and at home.
It also assists with the fund-
ing of golfers who are inter-
ested in playing in interna-
tional competitions.
"Since the tournament start-
ed we have given out at least
20 scholarships, or assisted
young golfers in attending
international golf tourna-
ments," said Adderley.
"This allowed the fund to
be at the point it is today, and
we are hopeful with addition-
al emphasis, we will be able
to take the funds to higher
heights."
The golf course is said to be
a challenging one, and is in
excellent condition.
The golfers will play an
18-hole game, with the prizes
on every par three for the
golfer who is nearest to the
hole.


INITIATE LAUNCH
Sit here and the count down begins, check the chrome ringed barrel like performance gauges, adjust the flush mounted
audio and climate controls to your desired settings, and make sure you establish the proper mood with the industry
first driver confifurable MyColour instrument panel lighting that allow you to select your own colour dash lighting.
Thoroughly modem and unmistakably MUSTANG, its always all systems go in here.
2005 Ford Mustang, standard shift / leather, loaded
Special Cash Price $33,384.00

2005 Ford Mustang, automatic / leather and loaded
Special Cash Price $35,400.00
Lic & inspection to birthday, floor mats, full tank of gas, 3 year roadside assistance first 5 services to 12000 miles free.
3 year or 36000 mile warranty
see the full line of all your favourate FORDS at

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD.
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-8094
I I I I I I lii lllil^lli l I ^liII i I I Ijj m


)~ ~I _ _









THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005



SECTION


SThe Tribune


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


'Operation Community Touch'





puts hands on Mason's Addition


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
The Mason's Addi-
tion park will be
the focus of
Christian evange-
lism on Saturday,
October 1, as leaders from var-
ious local churches meet com-


munity members in an initia-
tive dubbed "Operation Com-
munity Touch".
Outreach
The outreach programme,
which is the brainchild of
Bahamas Faith Ministries
International (BFMI), became


a reality after the church invit-
ed other ministries to partner
with them. Golden Gates
Assembly World Outreach;
The Church of God, East
Street and Lilly of the Valley
Corner; Remnant Tabernacle
of Praise; Christian Disciple-
ship Ministries; Fellowship
Church of God; Mission Bap-
tist Church; Christ Community
Church; Cathedral of Praise;
Evangelistic Temple; Family of
Faith; Judea Worship Centre;
and East Street Gospel Chapel,
have joined forces in an effort
to bring encouragement
through preaching, sharing tes-
timonies, prayers, and music
by local choirs, the Farm Road
Marching Band, and the Sax-
ons, Music Makers and One
Family Junkanoo groups.
The evangelism rally begins
at 4pm and ends at 9pm.
In a press conference held at
BFMI yesterday to announce
the programme, Dr Richard
Pinder, fellowship pastor at the
church said thaf the pro-
gramme was conceived out of
the need for the church to
come against the anti-social
behaviour, crime, disregard for
authority, and the breakdown
of the family structure that is
broadcast in the media daily.
"In a society, it takes all of
the stakeholders to assist in
alleviating these symptoms,"
said Dr Pinder.
At a time when the church
seems to be "out of touch" with
society, and remains within its
four walls, the Operation Com-
munity Touch hopes to, in
some way, bridge the gap
through hands-on ministry.
Mason's Addition is not the
only community that the Oper-
ation has touched, though. In
June, members visited the East


* PICTURED at the press conference (1-r) are Pastor Bradley King, of East Street Gospel
Chapel, Dr Richard Pinder, fellowship pastor at Bahamas Faith Ministries International, Pastor
Dave Burrows, of BFMI, and J Alfred Farrington, head of evangelism at The Remnant Tabernacle
of Praise.
(Photo: Petura Burrows)


Street area and conducted a
door-to-door walkabout, as
they ministered the word of
God and gave out food youch-
ers. The"following week,'they
met in a rally.,imilar to the one
that will be held on Mason's
Addition Park this Saturday.
Programme
This programme reaches out
to the "unchurched", said
Evangelist J Alfred Farrington
of The Remnant Tabernacle of
Praise, Carmichael and Golden
Isles Road, who grew up in the
Windsor Park neighbourhood.
Though the church does face


numerous challenges trying to
reach out to the community,
he believes that much more
can,,and should be done.
"We have-6iir sisters'iahd
brothers, our aunts and our
uncles, our grandparents in
those various communities who
are less fortunate. And some
of us came from those same
communities, so we believe
that by taking God's kingdom
beyond the four walls and
speaking with people one-on-
one...we can help each other,"
he adds.
But any. outreach that will
make a difference, says the
evangelist, must learn from


Jesus' example, as he "served
the whole man".
Vouchers
The programme has given
out food vouchers of different
amounts at the Windsor rally,
and plans to do the same thing
in Mason's Addition.
Hundreds turned up to the
Windsor rally, and organisers
expect even more this time
around. Last Saturday, minis-
ters held a house-to-house
walkabout, when they invited

See TOUCH, 2C


'God loves eve


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
I REMEMBER growing up and hearing
'about the love of God. Two of my
favourite hymns were, "Jesus Loves Even
Me" and "My God Loves Me".
The first one says:
"I am so glad that my Father in heaven
tells of his love. In the book he has given
wonderful things in the bible I see, then I
remember that Jesus loves me.
"I am so glad that Jesus loves me, Jesus
loves even me."
And the other says:
"My God loves me, his love will never
end, He brings life that will reach past the
end of time."
Today, fundamentalist theology has
some how shifted from that concept. There
only seems to be a God of judgment wait-
ing to pour down condemnation on nations
and individuals who stray from his teach-
ings.
This was brought home to me over the
past weekend. While driving in my vehicle
on Sunday, listening to 94.9fm, around
1pm, a Pastor Russell was on the radio
claiming that Katrina had devastated the


Gulf Coast of America because of the sins
of its people. He talked about the various
sins that were committed by them, and
said the destruction was God's way of say-
ing he was not pleased with them, espe-
cially New Orleans.
I was further baffled when Pastor Russell
recalled the destruction of last year's
Tsunami, which he said was the result of
the sins of people of that region.
Frightening
The concept preached about whom and
what God is over the airwaves, by some
preachers is frightening. Once again I was
reminded of the words of the late Mahat-
ma Gandhi: "I love Christ, but I dislike
Christians because they are so unlike
Christ."
This comment was made by him when
he experienced the horrible treatment of
black South Africans by the whites in that
country years ago.
Today, many are concerned when state-
ments are made about why a natural dis-
aster hits a country.
I was in Eleuthera when Hurricane


Andrew hit that island on August 23, 1992,
around 3pm. Lives were changed, homes
and property destroyed, and some people
are today still recovering psychologically
and financially from the storm.
The question one can ask is: Were the
residents of North Eleuthera, Spanish
Wells and Harbour Island any more sinful
the those south of the Governor's Har-
bour airport?
I do not think so.
Take it a little further: Were the peo-
ple on Eleuthera anymore sinful than those
in New Providence or elsewhere in the
Bahamas that was not damaged by
Andrew.
I don't think so.
The people who were affected by the
hurricane are now stronger, and for some
of them, their faith in God and man was
renewed.
The assistance that came from around
the world was overwhelming. A British
Navy ship was on the island within days,
the Americans came, but what was most

SEE page 2C


'Guardian



angels'


* FATHER James Moultrie Rector of St Matthew's
guarded by two angels as the church celebrated its Feast
of Title on Sunday. The church demonstrated its Christian
Witness through the streets of the Parish in a procession
around East Bay and Shirley Street.


See more pictures on Page 8C





"









PAGE 0, TURSDA, SETEMBE 29,2005EHEITIBUN


EVERCHANGING
LIVES MINISTRY
THE church in the Robinson
Road Plaza, where Prophet
Niemoller is pastor, is sched-
uled to hold the following
weekly services:
Sunday, 9:30 am Sunday
School, 11 am Divine Wor-
ship, 7:30 pm Evangelistic Ser-
vice
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Tuesday, Mid-day Service, 8
pm Choir Practice
First Wednesday of each
month, 7:30 pm Women's Fel-
lowship Ministry
Thursday, 7:30 pm Break-
through Miracle Healing Ser-
vice

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com


EAST ST
GOSPEL
CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
. Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting


ZION
METHODIST
MINISTRIES

THE church in the South
Beach Shopping Centre, East
Street south, is scheduled to
hold the following worship ser-
vices:
October 2, 10:15 am Sun-
day School, 11 am Divine
Worship Service
Third Monday, 7:30 pm -
Ladies Ministry
Wednesday, 7:30 pm -
Prayer and Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Music
Ministry
Saturday, 3 pm Dance Min-
istry, 4 pm Children's Choir
Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled'
to hold the following services:
October 2, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung


Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-,
tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions


FIRST HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays,.7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
Ist Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service


Church Notes


TOUCH, from Page 1C


the community out to this
weekend's rally on the park.
For Bradley King, pastor
with the responsibility of evan-
gelism at the East Street
Gospel Chapel, Operation
Community Touch is the ful-
fillment of Phillipians 1:27,
"strive together for the faith of
the gospel".
Pastor King says that regard-
less of denomination, all
churches preach the gospel,
which is the benchmark of this
Operation. "It is a creative way
to reach out to the youth of the
community and we feel that it
is something that can be effec-
tive so we partnered with," says
the minister who grew up in
the Grants Town area and
knows the struggles in the
"inner city".

Currently

There are currently 13
churches of various denomina-
tions on board, but Evangelist
Farrington believes that more
churches can be involved in this
work. Only when the body of
Christ can "get rid" of denom-
inational barriers, can it be on
its way to being a united people
and make some impact in
bringing God's kingdom down
to earth.
"Take Carmichael Road just
for argument's sake, there are
over 50 churches on
Carmichael Road alone. So
even if we can pick up just half
of those churches to come in
with us along with the others
that are already there, then
we'll be saying something,"
said the minister.


After Saturday, the next stop
for Operation Community
Touch is still unclear, but it
may be the Fox Hill area.
Arawak Cay on a Sunday
.evening, which is the most pop-
ular night, will also be a target
for outreach'later on down the
road.
"We are going beyond the


four walls to the unchurched...I
am glad that I am now at this
time and place in my life that I
am able to go back there and
tell them about the goodness
of the Lord. To say listen, I use
to live next door, I use to go
to the same pump for water,
so even that is an encourage-
ment for them."


FROM page 1C

impressive was the number of
men that showed up from the
Jamaican Defence Force. They
came armed with electricians,
plumbers, carpenters, doctors
and other necessary workers.
This was evidence of a God
at work for those who lived
through Andrew. We did not
see ourselves as victims of a
vicious God who was angry
with us because of our sins.
I am no theologian, but I
recall the words of the late
John Paul 2, who said: "We
must look at the signs of the
times and interpret them in
light of the gospel."
In the gospel we see a God,


through his Son Jesus Christ as
one who cared for the injured,
the lost, the hungry and the dis-
enfranchised.

Together
Today we see the world com-
ing together to help people in
need. Russia, France, and even
Cuba offering help to America,
what a miracle, acts of love,
when you see the response
from people all over the world,
offering help to those in need.
It is there I believe we see the
hand of God.
I lived in New Orleans for a
few months while attending


graduate school.
The history, culture, but
most especially the faith of
most of its people is what I
remember, not those who com-
mitted sins like people all over
the world, including the
Bahamas.
It's in times like these that
people need encouragement,
not condemnation because
they live in an area where a
natural disaster landed.
My prayer is that we as a
people will continue to come
to the aid of those in need.
Let's show those in need the
face of God through our
actions of love.


Help us help!



Sring September, for every hamburger you


purchase, McDonald's will donate 50 cents

to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.



iWmOVflyrt,.


ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of October 2-8:
Sunday (Feast: Pentecost
20), 9 am Family Eucharist
(Theme: "The Love Commu-
nity") Preacher: Rev Fr S
Sebastian Campbell)
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess;
Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pmin ,-
Home Visitation
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale;
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice at All Saints, 7:30 pm
- Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 6:30 pm to 8:30
pm Dance Camp at the Com-
munity Centre
Saturday, 6 am Prayer Ses-
sion, 2 pm Acolyte Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian.
Campbell)


* Dr Richard Pinder, fellowship pastor at
Bahamas Faith Ministries International


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


"a







THE TRIBUNE


I I RIUI I.


Choosing and




Being chosen


Prayer breakfast
b kI:I


ON Saturdy, September 24 the Cursillo
Community a the Parish of St George's held a
prayer and felowship breakfast. Elaine Deveaux
conducted th event with quite reflections, songs
and prayer. htercession was made for Cursillos
in the dicocan community and the world wide
communityfor the clergy in the Anglican Dio-


cese, the upcoming session of the Diocesan Syn-
od and for the Archbishop's charge during
Diocesan Synod.
Pictured are members of the Cursillo Com-
munity at St George's Anglican Church with
Rector, Father Kingsley Knowles.
(Photo: St George's Communication Ministry)


*sreeI0m


ByFR HENRY CHARLES
^/ BJ now most a alysts,
^nde/ d most people, realise
{that the war in Iraq9has been
kithhohgh several modes of justi-
Q fic ion.
.Ihitially, it was/a matter of
,ridding the work' of weapons
,of minass destriution. When
these proved dificult to find, it
,became getting rid of a mad-
'min who, lef undisturbed,
,,would have pirsued a policy
of getting WNDs.
Then it become care for the
people who ad suffered much
under the iadman, whatever
about WIiDs. Thence it
became th yearning for free-
dom in *gh people, wh Oi
madmeni frutall,.:,v I.;i t.isow
freedom Ielf, the birthright of
all people and. God's gift to
human~ d, irrespective of
madme
The lst stage, the cause of
freedom itself, has placed
oppon its of the war in an
awkw i position. Few people
may vnt to see "American
imperism" succeed. At the
same Fne, how can anyone be
againt helping others to
become free? The war may be
an awil hellhole, but can west-
ern dmocracies afford to let
it fail What would that say of
their ommitment to freedom?
Sole of the big democracies,
however, Canada, France, Ger-
man, Great Britain, find ways
to e)lain their limited involve-
mer. They can't impose their
owipolitical preferences on
anyne, or the issue is seen less
in ;rms of freedom than in
tens of staving off disaster.
Canadians hold their values
der," as a recent foreign-poli-
cyeview put it, "but they are
nc keen to see them imposed
brothers. This is not the Cana-
din way." For Chancellor Ger-
hrd Schroder, Germans are
tb same. Democracy cannot
b "forced upon (other) soci-
ees from the outside."
France, which once through
te Marquis de la Fayette,
jined America's fight for free-
om, seems today to prefer
sanding by and watching Iraqi
emocrats struggle to keep
narchy at bay. Even Ameri-
a's staunchest ally, Tony Blair,
'iews the situation more in
erms of managing chaos than
n promoting democracy.
America alone burns with
zeal to export freedom and
democracy. Itwasn't always so.
During the Cold War, stability
mattered mire than freedom,
and democracy less than the
containment of Soviet power.
Eisenhover let the Soviets
walk intorlungary because he
thought hat war was simply
out of tir question; it was too
horrible prospect to contem-
plate. ticcessive presidents
proppel up repressive leaders
and regimes everywhere:
Pinoclet, Somoza, the Shah,
King Jaisal, Mobutu.
A jet-hopping Henry
Kissiger popularised realpoli-
tik. fis guiding star was not
Thoias Jefferson but Otto von
Bisnark. In Kissinger's view,
thos who wanted freedom and
denocracy in Eastern Europe
wer out of touch sentimental-


FR H CHARLES

-, s.S They-;_ ead, We
' global pi.ctfueia AdL6&i to
terms with the eternal presence
of Soviet power.
Now, fast forward to March
of this year, and this is George
W Bush in a speech framed by
the new agenda: decades of
American presidents' "excus-
ing and accommodating tyran-
ny, in the pursuit of stability" in
the Middle East, said the Pres-
ident, inflamed the hatred of
the fanatics who piloted the
planes into the twin towers on


9/11.
Well, there, by the way, you
have a reason for 9/11 deeper
and more sophisticated than
"they don't like our values."
But more importantly, the
turnaround means that for
Bush, America's vital interests
and the American experiment
in democracy itself now dictate
that the spread of freedom be a
matter of national priority. This
was already a key idea of
Bush's second Inaugural:
"America's vital interests and


our deepest beliefs are now
one."
The American experiment,
however, for all its universal
aspiration, has always been
exceptional, because of its con-
nections with slavery. Think,
for example, of the abysses
between Jefferson the "incom-
parable genius and apostle of
liberty," on the one hand ("All
men are created equal"), and
Jefferson, the slave-owner, on
the other, cohabiting with his
slaves, without ever seeing
them for an instant as anything
close to fellow citizens. Note
further that, from the Emanci-
pation Proclamation of 1863 to
the Civil Rights Act of 1964, it
took an entire century for the
promise of freedom to even
begin to be kept.
This may still not be what
gives the Europeans pause. It
may be rather that Europe sees
the new American under-
standing against the back-
ground of its own failed impe-
rial projects. Britain, after all-
to take the most obvious claims
of a union between national
and universal significance-was
once thought to have a special
commission to spread the rule
of law to "lesser breeds." But
where now is that Land of
Hope and Glory, Mother of the
Free?
Thus, what may strike Bush
as the clearest interpretation
of "manifest destiny" may only
appear to others as the last
delusional example of imperial
hubris.
Besides, there are other
problems these days with
American democracy. Canada,
for instance, wonders why
health care remains an option
of privilege and not a right for
all citizens; or why, notwith-
standing anyone's love for
hunting and shooting, there
should be a constitutional right
to bear arms. Europe and
Canada have also moved left
on issues like capital punish-
ment and full marital rights for
same sex couples. America is
moving in the opposite direc-
tion.
If you consider further the
radical religious turn in Amer-
ican conservatism, which
Europe finds incomprehensi-
ble, you have a growing sense
that what different societies
mean by democracy today dif-
fers more and more from the
usual meanings. In this (other)
"New "World Order," Ameri-
ca doesn't seem to be the nat-
ural leader it once was.
All these theoretical issues
may factor into the equation
of giving or withholding sup-
port for Iraqi freedom. But per-
haps the most pressing issue is
how much cost in terms of sol-
diers' lives and blood will the
American public accept as a
fair price for American involve-
ment. The jury is still out on
the matter, but the prosecutors
of the war appear less and less
convincing to the public,
indeed, even to themselves.
If the situation deteriorates
further, what Europe or any-
body else thinks won't matter a
hoot. This experiment in
exporting freedom will quickly
come to an end.


* By REV ANGELA
BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS

You did not choose me, but
I chose you and appointed
you to go and bear fruit -fruit
that will last.
(John 15:16)
HOW do you know what
God wants for your life? You
test the calls. What if you
think you know for sure?
You follow that dream. I had
my life all planned out: Bach-
elor of Arts degree and Post-
graduate Teacher Training
Certificate from England;
Master of Arts degree from
Canada, then home to teach.
I had always wanted to be a
primary teacher from as far
back as I could remember.
My mother was the principal
of one of our Anglican pri-
mary schools and it seemed
to be what I was born to be as
well. In the September of
1978, I began my career as a
teacher.
I knew that something was
wrong that first semester of
teaching. I was not enjoying it
as I thought I would it was
not "me". I could do well
with structured organisation
and intense personal disci-
pline, but teaching was not
energising. Somewhere I had
read that to operate in one's
area of giftedness meant that
there was a steady supply of
energy from within. On the
contrary, I was spiritually
exhausted by all the demands
of 24 highly energetic and
challenging fourth graders.
Eventually, it became quite
clear what I was meant to be
doing for the Lord.,
What has your journey
been like over the past few
years? How have you been
tested by God? Has your
journey been one mainly of


MEDITATION


REV PALACIOUS


"Are you

happy
with your

present
career? Are
you feeling
energised
most of
the time?
Could God
be calling
you to leave
the familiar
and venture
into the
great
unknown?"

Rev A Palacious


discernment or disappoint-
ment?
As you reflect on your sto-
ry, think of a time when you
were brought into God's will
by a method or process of
elimination. Perhaps you
were selecting a life partner,
and as you learned more
about God's priorities, you
found your preferences shift-
ing until you ended up in a
relationship that was founded
on very different criteria than
before.
Are you happy with your
present career? Are you feel-
ing energised most of the
time? Could God be calling
you to leave the familiar and
venture into the great
unknown? Is there a sense in
your life that God has cho-
sen for you to bear the fruit
that you are producing or is it
more a matter of your
imposed will? Do you want
to be called by God?
For some of us, there is the
desire to be obedient but we
do not know how to sense
God's call. It is really a kind
of spiritual guessing game
where we look under the cups
to find the hidden object only
to discover that it seems not
to be under any of them.
Reading Scripture or devo-
tional material often raises a
little flag at just the right
moment and we begin to feel
a tug. A thought may inter-
rupt our inner dialogue, or a
call may come at a critical
moment and the offer of
prayer is like a small light in a
very dark room. A song on a
gospel station or on a
favourite CD may set in
motion echoes of reassurance.
Be still before the Lord and
pray: "Lord speak to me and
help me to hear your will for
me. Let me patiently trust
you and obediently follow
your call."





THEIR


PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


PYour Bahni Supermarkets N I


SUPER
VALUE
2U I NOW ACCVMTIN4G
SUNCARD
QUALiYR M PRCES RESERVED


HELLMANNS
REGULAR


$ 59
32 OZ


LIBBY'S
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
OR SLICED
BEETS
8914.75 OzJ


SEILGOD
SEP. 9T MA 5HATMA0


MAHATMA
LONG GRAIN/PARBOILED

RICE
i, -LB
20 LBS $7.99
-1s 11 m Ir& :


AL :rA W I LIMME


CAMPBELLS
SUPERIORE
SPAGHETTI
& MEATBALLS
1 5-OZ
FRANCO AMERICAN SPAGHETTI
& MEATBALLS 7 OZ .890


HUNTS -
SJUICY

$ s4 79


SHIPS


I


OIL


m 7 9

KEEBLER
CLUB
REGULAR/REDUCE FAT
CRACKERS
$ 99 '* *
.... 16- OZ


BEECHNJT
BABY FOOD
&U
JUICES


i;


RUFFLES
KITCHEN

BAGS


:11 IoI l :


ARM & HAMMIER
POWDER FRESH
DETERGET.I
, 469
4 37 LDS


' NIAGARA
SPRAY.
STARCH
$ 99L
22 OZ


S FESTIVAL

h CLEANER
33 -8O


E MONTH
U--J _^^^^
_ i^ *< "'K


M


0


I1


OZJ


1 IB


IB


POST


I


k 11%


HUNTS

,ETCHUP I


.-oo,


f A-


$199
| 36-






THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 5C


P&G
END Of MONTH
SUPER SAVINGS
AT SUPER VALUE SjOP SHOP AND SAVE TODAY!


-I-


HOTJ

OFF

THE

GRILL.

I


ro


GALAXY SLICE ISLAND QUEEN 4 LB BAG


SANDWHICH
CHEESE
DKOTA ASST'D
BAGLES


10 OZ
$1.39
16 OZ
$1.79


SUPER VALUE GAL
ASSTD
FRUIT DRINKS $1.99


0os
C
S
,q


FRENCH FRIES


FROSTY ACRE 8 EARS
CORN ON COB $2.69


PEPPERIDGE
LAYER
CAKES


FARM ASST'D
19 -OZ
$3.59


;CAR MAYER OSCAR MAYE
BEEF/JUMBO
'OTTO CE BUNE'TF
ALAMI FRANK
112 OZ L, 1-99


WHOLE ROTISSERIE
CHICKENS $7 H I
mJ 161111


$3.79


:R
&
1
S
LB


k I L


1


"BUNE


l4k


i

















,,"e re Mua M


our rei ion



is Islam' >


* By MADIHAH HEPBURN
We are the
silent but
gro wing
minority.
We are the
signs of change among an over-
whelmingly Christian majority.
We are in your schools; we
work in both the public and pri-
vate sector. Perhaps you have
seen us, riding the jitneys, walk-
ing in the mall on a Saturday,
stood behind us in line at the
grocery store. Perhaps you have
wondered who we are, what we
believe in, why we dress this
way, or are we even from this
country. So who are we? We
are the Muslims and our reli-
gion is Islam.
Islam established itself in the
Bh1i1amas in the 1970s with the
founding of the first community,
known as Jamaat-ul-Islaam, by
a group of intrepid, young
Bahamians. Since then the com-
munity has grown, with mem-
bership mushrooming from
about 20 individuals to over 200.
What is the allure of this reli-
gion, which attracts people from
all walks of life, the majority of
them converts who were raised
within the Christian faith? To
answer that one must first
answer the basic question:
"What is Islam?"
Principle

Islam is one of the major
monotheistic religions in the
world. It is based on the princi-
ple of the oneness of God, the
Creator (known to Muslims by
the Arabic name 'Allah'). In
fact the first words one utters
when becoming Muslim is the
phrase 'There. is no God but
Allah...'. Therefore the empha-


sis here is in the belief of the
oneness of God. As such the
most striking feature of Islam
is that it calls for the absolute
submission to the will of God.
In this way every act of our dai-
ly lives becomes an act of wor-
ship in its own way.
Muslims pray a minimum of
five times per day. Prayer in
Islam is radically different from
other faiths. It is an exercise of
both the mind and the body in
the pursuit of salvation of soul.
Prayer, especially group prayer,
provides the practitioner with
a sense of belonging and pur-
pose, as everyone performs
identical movements in unison,
all in pursuit of submission to
God.
Islam provides us with the
rules, a template with which to
live our lives. Everything from
our diet to how we dress, to
how we interact with others, has
been laid out for us within our
holy book, the Qur'an. The
Qur'an is the last book of reve-
lation sent to mankind to guide
them along the straight path. It
was revealed to the last mes-
senger of God, the Prophet
Muhammad. Therefore by fol-
lowing these guidelines we have
an opportunity to worship God.'
Muslims avoid pork and alco-
hol; eat meat that has been
sla'ightered in a specific man-
ner (halal). In addition both
men and women follow a dress
code that evokes modesty and
humility. As Muslims our out-
ward appearance andLbehaviour
should reflect our innrechar-
acter, one that is entrentked
with the ideals of modesty,.
humility and god-fearingness.
The Muslim woman in par-
ticular seems to garner the most
attention here in the Bahamas.
We are the most visible ambas-


sadors of out faith. Our dress
(hijaab) conceals the majority
of our bodies, excluding the
hands and the face, and some
women also choose to cover
these aspects as well. This fea-
ture makes our faith writ large
for all to see. The hijaab of a
Muslim woman is uniquely lib-
erating, in that it removes our
sexuality from the public view
and saves us from objectifica-
tion. Hijaab is more than simply
cloth; it is a demand for respect,
a demand to be judged on our
true worth and not as a sexual-
ized object.

Oppression

In today's society hijaab has
been linked to oppression, and
been labeled as the attempts of
a patriarchal religion to control
the movement and expression
of its women. However to
accept this stereotype as truth, is
to deny us Muslim women,
agency. We have made a choice
to cover our bodies, to devote
our lives to Islam, because to
us it is the right choice.
Every day we struggle against
the stereotypes of Islam that
exist within the media and the
society at large. These stereo-
types often confuse cultural
practices with true Islamic prin-
ciples. Even more damaging are
the careless articles which con-
tain misinterpreted information
or even worse, not enough
information. Ignorance breeds
fear, fear breeds prejudice. Edu-
cation is the light, the light that
can dispel ignorance, negate
fear and banish bigotry.

b For more information about
Islam in the Bahamas, call 341-
6612 or e-mail nayyabnaza-
kat@hotmail.com


Book Title: "Faye" BOOK REVIEW.
Author: Valleria Strachan B __ RI____.
P ,i17 i p U., AUUt11M1n' U -'4*1 1 *U:e:.L1.L",


.Pubished by Authoriouse,
Bloomington, Indiana

* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

FOR those who experience
faith through the testimonies of
others, here is an opportunity
to be encouraged by the story of
a little girl named Faye who
died in April 2000 after a seven-
month health battle. The story
is told by her mother, Valleria
Strachan.
"Faye" is written in a con-
versational tone, which makes it
very easy to identify with the
author's fluctuating emotions
of joy, then sadness, and ulti-
mately abandon to the plan of
God.


Though some can only imag-
ine the emotions of one who
has lost a child, this book actu-
ally allows the reader into that
world.
In "Faye" we see a woman
of faith (Valleria) facing the all
to common challenge of find-
ing some common ground
between her will and desires for
her daughter's healing, and
what God wants. As the story
unfolds, the reader is also left
with uplifting scripture that
helped the author face her
ordeal and eventually accept
God's plan.
It is a detailed chronicle of
Faye's birth, hospitilisation,
being discharged from the hos-
pital, re-admittance and finally


her death. Arguably the most
thought-provoking chapter in
this book is "Life After Death",
which speaks of the mother's
emotions after the funeral, cop-
ing with hurt, praising God in
the midst of it all, and subse-
quent attacks on her marriage
and finances.
You must hand it to this
author because she bravely
shares even the most embar-
rassing, and seemingly "unbe-
coming" details of a Christian's
actions taken in her struggle. It
is a true to life account that is
not sugar-coated.
"Faye" leaves its readers feel-
ing as if they knew this little
girl. It leaves them, somehow,
with an attitude of faith, that if
Valleria Strachan could face all
that she did and still trust in
God, then they can too.


St. Cecilia9s Parish Mission
October 18th October 21st 7:30 nightly
Theme: "Jesus... the bread from heaven" (John 6:33)

St. Cecilia's Catholic Church will hold its annual mission October 18th October 21st,
N205 at the parish on 3rd and 4th Streets and Coconut Grove Avenue, The Grove, Nassau.
Our Guest speaker Father Urban Hudlin, OP from Trinidad and Tobago will preach for
four nights beginning at 7:30 pm nightly.

As the liturgical "Year of the Eucharist" comes to a close, the St. Cecilia's Parish Family
unites with the Universal Church in celebrating JESUS. This year's theme is "Jesus...
the bread from heaven," John 6:33. .

We invite all to come arid be blessed by the presence of the Lord and receive a Word
for our time. We are anticipating a great move of God during our time at mission. Come
expecting to receive what you need from God at this time, it may be healing, deliverance,
peace or renewal. Our special gue;st;peaker is an awesome man of God who is filled
with the Holy Spirit and has a burning.desire to share the love of Jesus throughout the
world.

bout our Guest Speaker

Father Urban Hudlin OP is a dynamic man'of God
who has studied extensively to prepare hiriself to
preach the word of God in power of the Holl Spirit.
Since -995,. Fr. Hudlin has preached in the USA,
England, Ireland, Canada and The Caribbean and The
Bahamas.

Fr. Hudlin was ordained a priest on June 21st, 1992.
He has studied in Ireland, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and
Tobago and the United States. Fr. Hudlin obtained a
Diploma in Fundamental Theology from the
Dominican House of Studies, Ireland in 1984. In 1987,
he obtained a Diploma of Philosophy from the Institute
of Philosophy and Theology in Dublin, Ireland. Father
Hudlin went on to study at Aquinas Institute of
Theology and Pastoral Ministry at St. Louis University,
Missouri, where he obtained a Diploma in the
Homiletics.

In 1987 Fr. Hudlin received a Bachelors Degree in Philosophy from the University de
Benjamon, Puerto Rico.Fr. Hudlin we it onto study at the University of the West Indies
in Trinidad and Tobago where he received a Bachelors Degree in Theology in 1992. In
2001, Fr. Hudlin received a Masters Degree in Pastoral Theology from Boston College,
USA.

Pastoral assignments and Ministries

Fr. Hudlin has been a presenter of Bible Reflection on the National Television Network
in Trinidad & Tobago (T&T) from 1991 to 2004. He has served as Assistant Parish
Pastor and Pastor at several parishes in T&T since his ordination in 1992.

Our guest speaker also served as Vicariate Cotncil of the Dominican Order, T&T from
1992 to 2004. He was the Moderator of Catholic Charismatic Renewal of T&T from
1995 through 2004. He is the Spiritual Director of Grace Ministries since 2001 and the
Episcopal Vicar of Evangelization, of the Archdiocese of T&T since 2003. In addition
to these many duties, Fr. Hudlin serves as a Lecturer at the Regional Seminary of
U5ga~danrMaityrs, Mout St. ~ at the Pastoral Institute, Caroni
Centre, T&T.


i


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








F. r > 4t



MINISTRIES 1275 Breadfiit ..reet R ewood
7Manie Fir famrurtna


raised Jesus Christ'from the dead, and l '
my heart that Jesus Christ is alive and
n my life. I thank you Lord that I am saved.


.Opportu nity to worship


p


iool 9:30am ,
Norship 11::00am
ervice 7:OOpm
Apons of Mass Deliverance
ht/ Bible Study
"otth Meeting


dey @ yahoo. com


* *

* * --* *~j^
-isU t*Jo-*10.9
' Sfrom 11:45affio.
MI 2::BiMnon eBvery
A,-hursday^^bf the


- ICr~l~


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE


mPI


m ,














St Matthew's Anglican


celebrates


Feast of Title


M MEMBERS of Saint Matthew's Anglican Church along with fellow members of the Anglican
Carch processed around The Pond area of New Providence on Sunday as the church celebrat-
ed its Feast of Title. Bishop Gilbert Thompson joined in the celebrations and Archdeacon I Ran-
fdiy Brown delivered the sermon.
(Photo: St Matthew's Communications)


0 THE newly formed Sunrise Choir of St Matthew's Church pictured with Fathers James Moul-
trie, rector (far back left) and Father Don Haynes, assistant priest (far right). The choir celebrated
the morning mass on the feast of title of St Matthew on Sunday. The historic parish celebrations
began earlier in the week with three night of missions services conducted by Father Sebastian
Campbell; and concluded on Sunday evening in a mass evening song, sermon by Archdeacon I Ran-
fudry Brown and benediction. The Sunrise Choir is conducted by Bill Malone (seated centre).


(Photo: St Matthew's Communications Ministry)


The Authoritative Word of God
Scripture Text: The First Three Books of Genesis
Walter Savage Landor had this, to say about "The Bible a Book of Genius,"
I am heartily glad to witness your veneration for a book which, to say
nothing of its holiness or authority, contains more specimens of genius
and taste than any other volume in existence.
Mankind: In the beginning God created an atmosphere [place] for man:
God created mankind, both male and female together at the same time
[Spiritual beings], but He formed the man in the physical atmosphere first:
God made woman from Adam's rib, and brought her to the man thereby
establishing the principle of marriage: The man and woman produced
offspring and began to multiply and be fruitful, subduing the earth as God
intended.


Program Organizer Proverbs chapter 18 provides us a profound statement, "Whosoever
SThe Prophetic Voice finds a wife finds a good thing, and obtains Favour of the Lord." We must
understand the necessity of the woman in the 'Creation Process'; they
P. 0. Box N-9518 were created together, and God brought the woman to man. When a man
Nassau, Bahamas finds a wife, God is extremely pleased with that man and extends Favour
to.him. Why? Because A relationship whose foundation is poured with a
lifelong foundation ensures the production and upbringing of children to
replenish mankind in the earth. When a man is operating within God's established order: The Law of
Marriage releases the benefits associated with the Authoritative Word of God; and invokes the enabling
power for man to become fruitful and to multiply in all aspects of life and godliness.
Genesis 3:16: Established man as head of the home. God said, "Your desire shall be to your husband,
and he shall rule over you." What does it mean? The woman's failure to obey God's command resulted
in the serpent deceiving her, causing her disobedience to the "Authoritative Word of God." Since she
did not fully grasp the fatal penalty associated to the Law. She was relegated to a lesser position in
handling the Authoritative Word of God.
As the established head a man acts as the conduit [pipeline], the source, for the Authoritative Word
of God supplying all his household might need from God. The Father in a household can appropriate
everything for his family through the Authoritative Word of God: whether he speaks them into their
gifting, profession, a business, home, and money. The man rules his household in the Authoritative
Word of God, God's concern is to reveal the Power of His Word as the Ultimate Authority in the
presence of principalities and powers in the heavenlies.
Men if you understand nothing else, do all you can to understand this one point. In Ephesians 4:12-
13: Paul addressed the abilities God placed in men to benefit the society: "He gave gifts unto men
for their perfection:" "Till all come to the knowledge of the Son of God, a perfect man." This ability is
necessary to appropriating the blessings through your application of the Authoritative Word of God.
The Authoritative Word of God visited Joseph in two dreams, and showed him future events concerning
his life. He believed God had visited him and held fast to his dreams even after his jealous brothers
deposited him in a pit, and sold him into slavery. Joseph ran from the amorous arms of Potiphar's
wife, a picture of pulchritude, and served time in prison for a crime he did not commit. He continued
to believe the Authoritative Word of God who visited him in his dreams as a youth; and determined
to hold fast and stand strong for righteousness sake, when stronger men would have thrown in the
towel, in the face of so many disappointments. Eventually, he became Prime Minister of Egypt and
saved the known world from starvation.
Daniel was a young Hebrew captive taken into Babylon by King Nebuchadnezzar and placed among
a horde of jealous princes, presidents and other administrators. He believed the Authoritative Word
of God was with him in Babylon, and operated with the spirit of excellence in all his tasks. When placed
in a hopeless situation having to choose whether'to serve God or man, his choice of God took him
into a den of hungry lions, he emerged the next morning, without a scratch on his body.
Jesus the express image of the Invisible God who Himself was The Authoritative Word of God brought
salvation to the whole world through his suffering on the cross. The Church as guardians of the
Authoritative Word of God has suffered persecution throughout the ages and survived. The gates of
hell have not prevailed against her, because of the Authoritative Word of God.
Shis suggests that men who align themselves with the Authoritative Word of God will withstand every
opposing force sent from hell against them.


* NEWLY formed Saint Matthew's Youth Choir displayed their talents in song for the first
time at the feast of title evening service at St Matthew's Anglican Church on Sunday
evening. The Choir is accompanied by Miss Francyss Pratt.


* LAY readers and the Usher Board of Saint Matthew's Anglican Parish on a procession of Chris-
tian Witness through the streets of Nassau on Sunday as the Parish celebrated its Feast of Title.


SPastor Ben Bailey


~


i-. -E 8C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


0 NVOMEN ol'St Matthew's
Parish processed around The
Pond as theN celebrated the
Feast ofTifle'mi Sunday. Father
I Ranfurly Brom.-ii delivered the
sernion.,
(Photo: Sl Matthew's
Communications)




THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2005, PAGE t


THE TRIBUNE


Cordially Invites You To Participate
In The National Telethon


Friday,


September 30t, 2005


8:00p.m.


-12:00 Midnight


The Independence Ballroom
SRadisson Cable Beach Resort




"Let's support our brothers and sisters of New Orleans whose
lives have been devastated by Hurricane Katrina."

This message is sponsored by The Bahamas For America's
Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund. All proceeds collected
through this initiative will be forwarded to the American
Red Cross with the assistance of the American Embassy.

For more information visit our website at
www. bahamasforamerica. coRm

ZNS TV 13 will provide live coverage. MORE 94.9 FM, LOVE 97.5


EM, 100 JAMZ,


102.9 ISLAND FM will give continuous updates
throughout the evening.


I I





.1115'


tI I:,'lltlto:t**
* 0 0 0. .
|:1ttl1tl0t1400





' sgO*IO*!$sS****,,
. 0.0 .





e* 00 0 *




Available
asI
oz 1041 1


.11


I

a'*',


...t


( *


el


V


Copyrig
Syndica
from Com


hted
ited C
mercia


af
0*

^|e


lt

I .!1 ofI ILi4
Materia
ontentj!
I News Pr


II '


I a
** 4.1
* *
* t I


I
S
I,
eel


I0* 4j


'q stptl*ji4 illillU Ajft klAf 'ltAlhlt:*:!'if^:IIlIM.,

*l'istsgaggagesiiJt In 4t:S^i s < t>*<:ItI*s.*
..5. 0.t.*. .
tis ,,,seIs W,,,,,""4sse6 1 tog,....*o:1'* "8S.S".'
j *!'0 it 1 *** eje ** *** ** t* **0 0* 0 **0***0***** 0
,,ar o p., e "Oo;.~ovov''.
,I~~~~~~~~~A -. A&I , 1' l! ,.


II,
eb.'..
.rn


* ** 4
I If
10104
0000


i ll


I
* O


-


A


iiil







O
action

ssin

or


1


I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs