Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00215
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: September 26, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00215
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text










BIG MAC" i'mlov' ft.
HIGH 87F
LOW 75F

SSHOWER
^ AND SUN


The


Tribune


Do you need Approved I


Approved Lending Services
Call 328-5626 today!


Volume: 101 No.251


BAIHAMIANS SAFE IN TEXAS
AFTER HURRICANE THREAT
* SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE THREE
.......................................... I.................................................


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


PRICE 500


SHOCK WIN FOR
THE BRACKETTES
SEE SPORTS SECTION
.... .. .... ... .. .. .. ... .. ....... .. .. ..


w


Police hunt man

believed responsible

for separate attacks


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are investigating
two attempted abductions of
young women over the week-
end, both of which occurred
only an hour apart.
Shortly after 6am on Satur-
day, a 27- year-old woman went
to exercise on Potter's Cay
Dock, near the Paradise Island
exit bridge.
A dark-coloured Nissan Sen-
tra pulled up next to her and
she was approached by a dark
male wearing a long grey shirt
and dark pants.
The man, who appeared to
be in his mid-twenties, pulled
out a black handgun and
attempted to force the woman
into his vehicle.
A struggle ensued and the
woman was able to escape.
Just before 7am on Saturday,
a driver of a dark-coloured Nis-
san tried to force an 18-year-old
girl from Fox Hill into his car.
Police said the incident
occurred while the girl was
standing near Dunkin Donuts
on East Street South. The vic-
tim was also able to escape. '
Based on descriptions given
of the vehicle, police believe the
same person may be responsible
for both attempted abductions.
Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans is advising
women to pay close attention
to their surroundings and to
travel in groups.
He also advised that women
should exercise in well-lit public
areas, where there are a number
of persons around.
Shots were fired at a police
patrol vehicle early on Sunday.
After midnight, in the Soldier
Road area, shots were fired at
police from a burgundy Nissan
Sentra.


The officers then chased the
vehicle. The culprits hit a
parked vehicle on Prince
Charles Drive before evading
the police.
The public is asked to call
police if they see a burgundy
Nissan Sentra with damage to
the front area.
A man was stabbed after
refusing to surrender cash.
Paul Thilome was approached
by an armed man while on a bus
in the Faith Avenue North area
on Saturday evening.
The man, armed with a knife,
demanded cash and Mr
Thilome refused. As a result,
Mr Thilome was stabbed in the
left shoulder.
Police said the victim was tak-
en to hospital. His condition
was unknown at press time.
Police are also investigat-
ing two armed robberies.
The first occurred on Friday
night, when two masked men
entered City Market, Village
Road.
Just after 7pm the men,
armed with handguns, held up
employees and customers.
The store was robbed of an
undetermined amount of cash
and a female customer was
robbed of personal items.
The armed men escaped in a
green vehicle. However, police
did not know the make and
model.
Orchid Hotel on Village
Road was robbed by a lone
gunman at 4am yesterday.
The man, armed with a
chrome and black handgun,
demanded cash from an
employee. The gunman fled the
scene with an undetermined
amount of cash.
Police suspect the culprit was
helped by someone waiting out-
side the building.
Investigations continue.


* JOHN Pinder speaks to the press yesterday at the Bahamas Public Service Union Building
(Photo:Felipt, Major/Tribune Staff)

Union opposes government plan to

up social workers' responsibilities


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
UNION chiefs are to get
tough with the government
over plans to boost social
workers' responsibilities with-
out proper consultation.
Executives of the Bahamas


Public Service Union say they
will not tolerate a Ministry of
Social Services proposal to put
social workers on call 24 hours
a day or to have them placed
in charge of hurricane shel-
ters.
Union president John Pin-
der told The Tribune that the


ministry made the decision
without consulting the union,
which is absolutely against the
idea.
Mr Pinder said social work-
ers are already understaffed,
underpaid and forced to work
SEE page nine


Trafficking

of women

could be a

problem in

Bahamas

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
TRAFFICKING of young
women may seem foreign but
a human rights activist has
warned Bahamians that the
problem may be right on their
doorstep because of the coun-
try's high amount of immigra-
tion traffic.
Nola Theiss, the former may-
or of Sa.ibel, Florida, is a mem-
ber of Zonta International, the
civic organisation which
advances the rights of women
around the world.
Members of the group's dis-
trict 11 of which the Bahami-
an chapters are a part were
in Nassau last week for the dis-
trict's annual convention.
Ms Theiss's club, the Zonta
Club bf Sanibel and Captiva
Islands, Florida, won the club
of the year award for their
efforts to educate the public and
change legislation on human
trafficking. The-presentation
came during the group's award
banquet held in the Atlantis
ballroom.
Ms Theiss told The Tribune
that the most common cases of
human trafficking involve
women who find themselves
displaced as a result of eco-
nomic instability, a war zone or
a national disaster in fact, she
said there had just been reports
of the activity in the hurricane
ravished gulf coast.
These women are then sus-
ceptible to the advances of
unscrupulous individuals who
promise them the chance of a
better life only to exploit them
through sex, prostitution, labour
or criminal activity.
These women are often vul-
nerable and, because they
regard their captors as saviours,
are willing to do whatever is
asked of them, seeing it as a
way to repay a debt.
Countries with a large
amount of immigration traffic
tend to have a high incidence
of human trafficking, which
makes the Bahamas prone to
this type of activity considering
the large. number of Haitians
and other immigrants who flock
to this shore in search of a bet-
ter life.
While there may be a ten-
dency to ignore the issue,
SEE page nine


.Mwth a Hot, Fresh and Hearty Breakfast from Burger Kingi Satisfying
Platters, Tosty Crosisn'wich Combos, Delkcious French Toast Sticks...


Nassau and Bahama Islands'.Lei, g NewpapS


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION




BAHAMAS EDITION


I


n


Iel


le


0 1


on










Legendary ... 'AV- ,SUU I<
gnt
restaurant
MAINSECION
L...........P1,2,3,5,6,7,9,10 reopens in
Lo..'.........P1112,14,15,16
dto / ers ........................ ...P4 Baham as
Ad ts ...................... .. .............. .P8, 13'
PORTS SECTION SCORES of invited guests
and dignitaries attended the
........ ............... P ,2,3,4,6 grand opening of the leg-
t P5 endary Card Martinique at ,,
the recently opened Marina
......... ............ .......P8Village on Paradise Island ........
)q Saturday evening.
....... Pay
The restaurant, "which
........ ................... P10,11,12 gained acclaim for its chic
INIHTSCTO atmosphere, superb French
C I Ncuisine, world-class service .
P 2,3456781 and its appearance in the
1965 James Bond classic
weather ........ ............................... P9 Thunderball, reopened for
the first time in eight years.
Guests including Prime
CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES Minister Perry Christie
accompanied by his wife Mrs.
Bernadette Christie and for-
Ingraham and wife Mrs. hosts
Delores Ingraham were host- :: Ga erynosts
MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS ed to an elaborate evening of
cocktails and dinner pre- m t e
Main...............................................12Pages pared by the restaurant's mother and
featured chef, world, *.. ::: {:." 5,{t: :{:
Sports/Business ................. .......... 12 Pagesa-Geoerged ug te
renowned Jean-Georges --. ,., da ghter
Vongerichten.
.. 'K exhibition


\





Colours:


White, Orange, Pink, Black,
Lime Green, Baby Blue, Yellow


Rosetta St.


Phone: 325-3


3336


Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
Installation & Maintenance
Homes Offices Subdivisions
Call Us Today!
Tel: 393-7733
.3 al:h6CR~eicoewrs Un-


,"?Ao6l,-1


sponsored by
The
BahamasMinistry
of Tourism

b'i h.', I ISLAND$ OF THE
0


.Romeo Farrington
2002 Cacique Award Winner
Lifetime Achievement Award


Romeo Farrington's amazing service skills have
caused him to win the prestigious Caci4ue Award not
once, but twice. He first captured the award for
Transportation in 1996. then accepted the Lifetime
Achievement Award for 2002. Romeo Farrington
will forever be known for his impeccable service and
his incredible peculiarity as one of only a few
two-time Cacique Award winners.

The next Cacique winner could be someone you know.
Deadline; October 14, 2005


-~1


Submit nominations today. Nomination forms available at Ministry of Tourism offices throughout The Bahamas or submit online at www.caclqueawards.com.


One piece on display is
named "Rhapsody" and is
a celebration of nature por-
traying a mountain, river
and the sun shining down
on the sea. There are also
paintings of women dancers,
such as "Folk Dancers at
Dusk." Marielle explained
that the women in this par-
ticular painting are per-
forming a traditional
Jamaican dance.
Max Taylor, a senior
Bahamian printmaker,
sculptor and ceramicist, said
he was impressed.
"It almost reminds me of
a fantasy in a cave. Tech-
nique and composition wise,
I think it is very good," said
Mr Taylor.


Man, 22,

'serious but

stable' after

being shot

four times
EARLY Sunday
morning Dallas Bullard,
22, was shot four times in
the upper thighs after
being accosted by a man
wearing a mask outside
his apartment in Weddell
Avenue, Freeport.
His attacker fled and
the victim was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where he is listed in seri-
ous but stable condition.
A CRANE operator
on Chub Cay in the Berry
Islands was injured after
being thrown off a four-
wheel all-terrain vehicle.
David Sower, 24, of Cal-
ifornia,'was airlifted to
Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, where his condition is
reported as serious.


illg i
- sCnr


NOW IN STOCK


- ---


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEM^^^^^^^^SBER26H20,HAG


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Simultaneous




elections




to be held




by the BPSU


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union will conduct simul-
taneous elections for both
trustees and union positions
when its members go to the
polls this week.,.
President John Pinder told
The Tribune that in the past,
two separate elections had
been held to fill the posts.
However, he said that
despite some criticism, the
union decided this year to
conduct both elections at the
same time.
He said the decision was
simply a matter of practicality
as often there was a poor
turnout of voters.

Ballot
In addition, he said, it was
easier to prepare one ballot
with the two categories than it
was to conduct two separate
elections.
Mr Pinder said the decision
ensured that Family Island
voters also have a chance to
vote in the trustee election.
He encouraged all union,
members to vote in Friday's
election, reminding residents
that they do not need a photo
ID as their names will be, on
the voter list. He said only
those who have received
salary notification as of May
are eligible to vote in the elec-
tion.
In a further effort to make
the election process easier, Mr


Esso prices
ESSO Standard Oil S.A.,
Ltd. has announced that Esso
wholesale prices have not
been increased.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won' an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Pilidei;said ballots' will fea-
ture candidates' symbols as
well as their names.
Polling stations include: the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health, Sandilands,
Princess Margaret Hospital,
the BPSU Hall, and Sir
Kendal Isaacs gym.
One issue union members
will be addressing is pay.

Hardship
He noted that the cost of
fuel has presented a hardship
for union members and said
this is one reason why the
union has been agitating for
the $150 salary increase rather
than a lump sum payment.
Mr Pinder said the $150
raise is not too much too ask,
considering that it amounts to
$37 a month.
He said the union accepts
that rising fuel prices are the
result of international factors,
but added that government
should be sympathetic to its
workers.
At present, he said union
members can receive gas at a
discounted rate of ten cents
less per gallon if they buy it at
the union's gas station on
Wulff Road.
The union hopes this can be
increased to a 25 cents dis-
count soon, he added.


Frank Rutherford

and students spared

by Hurricane Rita

* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
FORMER Olympian Frank Rutherford said last night that
Bahamian students who moved into his Texas home during
the passage of Hurricane Rita are all safe.
In an interview with The Tribune, Mr Rutherford said he
expected that Sugar Land, the suburb of Houston where he
lives, would not have been greatly affected by the hurricane.
In fact, he indicated that they never lost power and did not
experience any interruption in the water supply.
"From the physical devastation of Rita, Houston has been
spared when compared to what happened in New Orleans," said
Mr Rutherford.
Six students rode out the storm with Mr Rutherford, four of
whom already reside with him.
One of the other two who took refuge at his home has left to
go back to his apartment.
Maxwell Rolle, a Nassau resident whose daughter Waltia
stayed with Mr Rutherford during the hurricane, said he spoke
with his daughter yesterday afternoon and she "seemed to be in
high spirits and in good health."
"My main concern was that the government should play an
important role to see that the students were safe. At the end of
the day, these students are Bahamian citizens who are repre-
senting the Bahamas abroad," said Mr Rolle.


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THE MOST THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB IS FREE!
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.
Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.
Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone
Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
Restoration & Care
Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor L "
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY IVE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
www.procheinsystem.com www.stonetechpro.com www.iicrc.org
*psp@coralwave.con


* !C SALE
BUY2 YARDS AT REGULAR
PRICE & GET THE 3RD
ONE FOR 1t1!

LINEN COTTON RIN T
Sept.AMOURct. SILK
JABROADES CHIFFON
SSPECIAL OCAT BSION
Made TROPIra & Rob FABRICS

*ALL SHEER & ANTIQUE SATIN'
S*ALL COTTON PRINTS
ALL JACQUARDS, BROCADES
ALL WAVERLY FABRICS
ALL FABRICS FROM SPAIN


Sept. 15*h-0d. 01

Madeira & Robinson Rd. Stores


Much needed


wheelchairs will


be completly gone


by end of year


With the help of a $10,000
donation from The
Holowesko Foundation, the
Bahamas Association for the
Physically Disabled (BAPD)
is looking forward to taking
delivery of a full container of
wheelchairs. BAPDAdminis-
trator Linda Smith, remarked
that the delivery is coming at
a critical time. "We have been
out of chairs for some time
now," she said, "and this
shipment is sorely needed."

Yet Smith also knows that the
wheelchairs won't last very
long, certainly not pastthe end
of the year. "As incredible as
it might seem," Smith stated,
"the need for new wheelchairs
is constant and exists
throughout the country. The
container full of wheelchairs
will not last into the New
Year."

From the hope and vision of
a few young paraplegics 34
years ago, the Association has
grown to become a vigorous,
national organization. Today,
BAPD serves the disabled of


our community with a variety
ofprograms, including special
education, physical therapy,
speech therapy, computer
training, social interaction and
independent living skills.

With written criteriainplaceto
guide selection BAPD ensures
that needy individuals, on New
Providence and in the Family
Islands, who cannot afford to
purchase a wheelchair on their
own are the first recipients.

BAPD reminds us that a
person who is physically
challenged is "an individual
who has the same goals as
people everywhere -to get the
most from life, to achieve
independence, to be pro-
ductive, and to have friends."

In a few short months 280
wheelchairs will be gone,
distributed free ofcharge to the
most needy. Afterwards,
BAPD will begin its search
again to secure funding for yet
another shipment of chairs. If
you can help please give them
a call at'322-2393.


THE HOLOWESKO FOUNDATION was established to support and
bring attention to the many good works being carried out in
our society. Requests for information can only be made in
writing to P.O. Box N 942, Nassau, Bahamas.


Hom [F^abi[


SrB, Mall-at- larthon
I BOX OFFICE OPENS AT IOfl:O AM DAILY


FECTIVESEP'I'ENIIII. 1l;T------


FLIGHT PLAN NEW 1:10 3:45 NA 6:10 8:20 1045
TIM BURTON'S CORPOSE.BRIDE NEW 1:30 3:50 NA 6:30 8:40 10:50
ROLLBOUNCE NEW 1:00 3:40 WA 6:00 8:20 10:40
CRY WOLF T 1:20 3:25 NWA 6:20 8:30 10:45
LORD OF WAR C 1:00 3:35. NA 6:00 8:15 10:40
JUST LIKE HEAVFN B 1:10 3:50 WA 6:15 8:25 1035
THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE T 1.00 3:25 WA 6.00 8:15 10:40
THE MAN C 1:15 3:30 N/A 6:10 82 10:55
TRANSPORTER 2 T 1:20 3:40 W NA 620 8:40 10:45
UNDERCLASSMAN T 1:15 3:50 WA 6:15 8:25 10:50
THE GAVE T WA WA NA N/A A 8:30 10:55
VALIANT A 100 2:50 4:50 6:30 N/A N/A

FUGHTPLAN NEW 1:00 3 25 t:30 8:3.5 10:35
TIM BURTON'S CORPSE BRIDE NEW 130 340 6:15 81 10:15
ROLL BOUNCE NEW 120 3J0 6.00 8 .15 10:25


i I


1


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


14


'~$E~"


9iass


f I








PAGE 4, MONDAYSEPTEMBER 26, 005TTHE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972- -

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242) -352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


BEC union holding public to ransom


ABOUT 40 Bahamas Electrical Workers
Union members marched with their protest-
ing placards at the Clifton Pier power station
during their lunch hour Friday. This time they
had a new beef against BEC management.
Union secretary general Stephano Greene
told the press that the demonstration was his
union's way of telling government that its
"members are fed up with BEC and the way
they treat union members."
Just as the union might be fed up with BEC
management, the public is sick to death of
the union. With almost every recent thun-
derstorm, this essential service has shut down
leaving whole areas of this island in dark-
ness. We suspect the main problem is that
generators are not being maintained up to
standard.
The union's latest complaint is that con-
tract workers have been called in to do work,
including minor work, that could be done by
Bahamians. If this is so why wasn't the work
done by the BEC staff? Why was the gener-
ator allowed to deteriorate to such a state
that anyone had to be called in?
"Our members never run from work," Mr
Greene assured the public. That might be so,
but these essential service employees cer-
tainly know how to go-slow at the most incon-
venient times.
When the Bahamas was under tropical
storm watch last weekend as nature gave birth
to Hurricane Rita, BEC workers delayed
repairs to areas in New Providence shut down
by a thunderstorm.
BEC General Manager Kevin Basden was
frank in his apology to the public. He said
that most of the areas affected by the failed
electricity could have been corrected in two
hours, However, residents of areas that had
the most severe damage suffered longer
because workers were directed by the union
to "work no overtime and make repairs slow-
ly."
At that point Prime Minister Christie
should have ordered them back to work with
the threat of dismissal. This including
imprisonment if equipment is deliberately
damaged can be the consequence of dis-
rupting an essential service.
Union president Dennis Williams objects to
the current dispute being referred by man-
agement to the Industrial Tribunal for arbi-
tration. He calls it a delaying tactic by man-
agement. Management, on the other hand,
sees no useful purpose in continuing talks


Looking for

Japanese used cars?


New Arrivals Weekly


Mitsubishi

, iSuzuki


Toyota

Nissan ......

Honda
We have various makes


Prices Start


tC'


at $4,000. 0(


)ur prce
*


Buying
at


Bahamas Bus & Truck

call:


with the union on the Department of Labour
level.
There is no reason for this dispute to have
gone this far. It appears thatt management
dropped the ball when it forgot to establish
the merit system in May just as the union
forgot to negotiate the 40-hour work week
into its current contract. This has given the
union an excuse to have a bargaining issue. It
is an issue that can be easily solved behind
closed doors without the public being incon-
venienced. However, it seems that greedy
unionists want to use this issue to pry open the
contract and renegotiate new terms includ-
ing a pension plan that is already considered
among the top two per cent of the world's
best.
At present all workers receive increments
according to their salary scale. In an effort to
encourage productivity, government decid-
ed to replace increments with a merit system,
whereby salaries could be increased from the
three per cent increment base up to eight per
cent, depending on individual performance.
In May of this year management should
have notified staff of the basis on which their
individual performance would be reviewed.
Workers were to have been informed what
would be expected of them during 2005 for
overall performan e to meet the objectives
and accompliiin ehts established for the
appraisal period. They were to expect their.
first merit pay in June next.year.
However, BEC management let May 2005
slip by without implementing the system. And
so the union does have an issue. Manage-
ment has acknowledged its error. However,
the issue is one for negotiation, not a strike .-
Nor is it an issue to be-used to rewrite a con-
tract that doesn't expire until the year 2007 -
an election year.
And for those unionists who think they
are going to take advantage of the public to'
get as much as they can out of the Public
Treasury before the election, they should
reconsider, especially when the public learns
how much BEC workers make in basic salary,
non-contributory pension and medical insur-
ances, overtime and the many other perks
that make them the best paid work force in
the country,
The present oil crisis is going to squeeze
world economies including the Bahamas -
to such an extent that BEC workers should
count their abundant blessings, and return to
their jobs without further noise. .-


EDITOR, The Tribune


WE are now less than eight
weeks away from the Free
National Movement's conven-
tion which is slated for Novem-
ber 6 this year.
We now know that Mr Brent
Symonette and Mr Zhivargo
Laing will not be contesting for
the post of leader. What we do
not know, at this late juncture.is
whether former Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham will be offer- -
--ingorif he-is able to obtain an
accommodation with at least
the current leader, Tommy
Turnquest and possibly with
Dion Foulke.s, the only
announced candidates to date?
There has been some specula-
tion too, that former Attorney
General Carl Bethel still has his
options open and has stated
recently that he will offer for
one of three positions: leader,
deputy leader or chairman.
Time is running out for both
Mr Ingraham and Mr Bethel if
either of them plans to be the
next leader of the FNM. In Mr
Ingraham's case, most proba-
bly with an accommodation
with Tommy Turnquest,
whether that is Mr Turnquest
as his deputy or some other
accommodation and in the case
of Mr Bethel a decision to offer
himself just as Mr Turnquest
and Mr Foulkes has done.
Mr Ingraham's comeback is
talked about widely because it is
generally believed that if he is
elected leader of the FNM he
can deliver, again, for the party,
this time and for the country.
While among certain elements
in the party he is not that pop-
ular, among other elements in
the party and in the country it is
believed that he can win the
government, and above all else,
the FNM wants to win the gov-
ernment. It does not want
another five years in the wilder-
ness. Too, can the country
afford five more directionless.
years of the PLP? It is very
doubtful given the current state
of affairs and the need for
action on so many fronts!
Hence, Mr Ingraham ought
to decide, if he has not done so
already and informed the party
and the public whether he
intends to offer for leader at the
party's convention through an
accommodation; that is unop-
posed at least in regard to Mr
Turnquest because, after all, he
told the Bahamian people that
Mr Turnquest was the best man
for the job.
But, of course, Mr Ingraham
cannot be faulted for having the
-view that that was his opinion at
the time, but that Mr Turnquest



AINTON
= TInu I


has proved otherwise since
August, 2001. In those circum-
stances he could even challenge
Mr Turnquest; that being the
situation it might be prudent for
Mr Turnquest to consider not
offering so as to not suffer the
embarrassment of a significant
loss.
As for Mr Bethel, he needs to
inform the party and the public
as to whether he will offer for


EDITOR, The Tribune
BAHAMIANS since time
immemorial have accepted
the heavy-handedness of men
who over react physically
with females.
We have grown up with
our mothers and sisters
being subjected to physical
beating from men who
impose their will on them to
show power. Surprisingly
many women accept the
punishment and some even
ask for more.
I was stunned when a
woman who I thought was
mentally stable said: "If a
man don't beat you, he don't
love you". I quickly conclud-
ed that she needed urgent
psychiatric treatment.
The Bahamian society has
become numbed and far too
tolerant with physical abuse.
Too many women are made
to endure torture at the
hands of a man who lies
about loving them. The sad
part is too many women
think very little of them-
selves, by staying in abusive
relationships.
The laws in the Bahamas
are too weak when it comes
to domestic violence. The
police act like everything is a
joke. They say, "I don't want
to get in that, it's a man and
woman affair". This is pre-
posterous to say the least.
The police only get serious
when the man kills the


leader or any other post for that
matter. If he enters the race for
leader it is unlikely that Mr
Ingraham will get in a race with
the FNM's "Young Turks" who
would have all decided to make
their bid now, and if that is the
case, it would not he so bad. It
would certainly make for a very
interesting and presumably
exciting convention provided
that the process is fair and the
party is truly unified behind the
winning candidate!
AN FNM
Nassau
September 9 2005


woman, which could have
been avoided in many cases,
had the police done their jobs
properly and stopped talking
foolishness.
The United States does not
play with domestic violence,
period. You hit a woman in
the USA and your backside
is grass. This same kind of
approach should be taken ins
the Bahamas.
Cowards who masquerade
as men should be made to
suffer tremendous hardship
when they hit a member 6f
the weaker sex. Any man
who hits a woman should be
prepared to, spend many
years in prison, where they
will meet their match.
It is a known fact that menr
who are quick to take advan-
tage of women are usually"
"not real men" and are.
extremely afraid to attempt,
to do the same to a man.
The police must make'
sense,, by arresting and
detaining any man who hits a,
woman. This must stop, no
excuses about the woman,
nagging, because discipline is,
the order of the day. "She,:
made me do it" is a lame rea-
son to act like an animal.
Real men protect, provide:
for, and love their woman,'
not keep them in fear and.
cause them pain.


IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau
September 2005


Need for




clarity in




candidates


Why the


men who hit


women are


all cowards


DON ST

I DTF


WE SELL OUTER SPACE
TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160



ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM
SS S-^.. ,'. ,, sfe* I


ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Seving The Bahamian Community Since 1978
"> ---- -


WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005








THETRIUNEMONAYLSEPEMBRS2,1


Small states need


a stronger UN


'
-~ a *-* *


a -
- a


* - -


- r S


- vlo .b


--qm 0 -b


-0- 0 -
low-


SCopyrighte Mate ial


--t --Syndicated Content -. '


Available from Commercial News Providers"
a m own"-


a *- .,..ea i qa .,


-


a --
-
~- -
a-- -
S ~


- a


S -


a --

- 0 0
a


MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 26
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Health For The Nation
1:30 On The Yard
2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Colombia Trade Show 2005
5:30 Cybernet
6:00 One Cubed
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Baker's Bay
8:45 Ardastra Gardens
9:00 Legends From Whence We
Came:
10:00 Sports Life Styles:
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
NOE N-V 3rsre
th rih. o aelstmnt
progamm chages


-~ a-.
*0
0
S. a


a -


TROPICA
EXTERMINATORS {l


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


QUALITYSMT
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Vi ou showriort otQuoliy Auto Se (reepor) d for similar dess Quee' Ho way 3526122


T ashiton M all
Top of The Hill Mackey Street, Mall at Marathon & Town Centre Mall


.r~a1iA$m11m


Ends September 30
New arrivals for this week
will be excluded from our storewide sale

Take an additional 10% Off

Items on Clearance Rack


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, ,O0L,


THE TRIBUNE


-


F


4








PAGE MONAY, SPTEMER 26 2005THE TIBUN


QUALITY INSIDE

AND OUT
m- n n .u- n- n u -nnu- n n n n n o S H


REFRIGERATOR

Model RM46-W

9.6 Cube Feet



$39500




Guns, human rights and



dealing with China


RIGHT SAID, FRED!

FOREIGN Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell was
on to something important when
he highlighted the unwillingness
of the world community to attach
as much importance to the trade
in small arms as it attaches to
drug trafficking and internation-
al crime in which these arms are
a fundamental factor.
Tragically, the most impor-
tant members of the world com-
munity have either consistently
failed or actively refused to
accept the trade in small arms as
a multilateral security matter
worthy of the kinds of rules and
responses that have been
mobilised against the drug
trade, money laundering or,


Hyundai's Ultimate

Sports-utility Vehicle


Cash price starting at

$23,995
GL 2x4 4-cylinder





HYUnfDRI


You have a certain sense of style. So you want a
look of individuality in your car, one that will set
you apart from the SUV crowd. Here it is, the
Hyundai you've been waiting for. The Hyundai
Santa Fe features a 2.4 litre engine ( optional 2.7
litre V-6 DOHC). Also includes power steering,
alloy wheels, AM/FM radio/CD player, and more.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING


Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday,
full tank of fuel and 12,000-mile/1 2-month warranty.


I$iQALITsales
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916


PERSPECTIVES
.............w ::: miim e


AND


REW


more recently, terrorism.
In the case of China, Russia
and the United States, this fail
ure has generally been within
the context of protecting large
state-run weapons industries or
acceding to powerful private
interests back home.
In the United States, the
whole question has unfortu
nately been linked in mosi
politicians' minds with the
domestic political issue of the
right to bear arms.
Thus, in 2001, at the last seri
ous UN conference on the trade
in small arms and light weapons
the US "public" delegation
included three representatives
of the gun rights lobby.-
At that conference, there
Under-secretary of State Johr
Bolton (who has since beer
appointed US Ambassador to the
UN) made clear that certain "red
line" issues would, if pressed
result in his country leaving the
conference altogether.
Among these were any
transnational rules inhibiting
individual rights to bear arms
and any prohibition on the
export of arms to 'non-state
actors'.

n fairness to the United
States, the country's
domestic laws do contain a vig-
orous system of export controls
over arms producers, which is
far more than can be said of
either China or Russia, both of
which view the export of small
arms as a vital growth industry.
In fact, the US export rules
are~at least as stringent as those
of the EU, which is generally
seen as the champion of small
arms control.
SBuitlearly this' hiaidt'been
nogi.h The priv'eaid public
armories of industrialised
nations remain by far the largest
source of the small arms that
take the lives of thousands of


VETERINARY HOUSE CALL SERVICE
by
Appointment
Dr. Dwight A. Dorsett
Veterinarian


Dogs *Cats Small Pets







a24hrs/7 daysEmergency Service


ALLEN
people annually throughout the
world.
Moreover, there is clearly a
substantial and sophisticated
criminal network that takes
advantage of both the easy


It is time that
politicians in all
countries, big
and small,
dropped the
fiction that
the easy


domestic and
international
availability of
" guns (handguns
especially) is a
g matter separate
e and unrelated to
e the growth of
drug smuggling,
violent crime and
I international
s insecurity

d availability of weapons on
1 American streets and the rela-
. tively lax policing of north toi
s south traffic (anecdotal evi-
dence.suggests, for instance,
that many of the firearms sold
1 illegally in the Bahamas come in
on cruise ships).
" 'It 's tife 'that'politicianis in
all countries'big'aifad' small,
t dropped the fiction that the easy
t domestic and international
t availability of guns (handguns
d especially) is a matter separate
and unrelated to the growth of
drug smuggling, violent crime
and international insecurity.
PUBLIC OWNERSHIP
NEED NOT MEAN
POLITICAL
MANAGEMENT

t is, of course, the classic
irony of our age that the
country whose explosive growth
is driving and sustaining the cap-
italist world economy is the only
major country that still claims to
be a socialist worker's paradise.
For their part, the World's
capitalists are eagerly lined up
to jump into bed with Chair-
man Mao's communist party
successors on terms that often
seem to defy received capitalist
wisdom.
The latest high profile suitor
is the Disney Corporation,
which is set to open and operate
its latest international park, in
Hong Kong, in joint ownership
with the 'communist' govern-
ment of the People's Republic.
Under terms of the deal, Chi-
na will own no less than 57 per
cent of the venture, leaving Di.s-
ney, which puts up all the mon-u
ey and assumes all the risi.
(including the political risk)


a
I-
.n
e
r
.e
e

t
A
e

z
i-
le
S,
Is


book store


BAHfMAS



MANUFACTURING
COMPANY LIMITED
Phone: 242-326-4121 Fax: 242-326-4124




We will be CLOSED
for STOCKTAKING
on Thursday 29th September
& Friday 30th September.
We will re-open on Monday 3rd October, 2005


Business Hours: Mon Fri 8am-5pm


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


MULT DISOUN FURITUR AN

-11111660
APPIANESEY FNOTAIR
Ame"w 322-2536 c 325-2040'- 323-7758 328-7494


with a mere 43 per cent stake.
On paper at least, this may
sound like lunacy. But nobody
doubts that China's leader$
mean business first, business
second and business last. Ever
since Mao's successor, Deng
Xiaoping, declared that "it is
glorious, to be rich", China's
leaders have been on something
of a crusade to deliver their
country's billion-plus people the
kind of wealth they see only in
the capitalism.
Moreover, they have come
to trust in capitalism's ability to
create such wealth when it is
unaccompanied by petty politi-
cal interference.
They will therefore almost
certainly leave the "dismal sci-
ence" of making a profit to the
board and management of Dis-
ney and limit their 'interference'
to insisting on the larger part
of what will clearly be a worth-
while dividend.
They will insist, too, that the
development remains broadly
guided by the interests of their
developing country.
This, ideally, is what public
ownership should be all about
in developing countries.
Whether it is large manufactur-
ers in China, outsourced call
centres in India or resorts in the
Caribbean, there is much to be
said for a properly managed
relationship between govern-
ment and private investors as
joint owners of enterprises.
There is no logical reason
why such an ownership model
could not technically exist
involving the government of
The Bahamas, through its Hotel
Corporation. To many of us, the
FNM's downsizing of the cor-
poration was a sensible

Ideally, the
investor
manages, while
the government
ensures the
venture's
long-term
compatibility
with the
nation's
development
goals.

response to circumstances in
1992, rather than a surrender
forever of the government's
inherent right to determine its
own relationship with the
means of production.
The difficulty for small, high-
ly political democracies like the
Bahamas is that, unlike in Chi-
na, the temptation to pollute
long-term national interests
with short-term political patron-
age becomes irresistible for
some governments as it clear-
ly did in all of the sectors in
which the state took a hand
under the first PLP government.
The challenge for this PLP
government is to demonstrate
that, where the state (rightly or
wrongly) feels compelled to
exercise this most sovereign
ri-ht on behalf of the governed,
., exercise does not descend
ce again into a political cha-
de and a national embarrass-
ment.











intuesday's


Landfill site to re


.eve


Abaco's existing dumps


ABACO looks set to get a
large landfill dump to take
garbage from all over the island.
Bulldozers are already on site
*between Spring City and Snake
Cay and the first dump-trucks
are expected to arrive there early
next year.
The site will relieve existing
dumps, especially the much-used
Marsh Harbour facility, which
takes trash from Winding Bay,
Hope Town, Man o' War Cay,
'and Murphy Town, among oth-
ers.
"This will be the primary dump
for the whole of Abaco," said an
islander yesterday. "It will appar-
ently take domestic waste and
construction debris."
The new site, which is now
being cleared of trees and bush,
'will include a huge hole to take
rubbish for years to come.
It will apparently eliminate
burning, which causes smoke haz-
ards at existing dumps.
ABACO Regatta, due to
have been held this weekend but
postponed because of Hurricane
Rita, will probably take place next
month.
Working boats from the south-
ern isles were unable to make it to
Marsh Harbour for the event, so
the date was put back.
"We are now waiting for details


FAMILY ISLAND ROUND-UP


of the revised dates," said a
source.

ROTARIANS at Marsh
Harbour were selling steak din-
ners at $20 a time over the week-
end to raise money for Katrina
relief.
A good turnout at the Angli-
can Hall in Abaco's "capital" kept
the cooks busy.
Customers went away full and
happy. "We got a steak dinner
AND dessert," said a visitor. "Not
bad for $20!"
THE disappearance of hote-
lier Dwight Johnson is stiil the big
talking point in Eleuthera.
Police have no further leads on
the whereabouts of Mr Johnson,
who vanished a month ago after
dropping his wife at home.
Mr Johnson's bloodstained
truck was found up a side road,
but its owner described as "like-
able and popular" was nowhere
to be seen.
Police said yesterday they are
no nearer solving the mystery.
"There have been no, new leads,"
said a spokesman.


Mr Johnson's father, Baldwin
Johnson, also vanished some time
ago, but he is thought to be in
Cuba.
PEOPLE living in Ragged
Island believe their tiny commu-
nity will be "viable" for only anoth-
er ten or 15 years unless facilities
there are upgraded.
Residents have complaints on
several fronts, notably water sup-
ply, local education and road con-
struction.
"I can't see Ragged Island last-
ing more than ten or 15 years
unless young people are encour-
aged to stay," said Myron Lock-
hart-Bain, the former chief coun-
cillor.
Currently, youngsters leave the
island to attend secondary school.
Many don't return.
The 60-strong community was
upset last week when the weekly
mailboat was held in Nassau for
safety checks.
They said the boat was one of
the safest in the Bahamas. The inci-
dent was, they said, another exam-
ple of poor treatment for Ragged
Island, regarded by reideints as
the "Cinderella,' of the Baliamas.


Phone: 323-3460
Montrose Avenue & Oxford Street 2 Doors North Of Multi Discount Furniture
Children's Clothing, Shoe, Shoes,Socks, air
Tcessories, undergarments, TofS, & Jt More


We need room for NEW INVENTORY
please help! Lets make room now!


41!


S20% off all Shoes
S20% off Lisa Frank
S20 % off Spencer
: E S^t^rms.- .. . !:ii : ; .'* .,*. : : f .:.^' .,^. .^^, ^ ., _. ~ .


77, .


Your car.


Your trust.


Our responsibility


DrafN Service Suspension i Alignment E0haus1

Oil, Lube I Filter "OODYER TiRES"


merican I Imporled Cars Light Trucks Vans i SU's
* Complete InspecIin EslimaIes before we solar IIhe work


--LOCATIONS TO SERIES YOU

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST Si
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-


r. & SOLDIER RD
2940 or 356-2941


Open: Monday Saturday
8am*5pm

Fax 326-4865 P.O. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS *O

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


Impreza 1.6 Sedan
Equipped with unbelievable power.
All weather grip, all wheel drive.
Fuel efficient, cool and sporty.


N \'\~


Think. Feel. Drive.

Our parts department is fully stocked, with every component to ensure
that your vehicle runs trouble free Trained technicians on duty.


NOTED JOURNALIST,


ARTHUR FOULKES:


UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT


- -- --- -- -, 915p


:~d~.~*-xr;s~s~n~~~.~


- --- --- ;---


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 7







SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
7t is/ a dollar, with One filled SAVKA.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at: f
7 Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
SFREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2


CABLE


&
|V


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Soecial!


W/D THRIFTY MAID
KIBBLES VARIETY u, ACOR
MIX DOG FOOD W. K CORN
1 7 LB 29 OZ

S1449 $1 79


LUV5


CONVIENT
DIAPERS SIZE 1
40 CT


DEVON
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ
S1 19


JBI
COCONUT
WATER


S1.5 OZ
2/sI;1 49


HUNTS
BBQ SAUCES
ALL FLAVOURS
18 OZ
2/3oo00


IVORY


SOAP BAR (VALUE
PACK 24 PACK)
24- PACK


II


DELMAR
FLAKE TUNA
IN WATER

2/.990
v-e
JUICE
REGULAR &
SPICY


.990


GOLD & RED DELICIOUS APPLE CELLO LETTUCE
BARTLETT PEARS
EACH 9 A
laz>- laU EACH


CANTELOUPES
EACH


CARROTS



WINN-DIXIE
SPREAD

SUPER BRAND
LITE/ REG & SOFT
CREAM CHEESE
2/$- OO
^9 8-OZ


W/D
ASSTD & MIX VEGETABLES
16 OZ
W/D
CORN ON
THE COB
4- EAR

ARIEL
REGULAR
DETERGENT
400 GR
2/$ O50


AUNT JAMIMA
PANCAKE
SYRUP
ASSORTED
24 OZ
3S 49


HUGGIES
BABY
WIPES
80 CT
*4990


MIX-N-MATCH
RED, WHITE SEEDLESS & GLOBE
GRAPES
1*g 99
EACH
ONIONS
3.LB BAG


KRAFT
AMERICAN SINGLE CHEESE
$o39
5 16 OZ
LENDER'S
ASSTD FLAV
BAGELS 5CT
S 79 -
14.5-O


KIDS CUISINE
ASSTD FLAVOURS
s299
8,9,10-OZ
W/D
ICE CREAM
64 OZ

KOOL-AID
HANDI SNACK
GELS
4 PACK
$179


McVITIES
RICH TEA &
GINGER
NUT
300-GR
$179

DOWNY
FREE FABRIC SOFTNER
ASSORTED SCENTS
40-OZ


LIBBY'S
ASSTD FRUIT
CUPS 4 PACK (4.5-OZ) 4- PACK ......$3.69
PLANTERS
CHEESE MANIA BALLS 4.-oz ........$1.99
CRACKING GOOD
BIG 60 ASSTD COOKIES s-az........$2.39
WINN DIXIE
MACARONI & CHEESE
DINNER 7.2s- O........................2/$1.39
SUNCHY
100% APPLE &
FRUIT PUNCH JUICE i.s-oz........2/.990
KRAFT
MAYONNAISE REGULAR 32-oz ......$3.79
CAPRISUN
DRINKS ASSTD
FLAVOURS sacK.......................... $3.99
HICKORY
GLEN TURKEY
FRANKS 12-oz ..................................$1.19


KRAFT
SALAD
DRESSING
ASSORTED
8-OZ
2/$300


FRENCH'S
MUSTARD SQUEEZE
REGULAR
20-OZ
$ 89


JOY
DISH LIQUID
ALL SCENTS
25 OZ


FESTIVAL
MULTI
CLEANERS
33 OZ
1 99


PASTA RONI

ALL FLAVOURS
4.6 OZ
2/$3 00


MAHATMA
RICE LONG GRAIN
& PARBOILED
5- LB
s2 8943i


MINI
PORK
RIBS
LB
.970


IUnPET
WINGS OR
DRUMSTICK
ILB
.99


MISCUT
CHICKEN
WINGS


$1


19
LB


PRESTIGE PORK LOIN CENTER CUT
CHOICE BOTTOM END CUT PORK LOIN
ROUND ROAST CHOPS CHOP REGULAR
$a7- 89 $249
LBB LB
S279*. 18 1 $49
LB $ 9 2 LB
PRESTIGE N.Z PIGS
BONELESSEWYORK LAMB FE T
*STRPT5M OICIE SHOULDER
CHOPS LB
LB
$999I ^I .690


PRESTIGE WHITE & YELLOW
REGULAR MEATBOLOGNA AMERICAN CHEESE
^ U< LB
WHOLE TOUFAYAN
ROTISSERIE CHICKEN PITA BREAD
ALL VARIETY
$79 2/s SO2
EACH va 12- oz


JUMEX
NECTARS
ASSORTED
355 ML
2/$ 149


APPLE
CIDER

VINEGAR
$z99


ULTRA GAIN
2 POWDER SCENTED
W/BLEACH 31USE
73 OZ


AUNT JAMIMA
PANCAKE MIX
ASSORTED
32 OZ



CAMPBELLS
SELECTED RED &WHITE
SELECTED SOUPS
10.5 OZ



GERBER
BABY FOOD
ASSORTED
5-LB
2/.99


ROBIN HOOD


GRITS
5 LBS
a-&_n


I --I


InVEV


I-- II


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005








CONGRATULATIONS



WINNERS


South Beach Cable Beach


Lex Brown


Oaksftield
Valencia Laroda


Rosetta Street
Linda Moreley


Lfiord Cay
Mariana Curtie


Aaron Strachan


Seagrape
Sheree Minnis


Harbour Bay
Catherine Glinton


" Eight Mile Rock
Paula Reily


Independence Hwy ISeahorse


Jacklyn Johnson


Shopping Plaza
Lonna Munroe


Village Road O Down Town
Sherene Brown Shnnninn Pla;


Immigration situation

may conceal woman

trafficking operation

FROM page one
because it involves immi-
grants, Ms Theiss urges law-
abiding citizens not to turn a
blind eye.
"I tell people that if it is
something that you would not
want to happen to your young
daughter or relative, then it is
something that you should not
tolerate of someone in your
country."
Noting that citizens have a
moral responsibility, Ms Theiss
pointed out signs Bahamians
can look for.
"Look at whether they are
here voluntarily or involuntari-
ly, and whether they are free to
move around. Also, if you see a
group of four or five of them
and there is someone who says
he can speak for them and
wants to translate for them,
then that may be their way of
controlling the situation."
She added that often the vic-
tims have an unnatural fear of
authorities, another way of
exerting control.
The problem is not only lim-
ited to immigrants, but to chil-
dren of good homes as well.
She said often, children who
are in a rush to be grown up,
or are unhappy (like runaways)
are not rational when persons
approach them with offers of
fame, .money or success. She
urged parents to have frank dis-
cussion with their children and
warn them of the dangers they
could be facing.
"Many victims are enraptured
and then encaptured," she
warned. N NOLA Theiss


Public serviceunion

anger. at ministry plan

for social workers


FROM page one
in a high-risk environment.
He said it was unfair for them
to have to man hurricane shel-
ters, which should be the
responsibility of the National
Emergency Management
Agency, police and defence
force.
He noted that social workers
are not shift workers, nor are
they trained to deal with the
demands of running hurricane
shelters.
Mr Pinder added that social
workers are forced to go into
potentially dangerous situations
to remove children from unsuit-
able homes, often without
police escort.
He said that if the workers
were to be on call, and then


have to go out in the small
hours,of the morning, they
would still be expected to come
to work at 9am the next day.
Shortage
Mr Pinder explained that the
situation was brought to his
attention a few weeks ago. As
he understood it, the ministry's
rationale for the decision was
the increasing workload and
shortage of social workers in
the country.
He said the ministry is expect-
ed to hold a meeting with the
social workers today. Executive
members have a prior commit-
ment in Grand Bahama and will
not be able to attend the meet-
ing.


"However, I have instructed
my members to adjourn the
meeting if the ministry tries to
enforce the regulations," he
said.
Mr Pinder said he has tried
unsuccessfully to reach either
Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin or permanent
secretary Barbara Burrows to
address the issue.
He said the ministry needs to
put all thoughts of changing the
workload on hold until both
parties can sit down and discuss
the issues.
He also claimed that some
members at social services have
been dealt with in an intimidat-
ing manner, something the
union refuses to tolerate.
"When you touch one, you
touch all," he said.


B7

L _ ...........


1 EXCELLENT
CONDITION!



MOTORS LIMITED Y]W
VILLAGE ROAD N EAR SIIRLE STREET


I 0I B'd/1; [ I 7-
I BA CK_'V R SCH O OL______________ ________________ _^^


rMPLITE GIVEA=WA


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


.'29-~"













Confronting the genuine issues of


National security is a
critical job for every
government. Its elements
include combating crime and


illegal fishing, stemming the
flow of illicit drugs and other
materials, incarcerating offend-
ers, working with others against
international terrorism, pos-


sessing a disaster preparedness
capability which will aid in rapid
rescue and recovery and, of
course, immigration.
In addition to seeking my
party's nomination for the Blue
Hills constituency, I am also
running for the leadership of a
renewed and revitalised FNM
because I would like to serve
the nation as prime minister.
It is important for me, there-
fore, to make a contribution to
the debate on immigration in a
manner which is comprehen-
sive, balanced, and responsible.
As I listen to the immigration
debate it often seems incom-
plete and unfocused. And it
usually focuses only on illegal
immigration.
Because I believe Bahamians
are often squeezed from the
"top" by legal immigration and
squeezed from the "bottom" by
illegal immigration I will
address both of them.
But I want to do something


FNM leadership candidate Dion

Foulkes presents his views on

Haitians. immigration and their

effect on the Bahamian economy


more. I want to talk explicitly
about the principles I bring to
this debate. Whereas a great
deal has been written and spo-
ken about this critical matter,
we haven't had enough dialogue
on the values and principles
which should guide our agenda.
Furthermore, though I will
criticise the PLP on this issue, I
do not intend to grandstand.
The Bahamian people are tired


IAn omlti.cto


Pansat 2700A Game Boy ADVANCE
$275.0O $129.99
7We Stock Accessories/ Repair Phones
(2235565Mo a t. *i l Sl l -
I 1 il n il R


of those who only criticise with-
out offering any meaningful
alternative.
While I will offer an aggres-
sive approach to illegal immi-
gration and a firm hand regard-
ing how we regulate legal immi-
gration, I will not be a party to
uncharitable or inhumane treat-
ment of, and demeaning lan-
guage about, fellow human
beings.
Our task must be to elevate
debate, not cheapen it through
prejudice. We are too good a
party and too good a nation to
go down that road, which in
essence is really a dead end.
IMMIGRATION HISTORY

n one sense there isn't
really anything new under
the Bahamian sun regarding
immigration. Ever since the
Eleutheran Adventurers came
here seeking religious freedom,
various peoples have come to
these shores looking for a better
way of life.
West Indians, Greeks, Chi-
nese, Lebanese and Jews came
to the Bahamas in significant
numbers in the 19th and 20th
centuries seeking economic
advantage. And many still come
seeking opportunity.
Successive groups of Haitians
- some legally, many illegally -
have come seeking both eco-
nomic opportunity and escape
from the turmoil of their own
land. Indeed, an uninterrupted
flow pf Haitian migration began
as early as 1791 and many of us
trace our own heritage back to
this early influx, includingpeo-
ple with surnames like Beneby,
Demeritte, Deveaux, Moncur,


and Poitier.
We should be proud of the;
contribution Haitians and other
immigrant groups have made.
to the beautiful quilt that is the,
modern Bahamas.
Bahamians have also emi-
grated from our country seeking.
opportunity. During the late:
19th and early 20th centuries'
scores of Bahamians went to,
the southern United States and.
Central America as migrant
workers. And even though we
are an economically blessed.
country today, many of us still;
seek opportunity and financial
reward in other lands. ,-
So the Bahamas has an envi-
able record as a place of wel-
come for immigrants just as we,
have been the beneficiaries of:
the generosity of others.
But throughout history,
nations have appreciated the'
need to regulate immigration.
Indeed, Bahamian migration
into the Florida labour market.
was massively curtailed by
around 1924.
And today, a Bahamian can't'
just pick up and live.in someone
else's country without prior,
immigration approval.
Beginning in 1925, the colo-
nial government took some of'
the first decisive steps to regu-
late the flow of legal immi-
grants. Successive post-inde'
pendence governments have,
also attempted to regulate,
immigration to the Bahamas.,-
TODAY'S CHALLENGES',

Though many of our
.- legal and illegal immi-
gration challenges are not new.
they are different in significant


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVE. PHONE: 322-1722 FAX: 326-7452


INTRODUCING MiTSUBISHI 2005


2.4L Engine, Power Windows, Air Conditioner
Radio/ Cassette, Keyless Entry.
Central Locking, Roof Rails


TMITSUBISHI

MOTORS
wake up and drive


Price Includes: First Service Full Tank of Gas
License & Inspection Full set Floor Mats


IVm E~sIr L -.1E FWTsJU E


Announcing the opening of


An Engineering Consulting firm specializing in



Mechanical

Electrical

Plumbing Design
and Project Management services








Sonia B Brown, PE


Principal




P.O. Box GT 2832
Tel./Fax: 242 364-6465
Cell: 242 357-4724
E-mail: rsbrown@batelnet.bs


PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE














immigration facing the Bahamas


ways. Allow me to address
some of these differences.
Legal Immigration: While
there have been various waves
of globalisation in human his-
tory, this present wave is more
intense and demanding in sig-
nificant ways. The question is:
how will the present wave of
globalisation affect immigration
into and migration out of the
Bahamas?
First of all it means that
Bahamian professionals can
find high-paying jobs in New
Providence or Providence,
Rhode Island; in San Salvador,
Bahamas or San Salvador, the
capital of El Salvador; in
Georgetown, Exuma, as well as
Georgetown, Guyana.
There are two questions
we're going to have to increas-
ingly ask ourselves: How do we
keep qualified Bahamians at
home and how do we re-attract
those who have left and may
want to return?
Meanwhile, to maintain our
economic edge and advance our
development agenda, the
Bahamas must be open to a cer-
tain level of legal immigration
into the country.
In this new age of globalisa-
tion there will be increased
pressure to allow non-Bahami-
ans to either take up employ-
ment in or have ownership of
various businesses in our coun-
try.
You have seen this in the
CSME debate and you will see
this more and more on other
fronts. While we must allow a
healthy level of legal immigra-
tion to meet our needs, I also
want you to take into account
what I have heard from far too
many Bahamians.
,-Too many companies have
been complacent or sluggish in
training Bahamians to take over
various functions. There are still
too many examples of expats
who have come on short-term
or medium-term work permits
but who have had their permits
extended repeatedly, even
though there are qualified
Bahamians in their field.
But there is another aspect
of legal migration we often for-
get about, and that is that there
are many Haitian migrants who


are here legally in the Bahamas.
We must honour their adher-
ence to Bahamian law and grant
them the protection they
deserve. However, once some-
one's work permit has not been
renewed they must return to
their country of origin.
Illegal Immigration: Though
we need ongoing research there
is a worrying picture which has
emerged of the long term envi-
ronmental, health, educational
and other social effects of mass
immigration from the Repub-
lic of Haiti.


The Bahamas
has an enviable
record as a
place of
welcome for
immigrants
just as we have
been the
beneficiaries of
the generosity
of others

These include disturbingly
high birth levels; troubling inci-
dences of communicable' dis-
eases such as TB; unsanitary
conditions and environmental
damage in various communities
in New Providence and the
Family Islands; and increased
pressure on our primary and
secondary educational institu-
tions.
While Haitian immigration
has contributed to our labour
market and there are some
monies which many of these
immigrants put into the econo-
my we cannot pretend that the
current level and pattern of
immigration is economically or
socially sustainable.
What is significant is that
because of the vast number of
Haitian immigrants already
here legally and illegally we
cannot continue to add signifi-
cant numbers indefinitely. A


nation of 300,000 people can- anised or integrated into our
not continue to allow unlimited way of life.
immigration from a nation of This should include, but not
seven million people. be limited to, an insistence on
We have reached saturation proficiency in basic English and
point in terms of Haitian immi- participation in programmes on
gration. And I am concerned Bahamian civics and history.
that that saturation point may These programmes will be paid
reach a negative tipping point in by those who use them.
terms of social peace and eco- 2. Adherence to the Rule of
nomic and social sustainability.. Law: My government will
We must admit that there is aggressively prosecute those
some prejudice and discrimina- who smuggle illegal immigrants
tion towards our Haitian broth- from any country into the
ers and sisters. But by and large Bahamas. Some persons may
Bahamians are a tolerant peo- be offered leniency if they co-
ple. And we have been an operate in assisting the govern-
extremely welcoming nation. ment in successfully prosecut-
Within this context I believe the ing the ringleaders, the worst
concern I hear from many peo- abusers of the law.
ple of goodwill about the lev- Secondly, those who break
els of Haitian immigration are Bahamian immigration laws will
not primarily about intolerance, have to suffer the penalties the
prejudice or mean-spiritedness. law imposes. This means that
Rather, they are genuine those who come here illegally
expressions of concern based will not be granted the right to
on daily experience and future work.
hopes for the nation that A more sophisticated com-
though we have always been puterised database is needed to
open to other cultures, we must better track those who have
act now to preserve and protect come here illegally yet still
our cultural identity and demo- apply for work permits. We will
cratic heritage, also refuse to grant work per-
mits to those who enter as visi-
PRINCIPLES tors.
But the rule of law also
I would like to outline for you applies to Bahamians. Unless
a few of the core principles we enforce penalties for those
which I bring to the dialogue who employ illegal immigrants
on immigration. the practice will go on endless-
1, Bahamianisation: In terms ly. Government officials who
of legal immigration my belief abuse the law will also have to
is simple: If there is a qualified be dealt with severely.
Bahamian for a position, then 3. Preserving Our Identity
that Bahamian should get the and Way of Life: The reason
job. This also means that if we many people have come to our
can't find a resident Bahamian Commonwealth is because they
that we are prepared to look out- wish to share in its benefits. We
side for a qualified Bahamian. should celebrate this and also
If there is no qualified cherish our Bahamian identity.
Bahamian, then a non-Bahami- But the very way of life many
an may be brought in until a seek here will be destroyed if it
Bahamian.becomes qualified or is overrun by attitudes and
can be successfully trained. You behaviour which are not con-
can be assured that my govern- sistent with our democratic her-
ment will not be bringing in any itage, basic civilities and social
Korean fishermen to do what stability.
Bahamians have been doing for While we are not a perfect
generations. people or a perfect land, we can
But Bahamianisation also claim a high level of political
means something else to me. It freedom, economic and social
means that those who have per- mobility, and social peace. We
manent residence with the right must do everything in our pow-
to work andlthose seeking citi- i this er
zeriship must also be Bahami-nn 4 Ge 06nrE-


tunity: Part of the problem with
the dialogue on immigration is
that the Bahamas is not always
sure of the overall economic
direction it wants to take.
Such a direction will tell us
about the type and quality of
labour our economy needs.
Such a plan must be the con-
text in which you create an
effective immigration policy.
My immigration policy will
ensure that Bahamians are con-
sidered first, but that we will be
very open to expatriate exper-


tise when it is required.
5. Human Rights: Bahamian
immigration policies must
adhere to basic standards of
human rights, including our
policies on detention and repa-
triation. Moreover, we must
ensure that those few officials
and others who treat illegal
immigrants improperly are dealt
with in the appropriate manner.
We uphold our own dignity by
speaking forthrightly yet
respectfully about those who
are strangers in our land.


Intensify the experience!
Inside:the Town Centre Mall
(Next to Furniture Plus)
Tel:(242) 394-2607 Today
. :. ,m 4Z ,.,. .39.4.12....2


SPallet Racking Locker .. Steel Shelving.


Your dream home begins with a lot you can build
on. With our help, you can realise your dream, as
EASY AS 123!
* No commitment fees
* Competitive interest rates
* Flexible payment terms with up to 10 years to repay!

Call or visit any RBC Royal Bank of Canada branch today.
We'll help make your dreams come true EASY AS 123!


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean RB RBC

il Royal Bank
Rel stered trade-mark of Royal Bank ofCanadaThe Uon&Globe symbol S Of Canada-
and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada
----- -- --


., .: . ...' '" ... .... . ..... .... :,. . .. .. '.++" ... + '+'-


59 Montrose Ave. IPOBox 8645


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 2, MNDAY SEPEMBER26, 005 HE TIBUN


French diplomat makes visits


* AMBASSADOR Designate of the Republic of France, Francis Hurtut, presents his letters of
credentials to Governor General Dame Ivy Dumont at Government House on Thursday,
September 22
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)


National Choir of The Bahamas



A4.AUDITIONS
Come and Try out for the National Choir of The Bahamas

Monday, September, 26th
College of The Bahamas, Music Block
(2 storey building opposite McDonalds)
7:00 pm


Jefferson Johnson


Must be at least 25 years old. No upper age limit.
Come prepared to sing any song.


Rehearsals for all members begin October 4th, 2005, at 7:30 pm.
Only those accepted may participate in a Choral 'Workshop to be
conducted by Dr. Jefferson Johnson, Director of Choral Activities at
the University of Kentucky, to be held in Nassau on October 21 a d
22, 2005.

For further information call 356-2691/2 or
302-4512.





RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA


CLIENT CARD

Anytime. Any place.

Anywhere.
Enjoy the convenience of self-serve,
banking 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
at more than 20 locations across New
Providence and the Family Islands.


With your RBC Royal Bank
of Canada Client Card you can:

V Make cash withdrawals i
(get a FREE
withdrawal with
every payroll credit \
to your account
per month)


* AMBASSADOR Designate of the Republic of France Francis Hurtut presents letters of
credentials during a courtesy call on the Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service
the Hon. Vincent Peet on Wednesday, September 21 at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)



In with the old -



how age can help


WHEN you're ready to buy a
home, do you think you'll pre-
fer new construction or an
existing home or condo?
A brand new house may
sound appealing, but consider
what an existing home could
offer above and beyond the fea-
tures you'll find in a newly-built
(or yet to be built!) house.
Foremost in your mind is
price. With comparable ameni-
ties, you'll likely find that a
resale home lists at a lower
price than a new one.
In the US the National Asso-
ciation of REALTORS
research predicts the median
price, of resale homes will rise
five per cent in 2005, while new
construction will rise six per
cent.
One per cent can be huge
when you're considering such
a large purchase. We do not
have access to local statistics


*E
aha


but I am sure the ratio is simi-
lar.
Location, location, location.
Many existing homes are
already located in well-estab-
lished neighbourhoods near
shopping, transportation and
entertainment.
Frankly, land is more scarce
thse days than in the past, so
newer construction tends to be
ever further out from the centre
of town, sometimes on small-
er, unadorned lots without
much landscaping. If you'd like
a spacious yard with a fence
and beautiful trees, you'll prob-


ably start by looking at older
homes.
Don't get me wrong new
homes offer a lot of modern
Amenities. But don't overlook
older homes that are often
updated and improved with the
very features you're looking
for. Know what you want
before you begin your search,
and keep an open mind.


& Make account deposits

V Keep a record
of your transactions

/ Make RBC VISA*
and MasterCard*
payments

V Transfer funds
between accounts


V Sign up for Royal Online Internet
Banking and enjoy secure online
banking, 24/7


Call or visit your nearest RBC Royal Bank of Canada
branch for more information.


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada"' The Lion & Globe
symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


RBC
SRoyal Bank
of Canada"


.... .... .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . ... ... ... . .. .. .. . . . ..". .. '.. .r . .


PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 13
I


"YourBahian SuponWkets"




VALUE
NOWACCWIING
A SUNCARD


MIX OR MATC


MIX OR MATCH
RED & GOLDEN
APPLES
3/890A


SWEET 1
BARTLETT
PEARS
3/89,0


PCIA TURKEY o


DRUMSTICKS
PERP- LB

.* 99_.


S FRESH
GROUND

BEEF
S99
PER LB


YELLOW PERSIAN
lONIO am I
$S69 4/$ 00
IDAHO BAKING GREEN OR RIPE '

POTATOES PLANTAINS
LOOSE
^._______2/_ 9 0__ ______


mROERiLON


ARMOUR
BEEF/CHICKEN
VIENNA
SAUSAGE


EVER





HELLMANN'S
REGULAR

MAYOK


BED BATH & HOME


HOME


RUGS
TOWELS
SHEET SETS
TABLECLOTHS
THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS
SHOWER CURTAINS


SALE


BATHROOM ACCESSORIES
LAMPS
BLENDERS
FIGURINES
BAKEWARES


WALL CLOCKS
WALLPICTURES
PICTURE FRAMES
FLATWARE SETS
COOKWARE SETS
GLASSWARE SETS
DINNERWARE SETS


SLocated: Harbour Bay Shopping enter
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


SHEET S
TOWE
COMFORT
RUGS
THROW PIL
SHOWER Cl
TABLECL(


LOOK FOR OUR RED TAG ITEMS
3ETS KITCHEN CURTAINS LAUNDRY HAMPERS
LS POT SETS GARBAGE BINS
RTERS FLATWARE SETS BED TREYS
S SCHOOL SUPPLIES BED REST
LLOWS WALL PICTURES BODY PILLOW


JRTAINS
OTHS


TEA KETTLES
SPACE SAVERS


Pay Less at Discount Mart
VE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISAAND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITYSTAMPCARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411393-5569'


MIS CUT
CHICKEN

WINGS
SPER-LBi
$419


PAR EXCELLENCE


RICE


I* L


-- -


CENTER CUT

PORK

CHOps.'',

0 19S,
1PER L


I-


-"


-- I ILI ..-


I












Ppe prays for victims of hurrian in


southern US as well as rescue workers


.e~.
-


TENDER MOTOR INSURANCE


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with Motor
Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from BTC's Security's Desk located in its administrative building
on John F Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
"TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE", and delivered on or
before 5:00 pm on Friday, September 30, 2005 to the attention
of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.










$1,000 Customer CASH BACK Incentive For September


an 2005


That's right the worlds #1 spot utility is now on sale,
so come on in and take advantage of the best deal in
the Bahamas on a full size American Built SUV.


2005 FORD EXPLORER


XLS 5 Passenger
4.0 V6 Automatic
Air Condition
Radio, CD player
Power, Locks, Windows, Mirrors
Running Boards
Alloy Wheels
SPECIAL CASH PRICE
$34,500.00


XLS 7 Passenger
4.0 V6 Automatic
Air Condition
Radio, CD player
Power, Locks, Windows, Mirrors
Running Boards
Alloy Wheels
Third row stealing
$35,500.00


XLT 7 Passenger
4.0 V6 Automatic
Dual Air Condition
Radio, CD player
Power, Locks, Windows, Mirrors
Running boards
Alloy Wheels
Third Row seating
$38,100.00


Included: 3 year / 36000 mile Warranty, Licence and Inspection to your birthday. 2 year (24 hour, 7 day) roadside
assistance, floor mats and a full tank of gas, rust proofed and undercoated, 1st 5 services to 12000 miles



FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friend motors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendly motorsbahamas.com


q - 4W


- -
- b

~ -


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


0 --Omw- 40-NO ,wsume 04


For further information call 356-2691/2

1. I


TENDER

VEHICLE CLEANING SERVICES
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders
from suitably qualified companies to supply the company with Vehicle
Cleaning Services.
Interested companies can pick up a specification document from BTC's
administration building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of
9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.
Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "TENDER FOR VEHICLE
CLEANING SERVICES" and delivered to the attention of:
Mr Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas
Bids should reach the company's administrative office on John F. Kennedy
Drive by 5:00pm on Thursday, September 29, 2005.
Companies submitting bids are invited to attend a bid opening on Friday,
September 30, 2005 at 10:00am at BTC's Perpall's Tract Drive location.
BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THETRIUNEMONAYRSEPEMBRA2, 205,PAG 1


US bus


incssman to fight


bar on run for president


um


* -


-a -S
* -
a -
a a. -
a-. ~
~ -


a -
* r
7


-Copyn


1%--m Synd


tar n


_---


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.


* a -
* ~ a -
- -
-a - a
*~- ~a
- - -a
- ~
a a -


- -


- -


r9


-.af
f *m *








.. 4 4 b
Sa" __. -
oo-
a a a4b
- -
a a.h



a b. -


1i cated jConte-nt`


ommercial News Providers "


ft 0 MoP,4 o


-"no-- 00
4b ~


41ba
411.

- -4.h.


- .0


a.-.~ -a
- a -


a -
- S ~
e a
- a a -
a
- a - a. - -~
- - a
- -a- a -
a -~


*


MO M


13BAHAMIAAN

Old Fort Bay, Oceanfront Villa

EXECUTIVE RENTAL
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ il i.;..q .,, ,_ ,.,.... :,'t. ).(. (:,-" ';i


View from Master Suite Aerial View
Four Thousand Sq. Ft. 4 bed, 4.5 bath villa, separate.
l i g and dining rooms, large covered patios, all three
floors have separate central A.C. Private enclosed
courtyard lush flowering trees surrounding large pool.
Private roof. deck ideal for sunning. Panoramic views of
Old Fort Bay with beautiful sunsets. 85 ft. dock,
2 car garage. Totally enclosed with excellent security.
Rent: $9.500.per month
Tel: 322.1069 or 359.2964
www.bahamasproperty.com


Available fro


I.FireTh~reads~
MakyS t 39-68 ho poI Bv 2816


a I- I


- I------__IL-----~~_l~_. - ~ -----__1.~~1_~.~~


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


- -MONO


:1


-, -_-






PAi 16,i MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE:
>**


LOCALAND3ITERATIONALNW

J,, lor

%-4F kruo t for

D apartment "1

of Public

health march
N41 'MEBERS of the
Department oPfPublic
II Iuath marched down-
Robinson Road yesterday toM N IST RYOEH
encourage Bahamians to getH
their children immunised
early in life.
hec group marched from D EPA M N
Town Center Mall to theM
Blue Hill Road Park..:
(Photo: Felipd Major/
Tribune staff) -O


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"







MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahaman inuranc


tr!Dune


Bahamas to


face more


national


tax


blacklists


1 MICHAEL PATON


Payments change

to speed Registrar's

turnaround time


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
THE Registrar General's
Department has confirmed
changes to its payment
options, which are intended to
speed up processing proce-
dures and reduce the turn-
around time for documents
from 30 days to a matter of
weeks.
Shane Miller, Registrar
General, told The Tribune that
under the new system, cus-


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE head of a Bahamian
company that has just secured
Caribbean distribution rights
for an encrypted e-mail solu-
tion told The Tribune that
there was an enormous
demand for his product in this
nation, with not even the Prime
Minister's Office possessing
technology to keep sensitive
messages out of the hands of
hackers and other undesirables.


tomers who wanted to regis-
ter deeds and documents will
only be able to pay for the ser-
vice using a bank-certified
cheque, credit card or cash.
The latter form is being dis-
couraged, and cheques drawn
on company accounts not
accepted.
But for services unrelated
to the recording of deeds and
documents, such as company
incorporations, the payment
options will remain the same,
with customers able to pay
SEE page 3B


Elvis Hepburn, president and
chief executive of Freeport-
based Sharpworx (Bahamas),
said the market for secured e-
mail solutions was "enormous",
covering all sectors of the
Bahamian economy. He found
it "absolutely appalling" that
his research had shown the
Prime Minister's Office and
other sensitive government
ministries did not have e-mail
security.
SEE page 7B


'Pivotal' moment on OECD's 'harmful tax practices'
initiative could provoke trend that deprives nation's
financial sector of new business


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas could be placed
on more national tax black-
lists, inhibiting the flow of
new business to its financial
services industry, if the
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation


and Development's (OECD) November
summit on 'harmful tax practices' fails to
produce, the progress its members desire.
Michael Paton, the Bahamas Financial
Services Board's (BFSB) deputy chair-
man, said there was "potential for the pres-
sure to be ratcheted up" on the Bahamas
and other international financial centres,
depending on the OECD meeting's out-


come, if other nations opted for the nation-
al tax blacklist route.
National tax blacklists, as defined by a
Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners
(STEP) report, are legislation or regula-
tions that "prescribe" negative treatment
for certain transactions and products
SEE page 2B

Court hears
dispute over

es $23m plant
t, Sci- M By NEIL HARTNELL
EST), Tribune Business Editor
unch-
"that THE losing bidder for the,
$23 million Blue Hills reverse:
gy use osmosis plant was in the
ording Supreme Court last week to,
th ris- argue its case for a Judicial
e bur- Review of the contract that was;.
aange awarded by the Government:
to rival Consolidated Water. -
The outcome of the hearings
See COURT, 2B


By NEIL HARTNELL summer by the Bahamas I
Tribune Business Editor ence and Technology Cor
released without any fanfare
THE Bahamas has been urged to imple- es in calling for a national
ment laws and policies permitting "non-BEC conforms to sustainable de
power generation" and to provide real prop- The Bahamas had the I
erty tax reductions for homes that use solar per capita in the Caribbean
water heaters and other renewable power to the Commission, and thi
sources, as part of a national energy policy. ing global oil prices was imp
Although much publicity has surrounded den" on the nation's fo
the Government's Petroleum Usage Review resources and economic efi
isCommitteer.and soaring gas prices,.the ground.
it is covering is not new. A paper produced last SE ,Page 4B


Environmen
mission (B
e, pulled no p
nergy policy
velopment".
highest energy
region, acc
s coupled wi
posing a "hug
foreign exch
ficiency.


Investing Is Only For Rich Folks.


That is the biggest lie we teourselves. Why speak


failure overyour finances? Every day, thousands of


S Bahamiaris are already investing and generating


millions of dollars in personal wealth. Why arent


you claiming your share?


For professional financial advice In a friendly atmosphere, you should call:


^Colina.
Financial.Advisors
Make Your Money Grow *


MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com


502-7010


CMlrsp~Od~"i~tY~etnsxPpwe p ea~ube~~$~le rAuptPsJohoegreei4~cPtochang A~d~nlrrihs~mlriea II


Micronet
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270 Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242.328.3040 Fax 24 3R.q 04A.qa


Back-to-School technology that will
keep you ahead of the class.

DL MIwfOBfOt TOSHIBA
C.Rt. I TIFID Don't copy. Lead.
inrest pwftnW


- il info@rnioronetb


0 eoipf mac :s sw o


BEST urges incentives for no

BEC electric producers, hom


Web Site: wwwtnicrone s


Bahamian insurance
premiums to rise...




Page 3B


.~--- - ~- -'" .


~---~II~.~ ~*~.~_.l-~--.-.ICI1 ~. ~.~_ _~._.~ __ ______ ----------1~ ~.~._. ---------_.1.~.~.~~ __. -1








PAE BMODABEPEMER26N205SS IRIUN


FIDELITY MARKET WRAP


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

Brisk trading
took place in
the Bahamian
market this past
week as just
under 50,000 shares changed
hands. The market saw eight
out of its 19 listed stocks trade,
of which two advanced, one
declined and five remained
unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) with 19,750 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 40 per cent of the total
shares traded.

Mover

Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the big mover for the week,
up $0.19 to close at its new 52-
week high of $9.05. On the
down side, Kerzner Interna-
tional's BDR (KZLB)
declined by $0.40 to close out
the week at $5.36.

COMPANY NEWS
FirstCaribbean Interna-


tional Bank (Bahamas) Ltd
(CIB) -.
For the 2005 third quarter,
CIB posted net income of
$23.2 million, representing an
increase of $3.2 million or 16.5
per cent over the comparable
period last year.

Income

Net interest income
increased by $6.7 million to
total $30.8 million, while non-
interest income grew by $1.7
million to total $10.4 million
year-over-year. The strong
performance of the bank's
US$ security portfolio, due to
an increasing US Fed rate, was
one of the catalysts behind the
27 per cent increase in net
interest income for the peri-
od.
Operating expenses for the
2005 third quarter increased
by $355,000 or 2 per cent, in
line with budgeted numbers.
Total assets as at July 31, 2005,
stood at $3.4 billion up $219
. million year-over-year. Robust
growth in the bank's residen-
tial mortgages and business
loans were the primary con-


tributors to the growth in the
bank's asset base. Some 1125
shares of CIB traded in the
market this week, the stock
closing at its 52-week high of
$9.50.

Colina Holdings Bahamas
(CHL) -
For the second quarter
2005,.CHL posted a net loss,
after minority interest, of
$175,000 compared to net
income of $887,000 for the
comparable period last year.
Revenues increased by 106
per cent to total $40.7 million.
This sizeable expansion .in
CHL's revenue can be attrib-
uted to its acquisition of Impe-
rial Life Financial on January
1, 2005. Benefits and expenses
grew by $22 million to total
$40.8 million. CHL's manage-
ment has attributed the
increase to non-recurring
extraordinary technical and
professional c6ots incurred as
the company attempts to inte-
grate its latest acquisition.,


11 in


Tines
recent tinies, CHL 'has

' .* :' j. * ? ' ''


been plagued with its fair
share of internal conflicts and
corporate governance issues
etc, and with its upcoming
Annual General Meeting slat-
ed for October 18, 2005, CHL
shareholders and policyhold-
ers are hoping management
will come prepared to put
their anxieties to rest.

Kerzner International
(KZL) -
KZL has announced that
99.22 per cent of the holders
of its outstanding $400 million
8 7/8 per cent senior subordi-
nated notes accepted the com-
pany's' tender offer of
$1,082.83 per $1000 par value
as at September 21, 2005.

Entitled

Any person still wishing to
accept the tender offer on or
before October 8 will be enti-
tled to $1,060.58 per $1000 par
value. The company intends
to use the proceeds of a new
$400 million 6.75 per cent
senior subordinated notes,
plus cash, to repay the ten-
dered notes.


FROM page 1B


involving listed international
financial centres.
The Bahamas appears on, the
national tax blacklists of
Argentina, Brazil, India, Mex-
ico, Portugal and Spain, being
specifically named as a so-
called 'tax haven' in those
countries' decrees, legislation
and regulations.
This nation is also named on
the 'informal' national tax


blacklists of Australia, France,
Germany and the US, mean-
ing that although the Bahamas
is named as a 'tax haven', there
are no formal legal conse-
quences for transactions going
through this jurisdiction.

Blacklists

Mr Paton said: "I think it's
fair to say that blacklists are a


very effective'tool used lby
Latin American countries .to
prevent new business coming
to places like the Bahamas.
"There is no doubt we have
existing legitimate business
from Latin American coun-
tries. The blacklist itself is not
going to cause it to go away,
but it's the new business, and
the concern we have is there's
the potential for more of these


Opportunity



World Class Retailer


Esso, a market leader in fuels and
convenience retailing, is looking for
operators/ franchisees for its
service stations across the country.
Retails Sites immediately available
in New Providence.

If you have...
Successful experience in sales,
finance, or administration;
A minimum of five years
successfully supervising a team
of workers;
A desire to provide superior


*
*
*


customer service;
Computer literacy;
Organisational discipline;
Access to capital and a good
credit history


Application forms may be collected at
our Windsor Field Office (immediately
West of Nassau International Airport).

Completed forms should be addressed
and returned to:

Yorick Cox
Caribbean Sales
Support Co-ordinator '
Esso Standard Oil S.A. Ltd.
Windsor Field Road
Nassau, NP :4
Bahamas /i

Applications should be submi o
later than September 30 2005


...We want to know you!


SWe're drivers too.


blacklists to come out, espe-
cially if the November Mel-
bourne meeting does not get
movement in their [OECD
members'] favour.
"If they don't see any move-
ment with it, there's the fear
they may resort to blacklist-
ing."

Practices

The STEP report described
the 'harmful tax practices' ini-
tiative as "stalemated", report-
ing that the OECD was still
insisting that international
financial centres such as the
Bahamas fulfill their commit-
ments to greater transparency
and information exchange. .
This demand was being
made even though there is little
chance of attaining the 'level
playing field' international
financial centres are demand-
ing, as a number of OECD
nations have not committed to
information exchange them-
selves.
"If no way of breaking this
impasse is found at the Novem-
ber 2005 meeting of all inter-
ested parties in the OECD's
Global Forum, the whole
process may collapse," the
STEP Report said.
"In turn, if this multilateral
process does collapse, it
appears highly likely that a
large number of OECD states
will .introduce new tax black-
lists. Several OECD states,
including Germany and Aus-\
tralia, are already considering
their options.in this area."
Mr Paton said that to dis-
courage its citizens and com-
panies from using internation-
al financial centres such as the
Bahamas, Mexico had made it
a criminal offence not to
declare equity interests in com-
panies registered in these
nations.
"You can see the potential
for the pressure to be ratch-
eted up if more jurisdictions
opt for the blacklist route," Mr
Paton said.
"The challenge for us is to
see what we do in response to
these blacklists."


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.80
$1.10
$0.80
$6.88
$10.00
$12.25
$1.40
$9.05
$9.00
$1.69
$9.50
$2.40
$4.20
$1.15
$9.21
$10.70
$9.94
$8.50
$5.36
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTDPRICE
CHANGE


$0
$-0
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.19
$-0.09
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.04
$-
$-0.40
$-


0
4847
0
100
-0
0
0
12000
19750
45
1125
0
0
0
0
0
4800
0
6802
0


-27.27%
-14.58%
.-5.88%
19.65%
25.00%
-5.77%
-22.22%
27.46%
26.76%
-23.18%
26.84%
60.00%
6.06%
-42.21%
15.13%
10.31%
0.51%
3.41%
-11.55%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
* Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.08 per share payable on September 30, 2005, to all com-
mon shareholders as at record date September 15,2005.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB) has declared a dividend of $0.06 per
share payable on September 30,2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date September 23, 2005.

* FamGuard Company will hold its Annual General Meet-
ing on September 29,2005, at 4pm at British Colonial Hilton,
Governors Ballroom A, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

* Colina Holdings (Bahamas) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on October 18, 2005, at 4pm at the J. Whitney Pin-
der Building at Colinalmperial Insurance, Collins Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas. :



International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change

CAD$ 1.1708 -0.73
GBP 1.7763 -1.73
EUR 1.2043 -1.53

Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $64.19 1.89
Gold $470.30 2.17

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly %Change

DJIA 10,419.59 -2.09
S & P 500 1,215.29 -1.83
NASDAQ 2,116.84 -2.01
Nikkei 13,159.36 1.55


Given the uncertainty over
the OECD initiative, Mr Paton
said it would make sense for
the Bahamas to review its pol-
icy on tax information
exchange and the 'harmful tax
practices' issue.

Signing

Currently, the Bahamas has
said it will "not do anything" in
terms of negotiating further
Tax Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs) until
there is a 'level playing field'
on the OECD issue. This
nation is also attempting to
hold off for as long as possible
signing a TIEA other than the
one entered into with the Unit-
ed States.
Yet Mr Paton told The Tri-
bune that Mexico had told the
Bahamas the price for escap-
ing its national tax blacklist
would be to enter into a TIEA
with it. Other countries had
"intimated to us" that a TIEA
was also necessary for the
Bahamas to escape their lists.
During its November meet-
ing in Melbourne, the OECD


will release its 2005 'progress
report' on the 'harmful tax
practices' initiative. A sub-
committee, on which ,the
Bahamas is represented by
Rowena Bethel, the Ministry
of Finance's legal adviser, will
report to the main OECD
Forum on what individual
nations have done to meet their
commitments.
Mr Paton said much could
depend on the tone of press,
statements made by the OECD
once the Melbourne meetings
concluded. Something saying
the process was moving in the
right direction could hold off
national tax blacklists, but any
breakdown could spark moves:
in that direction.
The BFSB deputy chairman
said: "I guess the question on
the table is the spin that the'
Melbourne meeting will come
out with.
"The November meeting
could be a very seminal meet-
ing on the OECD initiative, so
we need to start analysing and
looking at the next step. It's
going to be a very interesting
few months."


Court, from Page 1B


is uncertain, although it is understood that a
verdict has yet to be delivered. Maurice Glinton,
Biwater's attorney, and the UK-based compa-
ny's chairman, Adrian White, who was in Nas-
sau last week for the hearings, did not return
The Tribune's calls seeking comment.
UK-based Biwater International, which was
the runner-up to Consolidated Water in the
bidding for the 20-year contract, filed an appli-
cation for a Judicial Review of the award with
the Supreme Court on March 10. Consolidated
Water is not a party to the action.
In the first instance, Biwater International is
seeking a Court Order that overturns the Con-
solidated Water award and instead hands it the
Blue Hills project. Failing that, the UK compa-
ny and its Bahamian subsidiary, Biwater
Bahamas, "are seeking an order from the court
awarding compensatory and exemplary dam-
ages to them".

Clarification

Mr White earlier this year told The Tribune
that Biwater was "seeking clarification" from the
Supreme Court on whether a Letter of Award it
had received in relation to the $22 million Blue
Hills reverse osmosis plant contract constituted
a "binding agreement".
He said the company's major "problem" was


the "multi-million" amount it had spent on costs
associated with the bid for the contract, which
the Government had eventually awarded to
Cayman Islands-headquartered Consolidated
Water.
He alleged that after a Letter of Award, which
initially gave the Blue Hills contract to Biwater
International, was annulled by a Letter of Can-
cellation, the Government "encouraged us to
carry on working", incurring extra costs.
Compromise

Mr White said Biwater was "seeking redress
or a compromise with the Government",
although it would prefer the latter solution as it
had "no vendetta against the Government".
He added: "The reason we've applied to the,
Supreme Court is because we felt we have a,
binding contract. We are seeking legal clarifi-
cation to confirm that. I think our process real-
ly is as simple as that.
"There's definitely nothing vindictive about,
this, we're just seeking clarification because, of
course, it's c6st us a huge amount of money to
undertake the bid, and having embarked on the
contract against the Letter of Award, our costs':
have been enormous and our loss of profits
from the 20-year contract becomes very sub-
stantial indeed."'


- ----


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


. I rit TRIBUNE















Bahamian insurance premiums





to rise as consequence of Rita


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
BAHAMIANS are likely to
experience a significant
increase in their homeowners
insurance premiums next year
due to the damage inflicted by
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
on the US Gulf coast, as the
global reinsurance industry will
seek to recoup losses and
obtain an incentive to continue
insuring risks in storm-prone
areas.
The latest reports estimate
Hurricane Rita as having
caused some $9 to $18 billion in
wind damage alone. Hurricane
Katrina's cost to insurers is
being estimated at $15 billion,
but the total may rise to match
or surpass the $21 billion price
tag attributed to Hurricane
Andrew in 1992, the most
expensive hurricane in recent
history.
The cost to insurance com-
panies could be as much as $40
billion to $60 billion out of total
losses of more than $125 bil-
lion, according to Risk Man-
agement Solutions, an interna-


tional company that estimates
insurance catastrophe risk.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany's general manager, said
it was too early to know what
the precise impact on Bahami-
an homeowners' insurance pre-
miums will be.
He added that Bahamian
insurance companies would.
have to see what happens with
Rita and how much the insured
losses were before determin-
ing what the likely increases
will be.

Increases

"Katrina doesn't guarantee
increases in premiums, but with
multiple, material size losses,
then the probability is that
there will be an impact. As
soon as we have a clear indica-
tion as to what the adjusted
premiums will be we will advise
our clients," Mr Ward said.
Following Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne, insurance
premiums for homeowners
rose by an estimated 25 to 30
per cent for Bahamian home-
owners, the result of a combi-


nation of local storms and
world factors.
With two months still to go
before the end of the 2005 hur-
ricane season, Mr Ward said
the Bahamian industry was
depending for reinsurance next
year on the same companies
likely to be hit by multi-million
dollar claims in areas impacted
by Katrina and Rita.
He added that reinsurers will
take into consideration the fre-
quency of storms not only in
the Caribbean and Gulf of
Mexico, but other losses or per-
ils that may halipen around the
world, before assessing to what
extent they have to adjust their
premiums and pass on the
increase to Bahamian insur-
ance companies.
Steve Watson,.managing
director of RoyalStar Assur-
ance, said he expected premi-
ums to rise for Bahamian
homeowners next year as a
consequence of Hurricanes
Katrina and Rita.
"If Rita doesn't produce too
large a loss, the increases may
be about 20 per cent, but I have
a feeling it will be more than
that. The reinsurers don't even
know what the losses are from


Katrina, with all the flooding.
That will make the process
more complicated," Mr Wat-
son said.

Online

Meanwhile, the online edi-
tion of The Guardian, a British
newspaper, reported that the
prospect of a major storm hit-
ting Houston was one of the


market's "realistic disaster sce-
narios".
The threat of this specific
calamity, the article said, acted
as a "stress test" that insurance
experts use to calculate
whether the market has the
financial strength to deal with a
major disaster.
As part of its financial emer-
gency planning, Lloyd's of Lon-
don required each of the syn-


dicates that make up its market
to pretend that the industry has
been hit by a $60 billion loss
caused by a windstorm hitting
Texas and slamming into Hous-
ton.
Under Lloyd's pretend pat-
tern of damage, there would
be $10 billion of losses caused
to offshore energy, such as oil
rigs, and $50 billion of main-
land property losses.


FROM page 1B


using credit cards, cash and
company cheque.

Personal

Personal cheques for these
other services will not be
accepted, and company
cheques will be accepted at the
Registrar General's Depart-
ment's discretion.
The announcement confirms
Tribune Business's exclusive
story last Thursday, when it
reported that financial services
executives had expressed con-
cern that company cheques
were no longer being accepted.
They also complained they
had been given no warning
about the payments system,
change.
Mr Miller told The Tribune
that the main driver of the


change was the Department's
attempt to implement a sys-
tem that allows it to reduce its
turnaround time. There were,
however, several potential
obstacles to achieving this
objective, including waiting for
cheques to be cleared at the
bank.

Documents
"We're trying to get docu-
inments back to customers in a
month or less than a month,
that's why we're doing it this
way," he explained. "Other-
wise, we actually have to wait
until the cheque is cleared,
which will slow down the
process.
"With this system we can
guarantee the documents will
be back in hand within 30 days


p


I LIMITED

will be held in the

Governor's Ballroom A

of the

British Colonial Hilton

at 4:00 p.m.

on Thursday,

September 29,2005.









aa n O





Prpry-FeeotIrn


or less; that was the main rea-
son to implement such a sys-
tem."
Mr Miller said officials his
department and the Ministry
of Financial Services and
Investments will be in consul-
tation with the business and
legal community to determine
how to accomplish an accept-
able turnaround time. The sec-
tor, along with the Govern-
ment, is expected to discuss
the best system to put in place
and how and when it should
be implemented.
"The whole idea was not to
cause confusion, but to facili-
tate a process to knock down
the time it was taking to
process the documents," Mr
Miller said.
"Having to wait for a
cheque to be cleared threw our
automated process back. Right
now, we're getting documents
out in 30 days, and we're try-
ing to get it down from there."

Policy

Notice of the payments pol-
icy change was published and
sent out to the Registrar Gen-
eral's Department's customers
in mid-September, and the
changes are currently in effect.
According to Mr Miller, it
was always a general public
service policy that only certi-
fied cheque be accepted as
payment, as opposed to per-
sonal or company checks. A
number of departments
waived that policy for one rea-
son or another and begun
accepting company cheques.


The

Annual General Meeting

of the


Shareholders of

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION


Bl !Colina "IMCM
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing InfrmationfA O.
2,Septeer :2005

4;wk t 82wk.LowPrevious IlI Tod.V.CloseChange 0a11y Pol. RE $ 6 Y
1w.-10.00w AaO SMares 0,80 0.80 000 -0.207 0. NIM 0.00
10.00 8.00 Baham asProperty Fud 10.00 10.00 0.00 1452 0340 0.9 340%
6.90 5.55 Bank Of Bahamas 0.88 6.88 0.00 0.581 0.330 12.3 4.80
0.85 070 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0:00 0:204 0.010 3.9 1.26
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0126 060 13 4.29%
1.15 0.87 FidelityBank 1.10 1,10 000 4,847 0.066 0.030 10.7 2.73%
9.05 6,90. Cable Bahamas 8.99 0.06 0.06 11,000 0.818 0.240 14.6: 2.65%
2.20 1.69 ColinaHoldngs 1.609 1.69 0.00 0.004 0000 M 0,00%
9.10 6,75 Commonwealth O Bank 9,09 9.09 0.00 0.705 0140 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0,67 Doctorst Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0:429 0.000 5. 6 0.00%
420 3.85 PFamguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 8.8 5.71%
10.70 9,25 Fnco 10.70 10.70 0.00 0.895 0,540 15A 4,77%
9:50 6,99 FirstCaribbean 9,50 950 0.00 0.695 0:380 13,7 4.00%
9.21 8.31 Focdl 21 9.21 0.00 0.676 0.500 13,6 5.430
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concret 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Ulllitiesa 9.90 9.90 0.00 0.528 0.405 18.8 4.04
8.50 8.20 J. S Johnson 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.526 0.560 162 6.59%
6.69 4,38 KerOna international DRa 5.7 5.36 -0.21 0.122 0.000 45.7 0.00%
10.00 10,00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 00 0.00 2.036 0.780 4,9 7.60%

13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11 00 1.488 0.900 91 7.26S
10.14 10,00 Cardbean Crossigs (Pral) ; 00 10.35 10000 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
,0 0.40 RND Hedings ,' 0.29 0.5 0.00 .0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
S28,00ABDAB 41.00 4300 4100 2220 0000 194 0.00%
1.00 13.00 Bahiamas Supermarkets 12.33 1333 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 0.103 0.000 NIM 0.00%

1.2521 1.1846 Colina Money Market Fund 1.252089*
2.4169 2,0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4169 **
10.5576 10.0000 FidelIty Prime Income Fund 10,5578"*
22560 2.1491 Collna MSI Preferred Fund 2.755981,
1.1273 1.0576. Colna Bond Fund 1.127305""

l8iXALLSHAREINDX. 19Dec02 1,000.01 TLD. last12m onthdden datidead M y dolg plft
82wk4i ,ighlest cingp price in last 52 weeat id $ .yng price of Colis and RsA t
82n-Lotw -Laonest loin9price in last 52 wekt Ask $ ng prte of ConaT and fidat
Prevto Cl. PIe touay' weighted price for dlyvlM LstI Prile Last traded oer.l.counter ptc
Today Cloese Cuwent ldey'seigiedie for dally Wu n Wekly Vol, Tradnng vok ene l eplr weea
Chany Change In dosing price from day to dai EPS $ A omLpainy'a iapm anllthangs pri iw etor ite t 12 mis
ally Vo..-NuAmber oftotal h ahrstadedtoday .NAV NwtAsset Valeu
OI. I DIdenIds per rsa pad inh tslat 12 month NM NotMNMeaniUng
PIE Closing price divided by tMW last 12 montieanl INX. The F18 itfy Bahi nStockxln"a 1Jal* 1.1994 10(
"-ASATAUG. 31,2 00 1**- ASATJUl.31, 200
-AS AT SEPT, 9, 208"t .-A8 ATAU 11, "*8 AS ATAUG. 31, 20O


COFR


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 20ub, I


THE TRIBUNE














National tax blacklists slamed as arbitraryv


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
NATIONAL tax blacklists used by
onshore countries to deter the cross-
border flow of financial services busi-
ness to international financial centres
such as the Bahamas have been
described as "arbitrary and discrimi-
natory" by an international study, dam-
aging the economies of listed coun-
tries.
A study conducted for the Society of


Trust and Estate Practitioners (STEP)
found that there were "strong indica-
tions" that national tax blacklists were
not created or maintained in line with
"consistently objective standards".
National tax blacklists, and associ-
ated regulatory and legal penalties, are
viewed as a particularly effective deter-
rent to new business flowing to inter-
national financial centres such as the
Bahamas. They are especially popular
among Latin American nations.
The Bahamas appears on the


national tax blacklists of Argentina,
Brazil, India, Mexico, Portugal and
Spain, being specifically named as a
so-called 'tax haven' in those coun-
tries' decrees, legislation and regula-
tions.
This nation is also named on the
'informal' national tax blacklists of
Australia, France, Germany and the
US, meaning that although the
Bahamas is named as a 'tax haven',
there are no formal legal conse-
quences for transactions going through


this jurisdiction.
Yet the STEP report found that a
number of these 'blacklists' included a
non-existent place called Patau. Rather
than identify fiscal legal entities, some
lists named the 'Pacific Islands' as a
'tax haven'.
In addition, Venezuela appeared to
have simply copied Mexico's national
tax blacklist, as had Argentina and Por-
tugal, and in the process inadvertently
blacklisted itself. Other lists included
nations that no longer existed, such as


the Windward Islands, there was the
confusion of similar sounding place
names, such as Vanuatu and Vanat
Levu. "Adding to doubts concerning
the reliability of these lists is the ten'
dency for individual mistakes to recur
from one list to another. This suggests
that the tax authorities are simply 'cut-
ting and pasting' from foreign lists, and
have not conducted independent
research on the jurisdictions they are
singling out for unfavourable treat-
ment," the STEP report said.


FROM page 1B
Among the recommenda-
tions made by BEST, in a paper
on activities in science, tech-
nology and innovation in the
Bahamas, was that independent
power producers (IPPs) inde-
pendent of BEC needed to be
encouraged.
The BEST paper urged that
the Government take a policy
decision requiring BEC to buy
electricity generated by IPPs
from renewable energy sources,
such as solar power or wind
power. Out of 78,000 homes in
Barbados, some 36,000 just
under half had solar water
heaters.
It called for policies requiring
BEC to allow third party gen-


erators to connect to its grid,
and that the 100 per cent gov-
ernment-owned corporation
"conduct integrated resource
planning" to evaluate renew-
able energy projects".
BEST also urged that a poli-
cy be developed to set "targets
and a timeframe that defines
the future market penetration
of electricity from renewable
energy sources by BEC or IPP
or other third party producers".
Among the critical issues fac-
ing the Bahamas on the energy
front, the BEST report said,
were energy security, maximis-
ing energy productivity and
preventing pollution.
It added: "There is an urgent


need for these issues to be
addressed and action taken
from a national level toward
making the Bahamas the best
little country on earth. The
need to act now is because
many of the desired results
would take years before the
fruit can be reaped.
"In the meantime, our com-
petitors have already begun
while we lay complacent. There
is a need to appoint an inde-
pendent energy advisory com-
mittee to advise the minister.
responsible for energy on all
energy related matters. Deviel-
op within that group policy
planning and implementation
skills."


ENGINEERS & TECHNICAL PROFESSIONALS
In response to its continuing growth, a full-service design, engineering, and environmental consulting
firm is seeking engineers, scientists and other technical professionals to support project opportunities
in the industrial and major commercial sectors. Professional applicants should have expertise and
experience in any of the following areas:
* Environmental (qualification in Chemical, Environmental or Civil Engineering, or
Environmental Science or Specialty)
* Mechanical/Systems Design (qualification in Chemical or Mechanical Engineering)
* Instrumentation, Controls and Automation (Chemical, Electrical, Instrument or
Mechanical Engineering)
* Civil/Structural Engineering
* Engineering CAD Drafting
* Geographic Information Systems
* Construction Management
* Quality Compliance Management
* Quantity Surveying
Applicants should send detailed resumes and qualifications to:


Phoenix Engineering Group Ltd.
Attn: Managing Director
P.O. Box F-43741 /' F
Freeport, Grand Bahama T
.'-..:Bahamas'g,, ... .* L- ...^,,
O! IS , "i


Phoenix


77 = 7'r 7.*'. .


:i p- ~ ~~ I" --.I lr TO 1- j ....... .'- I . .; .' "^ l A r
; a^;*^ 1i~ H*.* *^ ~ f^ B ,:a B;M^'.^.. (,^ !& ,?_.;. -..: *Kf .& W .i;., '.;y;..' tf-n i: .'.


Inadvertently or not, the lat-
ter step appears to have been
taken through the committee
appointed by Leslie Miller,
minister of trade and industry,
to review the petroleum indus-
try, although it is unclear
whether its brief extends to an
in-depth look at renewable
energy sources.
To enhance energy efficien-
cy, the BEST report recom-
mended a number of incentives,
including reduced customs duty
for energy efficient vehicles and
an investigation into using liq-
uefied natural gas (LNG) for
,pubicipower generation.
Other suggestions involved
grants for energy audits in the
hotel industry and other sec-
tors "'to identify opportunities
for solar hot water and othei
renewable energy systems",
plus the "establishment of
administrative procedures for


t



t







ei
1
I

c
bi


den on limited foreign
exchange, has had significant
negative environmental and
social impacts, is troubled with
high prices and uncertain sup-
plies, all resulting from a high
dependence on a single energy
type oil. We have more than
one vehicle per licensed driver,
and energy use per capita is the
region's highest.
"Increased consumption and
negative environmental impacts
speak to a need for an energy,
policy that conforms to sus-
tainable development devel-
opment that meets the needs
of today without compromis-
ing the ability of future genera-
tions to meet their own needs.
Sustainable development goals
should guide the development
of our energy.policy." .

Report


the negotiation of power pur- The BEST report said energy
chase agreements between util- costs for electricity and trans-
ties and independent power port "need to be at levels that
producers and Other third par- are affordable and that busi-
ty generators". : nesses can thrive". Maximising
BEST also called on the energy productivity, it added,.
Government to "provide indus- was vital for economic efficien-
trial development incentives for cy and growth.
renewable energy projects in "We are already in a highly
remote locations that are inte- competitive environment with
gral to wider income generating respect to tourism and bank-
activities or forms of com- ing, with more competitors
merce".:" entering the marketplace each
The report added: "A sound day. As our GDP increases, so
energy policy is a fundamental does our demand for energy
building block for a strong imports and we must increase
economy, a clean environment our productivity to ensure that
and beneficial social conditions, our industries maintain their
[n the Bahamas, almost 100 per competitive advantage," the
cent of our energy needs BEST report said.
depend on imported hydrocar- "On the supply side, compe-
bons. tition needs to be spurred in
"This has place ddafihge &bu- 'Pthe',electricity, supply, industry


to improve operational effi-
ciencies and provide differing
sources of energy supply. WO
need action to change the exist-
ing environment to encourage
independent power producers,
particularly those offering pow-
er from renewable energy
sources."
And the paper added: "The
use of diesel tractors and buses
can contribute significantly to
energy savings, as well as the
improved use of public trans-
port and the use of higher effi-
ciency vehicles.
"Commercial buildings
account for more than 50 per
cent of energy use. Air-condi-
tioning, equipment and appli-
ances are the.most important
energy users and represent sig-
nificant opportunities for ener-
gy savings. Compact fluores-
cent lamps and electronic bal-
lasts can have significant posi-
tive efficiency impacts. With
reference to a recent initiative,
in which Jamaica undertook to
sell some 150,000 CFL's over a
15-month period, it was esti-
mated that this would save
112,500 barrels of imported oil
over the 10-year life of each
bulb."
On energy security, the
BEST report warned against
relying solely on one source for
oil supply, contradicting some-
what Mr Miller's insistence oh
committing the Bahamas' to
PettoCaribe. It described
Venezuela as an "unstable
economy" due to the strikes
that sought to topple President.
Hugo Chavez in 2003, and rec-
ommended diversification and
increased use of renewable
energy. .:' : :'


COMMONWEALTH BREWERY LIMITED


P.O.BOX N-3897 CLIFTON PIER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS.
TEL: (242) 362-4790/2, 302-2900, 302-2901/ FAX: (242) 362-4793

VACANCY NOTICE


A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of New Providence,
is presently seeking the following:

Finance Department

Position: Accounts Payable Officer

D: ls:' I. "clude:..

> Processing of accounts payable documents.
;ProcesSing of periodic payment runs.
> Reco6icilling payable and accrual accounts.
> Maintenance of freight expense account.
> Maintenance of prepayment schedules.
> Maintenance of miscellaneous excel reports.

Minimum Requirements:

>University Degree: Finance or Accounting;
> To years Experience in financial arena;
>Strong communication, administrative, time management skills and
reporting skills;
> Excel spreadsheets usage at an advanced level a must;
S> Proficiency in Word applications required;
> Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong commitment
to detail and good analytical skills.

TI IDEAL CANDIDATE:

> Must be a team player that is willing to support the efforts of the team
or any team member.
> The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative with little supervision.
> Must have good communication skills

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available
to the successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to
the address below no later than September 30th, 2005:

Human Resources Manager
Commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O.Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 1-242-362-4793


S .I... ...... . .. ...


PAGEE 4S, ,MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


IVIiumLJi, o.r IIIVIiD-n 0-o, 0UVO, -VAIt-- O


sITRE


FOR CONTINUHG EDUCATION & VISION


@LWVIu~ui


COMPUTER OFFERINGS
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does
not understand how they work. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: None Begins:Monday, 26 September 2005 6:00pm- 9:00pm Section 01 (GEES)
Saturday, 24 September 2005 10:00am-1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
Duration:12 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Tuition: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands-on practice with a
variety of software including: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.
/


Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I Begins:Thursday, 29 September 2005
Duration:12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Time:6:00pm-9:00pm
Fees: $550.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Thursday, 13 October 2005 Time:9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $160.00
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training
in the following areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency,
Internet and Email Proficiency. ,
Pre-requisite: None Begins:Wednesday, 28 September 2005 Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration:12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting
and Repairs.
Pre-requisite:None Begins:Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm
Tuesdays and Thursdays Duration:12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees: $500.00
QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that 20
employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will
learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre-requisite:None Begins:Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course targets persons who would like to create their personal webpages and will cover
Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins:6 & 7 October, 2005 Time:9:30am-4:30pm Duration:2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00

COMPUTER WORKSHOP.
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service.
It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.
Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$170.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Date: 13.October 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $160.00
WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with
computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include
Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting .of web pages.
Date: Thursday, 6th & Friday 7th October, 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $550.00
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current
Human Resource profesipnals with t t"oryiopls and tephniques,requiredfpr,fGtiyehum aqr sgurce,.
management practices today's workplace.
Date: Thursday, 6th & Friday 7th October, 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition: $350.00

HEALTH AND FITNESS COURSE OFFERINGS
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic
areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological
Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems
to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting:Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
This is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include
introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential
oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.
Starting: Monday, September 26, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee:$620.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic
anatomy and physiology; choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing
and how to teach group exercise.
Starting: Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition. Fee:$400.00 Venue: TBA


TRANSFER OF COB ACADEMIC UPGRADING COURSES
FROM FACILITIES AT
C.C. SWEETING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL


Please note new class locations listed below:

COURSE SEC TIME DAY/S ROOMS NEW ROOMS
(Originally
Assigned)

MATH 046 3C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 27 BTTG -11
MATH 047 3C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 28 BTTC-12
MATH 046 2C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 29 BLVD -4C
MATH 048 4C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 30 Monday--BLVD 2A
Wednesday--BLVD LT -A
MATH 048 2C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 31 CCS Sr. Block i
MATH 047 2C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 32 T-29
MATH 048 3C 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 33 CCS Sr. Block i
MATH 046 10 6:00-7:50 PM MW CCS 34 CCS Sr. Block i

ENGQ015 1C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS 27 BTTC'-4
ENG 017 4C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS0 -28 BTTC -8.
ENG 015 2C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS 29 BTTC -LT
ENG 017 5C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS 30 Tuesday-BTC -3
~____~~_________ _________Thursday-BTTC- 2
ENG 017 2C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS 31 CCS Sr. Block i
ENG 017 1C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS 32 CCS Sr. Block i
ENG 017 3C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS -33 Tuesday--GSR -1C -BLVD
_______________________ Thursday--GSR -1B BLVD
ENG 016 1C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS -34 CCS Sr. Block i
ENG 016 2C 6:00-7:50 PM TR CCS 37 GSR-1C- BLVD

BTTC Bahamas Tourism Training Centre
BLVD Boulevard Building
T Technology Block
-------------i_____________________r.


COURSE NO, SECT
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01
ACCA901 01
ACCA902 01
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01
CUST900 01

COMPUTER
COMP901 01
COMP901 02
COMP902 01
COMP903 01
COMP 941 01
COMP953 01
COMP960 01
COMP930 01
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01
COSM804 01
COSM807 01
DECORATING
DEC0800 01
DECO801 01
FLOR800 01
FLOR801 01
FLOR802 01


ENGLISH
ENG 900
ESL 900
HEALTH AND F
MASG900
MASG901
HLTH 800
LANGUAGES
CRE 900
CRE 901
SPA 900
SPA901
FRE 900


MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01
MGMT901 01
MGMT902 01
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01
SEWING
SEW 800 01
SEW 802 01
SEW 805 01
SEW 811 01


COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III

CREDIT& COLLECTIONS I
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER
SERVICE W/S

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECH. I
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
MS POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S

MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAIL ART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN III


01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG.
ITNESS
01 MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS I
01 MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS II
01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR


CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I

HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. I
HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. II
HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT W/S
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I

BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING 11
DRAPERY MAKING I
UPHOLSTERY MAKING I.


DAY START DUR. FEE


6:00-8:00PM
6:00-8:OOPM
6:00-8:00PM


Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur


6:00-9:00PM Tue
9:30AM-4:30PM Thur


6:00-9:00PM
10AM-I:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-7:30PM
9:30AM-4:30PM
9:30am-4:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


26 Sep
26 Sep
27 Sep


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


27 Sep 8 weeks $225
13Oct 1 day $170


Mon 26 Sep
Sat 24 Sep
Thur 29 Sep
Wed 28 Sep
Tue 27 Sep
Tue 27 Sep
Thur 13Oct
Thur/Fri 6 & 7 Oct


Mon
Tue
Mon/Thur


30ct
40Oct
26 Sep

4 Oct
5 Oct.
30Oct
6Oct
4Oct


12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
6 weeks
12 weeks
1 day
2 days

8 weeks
8 weeks
6 weeks

8 weeks
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


4 Oct 8 weeks $225
3 Oct 10 weeks $250


6:00-9:00PM Thur 29 Sep 10 weeks $465
6:00-9:00PM Mon 26 Sep 10 weeks $620
6:00-9:OQPM Thur 29 Sept 10 weeks $400,


6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fii


30Oct
4 Oct
30Oct
4 Oct
4 Oct


29 Sep
26 Sep
6&70ct


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

12 weeks
12 weeks
2 days


6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $225


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


$225
$250
$225
$225


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of
your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course.Content, Course Schedule and Course






All persons interested in attending The College of
The Bahamas beginning January 2006 semester,
are reminded that the late application deadline is
Friday, 30th September at 4:00 pm. Applications
should be forwarded to the Office of Admissions
which is located in the Portia Smith Student Services
Building, Oakes Field Campus.
Late Fee $50.00
For more information, please call 302-4499.


CUUNARY & HOSPITAUTY MANAGEMBHT INSTITUTE
(Formerly School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies)

Industry Training Department
CUUNARY COURSES FALL SEMESTER 042005
COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR. DAYS TIME TUMON & FEE RESOURCE ~Vnw II. Enrol.
(ADDONAL$40 MATERIALS
P FEE FOR
_NEW STUDENTS)
1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 September 29 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pni $225.00 $10-$12perweek SITS Mah 15
2. GourmetlCookingI COOK823 October 3 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $20.00 $20perweek SHITSMain 15
Kitchen I
3. Gourmet Cooking II COOK 824 October3 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9.pmi $225,00 $20 per week SHTSMau 15
8. Cake&PastryMakingl COOK813 October4 10weeks Tues. 6:00.9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSLarder 15
9. Cake & Pastry Making II COOK814 October 4 10weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $250.00 $10-$15perweek SHLTS asy 15
10. Bread Making COOK810 September 29 6weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $5- $10 per week SHTS Larder 15
11. Cake Decorating I COOK817 September28 10weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSlader 15
12. Cake Decoration II COOK 818 September28 10 weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.0b $10-$15sper week STS y 15
For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & TourismStudies at 23504,323-58 04 or fax 325-8175







inday -rdyfom pm.I 0e6fcto


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Fall Semester








PA GE 6B O DA S PT M E 2 2 0 THE TRI U N

Seaplane trip


s Ii OWCases
showcanes



Out Islands


Jurait visi thh F1~lMJE e '.hamSV4s]H


THE Ministry of Tourism
organised a seaplane trip for
visiting journalists to show-
case the Bahamian Family
Islands and the numerous
attractions and activities they
provide for tourists.
Visiting
Thirteen visiting journalists
island hopped between Bimi-
ni, Abaco, Eleuthera and Har-
bour Island.
They represented the largest
press trip organised so far for
2005.
The writers came from a
wide spectrum of newspapers
and travel journals, including
major publications such as the
Boston Herald, Private Air,
NY Post and Islands maga-
zine.


0 -NEE -DE-

Jewelry Sale

Associates


* The Abaco Tourist Office gave a warm welcome to the
visiting journalists with a reception at the Abaco Beach
Resort. While on Abaco, the journalists were given
tours of the island and surrounding cays. Pictured are
director of the Abaco Tourist Office, Jeritzan Outten;
press trip organiser, Sanique Culmer; journalists and
staff at the Abaco Tourist Office.


* Visiting journalists are awed by the natural wonders found in Preacher's Cave, Eleuthera.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

INSTALLATION OF TWO (2) YOUNG MODEL HC-1066-
V400T40 RADIATORS & RELATED
CIVIL/MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL WORKS AT THE
BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS POWER STATION
TENDER No. 585/05
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible
bidders for the installation of two (2) Young model HC-1066-V400T40
radiators and related civil/mechanical/electrical works at the power
station located at BAILEY TOWN, BIMINI, BAHAMAS.
Interested persons may collect the tender documents from the
Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 28 September 2005 by
4:00p.m. and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 585/05
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 7B


BUINS


FROM page 1B


Mr Hepburn, whose compa-
ny has secured the Bahamian
and Caribbean distribution
rights for Secured-eMail AB
Encryption Solution, said: "The
market for secured e-mail is
enormous. Every person you
speak with: the lawyers, the
financial people, the medical
practitioners, hospitals, clinics,
accountant firms, colleges, ter-
tiary institutions, the regular
mom and pop stores...........
"Our summation is that
every institution in this country.
has some need for e-mail
encryption. Not even our Prime
Minister's Office has e-mail
encryption. Financial services,
immigration, the Attorney
General's Office, none of these
places has e-mail encryption."
Among the risks facing unse-
cured e-mails were that they
can be left sitting on servers
around the world years after
they have been sent. E-mail
messages can be read and mod-
ified by hackers while on tran-
sit to their destination, who can
also steal the login and pass-
word used to access your e-mail
system.
Mr Hepburn described other
Risks of unsecured e-mails as
including identity theft, eaves-
dropping, false messages and
unprotected backup.
"There are quite a few hack-
ers around here," he added.
"Since I've been involved in
this in the last six months, I've
been amazed to learn how
many potential hackers there
are in the Bahamas.
"They are not using their
knowledge for positive results,
but to cause mischief and trou-
ble for other people. They are
mainly aged 15-16 and
beyond."
Mr Hepburn said a list of
Bahamians who were purport-
ed to be suffering from the


HIV/AIDS virus, while not
correct, this had been leaked
into the public domain through
intercepted e-mails. E-mails
that relied on wireless connec-
tivity were particularly vulner-
able to hackers who could
intercept them, simply by using
some receiver and sitting in the
parking lot outside.
"There is a tremendous need
for secured e-mail," Mr Hep-
burn said. "We in the Bahamas
continue to blow our whistle


that we are heading to first
world status. This is all a part of
first world status."
Sharpworx (Bahamas) was
incorporated last year, and it
secured the contract for
Secured eMail AB Encryption
Solution within the last six
months. Secured eMail is a
Microsoft Gold Certified Part-
ner, IBM Business Partner, HP
Business partner, Novell Part-
ner.
The product is to be official-


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that IMMACULA LUMA OF SUNLIGHT
-VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any'reasp why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should sen6d a writteirand signed statement
of the facts within twentfy-ei d sf: hidi fTH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.










Firetrail Road West
over 7,000 square feet
$63,000, Going Fast!!


Call: 326-5514 /
436-9477 / 565-5638


ly launched in the Bahamas on
Wednesday during a presenta-
tion at the British Colonial
Hilton, and seminars are also
set for the Family Islands this
week.
Mr Hepburn is also planning
to role out the Secured eMail
AB Encryption Solution to
other Caribbean countries
between now and year-end. He
said the initial response had
been "absolutely phenomenal",
and he was talking with poten-
tial vendors in Trinidad and
Jamaica.
Mr Hepburn said Bahamas-
based commercial banks had
indicated their interest in the
product, saying they wanted to
hold meetings with him after
the British Colonial Hilton pre-
sentation.
He added that while most
banks had indicated they had
an internal private network to
communicate at corporate lev-
el within their offices, this did
not extend to messages sent
out to customers.
The Secured eMail AB
Encryption Solution essential-
ly 'password protects' e-mails,
allowing only the intended
recipient to open them by using
a password.
It comes in four basic pack-
ages: the Home edition; the
Professional edition for small
firms; the Corporate edition,
which can be configured for 31-
300 users; and the Enterprise
edition for companies with up
to 50,000 users.


p (he T ribl-ieB

'R1d Ett


To avertse i

The Tribut
call 32-198


EX ECU VE Collins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
Open: Mon to Fri 8am 5:30 pm
Sat 8am -12 noon
MOTORS LTD Te322-6705/6 Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER Salesperson: Barry Pinder,
Parts and service gumanteed Pam Palacious, Terrol Cash


Large wholesale business is seeking to employ an




as part of its team. The Candidate must be able to:

> Ensure timely and accurate review of all
reconciliation's and entries to the general ledger.
> Supervise a small accounting team.
> Be responsible for the day-to-day operations
of the accounting department.

Requirements:

> i erea :glS:sup.ervoyexperience

> Knowledg.ef-o cAp accounting software a
plus.
> Proficient in Microsoft office.
> Excellent oral and written communication
skills.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Mail resume by September 30th, 2005 to:

The Financial Controller
C/O The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas

Or e-mail to: theresadavis@coralwave.com


Weti--n Wr REGISTRATION FORM (
C. Cancer patients ad their relatives.


Name


Home. .................___ Work Cell


E-mail


,Ae you a cancer survivor? Yes_ ... No_____


Participant categories; __ A,12 years 13-25 years ___ C, 26-40 years

.| 41-f5 years __ E. over 55 years


T-Shirt Size:


Donation: 6-12 years


Date: Saturday, O gtober 1t, 2005 at 6:00 a.m.
starting at the Caq~gr Caring Centre
East Terrac, CentreviIIe doors south of ZNS)

Telephone 325-2483 or 323-4482

I hereby assume full and complete responsibility for any injury or accident which may occur during my
participation in this event or while on the premises of this event, and I hereby release and hold harmless the
Cancer Society, its partners and sponsors from any loss, liability or claims I may have arising out of my
participation in this event including personal injury r darmg sqff re me.

ainatureu


Exciting prizes will be given out!


The True BRITISH
%?o-- ... .. Sister Sister AMERICAN


Si


(L-R) Ken Pyfrom, CFO, Nathaniel Edgecombe, Amee International,
I. Chester Cooper, CEO, Hugh Newbold, VP, Ordinary Division


NOTICE

WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT OUR
OFFICE RENOVATIONS AFRE NOW COMPLETE
AND WILL RESULT IN THE RELOCATION OF OUR
ORDINARY LIFE DIVISION, HARBOUR BAY
BRANCH TO INDEPENDENCE DRIVE EFFECTIVE
SEPTEMBER 26, 2005.

KINDLY CALL 461-1000 FOR 'ASSISTANCE OR
VIST OUR INDEPENDENCE DRIVE, PALMDALE OR
CARMICHAEL ROAD

A S BRITISH Y

"A STRONG LINK IN YOUiR FINANCIAL FUTURE"


. . . ......... ..... ................


1 `~ ~"


mpm'~


.-, I


P.O Box, Phone ...........................................


Male_ Femole_


-- 7 -... .








THE TRIUNE BUCNESSSAGPAGE


/


-


~I~ D


* -




* ,
9 *
e 'emhj aI


k6, -o
ftw hm


1'








n *
soft 41
;Le we


Oil


4b- / -461 At


*f


. *


VI


t 0 a"_>
olp" ,,Ip 'up


'40


a.-..-.__


-


*
ft


am 4


- T__ .~


-*- -
* -*


- ,.


vv c ..


S-Syndicated Content


-Available from Commercial News Providers" *

-e 4 l-w -A -


some*
o u* 4.


- a - 4.


* -. --l -- -

404m Oe m
*m* *** e


*ff
ome a *u nim
* 4m e. 0*


mape







0


.. -* -- --
.,-, ---

oI-*


opvrigahted -Material


-I


*



ao


0 4w


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 8jR-


'fT


-. dRlSM


ri


-W a -


I


I


---







MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 26, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Antiques Road- Anques Roadshow Tomorrow's American Masters "Bob Dylan: No Direction Home" Archive footage of
B WPBT showHartle- Atques (1950s-1970s)" Pop col- Bob Dylan's childhood and life on the road. (N) n (Part 1 of 2) (CC)
poo' lectib (N) (CC)
The Insider (N) The King of How I Met Your Two and a Half Out of Practice CSI: Miami "Blood in the Water"
0 WFOR 1 (CC) ueensocal MotherTed Men Jake's Ben's first week- JiTV) A gir dies on a burning yacht.
Discord' (N) 1 throws parties. school principal. end alone. (N) 1 (CC)
Access Holly- Surface "Episode 2" Miles tries to Las Vegas Ed tries to figure out Medium "The Song Remains the
S WTVJ wood (N) (CC) form a bond with the new species, who has been making counterfeit Same"Asong cluesAllison toa
(N) A (CC) chips. (N) a (CC) missing coed. (N) A ( (CC)
Dec o e Arrested Devel- Kitchen Confi- Prison Break Michael turns up the News (CC)
WSVN opment' British dental "After- heat to break through his cell wall.
Bombshell" (N) math" (N) (CC) (N) g (PA) (CC)
Jeopa i(N) Sports Jam Live NFL Football Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos. From INVESCO
M WPLG Field at Mile High inDenver. (Live) a (CC)

:00) Cold Case Bullied to Death (CC) Growing U Growino U Airline Passen- Airline A woman
A&E ReIe (CC) Gotti The ottis Gotti"nocoutger is pulled from fears flying. (CC)
go to Siena. (N) Performance a flight.
Hardtalk BBC New World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight) Report (Latenight). sentialguide to (Latenight).
atig___________ computers. t11S
BET A* HAIR SHOW (2004, Comedy) Mo'Nique, Kellita Smith, Gina Torres. A hairstylist needs The Parkers ,1 The Parkers 1
her sister's help to win a contest. (CC) (CC)
Coronation Into the West Traders introduce modem conveniences to native peoples; CBC News (CC) Venture (CC)
CBC Sreet (CC) Jacob makes the ultimate sacrifice to save his family. (N)
CNBC Katra Crisis, Late NIght WithConan O'Brien Mad Money Th Big Idea With Donny Deutsch L elie ke
Recovery (N) (CC)
CNN o00)Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown B mI I P u ppe- 1 c
SA The Daily Show The Showbiz Drew Carey's South Park Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV h is sid e ic k D e ek u ,
COM MIGHTY WIND With Jon Stew- Show With Green Screen Shelly baby-sits "Bad Habits" "Health" t (CC)
(2003) Premiere. art(CC) David Spade Show Ca (CC) Cartn C C) (CC)
COURT Coast to TheInvestigators A man is mur- Forensic Files North Mission Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec-
COURTC st" (CC) dered on his way to work. "Order Up" Road tives ties
*Road 'w amis ( )sives tv i c es. I
That's So Raven * LILO & STITCH (2002, Comedy) Voices of Daveigh Chase, Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister
DISN (CC) Christopher Michael Sanders, Tia Carrere. Animated. A lonely girl be- "Pack of Lies" Tamera hosts a
friends a mischievous alien. 'PG' (CC) (CC) radio show.
YThis Old House Weekend Deco- Fresh Coat "Art Scrapbooking Embellish This! Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty
SDI (CC) rating Deco Study" Sweater project.
DW Euromx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx 8 yo Y ck ild een to Pe
Depth Tagestema Depth
E! E News Brooke Shields: The El True Hol- It's So Over: 50 Biggest Celebrity Break-Ups! .cMO OS
______ lywood Story t (CC)yfd Str (1(00) au oudn
ESPN Monday Night Countdown (Live) (CC) Fgre Skating State Farm U.S. Championships. From Portland, Ore. ~ e eve 'T
ESPNI Track and Field Golesde Es- Gol ESPN: NFL Football Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos. From INVESCO
pana(N) Fuera de Juego Field at Mile High in Denver. (Live) M 3 :30pm to 4 :30p m duA-I -ke.
EWTN DalyMass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
E Lamonth of September 2005
00)FIT TV FI R tTV's Housecalls Getting in FitNation "Aches & Pains" Pro ath- Guru2Go Champion kickboxer '
FITsecalls (CC) shape for a wedding. n ( C) letes share advice. 1 leams yoga poses; paparazzi. (1
FOX NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
OX-N Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL (:0) B Baseball Washington Nationals at Florida Marins. From Dolphins Stadium in Mi- Best Damn Sports Show Period
ami. (Live)(Live) (CC)
GOLF GolfChannel Academy Live (Live) Golf Kraft-Nabisco Shootout. From Hillcrest Country Club in Boise, Idaho. Enijo Greatof F o Prizes and Lo s F'Fun.
GSN Ungo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (1 The Amazing Race ( (CC) Poker Royale: Comedians vs,
Lingo (cCC) Poker Pros (CC)
G4Tech (:00Attack of X-Pla "Andi Cheat"Destroy Icons Judgment Day Filter Sports Judgment Day
the Show! (N) Stree all." AllHumans" games. (N)
:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger A parolee ** PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE MALIGNED MOBSTER
HALL Texas Ranger who wants to go straight is forced to (1991, Mystery) Raymond Burr, Paul Anka, Michael Nader. Mason de- i'm lovin' if
A (CC) pull one last heist. (CC) ends a mobster accused of murdering his wife.
Holmes on Rooms That Design U Space Debbie Travis' Facelift "DJ's Gar- Holmes on Homes "Windwow Well
HGTV Homes Repairs Rock'Couture planning. A den" (1 Hell" A
on a ceiling. A Chic" A
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W.Scham- Inspirational Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- LoveaChild
_ (CC) bach (CC) Programming d... ay
Transformers Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Joey Everybody Everyboy
KTLA Cybetron Teenage Witch Kids A (CC) Kids Michael is begs for Ross' Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
"Rusih" ((CC) left in charge. forgiveness. (A 1 (CC) (' (CC)
*s DIRTY LITTLE SECRET (1998, Drama) Tracey FORBIDDEN SECRETS (2005, Suspense) Kristy Swanson, David Kee-
LIFE Gold, Jack Wagner. A kidnapping leads to the revela- ley, Christopher Bondy. Premiere. Strange events plague a woman in her
tion of a disturbing truth., (CC)(S) childhood home. (CC)O
MSNBC Hardball mauntdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
NICK mm eutron: SpongeBob Zoey 101 "Back- Full House "A Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of The Cosby
N K Boy Genius SquarePants ,, pack" ( Date With Fate" Bel-Air Bel-Air Show (1 (CC)
NTOut of Practice Surface Miles tries to form a bond Las Vegas "Fake the Money and News (1 (CC) News Simply the Best
(N) A (CC) with the new species. (N) Run" (N) I (CC)
OLa (:00) Survivor: Countdown: 25 Outdoor Investi- E-Force (CC) Outdoor Out- Survivor: Africa "Smoking Out the
-t( frica C( ) Craziest Rides gations takes Snake" A (CC)
SPEED NBS 24-7 (N) Inside Nextel Cup (Same-day Behind the Headlights NASCAR Nation NBS 24-7
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TEN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Ross is Friends Monica Friends "The Friends Phoebe Family Guy Bri- Family Guy Pe-
TBS Loves Raymond distraught over and Chandler One With the prepares to give an is smitten with ter's given sensi-
"No Fat" (CC) the wedding. 1 kiss. (1 (CC) Free Porn"(CC) birth. ( (CC) Lois. (CC) tivitytraining.
(:00) Incredible Trauma: Life in the ER "Putting It Untold Stories of the E.R. "A Day Two Headed Baby A baby is born
TLC Medical Myster- Together" Rocky Mountain Regional From Hell"A 6-year-old's illness has with two heads.
ies (CC) Trauma Center in Denver. no discernible cause.
(:00 Law & Or- Law & Order McCoy and Law & Order "Veteran's Day" De- Law & Order Fontana and Green
TNT der Refuge" Carmichael are forced to jail wit- tectives probe the strangling of a zero in on the young wife of a mur-
(CC) (DVS) nesses to continue an investigation., peace activist. (1 (CC) (DVS) dered venture capitalist. (,
Teen Titans Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Home for Imagi- Cartoon Car- Yu-Gi-Oh! ( Dragon BIIl Z
THomecoming" tures Next Door nary Friends toons (CC)
TV5 (:00) Des racines et des ailes Extremis: la colre des parias Ombres et lu- TV5 Le Journal
Wc (6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TW C PM ditio (CC) (CC) (N) (CC)
UNIV 00) Inocente de Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen Cristina Una hora con Chayanne.

:) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent De- ** CARLITO'S WAY (1993, Drama) Al Pacino, Sean Penn, Penelope
USA der: special Vic- tectives probe a Chinese immini- Ann Miller. An ex-con finds it hard to escape his former lifb of crime. (CC)
tims Unit grant's murder and smuggling.
VH1 Fabulous Life Of... "Hip Hop Su- Hip Hop Honors: VH1 Hip Hop Honors (N) (
perspenders '05" ,1 Pre Show
WG00) America's * SPLIT DECISIONS (1988, Drama) Gene Hackman, Craig Sheffer, WGN News at Nine ( (CC)
W GN Funniest Home Jeff Fahey. Ayouth from a boxing family replaces his murdered brother.
Videos ( (CC)
Everybody 7th Heaven "Home Run" Martin Just Legal Skip and Cooper defend WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond leams that he may be the father of a black man wrongly accused of Tong Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
S(CC) Sandy's unborn child; (N) (CC) robbery and murder. (N) & Mr G (CC)
Jeoprdy! (N) eon One All of Us "If You Girlfriends Lynn Half & Half Bi Dr. Phil
W SBK (cc Half-naked Can't Stand the agrees to wed in Dee Dee's budg-
singing musician. Heat..." (N) Hawaii. (N) et. (N) (CC)
(6:30) s *** MEN IN BLACK (1997, Science Fiction) Tom- (:45) Just Like **irt I, ROBOT (2004) Will Smith.
HBO-E SHARK TALE my Lee Jones. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial Heaven: HBO A homicide detective tracks a dan-
(2004) 'PG' (CC) activity on Earth. ( 'PG-13' (CC) First Look (CC) gerous robot in 2035.
Countdown to Curb Your En- Extras Andy Rqme "Stealing From Saturn" Cae- Rome'The Ram Has Touched the
HBO-P Tarver-Jones 3 thusiasm Larry learns a secret sar seeks to consolidate his hold on Wall" Caesar weighs Pompey's
(CC) has a revelation. about his friend. Rome. ( (CC) counteroffer. (CC)


*x TAXI (2004, Comedy) Queen Latfah, Jimmy Fal- :15) The Making **s SHARK TALE (2004, Comedy) Voices of Will
HBO-W Ion, Jennifer Esposito. A bumbling policeman and a Of: Robot Will Smith, Robert De Niro. Animated. A bottom feeder pre-
__cabby chase bank robbers. 1 'P -13' (CC) Smith stars. tends to be a shark slayer. 1 'PG' (CC)
** BREAKIN' ALL THE RULES (2004, Romance- *** BOOGIE NIGHTS (1997, Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Burt,
HBO-S Comedy) Jamie Foxx. A man writes a successful how- Reynolds, Julianne Moore. A naive teen becomes a star in the late'70s
to book on breakups. A 'PG-13' (CC) porn industry. 0 'R' (CC)


(:15 I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER * DODGEBALL: A TRUE UNDERDOG STORY (:35) HOT LINE:
MOMAX (1997) Jennifer Love Hewitt. Teens are terrorized by a (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. Dodgeball teams com- FIERY DESIRES
psychopath in a fisherman's coat. ,) 'R' pete for $50,000 in Las Vegas. 'NR' (CC) (1996) 'NR' (CC) Gif e
S:15) *** THE ITALIAN JOB (2003, Suspense) (:05)The L Word "Lagrimas de Weeds "The Pun- Weeds "The Pun-
HOW Mark Wahlberg. iTV. Athief and his crew plan to steal Oro (iTV) Mark becomes more ma- ishment Light" (N) ishment Light' m a k e re a t
back their gol d. A 'PG-13' (CC) nipulative. 1 (CC) (CC) (CC) 1m.e
(6:00)*** ** * BLUE STEEL (1990, Drama) Jamie Lee Curtis, (:45) *s CONFESSIONS OF AN AMERICAN GIRL
TMC THE SCHOOL Ron Silver, Clancy Brown. A serial killer implicates a (2002) Jena Malone, Alicia Witt. Family members visit
OF ROCK (CC) new policewoman in his deeds. 1 'R' their incarcerated patriarch. A 'R' (CC)









PAGE OB, ONDA, SETEMBR 26 200 TRIUNEORTST


WK


* LESLIE WHITE gives it all he's got as he powerlifts 727.5 pounds.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


I ~


White has to settle for





a share of the spoils


"Copyrighted Mate
Syndicated Conten
Available from Commercial New


0 -
4


















*

-













S



*


S
*
d


POWERLIFTING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
"THE national record was
mine, but I let it slip away,"
screamed Leslie White, as the
judges ruled his third attempt
at the national record no
rial good.
it White was inches away from
s Providers" setting the new powerlifting
record at the Bahamas Pow-
erlifting Federation (BPF)
nationals yesterday, but his
squat was not low enough.
Before attempting the squat
of 727.5 pounds (330 kilos),
White easily picked up the 700
pounds, (317.5 kilos), which
tied the current national
record, which he now shares
with Kevin Woodside.
But as White stepped back
from the bar after attempting
the 727.5, the judges switched
on the red light, signaling that
the attempt was no good.
"I could set that record, it
was easy, but the lifting con-
ditions weren't right," said
White.
"I am not making any
excuses, but in here was cold,
I don't think anyone was able
to hit their targets in the tem-
perature.
"I just couldn't get warm,
no matter how hard I tried, I
couldn't get warm.
"I went into my first attempt
feeling the pinch, but the
-- weights I had on it weren't
heavy so that made it easy."
White madehis first attempt
at the bar look fairly easy.

Strength
Bracing himself to pick up
650 pounds (295*kilos), White
intentionally allowed his hips
to touch the mats, showing his
strength to the judges.
He said: "I felt as though I
could have pushed more
weights, I made a mistake
before my final attempt.
"Besides being cold, I went
in the back to drink some
water.
"When I was lifting the
weights for the national
record, I could feel the water
starting to come up when I
squeezed.
"I thought I was far enough
at that point, but the judges
viewed it differently."
The Bahamas sole competi-
tor for the World Champi-
onships, failed to squat low
enough for the judges to signal
a passing mark.
Although White wasn't able
to meet the mark, he is confi-
dent that he will surpass the
national record.
He added: "I am now
preparing for the World
Championships so any com-
petition is good for me right
now.
"What I really tried to do
1,i~f' O -rn ^^ r~ra c'r- ^BMI / nr i/'rn


Leslie equals


national record


I could squat, using that, as a
confidence booster for the
Worlds.
"I know what I have to do if


Novices put


their weight


behind BPF


nationals

* POWERLIFTING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE novice powerlifters stole the
show at the 25th annual Bahamas
Powerlifting Federation (BPF) nation-
als.
After having to go through three
rotations, squats, benchpresses and
dead weight, novice lifters Lincoln
Knowles, Leanie Diaz and Portia
Moxey believed the first round to be
the easiest.
Knowles, the youngest male in the
competition, started lifting in June
and successfully squatted 137.8 pounds
(62.5 kilos).
He said he knew his first competi-
tion would be a little easy.
I felt as though I could push more
weights," he said. "But I didn't want
to push myself too hard, this being my
first competition.
"I wasn't scared at all when they
added more weights to the bar, I want-
ed more.
"The thing that helped me to relax
the most was knowing that I had a
capable coach spotting me.
"He really wanted me to do my best
out here today and I feel as though I
did a great job. I would like to encour-
age guys my age to come out and lift."
Both Knowles and Moxey finished
up the competition at the same weight,
while Diaz tested her strength.
Although her third lift was ruled no
good, Diaz finished off the squatting
round with a successful squat of 203.9
pounds (92.5).
The sole competitor in the women's
heavyweight division, Bernadette Ban-
nister was placed on the edge yester-
day, as she failed to squat her first two
attempts.
It was Bannister's plan to squat a
heavier bar, but her two failed
attempts at 341.7 pounds (155 kilos)
were ruled to be not low enough.
According to Bannister, the weight
on the bar wasn't the problem, the


I Wgtfito nriedal at those
gaTn'is, so I will hit the gym
again, under the supervision
.of my coaches.


"I need to make a little
more adjustments before the
big competition."
A confident Valentino New-
ton walked over to the judges'
table after a successful squat at
341.7 pounds (155 kilos)
motioning to add more
weights to his final attempt.
The slim built Newton took
a huge jump, adding 12.5
pounds on the bar, equaling
369.3 pounds (167.5 kilos).


Taking deep breaths before;
attempting, Newton gestured,
to his spotters that he wasil
ready.
Newton was successful 'ini
taking the bar of the posts
squatting to the floor, ,t't:
screamed quit as he tried ti
power up.
For Max Wilchcombbea
great day at the job ende-d
with a successful squat of 4134
pounds (187.5 kilos).
'V.."


* BERNADETTE BANISTER makes it look easy as she power lifts 341.70 pounds.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


"But, overall I think I did very well,
could have done a lot better if I wasn't
the only person lifting in this division.
"I believe I could have cleared this"
weight on my second attempt, if I had
competition to give me that extra,
boost. But I didn't and that is disap-
no~tingt"


tightness in her thighs was.
"The bar wasn't a problem for me, it
was the fact of me not being warm,"
said Bannister.
"I tried everything in the book to
stay warm, but it was impossible. In
here is cold, too cold to be lifting in
thil>

TRIBUNE SPORT.


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005







KIBUE ~I'OR $ MNDAY SLP~ivIER 6, SPORTS.,


Brackettes

defuse the

Bommers
FROM page one
ductive hit of the series.
Coach Colin 'Troppy' Knowles said this is
what the Brackettes are all about.
"We have a veteran team that blended well
with the young rookies coming in," Knowles
stressed. "The last blow from the young girl
was just an indication of what to expect from
us.'
It was a heartbreaking loss for the Bom-
mers, who reeled off three consecutive hits
from catcher Avis Bethel, first sacker Denise
Sears and second sacker Denise Gordon to
lead off the fifth, yet they couldn't score a
run.
"The season was good, but I really thought
we".-*ould have pulled it in the playoffs,"
Bethel said. "I'm a little disappointed that we
didn't do it, but I'm happy for the Brackettes.
Someone had to do it and they did. We did-
n't.,
Losing pitcher Marvel Miller, who came
from Long Island, said they are still trying to
find out what happened after the second game.
"It really shouldn't have gone this far," said
Miller; who gave up eight hits and struck out
four in the loss. "We just didn't hit the ball.
Why, I don't know. Congratulations to the
Brackettes. Better luck for us. We will meet
them again."

CELEBRATION time after the DHL
Brackettes booked their place in the final.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Roddick series




up a treat for IS


"Copyri ted Material;


WSyndicated Content


a -
0 __ B


rAvailiablefromCommercial News Providers"
omm Ne __._ id__ s


'U.


0* 4l . 4 ~bo wft 4bq 40
ft dOW .
QM gb am
-- O w


- ~- -
~ -

--
S -






* a S


a a = -
- --


* *~. -
a
a


do.


a


- .~ -
a


~0
* -.
0


~0 a
a -
a a *
0 ___
a *


MONDAY, St-PTivMBER 26, 0uo5, PAuL .,..-


i HIBUNE 6PORI b


- O f









MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


SECTION 4


B ,
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


A.


w lm


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Shock

10-0 win

books.

place m

the final


* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IT CAME down to the fifth
and deciding game as the sec-
ond placed Degeo Bommers
and the third placed DHL
Brackettes battled for the final
spot in the New Providence
Softball Association ladies'
finals, but nobody expected it
to end the way it did.
Behind the five-hitter from
ace Ernestine Butler-Stubbs
and a potent offensive attack
highlighted by first sacker
Krystal Delancy's grand slam
home run, the Brackettes sent
the Bommers packing for the
rest of the season with a stun-
ning 10-0 whitewash.
The Brackettes prevented a
much-anticipated rematch of
last year's finals and set up a
showdown with the pennant-
winning defending champions
Electro Telecom Wildcats.

Youngsters
"I knew we could have
made it here. We just needed
to put in the team work and,
because of the players that we
have, we knew we could do
it," said Delancy, one of the
many youngsters the Brack-
ettes have incorporated into
their veteran line-up.
But after trailing 2-0 in the
best-of-five series, hardly any-
body expected that the Brack-
ettes would bounce back to
sweep the Bommers in three
straight games.
However, it all depends on
who you ask.
Brackettes'.Butler-Stubbs
said, "I told my team that we
were going to sweep them. So
I told them, so we did it. I told
my team, I just want them to
play ball behind me. I will
pitch this ball like I never
pitched before."
She's pitched better games,
but in this crucial situation, it
was one of her best. She
hurled a five-hitter, striking
out three, including the final
out as the Brackettes cele-
brated on the field with the


Wildcats in the, stands watch-
ing.
Wildcats' ace pitcher Mary
'Cruise' Edgecome looked on
and stated: "I hope they bring
that same intensity that they
played against the Bommers
because we will be waiting for
them to give us a good series."
The series will get started
on Thursday night with the
NPSA giving all of the teams
an opportunity to secure a
berth into the Bahamas Soft-.


ball Federation's National
Round Robin Tournament
that will be staged over the
weekend of October 20-23.

Mound
While Butler-Stubbs got the
job done on the mound, her
team-mates picked up their
offensive play, as they did in
the previous two games, to
stave off elimination.


Second sacker Jeannine
Wallace had a perfect 3-for-3
night, scoring a run, while
shortstop Zella Symonette
and third sacker. Ebony
Delancy both had a single, dri-
ving in a run and scoring
another. Alicia Rahming, who
replaced an injured Dornell
Butler in the bottom of the
first, was 2-for-4 with an RBI.
But it was in the top of the
seventh with one-out and the
bases loaded, Krystal Delancy


delivered the big blow.
With a shot to right field,
she raced to a grand slam
homer, picking up catcher
Christine Porter, right fielder
Lilly McDonald and Ebony
Delancy in a six-run rout that
put the game further out of
reach for the Bommers.
"I honestly didn't know that
I was capable of doing it," said
the southpaw of her most pro-
SEE page liB


rPacke tes whitewash








the e geo Bommers


Teams getl|

rest before

NPSA's

final fling

* SOFTBALL
ByBRENTSTUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
FANS will have to wait a
little longer for the start of,
the New Providence Soft-
ball Association's best-of-
seven championship series.
Commissioner Burkett
Dorsett announced Satur-
day night that the finalsin'
both the men's and ladies'
divisions won'i get under-
way until Thursday night at
the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball
Stadium.
"We feel that we will give
the teams' another 2-3 days
rest, especially thisteam
that just played tonight,' ,
said Dorsette, referring to'
the DHL Brackettes, who :
pulled off a 10-0 whitewash
after a 2-0 deficit and swept
the Degeo Bommers in
three straight games.
"All of the other teamK.
completed their playoffs ,;,
from last week Tuesday *
and the NPSA executives-.
said they wanted to start "
more towards the weekenfdd
as opposed to starting on.
through the week," Dorse'
stressed.

Time
"But, as you can see, we
have some time on our
side, so we should be able
to get in the seven game-
series."
The Bahamas Softball
Federation's National
Round Robin Tournament
will run from'nOctober 20-
23 at the stadium along
with the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.
Championship teams
from AndroS, Long Island,
Exuma, Grand Bahama, :
Abaco andEleuthera wil?
converge here to play
against the champions of-
the NPSA men's division:
All of the islands, with thl
exception of Eleuthera, will
be represented in the
ladies' division.

Champion'
The NPSA ladies' chami,:
pins will come from eitd*
the pennant-winninig.i ._
defending ehamipionis Ele
tro Telecom Wildcats or
the Brackettes, while the
men's champions will be
decided between the pen-
nant-winning Electro Tele-
com Dorcy Park Boyz andi
the defending champions
TBS Truckers.
In addition to the NPSA
final, the first Church.
Games are also being
planned fpr October 11-21.
But Dorsett, who serves as
first vice president of the
BSF, said they don't antici-
pate those games conflict-
ing with the nationals.
"When Mr (Colin)
Knowles approached us, we
told him that the round
robin will start the week;
after the holiday," Dorsett
stated. !
"So we anticipate that
they willibe finished by
the time we are ready td.
start."


L-~L -_ -..:


--








MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


The stories behind the news


Carl Bethel (left), chairman of
the Free National Movement, has
announced last week that he will
run for the position of deputy
leader of the party. Mr Bethel is
the first FNM member to
announce his candidacy for the
position of the party's second-in-
command. The previous week,
Montagu MP Brent Symonette
told The Tribune he was seriously
considering a bid for the position
of deputy leader...


I PLACES I


Hundreds of Bahamians
were trapped in the city of
Houston last week when Hur-
ricane Rita one of the most
intense storms on record -
headed for the coast of Texas.
The massive storm was pre-
dicted to have an even more
severe impact than Hurricane
Katrina, which devastated
New Orleans just three
weeks ago...


BEC management has asked for its dispute with the
union to be referred to the Industrial Tribunal for arbi-
tration. Management said last week that it no longer
sees the value of its talks with the Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union continuing at the Department of Labour
level. Union officials, however, have described this as an
unnecessary act and a stalling tactic. There are four
issues raised by the BEWU which are being addressed by
the Department of Labour:
. Change in working hours
Retroactive pay as a result of change in working
hours
Percentage increase and merit pay; and...


Political veteran says FNM





leadership is cut and dried
I d. h .- .;^ ;. J *1. ** '1 *..! .*- 1 ^. ** '.'


Fo m e pri m i is e se for c *'*'....'* -' .** .*'**.,* *


1 By JOHN MARQUIS
or many months now,
one political veteran has
S been forecasting, in pre-
cise detail, how the
-- FNM's leadership tussle
will be resolved.
With quiet assurance and mea-
sured calm, he has predicted the
exact course the party would take in
propelling Hubert Ingraham back
into the hot-seat.
Firstly, he said, Tommy Turnquest
would continue his forlorn quest to
retain whatever power he has until
such time as someone near and dear
to him suggests he sniff the coffee
and take his leave.
Next, Dion Foulkes would
announce his bid for the leadership,
with all the usual flurry of press
releases, grand gestures and high-
flown objectives.,
Running
Thirdly, Brent Symonette would
declare himself out of the running
for the top job, but available for the
deputy's slot.
Fourthly, coming into the final
straight towards convention time,
existing front-runners would fall
away, having been persuaded to
stand aside for a grand entrance and
magnificent fanfare.
Then, as convention day draws
near, Mr Ingraham would suddenly
step forward into the spotlight as par-
ty saviour by acclamation.
Not all of these predictions have
come to pass. Not yet. But the griz-
zled veteran, who knows the ways
of Bahamian politics, remains con-
vinced that things will go just the
way he said.
Others who have been around for
a long time are now beginning to nod
their heads and declare: "Yes, he's
right." And their view was reinforced
last week when INSIGHT was told
by an insider that the former prime
'minister is definitely angling for a
comeback.
The resurrection of Hubert Ingra-
ham as the FNM's only means of
.making a decent fist of things in the


With the Free National Movement annual.

convention only six weeks away, speculation
is still rife over the leadership and who will

be in the running when party delegates

descend on Nassau. INSIGHT reports...


2007 general election is now seen by
many as well nigh inevitable..
Whatever his faults and most of
his critics agree they run well into
double figures he is viewed as the
only one with a semblance of what it
takes to breathe life into the recum-
bent FNM and make it stand up and
fight in the run-up to polling day.
Since the 2002 election, when the
PLP grabbed power against every-
one's expectations, including their
own, the government's paralysis has
been matched only by that of the
FNM.
It would be hard to imagine, in the
entire history of world politics, two
parties so utterly bereft of ideas and
the energy necessary to carry them
out.
If the PLP is a "good for nothing"
government and that epithet has
been applied repeatedly over the last
three years then the FNM has been
equally culpable as a woefully inef-
fectual opposition.
When historians come to chart this
era in Bahamian politics, inertia will
emerge as the government's domi-
nant characteristic. The FNM, mean-
while, will be remembered as
comatose, catatonic and utterly
colourless, all rolled into one.
That is why, observers suggest, Mr
Ingraham will make himself avail-
able for the leader's role, having
repeatedly said he wouldn't.
Put bluntly, Mr Ingraham is seen as
the only sign of animation in the 'still.
life' exhibition the House of Assem-
bly has now become.
Observers
Political observers agree that the
PLP's performance as a government
has been lifeless and lacklustre in the
extreme. Its first two years were
spent stumbling from one crisis to
another, with Sidney Stubbs, Leslie
Miller, BAIC, the Korean boats, the
Junkanoo bleachers and assorted
other embarrassments all combining
to create .an impression of utter con-
fusion and disorder.


SEE page 4C


Quality Screenprinted T-shirts, polos, caps, uniforms, G"
sweats, tank tops, shorts & specialty items.
Embroidered shirts & caps logos or monogramming. urI
All artwork designed, printed, digitized and embroidered
right here in The Bahamas by our talented Bahamian Staff!
5 Ae........Bo Ss..h...... ..m:........................ B.39 4 .. .


JIIlThe ibuUne


,;;; :


-- --








PAGE20,MONDY, EPTEBER26, 005THETIBN


L ast week's
INSIGHT on
Haitian immi-
gration sparked calls
for a full appraisal of
the problem and a
more determined effort
to halt the influx of ille-
gal foreigners. Readers
expressed alarm at what
they see as a major cul-
tural threat to the
Bahamas and said it
seemed the public was
being kept in the dark
about the full extent of
the situation. Here are a
selection of readers'
views, sent in response
to the article.

Re: The Haitian Problem -
so what is the truth?
I READ the subject arti-
cle with much interest. It
seemed to be a fairly bal-
anced report of the issue of
immigration.
Your article, in my view,
did not stress enough the fact
that Haitians are in the
Bahamas for economic rea-
sons primarily. .
To answer your question
'So what is the truth?' I pose
a series of other questions,.
namely:
Why are no observations
of Haitians reflected as part,
of balanced reporting?
Why are Haitians always
portrayed as huddled on the
bow of a boat just arriving
from Haiti?
Why are there no images
of 'Haitian workers in the
Bahamas (gardeners, con-
struction workers etc)?'
Why do we never see any
details regarding the 'other
side of Haiti' referred to
under the heading 'cultured'
in this article?
Yes, the numbers
(unknown) are alarming, but
does the Department of Sta-
tistics not have definitive fig-
ures based upon the last


national census? Why are
these figures not printed in
your article instead of rais-
ing questions based on con-
jecture and unsubstantiated
data?
Why are we always pre-
sented with photographs of
Haitians who have been at
sea for many days and are
likely to be famished?
Your article is accurate
and on the point in so many
respects. However, the subtle
suggestions and innuendoes
are what I and many other
Bahamians find very dis-
turbing.
Why are Haitians always
portrayed as angry, aggres-
sive people? They can be
warm and friendly loving
people, too. Just as Bahami-
ans can be good, bad, loving
and outgoing, we can also be
violent, criminal, sexual
abusers and paedophiles as
well as self-proclaimed Chris-
tians (or should I say hyp-
ocrites?)
Anon
INSIGHT note: Getting
'the other side' from the
Haitian community is not,
easy, though the attorney
Eliezer Regnier does well in
representing their cause. Last
week's INSIGHT was, how-
ever, considered fair and bal-
anced by those who respond-
ed. '
Regarding statistics, there
appear to be no definitive
numbers covering births,
deaths or arrivals. One of the
major points of the article
was to emphasise the gov-
ernment's lack of informa-
tion in this area.
Bahamians are being
kept in the dark about the
growing population of illegal
Hatians in the Bahamas.
The government needs to
treat this as the most impor-
tant issue in the Bahamas
because soon the Bahamas
will no longer belong to
Bahamians. Controlling the
population is not racist, it is
necessary.
Noelle Dorsett
Dear Mr Marquis


JUST to say, once again,;
an amazing piece of writing. I
do hope you are preparing
to put all your articles into'
book form.
Alison
IENJOYED your article'
on the Haitian problem. It,
was very much to the point.
I think we should put the,
pressure on to sort out this
matter once and for all. They,
are taking over in Eleuthera
and it needs to be dealt with.
It is the Anglo-Saxon ele-'
ment that has given us sta- -.
bility on which to build.
DK, Nassau
Subject: "The Haitian:
Problem"
I HAVE read in today's,
newspaper, The Tribune,
September 19 2005, the arti,
cle on the above subject 'liiis
is ari interesting article.I am,
grateful f9r journalists,'e
' as' yourself who' are'ipepae
to ell the truth. ':
became interestedin'qt
plight, but it seenis lji
'Baa mians eitheri
understand the iplicati 6ni
for generations to tcoiri .
simply that they just d
care. This is. a yvery, se
situation we are faced wt.
and it, would appear t'
that .the present Miisterof
Immigration, Miistiet
Health and Mr Ron Plet
have some allegiance :tpo'tle'
countries becatise they' are:
certainly not doing' iythint
about it:.
Every he oie can tuiI
there are- illegals. Not, only
Haitiansi but Jamaicans, as
Wvll who b'ome into the coun-',
try as visitors and end up.,
applying for a work permit I
had a conversation with:a:
friend of mine and we shated-
our views on the dilemma.' I
told her that I would never
hire a foreigner be it that .


they are here legal or illegal
because, in so doing, I will
be building up their commu-
nity. My friend, needless to
say, did not share the same
sentiments until the incident
in Nassau Village.
We, as a people, are just
waiting for a catastrophe
before we react. We have not
learned about strategic plan-
ning. The Bible does tell us
where .the people lack vision,
the people perish. Sadly, I
see us as that kind of people
who are going to perish for
lack of wisdom and insight.
For those Bahamians who
are selling their birthright to
foreigners, I feel that they
should be dealt with in a very
firm way. We 'need to
upgrade the immigration sys-
tem through modern tech-
nology; We need to imple-
ment stricter policies per-
taining to, the ones, who are
born here,
,Wem im'ust, do something
anid do it qui-kly ,The ille-
gals know that we have a
jewel, only we can't appreci-
ate it.
:Marriages are another part
of the scheme. Some of these
marriages are to criminals
who go back home and
return under new passports.
We can have the illegals fin-
gerprinted so that when they
.wish to return, they are
stopped immediately. I know
personally of such a case.
We must invite the citizens
to become informants who
will then report it to the
authorities and to a body that
is recognised for standing up
for The' Bahamas. :
There are a group of Nige-
rians who are presently living
in Monastery Park. There are
maids coming in from Peru,
Mexico etc. and living in
Lyford Cay, pretending to be
guests..
We need to entrap our law


FEEDBACK


enforcement officers who are
involved in this corrupt trade.
I can go on, but time does
not permit, but I shall await
your next article.
Many thanks
L. Rahming
JUST had to tell you how
much I enjoyed today's arti-
cle about Haitian history etc.
Well done!
I was trying to tackle one
thing at a time when it comes
to this problem. You contin-
ued the list of social ills con-
nected to the illegal immi-
grants.
I contacted (a week ago),
the ZNS newsroom via fax
and told them now that
there's so much attention
paid to the aftermath of Kat-
rina in New Orleans, it would
be a good time to point out
that we have the same situa-
tion here raw'sewage, dead
things, etc and are in dafigert
of the same diseases men-
tioned on the US stations.
Well, they called me up
and wanted to interview me
on camera! I told them I
can't do that as I would be
putting myself and my home
in danger. These are violent
people. I told them they did-.
n't need me, just go to the
village themselves. They nev-
er got back to me again...
So I'm glad you've given
me the protection of being
anonymous. I believe you've
really started the ball rolling
and opened the eyes of the
public as well as government.,
To add to the list of social
ills, years back, before I got a
huge guard dog, our home.
was robbed on almost a.
weekly basis, the police:
couldn't catch the thieves as
they would head straight to
the Haitian village and sell
everything they took.
I saw in the paper a pic-
ture of a small shop selling
goods. The police never even
checked to see where the;
clothes and things came.
from. I would have clothes,
linens, food, soaps and
lotions, and fruits (from my
trees) taken from my house,
all things that could easily be
sold to Haitains.


~w.cjU d4~


V

Kotx fib Pvlod?


Share your news

The,ibune ants to hear from people who
arq Making ~ews in their neighbourhoods.
, laps you are raising funds for a good
cause, ci aigning for improvements
in the area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.


PAGE 2C MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


There really is no end to
the problem of allowing ille-
gals and legal migrants liv-
ing in the bush.
Thank you for the good
job!
Mrs J.
Your article in this morn-
ing's paper was interesting,
but quite frankly barely
scratches the surface. The
Haitians are only part of the
problem albeit a rather
large part.
Have you noticed the num-
ber !of Hispanics:in this little
town? Go intoKelly's or any
large foodstor&axi.d you will
hear as much Spanish being
spoken as English. I am con-
vinced that'not only do we,
have corrupt low level Immi-
gration/Police/Defence Force
personnel who let a few "slip
by!'i;'but the greater problem,
is the' pcrrupt ;"top" 'dogs -
': thosewho movylarge tium-
bers in without fear of some
low level Immigration offi-
cer having the ... to stop or
question them ,,
:L'aii'youfiiid outfrom the
relevant ministers immigra-
tionti, national secunty, works,
housing and 'itheime min-
ister how is it that Haitians
caH build :theix shanties on
public and private property
without a permit, be con-
niected to the electrical sup-
ply, use our medical and edu-
cational ,faeiiities.' with
absolutely no repercussions.
I, or any othertBahamian,
cannot add aroom' onto my
house pr erect a wall around
our property',ith'out an
MOWIpermit.
Ssupposethe, slogan is,
trte, it IS better in the':
Bahamas so'long as :you are
not a Bahamian.
As to your spcifi ,ques-
Stion -Enoihel Pwell was
absolutely right attim sure
there are a large .ber of
Bthitonwhoiwish to 'd that
`6 a11l 'iiii.
h, "' .,d;ll9'-id to him.
Were g6iffg to be worse
than the Britisi in 10-20
years; we shall all be exiled to
Mayaguana oops! That one
has been sold aready hasn't
it?
*Li









THE TIBUN MONAY, EPTEMER 2, 205,SPGEH3


WITHIN 14 to 21 days, THE new COB president
;Bahamians can expect to pay will be chosen from two vet-
anywhere between $5.50 and eran college academics, it
$7 for one gallon of gasoline, was revealed last week.
Minister of Trade and Indus- College council chairman
itry Leslie Miller announced Franklyn Wilson has
last week. announced that applications
Mr Miller said he was have been submitted by act-
pleased that some local dis- ing president Dr Rhonda
.tributors had agreed on their Chipman-Johnson and Dr
own, and in some instances Pandora Johnson, vice-pres-
with a little push from the ident of research, planning
'Fuel Usage Committee, to and development.
lower prices temporarily late He said the council will
Llast-week. ....deliberate the matter_ ataL
- However despiteM 1&Iemt- 'ifi 16 hibmh eetiigtI


porary decrease, prices are
poised-to jump drastically
when the next shipment of
fuel reaches the Bahamas, he
said.


HUNDREDS of Bahami-
ans were trapped in the city
of Houston last week when
Hurricane Rita one of the
most intense storms on
record headed for the
.coast of Texas.
The massive storm was
predicted to have an even
more severe impact than
Hurricane Katrina, which
devastated New Orleans
just three weeks ago.
As Hurricane Rita roared
through the Gulf of Mexico
and Bahamians scrambled
to. secure their homes and
leave Houston, concerned
parents of students living in
the Texas city as well as
ministerial officials,
expressed disappointment
over the fact that the
Bahamian government had
not offered more direct
assistance in the situation.
Among Bahamians
boarding up their homes
and praying for the best last
week were students and
Olympic athletes as well as
government officials.
Bahamian Olympian
Frank Rutherford said that
in an attempt to ensure the
safety of Bahamian students
during the passage of the
storm, he had taken it upon
himself to gather as many
as he could at his home.
Mr Rutherford said that
although he appreciates the
help of the Bahamian gov-
ernment to ensure the safe-
ty of its citizens in Texas,
he feels that there should
have been a more concerted
effort.
'He said that there was no
contingency plan and no
plan to evacuate Bahami-
ans. Mr Rutherford added
that the government did its
best but there is room for
improvement.
The former Olympian
said that Houston, as the
fourth largest city in the
US, which many Bahamians
call home, warrants the
establishment of a con-
sulate office.


the selection process.


BEC management has
asked for its dispute with the
union to be referred to the
Industrial Tribunal for arbi-
tration.
Management said last week
that it no longer sees the value
of its talks with the Bahamas
Electrical Workers Union
continuing at the Department
of Labour level.
Union officials, however,
have described this as an
unnecessary act and a stalling
tactic.
There are four issues raised
by the BEWU which are
being addressed by the
Department of Labour:
Change in working hours
Retroactive pay as a result
of change in working hours
Percentage increase and
merit pay; and
Pension plan revision.
The union has announced
publicly that they have insti-
tuted a "work to rule" but
BEC management said that,
as an essential service organi-
sation, BEC cannot effective-
ly run a 24-7 operation with
the imposition of industrial
action.


CARL BETHEL, chairman
of the Free National Move-
ment, has announced last
week that he will run for the
position of deputy leader of
the party.
Mr Bethel is the first FNM
member to announce his can-
didacy for the position of the
party's second-in-command.
The previous week, Mon-
tagu MP Brent Symonette
told The Tribune he was seri-
ously considering a bid for the
position of deputy leader. He
said he would inform the pub-
lic of his final decision by the
time parliament reconvenes
on October 5.
Mr Bethel's announcement
comes less than two months
before the planned national
convention of the FNM.
From November 8-11 the
FNM will review the party's,
policy agenda and begin to
prepare for the 2007 election
battle.
During this convention the
FNM is also expected to elect
party officers, including the
leader and the deputy leader.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


WEEK IN REVIEW









PAGE C, MNDAY SEPEMBER26, 005IHESTIBUN


. CARL BETHEL 0 TOMMY TURNQUEST BRENT SYMONETTE


IR VIOM page one egy, no indication of forward allusions and hollow promises


There was no sign of a strat-


planning, just a ragbag of
muddled thinking, biblical


against a background of
tumult and mayhem.


Prime Minister Perry
Christie, as an antidote to the
"maximum leaders" of the
past, chose government by
consensus as the way forward
for the Bahamas.
However, the many com-
missions he set up seem to
have achieved very little, and
his laissez-faire approach to
Cabinet affairs has left an
impression of indiscipline and
lack of control.
Mr Christie, far from being
a maximum leader, has
emerged as a "minimum
leader" who seems to assume
the bemused state of an unin-
volved bystander.
Repeatedly over the last
three years, a strong hand has
been required in bringing sev-
eral unacceptable situations
under control. However, noth-
ing happened,
Several Cabinet members
have become prime candi-
dates for reshuffling. Again,
inaction was the preferred
option.
As Sidney Stubbs blundered
from one catastrophe to the
next, Mr Christie was in the
terraces looking on, a silent
spectator.
While Mr Miller charged
around like a steer on the
loose, it never occurred to the
PM to rein him in, it seems.
Having been laid low by a
stroke earlier this year, Mr
Christie was out of the picture
for several weeks during
which according to PLP
insiders his deputy Cynthia
Pratt brought a measure of
order to the unruly Cabinet
ranks.
Apart from anything else,
she insisted that ministers turn
up for meetings on time, a
concept that many found hard
to understand or accept.
Given the government's
perceived all-round inepti-
tude, the opposition ought to


The fine line of General Electric appliances found at Geoffrey Jones cater to today's busy households
and fit every lifestyle. Our wide variety of GE appliances are designed to suite your needs, providing the
ultimate in convenience, performance and style. Vth the best that technology has to offer, competitivei
pricing and a full service department, Geoffrey Jones is your ultimate appliance centre.




You'll wonder how you ever got along without it


have been enjoying a field
day, romping all over their for-
mer tormentors with glee.

Colleagues

Bradley Roberts, the man
who used to blitz them every
week in the Assembly with his
much-publicised "bomb-
shells", ought to have been
cowering under sustained


.,ffcfRff


bombardment for his many
defects as a minister.
But, like his Cabinet col-
leagues, he has been given a
ridiculously easy ride by the
FNM. Government and oppo-
sition have snoozed away
alongside each other like a
couple of overfed potcakes.
No wonder Hurricane
Hubert is back in the picture.
He at least has the capacity to
rattle the rafters and shake
everyone awake in an Assem-
bly full of sleepwalkers.
However, his re-emergence
- if it happens will not be
greeted with universal joy,
even in the FNM itself, where
pro and con factions are said
to be more or less equal in
number.
"The fact is that many peo-
ple in the party and the coun-
try don't like him," said an
insider. "Even so, the feeling is
.that he will probably get the
FNM leadership, in spite of
everything. However, it's also
felt that he will fail at the polls.
"I personally don't think he
can win a general election.
The bitterness against him is
phenomenal. But I do think
he will be available to become
party leader again not in a
fight, because he has never
fought for anything, but by
positioning himself for what-
ever opportunities come
along. He is very good at
that."
Meanwhile, according to the
veteran politician who has
long predicted an Ingraham
comeback, Tommy Turnquest
will quietly vacate the leader-
ship, convinced at last of the
utter hopelessness of his posi-
tion.
"Only his mother thinks he
has a chance of staying on as

SEE page 10C


M DION FOULKES


I il I ((I cmrmrd Rset,&Motonc\ 222889 JO E AC


~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


lntelliSr~nt Crnetv.fficient.


I_








THE TRIBUNE


"Some people feel like this
is Armageddon. People are
panicking. In the 22 years
that I have lived here I have
never seen the city like this.
"It is unbelievable. Many
of the (Bahamian) students
here, although they are used
to hurricanes, are scared of
what this storm will do. "
Frank Rutherford, for-
iner Bahamian Olympian
and employee of the Min-
istry of Sports, Youth and
Culture talks to The Tri-
bune about the mood in
Houston as Hurricane Rita
approached Texas last
week.
"We should carpool as
much as we can. I believe I
saw in the newspapers how
the taxi union members, the


mailboat operators, are
clamouring for a raise in
their fees and rightfully so.
"Because no-one antici-
pated that the price of fuel
would have gone to what it
is now. Last night it was
$68.50 a barrel, but it is
expected to reach $72 a bar-
rel by weekend.
"That's why we say this
is a serious, serious prob-
lem that must be addressed
head on. This affects every
avenue, every sector of our
economy."
.- Leslie Miller, Minis-
ter of Trade and Industry,
sent a warning last week
that gasoline prices could
jump to as high as $7 with-
in 14-21 days.
"Unfortunately, and even


with the involvement of the
Labour Department as concil-
iator, our discussions have not
proved very fruitful or pro-
duced a mutually satisfactory
result."
BEC management on the
state of contract talks with the
Bahamas Electrical Workers
Union. BEC has asked that
the matter be referred to the
Industrial Tribunal.
"Both women have been
employed with the institution
for more than 25 years,
beginning as lecturers and
occupying various adminis-
trative positions in subse-
quent years."
COB council chairman
Franklyn Wilson
announced last week that
acting president Dr Rhonda


rdammmm


Chipman-Johnson and Dr
Pandora Johnson, vice-pres-
ident of research, planning
and development have sub-
mitted applications for the
college's president post.


PARADISE ISLAND


25 %


50% OFF

I.WI.F '
: D ,tiii/*


% 'ea Te:. (242) 363-1. 027


Enter as often
as you like!
Attach 6 labels of Campbell's Red
& White Condensed Soup (10.5oz)
to an entry form and place in the


Name:
AAA -....


specially-marked boxes at i-Address:
participating stores, at the Telephone:
d'Albenas Agency on Madeira--
Street or at Custom Computers in ,ram phell's
the Island Traders Building. "Cam pbell's
Promotion ends October 28, 2005. it's g t the g ds"
I I - -


.


- --- ;-


INSIGHT
ME,


notes 0 the W ,,ek
.....................


I


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER2612005 PAGE 5C











C


ISSUES&IDEAS

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,2005 1 THE MIAMI HERALD


REMEMBERING SIMON WIESENTHAL


WIESENTHAL PHOTO BY ED ALCOCK/ZUMA PRESS PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL BABIN/HERALD STAFF


Simon Wiesenthal survived a dozen
concentration camps, then spent his life
bringing Nazi war criminals to justice and
searing the Holocaust into the conscience of
the world. He frequently called himself a
"deputy for the dead." "When history looks
back," Wiesenthal said, "I want people to
know the Nazis weren't able to kill millions
of people and get away with it."

Here are the reminiscences of two who
knew Wiesenthal, who died Tuesday at age
96.
-- ---- -- --- -- -- ------ - -- --- -- -- -- -
PAYING TRIBUTE TO WIESENTHAL'S LIFE
Ss o On Herald.com: Share
your condolences
in a guestbook.
* Excerpts from this guestbook appear on
* Also online: Obituaries from the past week.


.* * 4


a


- -
~-~- -


-db . - -
0* -. -
.4bl


- -.O -. -
41 40 4 -


- 0
- 0


-- -M


- -


- N- 4b 4- .


a -
* *
4 0-l
4b ,


-.m~ d- -.=
*d- a 4
qB, *
-* qD *- 8


- 4b


It is up to us to ensure
that the world never forgets
BY ROBERT L. NOVAK
The Simon Wiesenthal Center
I was only 11 years old in 1961, but like many
Americans, I was mesmerized by the televised trial
of Adolf Eichmann, head of the Gestapo's Depart-
ment for Jewish Affairs from 1941 to 1945.
One witness after another described the brutal
treatment inflicted upon them by the Nazis and
their collaborators simply because they were Jews.
SS-Obersturmbannfuehrer Eichmann, architect
of the plan to carry out Adolf Hitler's "final solu-
tion" against the Jewish people, sat impassively in
the dock, responding that he was a mere bureau-
crat "just following orders."
For his crimes against humanity, Eichmann was
found guilty and,, to this day, remains the only per-
son to ever be executed in Israel: hanged in 1962.
Later, I learned that a Holocaust survivor named
Simon Wiesenthal helped bring him to justice. He
pursued Eichmann and other Nazis relentlessly,
and although his search sometimes led him into


*TURNTONOVAK


c'Copyrighted Material



am, Syndicated Contentl _


ua

o 0


Available from Commercial News Providers"


*
-a ~-


a-~~ ~
- m -


amw 0


- 4b"04
b O i


- o


b- 0. ."- n.
b 4b


_1_ 11~--~ _11111 111111111111111111~ 1-


C-


fI


sm-


-


*


-- e


q - -








7C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION ISSUES & IDEAS THE MIAMi HERALD


*NOVAK

dead ends, he was driven, per-
haps obsessed, with tracking
down war criminals.
His painstaking research
helped lead to Eichmann's
capture in Argentina by
Israeli agents in 1960, and
Wiesenthal became my hero.
I've had the honor of work-
ing for the institution that
bears his name for 19 years.
After Eichmann was appre-
hended, Israel's prime minis-
ter, David Ben Gurion, sent
Wiesenthal a letter praising
him for what he had achieved.
Wiesenthal answered that
he was but one of many indi-
viduals involved in the cap-
ture of Eichmann.
The idea to establish the
Simon Wiesenthal Center
originated in 1977 with Rabbi
Marvin Hier, an Orthodox
rabbi from Vancouver, British
Columbia, by way of New
York's Lower East Side.
Hier was inspired to create
an institution that would per-
petuate the memory of the
Holocaust after he visited the
remnants of concentration
camps in Europe.
Who better to identify with
it than the man Hier saw as.
the conscience of the Holo-
caust, the unofficial "attorney
general" for the six million
Jews who perished?
Hier took a delegation of
prominent business leaders to
Vienna, seeking Wiesenthal's
permission to use his name.
"If you are going to create
another memorial for the
dead, I am not very inter-
ested," Wiesenthal told them.
"But if you will create a truly
living institution, I cannot
refuse you. For me, it is
important to remember, but it
is far more important to
remember to act."
These are the guiding prin-
ciples by which Simon Wie-
senthal lived, and they
became the Center's mandate.
Hpu itg shce far
ou ': 'for ven-
gen~d that
he hoped his work would
send a stronger message to
the future's potential murder-
ers than to the actual murder-
ers of the past.
By fall 1986, I'd been work-
ing for Jewish organizations
for 13 years and was commit-
ted to the cause of Jewish sur-
vival.
An offer to work for the
Simon Wiesenthal Center
came out of nowhere, but it
was bashert meant to be -
to work for a cause in which I


-dw -meo 4 W 4
4w -90 om Lq m Sh


-mm q mm
.-Uo


- -




-b
9md.
__ o__


"Copyrighted Material


Syndi cated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


W 4m*1 uW -. m 4 -


qw- --


- ..- -


- -44 b a .0 -


- .w ~ ow*
4611MO Ql.b w 4


4- am
o _,,


o -4P .


* 0 m a, -


- m -* A 'f -q o


Robert Novak is
the national
Director of
Development for
the Simon
Wiesenthal
Center, based in Boca Raton.

believed so passionately.
I opened an office in Flor-
ida, and the following Janu-
ary, met Simon Wiesenthal
for the first time.
Then 78, he looked more
like my grandfather than a
superhero.
At the time, the Wiesenthal
Center had a small Holocaust
museum at its headquarters in
Los Angeles. I was in a group
watching as Wiesenthal led
former Soviet refusenik,
Natan Sharansky, on a
museum tour.
Sharansky, who had been
imprisoned by the Soviets for
many years, knew nothing
about the Holocaust or Jewish
history, and was stunned
when Wiesenthal showed him
a replica of a crematorium.
Disbelieving, Sharansky
asked Wiesenthal if it was
true that the Nazis burned


Jews. I was in awe of Wiesen- thal, but he had a wonderful
thal's humanity and compas- sense of humor: a quick wit,
sion as he comforted Sharan- always a story, warm and very
sky and confirmed the Nazis' approachable.
inhumane acts. For many years, the motion
In March 1987,1 organized picture industry sought his
the center's first South Flor- permission to make a movie
ida tribute dinner, honoring about his life.
Don Soffer, the developer of He would always decline,
Aventura and Turnberry and saying he didn't want to be
a member of the center's portrayed as the "Jewish
board of trustees. James Bond."
Not only did Wiesenthal As Wiesenthal was
travel from Vienna to attend, approaching his 80th birth-
he was joined by Col. Richard day, Robert Cooper, vice
Seibel, commanding officer of president of HBO, suggested
the Allied forces who liber- to Wiesenthal that he cooper-
ated Wiesenthal at Mauthau- ate with a film because cer-
sen, an Austrian death camp. tainly after his death, some-
It was only the second time `6ne would do it without him,
they had seen each other in 40 and not as well. Wiesenthal
years. agreed. Adapted from his
Before the banquet, we book, the film was entitled,
held a press conference. A fel- The Murderers Among Us,
low Mauthausen survivor starring Ben Kingsley as Wie-
who had heard that Wiesen- senthal.
thal was in town stood quietly The two men developed a
at the back of the room. remarkable relationship. At a
When it was over, the man banquet in Los Angeles, they
approached Wiesenthal and walked onto the stage
in an emotional reunion, they together, and I was amazed at
embraced and cried. It was a the resemblance. I later
deeply touching moment. learned they were both born
The public only saw the on Dec. 31. For the next sev-
serious side of Simon Wiesen- eral years, I made sure to send


Wiesenthal birthday wishes.
On the occasion of his 90th
birthday, I expressed my
appreciation for all that he
had done for mankind, wished
him good health and said that
he should live to be at least
120.
He replied that although he
knew he wouldn't be around
for another 30 years, people
like me would carry on his
fight for justice and tolerance.
By choosing this work, we
have accepted a commitment
to represent those who were
lost, those who survived and
future generations.
The Wiesenthal Center has
had the distinction of winning
two Academy Awards. The
first film, Genocide, tells the
story of the Holocaust. In the
final scene, Wiesenthal is
shown placing a note among
the stones of Jerusalem's
Western Wall. The note read:
"I am my brother's keeper."
Last week, Simon Wiesen-
thal left us, but his life's work
will live on in me and my col-
leagues at the Simon Wiesen-
thal Center.
It is up to us to ensure that
the world never forgets.


. NMundhlJnd then .\tu:i.' truil


d -01 4

"Nmom- Wmft amm-
am-4- 1
* e -
p


o p.

-Q


*A
dm o o t


* -4 0M -
. 4b aow



o - -
- *-n-..m
" "o0 *o


* -o-M *
... -



0 Ma - w

* -
M r b 4b P" 4


0 1 4 W 4FI


m *ow4awdom w~
0 -moo om
do- m ON-=f
4mgm- 41

4b a. -a l
*-lvmm ~ q- -f
404b -o dww

ftm- 4bmm -4=
q- 04 p fpmw


- -.4 - -


0-. t. -ma.

a* -



qw.4b0 wo 0
,-,= - .,,=
4 u-wa -
Nmwommf
amoe 0Pom-0
q- mo a _


- ~
al"Mmo..,o.m o




o qb-
oQ wm a-.. 4m Q O
mbm -

. -
m- *mm 4 n ..
am M o
0 -m m.nn-

40 am-dom
4b -W _b-q a

- oba dmm w 0 -
4b 0 o b o- -
*0o ft 9b wfm


ft 4b4- -

= 4a- --a 0

-. m * m


GUESTBOOK
EXCERPTS


ROBERT L. NOVAK



'His life's work will live on'


- DEBORAH SAN GABRIEL,
Brookline, Mass.


They should have
cloned you. Rest in
peace.
- IKE OSTROWE, FdMMse Ir


To all who
remember Simon
Wiesenthal,
we understand that
he [and his wife] lost
89 family members
in the Holocaust. No
one can imagine
what he must have
endured to survive.
Thank God he did.
He chose to make
his life count for all
those who could not
have a life and for
future generations,
too. The world owes
him so much! May
we never forget! Rest
in peace, brave soul!
-ARLENE ROSE, Pk Pines


Because ofyour life
I will never forget!
Thanks for the
teaching! If we just
fry, just try, this
world will be just as
in your dreams! Men
like you never are
gone or forgotten.
- GEORGE VERA, Miami
0 e

You had a purpose
in life and greatly
fulfilled it. can't
think of many people
in my life hatI f
could call my hero,
but Simon
Wiesenthal, you
were truly one of the
very few.
VICTOR HICKS, Lake City
0 0

Condolences to the
Wiesenthal family.
... Simon
Wiesenthal has
shown every man,
woman and child
that one man can
make the difference.
May his work and
essence live on in
each of us, and give
voice through our
everyday actions.
Rest in peace, our

beloved Simon.
Thank you for your
courage and
humanity.
-S. CHAYE, aConid
000
Because ofyou,
Lady Justice was
able to smile, not
weep. May the fruits
of your work live on
forever. Baruch
Hashem.


g G m wo A. a -...


Cm "Copy righted Material


----. "Syndicated Content-


Available from Commercial News Providers'"


....................o................................................ ...............................I....................................................................................................I........ ................. ................I.......


I _p


7C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


ISSUES & IDEAS


THE MIAMI HERALD


- O *o


8






WWW.HERALD.COM __


OPINION
JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER EXECIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JOHN S. KNIGHT 0894-1981)


INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,2005



JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


r^ 4
^~ <

,y


'-C
S 'I
lh~t


% t


r

*4


dab


Dok Robwrts hcnv art:'


-48.
04b qo


4D emom w-W 4
-ao w 4=P = em4W
4w 0 ao-oo %wO
40 0 ownOW
4m md w mm emw
emm eq do m o mp

1 7- m m m olet4 p


sa- 4b






3. "-. Syr


Available from
4hu e- em -

ef m ae M
-w =
em --
40. ~ a
l om



IM441ra 4m 90M -ow- t
O
o _m e


yri g
Yrmiwe


* a
40 I m4D on ft o
m oq - o
~.




ted -M teim
t-dM M te ri


No 0 b4b0 1
-- m p -
om 4b4D*
1.0- .OWC



MpI em-em


qm* b am
4 1 oND
-mw- m em


em


Mo "obs -

q ~ o e m
oeb am *a* 4

4m4omm o- e
4b -w om4b ebft

ft -- -- _--
40 40M e uo am 4 .0 C
0b eft 4b m ob _____
mo m WD b mp =mem.4i
Cb P
I *.-


I P.S I trK# nl n.xwfrnun its slumhr


so m o amGRO

44 C mo em 4- 0

4wm0 .- 0mosmem
* C 40qm e em "C em



"no am WIN*

4 m -

0 Gm
emap ~. ie



em e


404

44b 01NI
ab 41b Qmm


o 4b40NOaftm *a osp
q -w- mp e m-





4b wm qmm o b
Qfm4b mom C md
4 bmo-w 0-
0 4 wm D em C4b"
w Qe 0.ftm 44 em
L0 41o ft ____ -4 C
o 4 em 0 /m 4M mb

em *u CIPe mp x
duma Cft-Qb- I 4ww o


moe mw Wwwqpm 0 4b-b

em 41 b o-WOsmmGP
em 00dom mw -p
mms Cm qodob.

4w- eme4b
emw
Um.- ft-mem am 4w

'% =o 4061%am m b
0-1 qm e- amo
ow oo 0 w-wft 0dOWM 0
el 0 C e4m-40 qpmw*e
-0 an=* 4 C pm we *am

sm.-Now


me a 4m #o
If %VMJ fli 1W




=_ -=-''

e em s em ~
Omemd
em-



ove ermm em -
em, m u 4C 0
*o C em em










em














em
m od e* e om elmsO
48 ,o wn% iqb Own

















so o m
e4. eI0 -0 -- m -O
V- 4b emom aem emo m
e1mm ftemomdo omm m 0 lm,

db~dm































a-nw 4910" edi e om O
m emm ,O WAM eGm

m em4 4

"= C mo
em 40MIOM0e xisom
4UN. f- 4Mewmp 1
40- 4 m- f- om a-ono-
am -am 4edmb,-


-we -m m 0 mW

fo C- S emmo lp4
ft. soft 0.00

GIM 4Dft-o its
'roviders"..


am Al* wGmm4* CMM "110
44090-. m emm a f m OM
allw -- D f a

ftM 0Qe0m m* o
-m m AP Shw. am m *-am
U Coome asoeb

am 4* ft

4ft -a
aC 4 m-l
o ekwmm
Of"W mmow 4 em

so m mm m
dw QW, am WIMIS
4b 4tmmmwgll
C Cmm goom qlggll




-0 -4 a Wb- -a.


G 4110-Mw--w s -on* o
Wea 4sm amOn -4%
491b 4b amem mom i"



49Mo 4w
doem


id cicated Content


Commercial News P


-I- I I~~~-~~-. ..............~'





tAw





* ft f0$*
Ele*d*
^ff S?


,0lflt


4.0
)* **'
i *i.
* 0

n0


.1
N*f


.a


V


El


'
1 1


'Uj"
IAvailable
;/ *i


aop
Syn
frorim


riahted Material


dicated
Commerc
.*0


Contentt E
ial News Providers"
I * *

I i 4*o
f "


I^M~it~p~ii*bpeW~ft~lS*blilP I
W i "PPFSi MPk F*P, W F io

* ***!***** m Pl* ins **i **et*e, n
I lll>ll 8 p P !.P *P OIOPWI k 1Pha


l'I
1I


* 0 1


.. I


U








PAGE 00, ONDA, SEPEMBE 26,2005IHESTIBHN


FROM page 4C


leader," the veteran said wry-
ly.
Dion Foulkes, who raised
his banner some weeks ago,
has been credited with stak-
ing his claim with a boldness
Turnquest seems to lack. But
he attracts a mixed reaction.
"Yes, he is viable as a can-
didate if Ingraham doesn't
run, but there are many who
see Foulkes as too callow for
leadership," said one promi-
nent FNM.
"Also, he is still remem-
bered for one or two unex-
plained matters during the last
FNM administration, and for
being part of the ridiculous
'dream team' foisted on the
people.by Hubert Ingraham.
"Some memories run deep
and last a long time. Foulkes is
associated with the dying days
of the old FNM government, a
government noted for its arro-
gance and smugness."
Foulkes himself insists his
campaign is for real, bolstered
by some encouraging feed-
back from party supporters.
Others feel he will be talked
out of running if the ex-PM
heeds the call to to become
the FNM's saviour once again.

Resistance

Whatever the scale of his
support, Foulkes also faces
fierce resistance. One FNM
stalwart called The Tribune
last week to shriek: "Stop pub-
licising Foulkes for the lead-
ership. It's ridiculous it can't
happen."
Symonette's position, mean-
while, is causing much debate
in party ranks.
As the FNM's most promi-
nent white, he is said to see
himself as one half of a "salt
and pepper" ticket. However,
if he's the salt, who's the pep-
per?
According to FNM sources,
Symonette doesn't like
Foulkes and doesn't rate
Turnquest, even though the
latter has said he would have
no problem working alongside
him.
While Ingraham is not top
of his- Christmas card list, he at
least commands respect for
getting things done. Hence,
Ingraham-Symonette is seen
by insiders as the likeliest
FNM ticket come polling day,
especially as the party's big-
time backers including its
Eastern Road sponsors have
made it clear the ex-PM is
their preferred candidate by
a long way.
As of last Wednesday, Carl
Bethel entered the fray as a
contender for the deputy lead-
ership. This, it is suggested,
makes him a potential running
mate for Foulkes or Ingraham
in a variation on the "salt and
pepper" theme.
Money

INSIGHT was told: "There
is no question Ingraham now
wants to make a comeback,
but he also wants Turnquest
and Foulkes out of the way
first. There is also no question
that the Eastern Road set
have said bluntly that they are
only prepared to put their
money behind Ingraham.
"However, to be honest, I
think the party and the coun-
try are moving beyond Ingra-
ham. I think we have sufficient
talent in our ranks to produce
a leadership that can win with-
out Ingraham."
What does all this mean for
the PLP? Well, unless the
FNM gains focus over the next
year, and unites behind a lead-
ership team with a realistic
chance of success, a govern-
ment notable for achieving lit-
tle or nothing will be back in
power by default.
"No-one is impressed by
anything the PLP has done,"
said an observer, "However,
people don't see the FNM
under Turnquest as an alter-


native. He has no charisma
and none of the qualities
required for leadership. That
means Foulkes or Ingraham
at election time, or another
five years of oblivion for the
opposition party."
The question-mark hanging
over Christie's leadership
appears to have been resolved
- by the prime minister him-
self. Party sources say he has
told colleagues he intends to


lead the PLP into the next
election come what may.
A source told INSIGHT:
"Perry has dug in his heels and
it is believed he wants to com-
plete eight years as prime min-
ister to qualify for his pension.

Desire

"In the event of his death,
the pension goes to his wife.
That, it is thought, is the main


driving force behind his desire
to stay. He wants to ensure
security for his family."
Meanwhile, enthusiasm for
his likeliest successor, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe,
appears to have cooled in
some sectors of the party.
"Senior PLPs seem to be
downplaying Wilchcombe
nowadays," a source disclosed,
"They are no longer looking
in his direction. I still believe


that Cynthia Pratt is the one
to look out for. And I think
she is interested."
Back to the political veteran
with his crystal ball. "The
whole Foulkes and Turnquest
nonsense in the FNM is a
smokescreen," he said. "Ingra-
ham will be the FNM leader in
the next election. Mark my
words."
As speculation continues,
the former PM himself


remains silent. That, says. ,
veteran, is a typical Ingra-hi
tactic.
"He will not throw his iRa
into the ring. That's not ,S
style. But when all the othef4
have been talked outof stahd-
ing, he will step forwardia
claim the prize."

M What do you think? Fli
328-2398 or e-mail jmaI
quis@tribunemedia.net
*. *'. '' ". : **'h


CHEVROLET


FOR ALL LIFE'S ROADS


During Septemberor every hamburger you

pur e,Mcon will doateso50 cents.

to the victisf rricane Katrina.* .




t.^' ,,^ ,/*1 ? "'n t i'


PAGE 10C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


:T~I~I~~







O
action

ssin

or


1


I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs