Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00203
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: September 12, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00203
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text





"TH ONE&

ONLY
BIG MAC" lot.
HIGH 92F
LOW 78F


SUNNY


The


Tribune


Do you need Approved?


Volume: 101 No.239


US OPEN TITLE GLORY
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SEE TRIBUNE SPORTS SECTJ:ON


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


PRICE 500


LESSONS LEFT BEHiR
KATRINf'S WAKE
* SEE TRIBUNE INSIGHT SECTION


Minister of Works


makes announcement


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Ministry of Education
intends to spend $40 million
over the next 18-24 months to
buildnew schools throughout
the Bahamas, Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts said
yesterday.
Mr Roberts' announcement
comes on the heels of heavy
criticism by the official opposi-
tion which is accusing educa-
tion minister. Alfred Sears :of
"misleading" 'thlie public and
calling for transparency of gov-
ernment-awarded contracts.
(See story page 3)
Following a week of contro-
versy in which incomplete
repairs led to some schools
remaining closed at the start of
the new term, Mr Roberts yes-
terday announced that govern-
ment would invest millions of
dollars to construct new schools
in New Providence and the
Family Islands over the next
two years.
Minister of Education Alfred
Seats told The Tribune yester-
day that repairs to the four
schools which were closed due
to safety reasons had been car-
ried out to the extent that class-
es would resume today.
In the case of C C Sweeting
Junior High School, which
remained closed last Monday,
Mr Sears said that some
$700,000 had already been
invested in repair work, but that
an additional $1 million was
needed to complete renovations
to the entire school.
Speaking as a guest on Love
97's talk show Jones and Co
yesterday, Mr Roberts said that
many government schools,were.
built more than three decades
ago and required extensive and
costly repair work.
"The cold reality is that a


number of schools were built
many yearsago, they were
designed to last from periods of
25-30 years': Repairing old
buildings is very expensive
proposition,"i he said.
Submitting that the Bahamas
should learn from its past mis-
takes in school construction and
move on, Mr Roberts said that
although the government is
responsible fdr the schools, con-
tractors who are hired for work
on the buildings also share in
that responsibility.
Throughout last week, classes
at C C Sweeting and A F
Adderley Junior High schools,
and Carlton E Francis and C W
Sawyer Primary schools were
cancelled because of incomplete
repairs to b ildings and the
resulting safety issues.
Parents land teachers
expressed their frustration over
the state of disrepair of the-
schools to Minister Sears. In
some cases teachers walked off
the job in protest of the condi-
tions in which they were being
asked to work in.
Mr Sears said yesterday that
all the affected schools would
be opening today as promised
previously by: the ministry.
"Work to the schools was car-
ried out throughout the week
up until (Sunday) evening," he
said.
Although not all necessary
repairs have been' completed,
said the education minister, the
schools are now safe to be used.
He explained that any further
repair work would be scheduled.
around the schools" curriculum.
"In some cases we will have
work take place in the evening
hours," he adled.
Giving details o6 the repair
work to the four schools, Mr
Sears said: "With C C Sweet-
SEE page three


Fall in number of Developed country

armed robberies status for Bahamas
W'wthin 15 ers1


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
ARMED robberies in the Bahamas have
decreased by 14 per cent in the first half of
2005 compared to the same period last year, it
was revealed yesterday.
The latest police statistics show that there
has been a significant decrease in armed rob-
beries for the months from January to June,
press liaison officer Inspector Walter Evans
reported on Sunday.
He attributed the decrease to increased
police presence both visible and covert -
and an improved relationship between the
public and police.
"A good working relationship between the
police and the communities is critical to our
work. We now hope to achieve even better
relationships, to get people to work hahd-in-
hand with police and perhaps get those num-
bers to drop even further," he told The Tri-
bune.
According to the latest statistics, the number
one motive for armed robbery is money.
Sixty-eight per cent of incidents involved
the use of a handgun. Knives and other sharp
SEE page 12


v T J.JLJ.L j, J I ,Al


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Repoiter


THE Bahamas is on track to gain the status
of a developed country y the year 2020, Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs red Mitchell said yes-
terday.
Mr Mitchell, who ill represent the
Bahamas this week at. he United Nation's
2005 World Summit in New York, told The
Tribune that he is confid nt that the Bahamas
will be able to join the tfanks of the United
States, Japan, Sweden ajid other developed'
countries within the next' 15 years.
Last week, the Unitedl Nations Develop-
ment Report revealed that the Bahamas is on
track for the majority of th ., Millennium Devel-
opment Goals set by the United Nations for
2015, ranking the Bahamas: 50 out of 177 coun-
tries on the high human development scale.
"Like most of the Caribbean countries which
are considered middle de veloping countries,
we have already exceeded many of the goals of
the (United Nation's) Millennium Report. We;
are on track with our huinan development,
SEE page 12


SEE page 12


inside

FNM hits out at Sears
over announcement
THE Free National Move-
ment has accused Education
Minister Alfred Sears of "mis-
leading" the Bahamian people
when he tnnounced.that 98
per cent of all school repairs
had been completed before
the start of the 2005/2006 aca-
demic year.
See page three
Claim of burning
corpses 'reckless'
THE claim that human
corpses are being burned in an
open fire pit at a Haitian com-
munity near Marigold Farms is
"reckless and irresponsible", said
Ron Pinder, parliamentary sec-
retary'in the Ministry of Health.
See page five


Nsd a a 6 La6 ging newnpaSe'r


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION




BAHAMAS EDITION


- 3,


foptne.


sc 0o0







PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


I O CALNE


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ITALIAN CUISINE

Seafood, Steaks

and hops!
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^SfRwgiKB ^BrXiBEf 8 WB'yBSS VaK ^S


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/


* A PICTURE taken of the attacksw which destroyed the World Trade Center
(Photo: Helene Seligman)



September 11



terrorist attacks



remembered


E By CARA BRENNEN
Tibune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas yesterday
joined with the United States
and the world in commemorat-
ing the fourth anniversary of
the September 11, 2001 terror-
ism attacks.
As Americans paused o
remember that day, the are
still trying to recoverjrom the
devastating effectsofurricane
Katrina, whichr'rtually wiped
out the .Gull Coast two weeks
--ago.
Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the coun-



RoyalStar

SAssurance


try sends its continuing sup-
port to the United States at
this time.
He described the attacks on
the Pentagon in Washington
DC and the World Trade Cen-
tre in New York, which killed
more than 2,000 people, as an
attack on western civilization.
He said the Bahamas totally
rejected that concept and added
that the country continued to
do its part in the important task
of eliminating social injustice
and poverty.
In the aftermath of the ter-
rorism attacks, the Bahamas
suffered an economic blow and
Mr Mitchell said the current sit-
uation in the southern US could
also cause a similar economic
decline.
"There is cause for concern
because there may be some
knock-off effects," he said.
Mr Mitchell said that what-
ever economic issues affect the
United States, the Bahamas


receives its share and is affected
as well.
However, he said the country
would continue to provide what-
ever aid and support it could to
the US, although he accepted
that everyone might have a dif-
ferent opinion on what amount
that support should be.
In the US, the September 11
anniversary was observed by a
ceremony at ground zero in
New York, where the names of
the victims were read by their
siblings.
Moments of silence were also
observed throughout the world.
During the ceremony in New
York, a moment of silence was
also held for Hurricane Katrina
victims. As of yesterday, the
death toll for that disaster stood
at about 400.
Also, two beams of light
known as the "Tribute in
Light" were expected to shine
from dusk to dawn yesterday
in New York.


Police investigate robberies


INVESTIGATIONS are
underway into an armed rob-
bery of the Jolly Roger on
Shirley Street.
According to police, a "dark
male" entered the establishment
after 2pm on Friday, threatened
.patrons and staff with a handgun
and demanded cash.
The gunman fled the scene
with an undetermined amount
of money.
Police are also investigat-
ing the armed robbery of a


COMMENTS made in The
Tribune on Thursday in
response to Bishop Simeon
Hall's criticism of the
Bahamas Christian Council


Bamboo Shack employee on
Sunday at 2am.
The employee of the popu-
lar take-out eatery was walking
across a parking lot on
Carmichael Road, heading
towards her vehicle, when she
was held up by two gunmen,
said police.
The men robbed the employ-
ee of an undetermined amount
of cash before fleeing the area.
Investigations into both mat-
ters continue.


were wrongly attributed to
Reverend C B Moss. In fact,
the statement was issued by
the council's president, Dr
William Thompson.


property >1 electrical fire
motor "
:home
liability
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it he
call before ithappens


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freeport t 242.352.4564 f 242.352.5118
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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


-Correction













FNM hits out at Sears over





school repairs announcement


THE Free National Move-
ment has accused Education
Minister Alfred Sears of "mis-
leading" the Bahamian people
when he announced that 98 per
cent of all school repairs had
been completed before the start
of the 2005/2006 academic year.
Two schools in New Provi-
dence Carlton Francis Prima-
ry and C C Sweeting Junior
High,- were unable to open on
time-due to extensive repairs
needed, and A F Adderley
High School is in a "crippled"
state of disrepair, said party
chaiman Carl Bethel following a
tour of the schools at the week-
Send.
"The minister seems also to
be unaware of the fact that at
least 51 government schools
throughout the Bahamas are
still in need of substantial and
disruptive repairs or re-build-
ing, even now," said Mr Bethel
on Saturday.
The delegation of FNM offi-
cials, who toured Carlton Fran-
cis Primary, S C McPherson Jr
High and C C Sweeting Jr High
schools last week to asses the
state of the campuses, has made
three reccomendations to
resolve the ongoing school
repair problem:
The appointment of a full-
time Minister of Education,
assisted at least by a parlia-
mentary secretary;
the further empowerment
of School Boards, with increas-
es in the dollar value of repair


m:i m va t,


and maintenance contracts
which the Boards could issue;
subject to ethical and quality


Ministry to




spend $40m




on schools

FROM page one

ing we overhauled the eastern block, but we still have to renovate
all the other blocks. At A F Adderley wcrk has been done to such
an extent that we can allow classes to r-,sume; however, for the
future we plan to construct a new eight-classroom block. At Carl-
ton E Francis we have the problem of the concrete separating
from the steel. But the contractor will have that problem solved
within the next few weeks."
Mr Sears thanked all the contractors f r their work which made
it possible for the majority of the 158 sc aools in the Bahamas to
open on tipie and he thanked the parents and teachers for their
patience.
President of the C CSweeting Junior F igh School PTA, Dwight
Rolle said that Mr Sears should be "comn mended as much as criti-
cised".



Victim identified


POLICE have confirmed
the identity of the Grand
Bahama businessman shot
dead in the car park at Nassau
Palm resort on Thursday.
Late yesterday afternoon
press liaison officer Walter
Evans identified the victim as
Roland Julmis.


He is the Bahamas' thirty-
secor d homicide for the
year.
Mr fulmis was killed during
a chase e across the resort's car
park.
Poli ze said that several shots
were :'ired at the victim. One
of the shots was fatal.


controls and;
the passage of a Govern-
ment Procurement Act which
would remove politics from
government contracts, provide
for transparency and fairness,
and ensure that quality work is
performed when the people's
money is spent.
"The Minister of Education,
Alfred Sears, is overwhelmed
by his duties and out of touch
with the realities on the ground
in education," said Mr Bethel
in a statement released by the
party on Sunday. "When the
Minister assured the Bahamian
people (more than week ago.)
that 98 per cent of all school
repairs had been completed
before the start of the school
year, he misled the Bahamian
people."
The party has reiterated its
call for government to assign
the education ministry to a full-
time minister.
Mr Bethel said it was
"unheard of" that Mr Sears
"blamed" the Minister of Public
Works for the deplorable state
of schools, and "reminded" the
minister that the "buck stops
with him".


"It is his responsibility, and
his alone to see that repairs to
school buildings are conducted
in an efficient and timely man-
ner. It is his job to 'ride herd' on
the Ministry of Public Works to
see that repairs are conducted,
rather than to seek to finger-
point and cast blame on oth-
ers," said Mr Bethel.
Mr Bethel also criticised
Prime Minister Perry Christie
for the "chronic situation" in
education.
Mr Bethel said that the prime
minister refuses to acknowledge
"wh 0lels
Bahamas knows, that the Min-
istry of Education deserves a
full-time, hands-on, and quali-
fied Minister of Education".
Regarding Mr Sears' propos-
al to institute a preventative
maintenance programme in the
Ministry of Education, Mr
Bethel dismissed the suggestion
as a "band-aid" solution that
has been tried before and has
failed due to the "bureaucracy
and inertia" in the Ministry of
Education.
Mr Bethel said that the min-
SEE page 16


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


~~~I""^"


m


m








PAG 4,MONAYSEPEMIBER I205TTTHE TTOTHNI


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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COB and the




resignation of




President Smith


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM a student of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and I
believe that our institution is
contributing to the growth of
our great country, but the way
in which the Smith removal
was handled was and will
always be unbefitting to such
an entity.
When President Smith
came to the institution, a feel-
ing of positive change swept
through the halls of COB.
During his reign, this expec-
tation was met and is still
being manifested today even
after his dismissal. The only
thing for example, the cam-
pus itself did not look like a
college and could have been
easily mistaken for any senior
high school here on the island.
Moreover, my advisers and
lecturers who had a dissatis-
fying taste of how our people
were transported from Africa
to the New World were kept
cramped in a sardine can of
an office over at the G-Block.
Now, as I walk through the
refurbished campus of COB,
the feeling of being on a Col-
lege, nay, a university campus
dawns on me. Moreover,
entering Chapters (the new
bookstore) blew my mind. I
never thought the old pass-
port office could have been
revived, let alone exist as a
First World bookstore, cafe
and office area. After inspect-
ing the first and second floor,
I was drawn to the third floor.
There, there is an Executive
Board room that would make
Prime Minister Christie jeal-
ous (and he should be) with a
view of the campus on the oth-
er side of the road. The only
thought that came to mind
which I can actually reveal
now without a fear of censor-
ship was simply, the masters of
COB, with Mr Smith at its
helm could see the Kingdom
they were building while it was
being built; yes, the Universi-
ty of the Bahamas.
After leaving the most pre-
mier Executive Office in the
land, I took myself on a per-
sonal tour of the rest of the
third floor. Besides the new
classes with their new and
comfortable desk and chair
combination, offices for past
presidents and so on, I found
the slaves I left two years ago
in modem looking offices with
pressed word furniture and


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above all, they were separated
from each other! The only
thing that went through my
mind was that either the slaves
had escaped from their shack-
les and holding cell or their
master thought of them as his
brothers and sisters, not chat-
tel. I couldn't pass up the
opportunity to congratulate
the things turned humans.
They were likewise pleased
and anyone who was forced
to work in substandard con-
ditions as professionals (which
they did, and thank you)
would have acted likewise.
After leaving our Freedom
Tower (aka Chapters), a feel-
ing of anger corrupted my
Heaven-bound soul. I started
calling for the resignation of
ALL four members of the
committee in whatever capac-
ity they hold now, be it God-
given or inherited, including
old Frankie boy, who forced
President Smith to resign. I
even called for that disgrace
of a lecturer who lurked
behind the scenes during this
whole process to resign
instantly; he is not needed!
Resignation is not always
the cure to a problem though.
The disgrace I referred to
above and many others have
said that President Smith was
overpaid. Moreover, that
same disgrace and his clique
have said that if President
Smith were retained as Presi-
dent, he would have been
placed in an awkward position
if a student were caught pla-
giarizing. But the solution was
simple. If President Smith was
getting paid too much, as
some claimed and if he need-
ed to be punished in order to
punish potential student pla-
giarists, a significant pay cut
for a period of time would
have had the same effect. That
is, punishment for plagiariz-
ing. Of course President
Smith's punishment would nor
could it act as a precedent for
students because all students
of COB are governed by the


Student Catalog which states
that students ought not to pla-
giarize and there are conse-
quences if we do... and if we
are caught. However, it's my
opinion that those four mem-
bers of the Special Envoy and
the fifth de facto member
were blood-thirsty.
This academic year is and
will be a sad year for COB.
While this feeling of despair
had been sparked by Presi-
dent Smith's wrongful
removal, I fear that the has-
tened speed the institution
was going at to attain univer-
sity status has been halted. If
we cannot compel Mr Presi-
dent to return, I pray that we
find someone like him who
can continue the process
because at the end of the day
we have to take The Bahamas
forward. Such persons like the
disgraced, the four members
of the committee and the
chairman cannot be tolerated.
I would advise the powers
that be in the wider commu-
nity to react fast to what has
happened to President Smith.
I am a student of COB, a
qualified voter and election
year is in fact approaching so
if they want to keep their jobs,
they should insist that one be
given back. However, the only
sad thing about this country
and our system of Govern-
ment is that we really don't
have any alternative to the
present governmental leaders.
So dog eat my lunch. But on a
serious note, in my opinion
Frankie Wilson and his crew
were misguided and acted
contrary to the wishes of the
majority of God-fearing rea-
sonable people in COB and I
believe, in The Bahamas as
well. As for the new Acting
President, no comment...for
now.
All I will say now is that
what we had and what we
have is a throw-back to the
day of Pilate's great request
and its result.

A CONCERNED
and SHAMED
STUDENT OF COB
Nassau,
September, 2005.


'Miracle' water concern
EDITOR, The Tribune.
LIKE a sticky piece of fly-paper we seem to attract "scam artists" and
unless we are careful this incredible story being pushed by alleged
"prophet" and self appointed Bishop Lawrence could well be yet
another to add to the long list of past scams.
Wasn't it some years ago we had those who had a pyramid scheme
where you paid in so much cash and then you were promised that you
would be rewarded incredibly the police at that time could not
find any illegality to the scam.
This miracle "Crystal Select" water goes a lot deeper and is poten-
tially something that could cause considerable harm to the gullible.
The Police, the Ministry of Health and Business Licence people
need to react immediately to establish and quantify whether or not the
claims are accurate and can be substantiated and if not, I presume they
cannot be supported, give the public the appropriate warning.
It is so ironic that we see these charismatic, evangelistic church
people copying more and more the established traditional faiths who
only so few years ago they ridiculed owing to their vestments, titles abd
liturgy.
Has Bishop Rolle a business licence to sell water? Has he and his
assistants complied with all health requirements, health certificates, etc?
Has Crystal Select a valid health certificate?
This gentleman, Prophet Bishop Lawrence Rolle is quite a charac-
ter and is alleged to have considerable influence in certain circles so The
Tribune is going to have to be very vigilant in following where this sto-
ry goes or doesn't go from the obvious need to be investigated by the
police and Public Health authorities immediately without delay. At
least let the public know what is true and what is false.
S JOHNSON
Nassau,
August 13,2005.









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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
EVERY Bahamian, regard-
less of what field they are in,
should have some form of
Bahamahost training.
That's the message that will
be enforced this week as the
Ministry of Tourism celebrates
Bahamahost Week.
The programme, which orig-
inated in 1978, was the brain-
child of former Tourism Min-
ister, Sir Clement Maynard,
who told The Tribune that he
got the idea from his travels
aboard.
He explained that other.
countries seemed to be able


to offer their tourists a more
in-depth type of visit and he
wanted to create a model
for excellence in this coun-
try.

Tourism

Since its inceptionamore than
20,000 individuals in tourism
related fields have taken part
in the programme.
"I never dreamed it would
have lasted for 27 years," said
the former deputy prime minis-
ter.
Managed by the National
Bahamahost Association, the
programme promotes profes-


sionalism, pride and education
in hospitality fields, to ensure
visitors receive a proper wel-
come.
The training familiarises all
participants with correct and
accurate information on the
country's history, geography,
civics, economics, culture, flora,
fauna and places of interest.
Additional emphasis is placed
on attitudinal training, team-
work and cooperation.
"Bahamahost is the differ-
ence between a tourist having
an ordinary vacation and an
exceptional one," said Samuel
Gardiner of the Ministry of
Tourism.
Both Mr Gardiner and Sir


Clement say they would like to
see the programme touch all
Bahamians, not just those seek-
ing a tourism related career.
They also feel that school-aged
children should receive tourism
training before leaving school.

Licences

It is a sentiment also ex-
pressed by Reverend Michael
Gittens of Christ Church
Cathedral. Sir Clement and
staff members of the Educa-
tion and Training Unit of the
ministry attended the church
on Sunday morning to kick off,
the week.


In his sermon, Rev Gittens
said that not only should the
Bahamahost programme be
taught in schools, but persons in
the tourism industry should
have to take refresher courses
before they are eligible to
receive their yearly licences or
permits.
He said tourism is too impor-
tant an industry in the country
for there not to be across the
board training.
Reminding the congrega-
tion that charity begins at
home, Rev Gittens encour-
aged service workers to be
more professional when deal-
ing with their Bahamian cus-
tomers.


"If the plane can't fly or the
cruise ship can't sail, you will
have to depend on Bahamians
to butter your bread," he
warned.
Persons who are interested
in taking the Bahamahost
course are urged to contact the
Ministry of Tourism.



32-257 1


Claim of



burning



corpses is



'reckless'



says health



official


' By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE claim that human
corpses are being burned in an
'open fire pit at a Haitian com-
munity near Marigold Farms is
"reckless and irresponsible", said
Ron Pinder, parliamentary sec-
retary in the Ministry of Health.
He said there is no evidence
to support the claims and urged
members of the public not to
make "inciteful and untrue"
statements.
Residents living near the
Haitian community told The
Tribune last week they suspect-
ed that bodies of humans and
animals were being burned in
,pit fires in the Joe Farrington
'Road area, causing "sickening"
smells day and night.
Mr Pinder said that if the
claims were. true it would imply
serious criminal activity.
"If you had deceased persons
and discarded the bodies, that
lends itself to the suggestion that
we could have possible homi-
cides, which is a very serious
activity because if that is the
case, you would have deceased
persons and no evidence of how
they died," Mr Pinder told The
Tribune yesterday.
He added that if individuals
did have such knowledge, they



MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 12
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Health For The Nation
1:30 On The Yard
2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic
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3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Colombia Trade Show 2005
5!:30 Cybernet
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6:25 Life Line
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8:45 Ardastra Gardens
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10:00 Sports Life Styles:
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
N:1 s
th.rgh.t. mkelat int


had a responsibility to report
the situation to the authorities
immediately.
He noted that the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
has on several occasions had to
go into some areas and fill in
open sewer pits and collect
burned debris.
Mr Pinder said that a num-
ber of persons use fire pits for
the production of coal. He said
that there is a chemical used.in
this production which gives off
an odour which could be what
the residents of Joe Farrington
Road are smelling.
While the department does
not encourage this activity, he
admitted that many people do it
to make a living and it is an
essential products
But he admitted that burning
for coal does "carry some nui-
sance to the public".
Mr Pinder said that the
department goes into all areas,
including those which may be
inhabited by persons in the
country illegally.
He explained that this is nec-
essary because regardless of
immigration status, the govern-
ment has an obligation to
ensure that there is proper
garbage collection and disposal
to eliminate the transfer of bac-
terial diseases.


Montagu Beach.


In this regard, Mr Pinder said
there is a need for partnerships
with concerned entities, includ-
ing Social Services, Immigration,
the Royal Bahamas Police Force
and the Ministry of Health.
He said that in the case of
dead animals, residents should
contact the Department of
Environmental Health, which
removes scores of dead animals
off the streets of New Provi-
dence on a daily basis.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER .


THE TRIBUNE


Ministry of Tourism celebrates




service training programme















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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 7


Minister Wilchcombe: more





iradio stations are coming


* By DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
Services
HOLMES ROCK, Grand
Bahama Grand Bahama is soon
to get a number of radio stations, it
was announced at the start of a
week-long Family Enrichment
Seminar now underway at the New
Mount Olivet Baptist Church here.
Making the announcement was
the Member of Parliament for
West End and Bimini Obie Wilch-
combe, who is also the minister
responsible for broadcasting in the
country.
"Broadcasting is an instrument
of development," Mr Wilchcombe
said, "and we are a country still
developing and what we did 75
years ago we didn't have to do 40
years ago; and what we do today
cannot be what we did 10 years
ago."
Private broadcasters changed
things, Mr Wilchcombe said, and
now we must use our broadcast-
ing system as the instrument for
further development of our coun-
try.
He said we must in our commu-
nities demand more: demand that
there are programmes that are
about the upliftment of our peo-
ple, about the development of our
culture, all aspects of our culture.
He added, "It ought to be where
broadcasting is seen as a source of
news, factual and in depth the
stories that create good images: but
.now the news has become tabloid,
sensational and for entertainment.
The mainstream newspapers can-
not be the tabloids and they cannot
be ZNS or Cool 96 or Love,
because when you put those sta-
tions on or when you read the
newspapers Tribune, Guardian
and the. Freeport News you are
looking for the mainstream media,
the more responsible media. The
Punch has a different role and once
you understand its role you can
read it and laugh at it.
"But there must be a balance.
So when I put on ZNS I am expect-
ing to see responsible news not
sensational nonsense. I want to see
a story that tells me about the econ-
omy Qm-y, quxfry,.wlat's going on


Broadcasting 'an


instrument of


development'

in my economy. I want to see a sto- and lectured passionately on
ry that tells me truthfully about 'Broadcasting in the Bahamas'.
what's going to happen about these Mr Wilchcombe was the keynote
hurricanes." speaker at the opening of the sem-
Mr Wilchcombe said he wanted inar under the theme, 'Adjusting to
journalists in the Bahamas to Society's Crisis'. The seminar hosts
realise that something like New are Rev John C Wallace, Pastor of
Orleans could happen in the the church and Deaconess Mother
Bahamas. He wanted journalists in Maria Wallace.
the Bahamas to recognise that He noted that journalists could
there are young men going to make things happen and "Change
prison every day. And why were things in a society, if your efforts
they going to prison every day? are utilised correctly. You are
Serious journalists should want to impacting people every day. Just
get to Her Majesty's Prison and do imagine if you were to use broad-
some interviews to find out why. casting correctly and effectively,
how we could be impacting our
E ure society.
Ensure s"How we could cause young
people to begin go think, young
And he stressed, "I want the men to begin to think. How we
journalists to raise hell with me would be able to reach out and cre-
because Holmes Rock School is ate what I believe is needed in this
not what it ought to be. Yes, do world- love. We can do it. But the
that, that's your job and don't wor- broadcasters who have that instru-
ry about me because that's my job: ment in their hands must first and
to take care of it. The journalist's foremost understand that broad-
job is to ensure that we know. And casting is a powerful instrument.
when we do know our job is to "I tell a lot of my friends who
respond to it. like to speak on microphones that,
Mr Wilchcombe is a former 'this is a weapon of mass destruc-
broadcaster with an impressive tion'. Many people destroy them-
record of service at the Bahamas selves talking on a microphone.
Broadcasting Corporation. In 1989 That's how powerful it is; just imag-
he headed the team responsible for ine how powerful is the instrument
the introduction of ZNS television she has, or the camera that he has,
to Grand Bahama, and while at the how powerful they are? Just imag-
Broadcasting Corporation he won ine how powerful is Miss Parker;
a national award for writing and every single Bahamian in the
producing the television documen- Bahamas sees her, every night and
tary 'Base Streets' which dealt with she has more influence than you
the impact of cocaine on sectors of could shake a stick at.
Bahamian society. "Just imagine now if she used
Described as "definitely corn- her influence for her community. If
mitted to principles, and believing she picks up the phone things can
that God determines our path and happen. That's what it is all about.
our work is for the fulfillment of And that is how we could better
God's Word", by Rev Charles Stu- use broadcasting to better our corn-
art J, Assistant You.th, Min.1ster ,munities..But we don't."


Mr Wilchcombe said the greatest
example that all of us have is the
recent disaster in New Orlbans. "It
was just so interesting that those
attending the seminar were meet-
ing Thursday night when a year
ago they were in darkness.
"We could not do what we are
doing tonight," Mr Wilchcombe
said.
"It is the same thing they are
having in New Orleans and Mis-
sissippi: the darkness that they are
feeling; the despair that they are
feeling right now; the pain that the
people are going through.
"But just think about this: it took
five days to get the (US) Federal
Government to truly respond. And
why did they respond?

Media
"They responded because of the
broadcasters, the media. The media
brought it to attention. Otherwise
no one would have known, no one
in the world would have known
what was going on and their (US)
federal government would not have
had to move if the media, the
broadcasters, the Fox, the NBC
and CBS and ABC and CNN, all
the world was there saying, that
there is no help coming; the people
are dying; there is no food; where is
the help?
"They started to call them
refugees and the next thing you
know President Bush was there,
the federal government was there
and now help has arrived.
"That's the impact of broadcast-
ers, that's the impact of the
media.
"You would not know what was
going on in China if it wasn't for the
broadcasters. You want to know
what's happening in any part of the
world: you would not have been
able to see Tonique Williams win-
ning at the Olympics, or the World
Games if it wasn't for the technol-
ogy and if it wasn't for the broad-
casters.
"Broadcasting is a powerful tool
and we should use it more for our
growth and for our development.
And if broadcasters use it for that,
a-nd affect people'A livesthen they
would be gteit'enpesbns: ..
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successful candidate should have an in-depth understanding of the
regulatory/supervisory structure of the local financial markets, current
banking regulations in relation to internal controls and "know your
customer" policies and procedures.

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review and monitor account openings and the due diligence
process for all accounts as part of the account opening committee;
ensure adherence to AML legislation and provide a current and
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Secret of slimming at breakfast


OVERWEIGHT Bahamian
girls who skip breakfast could
be adding to their waistline
problems, a new study has
revealed.
Those who eat breakfast -
especially if it consists of cereals


- are likely to be slimmer.
The findings of an American
study conducted over 10 years
shows that missing breakfast is
not a wise decision.
Girls who ate breakfast of
any type had a lower average


body mass index, a common
obesity gauge, than those who
said they didn't.
The index was even lower for
girls who said they ate cereal
for breakfast, according to find-
ings of the study conducted by


the Maryland Medical Research
Institute. The study received
funding from the National Insti-
tutes of Health and cereal-mak-
er General Mills.
"Not eating breakfast is the
worst thing you can do, that's
really the take-home message
for teenage girls," said study
author Bruce Barton, the Mary-
land institute's president and
CEO.
The fibre in cereal and
healthier foods that normally
accompany cereal, such as milk
and orange juice, may account
for the lower body mass index
among cereal eaters, Barton
said.
The results were gleaned
from a larger NIH survey of
2,379 girls in California, Ohio
and Maryland who were
tracked between ages nine and
19. Results of the study appear
in the September issue of the
Journal of the American Dietet-
ic Association.
Nearly one in three adoles-
cent girls in the United States is
overweight, according to the
association.
The problem is particularly
troubling because research
shows becoming overweight as
a child can lead to a lifetime
struggle with obesity.
As part of the survey, the girls
were asked once a year what
they had eaten during the pre-
vious three days. The data was
adjusted to compensate for fac-
tors such as differences in phys-


* EATING cereal for breakfast has been found as an effective
way to control the body mass index


ical activity among the girls and
normal increases in body fat
during adolescence.
A girl who reported eating
breakfast on all three days had,
on average, a body mass index
0.7 units lower than a girl who
did not eat breakfast at all.
If the breakfast included cere-
al, the average was 1.65 units
lower, the researchers found.
Breakfast consumption
dropped as the girls aged, the
researchers found, and those
who did not eat breakfast tend-
ed to eat higher fat foods later


in the day.
"We think it kick-starts your
metabolism because you've eat-
en something," Barton said.
"When you get to lunch you're
not starving and you can make
reasonable choices for lunch
and dinner."
John Kirwan, a professor of
medicine at Case Western
Reserve University's Schwartz
Centre for Nutrition and
Metabolism, said the findings
may be "more reflective of
overall eating habits and quali-
ty of food consumed."


Bahamas Development Bank


trip to American agency


A DELEGATION from the
Bahamas Development Bank
left for Washington DC on Sat-
urday, September 10 to meet
with representatives of the
Small Business Association
(SBA).
The SBA is the US federal
agency responsible for acting
'aDothertatalyst'to theadevelop-.
ment of small businesses
throughout America. The del-
egation will be headed by the


chairman of the Board of
Directors, Neville Adderley,,
and will include director,
Angela Sawyer; manager
Freeport office, Justin Sturrup;
and assistant manager, Busi-
ness Advisory Services Unit,
Andrew Stanford.
A representative from the
American Embassy in Nassau is
also accompanying the group.
THE BDB will be able to
draw on the vast resources of


the SBA in entrepreneurial
education, youth entrepre-
neurial development, bank and
customer training networks,
women's business centers, loan
administration, micro lending,
project analysis and monitor-
ing, information technology
(IT) and other areas of exper-
tise developed by the SBA in its
52year history. ;:E '8
The delegation returns on
September 16.


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE











intuesdM 1


UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS T THE POINT




Sir Clement honoured by Bahamahost


BAHAMAHOST, the cus-
tomer service training pro-
gramme that has continually
distinguished itself as the top
programme of its kind in the
region, is honouring its founder
Sir Clement T Maynard this
week.
Sir Clement, former and
longest serving Minister of
Tourism will have the special
privilege of being honoured by
Bahamahost with a week.of
activities that begins on his
birthday, September 11 and
ending on September 17.
Sir Clement implemented
Bahamahost in 1978. He noted
that after becoming Minister
of Tourism, he became very
aware during his travels of how
knowledgeable guides and oth-
er visitor service personnel
were in these various coun-
tries.
From these observations, the
idea of Bahamahost took hold
and gradually grew into the cus-
tomer service training pro-
gramme it is today.
Surprise
Although the programme was
his brainchild, Sir Clement
expressed surprise and pleasure
that Bahamahost is now
approaching its third decade.
Outlining the importance of
Bahamahost to the overall
tourism product, Sir Clement
said: "There are beaches in


many places; God didn't dis-
criminate. We in the Bahamas
could be the best in the world
and we could then charge what
we want because we are the
best but we must see to it that


the visitors enjoy their holiday
and get the very best attention
and care."
This, he added, is what
Bahamahost is all about.
The programme got its start


through a generous grant by
Winn Dixie Food Stores Inc,
operators of the City Market
chain on New Providence.
Today, the programme boasts
over 23,000 graduates from all


* SENIOR Director of Education and Training formally announced Bahamahost week at a press
conference last week. Also pictured is Diana Brooks of the industry training department in the
Ministry of Tourism. .. .


segments of tourism in the
Bahamas.
Bahamahost Week will fea-
ture a slew of activities begin-
ning with a church service and
ending with a Fun Run/Walk


on September 17.
Also planned for this week
on Wednesday, September 14
is a free Bahamahost seminar
at SuperClubs Breezes begin-
ning at 9am.


Your car.


Your trust.


Our responsibility


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NOTED JOURNALIST,


ARTHUR FOULKES:


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOA0 NW


Psychiatrist calls


for


leaders to be proactive


THE Bahamas must not be
"caught with its pants down" in
the event of a disaster, local psy-
chiatrist Dr David Allen has
warned.
Dr Allen, who submitted rec-
ommendations to government
following last year's devastat-
ing hurricanes, is urging the


country's leaders to be proac-
tive rather than reactive.
He pointed to the recent
destruction and havoc inflicted
upon the Gulf Coast by Hurri-


cane Katrina, which has left the
US government scrambling to
deal with the thousands of resi-
dents affected by the storm.
One of Dr Allen's main rec-


Public Utilities Commission






PUBLIC CONSULTATION
on
An Application by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited to Modify its Monthly Rates/Prices for Telephone Lines


The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) invites comments from consumers
and providers of telecommunications services on its consultation document on an
application by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) for
permission to increase its monthly rates/prices for telephone lines.

On June 20, 2005 BTC submitted to the PUC an application to increase its
monthly rates/prices for telephone lines for business and residential customers. The
application is designed to more closely align BTC's prices to the underlying cost of
providing services.

Section 8.5 of the Telecommunications Sector Policy (TSP) stipulates the
key principles of government's tariff policy including the rebalancing of telephone
prices towards cost orientation. Section 6(1 )(h) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999
stipulates that one of the functions of the Commission is to regulate the prices that
may be charged by a licensee who is Dominant in a relevant market in accordance
with the provisions of subsections (6) and (7) of section 9. BTC is the only
telecommunications company in The Bahamas that has been declared dominant.

Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, requires the Commission to act
in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory manner and consistent
with the objectives of the Telecommunications Act.

The main objective of this consultation is to
(a) inform the public and stakeholders of BTC's
application for approval of increased monthly
rates/prices for telephone lines;
(b) explain the rationale behind the rates; and
(c) invite comments from the public.

Copies of the Public Consultation Document can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House at 4th. Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded
from the Commission's website at www.PUCBahamasgov.bs. Written comments
should be submitted by September 16, 2005 via post, hand delivery, facsimile or
e-mail to:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P.O. Box N-4860, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: (242) 323-7288
Email: info@pucbahamasgov.bs


The PUC will supplement its standard consultation approach by arranging public
meetings so that consumers and interested parties can ask questions or make oral
comments. The dates of the meetings will be announced in the media by the PUC.


ommendations to government
was establishing structurally
sound and organised shelters
equipped with satellite phones,
rope and first-aid supplies.
The society's lack of fortitude
to be proactive rather than reac-
tive is one of the many issues
that will be addressed on Tues-
day at Dr Allen's Bahamian
Forum, which will deal with the
topic "Shame: A Bahamian
Challenge".
Dr Allen believes that undis-
ciplined human emotions, like
waiting until something happens
to have a plan, is a cause of


some of the problems Bahami-
ans face today.
Shame, otherwise known as
an embarrassment, being dis-
graced, humiliation and indig-
nity, can lead to many social ills
and nurtures fear and failure,
according to Dr Allen.
"Fear and failure then
appears in different areas of our
lives and we don't even know
when it does," he said. "We hes-
itate in fulfilling our dreams and
goals and keep within our limi-
tations, and neglect to explore
our potential. Because fear has
a hold on us we're afraid that if


we put our best foot forward
and nothing happens, we'll be
embarrassed or ashamed.
Because of this. we don't grow.
We end up accepting medioc-
rity."
He added that products of
shame include an inability to
accept change and anger.
"Anger is ripe in Bahamian
communities. Domestic vio-
lence accounts for 49 per cent of
the murders last year. So does
that mean when you fall in love
in the Bahamas you have a 50
per cent chance of being
killed?"
The discussion on "Shame: A
Bahamian Challenge" begins
Tuesday, September 13, 5.45pm
at the British Colonial Hilton,


icent'


I


Dr Rahming

PRISON Superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming
has been chosen as one of Bethune-Cookman
College's "Magnificent 100".
Dr Rahming, along with 99 other alumni of
the Daytona Beach, Florida institution will be
feted at a gala dinner at the Riverfront Hyatt
Regency in Jacksonville on Friday, September
16.
The 100 honourees, selected from the estimat-
ed 15,000 graduates of Bethune-Cookman Col-
lege, were selected by a special panel of judges for
their dedicated support of the college and sig-
nificant contributions in the community, politics
and their professions.
Dr Rahming earned a BA in Sociology from B-
CC in 1978. He then went on to Washington in St
Louis, Missouri (ranked by US News and World
Report as among the top 15 of the more than
00 universities in the United States). At Wash-
ington University he earned the MSW Degree
in Social Policy and a PhD with a concentration in
Criminology.
He has served as special assistant to two prime
ministers; headed a detention facility in St Louis;
worked as consultant advisor on crime within the
Ministry of National Security; headed Sojourner
Douglas College for six years; founded
R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Academy (now Westminster Col-
lege); served as executive director of the Miami
YMCA and lectured at the College of the
Bahamas.
A former (opposition) leader in the Senate,
Dr Rahming has completed the United Nations'
Programme on Minimum Standards for the Treat-
ment of Offenders and the US State Depart-
ment's Drug Demand Reduction Programme.
He was a member of the National Crime Com-
mission; chaired the Prison Reform Commission
and the Multi-agency Task Force on upgrading
the Nation's Social Safety Net.
Dr Rahming is also a justice of the Peace and
president of the InterTech Group. He is a mem-
ber of the American Society of Criminology the
American Society for Industrial Security and the PRISON Superintendent
Canadian Criminal Justice Association. Dr Elliston Rahming


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was Showroom Manager for many years was presented with a parting gift. Miss Farrington
will be attending Business school at the University of Wales. At the same event the new
showroom manager at Nassau Tile, Nancy Johnson was introduced.
Pictured from left to right: Paulette McDonald, Showroom Supervisor; Jose Gomez,
Managing Director; Joanna Farrington and Nancy Johnson.


11





MiVulIAY, ~8Ll i'LMViER 2, 2005, FAut i


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


0OA'NW


Fall in armed robberies


FROM page one

objects are used in 22 per cent
of incidents.
in 63 per cent of the cases,
armed robberies are com-
mitllted between the hours of
4pmi and midnight. Twenty-
toiur per cent of incidents
occur between midnight and


8am, and the majority of
armed robberies are record-
ed between Thursday and
Sunday.
To improve upon the rela-
tionship between police and
community, Inspector Evans
said that officers are appeal-
ing to the public to become
familiar with the police sta-


tions nearest to them.
"We want people to learn
the telephone numbers of the
police stations in their area,
to get to know the com-
manding officers and their
staff," he said.
Mr Evans also encouraged
all communities to establish a
crime watch programme.
"Every area should have
crime watch, that way you
have the people in the com-
munity watching out for each
other. Communities that
already have crime watch
should make sure it is fully
functional, and in all cases
they should partner with
police," he said.
In a warning to private
persons, Mr Evans said that
people should take special
care when returning home
during late hours.
"People driving home at
night should always be very
observant of their surround-
ings, watch out for any-sus-
picious activity," he warned.
Mr Evans also advised that
people driving home alone
should contact a family mem-
ber by telephone to inform


them of their plans and
expected time of arrival.
Police advise women espe-
cially not to linger too long
once getting out of a vehicle.
"Women should always
have all essential items, like
phones, keys and handbags
at the ready before their
arrival so that they can
immediately leave the vehi-
cle and enter their homes,"
he said.
Mr Evans said that all
homeowners should also
ensure that their property is
well-lit and properly outfit-
ted with gates, security bars
and alarm systems.
For businesses, police
advise owners to ensure that
their properties are suffi-
ciently monitored by surveil-
laice equipment and/or secu-
rity officers guards.
"It is also very important
never to keep large amounts
of money in the business.
And when taking money to
the bank, businesses should
take care not to stick to a set
schedule, stagger the times
and use different vehicles,"
he suggested.


Thunderstorms

FROM page one
Ms Clarke said that the Met Office has now turned its attention to
an area of thunderstorms which has formed east of the Turks and
Caicos Islands.
While the system is not organised enough to be considered a tropi-
cal depression, Ms Clarke said it was expected to move towards the
Bahamas and cause inclement weather. Sporadic rain showers over the
next several days are expected. ,
Yesterday, BEC's general manager Kevin Basden said Saturday
night's lightening storm damaged some of the generators, making the
corporation "somewhat short of capacity".
This caused the island wide blackout on Saturday.
However, he said-repair crews were able to correct the problems and
restore power to most customers by late Saturday night, early Sunday
morning.
"There may have been one or two pockets that were not restored,"
he added.
As of Sunday afternoon, Mr Basden said only one or two generators
remained down. By 5pm all power had been restored, but an hour lat-
er, another island-wide power cut was experienced following the start
of a second round of bad weather.
By 7.30pm, as The Tribune prepared to go to press, Mr Basden
said that the first wave of customers had their power restored and BEC
crews were optimistic that power would be restored to the entire
island by Sunday night, barring another lightening strike.
Ophelia was centered 260 miles east-southeast of Charleston, South
Carolina and about 250 miles south of Cape Hatteras with maximum
sustained wind at 80 mph, the National Hurricane Centre reported yes-
terday afternoon during its 2pm update. It had meandered slightly
but essentially was stationary after following a wandering course since
it became a tropical storm Wednesday off the coast of Florida.
Little overall movement was expected before Monday morning,
the hurricane centre said.


FROM page one

we've made strides in the field
of education and battling pover-
ty, with the poverty rate below
10 per cent this is largely due
to our Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme," he said.
Mr Mitchell will be reporting
on the Bahamas' efforts in
achieving the Millennium Devel-
opment Goals at the high-level
plenary meeting to be held from
September 14 to 16 at the organ-
isation's headquarters in New
York.
"While each (Caribbean)
country has been placing focus
on different aspects of the goals,
Trinidad and Barbados have
declared that they will strive to
reach the level of developed
countries by 2020.1 I feel that this
is also a very worthy goal for the
Bahamas," said Mr Mitchell.
With more than 170 Heads of.
State and Government expected
to attend, the summit will be
largest gathering of world leaders




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Developed
in history.
Described as "once in a gen-
eration opportunity", the meet-
ing, which will be followed by
plenary debates, will focus on the
achievement of the Millennium
Goals, the elimination of pover-
ty in the world, and offer leaders
a platform to make decisions in
the areas of development, secu-
rity, human rights and a reform
of the UN.
The various Heads of State
and Government are scheduled
to discuss and vote on 32 treaties
this year, on issues such as
human rights, terrorism, refuges,
penal matters, the environment
and disarmament.
Other Caribbean leaders
expected to-attend this 60th ses-
sion of the UN's General Assem-
bly include Prime Ministers
Patrick Manning of Trinidad and
Tobago; Owen Arthur of Bar-
bados; PJ Patterson of Jamaica;
Dr Keith Mitchell of Grenada;
Winston Baldwin Spencer of
Antigua and Barbuda; Leonel
Fernandez Reyna of the Domini-
can Republic; Dr Denzil Dou-
glas of St Kitts & Nevis; Roo-
sevelt Skerrit of Dominica and
Ralph E Gonsalves of St Vin-
cent and the Grenadines, as well
as President Bharrat Jagdeo of
Guyana. Haiti's interim Prime
Minister Gerard Latortue is also
scheduled to attend.
Although Cuba's parliamen-
tary secretary Ricardo Alarcon is
also slated to attend, the Associ-
ated Press reported last week that
writing from Havana, Alarcon
said that American authorities
had denied him a visa.
Caribbean Prime Ministers
Patterson and Dr Douglas are
both set to speak at separate
meetings during the summit on
financing for development.


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 13


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* CANCER Society president Judy Ward-Carter (centre) is flanked by partners and sponsors of
the October 1 "Stride for Life" fun walk designed to celebrate cancer survivors and raise money-,
for education and treatment programmes.


THE Cancer Society of the
Bahamas will ring in October
as Breast Cancer Awareness
Month with the long-anticipated
grand opening of its Cancer
Caring Centre and Cancer Soci-
ety Headquarters Complex on
September 30, followed by a
"Stride for Life" fun walk on
October 1.
"The official opening of the
Cancer Society Complex is tru-
ly a dream come true," said
Cancer Society of the Bahamas
president Judy Ward-Carter.
"In the beginning, many could-
n't picture a project of this size.
But now, seeing it moments
away from completion, I have a
grand feeling.
"I can't say thanks enough
for the contributions that we
have received in the past and
expect to continue to receive in
order to operate this facility and
uphold our commitment not to


turn away anyone who may
need our help."
To celebrate this landmark
occasion the Society has organ-
ised "Stride for Life" a spin of
Relay for Life, founded by the
American Cancer Society in the
mid 1980s and held annually in
more than 20 countries around
the world. "Stride for Life" is
fun-filled event designed to cel-
ebrate cancer survivors and
raise money for education and
treatment programmes organ-
ised by the Society in the
Bahamas.
Mrs Ward-Carter said:"We
are pleased that sponsors such
as SunTee, British American
Insurance Company, Aquapure
Water Ltd, Commonwealth
Bank, The Sign Man, The Tri-
bune and SunFlower Organisa-
tion have graciously donated T-
Shirts and other promotional
items, covered advertising costs,


donated water produced signs,
and provided our prizes, include&
ing the grad prize a trip to
New York for the overall male
and female winners."
Participants will leave the
new Cancer Caring Centre com-
plex on East Terrace, Centre-
ville (2 doors South of ZNS) at
6am on October 1.
The SunFlower Organization
will conclude the weekend's
activities with an exciting free
SunFlower Day Concert fol-
lowing the fun walk October 1
on at the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts at 7.30 in the
evening.
For more information on the
concert, to attend the grand
opening of the Cancer Caring
Centre and Cancer Society
Headquarters Complex, or to
register for Stride for Life', 'dll
the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas at 323-4482.


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 15


;'i5 ~
1 -~ 9
~ K


4-"'


Casement Windows


Half Cirdes, Fans & Ellipticals


Horizontal Rollers
(Rolling Windows)


Single Hung
(Push Up Windows)


I .I


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6, MODAY, EPTEMER 12 2005THE TIBUN


THEWAL K IN
ME D ICAL C Li N 1 0


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The Walk-in Medical Clinic
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'Tisofe s o l aala l t uto es ain y ah


* FREE National Movement chairman Carl Bethel (second
from right) spoke with public school officials during a tour of
three public schools that were still in need of repair. Also pic-
tured, Loretta Butler-Turner of the FNM.
(Photo: Christine Aylen)

A DELEGATION of officials from the Free National
Movement, led by party chairman Carl Bethel, toured three
public schools this weekend to asses the state of the campus-
es. This photo shows work in progress at Carlton E Francis
Primary School. The FNM has heavily crticised the govern-
ment for not having all of its schools ready for the 2005/2006
academic year. Officials also toured S C McPherson and C C
Sweeting Jr High schools.
(Photo: Christine Aylen)


FNM hits out


at Sears over


announcement


FROM page three
ister should focus his energies'
on the development, empower-:
ment and training of School'
Boards.
The budgetary allocation to'
School Boards should :bp
increased, and greater responsi-


bility should be given to siiUti
School Boards, themselves, to
issue contracts for preventative
maintenance and school repair?
He said the cap should be
raised to allow School Boards: t
issue repair and maintenance coir-
tracts above the present $20,006
limit, to at least $50,000 per school
term. Where School Boards are
dysfunctional, then the Ministry
should send technical experts to
assist with institutional strength-
ening, he suggested.
Mr Bethel accused the Min-
istry of Public Works of "brazen-
ly engaging in the same practices
of political patronage that the
PLP heavily criticised the FNM
government for.
He claimed that contracts are
being issued to PLP political
cronies through the Ministry -of
Works and the Ministry of Hous-
ing and National Insurance with-
out competitive bids.
And contracts are being issued
to inexperienced, but politically-
connected, persons without being
put out to competitive tender, he
claimed.
Mr Bethel alleged that recent-
ly a person who had been award-
ed up to $250,000 in contracts to
paint schools sought the advice
of the manager of a paint store as
to what to do, since, he informed
the manager, he had never paint-
ed a building before.
The Free National Movement
wants an Act of Parliament to
govern the award of every gov-
ernment contract by any ministry
or agency of the government, to
ensure that there are competitive
bids, evaluated by impartial
experts (not civil servants or a
"Tenders Board" comprised of
unqualified civil servants) and
that the process of awarding
repair or procurement contracts is
conducted fairly and in accor-
dance with transparent and
accountable public policies.
See page one


-hmonth
September 2005


Serve up some Fun!

If a1ejo good food an good fm, we've got





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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


SECTION -


business@tribunemedia.net


T hm :---- ....... ..........


ss


Union chief to government:




Don't take Royal Oasis stake


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
The hotel union's presi-
dent told The Tribune
that the Government
should not re-enter
resort ownership by tak-
ing a stake in the still-closed Royal
Oasis Resort and Casino, which was
said to need close to a $100 million
investment just to bring it up to oper-
ational standard.
In an interview with The tribune,
Pat Bain, the Bahamas Hotel, Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) president, alluded to the


Government's previous hotel owner-
ship record and findings of the Hotel
Corporation Commission of Inquiry as
reasons why the current administra-
tion should not take a stake in the
Royal Oasis.
He also disputed comments made
previously by Obie Wilchcombe, the
minister of tourism, saying that the
stricken Grand Bahama-based resort
was likely to have one tower open by
the end of 2005 or even early 2006.
With no work having been done to
the resort since Hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne devastated parts of Grand
Bahama last year, Mr Bain said the
Royal Oasis needed an injection of


* PAT BAIN


some $85 millioii just to bring it to a
liveable standard.
"They should not be getting back
into the hotel business, but if the Gov-
ernment wants to, then they should
build a hotel on the beach which
would attract value customers, get bet-
ter rates and have a better market for
their casino," Mr Bain said.
Prime Minister Perry Christie said.
last week that the Government was
,prepared to take an ownership stake
in the Royal Oasis in a bid to re-open
(the property as soon as possible, and
i:o ensure Bahamians displaced both
directly and indirectly by its closure
were re-employed.


Following meetings with J. Flan-
nery, managing director of Lehman
Brothers' private equity arm, the
financier for the Driftwood Group of
Companies, owner of the Royal Oasis,
Mr Christie said the two parties had
agreed that the Government should
partner with the investment firm to
ensure a purchaser was found as
quickly as possible for the Royal
Oasis. During the press conference,
Mr Christie said that Lehman Broth-
ers had a significant interest in final-
ising a sale, based on the fact that both.

SEE page 6B


December decision on

Bazaar shops 'closure'


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
PAT Bain, president of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied, Workers Union
(BiHCAWU), said the union
-would decide by December
whether to close the stores it
ownedA -nfreeport's Interna-


tional Bazaar.
Mr Bain declined to identify
the number of stores the union
owned, but said a decision
would be made by December
on whether to allow them to
continue to operate.
He said.union officials would
first need to determine whether
it was economically feasible to
SEE page 4B


Regional manager flies in to


deal with Holiday Inn protest


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
DRIFTWOOD Hospitality Managemen-
t's regional vice-president, Thomas Rosati, is
expected in the Bahamas today to oversee a
management change at the Holiday Inn Sun-'
Spree Resort on Paradise Island, and to
meet with employees over concerns that
may have caused Friday's union demon-
stration at the resort.
Mr Rosati is expected to meet with Hol-
iday Inn SunSpree employees to discuss any
concerns they may have about the opera-


tion and management of the property, after
union official., levelled unfair dismissal alle-
gations against the hotel.
On Friday, members of the Bahamas
Hotel, Cateriq.g and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU), led by president Pat Bain,
held a demonstration in front of the resort
that was attenoled by about 15 persons.
Following tthe demonstration, Stephen
Kappeler, regic-nal director of operations
for the Holiday Dins in the Bahamas, said he,
the hotel's attdlrney; Valentine Grimes,
union officials aitid a former employee,met
with Vincent Pe ,t, minister of labour, and


Department of Labour officials to discuss
the situation. At the end of the meeting, it
was decided that hotel union officials would
put their concerns in writing so that the
issues could be addressed. During the meet-
ing, a number of issues that had not been
brought to management's attention previ-
ously were raised, Mr Kappeler said.
Among the grievances was the fact that
there was no security on duty in the day at
the front door. Union officials also com-
plained that the delivery door of the kitchen
SEE page 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A PROMINENT Bahamas
resident and businessmen was
said to be "ecstatic" after a US
federal judge in Houston over-
turned a four year-old convic-
tion for allegedly paying
$20,000 in bribes to a Texas
prison director.
US District Judge Lynn


Hughes acquitted Yank Barry
and James 'Andy' Collins, a
former executive director of
the Texas Department of Crim-
inal Justice, on grounds that
the federal authorities' key wit-
ness lied to gain favour with a
Louisiana prosecutor.
Mr Barry, who lives in .New
Providence in the Lyford Cay-
See BRIBES, 6B


Alliance 'draws'

case for $1.5m
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ALLIANCE Investment Management, the Benchmark
(Bahamas) subsidiary, is likely to have to go to the US 11th Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta in a bid to overturn a jury ruling
that denied its claims for more than $1.5 million in damages from
a US medical equipment manufacturer.
. Alliance effectively achieved a "goalless draw" in its fight with
New Jersey-based Akers Biosciences, gaining a summary judge-
ment and jury verdict that threw
out the latter's claims against the SEE page 5B


Clarification
IN its Friday, September 9, edition, Tribune Business ran a
story headlined Major FamGuard shareholder sells 5.2 per
cent of holding. The story described how the Jack Knowles
Trust had reduced its stake in FamGuard, parent company of
Family Guardian, by 5.2 per cent or more than 450,000 shares
over a 16-month period between April 26, 2004, and Sep-
tember 7,2005.
The Tribune is happy to clarify that the shares were not sold
on the open market via BISX, as the story stated. The shares
were instead transferred, not sold, to a member of the late Mr
Knowles' family through probate.


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PAGE B, MNDAY SEPTMBER12, 005BUSINTIBUN


0 FIDELITY MARKET WRAP


* By Fidelity Capital Markets

A moderate lev-
el of trading
activity took
place in the
Bahamian


market this past week, as over
25,000 shares changed hands.
For the week, the market
saw seven out of its 19 listed
stocks trade, of which four
advanced, two declined and
one remained unchanged.


The volume leader. for the
week was ICD Utilities (ICD),
with 8,630 shares changing
hands and accounting for 34
per cent of the total shares
traded. ICD was also the big
advancer for the week, up $0.34


to close at $9.94. On the down
side, Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) declined by $0.02 to
end the week at $6.88.
COMPANY NEWS
J. S. Johnson Co. Ltd (JSJ) -


support of our scheduled service between
the Turks & Caicos Islands and the Bahamas.
Travelers have' benefited like never before from
our premiurrm service and we look forward to


S Unequalled on-time performance
I More scheduled flights
Reliq;ble connections from Freeport to
Providenci/ales,Grand Turk & South Caicos


FL I -IT -15DI


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.80 $- 0 -27.27%
BAB $1.10 $- 0 14.58%
BBL $0.80 $- 0 -5.88%
BOB $6.88 $-0.02 2000 19.65%
BPF $9.50 $- 0 18.75%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -5.77%
BWL $1.40 $- 0 -22.22%
CAB $8.81 $0.01 2500 24.08%
CBL $9.10 $- 5800 28.17%
CHL $1.69 $- 0 -23.18%
CIB $9.50 $- 900 26.84%
DHS $2.46 $- 0 64.00%
FAM $4.12 $- 0 4.04%
FCC $1.15 $- 0 -42.21%
FCL $9.21 $0.21 3500 15.13%
FIN $10.60 $- 0 9.28%
ICD $9.94 $0.34 8630 0.51%
JSJ $8.50 $- 0 3.41%
KZLB $5.84 $0.14 1988 -3.63%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.08 payable on September 30, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date September 15, 2005.
FamGuard Company will hold its Annual General Meeting
on September 29; 2005, at 4pm at British Colonial Hilton,
Governors Ballroom A, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
Colina Holdings (Bahamas) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on October 18, 2005, at 4pm at the J. Whitney Pinder
Building at Colinalmperial Insurance, Collins Avenue, Nassau,
Bahamas.



International Markets

FOREX Rates

Weekly % Change

CAD$ 1.1771 -0.87
GBP 1.8401 -0.18
EUR 1.2414 -0.98

Commodities
Weekly % Change

Crude Oil $64.08 -5.17
Gold $450.00 1.03


International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change _
DJIA 10,678.56 2.21
S & P 500 1,241.48 1.93
NASDAQ 2,175.51 1.61
Nikkei 12,692.04 0.73
. . . . . . .. . . . ........ ........


For the first half of 2005, JSJ
has reported a less than stellar
financial performance, largely
due to the fall in income from
its subsidiary, Insurance Com-
pany of the Bahamas (ICB).
For the six months ending
June 30,2005, ICB contributed
$269,000 to JSJ's bottom-line
compared to $809,000 for the
same period last year. JSJ post-
ed net income of $2.5 million,
representing a decline of 10.1


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The Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism

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development of generations of performers. John Chip man
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Deadline: October 14. 2005


per cent when compared to
$2.8 million in 2004.
Total income grew by 2.5 per
cent to total $7.4 million, while
operating expenses declined by
1.3 per cent to total $5.1 mil-
lion. Year-over-year operating
income increased by 12.2 per
cent to total $2.3 million.
With an active hurricane sea-
son in full swing, JSJ manag-
ing director Marvin Bethell has
assured shareholders that the
company is poised to respond
should the need arise.
Benchmark (Bahamas)
(BBL) -
For the 2005 second quarter,
BBL posted net income of
$399,000, compared to $41,000
for the same period last year.
Total income rose by
$216,000 or 134 per cent to
total $377,60o, while operating
expenses grew by $96,000 to
total $237,000.
The climb in operating
expenses were largely attrib-
uted to depreciation and
Alliance audit and legal fees.
Unrealised gains from BBL's
investment portfolio con-
tributed $311,000 to BBL's bot-
tom line in the second quarter.
Earnings per share was $0.08,
up by $0.07 from $0.01 for the
equivalent period in 2004.
In related news, it was
reported that the jury rejected
claims from Akers Bioscience
(a New Jersey-based compa-
ny) that BBL's subsidiary,
Alliance, was guilty of fraudu-
lent omission and ruled in
favour of Alliance.
However, the jury refused to
compensate Alliance for its
monetary losses. BBL is
exploring its legal options as it
pertains to this case.


ces rnrougnour me Oanamas or suomir online ar www.caciqueawar


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


I Submit your nomination today. Nominm


rms availaDle at Ministry or tourism (


.com








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, Zuo, .


Financial industry needs more marketing resources


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WELL-trained client rela-
tionship managers are "critical"
in winning new business and
retaining existing clients for the
Bahamian financial services
industry, the BFSB's chairman
said, with more resources need-
ed for marketing this jurisdic-
tion and cementing its interna-
tional position.
In his address to the Bahamas
Financial Services Board's
(BFSB) annual general meet-
ing, Bruno Roberts said that
separate from regulatory and
compliance issues, Pricewater-
houseCoopers (PwC) global pri-
vate banking/wealth manage-
ment survey 2005 had shown
that winning new clients, and
retaining existing ones, were the
two "most pressing strategic
issues for financial centres such
as the Bahamas.
He added of the survey: "It
also positioned the quality of
staff and personal relationships
as the two most important dif-
ferentiators of competitors
offering financial services.
"This means that quite apart
from regulatory and improved
Know Your Client criteria, well
trained client relationship man-
agers are critical to the winning
new clients and client retention
processes."


FROM page 1B


could not be used as a
fire/employee exit. Other issues
included concerns over the envi-
ronment of the staff cafeteria and
staffing guidelines, with employ-
ees said to be overworked in
some areas because of a staffing
shortage. "We agreed that if we
had been aware of their concerns,
we would have responded soon-
er," Mr Kappeler said.
Mr Peet offered the use of a
Labour officer, a Ms Godet, to
review and act as a witness during
any meetings between staff asso-
ciates and Mr Rosati, and also to
determine whether the concerns
were legitimate.
I Meanwhile, Mr Kappeler said
of the demonstration: "There
were no employees employed by
the hotel in the picket line. Pat
Bain and his cronies came on to
the property, were loud and were
disturbing the guests. I called the
Paradise Island Tourism Devel-
opment Authority (PITDA) and
the police, and they removed
them to the front of the building
and pressed them back."'
According to Mr Kappeler,
there were no serious outstanding
issues involving employees or for-
mer employees that would have
warranted the demonstration, nor


did union officials at that time
state why they were there.
During a subsequent meeting
with an official from the Ministry
of Labour, Ms Godet, the Holi-
day Inn Sunspree was informed
that there were no open issues
that had to be dealt with,
although a few loose ends did
require their attention, Mr Kap-
peler said, refuting comments
made by union officials in a news-
paper report last week.
One of the issues that still
needed to be tied up involved an
employee who had been termi-
nated for alleged stealing. Mr
Kappeler said that what was
needed to close the file for the
Department of Labour was a
copy of the employee's signature,
showing they had picked up their
final cheque.
A second issue involved a ter-
minated union shop steward. Mr
Kappeler said that both the
hotel's management and union
officials had agreed that the union
would be told the amount of the
settlement with the shop steward,
and would receive the cheque on
their behalf. The agreed proce-
dure did take place and the
cheque was signed for by union
officials, but the Department of


Labour had not received any doc-
uments showing the cheque had
been signed for by union officials.
The final matter that was still
outstanding, said Mr Kappeler,
was that the Department of
Labour had not received, as of
their meeting on Wednesday, a
grievance document filed by the
union regarding the termination
of one of the hotel's workers.
He said further that contrary
to earlier reports, the Sunspree's
management has never "blown
off" a meeting with the Labour
Department, to which they had
been invited or requested to
attend.
Following four years of service,
Mr Kappeler is expected to leave
both the Bahamas and Driftwood
later this month. "We were a
strong staff. We have taken the
property from 47 per cent occu-
pancy, and that's just after Sep-
tember 11, through last month;
where we were at 80 per cent
occupancy," he added.
With Mr Kappeler's departure,
Mr Rosati is expected to intro-
duce Jackie Carroll, former assis-
tant manager of the Royal Oasis,
in Grand Bahama, as the acting
general manager at the Holiday
Inn Sunspree property.


a significant change in the way financial services organisations must operate.


SPARADIISLE':AND
BAHAMAS

1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CARL HENRY METELLUS, PINE
DALE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.








"Teache, 0 Lon Thy Wy "..Psalm 119:33

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Invites applications from qualified Christian Teachers for
the following positions for the 2005 2006 school year.

Chemistry (Gr. 10-12)
Biology (Gr. 10-12))

Applicants must:

Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School.
Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher form
of recognition College or University in the area of
specialization.
Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
Applicant must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high schooh's extra
curricular programmes.

An application can be obtained from the High School office
on Shirley Street and be returned by the 19th September,
2005, with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is September 19th, 2005


MOM Cohina. alWWWBW
Pricing Information As Of: j,
9 September 2005

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS Div S PIE Yield
1.10 0.80 Abaco Markets 0.80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
9.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.50 9.50 0.00 1.452 0,340 6.5, 3.58%
6.90 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.88 6.88 0.00 0.561 0.330 12.3 4.80%
0,85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0,00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1,80 1,40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1,40 . 000 0.126 0.060 11.1 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
8.81 6.90 Cable Bahamas 8.81 8.81 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.3 2.72%
2.20 1.69 Colina Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9-10 8.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2 46 2.46 0.00 0.429 0.000 6.7 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0:00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.61 9.26 Finco' 10.60 10.60 0.00 0.696 0.510 15.3 4.81%
9.50 6.99 FirstCaribbean 9.50 9.50 0.00 600 0.695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.21 8.31 Focol 9.21 9.21 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.6 5.43%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0:022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4,07%
8.50 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.50 8.50 0 00 0.526 0.560 16.2 6.59%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BORs 5.85 5.82 -0.03 0.122 0.000 48.0 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bad Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1 488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
1,0.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 410.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7,80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0,810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 NIM 0.00%
52wk-Hi S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months DIv $ Yield %
1.2508 1.1837 Colina Money Market Fund 1.2508"


2.4169
110.5576
2.2560
1.1273


2.0131
10.0000
2.1491
1.0576


Fidelity Bahamas G & I
Fidelity Prime Income I
Colina MSI Preferred F
Colina Bond Fund


I Fund 2.4169 "'
Fund 10 5576"*"
'und ; 2.255981"'
1.127305""*


BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
62wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change Change in closing price from day to da)
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earning .
* -AS AT AUG. 31, 200651"" -AS AT JUL 31, 2006
" AS AT SEPT. 2, 20061 ** AS AT AUG. 31, 20051 **- AS AT AUG. 31, 20Zt
.# .--J:4V\


YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price"
Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelitb
Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelit)
Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV Net Asset Value
NIM Not Meaningful
FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 10t


WON


"MENM El Mq MWE No Mm' I %Im 0 &1 al


Mr Roberts said that for the
Bahamas to remain credible, it
had to provide "reliable, effi-
cient services" that were backed
up by a rational regulatory
regime and infrastructure. Inter-
national clients also needed the
best communications systems
to help them conduct business
while in the Bahamas.
He urged the industry to be
aware of perceptions held in the
international markets regard-
ing the Bahamas' financial
products, services, legal frame-
work, regulatory regime and
agencies. "Mis-perceptions" had
to be corrected.

Resources

"Armed with this type of
information, resources must be
brought to bear to permit the
timely development of market-
ing programmes and the imple-
mentation of policies as the sit-
uation requires," Mr Roberts
said.
Acknowledging that it was
"not enough" just to monitor
the rapid changes occurring in
financial services across the
globe, Mr Roberts said: "We
must continue to do our part in
positioning the Bahamas to
respond to increasing demands
and requirements; In this con-
text, we must prepare ourselves
to readily adapt to continuous


regulatory and compliance
changes in a way that would
allow us to sustain and grow our
industry."
He urged that the Ministry of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments' five-year Strategic Plan
be "updated and refined",
pointing out that competitors
had already engaged in similar
exercises and allocated "signif-
icant resources" to their finan-
cial services industries.
The "critical issues" facing
the financial services industry,
Mr Roberts said, were the reg-
ulatory climate, improved risk
management, business continu-
ity plans and anti-money laun-
dering initiatives.
The BFSB chairman said:
"Legislation and regulation,
consolidation, and the intro-
duction of new products, ser-
vices and technology all have
created challenges and oppor-
tunities for this industry and its
regulators.
"As a result, we have seen
changes in the way services are
delivered, new instruments used
to provide services, and new
financial service providers,
along with a greater emphasis
by regulators to better under-
stand our industry."
He added: "Specifically, the
developments occurring at an
accelerated pace in the global
regulatory landscape represent


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Institute's pressing questions





for Minister on PetroCaribe


VERY few facts have been
released regarding the Petro-
Caribe oil deal by the Ministry


of Trade and Industry.
In the interest of trans-
parency and good governance,


the Nassau Institute asks the
Minister to answer 20 brief
questions.


1) What new infrastructure
is required for the Government
to become a supplier of gaso-
line to the Bahamian con-
sumer?
2) Will 100 per cent of the
cost for building the infra-
structure be paid. for by tax-
payers?
3) If taxpayers pay less than
100 per cent, who will pay the
difference?
4) How will you guarantee
the reliability of fuel received
from PetroCaribe?
5) Has a cost/benefit analysis
been done?

6) Will you make all the pro-
jected costs for changing the
present arrangements known
to the public?

7) What will be the price of
gas at the pump when govern-
ment supplies it?

8) Will government lift the


FROM page 1B


PROCLAMATION
WHEREAS, our tourism industry has been and will continue to be the lifeblood of our
economy;


AND WHEREAS, there is widespread recognition of the key role world class
customer service plays in the sustainable growth and development of our tourism
industry;


AND WHEREAS, Bahamahost has been the signature customer service training
programme in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and indeed the Caribbean region;


AND WHEREAS, the Training and Education Department of the Ministry of Tourism
now wishes to heighten the awareness of Bahamahost throughout The Bahamas
while celebrating its history and successes;


AND WHEREAS, a week of activities is planned to salute the Founding Father of
Bahamahost, Sir Clement T. Maynard, together with the thousands of Bahamians
who over the years have given The Bahamas the edge through their efforts as
Bahamahosts;


NOW THEREFORE, I Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the period beginning Sunday 11th September, 2005
and ending on Saturday 17th-September, 2005 as "BAHAMAHOST WEEK".


moratorium on the number of
gas stations now permitted to
supply the public?

9) In dollars and cents, what
will be the financing costs for
the Venezuelan oil?
10) What expertise does gov-
ernment have to be a compe-
tent middleman in the oil sup-
ply chain? How many foreign
oil experts will have to be
employed?

11) Today, the oil companies
have an assured supply chain
with the capability to procure
product from multiple sources.
Will any cost savings be signif-
icant enough to cover the
increased risk of a supply dis-
ruption?

12) Will the Government be
able to purchase crude or
refined oil at prices lower than
the market rate?

13) If so, for how long?

14) Can you guarantee that


employment, with union offi-
cials trying to encourage them
to look for jobs elsewhere.

Discussions
Mr Bain added that the
union was still in discussions
with the Government for the
balance of money to be paid
to those Royal Oasis workers
who were employed on salaries
less than the minimum wage.


the prices will always be lower
than those of independent sup-
pliers?
15) What is the budget for
the National Energy Commis-
sion?
16) Can you assure Bahami-
an taxpayers that the Commis-
sion will not turn into an over-
manned, under-performing
bureaucracy?

17) Have you taken into
account the "real" costs of bor-
rowing and how this will impact
the price at the pump?
18) Will these costs be paid
for at the pump or by increas-
ing taxation?

19) Can you guarantee that
the taxes will not be increased
to pay for the change?

20) Will an escape clause
from the Bolivarian Alterna-
tive for the Americas (ALBA)
be part of any agreement made
with Venezuela/Mr Chavez?


"There were a number of
workers were paid below min-
imum wage," he said.
"When Government paid the
wage, there was an obligation
under the Employment Act
that the wage should be raised
to the minimum wage, which
is $150. The Government paid
them on their existing salary,
however, so the union is still
in discussions for the balance of
the money."


PROBLEMS WITH YOUR CELLPHONE?
So you're not in touch at
all times and it's costing you

Come to CELLULAR TOOL BOX today.
We'll have your cellphone repaired
in no time.
Get The Best Cellphone Repair Service Guaranteed.:
Upstairs Carey's Dept. Store, Mackey Street.
T: 394-3652 or 558-4603 -- Open: 9am to 5:30pm









e, Sp- br3.,20, [i I :45P

IBrit Cl lHlton


Se o tee


High School Teachers:
Art and Design
Business Studies
Librarian/Media Specialist
Bible Christian Values Needed for one Semester
Successful applicants must:
Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
Have minimum qualifications of a Bachelor's
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from a recognized college or university
Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.
Applications must be made in writing together with full
curriculum vitae, a recent color photograph and names of
at least three references, one being that of your Church
Pastor to:
Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O. Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas
For further information, please contact the Business Office
t telephone numbers 324-6269 or 324-6887.
Deadline For Applications is Friday, September 16,2005


continue operations, taking
into consideration non-pay-
ment of rents, the inability of
tenants to continue their oper-
ations, and the lack of a sub-
stantial customer base due to
the still-closed Royal Oasis
Resort and Casino.
Meanwhile, Mr Bain said the
BHCAWU is continuing to
provide basic assistance for for-
mer Royal Oasis employees.
He said many were still seeking


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
Have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 6th day of
ember 205.

'- ? RY G. CHRISTIE
PRIME MINISTER


ELESDtre For LIF i

R tNber REGISTRATION FORM
Celebrating the opening of the Cancer Caring Centre, a home away from home for
Cancer patients and their relatives.


Name.


P.O. Box Phone Home Work Cell
E-mail /
Male ___ Female,__ '.you a cancer survivor? Yes____ No_
Participant categories: __ A. ,ears B. 13-25 years __ C. 26-40 years

---E. over 55 years
T-Shirt Size: Medium (M Lar t (XL)

Donation: 6-12 years $10. 13 yea $12 0


Date: Satu ay, ber 1t, 2005 at 6:00 a.m.
starti at the r Caring Centre
East Terra Centrevil ors south of ZNS)

^ Telephone 325-2483 or 323-4482
I hereby assume full and complete responsibility for any injury or accident which may occur during my
participation in this event or while on the premises of this event, and I hereby release and hold harmless the
Cancer Society, its partners and sponsors, from any loss, liability or claims I may have arising out of my
participation in this event including personal injury, r darogqpMrftVe'yme.


.. C TheTribune iSmited A| BRITISH
c uSi Sse, 1pePU In # aE c uAtio N AMERICAN .
-- a, f. c Sister Sister


- ''


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNEBUMINDAESEPEBR1,205AE5


FROM page 1B
Bahamian company.
However, Julian Brown,
Benchmark's president, said
the company would fight on
after the jury threw out its own
"fraudulent misrepresentation"
claim against Akers.
The case, which has dragged
on for three years, forced
Benchmark (Bahamas) to take
out a $1.5 million provision in
its 2003 accounts that almost
wiped out its entire profits for
that fiscal year, damaging both
shareholders and the compa-
ny.
Mr Brown told The Tribune
that the outcome of the initial
case had left Benchmark's
shareholders "no worse off",
as they had not lost anything,
apart from legal fees in the
fight to reclaim the $1.5 mil-
lion.
He added: "The case is
already three years old. We
made a provision in our books
and if we win, we get it back. If
we don't win, we're no worse
off, so we'll continue the bat-
tle."
Mr Brown confirmed that
Alliance was appealing, some-
thing it had 10 days to do. In
the first instance, the appeal
goes before the judge and court
that heard the initial case, and
the attorneys for both Alliance
and Akers will make fresh sub-
missions.
If the appeal is denied, Mr
Brown said Alliance would
then take it to three judges sit-
ting on the 11th Circuit Court
of Appeal in Atlanta. He
hoped that this court would
give a judgement in Alliance's
favour or, at the least, order a
retrial.
"We firmly believe we have'a
very good case. The evidence
in our view is really unques-
tioned, and even Akers them-
selves did not deny the evi-
dence," Mr Brown said.
The case was sparked when
began when Alliance, which is
a Bahamian broker/dealer,
received instructions from a
client to sell 2,8 million Akers
shares, which the client had
received from the US compa-
ny. Akers, which makes and
distributes diagnostic testing
products in the US and
Europe, is listed on London's
Alternative Investment Mar-
ket (AEI)". .


Alliance alleged that "
of its due diligence to
the negotiability and tra
ty" of Akers' stock,
obtained assurances fro
company's chief exec
Raymond Akers, and
financial officer, Paul
man, that there were no
tions on the 2.8 million




"We firm

believe

we have

avery

good case

The eviden

in our viev

is really

unquestion(

and even

Akers
th enselve


did not

deny the


- Julian B


and they could be trade
After openly tradii
Akers' stock on the L
Stock Exchange, Allian
covered the 2.8 million
were restricted and con
ed collateral for a loa
Akers obtained to fu
operations, contradiction
represqR.tatJig..,of the c


as part ny's senior officers.
ensure In a statement, Mr Brown
idabili- alleged: "Once Akers obtained
it had the final instalment of its loan
om the proceeds from Alliance's client,
cutive, Akers cancelled 2.765 million
I chief shares of its stock that [had
Freed- been] sold in the market, leav-
restric- ing bona fide purchasers of that
shares stock with worthless securities
and traders of that stock
exposed to adverse claims.
"Prior to its wrongful stock
cancellation, Akers was aware
of the sales of its stock but
remained silent and continued
to represent to Alliance and
RBC that the 2.8 million shares
were freely tradeable."
Prior to the jury trial, a US
federal district court judge in
the southern Florida district
gave a summary judgement in
Alliance's favour, rejecting
Akers' claims of breach of con-
tract and breach of escrow.
However, the court allowed -
ce over Alliance's "strong objec-
tions" Akers' claim for fraud-
ulent omission to be tried
WV before a jury. The jury rejected
this, but also rejected Alliance's
"fraudulent and negligent mis-
representation" claim and
edi failed to compensate the
..'. Bahamian company for that
$1.5 million.
Mr Brown, who previously
told The Tribune that he had
rejected a $500,000 offer from
Akers' attorneys to settle, said
the jury felt that since both par-
lS ties. had been harmed by the
case, "why should anyone pay"
the other side compensation?
Mr Brown said: "Justice was
not-done in this case. The jury's
verdict was against the mani-
S:B fest weight of the largely undis-
puted evidence. The court's
submission of frivolous fraud
claim to the jury served only
n to confuse the jury and give
them a way out by 'splitting the
baby'."
He also claimed that the
judge refused to apply Florida
and New Jersey law, which
d. made Akers' stock restrictions
ng the invalid and unenforceable
ondon against Alliance because the
ce dis- Bahamian companywas with-
shares out notice of those restrictions
istitut- at the time it received Akers'
n that stock certificate.
nd its "This case should never have
ng the been tried given the applicable
ompa- law,'t, v ,ifsai .
.........-.,..L.,. ~ ~ ^ ^i ^ '';^ :


SCENE TKE
Cie aI Prds unrie

FETUIN TE FILMOCATIO

Havn NgordCoy LyordCo






Satuday66 epembrS'I7th 205 6-ocloc


SPOSO
Nygr5Co: ucionHos l 0 e6 +Sanin


CmTRE FOR C


COURSE NO. SECT
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01
ACCA901 01
ACCA902 01
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01
CUST900 01

COMPUTER
COMP901 01
COMP901 02
COMP902 01
COMP903 01
COMP 941 01
COMP953 01
COMP960 01
COMP930 01
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01
COSM804 01.
COSM807 01
DECORATING
DECO800 01
DECO801 01
FLOR800 01
FLOR801 01
FLOR802 01
ENGLISH
ENG 900 01
ESL900 01
HEALTH AND FITNESS
MASG900 01


MASG901


HLTH 800
LANGUAGES
CRE 900
CRE 901
SPA900
SPA901
FRE 900
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900
MGMT901
MGMT902
MEDICAL
MEDT900
SEWING
SEW 800
SEW 802
SEW 805
SEW 811


& EXTENSION SERVICES

Fall Semester

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT


COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III

CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER
SERVICE W/S

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECH. I
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
MS POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S

MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAILART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGNIII

EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
ENGLISHAS A SECOND LANG.

MASSAGE THERAPY


ESSENTIALS I
01 MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS II
01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR


01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II
01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. I
01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. I
01 HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT W/S
01 MEDICALTERMINOLOGY I


BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II
DRAPERY MAKING I
UPHOLSTERY MAKING I


TIME

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


DAY START DUR.


Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur


26 Sep
26 Sep
27 Sep


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


6:00-9:00PM Tue 27 Sep 8 weeks $225
9:30AM-4:30PM Thur 13 Oct 1 day $170


6:00-9:00PM
10AM-1:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-7:30PM
9:30AM-4:30PM
9:30am-4:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Mon
Sat
Thur
Wed
Tue
.Tue
Thur
Thur/Fri

Mon
Tue
Mon/Thur

Tue
Wed
Mon
Thur
Tue


26 Sep
24 Sep
29 Sep
28 Sep
27 Sep
27 Sep
13Oct
6&7Oct

3 Oct
40Oct
26 Sep.

40Oct
5 Oct:
3 Oct
6 Oct
40Oct


12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
6 weeks
12 weeks
1 day
2 days

8 weeks
8 weeks
6 weeks

8 weeks
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


Tue 4 0ct 8 weeks $225
Mon 3 Oct 10 weeks $250


Thur
Mon
Thur

Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fri


29 Sep
26 Sep
29 Sept

3 Oct
4 Oct
30ct
40Oct
40ct

29 Sep
26 Sep
6&7Oct


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

12 weeks
12 weeks
2 days


6:00-9:00PM Thur 6Oct 10weeks $225


6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Thur
Mon
Tue
Wed


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of
your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course



SEPTEMBER

RESEARCH EDGE FORUM


Topic: "How Politics and Industry Corrupt
Scientific Research"
Friday, 16th September, 2005 @ 12 noon
Lecture Theatre, School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies
Presenter: Dr. John Hammerton,
former Chief Scientist to the BEST Commission

For more information, please call 326-4501/2






This is an introductory course covering basic medical terms. Students will be exposed
to terms that will enable them to read and interpret medical reports, charts, and
communications relevant to a variety of health care environments. Major topics
include Word Building Rules, Prefixes, Suffixes, Whole Body Terminology, Integumentary
System, Skeletal System, Muscles and Joints, Nervous System, Blood and Lymphatic
System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory System and Digestive System.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Prerequisite:
Tuition:


Monday, 26 September 2005
6:00am 9:00pm
C.R. Walker Secondary
None
$225.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-
1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception of the
application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide
copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change
tuition, fees, course content, course schedule and course materials.


CUUNARY & HOSPITAUTY MANAGEMBBT INSTITUTE
(Formerly School of Hospitality & Tourism Studlis)

Industry Training Department
CUUNARY COURSES FALL SEMESTER 042005
COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR. DAYS TIME TUITION&FEE RESOURCE Venue MN.Enru
(ADDITIONAL$40 MATERIALS
APPFEEFOR
NEW STUDENTS)
1. BahamianCuisine COOK 806 September29 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$12perweek SHTSMain 15
Kitchen
2. GourmetCookingl COOK823 October 3 6weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $20perweek SHTSMain 15
Kitchen
3. Gourmet Cooking Il COOK 824 October 3 6weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $20 per week SHTSMain 15
Kichen
8. Cake & Pastry Making I COOK813 October4 10weeks Tues. 8:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
9. Cake &Pasty Making II COOK 814 October4 10weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $250.00 $10 $15 per week SHTSPastry 15
Kitchen
10. Bread Making COO(810 September29 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $5-$10perweek SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
11. Cake Decorating I COOK817 September 28 10weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 $15perweek SHTSILarder 15
Kitchen
12. Cake Decoration II C00K818 September28 l0weeks Wed. 8:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSPastiy 15
______Kitchen
For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175


@ TH Coi' OLL
Visit our website a


MIN G


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


i
I
I
t


BUICAIM








PAGE B, MNDAY SEPEMBE 12,005UHEITIBUN


Legal Notice

Notice

Euro Canadian Management Limited

Notice is hereby given as follows:-

a) Euro Canadian Management Limited is in Voluntary liquidation
under the provisions of The Companies Act 1992.

b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 29th
June 2005.

c) The Liquidator of the said company is Christopher Johnson
of Chris Johnson Associates Ltd. Strathvale House, P.O.Box
2499 GT, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands, B.W.I.

Dated this 9th day of September 2005


Christopher Johnson

Liquidator


Legal Notice

Notice

Euro Canadian Management Limited
Creditors having debts or claims against the above named company are
required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.box
CB 12399, Nassau, The Bahamas on or before 14th October 2005 and
to establish any title they may have under The Companies Act 1992, or
to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before the
debts are proved or from objecting to the distribution.
Dated this 9th day of September 2005
Christopeher Johnson
Voluntary Liquidator
Chris Johnson Associates Ltd.
P.O.Box 2499GT
Strathvale House
Grand Cayman
Cayman Islands
BWI
Contact for enquiries:
Michelle Cullen
Tel: (345) 946-0820 Fax: (345) 946-0864

LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CAPUCCINO ENTERPRISES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with ection
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of CAPUCCINO ENTERPRISES LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


FROM page 1B


they and the Government were owed sig-
nificant sums of money by the Royal Oasis.
He said that even if it meant becoming
part-owners, the Government must pro-
vide a guarantee that the hotel and casino
would open in the shortest possible time.
Communities
Other members of the Bahamian hotel
and business communities were just as
sceptical as Mr Bain, pointing out that the
Government had hardly covered itself in
glory when it previously owned resorts.
The consensus was that the administra-
tion should avoid 'going back to the
future', and resist the temptation to inter-
vene despite the Royal Oasis closure hav-
ing left 1300 people out of work.
Rick Lowe, aiNassaut Institute director,
said: "The important point is that the politi-
cians feel they have to do something to
help these people, but wouldn't it be better
to find new investors?
"The Government has proven it can't
run hotels. That's why they had to sell the
ones they ran previously, and put them
out to different management."
Speaking to The Tribune on condition of
anonymity, a business community source
said the Bahamas was surrounded by any


number of examples of government
involvement in business that were absolute
failures.
Pointing to the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) and Bahama-
sair, the national flag carrier, the Govern-
ment's performance was rated as dismal,
fraught with huge costs for the taxpayer.
The public corporations also struggled with
low productivity.
While it is understood that the Govern-
ment's proposal to assume part-ownership
in the Royal Oasis would be done for the
sake of political expediency and provide
short-term jobs, it was noted that such a
move could "potentially take the country
back into that type of scenario, recreating
an environment where there could be a
return to that type of situation.
"The Government has no business being
in business," the source said. "Their basic
responsibility providing education; safe,
efficient, reliable public service; clean
water, there are enough challenges to get
to that level than going into areas where
they failed dismally in the past".
Industry

A hotel industry executive said that in
general it was not good practice for the


Government to get into these kinds of
businesses for any extended time, and that
it should restrict its potential loss if it had
to do it for short-term employment gain.
The source said further that it was of
vital importance that the Government
enter into a management contract with a
reputable company to manage the Royal
Oasis, and there be no involvement in
regard to employment specifications or
numbers of people employed. ......
"It should be run as a business to make
a profit and not solely to employ people,"
the executive said.
Executive
Another financial executive said the
Government would have to be "very, very
careful" about taking any ownership stake
in the Royal Oasis, and the fact it was con-
templating such a move indicated there
were few if any potential buyers eyeing
the property. "If they do it for only a short-
term period it's OK, but not a permanent
long-term basis," the source said. He sug-
gested that the Government first look for
a hotel group before committing itself as an
investor, and warned the administration
to avoid being used to "bail out" Lehman
Brothers.


Bribes, from Page 1B


Old Fort Bay area, has thus.
been vindicated over com-
ments made to The Tribune
some three years ago, when he
described the August 20, 2001,
guilty verdict against him as
"the furthest thing from the
truth".
Mr Barry, who is a close'
friend of legendary heavy-
weight boxer Muhammad Ali
and a major donor to the
Bahamas Red Cross, owns'
VitaPro, a company that makes
a soy-based alternative to meat.
He had always denied the
charges against him, but
despite a 'not guilty' plea, the
Texas jury took just one hour
to convict him of bribery, mon-
ey laundering and conspiracy.
He was alleged to have paid
Mr Collins "at least" $20,000 -
in two $10,000 instalments in
bribes to ensure VitaPro won a
"five-year, multi-million dollar
contract" with the criminal jus-
tice department just before
Collins retired from his post.,
The jury rejected Mr Barry's
defence that the payments to
Collins were advances, qq-
suiting work the latter planned
todo for VitaPro after retiring
from the correctional depart-
ment, but his sentencing has
been delayed as the trial out-
come descended into contro-
versy.
But Judge Hughes over-
turned the conviction son'
grounds that the chief witness
against Mr Barry, Patrick Gra-
ham, lied during the trial in a
bid to please 'an assistant US


NOTICE,

The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture is now registering for the
fifth (5th) Session of the National Youth Leaders Certification Programme,
schedule to commence on Tuesday 27th September, 2005.


The Ministry invites all interested Youth Leaders or Youth Workers to
pick up application forms from the Ministry's Headquarters on Thompson
Boulevard, Ministry of Education Building, 2nd Floor, West Wing, Monday -
Friday between the hours of 9:00 am 5:00 pm.


For further information please contact Mr. Gregory Butler, Deputy
Director of Youth at telephone numbers 502-0600 5.



Employment Opportunity


A leading conservation organization is seeking competent individuals with a positive
attitude to fill the following positions:

Bookkeeper and Accountant's Assistant
Location: New Providence
The successful candidate will provide support to the Finance Department through
the performance of a variety of routine and non-routine accounting and clerical
tasks.

Database and Membership Officer
Location: New Providence
The successful candidate will be responsible for the development of membership
database and for extending service to the general membership. Location

Rand Nature Centre Administrative and Education Specialist
Location: Grand Bahama
The successful candidate will be responsible for the development and to oversee
educational programs and outreach activities for the Rand Nature Centre, Peterson
Cay and Lucayan National Parks.

For additional duties and responsibilities for these positions please visit our website
at www.thebahamasnationaltrust.org or call the Human Resources Department at
393-1317.


attorney, Jim Letten, who
served in the eastern district of
Louisiana.
He ruled that Graham had a
secret deal with Letten that, in
exchange for his testimony in
other federal cases, he would
not prosecute him for crimes
in Louisiana and would seek a
sentence reduction for him in


other states. Graham was a key
witness in Letten's prosecution
of a former Louisiana gover-
nor and Houston mayor.
The judge said Graham's tes-
timony in Barry's trial was "rid-
died with contradictions". Gra-
ham has previously been con-
victed of theft and tax evasion.
Judge Hughes also ruled that
if federal prosecutors over-


turned his verdict, Mr Barry
and Mr Collins would receive a
new trial.
A report in the Houston
Chronicle quoted one of Mr
Barry's attorneys describing his
client as working on real estate
projects in the Bahamas.
Michael Ramsey said: "He's
ecstatic and feels like he's final-


ly been vindicated."
Although convicted by the
jury, Mr Barry had never been
sentenced due to numerous
omissions, misreportings and
other inaccuracies contained in
court transcripts of his trial.
Mr Barry told The Tribune
back in. 2002 that it took 10
months for his legal team to
obtain a copy of the transcripts,


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NELSON JOSEPH, 5TH
STREET, THE GROVE, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL JOSEPH, 5TH
STREET, THE GROVE, P.O.BOX N3331, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


PARKTOWN RIVER LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of PARKTOWN RIVER LIMITED, has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolation has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP INC.
Liquidator


which a Texas newspaper has
since described as "the worst
case of butchered transcripts" it
had seen.
Mr Barry told The Tribune
that his legal battle with the
state of Texas began when it
cancelled the food supply con-
tract VitaPro had with the cor-
rections department.
He said the contract had
originally been signed when
Anne Richards, a Democrat,
was governor of Texas, but it
was withdrawn after current
US president, George W Bush,
defeated her in the state elec-
tions. He alleged that powerful
cattle-producing interests lob-
bied the new state administra-
tion to end his agreement, and
he filed a lawsuit to recoup the
lost contract.
Mr Barry was then hit with
the alleged bribery lawsuit. He
said he had spent "mega mil-
lions" on hiring attorneys and
private investigators to uncov-
er evidence on his behalf, and
said of the trial: "There's so
many things going on behind
the scenes." I
"This [the trial] is the fur-
thest thing from the truth. I'm
just sitting here and have told
the lawyers to call me when it's
over," Mr Barry told The Tri-
bune. "I'm here in the
Bahamas happy, and hoping1it
will all go away. I'm confident,
not cocky.
"I'm just sitting back. Time is
a great healer, and Muhammad
and I have been best friends
for 37 years."
He added that there were no
travel restrictions upon him,
and said his attorneys had
advised him to "stay quiet',
despite offers to appear on
Oprah Winfrey's television
show and the fact that Ali had
been calling him for two
months to persuade him to go
on the programme.
Mr Barry is not short on self-
publicity, possessing his own
website, www.yankbarry.com,
which describes him as "an
impeccably attired business-
man" and a "walking Rock n'
Roll encyclopaedia" due to his
former career in the music
industry.
Mr Barry is also involved
with Muhammad Ali in an ini-
tiative called Global Village
Champions, which aims to feed
the poor, hungry and dispos-
sessed across the world.
Among the Global Village
Champions touted by his web-
site are singer Celine Dion and
her husband, plus Olympic
double gold medallist Michael
Johnson.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2005, PAGE 7B


1IIE7


BTVI ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF

THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR


TheBahma TehnialandVoctinalInsitte BT-) nnonce ativtie0t mak te penngof th newscholyar


September 19, 2005
Abundant Life Bible Church, Abundant Life Road
9:30 am (Day Students)
6:30 pm (Night Students)


* Registration


September 26 29, 2005
9:00 am 5:00 pm
Registrar's Office (see schedule)


* School Opens


October 3,2005


BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE
STUDENT ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SCHEDULE
Fall Quarter 2005 September 26, -29, 2005


Mon. Sept. 26


9:00 am 1:00 pm
2:00 pm 5:00 pm


Barbering. .
Cosmetology ,
Evening Wear Design & Production
Facial Technology
Nail Technology.,i .
Souvenir Manufacturing ."
Tailoring,
Women's Apparel Production ,


S Beauty Trades
Fashion Trades


Tue. Sept. 27 9:00 am 1:00 pm Auto Body Repar .Mechanical Trades
2:00 pm 5:00 pm Auto Mechanies &
Computer Repairs& A + Certification Electronics Trades
Electronics '
PC Repair& pgrade...
Residential Air-conditining & Refidgeratio'
W elding. .'i ".: .:, _i"., '., .
Wed. Sept. 28 9:00 am 1:00 pm Office Systems & Administration 1& 2 Service Trades
/ 2:00 pm 5:00 pm .. ... __ _.,_ ..


Thur. Sept. 29


.5U


9:00 am 1:00 pm
2:00 pm 5:00 pm


........... . ..... .' ..r... i.. l.,sTe


Cabinet Making. *
Carpentry
Ceramic Tile Laying
Masonry
Painting & Decorating ,
Residentialwtmilixt -H' ,' a
Upholstery,
Widow Treatment.


Construction Trades




, ., iI ... . H', s .f' 'iy j v


Noe lse ei coe ,20.Lt Rgsrto sSp-di3,20 i he( 'valt eitaint f$00


Seeking a career in the
Fashion Indu


~d~a1 ~


Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute
SOUVENIR MANUFACTURING PROGRAMME


BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Apply today to enl in oe of our cosructionprograms for the Fall Quarter.
Adv'ace' Cabinet Making
S *Tile Laying

Painting and Decorating -cetf ate


CONTACT THE ADMISSIONS
OFFICE AT 502-6318


* Orientation


I


'


MONDAY, :EPTEMBER 9, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005, PAGE 9B


SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow French per- My Favorite Broadway: The Love Songs Broadway History Detec-
* WPBT show 'Kettering" fume bottles; Confederate States stars perform love songs from Broadway musicals; tives (N) ,
stamped brass belt buckle. (CC) hosted by Julie Andrews. A (CC) (CC)
The Insider (N) The King of Everybody Two and a Half Two and a Half CSI: Miami "10-7 Horatio finally
0 WFOR (CC) Queens Slippery Loves Raymond Men Evelyn Men "It Was learns the truth about what hap-
Slope" "The Finale" A watches Jake. Mame, Mom" pened to his brother. (CC)
Access Holly- Most Outra- Most Outra- Las Vegas The new owner of the Medium Capt. Push puts his life on
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) geous TV Mo- geous TV Mo- Montecito plans some big changes the line to help Allison find a serial
ments t) (CC) ments n (CC) to the property. ) (CC) killer. n (CC)
Deco Drive Prison Break Michael becomes Prison Break "Cute Poison" Hay- News (CC)
B WSVN pressed for time and tries to enlist wire develops a fascination with
the help of his cellmate. (CC) Michael's tattoo. (N) n (PA) (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) Sports Jam Live NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Atlanta Falcons. From the Georgia
M WPLG Dome in Atlanta. (Live) A (CC)

:00) Cold Case Intervention A woman loves her Growing Up Growing Up Airline (N) (CC) Airline Mardi
A&E Files (CC) family, but can't live without beer; Gotti Art school; Gotti The Gottis Gras costume
93-pound anorexic. (CC) sightseeing. go to Siena. (N) competitors.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
computers.
BET.com Count- * SOUTH CENTRAL (1992, Drama) Glenn Plummer, Byron Keith The Parkers n The Parkers A
BET down Minns. Gang members prowl L.A.'s South Central slum. (CC) (CC)
Coronation Canadian Country Music Awards The annual ceremony takes place at (:06) BBC World (:36) La Vie, La
CBC Street (CC) Pengrowth Saddledome in Calgary. (Live) (CC) Report (CC) Vie (CC)
Katrina: Crisis, Late Night With Conan O'Brien Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Recovery (N)/ (CC)
C N (:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN Cooper 360 (CC)
*i BILLY MADI- The Daily Show D.L. Hughley: Shocked & Ap- South Park Cart- Blue Collar TV Mind of Mencia
COM SON (1995) (CC) With Jon Stew- palled The comic speaks out on man goes to fat "Fame" (CC) 16th and 20th
art (CC) race, politics, and marriage. (GC) camp. century life.
cOUR T Cops n (CC) The Investigators "Taking Vegas" Forensic Files North Mission Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
COURT Road & Justice'Woodward"
That's So Raven * LILO & STITCH (2002, Comedy) Voices of (:35) Buzz on Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister A
DISN "Double Vision" Daveigh Chase, Ta Carrere. Animated. A lonely girl Maggie (CC) Sadie says a family in the pub-
(CC) befriends a mischievous alien.'PG' (CC) hurtful remark., li eye. (CC)
DIY This Old House Weekend Deco- Fresh Coat Scrapbooking Embellish This! Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty "Il-
Classics (CC) rating lusion Knitting"
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth Tagestema Depth
E! The Soup Jessica, Ashlee and the Simpson Family: The E! True Hollywood Kill Reality (N)
_Story Joe Simpson drives his daughters' success. 9 (CC)
ESPN Monday Night Countdown (Live) (CC) Figure Skating Grand Prix Final. From Beijing. (CC)
ESPNI U.S. Open Ten- Goles de Es- Gol ESPN: NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Atlanta Falcons. From the Georgia
ESPNI nis Men's Final. pana(N) Fuera de Juego Dome in Atlanta. (Live)
WTN aily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
FIT T ,V Caribbean Work- FitTV's Housecalls Quit smoking. FitNation "You Are What You Take" The Extremists The Extremists
out [ (CC) ,t (CC) Supplements. /3 /3 (CC) ,n (CC)
FOX- N Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSN FL Marlins on Deck MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at Houston Astros. From Minute Maid Park in Houston. (Live)
FSNFlL (Live)__________________
GOLF Golf Fitness Golf Tavistock Cup-- Day Qne. From Isleworth Country Club in Florida.
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire t The Amazing Race ,n (CC) Ballbreakers (CC)
G4Tech :00) Attack of X-Play X-rated Cheat Icons "Ralph Judgment Day Filter Criss An- Judgment Day
G4TeCh the Show! Sims. T 7 Baer" gel. (N) (N)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Faith" A * PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE RUTHLESS REPORTER
HALL Texas Ranger girl's life depends on Walker finding (1991, Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, Susan Sullivan. A TV re-
"Child of Hope" a hijacked ambulance. (CC) porter is accused of killing an egotistical anchorman.
Holmes on Rooms That Design U Debbie Travis' Facelift "Karen's Holmes on Homes "Whole House
HGTV Homes Base- Rock "Calm and "Bryce's Nursery" Kitchen" Cl (CC) Disaster" Dave and Ana's house is
ment leak. (CC) Collected" Nursery. in ruins. n (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W'Scham- A Inspirational Life Todayi(CC) Inspiration To- Love a Child
: (CC) : a: bach:(GG)C Programming ., ..:. day. ,
KrLA Xiaolin Show- Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Joey re- Everybody r Everybody
KTLA down "The Teenage Witch Kids Jay wants Kids "Jr.'s Dating veals his feelings Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
Sands of Time" Blackmail. (CC) to go to work. Dilemma" for Rachel. Robert changes. "Lucky Suit" n
MALPRACTICE (2001, Mystery) Stephanie Zimbalist, AMBULANCE GIRL (2005, Comedy-Drama) Kathy Bates, Robin
LIFE Gabrielle Carteris, Michael Arata. A lawyer becomes Thomas, Gordon Pinsent. Premiere. A writer finds a new calling as a vol-
suspicious of her own client. (CC) unteer EMT. (CC)
MSNBC Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC cc mann_
NICv Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Zoey 101 Full House / Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of The Cosby
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants n (CC) (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show (CC)
NTV Two and a Half Fear Factor A (CC) Prison Break Haywire develops a News /1 (CC) News
Men (CC) fascination with Michael's tattoo.
OLN (:00) Survivor: All-Star BBQ Showdown "Grand E-Force Outdoor Out- Survivor: Africa "Question of Trust"
Africa ( (CC) Finale" The 2005 winner, takes /3 (CC)
SPEED NBS 24-7 (N) Inside Nextel Cup (Same-day Tuner Transformation Special (N) NASCAR Nation NBS 24-7
SPEED ___ Tape)-I
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Phoebe Friends Chan- Friends Joey Friends Chandler Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Pe-
TBS Loves Raymond finds meaning in dler's awkward bails out Rachel falls for Joey's ter's married to ter's religious fa-
,t (CC) a stray cat. (CC) situation. (CC) and Monica. Cr girlfriend, the mob. (CC) other moves in.
(:00) In a Fix Trauma: Life in the ER The doctors Untold Stdries of the E.R. A baby Supersize She (CC)
TLC Changing a and nurses of Good Samaritan Re- is losing consciousness for no ap-
home9s decor. gional Medical Center. (CC) parent reason. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order Detectives discover a Law & Order 'True Crime" A female Wanted A Mexican gang member's
TNT der "Untitled" Ct murdered prosecutor had been liv- rock singer's corpse is found stuffed jailbreak triggers a rise in race-relat-
(CC) (DVS) ing under an alias. (CC) (DVS) in a garbage can. : ed violence. (CC)
TOON Grim Adven- Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Home for Imagi- Cartoon Car- Yu-Gi-Oh! "One Dragon Ball Z
IM N tures tures Next Door nary Friends toons for the Road"
TV5 (:00) Thalassa (:40) Carnets de (:05) Les Falbalas de Jean Paul D'ici et TV5 Le Journal
Chine Gaultier d'ailleurs
6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWVC PM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
UNIV 00) Inocente de Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen Cristina El elenco de La Madrastra.

**NEXT FRI- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit *k IN & OUT (1997, Comedy) Kevin Kline, Joan Cusack, Matt Dillon.
USA DAY (2000) Ice Investigation into the sexual assault Premiere. A Midwestern schoolteacher is outed on national television.
Cube. (CC) of a heroin addict. (CC) (CC)
VH1 6:30) Celebrity Gene Simmons' Rock Star: INXS On Set Hook-Ups Fabulous Life The Surreal Life
V FitClub Rock School C Ct (CC) _________Of... C (CC)
Home Improve- FULL DISCLOSURE (2001, Action) Virginia Madsen, Penelope Ann WGN News at Nine C (CC)
WGN ment "Doctor in Miller, Rachel Ticotin. A reporter is asked to safeguard a Palestinian oper-
the House" A ative. Ct
Everybody 7th Heaven Matt learns that Mary 7th Heaven Simon and his new girl- WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond has filed for divorce and signed friend make a visit to Glenoak to long, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Lucky Suit" C away custody of her son. (CC) meet their respective parents. & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) One on One Flex All of Us Robert Girlfriends Half & Half Dee Dr.Phil
WSBK makes a confes- faces a major ca- "Wedding on the Dee feels pres-
sion: (CC) reer decision. Rocks" (CC) sure. C (CC)

H (6:30)*** (:15) A History ** BREAKIN' ALL THE RULES (2004, Romance- *A TAXI (2004) Queen Latifah. A
HBO-E THE RUNDOWN of Violence: Comedy) Jamie Foxx. A man writes a successful how- bumbling policeman and a cabby
(2003) 'PG-13' HBO First Look to book on breakups. C 'PG-13' (CC) chase bank robbers. (CC)
(:00) ** *, DEAD AGAIN (1991, Suspense) Kenneth Rome "How Titus Pullo Brought Rome "An Owl in a Thombush"
HBO-P Branagh. An amnesiac may be.the reincarnation of a Down the Republic" Mark Antony re- Pompey makes an unusual tactical
murdered pianist. C 'R' (C C) turns to Rome. C.(CC) decision. t (CC)
S(:00)Costas * THE MEDALLION (2003, Action) Jackie Chan, * THE RUNDOWN (2003, Adventure) The Rock,
HBO-W NOW C (CC) Lee Evans, Claire Forlan. A Hong Kong detective has Seann William Scott. A bounty hunter must find his
supernatural abilities. C 'PG-13 (CC) boss's son in the Amazon. C 'PG-13' (CC)


f(00) ** HE SAID, SHE SAID (1991, Comedy) Kevin ** FOOTLOOSE (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lith-
HBO-S Bacon, Sharon Stone. Conflict adds spice to an affair gow. Small-town teens fight for their right to dance. C 'PG (CC)
between rival columnists. n 'PG-13' (CC)
X (6:30) *x SUR- ** HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN (2004, Fantasy) Daniel *k TORQUE
MAX-E VIVING CHRIST- Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. The young wizard confronts the fugitive Sirius Black. (2004) Martin
MAS Ct 'PG'(CC) Henderson. C
(:15) ** CAN'T HARDLY WAIT (1998, Comedy) *** PATRIOT GAMES (1992, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Anne Archer,
MOMAX Jennifer Love Hewitt. High-school seniors flock to a Patrick Bergin. A former CIA agent is stalked by a vengeful IRA terrorist.
wild graduation party. C 'PG-13' (CC) C 'R' (CC)
S(:35)* DIRTY DANCING: HAVANA NIGHTS (;05) The L Word "Lynch Pin" (iTV) Weeds "Dead in Weeds "Dead in
SHOW (204) Diego Luna. iTV. Love blossoms between a Bette travels to New York City. n the Nethers" (N) the Nethers" (iTV;
Cuban and an American teen. Ct 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) (CC) C (CC)
(6:30) EVIL THE BIG EMPTY (2003, Comedy) Jon Favreau, (:35) ** LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY (2002,
TMC ALIEN CON- Joey Lauren Adams, Bud Cort. A struggling actor deliv- Comedy-Drama) Vera Farmiga, Jill Hennessy. New
QUERORS ers a mysterious suitcase. C 'R' (CC) Yorkers deal with relationships. Ct 'R' (CC)


II 4).


vie Gift Certifi

make great ifts!


MONDAY EVENING












Mackey and Smith to face



Sfor super middlewight tile




r w at the Redemption event


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
EXCITEMENT is brewing
for Saturday's First Class Pro-
motions "Redemption" profes-
sional boxing show at the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort and Crys-
tal Palace Casino, say promot-
ers.
The show, starting at 830 pm,
will feature the much anticipat-
ed rematch between Jermaine
"Choo-Choo" Mackey and
"Marvelous" Marvin Smith for
the Bahamas super mid-
dleweight title.
Earlier this year, Mackey out-
distanced Smith to clinch the
title. But now Smith has vowed
to bounce back and reclaim the
crown that he previously held.
Promoter Michelle Minus,
who along with her husband,
Ray minus Jr, is in charge of
promotional team, said with less
than a week away from the big
showdown, "everything is
falling in line".
"We're going to have a spec-
tacular show," she predicted.
"We're going to have some
entertainment inbetween the
fights. but all of the fights will
make this a dynamic show."

Jamaican

There are at least three
Jamaican boxers who will be in
town to fight Meacher 'Pain'
Major, Jerry 'Big Daddy' Butler
and Elkino Saunders. U JERMAINE "Choo-Choo" 1
"So we expect a large contin-
gent of Jamaicans to come out
and support their fighters," some card. We have some of
Minus added. the best amateurs competing,
Also during the show, First so it will definitely be an awe-
Class Promotions willhonor some show," Minus predict-
Nelson 'Chippie' Chipman; hot .ed.
the role he played in the pist "We're urging everyone to
as a referee. come out and support us and
"The undercard is an awe- help us fill the auditorium


Mackey, current holder of the Bahamas super middleweight title


because it promises to be a
night of boxing that you won't
want to miss."
Tuesday's edition of The Tri-
-bune, will..feature interviews
with bpth Mackey and Smith,
as they prepare for their
rematch in the show being spon-


sored by V-8 Splash.
The two were involved in a
special photo shoot for a com-
mercial on Saturday at the
National Boxing Gym at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.
Tickets for the show are cur-


rently on sale and can be pur-
chased from Heastie's Service
Station on Baillou Hill Road or
from Steve's Cafe, East Street
and Robinson Road, ..
Tickets are priced lf $75 for
VIP, $35 for ringside and $20
for general admission.


iSto1rm andpnowr cut dwkelayplayoRs


* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SECONDS before the tip-off in the
Bahamas Government Basketball


League signaling the opening rounds
of playoffs, the lights went out.
The action was expected to be
tense, with more than six games on
schedule at the DW Davis gym.
With players from all teams waiting


patiently and hoping to advance to
the second round of play in the
league, the starting five players from
the two opening teams were called to,
the circle.
Just as the ball was thrown in the air


for the centres to do battle, the lights
were cut off, due to the stormy weath-
er.
All games that were set for Satur-
day will be played on Tuesday night at
the DW Davis gym.


SCopy ghtec Material




SSyndicated Content

Available fromommercal eNws Providers


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005






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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


SECTION 4





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Tonique comes second to Richards


I TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THIS time, Jamaican-born American
Sanya Richards made sure there was no:
come-back victory for Bahamian Tonique
Williams-Darling.
As they brought their intense head-to-
head rivalry for the year to an end, Richards'
was the one to storm from behind and hold
on, pipping Williams-Darling for the victo-
ry in the women's 400 metres at the 3rd,
IAAF World Athletics Final in Monaco on:
Saturday.
Producing her third consecutive victory
after fading down the stretch in Helsinki,
Finland when Williams-Darling won at the
World Championships in August, Richards
won by just two hundredths of a second in
49.52 seconds.

Close

In clinching a $30,000 cash prize, the 20-
year-old Richards said "This win against
Tonique means a lot to me. It was a hard
and very close race, but it's been a great
year for me. I jumped from number six in
the world to being one of the two best ath-
letes."
Despite the loss, Williams-Darling will
remain as the top female quarter-miler, a
spot she took from her arch-rival, Ana Gue-
vara from Mexico.
Williams-Darling, however, had to set-
tie for second place in the grand finale when
she ran 49.54. She earned a purse for
$20,000 for her efforts.
But the 29-year-old Williams-Darling
admitted that, "I missed the victory on the


line. I'm tired, but it was a good race. The
back stretch was great and I have a second
place."
Running out of lane five, Williams-Dar-
ling had the race ini control as she came
through the first 200 in front., But the final
,200 belonged to Richards and this time, she,
didn't lose any steam.



The season finale echoed last year, when
Williams-Darling won the Olympic title
over her Mexican rival Ana Guevara and
went on to collect a $500,000 purse for.shar-
ing the $1 million jackpot on the Grand
Prix circuit.
However, Guevara came back to avenge
the loss in the 2nd IAAF World Athletic
Final.
This season, Williams-Darling was chased
by Richards all year long and, although she
won the IAAF World title, Richards came
back'in the post-Helsinki meet and had
Williams-Darling's number to win.
Third place went to American DeeDee
Trotter in 50.64. She got $12,000. Fourth
went to former World champion Amy
Mbacke Thiam from Senegal in a season's
best of 50.69 for $7,000.
Bahamian Christine Amertil, running out
of lane one, could do no better than fifth in
51.23. She earned a cheque of $5,000 for
her efforts.
On Friday's first day of competition, Chris
Brown came in third in the men's 400 in
44.68; Chandra Sturrup was fourth again in
the women's 100 in 11.07; Lavern Eve threw
the javelin 203-feet, 3-inches for fourth and
Leevan 'Superman' Sands was fifth in the
men's.triple jump with a leap of 55-6 1/2.


at golf event

* GOLF

H. GARLAND EVANS
and John Robertson pipped
the team of Kirk Smith and
Dion Godet by one stroke to
win the top prize in the Duke
of Edinburgh Cup Tourna-
ment on Sunday at the Par-
adise Island Golf Club.
Evans and Robertson, rep-
resenting Prime Bahamas,
clinched the overall title with
a net score of 60 to claim the;
prize of all-expenses paid trips
to England.
Smith and Godet, repre-
senting The Tribune, had to
settle for second with a 61.
They won a three-day stay at
the Ocean Club on Paradise
Island.
Coming in third was the
team of Ian Stewart and Dan
McDonald, who shot a 62.
There were also contests for
the longest drive and closest
to the pin.
In the ladies' contest,
Giselle Pyfrom had the
longest drive on hole number
13. The closest to the pin was
won by Helena Whitaker on
No.3 and the straightest dri-
ve was also won by Pyfrom on
No.4.
For the men, Thomas
Bethel took the longest drive
on No.2, qualifying him for
the Remax Regional Longest
Drive competition.
The closest to the pin on
No.8 came from James Hoyt
McGarity. Phil Andrews
had the straightest drive on
No.4.
The tournament raised
more than $75,000 for charity.


_.1:-----i~~--i~-~---- I I I I I I I I


lThe TfbneBi .








MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


The stories behind the news


Teen beauty queen Gari McDonald was officially stripped
of her Miss Teen Bahamas title last week by the pageant com-
mittee. In a statement, the committee announced that Kandra
Knowles was now the title holder of Miss Teen Bahamas
2004/2005. At a press conference last week, 18-year-old Ms
McDonald accused the committee of discriminating
against her because of her sexual orientation. Ms McDon-
ald, a lesbian, claimed she had been asked to relinquish
her crown because of her sexuality. The pageant com-
mittee denied Ms McDonald's claims and said the. 18-
year-old was stripped of her crown because of her failure
to attend planned functions...


Lessons


Various government schools
across New Providence and the
Family Islands continued to expe-
rience delays to the new school
year last week. One of those
schools was Carlton E Francis
Primary (pictured). Students
were unable to start classes as
scheduled last Wednesday after
teachers refused to teach in
"unsanitary conditions"...


left


I!


The Bahamas Public Services Union last week
rejected a $1,300 lump sum offer for government
employees. BPSU president John Pinder has asked
for an overall increase of $1,800. Mr Pinder
announced the union's rejection at a press con-
ference. Industrial consultants Keith Archer and
Frank Carter said it was the union that had broken
the tradition of'previous negotiations, where only
salaries and wages were discussed, but added that
government looks forward to maintaining a cordial
working relationship with the union through fair
negotiations...


behind


in Katrina' s


wake


AC^itategoyFiv hitwould.wreck Biahn Nas eo


* By JOHN MARQUIS


S F "VUntil the turn of the
21st century, the Unit-
ed States of America
was on a roll. Eco-
nomically buoyant,
socially progressive and strategically
s eentigly imprgn-able-, it was- what
every other nation wanted to be.
Self-confident, prosperous, on top of
its game, there was nothing this great
country seemed incapable of doing.
In fact, we were all beginning to
believe what Americans had been say-
ing for years that Uncle Sam was
the superdaddy of the world, a coun-
try with such wealth and savvy that it
could afford to be generous to every-
body else with plenty to spare, and
set the pace for western civilisation
for decades to come.
Such was its allure that I actually
began to seriously regret my decision
to turn down a job there in 1965.
Alongside my homeland, Britain, a
country still saddled with a demoral-
ising class system and a can't-do cul-
ture which is both destructive and
depressing, the USA seemed to offer
golden uplands and boundless blue
skies.
How things can change in five short
years.
There was a time when I never
missed an opportunity to praise the
good old USA. It was, in my eyes,
everything a country needed to be a
great democracy, an expansive land
with opportunities for all, a free nation
surfing blissfully towards a bright
future while my own country seemed
anchored to its past.
My feelings were best symbolised
in the Swinging Sixties when I
watched the dynamic, handsome,
youthful John F Kennedy in discussion
with the.doddering old Edwardian,
Harold Macmillan. Why, I asked
myself, can't we be led by someone
like Jack Kennedy instead this patri-
cian, complacent old relic with his gold
watch-chain and funereal waistcoat?
Soon afterwards, I applied for and
was offered a job as a reporter on the
Worcester Telegram in Massachusetts,
an opportunity ultimately turned
down when I discovered that as a
22-year-old alien in peak condition I
would be right at the top of the. draft
list for Vietnam.


Hurricane Katrina fortunately skirte round the
Bahamas on the way to its deadly mission ifn New
Orleans. The destruction it wroughtto the World's
most developed nation offers less ns f us all -and
shows how fragile western civili atiln really is.
INSIGHT reports..


"Copyrighted Matenal

Syndicated Content

vailable from Commercial News Providers"


0 ** a -m 4 a me- mme


Alluring as the United States was at
the time, I had no wish to squander
my young life chasing Vietcong
through the jungles of South East Asia
in a war I didn't care for or under-
stand. Vietnam was not Britain's war,
and jumping out of aeroplanes into a
:swarm of machine-gun bullets was
.never part ofmy career plan. I had
causeto regret that decision once or
twice over the years, but now I think I
was right after all.
The events of September 11, 2001,
or more specifically what happened
afterwards, exposed America as
almost block-headedly naive and insu-
lar. Its presidential election of 2004
wrote off a great swathe of its popu-
lation as just plain stupid. And Hurri-
cane Katrina, a storm of unprece-
dented fury, confirmed, alas, what we
flag-wavers didn't really want to
believe that the USA, far from being
a paragon of egalitarianism, is actual-
ly two nations, with one utterly con-
temptuous of the other.
If one ,ver wanted toname a single
man who prompted our disillusion-
ment, it would have to be George W
Bush. This man finds himself at the
head of the heap in spite of himself a
scion of a super-wealthy family who
was propelled by privilege and prefer-
ment to Yale University and the pres-
idency of the United States.
What Bush has achieved in a little
over four years is to, add weight to the
belief that America, in truth, is as hier-
archical, elitist, unjust and uncaring
under his rule as old Britain used to
be, and still is to a large degree. The
2004 election, in which rich Republi-
cans were utterly ruthless in pursuit of
their own self-interest, put the mat-
ter more or less beyond doubt. Hurri-
cane Katrina added the wax seal of
confirmation.
Personally, I don't think Bush's
abject performance in response to the
disaster was racially inspired. I would
even go so far as to say that I don't
detect any racial prejudice in the man
at all. I think he's probably too laid-
back and genial for that kind of non-
sense.
But he is, by background and
instinct, a man for whom big business,
and the interests of big business, are
SEE page 8C


- ; I


1"""'The Tihulll


I PILACESIH


F T L .....


t









PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
~fj *~n~


FEEDBACK~


READING Insight's
account of the art teacher, I
felt ashamed that such con-
ditions can exist in Bahamian
schools when education is
supposed to be top of the
national agenda.
It is criminal that lawyers,
who are arguably the most
worthless members of soci-
ety, are paid so much when
teachers, who are among the
most important, are treated
so shabbily. Who will have
the courage to address this
appalling situation and right
so many wrongs?
G E Cartwright
0000*****0

THE story of the art
teacher sounds far-fetched,
but I know it isn't. Her expe-
rience is very typical of what


is happening in Bahamian
schools.
It's interesting that people
like Loftus Roker, who was a
member of the first PLP gov-
ernment, is keen to decry
young reporters because their
English isn't up to scratch.
But he and his Cabinet col-
leagues were in charge when
educational standards went
through the floor. When you
read about classroom condi-
tions, it's not hard to see why
academic performance in the
Bahamas is so poor.
Old Generation
*****OOO

INSIGHT'S revelations
about teaching needed to be
said. The question it poses is
more relevant today than
ever before: if teachers are


so important, why are they
treated so badly?
Ex-educator
*000****

I know a wonderful old
teacher who, after a lifetime
of service, retired with a
grand pension of $400 per
month. This is shocking treat-
ment for a profession that
moulds our nation's future.
J P Rahmning
00*****

INSIGHT's article on
teaching needs to be repro-
duced, mounted and lami-
nated and sent to all govern-
ment members so that they
can look it every day and
hang their heads in shame.
Teacher turned entrepre-
neur


Quotes of the Week


"Now parents who have worked hard, parents
who have sacrificed just to get their children pre-
pared for school have to deal with this. Right
now all we are doing is allowing a lackadaisical
government to take advantage of the needy.
"This is not happening in the private schools,
this is not happening out east and west, this is
happening in the grassroot areas. This is a grass-
root area. We need to stand behind our people
and make the government accountable for what
they are doing."
Jermaine Higgs, chairman of the Bahamas
Democratic Movement, on public schools not
being ready for the new academic year last
week.


ceiling of the trailer. When they were asked to go
into that, the teachers absolutely refused.""
Ida Poitier, president of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers talks about the state of pub-
lic schools across the country.
"I knew that it was only a matter of time until
it happened so I wasn't shocked."
Gari McDonald, former Miss Teen
Bahamas responds to being stripped of her
crown last week. Ms McDonald believes she
lost her title because she is a lesbian, but the
pageant committee says it had nothing to do
with her sexuality.


"We had a Bahamian holding the position of vice-
"There are a number of schools that are out. president of sales, marketing and customer service.
Starting from the south, there's Crooked Island The consultant came in and told the board that they
High School. The ceiling has not been repaired, are three separate jobs.
they're still painting, the windows are not fin- "They removed the Bahamian from the job and
ished, and workmen are still on the site. We move went out and advertised for three persons to do the
to Exuma, and in Exuma, George Town Prima- one job the Bahamian was doing."
ry and Mount Thompson Primary are out. Claude Hamnna, president of the Bahamas Pub-
"At George Town primary in particular the lic Communications Managers Union responds to
students and teachers have been there for six the suspension of BTC manager who allegedly did
years initrailers. ,hetrailers are leaky, rat-infet- i. not cooperate yth executives and a team of foreign
ed, and there was a stench when they got there .. consultants. The manager's suspension was lifted
this morning because there were dead rats in the 24 hours later.


Front of the House Superstar
December-January-February AND
March-April-May
GONZALO BRONACACIO,
Entertainment
Pictured with Assistant Entertainment
Manager, Carla Minns


Back of the House Superstar
March-April-May

TAVALA FERGUSON,
Purchasing
Pictured with Financial Controller,
Camille Tynes


Back of the House Superstar
December-January-February

CHANTELL CLARKE,
Cost Control
Pictured with Financial Controller,
Camille Tynes


The Superstar program is a staff incentive program unique to SuperClubs that is used to motivate
employees and acknowledge the excellent work that they do.


.1-:


Il~srrlllsaarsaq~,, -~s~~~"~L"~U"3"~"~"1~-"~"""-"~~--"--- - - ----- ~-plqILr -- -


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







I rit I IbUNt


Various govern-
ment schools
across New
Providence and
the Family
Islands continued to experience
delays to the new school year
last week.
One of those schools was
Carlton E Francis Primary. Stu-
dents were unable to start class-
es as scheduled last Wednesday
after teachers refused to teach
in "unsanitary conditions".
Parents and children reported
to school only to be told that
classes were postponed until
Monday.
The parents were notified on
Sunday that the school would
not be opening Wednesday.
However, no alternative was
provided until Monday night.
During a meeting between
parents, the Minister of Educa-
tion Alfred Sears, and the
Director of Education, parents
were told that students would
be sent to various locations for
classes.
Those locations included
Carmichael Road Primary,
Great Bethel Church and
Southland Church of God.
Parents with children attend-
ing C C .Sweeting Jr High
School have also promised not
to send the students to school
until the proper repairs are
made.
Problems have also been
reported at C W Sawyer Pri-
mary School.

TWO more doctors came for-
ward last week to express con-
cern about the high Haitian
birthrate at Princess Margaret
Hospital.
This doctors' claims follows
a similar claim made the previ-
ous week that 90 per cent of
births at the public hospital in
August were Haitian.
One of the doctors said that
while figures may not be as high
as 90 per cent, government sta-
tistics do not reflect the reality.
He claimed that many Haitian
women do not fill out registra-
tion forms correctly.
Health Minister Dr Marcus
Bethel strongly denied the doc-
tor's claims and said that each
person coming into the labour
ward is properly processed.

TEEN beauty queen Gari
McDonald was officially
stripped of her Miss Teen
Bahamas title last week by the
pageant committee.
In a statement, the committee
announced that Kandra
Knowles was now the title hold-
er of Miss Teen Bahamas
2004/2005.
At a press conference last
week, 18-year-old Ms
McDonald accused the com-
mittee of discriminating
against her because of her
sexual orientation.
Ms McDonald, a lesbian,
claimed she had been asked
to relinquish her crown
because of her sexuality.
The pageant committee
denied Ms McDonald's
claims and said the 18-year-
old was stripped of her crown
because of her failure to
attend planned functions and
because she broke pageant
rules by holding her own
press conference without the
committee's knowledge or
consent and without a com-
mittee member being present.

THE Bahamas Public Ser-
vices Union last week reject-
ed a $1,300 lump sum offer
for government employees.
BPSU president John Pinder
has asked for an overall
increase of $1,800.
Mr Pinder announced the
union's rejection at a press
conference.


VARIOUS governm ttchools across New Providence
and the Family Islands continued to experience delays to the new
school year last week. One of those schools was the Carlton E
Francis Primary (pictured above and on the left).


(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Industrial consultants Kei-
th Archer and Frank Carter
said it was the union that had
broken the tradition of pre-
vious negotiations, where
only salaries and wages were
discussed, but added that
government looks forward to
maintaining a cordial work-
ing relationship with the
union through fair negotia-
tions.

BTC managers stormed the
executive offices last week
following the "unfair" sus-
pension of a colleague.
Mark Gilbert, an 18-year
employee of Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny, was suspended indefinite-
ly last Thursday for allegedly
not co-operating with execu-
tives and a team of foreign
consultants.
The consultants are in the
country in an advisory capac-
ity and managers have not
obligation to them, claimed
union officials.
Managers are taking issu-
ing with the number of expa-
triates recently hired by the
BTC board.
Mr Gilbert's suspension
was lifted on Friday, the fol-
lowing day.


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If so, call us on 322-1986
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/

/


You'll wonder hc


SRJON S &CO


INSIGHT


WEEK IN REVIEW


-- ---------i:I


--


I -


r


~I










ISSUES&IDEAS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2005 I


THE MIAMI HERALD


4 N


fthes we


* m


amo

*


S-* ****

- mew


WHAT DOES A HUMORIST DO AT TIMES

OF UNCERTAINTY SUCH AS THIS -

WHEN WE ARE REMEMBERING THE PAIN

OF 9/11 AND REMAIN FOCUSED ON

THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA?


DURING A DISCUSSION LAST WEEK, HERALD

EXECUTIVE EDITOR TOM FIEDLER

PUT THAT QUESTION TO OUR OWN HUMOR

EXPERT, DAVE BARRY, WHO SPOKE ABOUT DAVE BARRY






HUMOR AFTER


Sem
* anxima











We eP-lll~/ e


Sbr aiM

swi


Tom Fiedler: How does
humor fit into periods
when there is a lot of
angst in a society and a
culture? We went
through, and you obvi-
ously went thbugh,th
post-9/11 period. We -"
invade Afghanistan, we
invade Iraq, and here we
are in another tragedy of
this season with Hurricane
Katrina. What does a
humorist do when these
kinds of things are on the
front pages?
Dave Barry: Well, it
depends on the humorist.
I think, first of all, just to
put it in perspective, I think
that it's a mistake to.think
that these are more angst-
ridden times than others. I
always sound like an old man
going back to the '60s.
Whenever my son, who is 24,
tells me how bad things are,
which he does about once a


week, I say, you know, when
I was your age, the cities of
this country were on fire.
There were fires burning all
summer long in Washington
and Los Angeles. There were
S9di6irs'walking though the
strets'Betingshot atby sip-
ers from rooftops. If you
think the country is going to
hell now, you should have
been here then. It really did
seem like we were falling
apart as a society.We didn't.
So I don't know that I'm
going to say that now is
more angst-ridden than
before. We had the war in
Vietnam then, we have the
war in Iraq now. They're
both divisive. I'd argue the
Vietnam war was more trou-
blesome to more people in a
sort of fundamental, where-
are-we-going level, but hav-
ing said all that, I can't
remember the question at all.
Oh yeah. First of all, anxi-


ety is a good source of
humor. Bad times equal good
humor. People love... that
release that comes from
being able to just laugh for a
minute at how bad things
; re.
I r6te a ibuinich of col-
Sumnig in the aftermath of
Hurricane Andrew that I still
have people talk to me about,
just because it was so lousy
to live without power. There
were troops in the streets,
but it was also pretty funny
because there we were, it
was quite different from
Katrina. We were basically
suburbanites and we knew it
was going to get better. But it
was pretty weird to be camp-
ing out with your neighbors
holding guns in their laps in
case the looters came and
monkeys loose in the streets
and no power. That was just
*TURN TO Q&A


SHeraldcom

Read a transcript, and
hear a recording, of this
conversation.
0, Refslxafl0"t@ive
Barry' ;pst columDs,
including those dealing
with 9/11.
Check Dave's blog for
daily updates.



'THOSE WERE THE REAL
HEROES': A memorial
service in Shanksville,
Pa., on Sept. 11, 2002, a
year after United
Airlines Flight 93
crashed there. Some of
the plane's 40
passengers and crew
are believed to have
fought their hijackers.


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INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11,2005


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)




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OPINION
JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE 06LESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JAMES L. KNIGHT (1909-1991)


Rebuild this unique treasure


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WWW.HERALD.COM


.... . . ....... II M n I







6C SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION *


ISSUES & IDEAS


THE MIAMI HERALD


INTERVIEW WITH DAVE BARRY





'Bad times equal good humor'


*Q&A

a weird time. You could argue
that it was a bad time, but it
was also pretty funny, and the
longer it went on, the funnier
it would get and got, in
some ways.
The one exception to that
for me was 9/11, which was so
shocking and so awful and so
unprecedented to be attacked
in this country and see the
World Trade Center go down.
Now it is sort of accepted, but
at the time it was literally
unbelievable. I remember the
couple of days after 9/11, I
wrote a column the next day
basically saying, I'm not going
try to write a humor column.
This is horrible. And then I
remember sitting around star-
ing at the TV screen crying
for days and part of me think-
ing, what am I going to do
now for a living, because no
one will ever, ever be able to
laugh again.
On one hand, I knew that
couldn't be true, but on the
other hand, I really felt that
way. I know a bunch of people
in the humor business, and
I'm talking to them and say-
ing, what do you do, what do
we do now? Nobody knew.
We were stunned. We had
devoted our lives to some-
thing that now appears unbe-
lievably trivial, meaningless
and pointless amid all this
tragedy. Well obviously, that
didn't last. I think it was The
Onion [a satrical magazine]
that sort of the next week
came out with a funny, really
funny Web page about 9/11.
Impossible as that sounds and
as insensitive as it sounds, it
wasn't. It was just sort of,
again, just sort of human reac-
tion to any tragedy. You have
to deal with it somehow, and
that was how that was dealt
with.
I remember the e-mails and
the letters I got in response to
the column-I wrote ta
serious. Teye
consisten#4'werei -
dreds of them, and almost,
2-to-1, they said that was V
great. That was a great co-
umn: Thank you for writing
that. It was a really hard time.
Now you can go back to bing
funny, we need that now. I'
remember writing the first
humor column I wrote aftor
9/11, feeling odd about it,but
it got a very positive
response, and what was w-ird
was, the media didn't get that.
We in the media decide-
how everybody is going top
react. We're good at anticipat-
ing. And we had decided the
nation was in shock and
mourning and was going to
remain in shock and mourn-,
ing in the foreseeable future.
And so I remember getting a
lot of calls, interviews from
people who were doing the
usual mood-of-the-nation
interview. I got a lot of calls
because people wanted to
hear from a humorist --
What's the mood of the nation
now, 'cause we can't laugh .
anymore? and I kept saying
no, that's not really the mood


JOHN VANBEEKUM/HERALD STAFF
BUT, SERIOUSLY: Herald Executive Tom Fiedler, right, with Dave Barry at the WLRN/Herald studio in Miami. People
'love that release that comes from being able to just laugh for a minute at how bad things are,' Barry said.


of the nation. The mood of the
nation is yes, this is a horrible
thing, but we're not going to
let it change who we are, we
are not going to let it change
the fact that we're Americans
and Americans laugh, Ameri-
cans go on, Americans pro-
cess the tragedy and go on.
We're not going to let it beat
us. That was sort of what the
mood of the nation really was,
I thought. The mood of the
media was, you know, it took
a while for, I think, the rest of
us to catch up.
Fiedler: You later didcgo
and write a quite serious
piece about Flight 93.
Barry: That was one of the
more moving... experiences
I ever had as a journalist. And,
it was your idea, Mr. Fiedler.
You said I should write some-
thing about 9/11, a year after
9/11... In talking about
Ground Zero, you mentioned
Gettysburg, and that got me
thinking: Gettysburg is in
Pennsylvania, and the other
thing that was in Pennsylva-
nia is Shanksville, where
United Flight 93 went down. I
thought about these two
towns, and in both cases,
there was a little town in
Pennsylvania that had abso-
lutely nothing to do with any-
thing historical up to that
moment when some unbeliev-
ably cataclysmic event
occurred there that had never
been planned.
Gettysburg wasn't sup-
posed to be; nobody planned
to fight a battle there. Cer-
tainly, nobody ever planned
for Flight 93 to crash into a
field near Shanksville. But
here, these two towns were


chosen by fate to be the
scenes of these disasters that
really were part of a major
change in the nation. So I
decided to do a story about
Gettysburg today and Shanks-
ville a year after and how
these two events affected the
two towns the one a long
time ago and the one just a
year ago.
I ended up walking around
Gettysburg, which is still an
incredibly moving place to go,
and I think always will be.
This feeling of yeah, it just
grips you when you're there.


just never forget walking
around with him. Those were
real heroes, the people in that
plane.
Even today, people are still
realizing what they may have
saved by making that plane
come down and by taking
matters in their own hands,
which was a great story.... I
still get chills when I think
about that.
Tom Fiedler: Do you
think seriously about
humor?
Dave Barry: I have to
because people always ask


theory that basically the fun-
damental reason for humor is
a sort of human need to deal
with the fact that the world is
irrational and dangerous and
random and that it ends in
death. And, like, penguins
don't know that, which is why
so few penguins get into the
humor field. I'm not saying
they're not funny, but, you
know, just being professional.
But animals in general just
don't seem to figure that out.
But humans figured, oh my
gosh, the world I mean,
even though I live a wonder-
ful, good life, I could be killed
at any minute or horrible
things could happen. And
even if everything goes great,
I'm going to die, probably
without any teeth.
So there are two basic
ways that we deal with that.
One is religion OK, it's not
really going to end, it's going
to go on and on. And the other
is to find humor in it, to laugh
at it. I really think that most
jokes in the end, when we
laugh, we are releasing a ten-
sion that we feel about some-
thing that's a little scarier and
insane about our lives around
us. So that's my humor theory.
Fiedler: Are there differ-
ent types of humor or, of
course, schools of humor,
so to speak? Like there are
liberals and conservatives
in politics and in ideology.
Barry: There are schools
of humor. Starting with the
baby, adolescent, sophomoric
humor, which is like (flatulent
sound) noises like that make
people laugh. I did that with
my hands just for our radio
audience. So it's sort of like


And then walking around
with the coroner Wally Miller
in Shanksville, the guy who'd
been on the scene first and
been there for months picking
basically pieces of people out
of trees for square miles
around. Trying to gather
enough to give back to the
people who lost their loved
ones something to put in a
casket, even if it was a tooth
or a piece of a bone. He had a
real deep attachment to that
piece of the ground, which
was still no grass had
grown where the plane went
down. It was still open dirt
there, and we were there on a
rainy afternoon in July. I'll


me. I didn't use to, I mean, I
just thought as a kid growing
up that humor was, every-*
body got humor, and every-
body just thought it was fun
to laugh and stuff. At some
point when I became a'trained
professional in the humor
field, I found that everybody
wanted to probe into it. So at
some point I started develop-
ing theories about it. None of
them maybe, they may all be
completely false, these theo-
ries, but I do have quite a few
of them now... just because
people ask me, like I'm an
expert. Like I studied it.
Fiedler: Tell me one.
Barry: Well, I have this


that sort of poopie-joke
humor. And there's the guy
who falls down and we all
think that's funny. (Fiedler:
Chevy Chase kind of humor).
And then you get into the
more sophisticated humor
where you're ironic and sar-
castic, and it's sort of what I
like the kind of humor you
get into when you get older
and you're into Saturday
Night Live. Although I should
pick something, [The Daily
Show with]Jon Stewart, some-
thing that's that still pretty
funny. And then there's like
really serious humor like Vol-
taire, or something, what we
call humor that's not funny -
satire where it's like some
elaborate, intellectual conceit
presented as humor that
never makes me personally
laugh. But yeah, there's all dif-
ferent intellectual levels of
humor.
Most of them in the end
deal with some kind of, get-
ting back to my earlier theory
of it, some kind of disconnect
between what we do as the
orderly, rational and fair way
that we think the world
should work and the kind of
insane, random way that it
actually does work, con-
stantly confounding whatever
plan we have.
Fiedler: You had written
a book that became a
screenplay prior to 9/11.
Barry: Yeah... I had writ-
ten a book that had, as a key
plot element, these incompe-
tent criminals who steal what
they believe to be a suitcase
full of emeralds, which actu-
ally turns out to be suitcase
containing a nuclear bomb.
And they're able to get it on to
an airplane because at Miami
International Airport, the
security people are so stupid
that rather than notice that
it's a nuclear weapon, they
make them turn it on to prove
that it works. So they actually
make them arm their bomb.
Anybody who has ever beeil
through Miami International
Airport would confirm that it
could actually happen.
But unfortunately the idea
of a plot device involving a
bomb on a plane did not strike
people as very funny in the
aftermath of 9/11. This movie
was scheduled to come out
9/12, so that was that for that
movie.
Fiedler: It was put off?
Barry: I'm not saying that
the terrorists specifically tar-
geted my movie, I'm just say-
ing that it was bad timing.
Fiedler: You've been
doing a humor column now
for probably 25 years.
Barry: Yeah, actually
closer to 30.
Fiedler: I know one of
your first books was Dave
Barry Turns 40. Dave Barry is
a lot further from 40 than we
would like to admit.
Barry: I'm 58, but still
younger than you, Tom.
Fiedler: This is true.
Barry: And always will be,
Tom.
Columnist Dave Barry is on
leave from The Herald.


BY DAVE BARRY I FOR COMPLETE ESSAY, SEE WWW.HERALD.COM



'Nobody planned for the battle to happen here'


This is from an essay writ-
ten in September 2002, one
year after the 9/11 tragedy.
Here, a comparison is made
between Gettysburg and ano-
ther small Pennsylvania town,
where Flight 93 crashed.
On a humid July day in
Pennsylvania, hun-
dreds of tourists, as
millions have before them, are
drifting among the simple
gravestones and timeworn
monuments of the national
cemetery at Gettysburg.
Several thousand soldiers
are buried here. A few graves
are decorated with flowers;
suggesting some of the dead
have relatives who still come
here. There's a sign at the
entrance, reminding people
that this is a cemetery. It says:
"SILENCE AND RESPECT."
Most of the tourists are
being reasonably respectful,
for tourists, although many,
apparently without noticing,
walk on the graves, stand on


the bones of the soldiers.
Hardly anybody is silent.
Perky tour guides are telling
well-practiced stories and
jokes; parents are yelling at
children; children are yelling
at each other.
A tour group of maybe two
dozen teenagers.is paying zero
attention to anything but each
other, flirting and laughing,
wrapped in the happy self-
absorbed obliviousness of
TeenagerLand.
A few yards away, gazing
somberly toward the teenag-
ers, is a bust of Abraham Lin-
coln.
Lincoln gave his Gettysburg
Address here 139 years ago,
when the gentle rolling land-
scape, now green and mani-
cured, was still raw and battle-
scarred, the earth recently
soaked with the blood of the
8,000 who died, and the tens
of thousands more who were
wounded, when two armies,
160,000 men, fought a terrible
battle that determined the out-


come of the Civil War.
Nobody planned for the
battle to happen here. Neither
army set out for Gettysburg.
But this is where it hap-
pened. This is where, out of
randomness, out of chance, a
thousand variables conspired
to bring the two mighty armies
together. And so this quiet lit-
tle town, because it happened
to be here, became historic,
significant, a symbol, its iden-
tity indelibly defined by this
one overwhelming event. This
is where these soldiers sol-
diers from Minnesota, soldiers
from Kentucky, soldiers who
had never heard of Gettysburg
before they came here to die
- will lie forever.
This is hallowed ground.
* *
On the same July day, a few
hours' drive to the west, near
the small Pennsylvania town
of Shanksville, Wally Miller,
coroner of Somerset County,
walks slowly through the tall
grass covering a quiet field, to


a place near the edge, just
before some woods.
This is the place where, on
Sept. 11,2001, United Airlines
Flight 93, scene of a desperate
airborne battle pitting passen-
gers and crew against terrorist
hijackers, came hurtling out of
the sky, turning upside down
and slamming into the earth at
more than 500 miles an hour.
That horrendous event
transformed this quiet field
into a smoking, reeking hell, a
nightmare landscape of jet
fuel, burning plane debris,
scattered human remains.
Now, 10 months later, the
field is green again. Peaceful
and green.
Except where Flight 93
plunged into the ground. That
one place is still barren dirt.
That one place has not
healed.
"Interesting that the grass
won't grow right here," says
Miller.
Nobody on Flight 93 was
heading for Somerset County


that day. The 33 passengers
and seven crew members
were heading from Newark to
San Francisco. The four
hijackers had a different desti-
nation in mind, probably
Washington, possibly the
White House.
Nobody on the plane meant
to come here.
"I doubt that any one of
them would ever set foot in
Somerset County, except
maybe to stop at Howard
Johnson's on the turnpike,"
Miller says. "They have no
roots here."
But this is where they are.
And this is where they will
stay.
No bodies were recovered
here, at least not as we nor-
mally think of bodies. In the
cataclysmic violence of the
crash, the people on Flight 93
literally disintegrated.
Searchers found fragments
of bones, small pieces of flesh,
a hand. But no bodies.
In the grisly accounting of a


jetliner crash, it comes down
to pounds: The people on
Flight 93 weighed a total of
about 7,500 pounds. Miller
supervised an intensive effort
to gather their remains, some
flung hundreds of yards. In the
end, just 600 pounds of
remains were collected; of
these, 250 pounds could be
identified by DNA testing and
returned to the families of the
passengers and crew.
Forty families, wanting to
bury their loved ones. Two
hundred fifty pounds of identi-
fiable remains.
"There were people who
were getting a skullcap and a
tooth in the casket," Miller
says. "That was their loved
ones."
The rest of the remains, the
vast majority, will stay here
forever, in this ground.
"For all intents and purpo-
ses, they're buried here," Mil-
ler says. "This is a cemetery."
This is also hallowed
ground.


' remember sitting around staring at

the TV screen crying for days and part

of me thinking, what am I going to do

now for a living, because no one will

ever, ever be able to laugh again.'


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P A EN SM OHYET E


FROM page 1C

paramount. He was reared
amid wealth, so reacts to every-
thing like a wealthy man. It
probably never occurred to him
that many of those who
drowned in what is now the
cesspit of New Orleans could-
n't afford to flee. People from
his circle can afford to do what-
ever they like, and have little
knowledge of, or regard for,
those who can't.
So in the early aftermath of
Katrina, while his people
starved in the streets, Bush was
socialising with his rich bud-
dies out west. Poor people are
not a pressing priority among
Texas oilmen or corporate
moguls. Once polling day is
over, the power of the poor is
exhausted for another four
years and their interests go on
the backburner.
Professional martyrs like the
Rev Jesse Jackson were quick
to identify race as the chief
cause of Washington's appar-
ent indifference, but America's
divisions in the post civil rights
era are more social than racial.
It just so happens that most
poor people in a southern city
like New Orleans are black.
The aftermath of Katrina
revealed in the most graphic
way what these social divisions
mean when it comes to reacting
to a national crisis.
One image that will live in
the mind's eye forever is the
makeshift grave of a woman
called Vera Smith, whose body
was left lying under a tarpaulin
sheet at the junction of Jackson
Avenue and Magazine Street
in downtown New Orleans.
Vera, 65, went to the local
store to buy supplies just after
the storm hit. She was appar-
ently struck by a hit-and-run
driver. When her husband Max
eventually found her body and
asked for help in moving her,
police told him to "get the hell
out of here" because they were
cleaning the streets.
Eventually, Vera's decom-
posing corpse was buried
where it lay. A local man made
a cross and Vera was interred
under a white plastic sheet
bearing the poignant message:
"Here lies Vera. God help us."
The other comparably
depressing image was of an old
woman left dead in her
bathchair at the Louisiana
Superdome, with the trussed-
up corpse of an old man lying
alongside her. Could this real-
ly be the place, I wondered,
where I covered the Ali-Spinks
world title fight in the 1970s, a
magnificent indoor stadium
which seemed to reflect the
soaring spirit of New Orleans
and the American people?
Then, it was an emporium of
sporting excellence. Now it was
a morgue.
Somehow, Vera's grave and
the body in the bathchair rep-
resented, in the harshest terms,
the extent to which America
has lost touch with some of its
most fundamental ideals.

Tempest

Over the coming days, New
Orleans will throw up hundreds
more probably thousands
more equally heartrending
tales and pictures of poor folk
for whom the American
Dream was rent asunder by the
tempest. "Gone with the
Wind" is an old southern Civil
War expression which now
takes on an added edge as
thousands gaze solemnly at the
piles of matchwood that were
their homes, and rescuers ease
aside floating cadavers as they
seek out survivors.
The city of jazz, of Tennessee
Williams and Truman Capote,
of soft-shell crab, Cajun cui-
sine and seafood gumbo, will
also present us with an abun-
dance of images to reinforce
what is now becoming abun-
dantly clear that the US is not
only a nation where the wealth
gap grows ever-larger, and
where the political elite is effec-
tively distanced from the urban
throng, it is also a society that is
disturbingly fragile in the face
of outside forces.


In the space of 24 hours,'one
of America's most sophisticat-
ed cities an urban crucible in
which French, Spanish, Cajun
and Indian ,Jtures coalesced
into a melan'e of fine food and
fantastic music was trans-
formed into a lawless waste-
land.
As Katrina's killer winds and
gigantic sea surges faded, bad
men were on the streets killing
and looting and the govern-
ment, local, state and federal,
seemed powerless to react.
It was hard to believe, seeing
a black woman on television
screaming for food and water,
that these were scenes from the
most prosperous nation on
earth. It could have been the
Sudan or Ruanda.
A government which sent an
army.to Iraq to save a nation
from Saddam could not save
its own people from a calamity
which had been foreseen and
meticulously tracked for sev-
eral days.
When Bush eventually did
appear, he sounded hollower
than a bass drum. The down-
home rhetoric doesn't fool any-
body anymore. Only the front
of his face was talking.
His mother compounded the
impression that she and Dubya
live in a different galaxy by
declaring that many poor peo-
ple would be much better off
now they have lost everything
they own in New Orleans and
been moved to Texas. Are
these people for real? '

Fearsome

So what can we learn from
Katrina, a fearsome lady who
caused barely a breeze as she
skirted Nassau on her way to
bigger things?
Firstly, that hurricanes have
the power to level more than
trees, houses and traffic signs.
In the three states hit by Katri-
na,, the economy of an area as
big as Britain has been deci-
mated.
"Don't bother to come back
to New Orleans," a police
spokesman told those who fled
before the storm. "There is
nothing here. There are no
jobs, no power, no houses, no
stores, no businesses, nothing."
Secondly, that lawlessness is
the-natural spawn of catastro-
phe, even in a First World
nation like the United States
where, theoretically at least,
forces are in place to counter
every eventuality. In the
Bahamas, it is likely proba-
bly certain that ghetto gun-
men would be hitting Bay
Street in their hundreds at any
sign of civil order breaking
down.
Thirdly, that Godtalk and
prayer alone are not enough.
New Orlearis and Louisiana
may be noted for their low-life
elements and rampant amoral-
ity, but there are as many
preachers per square mile
around the Mississippi delta as
anywhere on earth. However,
they didn't save 'The Big Easy'
from nature's wrath.
In the Bahamas, those who
have grown used to the annual
threat of major storms must
now think in practical terms of
what might happen here if a
Katrina struck. It's no longer
possible to think of hurricanes
as an excuse for a bit of brava-
do, a time to hunker down and
buy in the six-packs. Suddenly,
our consciousness has been
cranked-up to contemplate
new levels of chaos.
Mass evacuation is an impos-
sibility, so emphasis must be
placed on precautionary mea-
sures, life preservation and, in
the aftermath, the maintenance
of order on the streets. The
task will not be easy, but vital if
the Bahamas is to survive as
we know it.
It is no exaggeration to pre-
dict that, with a direct hit on
Nassau from a Category Five
hurricane, the Bahamas' econ-
omy would be in dire peril,
with damage running into bil-
lions of dollars. The country
could be crippled for years to
come, its tourism industry in


tatters, its people back to catch-
ing conch.
If US-lovers like me are dis-
appointed at the way a great
country reacted to Katrina, and
the plight of its poor, they can
at least learn from Washing-
ton's errors and try to ensure
that such harrowing scenes
don't happen here. In truth,
though, the Bahamas might
find itself depending heavily
on the United States, which is a
far from reassuring prospect,,
given the tragedy unfolding
across the fetid swamp that
New Orleans has now become.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


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