Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: September 8, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00200
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text








ONLY
BIG MAC" w
HIGH 92F
LOW 8 A80F

SUNNY AND
BREEZY


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATIO




BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 101 No.236THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005 PRICE- 500


II


bI


ears


Doctor: hospital

births are the 'tip

of the iceberg'


* By FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
A SECOND doctor has
expressed concern about the
high Haitian birthrate at
Princess Margaret Hospital.
And the source feels hospi-
tal births are just the tip of the
problem, as Family Island clin-
ics are being overwhelmed by
Haitians.
While hospital figures may
not be as high as 90 per cent as
claimed by another doctor last
week government statistics do
not reflect the reality, the doctor
said, because many Haitian
women do not fill out registra-
tion forms correctly.
Last week, Health Minister
Dr Marcus Bethel dismissed
claims by a doctor in a Tribune
article who said 90 per cent of
births at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital in August were Haitian.
Dr Bethel said his ministry's
figures indicated that Bahami-
ans accounted for just over 73
per cent of all births in August.
However, the doctor who
spoke with The Tribune yester-
day claimed to know from per-
sonal experience that some
Haitian women state they are
Bahamian when, in fact, they
are not.
Dr Bethel strongly refuted
this claim, stating that each per-
son coming into the labour ward
is properly processed.
He said his ministry had
checked into that claim already,


and found that they are being
"properly processed through
the public health system."
He said patients must bring
in proper documents to show
their nationality.
Last night, The Tribune was
told that the labour ward was
overcrowded.
The doctor said more than 20
Haitian women had arrived for
treatment yesterday, while few-
er than 20 Bahamians were
seen.
The doctor said it was diffi-
cult to deal with some Haitian
women because of the language
barrier.
In some instances, the doctor
found that some were only pre-
tending to not speak English
because they wanted to defy
medical orders.
In addition, the doctor said
Anne's Town and Coconut
Grove ante-natal clinics were
swamped with pregnant Hait-
ian women.
What often happened, said
the doctor, was that Haitian
women arrived very early at
clinics and held more than one
number so that they and their
family or friends can be served
first.
At the post-natal ward, the
doctor said often there are not
enough beds for Bahamian
mothers because the ward has
so many Haitian mothers.
This claim was supported by a
group of women who told The
SEE page 11


fy j
kmbv a i]mea


Teachers refuse to teach in 'unsanitary conditions'


* STUDENTS wait to be taken home after Carlton E Francis postponed classes until next Monday..
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Miss Teen Bahamas

stripped of title

* By KARAN MINNIS
MISS Teen Bahamas Gari
McDonald has been officially
stripped of her title.
A press statement was
released yesterday by the Miss
Teen Bahamas committee stat-
ing that Ms McDonald "no
longer holds the title as Miss
Teen Bahamas."
It added: "Gari McDonald
will no longer represent and is
no longer authorised to conduct
any business on behalf of the
Miss Teen Bahamas committee. ___
"We would like to take this 0 GARI MCDONALD
SEE page 11 (Photo: Donald Knowles)


* By KARAN MINNIS
STUDENTS of Carlton E
Francis were unable to attend
school yesterday after teachers'
refused to teach in what they
call "unsanitary conditions."
Yesterday parents and chifl
dren reported to school only to]
be told that'classes were postL
poned until next Monday.
According to Jermaine Higgs,
chairman of the Bahamals
Democratic Movement, parents
were notified on Sunday that
the school would not be open-
ing yesterday. However, ng,;
alternative was provided until.
Monday night.
Mr Higgs said that during a
meeting between parents, the
Minister of Education Alfred
Sears, and the Director of Edu-
cation on Monday night, par-
ents were told that students
would be sent to various loca-
tions for classes.
Those locations included
Carmichael Road Primary,
Great Bethel Church, and
Southland Church of God.
"Now parents who have
worked hard, parents who have
sacrificed just to get their chil-
dren prepared for school have
to deal with this," said Mr Hig-.
gs. "Right now all we are doing
is allowing a lackadaisical gov-
ernment to take advantage of
the needy.
"This is not happening in the
private schools, this is not hap-
pening out east and west, this
is happening in the grassroot
areas. This is a grassroot area.
SEE page 15


Bahamian businessman found
guilty of drug charges in US
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A WELL-known Bahamian businessman has been found
guilty on cocaine charges by a grand jury in the United States.
Charles Alexander Bowe, 34, was convicted on four counts
related to the importation of eight kilogrammes of cocaine into
the United States from the Bahamas on December 3, 2004.
He is now facing a term of imprisonment of no less than 10
years, nor more than life, it was reported in a press statement by
the US Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Georgia.
Bowe was one of three defendants charged with importation
of cocaine, conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine,
possession, and aiding and abetting.
Defendant Damian Tiant Coverley, also believed to be a
Bahamian, pleaded guilty to the charge of conspiracy to import
cocaine and is now awaiting sentencing.
The third defendant, Omar Theophilus, remains a fugitive.
Bowe was indicted in Savannah, Georgia, in December last
SEE page 11


a4*tStam. Sia


.-I^as a Sad ahmaBIla n s'L I ntg -esar


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PAGE THUSDAYSEPTEBER 8 2005THE TIBUN


Union meets to consider



industrial action against



BTC over contract issues


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMAS Telecommuni-
cations Company managers are
considering whether or not to
take industrial action.
Bahamas Public Managers


10


Union (BCPMU) president
Claude Hanna made the
announcement yesterday after
an emergency meeting was
called for union members.
The meeting was to take
place last night.
Mr Hanna spoke to The Tri-


- 50% off


bune before the meeting,
saying that he planned to
tell members about the BTC
board's stance on outstand-
ing issues between the two
bodies.

Impasse

The board, he said, had
communicated to him that it
is unable to move any further
on contract demands made
by the union.
After putting the matter to
the members, a decision will
be made, and industrial action
is one of the avenues being
considered, he said.
Mr Hanna explained that
there are a number of unre-


THE Bahamas chapter of
Us TOO! International will
observe its annual Prostate
Cancer Awareness Month in
September Under the aus-
pices of the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas.
Activities began with a
Church service on Sunday,
September 4 at St George's
Anglican Church.
Prostate screenings have


solved issues between the
BTC board and the BCPMU,
including core matters such
as salary and medical bene-
fits.
He said that 80 per cent of
the union's original contract
complaints have been dealt
with, but when he
approached the bargaining
agent about the final matters,
further progress could not be
made.
Eight weeks have passed
since that meeting, and the
BTC board has only commu-
nicated with the BCPMU to
say it is unwilling to negotiate
any further, Mr Hanna said.
He is expected to inform
the public as soon as a deci-
sion is reached.


been scheduled for between
6pm and 9pm on September
19 at the Elizabeth Estates
and Flamingo Gardens clin-
ics, and on September 21 at
the South Beach and Flem-
ing Street clinics.
There will be radio and
television shows dedicated
to the subject, as well as arti-
cles in the print media and
flyers will be distributed.


~'\'',
w


Tourism site


succeeds in



pulling crowds


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMAS.COM has
proven to be an important asset
to the country's number one
industry according to the latest
statistics from the Ministry of
Tourism's information technol-
ogy department,.
The website was launched in
2003 and its performance since
then has Minister of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe beaming.
Tourism IT director Kayla
Ward told The Tribune that
,from November 2003 to June
2004, there was $1.1 million in
bookings on the site, while from
November 2004 to June 2005,
visitors spent $3.6 million
through Bahamas.com.
Mr Wilchcombe said that in
this day and age, the trend for
travel is turning more towards
the internet, and the ministry
wants to capitalise on that.
Last year, 30 million US
households bought travel on
line, spending $53 billion.
Of all the US households that
took trips to the Caribbean, 25
per cent booked online.
Experts project that by 2009,
46.4 million households will buy
online travel, spending $111 bil-
lion.
While the growth of the web-
site is impressive, Mrs Ward
explained that a three-year plan
is being implemented to raise
those numbers even further.
She said the focus will be on
finding out exactly what visi-
tors to the website want in
order to accommodate their
every need.
An online user research plan
will use studies to find out how


satisfied visitors are with
Bahamas.com. Questions will
help determine how effective
the website is, if there were any
needs not being met, and what
content is unnecessary.
For just the first quarter of
2005 alone, more than seven
and a half million web surfers
visited Bahamas.com.
The website can lure even the
most uninterested user.
The home page has a beck-
oning scene of Eleuthera's mys-
terious glass window bridge.
The media gallery offers live
video clips from around the
archipelago, and also offers 360
views of some of the most fas-
cinating places in the world.
Ministry of Tourism experts
have focused on the natural
beauty of the islands and the
charm of the Bahamian people.
Even someone who consid-
ers themselves a "true"
Bahamian can learn a lot from
the website.
The web surfer can go on a
boat ride in Bennett's Harbour,
visit an historic cave in Hamil-
ton's, Long Island, or swim with
dolphins in Bimini.
Potential visitors can book
hotel accommodations, tours,
or put together an entire pack-
age through the website.
Additionally, the web surfer
can find out exactly what is
going on in the Bahamas.
"In 2003 the e-Commerce
department of the Bahamas
Tourist Office, Florida was
established to move from a tra-
ditional business model to an
on-line business model, going
directly to the consumer," said
Mrs Ward.
"As the change in the travel
industry took shape, the
Bahamas government made a
strategic decision to launch its
own website to provide Inter-
net users an opportunity to
research their vacations direct-
ly from a knowledgeable
source, and provide them
referrals to travel agents who
had completed a Bahamas
Tourism Institute training pro-
gramme.
"E-commerce was also estab-
lished to build and maintain
strategic partnerships with oth-
er on-line travel companies.
Separate and apart from our
affiliate partnership with Expe-
dia.com and their private label
division, (WWTE) we work
strategically with Travel-
ocity.com, National Leisure
Group (NLG), and
Expedia.com to promote the
Bahamas online through mar-
keting, advertising and promo-
tional programmes and initia-
tives," she said.
These campaigns, Mrs Ward
added, are geared toward
increasing website traffic and
sales conversions.
"There are several vendors
who make available to us the
latest cutting-edge technology,
which enables us to accomplish
our goals and objectives."


TROPCL


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FOR RENT


All Shoes


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Screenings for


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUNETHURSAY, SPTEMBRL8,C005,NAGES


Search goes on for

Eleuthera man


SNIFFER dogs are now
being used by Eleuthera police
in the hunt for missing busi-
nessman Dwight Johnson.
A team of 12 officers is
combing bush and shoreline
around Governor's Harbour,
where Mr Johnson vanished
last Thursday night.
Police are still optimistic that
the 44-year-old father-6f-three
will be found alive. "Informa-
tion is still coming in and we
are following every lead," said
Asst Supt Wendall Deveaux,.
Eleuthera's police chief.
Mr Johnson, owner of the
Quality Inn Cigatoo, dropped
off his wife Michelle at home
on Thursday, then went to his
hotel to lock up, but vanished
on the way home. His truck
was later found in a side road
with bloodstains at the rear.
Mr Deveaux said: "We have
searched the entire area of
Governor's Harbour. We have
a team out now and they will


be out again tomorrow.
"We are searching the bush
and the shoreline. Dogs are
helping in the hunt," he added.
Eleuthera officers and Nas-
sau police reinforcements are
searching bush and beaches
with the assistance of volun-
teers.
They are also making door-
to-door inquiries in the area.
Forensic tests on the blood
found on Mr Johnson's vehicle
are not yet complete.
Mr Johnson's disappearance
is a double blow for the family,
described as "prominent in the
Governor's Harbour area."
In the early 1990s, his father
Baldwin vanished and has not
been seen since.
The Johnson family is well-
known in Eleuthera business
circles.
Dwight's brother, Lloyd, is
an attorney in Governor's Har-
bour while his mother Brenda
runs a gift shop and restaurant.


'Save our children'


Tr SReorter Residents' appeal to shut down 'drug house'
MEMBERS of a local com-
munity are pleading with police dents who say that despite aging illegal activity. People are hopes the situation is addressed
to clean out a "drug house" repeated calls to police, nothing always going in and out and before, more violence occurs.
they say is causing fear and has been done. someone saw a guy with a "There are a number of
ruining the peaceful atmos- According to one person, joint," she claimed, young boys in the area and we
phere they live in. who asked not to be named, The woman said that she was do not want them to get
According to concerned res- the situation has been going on alerted to the situation by cus- involved or be influenced," she
idents of the Grove, an apart- for two to three months. tomers of the business where said.
ment in the area has been used He claimed that the house is she works. "I am not afraid for Senior officers of the Drug
to sell drugs for the past sev- run by Haitian nationals and is myself, but I am concerned for Enforcement Unit (DEU)
eral months. now a thriving business, my customers." vowed that the matter would
Since that time, there have "The women through the She added the community- be investigated.
been a number of fights in the corner are afraid because there
area, and the residents feel the are sometimes group of 15 to 20
growing violence is directly men who congregate in the
related to what is going on at area," he said.
the apartment. One woman, who also spoke
Female community members on condition of anonymity and
in particular are afraid to ven- has lived and worked in the
ture out of their homes because Grove for the past two years, I
they fear they may end up the said the area has always been
target of an attack. very quiet.
Yesterday, The Tribune "Some people moved in and
spoke with several of the resi- it appears that they are encour-


BPSU turns down government



lump sum salary increase


Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
Fax: 326-9953
Bay Street (next to Athena Cafe) Tel: 323-8240
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2
Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
i*m aHarbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235
e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com P.O. Box N-121


* BPSU President John Pinder, along with president of the Prison Association Clive Rolle and Brad Sands ,ex-chairman of the
Police Association speaks to the press yesterday at the BPSU headqauterson.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Public Services Union
(BPSU) has rejected the government's
salary increase proposal.
Union president John Pinder announced
the decision yesterday, joined by represen-
tatives from the National Congress of Trade
Unions as they collectively declined the


$1,300 lump sum offer.
Mr Pinder explained that government
had appointed a committee to negotiate
with the unions on the salary increase.
The union is looking for a $1,800 increase
to their salary annually; a raise of $150 a
month or $32 a week.
"We had hoped for the negotiations to be
done by August before school opened in
September so that our members could buy


school supplies for their children.
"When they offered us the $1,300 we had
to consult our members before we could
accept that.
"However in the three meetings held,
the union has outright rejected the govern-
ment's proposal. We had put in a three-
year proposal and they had promised they
would give us a counter proposal on August
25, but we are still waiting on that," he said.


The Mall-at-Marathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

THE EXCORCISM OF EMILY.ROSE NEW 1:00 3:25 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:40
THE MAN NEW 1:15 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:25 10:55
TRANSPORTER 2 T 1:20 3:20 5:20 7:40 N/A 10:45
TRANSPORTER 2 T 2:00 N/A 4:00 6:00 8:40 10:55
UNDERCLASSMAN T 1:15 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:25 10:50
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THE CAVE T J1:0 3:30. N/A 6.05 8:30 10:55
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40 YEAR OLD VIRGIN C N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:20 10:40
VALIANT A 1:00 2:50 4:50 6:30 N/A N/A
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THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE NEW 1:00 4:00 6:10 8:20 10:30
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UNDERCLASSMAN NEW 1:20 3:45 6:10 8:30 10:35
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FOUR BROTHERS C I


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Tel: 328-1477


35 6:30 8:35 10:40i


I


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE










PAGE 4THURDAY, RSiELPTEMBER 8, 2005ETHEOT IBU


WE WERE horrified to read in The Tri-
bune's Business section on Tuesday that
Prime Minister Perry Christie says his gov-
ernment is prepared to go back into the hotel
business.
According to The Tribune report govern-
ment is "prepared to take an ownership stake
in the still-closed Royal Oasis Resort and
Casino to ensure the property re-opened and
that thousands of Bahamians were re-
employed, in a bid to ease rising discontent on
the island."
If these are to be the terms for the re-
opening of the hotel it would be better for the
Bahamas if it remained closed. There is no
government-neither PLP nor FNM that
can successfully manage a hotel. Of course
government will enter into a management
contract with a.reputable hotel chain, but the
fact that it will be part owner will give Cabi-
net the right of interference. The foreign
management will have to face the reality of
how things are done in the Bahamas an
attitude of mind that commissioners heard
so much about in 1997 during the inquiry
into the operation of the Hotel Corporation
of the Bahamas, and which they found "total-
ly unacceptable".
For example when the hotel corporation
was formed to acquire the government-
owned hotels, "the Bahamian people were
promised an autonomous corporation
accountable to them through normal busi-
ness accountability and through parliament,"
the commissioners reported. However, said
the commissioners, Paul Adderley, who for a
time was chairman of the corporatio.ne,
"exhiorted'the Commission niot to 'concern
itself with the Act as written, but instead to'
come to terms with the way in which, he said,
things were done in the Bahamas. He empha-
sised that we must realise that Bahamians
would know that, in spite of the Act, the
government would retain control over the
corporation."
The commissioners were disgusted. "This
disregard for the enactment," they said in
their report, "is totally unacceptable."
Lehman Brothers, who as creditors are the
virtual owners of the Royal Oasis, has,
according to Mr Christie, agreed that gov-
ernment should partner with it to ensure that
a purchaser is found quickly for the Royal
Oasis. It is important that.a partner should be
found urgently, but under no circumstances
should anyone agree to government becom-
ing an active part owner even for five min-
utes.
Lehman Brothers should get a copy of
the Commission. of Inquiry Report on the
Hotel Corporation of the Bahamas, February
1, 1997, to fully understand what it would be
facing.
The hotel corporation was established in
1974 when foreign investors walked out leav-
ing government with five hotels that were


on the verge of closure. If they had closed
thousands of Bahamians would have been
without work. Government took over the
hotels to save their jobs. This is the same
reason now being given for taking over Roy-
al Oasis.
At that time foreign investors walked out
because the Pindling administration, with its.
attitude of "this is the way we Bahamians do
things", made it impossible for them to oper-
ate.
Hoteliers found themselves confronted by
letters from government MPs instructing
them to employ persons whose only skill was
their ability to mark an X on election day
against the name of the letter-writing MP. If
investors valued the work permits of their
qualified foreign staff it would be more than
they dared do to refuse the request.
Hoteliers also found themselves writing
off more government official entertainment
than their resorts could afford. Eventually
in disgust, they gave notice and left.
And so for the next 18 years the Treasury
haemorrhaged until the Ingraham adminis-
tration came to the rescue and put the now
worthless hotel properties on the market. It
was only after these properties were priva-
tised and hoteliers were free to introduce
proper business controls that the hotel indus-
try made a comeback. It is now in the top spot
in the Caribbean.
In describing the origins of the hotel cor-
poration to the commissioners, Mr Adderley
acknowledged that the "tourism industry is
everything to the Bahamas." He said the cor-
poration came into being when the "Lucaya,
in Freeport was in the doldrums, Cable Beach
as well as Ambassador Beach was for sale,
and the Emerald Beach was hardly worth
the name."
According to Mr Adderley "government
considered that the corporation could be an
innovative income-generating, employment-
enhancing structure, because private enter-
prise wasn't filling that role." ,
Private enterprise wasn't filling the role
because, surrounded by all these Bahamian
attitudes, it could not operate as a business.
And because the Pindling government sub-
scribed to and encouraged "the way Bahami-
ans do things", neither could the corpora-
tion.
In a memorandum to the corporation's
deputy chairman, George Suhr, a recognized
expert in the tourism and hospitality field,
had this to say: "Neither the business acu-
men nor expertise is present in the corpora-
tion to manage hotels or even dispose of
those it owns."
After listening to the evidence, the com-
missioners came to the "inevitable judgment
that those in charge of this overall programme
- whether at the political, civil service or
statutory corporate levels were only pay-
ing lip service to their responsibilities".


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Stay out of the hotel business


EDITOR, The Tribune.
DO you want to know
what the results are from the
inaction of lazy, spineless,
fearful, or absolutely com-
placent politicians? Here in
Abaco we call it "The Mud"
and "Pigeon Peas". It must
be said, so let me be the one
to say it. Thank you.
Illegal immigration, wher-
ever it happens, is a burden
upon the society to which it
occurs.
Not only a burden for the
innumerable socio-econom-
ic reasons that one can think
of, but also the added bur-
den to law enforcement
agencies of the respective
countries suffering the
influx.
In the United States, there
has long been a vexing prob-
lem on the Mexican/US bor-
der/s, and only now does it
seem that the "Feds" are
finally thinking that maybe
they should do something
constructive about it.
At least that is what they
say. Seemingly, for many
politicians in the US, they
have just realised that they
have a serious problem. The
only thing positive I can say
about that is that "it's better
late than never." Lame logic.
The very same situation
exists here in the Bahamas.
For years now, there has
been a very serious problem
with the influx of primarily
illegal Haitian immigrants,
but in recent times we have.,
become more diverse in the
nationalities seeking refuge
here, ie Jamaican, Cuban,
Chinese, and even a few
Europeans.
I had a good laugh from
the recent "sweep" of the
straw market in Nassau the
other day by immigration
and other law enforcement
agencies in an attempt to
catch people working there
illegally. It seems as if our
government has just now
come to the realisation that
these kinds of things --for-
eigners working in the
Bahamas illegally are tak-
ing place! Wow!
Just for the record, illegal
immigration and the result-
ing employment of those
immigrants in the Bahamas
has been going on for longer
than I have been alive.
(That's forty-five years for
those of you who don't
know). Thus, it must be said


that previous governments
also suffered from the same
lack of courage as the pre-
sent one, about this situa-
tion.
I am a compassionate
man, but unfortunately the
Bahamas cannot continue to
accommodate any more ille-
gals coming to our shores.
We simply do not have the
necessary resources to do so.
We are already at critical
mass as far as I am con-
cerned. I believe we have
done more than our fair
share of lending a helping
hand to our less fortunate
brothers. We are slowly
inching towards the point of
becoming the less fortunate
ourselves.
If Amnesty International
is truly concerned about the
welfare of the less fortunate,
may I make a suggestion to
them. Instead of leaning on
the Bahamas so hard in an
attempt to force us to do
that which we cannot afford
to do, why don't they put
some real pressure on the
UN? Perhaps they can per-
suade the UN to stop talking
about what they should do,
and actually do something
about the circumstances con-
tributing to the need for
people to flee their own
country.
Right now in the Sudan,
the United Nations has the
power both economic and
military/political to bring
about change for the better
in that region.
During the tribal feuds in
Rwanda years ago that saw
untold thousands of people
die, the UN had "peace-
keeping" forces on the
ground in that country, who
were not authorised to fire
one shot in the defence of
those being routinely slaugh-
tered there.
(Please note that it was the
film "Hotel Rwanda" that
causedme to research that
very dark spot on the history
of humanity, although I was
aware of it when it was hap-
pening. A very powerful film
it was, and if there is any-
body who can watch such a
true story without shedding
a tear, then there is some-


thing very wrong with your
heart).
In Haiti at this very
moment, there are UN,
forces supposedly keeping,
the peace. Does the UN
understand that sometimes,
in order to bring about anl.
maintain peace, or at least.
some semblance thereof,,
they will have to actually kill
some bad guys? Does the
UN realise that it is not
always possible to solve the
world's problems diplomati-
cally?
Diplomacy is a tool that
only gentlemen will respect
and respond to. In the less
fortunate, embattled coun-
tries of the world today,
there are no gentlemen in
leadership positions. By and
large, most of them are mere:
thugs.
So, what does this all
mean for the Bahamas?
Nothing good I'm afraid. 'I
am told that in Nassau af
this point in time, of all the
children attending public,
school, sixty per cent of
them are of Haitian descent!
Very sobering indeed if it'
is accurate data! Here in
Abaco, it is supposedly right
around fifty per cent.
We have heard Bahamians
warning of the "Haitians
taking over" for years. We_
need no longer fear that, as
they have already taken
over. But the coup was sOi
subtle that we didn't eve#i
no tic,. The result ,of o.u
corniplacency inthese-i
of riatteirs is n6w confiin
back to bite us right in the a-
-, and hard. We have beefl
asleep with our eyes widi
open. Damn spineless politi-
cians that we have the'
new ones as well as the onde
they replaced!
God gotta have mercy on
us. We so stupid, we trowinf
away our tings like nuttin'.
Dis Bahamas is we tings! ,:
Got it, Mr Politician? If ya:
still ain get it, den call me6
The Tribune could hook ya
up. Don't be scared. An if
ya scared, den play ded. Ctiz
das how ya ackin now,
DEAD.

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS
One conchy joe boy
from Abaco
Abaco,
August 25, 2005.


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The problem





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immigration


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


R,0








THE~LCA TRBNETURDYSPTMER8I


Police silence 'makes Bahamas



more dangerous for women'


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE failure of the police to warn
communities about rape incidents in
their areas makes the country more
dangerous for women, a concerned
Eastern Road homeowner said yester-
day.
"You hardly ever hear about rapes or
read about rapes in the papers. But
they are happening all the time the
police simply don't tell the public about
them," the caller claimed.
In a report in yesterday's Tribune, a
caller claimed that a Canadian tourist
was raped in an Eastern Road home
last week.
Responding to the article, "Crime
concerns on Eastern Road," a retiree
living in the area, who wished to remain


anonymous, said that the entire com-
munity is very concerned about the
incident.
"The rape happened. I was out walk-
ing that day it happened at midday
between 1.30pm and 2pm and I came
by the house where it happened. There
were three police cruisers there and
officers told me to return home because
it was not safe," she said.

Fears

She gave The Tribune detailed infor-
mation about the location of the house.
"We are now all very afraid, terri-
fied really. We are scared to get out of
our cars. I don't even go out at nights
anymore. Police won't tell us anything.
It's a pathetic situation," she said.


Police on Tuesday confirmed that
they were aware of allegations of a
rape occurring in the area and that
investigations into the matter were
underway.
"We are doing an investigation at
this time and once that is completed
we will release information on that.
We are always receiving allegations but
we don't report those without evidence
that they have occurred," press liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans said.
However, some feel that the police's
policy to remain silent in such cases
may be a disservice to the communities
where such crimes occur.
The homeowner said that she
would wish to be informed about
rape allegations and other violent
crime investigations in her neigh-
bourhood, so as to better ensure her


own and her family's safety.
"It's not fair to us women. Police
don't give us any information and they
should. We don't know what we're
dealing with," she said.
She added that since last week, she
has felt the need to change her daily
schedule and habits.
"I don't go walking anymore. I have
four dogs and I'm afraid to walk them,"
she said.
The retiree said that she has heard of
many crimes occurring in her neigh-
bourhood which were never made pub-
lic.
"I know there is the fear that if
reports of rape and other crimes get
out, it will scare away the investors,'
but nevertheless people have a right
to know and protect themselves," she
said. t


New bikes to monitor

the behaviour of

public service drivers


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
IN an effort to help road offi-
cials reduce traffic violations,
two new motorcycles were com-
missioned yesterday to help
monitor public service drivers.
The motorcycles signalled the
re-establishment of the mobile
unit of the Department of Road
Traffic and will be used to help
regulate the conduct of vehicles
such jitney buses and taxis.
At an official ceremony on
Wednesday at the Road Traffic
Department, the two XP 900
Yamaha motorcycles were
unveiled.



Pest Control'


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HURSDAY
PTEMBER 8
SCommunity Pg./1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Update
Immediate Response Cont'd
Ethnic Health America
Spiritual Impact
Mr. Ballooney B.
Treasure Attic
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
Gilbert Patterson
Video Gospel
Gospel Grooves
ZNS News Update
Caribbean News Line
Legends Whence We Came:
Anthony Carroll
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Da' Down Home Show
Black College Talent Hour
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Page


E 6OE N-V 3rsre
prog ~. iihramIme changes!-


They will be used by grade-
two supervisors within the Min-
istry of Transportation, who will
ensure that traffic rules and reg-
ulations are being upheld by
public service drivers.
Road Traffic Controller Jack
Thompson said, "I have no
doubt as to the impact of these
motorcycles on our streets and
the difference they are bound
to make."
The supervisors underwent
training in terrain riding for
about a month.
Minister of Transport and
Aviation Glenys Hanna Martin
said the motorcycles will give
the officials the ability to move
throughout the island and to
have a more "comprehensive
oversight of what is happening
on the streets."
The new Road Traffic crest
was also unveiled yesterday.
The crest, created by a high
school graduate Todd Simmons,
includes a pedestrian crossing,,
traffic light, seat belts and tires.

FNM call for

visa answers

THE Free National Move-
ment is calling on the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs to answer
allegations of visa irregularities
that arose earlier this week.
The statement follows a
report in Monday's Tribune in
which the FNM claimed the
irregularities "have created an
alarming upsurge in immigrants
entering the Bahamas over the
last three years".
'Said yesterday's statement
.from the FNM: "The ministry has
entirely failed to confirm or deny
very specific allegations made,
namely: the fact that more than
2,000 visas were issued to Haitian
nationals last year; that nearly
1,000 visas were issued in the' first
four months of 2005 alone; that
visas were being issued in bulk
based upon the sponsorship or
recommendation of certain polit-
ically connected individuals; and
that visas were issued without
proper identification and pho-
tographs; or were signed by appli-
cants only with an 'X'."


The Bahmas Road Traffic brings three motor cycles to the department, from left William
Moroe, Monique Moss, Tony Missick.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Stafj)


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Businesses

'will bring

new life to

Okra Hill'


NEW businesses scheduled to
open in Okra Hill are hoped to
rejuvenate the area, Thomas More
MP Frank Smith told The Tribune
yesterday.
Okra Hill, part of the diverse
Thomas More constituency, is on its
way to being transformed as new
establishments are opened and old
ones return.
Mr Smith said that the Urban
Renewal Project has had a
"tremendous" impact on the com-
munity of Okra Hill.
"The programme in co-operation
with'the Royal Bahamas Police
Force has been responsible for
clearing lots, demolishing derelict
buildings. There has been a mas-
sive clean-up effort," he said.
The MP explained that traffic
through the area has picked up sig-
nificantly in the past few months
due to Atlantis' Phase III develop-
ment.
"Vehicles travel through Okra
Hill on their way to Atlantis," he
explained.
Businesses, such as a new car-
wash which is expected to open
next week, are now hoping to take
advantage of the renewed surge in
traffic.
The revitalisation of Okra Hill,
he said, has also led to a decrease in
crime within the community.
However, a concerned citizen in
a letter to The Tribune claimed that
the area is a still "crime infested"
and appealed to government
address the problem and establish a
police station in Okra Hill.
"Too many people had been in
hurt in the community. We are living
in fear for our lives," the letter read.
Mr Smith said that he was not
aware of a high crime rate in the
community, and added that in his
opinion there are sufficient police
stations nearby.
"The police are doing a very good
job. I think that we have enough
police stations. We could use more
officers, but we have enough sta-
tions. One thing I would like to see
for the future, however, is more
community policing," he said.
Mr 'Smith said he is confident
that the new businesses will serve as
positive elements in the Okra Hill
community.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, -, ,, ,


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


RBC
Royal Bank
R of Canada-


PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.

HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS


(702) Lot #30 Golden Gates
#1, containing a duplex/
apartment residence, with 2
two bed one bath, living,
dining rooms and kitchen
units (lot size 6,000 sq ft.).
Appraised value $177,000.
(433) Lot #165 located
Dorsetteville Subdivision,
Bamboo Town Southern
District containing duplex
apartment building (2,112
sq. ft.). Property 5,000 sq. ft
(50 x 100). Appraised value
$180,000.
(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown
Allotments, Love Hill
Settlement, Andros. Contain-
ing a two-storey residence.
Appraised Value $100,000.
(702) Lot #26 Block #22
Englerston containing a
duplex apartment. Property
size 5,000 sq: ft. Appraised
valued $60,000
(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block
3 with a parcel situated
between Lot #1, Block 3,
containing a 4 bedroom
condominium Sunset View
Villas, West Bay Street.
Appraised Value $750,000.
(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of
Coral Waterways, Section
One, Coral Harbour, N.P.
with two houses and a
swimming pool, #312 N.P.
bounded Northwardly by a
canal or.waterway of the said
Subdivision known as
Flamingo waterway and run-
ning 102.004 ft. Eastwardly
by lot #14 and 146.145ft
Southwardly by a reservation
for a private road. Appraised
Value $530,000
(601) Lot #25, containing
a fourplex (2 bed 1 bath)
George Glinton Subdivision
west of Kennedy Subdivi-
sion, off Soldier Road Lot
approximately 8,967 sq. ft.
Appraised value $172,000.
(433) Lot #27 of Village
Allotment #14 in the Eastern
District, containing residence
situated on Denver Street off
Parkgate Road in the Ann's
Town Constituency, N.P.
Property size 2,500 sq.ft.
Building size 990 sq.ft.
Appraised value $50,000.
(304) Lot #213 containing
residence in Elizabeth Estates
East Subdivision, N.P.
Appraised value: TBO


(70.1) 2 Vacant lots situated
Domingo Heights Subdivi-
sion, east of East St. South
and north of Malcolm Allot-
ment. Appraised value TBO.
(304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox
Hill Road and 659 ft. south
of Joe Farrington Road, N.P.
Appraised value: TBO
(702) Undeveloped Lots #35
& #36 Monastery Park. Val-
ued $80,000.
(565) Vacant lot #5 located
Eleuthera Island Shores, Sea-
side Drive Section B, Block
#15, Eleuthera. 9,691 sq. ft.
Appraised value $21,805.
(902) Vacant Lot situated
South Palmetto Point, Eleu-
thera, North of Public Road
known as "Hog Hole Road".
Dimensions 140 x 135 x 100 x
35. Appraised value $15,000


COMMERCIAL
BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8567
(800) Mrs..Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Marvin Clarke
(803) Mr. Brian Knowles
(806) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(807) Mr. Larry Bowleg
(808) Mrs. Hope Sealey
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH
Tel: 242-302-3800
(201) Mr. David Barr
(202) Mr. Frank Dean
(205) Ms. Thyra Johnson
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8
(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230
(901) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(903) Mrs. Rose Bethel


(102) Condominium Unit
N-310 Silver Sands Lodge,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value: TBO
(304) Lot #2 in block #8,
Steward Road, Coral Heights
East Subdivision situated in
Western District of N.P., .
approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with
a split level containing two
bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and
utility room-approx. size of
building 2,658 sq. ft.
Appraised value: $322,752
(902) Parcel of land located
at the southern end of
Tarpum Bay containing a
single family two-storey
residence 4,888 sq. ft.- 7
bedrooms/2 bathrooms.
Appraised value $77,000.
(902) Lot #4 located in "The
Village" in the settlement of
Rock Sound, Eleuthera with a
11/2 storey building contain-
ing a 3 bed, 2 bath, kitchen,
living room and linen closet.
Appraised value $109,795
(902) Lot #80 (57 ft x 50 ft)
located Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera containing 3
bed, 1 bath house. Appraised
valued $80,000
(902) 0.281 acre lot situated
Governor's Harbour with (1)
2 storey stone commercial
and apartment building con-
taining six apartment units,
one laundry and (2) One sto-
rey building containing two
2 bed/I bath apartments.
Appraised value $387,900.
(902) Lot situated North Pal-
metto Point, 100 x 100 x 100
x 100 containing a one story
house with 3 bed, 2 bath,
living room, kitchen and
linen closet. Appraised value
$123,192.
(902) Lot #14, Block #23
(125 x 80) situated Rainbow
Bay, Eleuthera containing
a one storey house with 2
bed/ .bath, kitchen, living
room and 2 linen closets.
Appraised value $89,998.
(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x
150 x 150 on Queens High-
way just south of Palmetto
Point with a two storey stone
building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3
bed/21/2 bath, kitchen, living
room and 3 linen closets.
Appraised value $287,209.


VACANT PROPERTIES


(902) Lot #46, Block #32,
Bahamia. Section IX Free-
port, Grand Bahama 90 ft
wide along Stratford Way and
150 ft along Stratford Court.
Appraised value $26,000.
(108) Lot #296 Section A
Royal Bahamian Estates,
Grand Bahama, vacant single
family lot .49 acre. Appraised
value $22,000
(902) Lot #5 & 6A, Block #3
Club Estates Subdivision
situated in Rock Sound near
the Rock Sound Club.
Appraised value $25,000.
(902) Lot #5 of Bowles 'Tract,
8.35 acres (2,017.17 ft x 200
ft.) located approximately 2
miles southeast of Governor's
Harbour. Appraised value
$292,000


(902) Lot #50 x 75 x 75 x
51 situated in Tarpum Bay
containing a one storey stone
house with a 3 bed/2 bath,
kitchen, living room and
linen closet. Appraised value
$107,750.
(400) Lot #100 of Bahama
Spring Subdivision, Section 1
of San Andros on the Island
of Andros. 150' x 125', total
approx. $18,750 sq.ft. with
duplex 2 bed, 1 bath each.
Appraised value $62,000.
(105) Lot with three bed, two
and a half bath residence,
situated Bailey Town, North
Bimini. Appraised value TBO

(903) Lot #15 located
Johnson Harbour View
Estate, Harbour Island, size
6,750 sq. ft. with a 3 bed,
2 bath residence. Estimated
value $95,000.
(901) Lot #7 Johnson's
Harbour View Estates,
Harbour Island. 9,063 sq. ft.
containing 4 bed/3 bath CBS
residence. Appraised value
$421,000.
(601) Property located
Monestary Park on Lot #105
(7,138 sq. ft.). Appraised
Value $136,000.
(902) Lot of land 175 x 184 x
175 x 200 situated one mile
south of the Palmetto Point
intersection, containing a
partially completed two
storey structure. Appraised
value $107,222.

(903) Southern portion of Lot
#27, located Johnson's Har-
bour View Estates, Harbour
Island. Lot size 72 x 48, con-
taining a 2 storey building.
Appraised value $110,000.
(701) Single storey commer-
cial building situated on the
south side of Harold Road
containing two offices.
(601) Property located
Mason's Addition with partly
completed restaurant. Value
$40,000
(902) Lot (8,000 sq. ft.) situ-
ated Sand's Alley, North Pal-
metto Point with incomplete
triplex (concrete structure
- belt course 2,529.6 sq. ft).
Appraised value $49,414.
(601) Lot (3,150 sq. Ft.) lo-
cated Mason's Addition with
partly completed restaurant.
Appraised value $35,000.


(401) Lot #38 located Love
Estates Subdivision western
district of N.P. Approximate
size 1.39 acre Appraised
value $300,000.
(400) 1 acre parcel of land
situated Conch Sound,
Andros. Appraised value
$18,000.
(565) Vacant Lot #9
(11,406.65 sq. ft.) situated
in Mango Lane Section "B"
Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores on the island of
Eleuthera. Appraised value
$25,665.
(717) Vacant Lot #16 (4,920
sq. ft.) in Caroline Estates
Subdivision, in the southern
side of Cowpen Road west
of Faith Avenue. Appraised
value $42,000.


ANDROS TOWN
Tel:242-368-2071
(400) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
(702) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles
(703) Mrs. Venus Bonimy
JFK DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. James Strachan
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd
CABLE BEACH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mrs. Joyce Coleby-Riviere
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mr. Travis Spicer
BIMINI BRANCH
Telephone:242-347-3031
(105) Ms Velderine Laroda


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Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
' The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-394-3560
(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon
(717) Mrs. Kaye Forsythe
(723) Ms. Alistair Curry
(724) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
MACKEY STREET
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Ms. Nicola Walker
BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-2451/3
(303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2
(101) Mr. Toure Holder
(102) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright
(103) Ms. Garnell Frith
(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles
(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey


RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada-


-Residents concern at

mosquito exposion


* STAGNANT water is a favoured breed-
ing ground as these tadpoles prove
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


CABLE beach resi-
dents are calling on the
givernment to do more
to tackle mosquitos in
the area,
"Since Tropical
Storm Katrina passed
through the Bahamas
they (the mosquitoes)
seem to have gone
mad. I don't know if
Environmental Health
still sprays for them, but
they need to do so
now," said one resident.
The caller was not
alone in his beliefs.
Kareem Hanna who
lives in Coral Harbour
said he would like to
see Environmental
Health officials work-
ing harder to tackle the


mosquito problem.
"I would like to see
Environmental Health
doing more, spraying in
outskirts areas," he said.
"There's a park around
here that we play bas-
ketball on and persons
used to walk around,
but now the mosquitoes
have made that impos-
sible. I barely even want
to go outside."
Parliamentary Sec-
retary Ron Pinder said:
"We're currently in,
communications with
the Met office to deter-
. mine when there will
be a subsiding of rains
in order for the com-
mencing of the fog-
ging,"


Cancer society moves



into its new building


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Cancer Society of the
Bahamas has reached a mile-
stone in its drive to provide a
peaceful retreat for persons
travelling to the Bahamas for
treatment.
Yesterday an elated president
Judy Ward-Carter proudly dis-
played the society's newly com-
pleted kitchen and administra-
tion building to a group of spon-
sors and patrons.
Only a few bolts and nuts and
finishing touches are still to be
done before the complex has its


grand opening at the end of the
month.
Now that the long anticipated
moment is almost here, Mrs
Ward-Carter says she' is so
thrilled, she feels like "turning
somersaults".
The project could not have
been completed without the
generosity of corporate
Bahamas and private citizens,
she added.
In addition to a main wing,
the facility has ten rooms for
persons to utilise when they
come into Nassau for treatment.
Mrs Ward-Carter explained that
the standard fee is $50 although


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they encourage patients td
donate whatever they can.
Already, it has been used'
quite a bit, with one patient say-'
ing that the facility is like stay-
ing at a first-class hotel.
Mrs Ward-Carter explained,
that the general rule is that a
patient may stay at the facility,
while they are having their,,
blood work and treatments
done, but that the day following
their treatment they will check,
out.
"This is so we can have the.
room for a new patient, but of..
course if someone is not well,
enough to travel, we won't put:
them on the doorstep," she said.:
If an emergency occurs, Mrs,
Ward-Carter said the society;
has an excellent relationships
with both Princess Margarete
Hospital and Doctor's Hospi-J
tal and the new building is con-
veniently located near bothes
facilities. 'I
The work to secure funding is
far from over, she added, saying'
that in addition to paying the
ibfiigP-0, f-'ndinig'fbristaff)
salaries and -bopetatirimal:cost
must be found.'


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Iron Lady of Caribbean



passes away at 86


'Dame Eugenia Charles, the
former Dominica prime minis-
ter known as The Iron Lady of
the Caribbean, has died at the
age of 86.
,Well-known to Bahamas
politicians over many years,
Dame Eugenia became a politi-
cal celebrity for standing shoul-
der-to-shoulder with US Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan when
American marines invaded
neighbouring Grenada in 1983.
"I'm recognised a lot more,"
she said at the time, "You go
into a restaurant and people all
know you." However, with typi-
cal modesty she added: "I don't
think it will last. Soon enough,
people will have forgotten me."
Although the US mission to
clear Grenada of communist
influence was the high point of
her career in international terms,
she was revered in her home-
land for more basic qualities.
One of her most famous
quotes was: "I never thought the
position of prime minister was a
ppsition of power. And so I did-
n't feel I had to hang on to pow-
er."
When she retired from her
post in the mid-1990s, she was
76. She immediately went off on
a'prolonged cruise to Alaska so
that her younger successors
could get on with their jobs with-
out her influence.
During her many visits to the
Bahamas, Dame Eugenia got to
know prominent Bahamians
well, and was a close friend of
the late Tribune publisher Sir
Etienne Dupuch. She and Sir
Etienne's brother, the late
Eugene Dupuch, QC, were law
students together at the Univer-
sity of Toronto and were called
to the Bar in London in 1949,
she at Inner Temple, and he at
Lincoln's Inn.
- The late Sir Lynden Pindling
also hosted her in Nassau when
he was still in power and she was
friends with former Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham.
At the height of the Grenada
crisis in 1983, Dame Eugenia was
besieged by the press. One of
her proud boasts was that she
had never said "no comment"


* DAME Eugenia Charles pictured with her friend, former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham


to a journalist in her life.
When Grenada was taken
over by an army junta after
prime minister Maurice Bishop
was executed, Dame Eugenia
flew to Washington to argue the
case for US intervention.
At the White House, she
agreed to appear with Mr Rea-
gan on television when the
announcement was made that
marines were landing on the
remote Caribbean isle.
After spending two "very busy
days" facing the media and
speaking to the Organisation of
American States and the United
Nations, Dame Eugenia's fame
soared even though she led
a miniscule nation of only 80,000.
As chairwoman of the Organ-
isation of Eastern Caribbean
States, she had joined her col-
leagues in identifying Grenada
as a communist staging point.
"We've seen the arsenal
there," she said at the time, "It
wouldn't have taken five men to
come in and take over Dominica
with that kind of equipment."
It was not surprising Dame
Eugenia reacted the way she did
to the Grenada threat. In the
first two years after her election
in 1980, there were two attempt-
ed coups the first by white
mercenaries out of New grleans
whose plot was scuppered by the


FBI, the second by eight
Dominican soldiers.
She admitted a lot of her top
soldiers were communist-
inclined. "I knew it was touch-
and-go, and with, the existence
of what was there in Grenada, I
knew there was no problem in
having us all killed to take over
the island."

Reaction

She told Associated Press at
the time that Caribbean leaders
called for action after Bishop's
death because it was obvious
Grenadians and the region -
faced a reign of terror.
She had little sympathy for
Bishop, but was alarmed by what
his death meant to the region.
"I was upset, not that Bishop
was dead, but that the men who
did it had worshipped him for
four-and-a-half years, then killed
him in such a brutal manner. It
showed there was a complete
breakdown."
Dame Eugenia, a graduate of
Toronto University, the London
School of Economics and Inner
Temple, scoffed at suggestions
that the US rewarded her fot
support of the invasion.
But she felt her stand was


appreciated by the Dominican
people. Refusing to capitalise on
her post-invasion popularity by
calling an election in 1985, she
said: "I think people like deci-
sion. They like to know where
you're going, not wavering. They
appreciate that sort of thing."
Dame Eugenia continued to
live at her family home in
Dominica after the death of her
father in 1983.
As prime minister, she was
noted for toughness and financial
restraint. She scrapped the army,
which she said was full of trou-
blemakers, and kept a tight hold
on Dominica's purse-strings.
A gravel-voiced conservative
with strong anti-communist feel-
ings, she described her foreign
policy as non-aligned, even
though she had close ties with
the US.
Although she warned against
the communist leanings of the
Dominica Labour Party, her
main headache was propping
up her island's battered econo-
my.
By relentlessly chasing foreign
aid, she reduced Dominica's
unemployment rate and upgrad-
ed the island's utilities.
"People criticise me for trav-
elling a lot, but I tell people you
can't get $95 million worth of
roads by sitting here. You have
to go out and look for it. You
don't get schools and electricity.
just by writing letters," she said.
Dame Eugenia, who never
married, was born in Dominica
in 1919 and received her early.
education there and in Grena-
da.
She became leader of Domini-
ca's Freedom Party in 1975, hav-
ing entered the House of Assem-'
bly five years before, taking it
to a landslide victory in the 1980
general election.
A Roman Catholic, Dame
Eugenia was a dedicated reader.
Asked once what she would like
to be remembered for, she said:
"For the fact that I have brought
to the people of Dominica a
pride, in themselves, a pride in
their achievenients, a pride in
the fact that they are Domini-
cans and as Dominicans they can


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 9


LOANW


Copyrighted Material

Pik Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-nw 4
.N mm


Extras needed for


Pirates se


* BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Aboi:' 200
persons are expected to h- cait
as extras in Disney's Pirates of
the Caribbean 11 and II1 movies;
which are set to begin filming in
Grand Bahama by the end of
this month.
Casting director Thomas
Gustafson revealed that the
producers are widening their
search for men of all types and
ages, not only to portray pirates.
sailors and seamen, but also
"clean cut" military type char-
acters in the movie.
During an initial casting call
in May. he noted that some i100
persons on Grand Bahama
were cast for roles and fitted
for costumes.
Pirates of the Caribbean star-i
ring famed actor Johnny Depp,
is expected to pump hundreds


of millions into the Grand
Bahama economy, which has
suffered tremendously due to
last year's hurricanes.
In addition to being a tourist
destination, Grand Bahama is
also becoming known as a des-
tinatliin for movie fishing. Dis-
ney is expected to put the island
on the map in this respect.

Tank

The Bahamas Film Studio's
state-of-the-art water tank at
Gold Rock Creek the only
one of its kind in the world, will
he used in the filming of spec-
tacular water scenes.
Mr Gustafson said filming is
scheduled start the last week in
September and will run through
December.
"We are trying to fill 100 or
so positions and we are going


to need over the coming months
a couple hundred people for the
movie," he said.
He said extras with non-
speaking parts earn $75 per day.
He noted that they would be
required to work anywhere for
five to 15 days over a period of
a month and a half.
Mr Gustafson said this is the
final casting for persons wish-
ing to be extras.
Hopefuls are asked to submit
an application and a recent pho-
tograph by September 16. It
must be addressed to: Mr
Thomas Gustafson,
Pirates of the Caribbean II
and III,
Background Casting Depart-
ment,
C/o Westin at Our Lucaya,
P 0 Box F-42500,
Royal Palm Way,
Lucaya,
Grand Bahama Island.


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THE TRIBUNE


tA loJ c:hallu(!














Are politicians and preachers to




blame for crimes in society?


I suppose that whoever
posed the question that I
am to address knows its answer,
but seeks to provoke thought
on the part of all of us who must
ourselves hear it.
Certainly, in posing the ques-
tion, you demonstrate that your
fingers are on the pulse of this
society, in that we all know that
crime is on the minds of most
Bahamians, that we are fre-
quently discussing who is to
blame for it and just as fre-
quently saying that politicians
and preachers have responsi-
bility for it.
To be clear, the question is
either asking: "Are politicians
and preachers the reason we
have crime?" Or: "Are politi-
cians and preachers the means
by which we must solve the
crime problem?"
It is even possible that the
question is asking both. Before


attempting to address either one
of these points of view, I believe
that it is necessary for us to
establish some definitions that
will ensure that you know what
I mean when I use certain
words relevant to our topic.
Crime, as I define it, is the
breaking or violation of the laws


of the state or of the land. It is
important to point out here
then that any law of this country
that is violated is a crime. Thus,
running a red light, shoplifting,
murder and keeping children
from school are all crimes.
We know that there is in law
and in society an understand-


Normally when people speak of
a crime problem, they are not
referring to the 5,000 traffic.
violations or the millions of
dollars in lost property through
pilfering by employees; rather,
they speak of the 40-plus
murders
.


STRAIGHT UP TALK


Z H I VA R G

ing that not all crimes are equal.
Treason, murder and rape are
considered more severe crimes
than theft or fraud. Neverthe-
less, all are considered crime.
Normally when people speak
of a crime problem, they are
not referring to the 5,000 traffic
violations or the millions of dol-
lars in lost property through pil-
fering by employees; rather,
they speak of the 40-plus mur-
ders. This is understandable but
not necessarily reflective of the
standard of public order sensi-
tivity that we ought to have.

t is often thought that if a
person is properly repri-


LAIN


manded for a white lie, he or
she will be less likely to gradu-
ate to heavy-duty lies. Similarly,
if citizens are appropriately rep-
rimanded for traffic violations,
they may be less likely to con-
sider more severe violations of
the law. So crime is violating
the laws of the land.
It is interesting to note that
there is a difference between
sin and crime. Sin is the viola-
tion of God's law while crime is
the violation of man's law. Now,
there are crimes that are not sin
and sins that are not crimes.
For example, adultery is a sin
but not a crime. No-one is pros-
ecuted in The Bahamas for a
'crime, if found committing adul-
tery. A spouse might use the
same as grounds for divorce but
there is no criminal prosecution
that can flow therefrom.
However, Christians know
that the Bible ascribes to adul-
terers a place in the Lake of
Fire among the murderers and
thieves. A crime that is not a
sin might be the breaking of
unjust laws in civil protest.
When Martin Luther King Jr
and others were arrested for
refusing to obey segregated laws
in Alabama and Mississippi,
while they did commit a crime; I
hardly believe that there was
anyone who thought that they
were committing a sin. Any law
that flies in the face of God's law
is unjust and its disobedience
may be a crime but not a sin. I
will return to this subject later.

Responsible is, on the
one hand, the cause of
something but on the other
hand, the means by which it
should be corrected. A good
definition for responsible in this
respect is, being able to respond,
that is, "response able".
"Politician", on the one hand,,
refers to the person who par-
ticipates in the process of gov-
ernance of a society. On the
other hand, it can refer to some-
one seen as participating in a
process of deception for power
and personal gain.
"Preacher" can refer to the
anointed proclaimer of God's
word or persons who says many
words that have nothing to do
with God even though he or she
purports to be doing so on
behalf of God.
The question is: who is
responsible for the violations of
the law that we are concerned
about, the preacher or the
politician?
Let me say that neither is alone
the cause of crime or the remedy
for it. Both politicians and
preachers being people can com-
mit crimes, perhaps some do and
in this way contribute to crime.


However, it cannot be fair t6
blame either for the myriad
crimes that exist in this nation or
any other. If we look to politi-'
cians singularly or together to
solve the nation's crime prob-
lems, we will be looking for a
long time. They simply cannot!

C-rime is both environ-'
mental and personal; it
is both corporeal and spiritual.
In a perfect environment, indi-
viduals can still make choices'
to disobey laws, principles and'
values that stabilise societies..
Adam and Eve are an example.
All we do in our external
environment can influence the
hearts/wills of individuals but
cannot determine their state.'
Jesus said: "Do not ye yet
understand, that whatsoever
entereth in at the mouth goeth
into the belly, and is cast out
into the draught? But those
things which proceed out of the;
mouth come forth from the
heart; and they defile the man.
For out of the heart proceed
evil thoughts, murders, adulter-
ies, fornications, thefts, false wit2
ness, blasphemies: these are the
things which defile a man...".
Individuals must choose right.
All the following can influ-
ence choice but not determine it':
Family
Community
Employment
Social Status
Education
My solution to crime is the
conversion of every Bahamian
to an active devotion to the
Christian God of the Bible.
Until the church is totally in
pursuit of this mission its mes,
sage to secular institutions oin
eradicating crime will smell o|
hypocrisy.
As for the government, its
best efforts at crime reduction
consist in educating its children,
training its youth, providing
maximum opportunity for
employing its people, providing
a safety net for its marginalised,
policing its society and secur-
ing justice and equity in the
state. Only when it is fully in
pursuit of this mission will it not
be criticised by the society.
However, it still remains a
matter of individual choice that
will make the real difference in
the crime issue. I have stated
before and will state again that
I believe that choice is made
easier and more certain for per-
sons of faith.
(This is an excerpt of a speech
to a youth seminar addressing the
topic "Are Politicians or Preach-
ers responsible for crime?")
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

T he question may n6ot
be: What are they,
doing about crime but, rather,
what am I doing about it? 4.


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A;'


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE;








TH TRBUETHRSALEPEBEN82W5SPG 11


Businessman

found guilty

of drugs

charges in US

FROM page one
year and his trial ended last
month with a conviction.
He will be sentenced after
the ,completion of a pre-sen-
tence investigation report.
According to court records,
the drugs were seized at the
Signature Air Facility in
Savannah International Air-
port after they were flown
into the state aboard a
private jet from the
Bahamas.
The court alleged that dur-
ing a six-day period, between
December 1 and 6, Bowe and
Coverley conspired to import
eight kilogrammes of cocaine
into the US.
The indictment read: "The
defendants Damian Tiant
Coverley and Charles Bowe,
aided and abetted by each
other and by others known
and unknown, did knowingly
and intentionally combine,
conspire, confederate and
agree together with others
known and unknown, to
import into the customs ter-
ritory of the United States
from a place outside thereof,
to wit, the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas, five kilo-
grammes or more, that is
approximately eight kilo-
grams, of a mixture or sub-
stance containing a detectable
amount of cocaine, a sched-
uled controlled substance."
US District Judge B Avant
Edenfield presided over the
case.
The matter was investigat-
ed by the Drug Enforcement
Administration (DEA) and
the United States Immigra-
tion and Customs Enforce-
ment Service.


Miss Teen Bahamas




has new titleholder


FROM page one
opportunity to inform the pub-
lic that Kandra Knowles is the
titleholder of the Miss Teen
Bahamas programme thus mak-
ing her Miss Teen Bahamas
2004/2005."
At a press conference last
week, 18-year-old Gari
accused the committee of dis-
criminating against her
because of her sexual orien-
tation.
Ms McDonald, who admit-
ted being a lesbian, claimed
she had been asked to relin-
quish her crown because of
this.
In response to Ms Mcdon-
ald's press conference, the
pageant committee held its
own press conference the fol-
lowing, day to deny the
claims.
Pageant director Chakita
Bonimy told the press that
the pageant is based on the
principle of moulding young
Bahamian females aged 13-
19 in the areas of spirituality,
social behaviour, academics
and personal development.
She said that after certain
allegations regarding Ms
McDonald were brought to
the committee's attention,
members met with her in pri-
vate. However, her sexual
orientation was not the spe-
cific focus of the meeting.
The committee said Ms
McDonald was not being
stripped of her crown because
she was a lesbian, but
because of her failure to


KANDRA KNOWLES

attend planned functions and
because she broke pageant
rules by holding her own
press conference without the
committee's knowledge or
consent and without a com-
mittee member being present.
After being asked repeat-
edly by reporters if the com-
mittee would allow a lesbian
to compete or be crowned,
assistant treasurer Marsha
Lambert said Miss Teen
Bahamas cannot condone
homosexuality.
The Tribune spoke with
committee representative
Richa Sands about the deci-
sion yesterday.
She said Ms McDonald was
replaced for no reason
beyond those outlined at the
committee's press conference.
Speaking about Ms
McDonald's sexual identity,
Ms Sands said: "This is not
something we condone; we
don't condone this lifestyle."


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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Doctor:

hospital

births are

the 'tip

of the

iceberg'

FROM page one
Tribune last week that it hap-
pened to their niece.
Said one woman: "One
Haitian woman had been
asked to move because
she had already been dis-
charged. But she took
her own slow time while
my niece had to wait in
the wheelchair. The hos-
pital will have to do
more to make sure
Bahamians are not being
disadvantaged in their
own country."
The doctor said: "This
often frustrates Bahami-
an women to the point
that they either come
late or not at all. While
treatment must be
offered equally to every
human being in need of
medical care, it is not
understood why the situ-
ation would be down-
played."
If the government, said
the doctor, were to come
to grips with the "reality
of the situation", it could
be better prepared to
deal with the future
implications of the grow-
ing trend.


6M VM f
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CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Invites applications from qualified Christian Teachers for
the following positions for the 2005 2006 school year.

Chemistry (Gr. 10-12)
Biology (Gr. 10-12))

Applicants must:

Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing
to subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School.
Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher form
of recognition College or University in the area of
specialization.
Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
Applicant must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
Be willing to participate in the high schooh's extra
curricular programmes.

An application can be obtained from the High School office
on Shirley Street and be returned by the 19th September,
2005, with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph, and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is September 19th, 2005


Jewelry Sales


Associate

We are looking for a strong
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motivated, a team player with
experience in Jewelry sales!
Must be well groomed and mature!


Please send resume to

info@coachtothetop.com

or fax resume to 325-7105


----


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005 THE TRIBUNE,


I LOCANEWS


BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland,
is presently seeking a Bahamian national for the position of

COMPLIANCE OFFICER

Applicants for the post of Compliance Officer and MLRO must have
at least five-years' experience at an international bank, law firm, trust
company and/or international diploma in AML & compliance. The
successful candidate should have an in-depth understanding of the
regulatory/supervisory structure of the local financial markets, current
banking regulations in relation to internal controls and "know your
customer" policies and procedures.

The job requires the individual to

review and monitor account openings and the due diligence
process for all accounts as part of the account opening committee;
ensure adherence to AML legislation and provide a current and
relevant AML training program for staff;
demonstrate strong organizational, communication and
interpersonal skills and be proficient at writing reports and making
presentations to staff, management and outside agencies using
Word, Excel and PowerPoint;
meet deadlines with minimum supervision and to be willing to
meet new business challenges by advising on and formulating
policy in cooperation with private banking and trust officers, local
management and BSI Group;
ensure current policies and procedures are maintained and kept
up to date so that, at all times, the bank meets its legal, regulatory
and BSI Group policy requirements.

The individual will report to the Head of Risk Management as part of
a small team dedicated to performing and monitoring the scope and
effectiveness of the bank's overall risk controls in relation to its business
and regulatory risks.


Resumes should be faxed to #702-1250 or mailed or delivered to the
offices of BSI, addressed to "-

Personnel Officer
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P. 0. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.
-* '* ' '' '' ** *' '.-.i ....rl n K ia . '


* By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Service
MINISTER of Education.
Alfred Sears apologised to par-
ents and teachers at CC Sweet-
ing junior high school on Mon-
day for the late start in classes
at the Oakes Field campus,
where contractors were work-
ing feverishly to complete
repairs.
"We're sorry and we thank
them for their co-operation.
We ask for their continued sup-
port," Mr Sears said. "We also
pledge that we will build with-
in the Ministry of Education,
the capacity to complement the
Ministry of Works so that we
have more control over our
destiny in education."
He told concerned parents
and teachers assembled in the
auditorium of the Oakes Field
campus that the Ministry of
Education is devising a pre-
ventative maintenance pro-
gramme for the continued
upkeep of its schools through-


out the country. He said a Cab-
inet paper on this proposal is
expected to be completed this
week.
The other schools which did
not open as expected due to
ongoing renovations were AF
Adderley junior high school
and Carlton E Francis primary
school.

Education
"The current system is not
serving education well," Mr
Sears said during a press brief-
ing at the Oakes Field campus.
"I've had experience now three
. years working with this system
and it is clear that the Ministry
of Works lacks the capacity to
address the needs of education
on a timely basis."
He commended the Ministry
of Works for the "extraordi-
nary effort" it made on behalf
of the Ministry of Education, in
spite of its limited resources.
Stressing the need for a sep-
arate maintenance crew for
education, Mr Sears noted that


following the two destructive
hurricanes last year, he
appointed Joshua Smith as
national co-ordinator and a'
technical team to deal with the
rehabilitative efforts of schools.
"I will be taking to Cabinet a
proposal to establish a nation-
al preventative programme
which will enable us to engage,
masons, carpenters, electricians
and other skilled workers to be
deployed permanently in our
schools, along with contractors
to service districts," Mr Sears
said. "It is my belief, based on
the advice I received, that if
we put more resources into the
maintenance of the schools, we'
will have less of a bill in terms-
of structural repairs."
Mr Sears said he has also
consulted with the Deputy
Prime Minister for the use of
prisoners from Her Majesty's,
Prisons in the maintenance and.
landscaping of schools. This,,
he added, would create a team
of technical officers from both
ministries to ensure the upkeep
of schools.


MINISTER of Education Alfred Sears addresses concerned parents and teachers assembled in'
the auditorium of CC Sweeting junior high school on Monday. The school is being repaired for
classes.
(BIS Photo: Raymond Bethel)



Sears apologies



to CC Sweeting


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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 13


Courtesy call at speaker's office
SPEAKER of the House of Assembly and South Eleuthera MP Oswald Ingraham greeting
Kailash Lal Agrawal, the High Commissioner of India to the Bahamas, during a courtesy call at
the speaker's office on Monday, September 5.
(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)



I iinKain RetpuN.K g Xrrr-


fo frr --rlk agrr mInk


e- "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


p 5


Over the last 27lyea
the premier customie
celebrate this momei
11 17, 2005 will be


September 11, 2005
Church Service ti Cf

September 12, 2G05
Founder of Baharoa
to appear on Baha

September 12~ 2005
Formal reading of pr

September 12, 2
Launching of mo
East Hill Street


Bahamahost has distinguihed itself as one of
ehvice training programmers in The B hamas. To
ous achievement the week, ofSpte'ber


September 15, 2005 9:30 a.m.
Clean up campaign, area TBA


September 16, 2005 10:00 a.m.
Food distribution to All Saints Camp, Children's Emergency Hostel
and the Persis Rodgers Home for the aged. (Drop off donations at
Ministry of Tourism, Norfolk House, Fredrick Street)

September 16, 2005 6:00 p.m.
Awards Ceremony and reception at Government House

September 17, 2005 7:00 a.m.
Bahamahost Fun Run/Walk, Eastern Parade to Goodman's Bay, regis-
tration fee: $5:00

Please join us in celebrating 27 years of quality customer service training.
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LOCALNEWS I^


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


I I; L14'IS














Kerzner raises over $325,000 for




development of nation's youth


QUALIFICATIONS
* Associate/Bachelors degree in related area
(Certification a Plus)
* 2 or more years related work experience
* Knowledge of networking(TCP/IP) and operating
systems, hardware and Microsoft Office Suite
* Knowledge of Cisco networking equipment (routers,
switches and firewall)
* Knowledge of Windows 2003 Server
* Knowledge of Lotus Domino
* Exposure to Healthcare Information Systems (HCIS)
a plus but not essential
* Excellent communication and troubleshooting skills
POSITION SUMMARY
The successful candidate will be responsible for:
* Supporting a Windows 2003 Server (Active Directory)
Environment
* Supporting Microsoft ISA Server
" Providing Network support
* Providing technical support and problem resolution
via the Helpdesk for users
* Testing, repairing and maintaining equipment
* Researching, implementing new technologies
Position is subject to weekend "on call" and shift rotation
Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits


SINCE the inception of
the Duke of Edinburgh
Cup Semi Finals golf tour-
nament in 2001, Kerzner
International and corpo-
rate sponsors have raised
over $325,000 to assist in
the development of the
nation's youth.
The funds have benefit-
ed the youth through the
Governor General Youth
Awards and the
Duke of Edinburgh Chari-
ties.
This year, Kerzner Inter-
national and local organi-
sations say they are redou-
bling their efforts for the
5th Annual Duke of Edin-
burgh Cup Semi Finals
scheduled for Sunday, Sep-
tember 11 at the Ocean
Club golf course on Par-
adise Island.
This year's semi finals
competition will feature
teams made up of two per-
sons.

Winners
Prizes will be awarded to
the three best twosomes,
with the first place winners
being awarded an all
expense paid, round trip
business class fare to Lon-
don to participate in the
Duke of Edinburgh Cup
Finals at Wentworth; Sun-
ningdale Golf Club, Ascot;
and Windsor Castle from
October 2 to October 8,
2005.
Patrick Anthony
Knowles, managing direc-
tor of Tyreflex Star Motors.
on Wulff Road, donated a
2006 Mercedes Benz to
Kerzner International
to assist with the tourna-
ment..
i The Mercedes Benz will
be awarded to the winner


KERZNER International's Vice President of Retail Services and Public Affairs, Ed Fields
is presented with a 2006 Mercedes Benz by the owners of Tyreflex Star Motors on Wulff Road
to aid the 5th Annual Duke of Edinburgh Cup Semi Finals. The automobile will be presented to
the hole in one winner. Pictured from left to right is Patrick Anthony Knowles, managing direc-
tor of Tyreflex; Alan Wilson, General Manager, Tyreflex; Dellareese Edgecombe, service man,
ager at Tyreflex and Ed Fields of Kerzner International.


of the Hole In One compe-
tition.
While making the pre-
sentation to Ed Fields,
Kerzner International's
vice president of retail ser-
vices and public affairs,
Knowles said, "It is defi-
nitely an honour to present
this Mercedes to the Duke


of Edinburgh awards pro-
gramme . This is our
fifth year of being a spon-
sor and its is definitely a
pleasure to help the young
people of this country."
The tournament is
expected to attract scores
of local players. The event
is one of the country's


(Photo: Bluewave Imaging).

biggest fund raisers
designed to assist with the
development of the.
nation's youth .
Part of the proceeds from,
the tournament will be
donated to the Governor
General Youth Awards
and the Duke of Edinburgh
charities.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005












Classes postponed .


FROM page one

We need to stand behind our
people and make the govern-
ment accountable for what
they are doing."
Yesterday in the grounds
of Carlton Francis Primary
School frustrated parents
were seen shouting: "This is a
bunch of crap. They knew
that the school wouldn't have
Been ready from July and yet
they failed to tell us."
Officially speaking on
behalf of the parents, Mr Hig-
gs said that his party is "great-
ly upset" about this situation.
"The parents and students
of the Carlton Francis school
would like to say to the gov-
ernment, shame on the gov-
ernment because they had
ample time to get the school
prepared," he said.

Students
"Two hundred million dol-
lars were allocated to the
Ministry of Education yet still
they want to treat the students
and the parents of this school
like second-class citizens."
In reference to the pro-
posed plan to relocate stu-
dents until the campus is pre-
pared, Mr Higgs said that the
plan was not sufficient.
"Why is it that the minister
sees fit to send children here,
there and everywhere?
There's a psychological effect.
It has been done before and it
has been proven that it has a
psychological affect on our
children. Our children deserve
better," he said.
"Our children deserve more
attention,. Our children
deserve love. Today it's these
children and, parents, tomor-
row it could be you."
According to Mr Higgs, the
BDM along with parents and
teachers will hold a press con-
ference today and on Friday
there will be a meeting of par-
ents and all interested persons
at seven o'clock at the school.
Mr Higgs pointed out that
none of the various locations
allocated for the children has
"adequate furniture, supply
or room for all of the chil-
dren".
"One of the places in par-


ticular is said to be dirty and
unsanitary. The teachers have
said that the yard is filled with
boards containing nails," he
said.
"None of these places has
adequate furniture, adequate
space, and this school itself,
the minister said they are just
ordering furniture for. They
had from July until now to do
all of this. This is poor, you
have hundreds of contractors
at Atlantis and at different
sites in this country. This work
could have been done," he
said.
Also present at the school
yesterday, Ida Poitier, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Union
of Teachers (BUT), explained
that there are still a number of
schools around the Bahamas
in disrepair.
"There are a number of
schools that are out. Starting
from the south, there's
Crooked Island High School.
The ceiling has not been
repaired, they're still paint-
ing, the windows are not fin-
ished, and workmen are still
on the site. We move to Exu-
ma, and in Exuma, George
Town Primary and Mount
Thompson Primary are out,"
she said.

Trailers
"At George Town primary
in particular the students and
teachers have been there for
six years in trailers. The trail-
ers are leaky, rat-infested, and
there was a stench when they
got there, this morning
because there were dead rats
in the ceiling of the trailer.
When they were asked to go
into that, the teachers
absolutely refused," she said.
Some of the other islands
still experiencing problems
were Ragged Island, which
Mrs Poitier said "is in a
mess", Rum Cay and Central
Andros High, which has no
bathroom facilities.
Mrs Poitier said that even
though the classrooms are not
ready, teachers at Carlton Pri-
mary will continue to report
to the campus, and if the
alternative locations are still
not ready on Monday they
will continue to report to the
school's campus.


* CARLTON FRANCIS remained close yesterday after teachers 'were unsatisfied' with conditions.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


BUT


president


hits out over


Sears' 'industrial


action'


* By KARAN MINNIS

MINISTER OF EDUCA-
TION Alfred Sears accused
the teachers of Carlton E


ga ga i i g '




Cheria Archer: English Language-C; Religious Knowledge-C.
Tanisha Bethel: English Language-B; Mathematics-C; Religious Studies-B; Social Studies-A.
Kristen Burrows: English Language-C.
Ryan Collie: English Language-B; Mathematics-B; General Science-A; Health Science-B;
Religious Knowledge-A; Social Studies-A.
Cleovandra Cooper: English Language-B; Mathematics-C; General Science-C; Religious
Knowledge-A; Social Studies-B.
Brittany Curry: English Language-B; General Science-C; Religious Knowledge-B; Social
Studies-C.
Sasha d'Arville: English Language-B; Mathematics-B; Health Science-C; Religious Knowledge-
C; Social Studies-B.
Daniella Darville: English Language-C; Social Studies-B; Religious Knowledge-B.
Shenique Davis: English Language-B; Mathematics-C.
Deangelo Dean: English Language-C; Social Studies-C.
Tory Ferguson: English Language-B; Religious Knowledge-B.
Jarrett Flowers: English Language-B; Mathematics-C.
Latia Forbes: English Language-C; Mathematics-C; Health Science-C; Religious Knowledge-
C; Social Studies-B.
Kenneth Gibson: English Language-C; Mathematics-B; General Science-C; Health Science-C;
Religious Knowledge-C; Social Studies-B.
Ariel Hall: English Language-C; Mathematics-C; General Science-C; Health Science-C; Religious
Knowledge-C; Social Studies-B.
Raynaldo King: Mathematics-B; Religious Knowledge-B; Social Studies-B.
Felicia Knowles: English Language-B; Mathematics-C; Health Science-B; General Science-C;
Religious Knowledge-B; Social Studies-B.
Wynton Moore: English Language-B; Mathematics-C; Health Science-C; Religious Knowledge-
C; Social Studies-C.
Shenae Munroe: English Language-B; Health Science-C; Social Studies-B.
Kyle McCardy: English Language-B; Mathematics-B; General Science-C; Health Science-C;
Religious Knowledge-C; Social Studies-B.
Floyd Pratt: Religious Knowledge-C; Social Studies-C.
Teran Richardon: English Language-B; Mathematics-A; General Science-A; Health Science-
A; Religious Knowledge-B; Social Studies-A.
Reisha Ritchie: English Language-A; Mathematics-B; General Science-C; Health Science-B;
Religious Knowledge-A; Social Studies-A.
Allendra Sherman: English Language-C; Mathematics-C; Religious Knowledge-C; Social
Studies-C.
Jordan Williams: English Language-A; Mathematics-A; General Science-A; Health Science-
B; Religious Knowledge-B; Social Studies-A.
Briana Zwolinski: English Language-B.


Francis primary school of tak-
ing industrial action.
Speaking at the school yes-
terday, Ida Poitier, president
of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) said that on
Monday night during a meet-
ing with teachers and parents
Mr Sears made the "disap-
pointing statement."

Alternative
Due to the ongoing con-
struction projects at the
school, the minister had allo-
cated several alternative loca-
tions for the students to attend
classes.
However, upon inspecting
the locations the teachers
"were unsatisfied" with the
conditions.
"What happened last night
was that the teachers agreed
to go to the site and were told
that the at the sites would be
clean and that they would be
set up and ready," said Mrs
Poitier. "That was not done,
and so the teachers decided


statement


that as long as that was not things like that to teach
done they would report here who are taking care o:
to the site that they were actu- nation's precious treas
ally posted to." our children."
"When they decided that,
the minister, said, Oh;, ''"!
you're taking industrial
action', and their view is that
they are not taking industrial Speaking to The Tri
action, they were just report- yesterday, Mr Sears
ing to duty." "What I was trying to say
Mrs Poitier said it was dis- that there ought to be b
appointing that the minister communication between
made such a statement. ministry and the union.
"If the union and the teach- ministry as the employe:
ers wanted to take industrial the right to assign work
actions they would show the needed and that was wha
minister what industrial action done, but I do not fee
is all about," she said. those others should be ti
When asked if he threat- to make such decisions,
ened to take any action said.
against them, Mrs Poitier said, "I have spoken to the
"No he didn't threaten any- ident of BUT and I I
one nor didn't he say that he encouraged the direct
would do anything." continue communicat
"I don't think that he would between them both in o
have gone that far," she said. to ensure that all issues
"We have kept our side of the resolved and to ensure
bargain but they did not keep the proper measures are d
theirs. We were most upset in order to ensure that
theirs. We were most upset best interests of the chil
that the minister would say are met," the minister sai


hers
f the
ures,


bune
said:
y was
etter
n the
The
r has
were
t was
el as
rying
," he
pres-
have
or to
ions
irder
s are
that
down
t the
dren
id.


* A BAD SIGN: Carlton E Francis remained closed yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE














COB's newest growth venture


THE College has added a
splendid new centre to its
Oakes Field campus, resulting
from the purchase of the com-
mercial property formerly
known as the Boulevard Build-
ing. The acquisition of the
40,000 square-foot complex is
part of the expansions under-
pinning COB's move to univer-
sity status and will house impor-
tant new institutional facilities
and commercial spaces for three
of the college's major new rev-
enue growth projects. College
management said that the
recently acquired building will
greatly increase its ability to
expand the academic enterprise,
generate new revenue and pro-
vide new services to the com-
munity.
The college has proudly,
announced the opening of three
new commercial ventures in its
new building a book store,
a cafe and a business centre.
Janice Cartwright, special
assistant to the COB president
with responsibility for revenue
growth projects, says the two-
storey book store will be the
most modern of its kind in the
country and will boast an excit-
ing range of products and ser-
vices for lovers of books, films
and the arts in general.
"The lower floor will offer a
Kid's Centre where children,
accompanied by parents or


Centre added to

Oakes Field campus


guardians, can enjoy two-hour
stints of activities and reading.
They will be able to browse
through and purchase an amaz-
ing range of the newest books,
games, hobby sets, videos,
DVDs, CDs designed just for
children," the college said in a
statement.

Genres
The lower floor will centre
on a collection of around 25,000
books covering popular genres
as well as rarer items, "for the
true bibliophile." "Also fea-
tured is an author-signing sec-
tion and activities there will
become one of the regular
offerings of the bookstore.
Additionally, shoppers will find
newspapers, magazines, com-
puter software, novelty items,
art and frames and gifts aplen-
ty," the college said.
The bookstore will also fea-
ture such services as a self-serve
Internet kiosk and self-serve
DVD and CD sampling area.
The upper floor will be given
over entirely to office and


school supplies the college's
logo items will be on offer.
"Those bearing the familiar
logo with flamingo and open
book will soon become collec-
tors items, as the University of
the Bahamas' identity will
include a new crest," the col-
lege pointed out.
"The new COB specialty cafe
is meant to be a smart, fun gath-
ering spot featuring tables and
umbrellas outside, with various
board games, such as backgam-
mon and chess, available to
patrons who want to linger with
friends.
"The menu will include fresh
Bahamian pastries and other
sweets, light meal items such as
fruit, green and meat salads,
quiche and a variety of other
savouries, as well as the usual
popular snack foods and drinks,
yogurts and specialty teas and
coffees.
"The business centre will be a
one-stop shop for copying, bind-
ing laminating, business cards,
posters, laptop rentals and
everything that is needed to cre-
ate your office away
from the office," the college
said.
Among the institutional facil-
ities to be found in the new
COB building are three gradu-
ate conference-type rooms and
two theatre lecture rooms will
be available to private sector
organisations for short-term
rental use for those special
meetings, seminar, workshops
and retreats.
The two lecture theatres will
accommodate 30 seats each, but
when an adjustable partition is
moved, the rooms will open to
60-seat units.
Because the whole of the
complex is equipped with wire-
less capability, visitors and reg-
ular occupants will be able to
use their own wireless-enabled

* THE upper level of the
book store is a spacious
student lounge area.


COB students search the
shelves in search of course
books. COB's new book store
offers spacious isles, neatly stack
books, easy access to other
materials and friendly service
to patrons.


computers to access all the ser-
vices of the Internet.
Housing seven conventional
classrooms, the newly acquired
space will be occupied by facul-
ty and staff of the schools of
education and social sciences
and a department of graduate
studies.
They will benefit from 34 fac-
ulty offices (11 double and 12
single), four administrative
offices and support staff, and
an office for the President
Emerita.
The multi-building complex
was purchased from Boulevard
,Investments Limited for $3.2
million.
It has been estimated that
renovations and remodeling of
the interior and refurbishing of
both the interior and exterior
will cost the college some $4
million.


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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








a DU


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Decision awaited


on


Bahamas


Food


deal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government
is expected to
decide shortly
whether to
approve the
acquisition of a large stake in
Bahamas Food Services, the
nation's leading food whole-
saler, with at least one of the
potential buyers a major US
foodservice corporation.
The deal has been on the
table for more than a year, The
Tribune first revealing its exis-
tence in an article on' July 30,
2004, but has not advanced due
to the Government's seeming
inability to make a decision on
whether to approve it some-


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A $540,000 decline in earn-
ings generated by its affiliated
general insurance carrier, Insur-
ance Company of the Bahamas
(ICB), caused J.S. Johnson's
net income for the 2005 first
half to decline by 11.1 per cent
to $2.548 million from $2.833
million last time around.
J.S. Johnson, which as an
agent places much of its gener-
al insurance business through
ICB a company it holds a sub-
stantial stake in reported that


thing that has affected other
investment projects.
But multiple sources have
told The Tribune over the past
week that the Government was
inching closer to making a
decision on the matter.
Although it is still unclear
which way the administration
will jump, most thought it was
likely to approve Bahamas
Food Services' tie-up with a
. major food wholesale player.
When contacted yesterday,
. Philip Lightbourne, Bahamas
Food Services' operations
director, declined to comment.
He said: "I refuse to com-
ment right now. It's in the
Government's hands right
now."
However, Mr Lightbourne


net income generated by this
shareholding fell from $809,000
to $269,000 in the first six
months of 2005.
In his message to sharehold-
ers for the second quarter 2005,
Marvin Bethell, J.S. Johnson's
managing director, said: "The
performance of Insurance
Company of the Bahamas, our
associate company, continues
to fall short of its 2004 perfor-
miance.
"Consequently, its contribu-

SEE page 3C


indicated he might be able to
say more to The Tribune "in a
few weeks" "whatever the out-
come might be".
Potential
At least two potential bid-
ders are interested in buying
into Bahamas Food Services,
the acknowledged market
leader in the food distribution
and wholesale business here in
the Bahamas.
One of the interested par-
ties was last year revealed by
The Tribune to be Sysco Cor-
poration, the New York Stock
Exchange (NYSE) listed com-


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
TANYA Wright, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce's president, said yes-
terday that the business community must
be willing to play a role in the decision-
making process on whether the country
joins the Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) and other trade ini-
tiatives.
She warned, however, that the ability
to take on an influential role on inter-
national trade would depend largely on
the mindset that existed within the busi-
ness community and the willingness to
understand that the Bahamas' contin-
ued growth and development may be at
stake.
Mrs Wright said failure to go forward
and at least engage the wider Caribbean
community in discussions regarding
membership in a regional trading bloc
would hamper the Bahamas' forward
movement.


pany that generated $26.1 bil-
lion in sales during its 2003 fis-
cal year.
Sysco bills itself as the lead-
ing supplier to "meals-pre-;
pared-away-fromi-home" oper-.
ations in the US, servicing
420,000 customers from 148
locations in the US, Canada,.
Alaska and Hawaii.
The company has made no
secret of its desire to expand.
internationally, and Bahamas
Food Services, which supplies
properties such as Kerzner
International's Atlantis and
Ocean Club resorts, plus Baha
Mar Development Company's:
Cable Beach hotels, is likely


to be viewed as an attractive
proposition given the increased
business streams that could be
generated by billion-dollar
expansions at both those loca-
tions.
L, ast June, Sysco acquired
International Food Group, a
Florida-based company that
'supplies foodservice products
to chain restaurants in inter-
' national markets, including the
Caribbean.
Executive
In announcing that deal,
Richard J. Schnieders, Sysco's
chairman and chief executive,


She added that with current trends
moving towards conducting trade and
other economic talks with blocs of coun-
tries, as opposed to individual nations, it
was important to consider whether the
Bahamas, as a single jurisdiction, could
sustain the level of prosperity it had for-
merly enjoyed when the world commu-
nity did business with regional group-
ings, such as CARICOM.
Asked whether she was suggesting the
Bahamas become a member of the
CSME, Mrs Wright said she was not.
She was instead encouraging stakehold-
ers to educate and prepare themselves to
be able to make a substantive contribu-
tion when the question did arise.
Addressing the Rotary Club of South
East Nassau's weekly luncheon meeting-
at East Villa Restaurant, Mrs Wright
used the opportunity to describe a num-
ber of initiatives being targeted by the
Chamber.
The recently-elected president
described a number of committees with-


said: "This is another step
towards establishing a Sysco
presence in foodservice mar-
kets outside of North America.
The combination of Sysco's
distribution and procurement
channels with International
Food Group's expertise in
delivering products to interna-
tional quick service restaurants
will result in customers having
access to a wider variety of
foods and other supplies in
those marketplaces.
"We are very enthusiastic
about the operational syner-
gies and future growth
prospects that this acquisition
provides."


in the Chamber that were looking into
various issues and concerns of the mem-
bership.
.The Chamber's Globalisation and For-
eign Relations Committee was reviewing
the question of membership in the
CSME, and will also be looking at the
impact of other relationships and what
benefit they might hold for the business
community and the Bahamas as a whole.
Also active is the Chamber's Crime
Prevention Committee, which has
aligned itself with the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.
Looking at the issue of white collar
and investment crimes, and the fact that
more money has been stolen by the pen
and a computer key stroke than by a
gun, Mrs Wright said that while it was an
issue that needed to be addressed in the
Bahamas, a majority of the Chamber's
membership could be considered small


See CSME, Page 2B


Pressure surges


responsible for


water leakages


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
PRESSURE changes in the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion's water distribution system
are the main cause of the leaks
that lose 53.6 per cent of the
8.4 million gallons pumped
round it per day, a member of
the team charged with fixing
the problem told The Tribune
yesterday.
Acknowledging that it. would
be "quite a task" to reduce "a
significant amount" of leakages
from the system by .one million
gallons per day, Paul Fanner
said: "The biggest problem is
the number of, or high rate of
repeats of leaks due to changes
in the pressure in the system."
He explained that "pumps
coming on and off" had the
ability to create "quite dra-
matic surges in pressure
through the system" that could
cause previously plugged leaks
to re-emerge and create new
ones.
Mr Fanner and his colleague,
Julian Thornton, are working
to help Consolidated Water,
the Cayman-based company,
fulfill the terms of its contract
with the Government to reduce
leakages from the Water &
Sewerage Corporation's distri-
bution system described as


non-revenue water by. one
million gallons per day, or 365
million gallons per year.
The pair are working closely
with the Corporation, which
Mr Fanner said had done most
of the preparatory work, as
Consolidated Water looks to
move ahead with building and
operating the $23 million Blue
Hills reverse osmosis plant.
Biwater, the runner-up to
Consolidated Water in the
Blue Hills bidding, said non-
revenue water was costing the
Corporation and by extension
the Government and the
Bahamian taxpayer some $9
million per year. If this was
saved, it would substantially
save on government subsidies
paid out in every Budget to
Water & Sewerage.
Mr Fanner yesterday told
The Tribune that he and Mr
Thornton were in "the pilot
phase" of the water loss pre-
vention initiative. This involved
"trialling" the methods they
would use, with the ultimate
goal of developing a strategy
and loss reduction programme
that.would be implemented
before Christmas 2005.
Until then, Mr Fanner said
they would not know how dif-

See WATER, 2B


U U


Money Safe.
Money Fast.




-I RN T R N AT IO N A L A
Ba*~e~Oflh~nett


$540,000 ICB


decline hurts


J.S. Johnson


Drop in affiliate's contribution
outweighs 12% operating income rise


Chamber chief: Business must


be involved in CSME decisions


I









PAGE B, TURSDY, SETEMBR 8,2005UHEITIBUN


Obtaining pe


mnanent residency


through property investment


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CSME, from Page 1B


support of our scheduled service between
the Turks & Caicos Islands and the Bahamas.
Travelers have benefited like never before from
our premium service and we look forward to


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businesses. They were more
concerned with "beige crimes"
such as robbery, stealing and
employee theft.
Mrs Wright said one of the
things the Chamber was look-
ing for in its relationship with
the police was a greater flow
of information and data
exchange, because the Cham-
ber received a significant num-
ber of requests for statistics on
crime.
The police had indicated
they were happy to share this
information with them, she
said, adding that following a
recent meeting with senior offi-
cials, a leading police officer
told the Chamber that in his
40-years on the force no organ-
isation had succeeded in form-
ing a similar relationship with
the police.
Another emphasis for the
Chamber during the year will
be on the Business Develop-
ment and Education Commit-
tee. A part of their mission will
be to look at providing net-
working opportunities, not just
through the usual luncheon set-
ting, but also introduce addi-
tional concepts including pow-
er breakfasts, evening meet-


ings and mentorship pro-
grammes.
Mrs Wright said the Cham-
ber was also working on having
a series of round tables, where
a single industry will be isolat-
ed so that small business per-
sons and entrepreneurs in that
sector can brainstorm and dia-
logue with major players.
In activating the various
committees, including a Pub-
lic Relations Committee, Mrs
Wright said the Chamber was
looking to improve its voice as
the representative, of its mem-
bership and the wider business
community.
She gave as an example her
recently publicised comments
on the negative impact to local
businesses that were the result
of the Harrold Road improve-
ments.
Mrs Wright said that follow-
ing her statement to the media,
she was inundated with tele-
phone calls from frustrated
business persons.
The resulting publicity also
opened the door for dialogue
between the business commu-
nity and Bradley Roberts, the
minister responsible for the
road improvement project.


Water, from Page 1B


ficult it would be to execute
the plan and achieve the loss
reduction goals.
He added there was nothing
"unique" about the Bahamas'
water leakage problems, say-
ing he had experienced similar






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issues and conditions when
working on projects in other
countries. "It's typical of an
ageing system that needs to be
handled carefully," Mr Fanner
said.
Mr Fanner, of Fanner &'
Associates, has spent 28 years
in the industry, working for
both Thames Water and Bristol
Water in a variety of technical,
operational and managerial
roles, both in the UK and over-
seas.
He is experienced in manag-
ing all aspects of non-revenue
water reduction work to meet
regulatory targets and the
determination of the economic
level of leakage, having been
responsible for this work over
several years at Bristol Water.


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


.


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- 4b --


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 200, t-..


THE Bahamas Mortgage Bro-
kers Association, which says it
has made a $100 million contri-
bution to this nation's lending
industry, has unveiled its mem-
bership for the first time.
The Association aims to
impose self-regulatory controls
and standards on the profession.
Its charter president was C. James
Bostwick, and current president is


Troy Sampson.
PICTURED here, standing
from L to R, are Floyd Armbris-
ter; Debra Cartwright, vice-pres-
ident; Wellington Johnson, trea-
surer; Andrew Edwards; James
Bostwick, past president; James
Smith, minister of state for
finance; Troy Sampson, president;
Richard Cartwright; Renea Bur-
rows, secretary; and Grafton Ifill.


FROM page 1B


tions to net income declined
$540,000, producing a consoli-
dated net income of $2.458 mil-
lion, a decline of 10 per cent
from the $2.833 million
achieved during the first half
of last year.
"As a result, earnings per
share for the six months fell to
$0.32 [per share]." For the six
months to June 30, 2004, J.S.
Johnson's earnings per share
were $0.35.
The impact from ICB's rela-
tively poorer performance
obscured the increase in J.S.
Johnson's brokerage income
for the 2005 first half, which it
gained from commissions on
sales of both general insurance
policies and life and health
insurance. On life and health, it
acts as a broker.
Brokerage income rose by
2.7 per cent to $7.316 million,
compared to $7.123 million a
year ago, while total revenues
were ahead by 2.5 per cent at
$7.424 million compared to
$7.245 million.
Mr Bethell pointed out that
J.S. Johnson reduced its


expenses for the second con-
secutive quarter during the
three months to June 30.
For the 2005 first half, total
expenses fell by 1.3 per cent,
going from $5.204 million a
year ago to $5.135 million this
time around. Staff costs fell
from $3.559 million in 2004 to
$3.421 million.
As a result, operating income
- before accounting for the ICB
effect was up by just over 12
per cent on the year before,
standing at $2.289 million com-
pared to $2.041 million.
Meanwhile, J.S. Johnson's
net assets had increased by 3.2
per cent during the first six
months of 2005, standing at
$10.235 million compared to
$9.917 million as at December
31, 2004.
The gain in total assets out-
weighed an almost $5 million
increase in liabilities, which
reached $16.898 million at June
30, 2005.
Total assets rose by more
than $5 million during the pre-
vious, six months to reach
$27.133 million.


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4 UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading global wealth manager, is
seeking an experienced professional to join their team as


OPERATIONS

SECURITIES MANAGER

In order to meet our requirements all applicants must
possess:

Bachelors of Science degree in Finance, Economics
or equivalent;

Series 7 qualifications is a plus;

CFA, CPA or the equivalent is a plus;

Minimum of five years working in the financial
sector;

Sound knowledge of international market and
financial instruments;

Extensive knowledge of processing Corporate
Actions, Income, Securities Trade, Free Deliveries
& Receives;

Solid knowledge of MS Office and related software;

,* Strong leadership skills;

Teamplayer

Written applications by Bahamian nationals only should
be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


=S = 3S = IBM Bahamas Limited

Career Opportunity

PROJECT MANAGER
The successful candidate must possess a thorough knowledge of Project
Management activities. The applicant should also have strong leadership
capabilities as well as excellent oral and written communication skills.
Duties and Responsibilities include:
Perform Effective Negotiations
Apply Communication Skills
Use Problem Solving Techniques
Apply Organizational Change Techniques
Manager Stakeholder Techniques
Lead Team
Analyze Customer Business Enviroment
Perform Business Development
Perform Strategic Planning
Manage Contracts
Apply Business Control Requirements
Perform Project Portfolio Management
Develop Agreements and Proposals
Develop Project Definition and Plan
Develop Risk Management Plan
Development Financial Management Plan
Develop Quality Plan
Develop Human Resource and Technical Environment Plans
Develop Change Management Plan
Perform Project Execution and Control
Perform Event Management
Manage Project Finances
Manage Project Quality
Manage Project Resources
Perform Project Change Management
Perform Project Closing Activities
Minimum Qualifications:
University degree or equivalent PM experience
Knowledge of current project management methodologies
Proven ability to demonstrate required proficiency levels for skills
defined in this position
Knowledge of business matters, finance, planning and forecasting in
order to manage business issues
Proven ability to articulate, compare and implement solutions and
alternative approaches based upon project management principles
Excellent oral and written communication skills
An equal opportunity employer, IBM provides competitive salaries and
benefits. Thus, compensation will be commensurate with experience
and qualifications.

Please submit detailed applications or electronic resume to the attention
i44.
Human Resources Adiiiistt.or ;. :
IBM Bahamas Limited ........
Fourth Floor
Atlantic House
Second Terrace & Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
e-Mail: jmoss@bs.ibm.com.
Deadline: September 16th, 2005
All applications will be held in the strictest confidence.
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


S7S IBM Bahamas Limited
Career Opportunity
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST]
Duties and Responsibilities include:
Works on I/T projects with direct customer contact
Understands the standard mission of the I/T Specialist in own area of specialty
Cultivates and maintains a positive relationship among team members
May co-ordinate activities of peers and more experienced team members to
implement technical solutions
Participates in development of proposals, benchmarks, proof of concepts and
selling of hardware, software and services
Performs technical role in support of solution construction, implementationand
system integration in a technology/industry speciality or product sales
Assists in delivery of high quality solutions to clients in response to specific
business requirements
Ability to absorb professional knowledge quickly
Perform tasks including study, analysis, programming, product installation,
test and system integration
* On occasion, provides technical support to managers/leaders
* Performs assigned tasks within schedule in accordance with established
standards and management guidance
Minimum Qualifications:
* University degree or equivalent experience
* Specific product knowledge of one major platform, process of architecture,
notably Networking and Industry
* Ability to work with Proposals, requirements, designs, implementations and
production projects/engagement
* Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Ability to apply basic knowledge of information technology and associated
tools of technical specialty to support attainment of team and department
objectives
* Ability to recognize and articulate job related problems to management
* Ability to prepare and recommend technical alternative involving technology,
methodology, tools, processes and solution components.
* Ability to analyze technical problems and create solutions involving the use
of existing techniques or tools
An equal opportunity employer, IBM provides competitive salaries and benefit.
Thus, compensation will be commensurate with experience and qualifications.
Please submit detailed applications or electronic resume to the attention of:
Human Resources Administrator
IBM Bahamas Limited
Fourth Floor
Atlantic House
Second Terrace & Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
e-Mail: jmoss@bs.ibm.com
Deadline: September 16th, 2005
All applications will be held in the strictest confidence. Only applicants who
are short-listed will be contacted.


C ina
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
6 September 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low AaoMr Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div PIE Y".. eld
1.10 0.80 Abaco Markets 0.80. 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 NIM 0.00%
9.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.50 9.50 0.00 1.452 0.340 6.5 3.58%
6.90 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.90 6.88 -0.02 2,000 0.561 0.330 12.3 4.80%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.187 0.010 4.3 1.25%
1,80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.126 00860 11.1 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 4 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
8.81 6.90 Cable Bahamas 8.81 8.81 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.3 2.72%
2.20 1.89 Colina Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.10 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0.67. Doctor's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.7 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.61 9-25 Finco 10.60 10.60 0.00 0.695 0.510 15.3 4.81%
9.50 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.50 9.50 0.00 300 0.695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.21 8.31 Focol 9.05 9.21 0.16 2,500 0.675 0.500 13.6 5.43%
1.99. 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1,15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0-00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.50 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.2 6.59%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.72 5.79 0.07 1.988 0.122 0.000 46.9 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE YIeld
1300 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9,1 7.25%
10.14 10 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
3.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
1600 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.0 1 3 1.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 NIM 0.00%
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2496 1.1822 Colina Money Market Fund 1.249581"
2.4169 2,0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4169***
10.4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4855""*
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.255981"
1.1273 1.0576 Colina Bond Fund 1,127305-.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX-19 Dec 02 = 1,00000 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by losing prko
62wk-HI Highest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidellt,
62wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fldelit1
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volum( Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumE Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Chaoge in closing price from day to da BEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NA" Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eating, FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994= 10K
AS AT AUG. 31, 20051. AS AT JUL 31. 2006
AS AT AUG. 26, 20061- AS AT AUG. 31, 2006*/ AS AT JUL. 31,200
MO&*9 aM .WN-A' 1'"


BUSINESS




IMortgage brokers unvel*l memberships








PAG 4B HRDY ETME ,20 H RBN


'Exhaust all avenues'


on local engineers'


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers (BSE) said yesterday .it was
adamant that every effort be made
to employ Bahamians before the
Government attempts to recruit for-
eign engineers, after it was revealed
that the administration was seeking
to hire 17 Caribbean nationals.
Cyprian Gibson, the BSE's presi-
dent, said that while the group had
no objection to the importation of
engineers, it remained adamant that
every effort be made to first employ
Bahamians currently in the
Bahamas, then exhaust every oppor-
tunity to invite Bahamians from
abroad to return home to take up
the vacant posts.
Mr Gibson said that in extending
the offer to those Bahamians living
abroad, the recruitment policies
should include the same incentives,


such as scarcity allowances, housing,
transportation, gratuities, scholar-
ships, as offered to foreign engineers.
The shortage of qualified Bahami-
an engineers and surveyors has been
highlighted by the Government
advertising several positions to for-
eign nationals across the Caribbean,
as it seeks professionals to work on
infrastructure associated with for-
eign investment projects and school
repairs.
The Jamaica Gleaner reported
yesterday that the Bahamas Gov-
ernment had placed an advertise-
ment in its Sunday sister paper seek-
ing to recruit 17 engineers and eight
surveyors. Several Jamaicans were
said to have already applied for the
posts.
The positions offer salaries from
$35-$46,200, with allowances rang-
ing from $3,500 to $15,000.
Melanie Roach, director of public
works, told the newspaper:


The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

LEGAL OFFICER

Responsibilities

Conducting litigation on behalf of the SCB for the enforcement of the
civil penalty regime under the Securities Industry Act (SIA) for all forms
of market misconduct

Working closely with other regulators and enforcement agencies in the
investigation of suspected market misconduct

Conducting examination of witnesses and preparing cases for court

Contributing to the enhancement of the enforcement regime of the SCB
and to safeguarding the reputation of The Bahamas as a premier financial
centre

Qualifications and Experience

Member of The Bahamas Bar for at least 5 years
Civil/commercial litigation experience
Prior working experience in the securities industry would be an asset


Competencies:
Ability to independently conduct and lead investigations
Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Capacity to work at both the conceptual and operational levels
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
securities markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005


"Bahamas is booming and we have a
lot of major developments, and the
Government wants to do more infra-
structure development to keep up
with the private sector.
"There are major road projects
and schools being built, and we need
surveyors for our building control
section."
Prime Minister Perry Christie had
gained approval for the advertise-
ment from his Jamaican counterpart,
P.J. Patterson, to ensure the
Bahamas would not create a
brain drain from other Caribbean
states.
Meanwhile, Mr Gibson said: "The
Bahamas Society of Engineers is
aware that that there is a strong,
upward demand for engineering ser-
vices at all levels, inclusive of the
professional/consultant levels, as well
as the assistant engineer and trainee
levels, because of the strong growth
in the construction sector.
"All indicators are that if the
trend continues upward, there will
eventually be a shortage of engineers
nationally. Therefore, every effort
must be made to encourage and
entice Bahamians to enter the pro-
fession. These observations are
based on the fact that in recent times
there have been a substantial num-
ber of local engineers that have
moved from being under employed,
towards being fully employed, and
the fact that there has been an sig-
nificant increase in the number of
postings for engineering related posi-
tions."
Mr Gibson said the increasing
demand globally should be viewed as
a prime opportunity to encourage
and advise school leavers of the
opportunities and benefits of enter-
ing the engineering profession.
He said further that, in the nation-
al interest, an aggressive scholarship
program may be required.
The BSE maintains, however, that
the Government and the private sec-
tor do not see the increase in
demand for engineers as an oppor-
tunity to bypass localengineering
firms and consultants.
Mr Gibson said that as is standard
internationally, the Professional
Engineers Act requires that foreign
engineers work in conjunction with
local engineering firms, regardless
of the size, because it was critical
that Bahamian engineering firms
have the opportunity to provide their
expertise, be given the opportunity
to expand their firms and provide
additional jobs for their Bahamian
support staff, and families.
From the BSE's standpoint, he
saiednthe specific purpose of the
BaBhamian engineering counterpart
on major jobs is to provide local
knowledge and expertise for the pro-
ject while protecting local Bahamian
interests, plus locally established
processes and procedures.
Bahamian engineers are also there
to protect and minimise the effect
of local engineering jobs being
exported overseas, and are also able
to help build and maintain techno-
logical capacity in the engineering
sector.
Mr Gibson said further that
Bahamian engineers are able to
assist in the transfer of technology to
the local sector. "As we are all
aware, the construction, and engi-
neering related industries employ
many individuals, and are a key sec-
tor for driving employment," he said.


CONSOLIDATE DEBT AND LOWER YOUR PAYMENTS

It can happen quickly. All of a sudden you'vegot more debt than
you're comfortable carrying and "...more month at the end of the
money." Let a Scotiabank representative help yotl become
financially fit. We offer practical solutions to consolidate your debt
into one affordable monthly payment; access some of the equity
in your home to lower your interest costs; or transfer to a lower
interest credit option. We can introduce you to credit life
protection and even help you start saving for your childrens
education. Start building a stronger financial future today.


STradmarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. lademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING
COMPANY LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd September;
2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Jurgen Salamon of Stockholmer
Allee 53,44269 Dortmund, Germany
Dated the 6th day of September, A.D. 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company


Legal Notice

NOTICE


FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING
COMPANY LIMITED. !

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.
Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 14th October, A.D.,
2005. In default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 6th day of September, A.D., 2005

Jurgen Salamon
Liquidator
Stockholmer Allee 53
44269 Dortmund
Germany


Solidarity






THE BAHAMAS UNION OF TEACHERS








ENERAL







MEMBERSHIP







MEETING




Date: Thursday, September 8, 2005

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: Walker's Hall, Bethel Avenue


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





















TETI B BUSINESS RD ,ET B0,A


Sujc prop en y:::


MILLARS HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
(Nassau)
Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old, single story triplex
with floor area of 2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist of
2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining area and kitchen. Lot size is
7,500 sq. ft. 75 x 100.


Appraisal: $268,411.00
Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West Ave., on
the southside immediately after Topps Laundermat. Take
first right which is Wimpole St, go around curve on left
which is London Ave., travelsouth on London Ave., property
is 2nd to last building on the right before T, Junction (High
street) L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.


No. 8 BELL SNOW CLOSE
BEL-AIR ESTATES SUB.
(Nassau)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 6,000
sq. ft. (60 x 100) designated as lot No. 348 of Bel-Air
Subdivision, situated on Turtle Drivve on Bel Snow Close,
being the fourth lot east of Turtle Drive, on the south side
of the road. The subject property is on flat terrain with
"T grass lawn and paved driveway in front, the grounds are
competley enclosed and fairly maintained. This property
consist of a 6 year old single story, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom,
livingroom, diningroom, familyroom and kitchen single
family residence with floor area of 1,711 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $193,200.00
Driving west on Carmichael Road until you reach Turtle Drive, turn left onto Turtle Drive and Bel Snow Close is the first
corner on the left after the Fedder Road that runs parallel to Charmichael Road. The house is the 4th on the right painted
white trimmed pink with wall in front.


TROPICAL GARDENS
pSbjt iope tty (Nassau)

Lot #3 a four year old single story house with floor area
of 1,340 sq. ft., and consisting of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
living room, dining room, tv room and kitchen. Lot size is
7,200 sq. ft., wide in front, and 98 ft wide at the back, 84
3A ft long at the north and 80 ft long at the south.

Appraisal: $189.963.90
Traveling west on John F Kennedy drive, pass the second
entrance into the airport, the first right after Esso's Division
Office which is Tropical Gardens Road, then first right
which is Kiskadee Drive, then first corner on the left,
property is third house through on the right.

DUNDAS TOWN
(Abaco)
2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre lot no. 25, living room,
dining room, family room, kitchen downstairs, upstairs
there are 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms.Age is 16 years,
color is yellow trimmed with white, upperlevel 1,080 sq.
ft., lower level, 1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft., covered
verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the land is portion W of one of
the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels situated near
Forest Drive being just'under half acre in size. Located
on the southern sidle of p ridge being 12 feet plus above
sea level with little likelihood of flooding grounds well kept
with above average landscaping including grass cover
with palms and citrus trees. Enclosed on 3 sides with a
6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the fron. 30 ft., by
36 ft., roof garage now used as a nursery school. At the
upper level on the eastern side is covered wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior walls concrete, ceiling of sheet rock
and floor of ceremic tiles.


CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)
All that lot of land numbering as "H" being one of several
lots in Cyclops Gardens located off the .northern side of
Cowpen Road one corner west of Faith Avenue Junction.
This property comprise of a two and a half year old single
storey duples with a gross floor area of 1,512.42 sq. ft., each
unit consisting of 2 bedrooms all wth wall airconditioning
units, 1 bathroom, living, dining and kitchen building is
effectively new.
Appraisal: $219,450.00
Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road
make a right then first right again. The subject property is
the 4th on the right tan trimmed brown.


WEST RIDGE ESTATES
(Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 34,089
sq. ft., being lot #152, of West Ridge Estates Subdivision,
zoining is single family residential with all utilities awailable.
The subject property is on hilly terrain at the top of a ridge
that offers a lovely view to the northeast. The grounds are
attractively landscaped with a grass lawn, ornamental shrubs
and flowering plants. Other improvements include chain link
fencing along the sides and rear boundaries, with a concrete
block wall at the front with asphalt paved driveway.
Appraisal: $1,049,788.90
There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house is located at the highest point of the poroperty.
This house has an approximate gross floor area of 4,8000 sq. ft., upstairs consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each with a
full bathroom), including a master bedroom suite, an office with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs
consist of living room, formal dining area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)

JOHNSON ROAD
(Nassau)
All that lot of land having an area of 5,520 sq. ft., (60 x 92)
situated on the corner of Johnson Road and Step Streeet.
This property is rectangular and comprised of a 12 year old
single storey house that consist of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
living, dining room and kitchen. Also an efficiency apartment
attached. The subject property is slightly above the level of
the abutting roadways with minimal landscaping. The property
is open with chain link fencing along its western boundries.
"Appraisal: $139,868.40
Heading east along Bernard Road, turn through Johnson
Road opposite St Augustine's College Drive all the way to
the curve heading west the subject house is first house on
the right all white trimmed yellow.


ALICE TOWN
(Eleuthera)
All that piece parcel of land and improvements containing
by admeasurements 5,500 sq. ft., being lot no. 115 in the
settlement of Alice Town on the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas.
This house is approximately 16yrs old and consists of 3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, fronroom, dining room, sittingroom,
with kitchen and utility room in one, floor area 1,645.42 sq.
ft. this house is is in very poor condition
Appraisal: $75,352.00


Appraisal: $267,987.91

ELIZABETH ESTATES
(Nassau)

All that piece, parcel of land having an area of 5,000 sq. ft., being lot no. 46 of the said subdivision situated in the eastern district of New Providence, between
Prince Charles and Yamacraw Road, approximately 2,200 ft east of Fox Hill. This property consist of a 21yr old single storey house which was expanded from
700 sq ft within the last 1 lyrs, to having a gross floor area of 1,460 sq ft quality of construction is good and maintenance is average. The effective age of the
building is 5 years, the house is comprised of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living, dining area kitchen and laundry room. The property is sufficiently elevated and
yard is open and the grounds are neatly maintained with minimal landscaping in place.
Appraisal: $162,750.00
Heading east along Prince Charles, drive passing the intersection of Fox Hill; take first corner right (Trinidad Ave), corner right before Government Clinic, then
first right again, (Tobago Cresent) the subject house is second house on the curve right, just after BEC Power Plant. Painted all white.


NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry
fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is
vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $46,167.18

BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated
and should not flood under normal conditions. The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60
ft. Wide Road. Appraisal: $8,647.80

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is
square in shape on elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family
residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA) Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry
fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is
vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $43,968.75

EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE (ELEUTHERA) Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living
room, dining room, kitchen and tv room. Appraisal: $148,802.22


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding under normal conditions. Land
size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277 sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33

LOWE SOUND (ANDROS) All that parcel of lot of land located next door to the New Mt Freedom Baptist Church or approximately five miles from the administrative
complex approximately 5,000 sq. ft., and rectangular in shape with a 3 bed, 1 bathroom wooden residence. Appraisal: $52,258.50


FLAMINGO BAY SECTION 3 (EXUMA) Lot #102, Palm Hill situated inland in the Flamingo Bay development. It is Hillside Residential and has 150 ft., footage
on Hill Road and contains 10, 438 sq. ft., in area. This property is undeveloped. The subject property is about one mile south of the George Town township.
Appraisal: $33,075.00

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA) Lots 12571 & 12572 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 10 underveloped residenial lots located near the Forest and Mt Thompson on
Utopia Drive. 80 feet frontage and depth of 125 ft 10,000 sq. ft., in area each there is no service in the area. The road is gravel George Town 10 miles away.
Appraisal: $26,250.00 EACH

BAHAMA SOUND NO. 18 (EXUMA) Lot No. 17861 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 18 a subdivision situate approximately 2.5 miles north westwardly of George
Town. The property is zoned residential and is level. Electricity, paved roads, water, telephone lines and cable tv services are available along Queen's Highway.
Water is also available from dug wells but city supply is available. The propert is undeveloped. Land size 82.10 x 122.11 x 82.10 x 121.0 Estimated Value:
$33,075.00





Plese ist ww.fsbbahma. c0 or0nteio phto


, ,


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 5B














Ministry of Tourism presents




Lifetime Achievement Award











ESSO is looking for Talented Candidates to fill the following position.
The successful candidate will receive Exceptional Carer Developmaent.

OPERATIONS ENGINEER

Rde

Achieve success and flawless execution in Terminal Operations through
managing operations personnel on a day to day basis. Responsible for
product receipt, storage and distribution and all operations related to
them. Ensure terminal activities are carried out safely and in accordance
with Esso's standards and government regulations at an acceptable cost
and at an extraordinary service level. THE Ministry of Tourism
ONTEhas awarded the first William
NECESSARYSKILLS: NOTICE H. Baxter Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award to Juidd
NOTICE is hereby given that CELINA CHARLES OFF Buchanan, one of the Canadian
Bachelor's Degree in Engineering (Industrial, Electrical of Mechanical) CARMICHEAL ROAD LAZARTO ROAD, P.O. BOX CR 56717, Tourism Organisation's (CTO)
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible founders.
or Related Fields for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as -Tethe award; estoblihled by
4 5 Years of exaiencein areas of study a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any the Bahamian Ministry of
reason why registration/!naturalization should not be granted, Tourism in recognition of the
Strong Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills should send a written and signed statement of the facts within late Mr Baxter's contributions
Cognitive/Tchnical/BusiesKnowledge twenty-eight days from the 1th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the to the Canadian tourism indus-
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- try, was presented in Toronto
-Must possess Analytical Thinking Innovation, and SoundJudgement 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. before an audience of Candi-
Commitment to High Standards an and Bahamian travel and
Result Oriented, Committed, with Drive and Perseverance LEGAL NOTICE tourism professionals.
Exercises Influence D xmonstrates Self Confidence and Personal Impact Present
Demonstrates Leadership NOTICE Vernice Walkine, director-
general for the Bahamas Min-
istry of Tourism, was on hand
If you fulfill the position requirements, please send yur resume by email FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING to present the award to Mr
Sr COfS PANYDLIMITED Buchananalong withEdith
tP Y. .... A Y. Bm. S ,. COMPANY LIMITEDter, editor-in-chief of B ax-
... A y .-. th ter Publications.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: "Mr Buchanan's remarkable
S__________________________________career and contributions to the
*, I ES C Wil Canadian travel industry ier-
(a) FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED is in dissolution tainly makediantr him a most woer-
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000. thinly make him a most wor-
thy first recipient of the
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 2nd September, William H. Baxter Lifetime
2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered by Achievement Award," said Ms
the Registrar General. Walkine.
'pn remin"The Bahamas is honoured
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Jurgen Salamon of Stockholmer to name him as the first winner
The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible Allee 53,44269 Dortmund, Germany of the Award."
While in Toronto, Ms.
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas. Dated the 6th day of September, A.D. 2005. Walkine, alon with Ellison
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD. diTommy Thompsonil deputy
Attorneys for the above-named Company director of communications;
MARKET SURVEILLANCE OFFICER and Paul Strachan, national
director Canada, also met
with Canadian travel media
Responsibilities Legal Notice and industry partners.

a Working as a part of a team responsible for monitoring the activities of licensees NOTICE Established
and registrants of the SCB, assessing the institutions' internal controls and An annual event beginning
risk management systems, as well as their financial soundness, and compliance this year, the William H. Bax-
with applicablelaws and regulations. FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING fetime Achievement
Reviewing financial statements, annual reports, proxy material and other such Award was established by the
COMPANY LIMITED Bahamas to serve as a lasting
documents reminder to Mr Baxter's con-
Monitoring payment of fees tributions to the tourism indus-
Compiling statistical data Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company try in Canada, as well as his
Recommending actions to help maintain high prudential standards and promote are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. fondness and support for the
Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 14th October, A.D., Bahamas and its several desti-
sound risk management and best practices in the markets. 2005. In default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of nations.
any distribution made by the Liquidator. In determining the winner,
pendent selection panel con-
Dated the 6th day of September, A.D., 2005 sidered individuals who:
Bachelor's degree in Business, Finance, Economics or Accounting improved professional stan-
3 years experience in the Securities Industry. Jurgen Salamon dards in the industry; demon-
Candidates with working experience in the financial services sector will have Liquidator strated successful-innovations
an added advantage Stockholmer Allee 53 d en the ndsy
44269 Dortmund standing with the general pub-
Germany lic.


uompetencies:

Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
capital markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to multi-task and juggle on-site inspection with off-site supervision
(as required)
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and excel)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

PAVERNITE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 6th day of September,
2005. The Liquidators is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


a


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










THE TIBUN THUSDAY SEPTMBER8,205,IPGES7














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High School Teachers:
Art and Design
Business Studies
Librarian/Media Specialist
Bible Christian Values Needed for one Semester
Successful applicants must:
Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
Have minimum qualifications of a Bachelor's
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from a recognized college or university
Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.
Applications must be made in writing together with full
curriculum vitae, a recent color photograph and names of
at least three references, one being that of your Church
Pastor to:
Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O. Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas
For further information, please contact the Business Office
at telephone numbers 324-6269 or 324-6887.
Deadline i t i nispFiday,, September 16,2005


Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005


eStaff Opportunities



Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club is a $500 million development on
Guana Cay, centered around a championship golf course and a marina.

As part of our commitment to government to employ 200 Bahamians
in the development we are now looking to fill the following positions
with Bahamian Nationals:

Chief Engineer

Rooms/Inn Manager

Yoga/Pilates Instructor

-Fitness Trainer

Resident Butler

Salary and benefits will be in line with experience and will include
health benefits.

Applications to Carter Redd, General Manager at P.O. Box AB-20766,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, or credd@bakersbayclub.com.


I I


The Rotary Club






















West Nassau





Please note effective Thursday, September


8th, The Rotary Club of West Nassau will


be meeting at Chez Willie West Bay Street.




Parking is available at the rear on Virginia


Street or just west of Chez Willie in the


Parking lot.


The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

FIELD EXAMINER

Responsibilities

Working as a part of a team responsible for monitoring the activities of
licensees and registrants of the SCB, assessing the institutions' internal
controls and risk management systems, as well as their financial soundness,
and compliance with applicable laws and regulations through the conduct
of on-site inspections
Identifying breaches in legislation and making recommendations for
corrective action
Recommending action to help maintain high prudential standards and
promote sound risk management and best practices in the markets

Qualifications and Experience

Bachelor's degree in Business, Finance, Economics or Accounting
Experience in compliance, auditing in the securities industry

Competencies:

Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
capital markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to multi-task
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and Excel)


Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:


MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


International Literacy Day September 8,2005


We l eopke


Honorable Cynthia A Pratt, MP
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security


"Never doubt that a small
group of thoughtful,
committed citizens can change
the world; indeed it is the only
thing that ever has."
Margaret Mead


jacia fA.


N /it hA


v 7.r
norable Alfred M Sears, MP
Minister of Education
Ministry of Education


Iris Pinder
Director of Education
Ministry of Education


Lenora Archer
Deputy Director of Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Ministry of Education


Patricia Collins
Deputy Director of Education
Development
Ministry of Education


Dr Leon Higgs
Director of Higher Education
and Lifelong Learning
Ministry of Education


Declare Iiat


Annette L Dorsette
Senior Education Officer
National Literary Service

4x'>A


Dorcas Bowler
Head Librarian
National Library Service


"Literacy is not a portion of
education. It is education. It is at once
the ability and the inclination of the
mind to find knowledge, to pursue
understanding, and out of knowledge
and understanding, not out of received
attitudes and values or emotional
responses, however worthy, to make
good judgments."
Richard Mitchell


Arthurlue Rahming
Director
Project Read
a'

Haldane Chase
UNESCO


"If we wish to open the world of literacy to our children, what they are asked to read should from the
.very beginning help them to understand them elves and their world."
Bruno Bettelheim and Karen Zelan On Learning to Read: A Child's Fascination with Meaning



1Pdng is ree dom
^\ywnlg F di ^^U19


Eileen Carron
Publisher
The Tribune


Erica Wells
Assistant Managing Editor
The Tribune


"Literacy is a bridge from misery to hope. It is
a tool for daily life in modern society. It is a bul-
wark against poverty, and a building block of
development... it is a platform for democratisa-
tion, and a vehicle for the promotion of cultur-
al and national identity... For everyone, every-
where, literacy is, along with education in gen-
eral, a basic human right... Literacy is... the
road to human progress and the means
through which every man, woman and child
can realise his or her full potential."
Kofi Annan


John Marquis
Managing Editor
The Tribune


Faco Nunez
News Editor
The Tribune


I-,,


Sir Arthur Foulkes
To The Point
The Tribune


Larry Smith
Tough Call
The Tribune


Zhivargo Laing
Straight Up Talk
The Tribune


George Mackey
Viewpoint
The Tribune


"I have sometimes dreamt that when the Day of Judgment dawns the Almighty will turn to Peter and
will say when he sees us coming with our books under our arms, "Look, these need no reward. We have
nothing to give them here. They have loved reading." Virginia Woolf


newspaper education


Patrick Rollins
President
Rotary Club East Nassau




PROJECT I
READ I
BAHAMAS


Christopher Russell
President
Rotary Club New Providence


. .. . . w


I


--


__


. ........... ............


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\a ~ KA-J^ VI^


/I(







PAGElOBTHURDAYSEPTMBER8, 205 TEPTRBUN


GN- 259


MINISTRY OF HEALTH



THE SMALL MINORITY



We in the Ministry of Health/Department of Environmental Health
Services wish to take this opportunity, to bring to the attention of
the general public a vexing problem. Once again, the litter bugs took
control of the New Providence Landscape during the weekend of
our 32nd Independence Celebrations.

In preparation for our Independence Celebration, the staff of the
Department of Environmental Health Services Grounds and
beautification division worked laboriously in the cleaning and white
washing of the curbing of the main streets of the island. Additionally,
our workmen ensured that all the major parks, Fort Charlotte, Arawak
Cay, RM Bailey Park, AF Adderley Park, etc.,, were cut and manicured
and the beaches were cleaned and garbage bins with proper linings
were strategically placed on the beaches and at the parks so that they
could be used by visitors to the respective areas.

Open spaces such as Fort Charlotte, Arawak Cay, the Down Home
Fish Fry, Rawson Square and Prince George Dock Festival Area and
its Environs were areas that had to be given daily attention from
Friday, July 8th to Monday, July 11th, 2005. This was necessary to
ensure that they were in a litter free state, due to many activities that
were taking place in the respective areas.

The department also called upon to assist with cleaning of the Thomas
Robinson Stadium after each session of the Central America and
Caribbean Games that took place over the Independence Weekend
(Friday 8th Monday 11th, July, 2005), in addition to cleaning up
of Bay Street after the Independence Junkanoo Rush Out. The
department recognizes the importance of its contributions during the
preparation and after the celebrations.

The Staff and Supervisors of the grounds and beautification division
of the Department of Environmental Health Services are to be
commended for their tireless efforts displayed during the Independence
Celebrations. What concerns the Department of Environmental Health
Services and as custodians of the environment and taking into account
the financial and human resources made available bylg6vernment,
private sector businesses and non-government organizations to keep
our community litter free, is the fact that there is in our community
a small minority of uncaring persons who consciously or unconsciously
take delight in littering with total disregard for anyone or anything.
Some say that littering is a part of the Bahamian Culture, while other
believe that someone should pick up their litter.

One is led to believe that littering is a part of our culture, if you were
to visit the Down Home Fish Fry the morning after the night before,
or a -visit to a park such as RM Bailey after a Saturday fair. The
landscape is completely littered even though it causes very little for
an organization to get permission to use a government park and are
instructed to leave it in a clean condition, but the request goes
unheeded. Our beaches are left in a filthy condition by sea bathers
and beach party lovers. Bins are provide but seldom utilized.

At big events such as the recent Independence Junkanoo Rush Out,
Bay Street from Elizabeth Avenue to Arawak Cay was extensively
littered. While we expect that at events such as Junkanoo there would
be some littering, Bahamians need to be more litter conscious and
place litter in the appropriate place a "Bin" not on the street or in
some vacant lot. Organizations and Bahamians in general need to
make a concerted effort to develop positive attitudes and embrace
the litter free environment concept. It may be said that the Ministry
of Health has persons hired for cleaning the environment and that
would be absolutely correct.

But can you imagine what could be done with the monies that are
spent on cleaning the environment if Bahamians were more litter
conscious and dispose of litter in the correct way. More monies could
be allocated to education our children and health care service for our
people, etc. Additionally, Tourists would not complain to the Ministry
of Tourism about the littered state of our environment.

The Ministry of Health/Department of environmental Health Services
is therefore appealing to that small minority of Bahamians that
continue to litter the landscape to take "PRIDE" in our environment
and develop a positive attitude. Remember that a litter free environment
should be to you a way of life. It is the quality of living that is


expressed in the clean home, clean industry, the clean community.
Being a way of life it must come, from within the people and is
nourished by clean ideals and principles.

If you are bothered by littering as much as we are or wish to develop
a positive attitude towards litter we hope you will join us in working
towards a litter free Bahamas.

There are lots of ways to get involved. Call the Ministry of Health
/Department of Environmental Health Services at Telephone # (242)
322-8037, Nassau, The Bahamas.


Former national



coach hits out



at basketball



performances


* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
BAHAMIANS must be will-
ing to pay the price in order to
excel in any sport, according to
former national basketball
coach Gladstone "Moon"
McPhee.
McPhee spoke out this week,
saying that Bahamians tend to
do just enough to get by, and
that such performances cannot
be acceptable.
He said that there is partial
truth to the statements voiced
by US collegiate coaches over
the weekend at the exhibition
games, in which they claimed
that Bahamians are athletically
inclined but lack the basic fun-
damentals of the sport of bas-
ketball.

Improve
The former national coach
who now works in the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture's
Freeport office, noted the
efforts of the Bahamas Basket-
ball Federation (BBF) to
improve the level of the sport
throughout the Bahamas, but
said more investigation into the
matter should be done.
He said that more than 50 per
cent of Bahamians just go into
the gyms and play instead of
practising at least two or three
times a week for a game.
"This has to stop, we can't
have athletes wanting to play
at a high level and not practise,"
said McPhee.
"Some Bahamians don't have
any respect for the game. It all
boils down to respect.
"You have to have respect.
This respect can be based on
the passion for the game, you
have to want within yourself to
improve and showcase to the
fans a high level of the game.
"This is one of the reasons
why the gyms aren't filled any-
more. You have athletes, if we
can even call them athletes, just
coming playing half par games.


Gladstone McPhee

calls for more practice


"How can you encourage par-
ents to send out their
children to games if this type
of behaviour is being
displayed?
He reflected on a time when
togetherness was not only seen
on the court but off it as well,
with teams performing commu-
nity services.
According to McPhee, par-
ents encouraged their children
to be a part of teams, but the
scenes which surround the gyms
and parks today are even dis-
couraging to him, a person who
has been around for more than
20 years.
He said: "The only time a
team nowadays enjoy meeting is
for a game, and the after party
which follows.
"The game is riot important
anymore, it'sall a bout what will
happens after the games."
"The competitiveness is lost,
the respect for the game is gone,
and 1 am afraid to say that the
love and respect for the game
might not be repairable."
An irritated McPhee claimed
sluggish play from night play-
ers may influence an upcoming
athlete stepping into the gym
for the first time and said that
the problem stems from the
coaches, for allowing players to
play in games after missing out
on practice.
"There is no excuse for miss-
ing out on practice," McPhee
added. "You should want to get
better.
"But our problem is we just
do enough to get. by, we don't
worry about getting better. This
is a total disrespect to the sport
and most importantly to your-
self as an athlete.
"No athlete who claims they
love the game should go out
and want to play, I don't care


how good they are.
"The federation is even
wrong for wanting to allow per-
sons to represent the Bahamas
in exhibitional games like the
ones held over the weekend,
without practising."
The teams selected by the
BBF to play against three of the
top ranked collegiate teams in
the NCAA came from the New
Providence Basketball Associ-
ation (NPBA) division I.
The last game played in the
league was in played in late
June.
However, the president of the
BBF, David Morley, begged to
differ with McPhee on how the
squads were selected to play in
the weekend exhibitional
games.

Selection
Morley clarified that the team
selection was placed in the
hands of the NPBA, not the
BBF, stating that the BBF's job
was to facilitate.
He said: "The BBF was
pleased with the level of play. It
wasn't the federation's job to
go out and select the teams to
play in the tournament, all our
job was to oversee it.
"The tournament was
brought to you by three groups,
the BBF, the NPBA and the
Basketball Travellers group.
"The NPBA gave the teams
two months notice to prepare,
so practising really rests in the
hands of the coaches of the var-
ious teams.
"What needs to happen is
McPhee need not criticise the
initiatives by the BBF, but
instead welcome and encour-
age some of the new ideas being
brought on."


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


%4inh-rn In-Lund
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TRIBUNE SPORTS


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SPORTS


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


SECTION A


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Bah ami'an








athletes ge








read for








Ifa I


COMPETING at the World Athletics Finals, clockwise from top left: Tonique Williams-Darling,
Christine Amertil, Chandra Sturrup, Leevan Sands, Chris Brown and Lavern Eve.


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AFTER beating the
Olympic and World Cham-
pionships gold medallist
Tonique Williams-Darling
on two consecutive occa-
sions, Sanya Richards is out
to try again.
Richards has taken over
from Ana Guevara to
become Williams-Darling's
main challenger.
The two will meet this
weekend at the World Ath-
letic Finals, set for Monte
Carlo, September 9th-10th.


Tonique and Sanya Richards

go head to head once more


The World Athletic Finals
will attract top contenders
who have had consistent per-
formances, with the women's
400m as one of the big
attractions.
The line-up,' which
includes Williams-Darling,
Christine Amertil, Richards
and Guevara, will.determine


the 'best of the best' in the
event.
So far, the IAAF rankings
have Williams-Darling slated
ahead of Richards with a
score of 1386 to Richards'
1379.
Right behind Richards is
Guevara of Mexico, with
1356.


According to the IAAF
website there have been 19
performances ran in under
50 seconds this summer.
Richards, with the fastest
time this year, has dipped
under the 50 second mark
eight times, with Williams-
Darling running six races
under


The 400m will be run on
Saturday at 2:45pm Eastern
Standard time.
Other Bahamian athletes
taking part in the finals will
be Chandra Sturrup, Chris
Brown, Christine Amertil,
Leevan Sands and Lavern
Eve.
Only the top seven ranked
athletes in the world in each
event will take part at the
games.
In the 100m, Sturrup cur-
rently has the world leading
time, but is ranked fourth,
with a score of 1341.
Amertil, who just missed
out in qualifying for the


200m, is ranked seventh in
the 400m with a score of
1297. In the 200m she is cur-
rently ranked 10th with.
1220.
Sands missed out on com-*
peting in two events at the
World Athletic Finals, after
he fell short of qualifying in
the long jump at the World
Championships.
He will be heading into
the World Athletic Finals
ranked fifth in the triple
jump, along with Danil
Burkenya of Russia, with a
score of 1259.
Eve is ranked fifth in the
javelin with 1154.


Go]ffel oI course i to mm pIro]


* GOLF
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
BAHAMIAN golfers Raquel Riley and
Jameica Duncombe are hoping to tee-off
a successful career in the Ladies Profes-
sional Golf Association (LPGA) tour next
year.
But before the duo hit it off in the
LPGA, they will have to surpass the qual-
ifying rounds either at the LPGA quali-
fying tournament or the Futures Qualify-
ing tournament.
The two qualifying tournaments are set
for September 20th-23rd and October 4th-
7th, for the LPGA qualifying and Novem-
ber 17th-20th, for the Futures.
The LPGA qualifiers are divided into
two sectional qualifying tournaments, all
having to play 72 holes.
The top 30 players and ties from the
two tournaments will automatically qual-
ify for the Tour Qualifying at the LPGA
International.
The LPGA International is the final
qualifying tournament for amateur golfers
hoping to make it into the professional
ranks.
This five day event will take place on


"The biggest thing last year was the maturity
factor. This year Ihave a different demeanor
and feeling about the whole game. Last year I
was feeling like if I didn't make it I would have
given up, it was like a sense of urgency. But this
year I am more confident, relaxed and feeling
much better about the whole tour and Idea of
turning professional."

Bahamian golfer Raquel Riley


the Legends and Champions course of
the LPGA November 30th-December
4th.
An excited Riley said she is now able to
control the pressure of turning pro, stating
that she will use her experience from the
tournaments she has played in the past
to guide her.
She said: "I've played in a lot of tour-
naments to see if I was ready to take it to
the next level. I've played in a few last'
year, but I didn't fair too well.


"Not because I wasn't hitting the ball
well, but mentally I was saying that I was-
n't ready last year.
"The biggest thing last year was the
maturity factor. This year I have a differ-
ent demeanor and feeling about the whole
game. Last year I was feeling like if I did-
n't make it I would have given up, it was
like a sense of urgency.
"But this year I am more confident,
relaxed and feeling much better about the
whole tour and idea of turning


professional.
"It has always been a dream of mine
since I started playing golf."
Last year Riley played in the qualifying'
rounds of the LPGA tournament, suc-
cessfully making the first cut of 30 mem-
bers. ,
A professional debut would have come
that year, but Riley lost out at a play-off
between her and two other golfers.

Dream
After coming so close to a lifetime
dream she considered giving up, but Riley
Said she realised that it would have take
more than skills on the greens to put her
there.
"I know I have the game to be out
there, it will just take me being tough
mentally, having that lengthy focus to
play," said Riley.
"There is no doubt in my mind that I
can do it, because I know that I can.
"See the thing about golf is you don't
know how long the game is going to last.
Sometimes a game of golf can be done in
like three hours, sometimes it will take
six, there is no time limit on the game.


"It's just a matter of staying focussed for
that lengthy time. If I can stay focussed I
know I will be able to make it in ."
Earlier in the year Riley played in the
Public Links Qualifier tournament, a tour-
nament she is calling a "feet-wetter."
Admitting that her game has really tak-
en off after the tournament, she still
believes that controlling her nerves in the
upcoming qualifying tournaments will be
a factor.
Riley got to a late -start in the sport,
picking up her first club at the age of 16.
She added: "The only thing I really
have to do is stay focussed, don't let the
nerves get the better part of my game.
"I knew I wanted to be a professional
golfer from the first day I enlisted in the
PGA tour as an intern.
"Doing my internship at the PGA was
exciting and will probably every golfer's
dream, but that wasn't enough. I needed
more, I wanted to be out there.
"Witnessing how they were treated by
the executives of the PGA, really moti-
vated me to go out there and give it my
all."
Indisputably one of the top female
golfers in the Bahamas, Duncombe is cur-
rently in Florida training for the tour.


L TheTribneffR


r~Enl I I I









- THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes


Page 2C






Uniting denominations





through sports, health


N By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
T he Bahamas
Christian Council
and the Ministry
of Youth, Sports
and Culture are
joining forces in an initiative
to unite different religious
denominations in the Bahamas


through sports, and promote
healthy lifestyles among
churchgoers.
Enlisted
They are calling the project
The Church Games, which will
be held under the theme "Unit-
ed in Christ through Sports",
and have already enlisted the


support of various religious
denominations in the country.
Churches have chosen
colours to be their trademark
throughout the games: The
Church of God National Office
(Red), Anglican Diocese (Pur-
ple), Catholic Archdiocese
(Navy Blue), Nazerene
Churches (Royal Blue), Bap-
tist (Lilac), Assemblies of


Brethren (Orange), Apostolic
(Green), and Seventh Day
Adventist (Gold).
Competing
The Games, which will fea-
ture churches competing in
baseball, basketball, boxing,
cycling, soccer, softball, swim-
ming, track and field and vol-


leyball, opens on Tuesday,
October 11 arid ends on Satur-
day, October 21.
And while October may be
some time away, churches are
busy preparing themselves,
though they say that competi-
tion is not the focus of these
activities.
Father David N Cooper, pas-
tor of Holy Family Roman
Catholic Church, and chaplain
in the Archdiocese Youth
Office, spearheads the! denom-
ination's efforts to participate
in the games. Husband and
wife team, Colin Knowles and
Oria Woods-Knowles, two
founders of the games, and
members of his parish, he adds,
have been pushing the dioce-
se's involvement from "day
one".
But the decision to get
involved was more than just to
support the work of his mem-
bers, says the pastor. The arch-
diocese wishes to be part of a
programme that will bring
churches back to the original
purpose of the church.
"This partnership (between
the Christian Council and the
Ministry) is trying to clean-up
the sports environment and
take it back to where it used
to be," he tells Tribune Reli-
gion. "If,you look back in the
day, churches were the ones
pushing sports in this country,
downplaying competition and
building up the camaraderie."
Even more important than
bringing churches "back to the
basics", is the fact that The
Church Games will present an
opportunity for denominations
to fellowship with one another,
since this is only done at
national events.
Says the pastor: "If we must


try to fight the social ills that
exist today, all denominations
need to come together because
one or two people cannot do
it. These games are a great ecu-
menical approach to this
because once we draw the
masses in, we can start to min-
ister. We have to get them
where they are interested first,
and sports is a major tool to
garner people."
Father Cooper believes that
the church has a responsibility
to cater to the physical man as
well as the spiritual man. And
these games provide that
opportunity.
"Churches shouldn't only
deal with the spiritual man
because we can't preach to a
man who is hungry. You have
to feed him first," the minister
argues. "Jesus is our example
and he didn't just preach,
preach, preach. He sat with
them, ate with them, talked to
them. These games are help-
ing us as ministers to get back
to the basics."
Organisers
Leading up to The Games,
organisers have been hosting
various activities. On Friday,
September 2 there was the Bat-
tle of the Bands & Choirs at
the Thomas A Robinson Sta-
dium. And on Saturday, Sep-
tember 3, organisers hosted a
Fun, Run, Walk & Push, leav-
ing the Kendal G L Isaacs
Gymnasium at 6am.
According to a press release
from the Games Secretariat,
the purpose of the sporting
activities is to bring a more

SEE page 2C


Special collection to help



Hurricane Katrina victims


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
THE Archdiocese of Nassau is joining
forces with 195 Catholic dioceses through-
out the United States and the world who
are taking up a special collection this
weekend to help the tens of thousands
affected by Hurricane Katrina.
Archbishop Patrick Pinder has asked
all parishes in the Archdiocese of Nassau
to take up the collection the weekend of
September 10-11.
The Archbishop has also asked every-
one to please remember the people who
have lost so much in the devastating storm
that is believed to have killed thousands.
Aftermath
The contributions will be made to
Catholic Relief Services, which was very
generous to the Bahamas in the aftermath
of hurricanes Frances and Jeanne last
year.
Catholic Relief Services was founded


Archdiocese of Nassau joining forces with

195 Catholic dioceses across US, world

S in 1943 by' the Catholic Bishops of the
United States.
Mission
Its mission is to assist the poor and dis-
advantaged, leveraging the teachings of
the gospel of Jesus Christ to alleviate
human suffering, promote development
of all people and to foster charity and jus-
tice throughout the world.
"Now is the time for us to express our
solidarity with the victims of the natural
disaster in their country," Archbishop
Pinder said in his memo.
Pastors and administrators have been
asked to encourage people to respond
0 ARCHBISHOP P PINDER generously to this collection.


The Tribune


Michael Maragh ordained deacon


* ARCHBISHOP Drexel Gomez has conferred the sacrament of Holy Orders on Michael Shannon Maragh (left). The
Ordination of Deacon Maragh follows that of Rev Carlton Turner (right) who was ordained at the historic Church of All Saints
in Mangrove Cay, Andros, on August 24. See full story on Page 3C
(Photo courtesy of St Barnabas Anglican Church)


I


si-








1-'AL L, IM~l1~UY, ~LI- I LV~bI-ib, ~U~RELIGIONiU~


ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE .church on Blue Hill and Wulff
Roads is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
September 11, 7 am Sung Mass, 10
am Sunday School and Adult Bible
Classes, 11 am Praise and Worship,
Sung Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins and
Mass, 4 pm Youth Band Practice,
6:30 pm Lay Pastors' Training, Lay-
ing A Solid Foundation, Adult Band
Practice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins and
Mass, 1 pm Mid-day Mass, 6 pm -
Prayer Chapel, 7 pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass, 6:30
pm Marriage Enrichment Class, 7
pm Prayer Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins and
Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm Young Adult
Choir Practice, 7 pm Senior Choir
Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins and Mass,
4 pm Confirmation Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm Christian
Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm Boys
Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm Youth
Alpha (every third Saturday), 3:30
pm to 4 pm Boys Brigade (ages
10+), 4 pm Youth Band Practice, 6


tr dicM


pm Altar Guild, 6 pm Confessions

EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East Street,
"where Jesus Christ is Lord, and
everyone is special", is scheduled to
hold the following services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday School &
Adult Bible Class, 11 am Morning
Celebration, 7 pm Communion Ser-
vice, 8 pm 'Jesus, the Light of World'
Radio Programme on ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel Choir Prac-
tice
Wednesday, 8 pm Midweek
Prayer Meeting (Second Wednesday)
- Cell Group Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells Choir
Practice, 8 pm Men's Fellowship
Meeting (Every 4th Thursday), 7:45
pm Women's Fellowship Meeting
(Every 4th Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Conquerors for
Christ Club (Boys & Girls Club), 8
pm East Street Youth Fellowship
Meeting


Saturday, 6:30 am Early Morning
Prayer Meeting

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK
YOU are invited to worship with
the church family at 9:30 am or 11
am on Sunday. Sunday School meets
during the 11 am service and the
Youth Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the corner
of Peck's Slope and Princes' Street,
across from the Central Bank. Park-
ing is available immediately behind
the Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST HOLINESS
CHURCH OF GOD
THE church on First Holiness Way,
Bamboo Town, is scheduled to hold
the following services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday School,


11 am Morning Worship, 7 pm -
Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer & Praise
Service, 7:30 pm Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise & Wor-
ship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30 pm -
Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm SALT
Ministry (Single Adults Living Tri-
umphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm SOME
Ministry (Save Our Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths Day/Dedi-
cation of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission Day/Com-
munion
4th Sundays Men's Day Service

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES
INTERNATIONAL
THE church in the Summer Winds
Plaza, Harrold Road, is scheduled to
hold the following services:


Sunday, 8 am Morning Glory
Breakthrough Service, 10:30 am -
Divine Worship Service (Live broad-
cast at 11 am on More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer meeting
every Wednesday and Saturday at 5
am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm Bible
Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meeting
For further information, e-mail:
ufm@bahamas.net.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949

CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street south is
scheduled to hold worship services at
7 am, 9 am and 11 am on Sunday,
September 11:

Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day Praise
and Deliverance Service, 7:45 pm.-
Men's Fellowship Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible Enrich-
ment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive Youth
Meeting
Bishop V G Clarke is the senior-
pastor.


Pope


meets


with Irish President May McAlese


I FROM page 1C


Christ-like attitude and atmosphere
back into sports, and demonstrate that
there can be healthy, competitive sport-
ing activities without the use of alco-
hol, drugs or foul language.
"Uniting people of different religion,
different cultures and different races
here in the Bahamas, in a display of
love and fellowship through sports. To
demonstrate the true meaning of Chris-
tianity, and the love of ones fellow
man..," says the release.
One of its goals, according to the
committee, is to re-open the doors of
churches to those who still find them-
selves on the outside and need to come
into a welcoming family of worship. "So
that the church would practice the art of
reaching outside of their four walls, and
once again take back the communities
in the surrounding areas by hosting
community events that involve the


members of the church as well as the
people of the community."
Another denomination that is behind
this cause is the Anglican Diocese of
the Bahamas.

Spearheads
According to Father Enrique McCart-
ney, who spearheads the Anglican dio-
cese's involvement in The Games, Arch-
bishop Drexel W Gomez decided it
would be beneficial for the.denomina-
tion to engage in fellowship with other
churches through the initiative.
"I also believe as the person respon-
sible for youth activities in the Anglican
church, that the Church Games will be
an opportunity to encourage all Chris-
tians to work together and support each
other in order that we are unified, this is
possible through the fellowship and fun


that the games will offer," he adds.
Father McCartney says that the event,
which will be held every two years, is
also an opportunity to promote "Chris-
tian charity" among participants. It is
also an opportunity to show "humanity
though athletics".
He stands with Father Cooper of the
Catholic church and other religious
leaders who believe that fulfilling a
man's physical needs and promoting his
health is equally as important as nur-
turing his spirit. "As Jesus is both
human in his intellect and body, in addi-
tion to being divine in his nature, and as
we are both body mind and spirit, we
are called upon to nurture all aspects of
6ur being," Father McCartney explains.
"Exercise and the ability to build up
our bodies is important simply because
'the body is biblically/theologically
referred to as the temple of Holy Spir-


it."
Father Cooper believes that Chris-
tians should never neglect their health
and maintenance of their physical bod-
ies. "I believe that Jesus does encourage
building up of our bodies. And I believe
he does encourage positive recreation
through the use of our bodies. After
all, the early followers of Jesus were
very physical in that they walked and
often did manual labor such as fishing."
Legacy
Says the youth leader: "We must also
remember that our sporting legacy as
Bahamians owes a lot to the church's
involvement in athletics. "Churches are
then in a sense returning to their roots
and at the same time reminding soci-
ety that spiritual and physical activity
can go hand in hand."


Holy Trinity

workshops
WORKSHOPS -
Friday 6.30pm, Saturday
8.30am
"Mission and Min-
istry" Father Harry
Ward, Father Atma
Budhu, Archdeacon
Ranfurly Brown
"Communications
and Technology" Min-
ister Alvin Moss, Tarran
Taylor, Chris Monaghan
(Christian Duplications
International)
"Identifying, Equip-
ping and Empowering
Leaders"


'AUt2I U, I HUMHUAY, St-' I tlVIlbttH ZUUO


I i -" I l-ilUNI -






* I L.. i I . I kI h





Archbishop Gomez confers




sacrament of Holy Orders
OtV--Lttll~lt ^-- l-7y V~lV'li I^ '^^


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
St Barnabas Anglican Church was
filled to capacity on Sunday as
Archbishop Drexel Gomez con-
ferred the sacrament of Holy
Orders on Michael Shannon
Maragh.
During the entrance hymn "Come Ye
Faithful Raise the Anthem", the faces of
family and friends were filled with pride and
joy to see another young man devote his life
to God and his church. Also in attendance
were Michael Maragh's parish families from
St George's, St Gregory's and St Anne's,
and his family members from Long Island.
The Ordination of Deacon Maragh fol-
lows that of Rev Carlton Turner who was
ordained on August 24 at the historic Church
of All Saints in Mangrove Cay, Andros.
A large crowd of Anglicans charted flights
and travelled by boat and Bahmasair to
attend a very emotional service,
Rev Turner is following in the footsteps of
his forefather Rev William Henry Sweet-
ing, the first black Bahamian priest who not
only started the original building of the
Church but donated the land for the con-
struction and the development of All Saints.
Descendants of Father Sweeting recently
refurbished the historic church.
Both Deacons were ordained out of the
Parish of St Barnabas and bring unique his-
tories and skill to the ministry within the
archdiocese and the nation at large.
Rev Maragh started his education at St
George's Kindergarten and then moved on
to Claridge Primary School. He was afford-
ed the opportunity to attend St Anne's Pri-


* ARCHBISHOP D GOMEZ


mary School from the sixth grade through a
scholarship from his home parish of St
George's. During his time at St Anne's, Rev
Maragh was a prefect and was graduated in
1995.
After high school he attended the Col-
lege of the Bahamas to study medicine. He
studied there for a year but after the tragic
death of a beloved uncle he left the college
knowing that medicine was not his true call-
ing. It was during his time of grieving that he
met Canon Basil Tynes, who guided him to
discover his true calling to the ministry.
He left Nassau to study at Codrington
College, Barbados, in 1999. While at
Codrington College he was vital in the cre-
ation of the college's first computer lab and
wireless network. Rev Maragh aspires to


continue his education in the computer and
Internet technology fields. He would also
like to further his spiritual formation by pur-
suing an advanced degree in spirituality.
Rev Turner was born in New Providence
but later moved to Mangrove Cay at the age
of three and lived with his grand aunt, Cat-
echist Jenny Veronica Sweeting. He attend-
ed the Mangrove Cay High School and was
graduated as Head Boy. In 1995 he entered
the College of the Bahamas and pursued a
degree in education with special emphasis on
Spanish/English. After graduating from the
college he began teaching at A F Adderley
Junior High School.
In 2002 he left the Bahamas to begin his
priesthood academic journey at Codrington
College in Barbados. In 2005 he received a
bachelor's degree in theology, with upper
class honours, from the University of the
West Indies, Cave Hill.
Rev Turner has spent the last 10 years in
the parish of St Barnabas, where he got the
chance to develop as a youth minister and
was also exposed to the ministry at all levels
of the church. From the youth department,
to the music ministry, to the server's guild, to
the vestry, St Barnabas has helped him
understand ministry in many different ways.
Under the impressive ministries of Suf-
fragan Bishop Gilbert Thompson, and espe-
cially Basil Tynes, the present rector, Rev
Turner was given excellent training and guid-
ance not only in undertaking efficient min-
istry but also in realising the obvious call on
his life. The recently ordained deacon is now
stationed at St Gregory's Anglican Church,
Carmichael Road under the ministry of
Father Atma Budhu.


The 'right tofood'


* By REV HENRY
CHARLES
A "right to food" sounds like
an attempt to introduce the ver-
nacular to human rights, but it's
really nothing of the sort. The
framers of the documents that
created the human rights move-
ment made it clear that the right
to food is a fundamental right.
The Universal Declaration of
HumnanhRights; f'Wb nstar ,
state MI doneR.
to a standard of living
for the health and well-beiig f
himself and his family, including
food, clothing, housing, medical
care and necessary social ser-
vices."
Article 11 of the Internation-
al Covenant on Economic,
Social, and Cultural Rights
recognises both a right to ade-
quate food and the right of
everyone to be free of hunger.
The strange thing is that
whenever we see horrific pic-
tures of hunger on TV (as
recently in Niger), we never
think primarily of human rights,
as we do when we see refugees
huddled behind wire fences, or
hear human beings referred to
as "collateral damage." We
think in terms of charity, and
we praise efforts to provide
relief as instances of self-moti-
vated generosity.
All signatories (like T&T) to
the Universal Declaration and
the International Covenant,
however, assume legal commit-
ments to "take appropriate
steps to insure the realisation"
of the two rights above both
"individually and through inter-
national co-operation."
Policies
Thus, in establishing policies
and programmes to address
hunger in their own contexts
they are not simply doing char-
ity at a macro level. They are
fundamentally meeting com-
mitments undertaken under
international law.
The commitments are quite
specific. Nations pledge them-
selves to "improve methods of
production, conservation and.
distribution of food, making full
tise of technical and scientific


* REV H CHARLES


know-ledge, by disseminating
know-ledge of the principles of
nutrition and by developing or
reforming agrarian systems in
such a way as to achieve the
most efficient development and
utilisation of natural resources."
The right to food, however,
is yet to receive in the interna-
tional conscience the kind of
attention it deserves as part of
the body of international law.
Philip Alston, a contemporary
human rights expert, says this
about the neglect: 'i
"It is paradoxical, but hardly
surprising that the right to food
has been endorsed more often
and with greater unanimity and
urgency than most other human
rights while at the same time
being violated more compre-
hensively and systematically
than probably any other right."
We have some idea of the
durability of the violation, when
we note that President Kennedy
declared in 1961 that the sixties
would see a man on the moon
and the phasing out of hunger
among children.
The violation is especially
unforgivable today, because for
the first time in human history,
famines can be anticipated and
their effects eliminated. There is
enough food to feed six billion
people. Needless deaths of chil-
dren and chronic malnutrition
are not simply the tragic fate of
the poor. They are preventable
realities, and they constitute an
offence against international
law more clearly than breaches
of many other political and eco-
nomic rights enshrined in inter-


CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921 J

will hold
: "THE ABUNDANT LIFE CRUSADE"
with Evangelists
Elliott Neilly and Brentford Isaacs
Sunday, October 9th- 16th
Sundays 7:00p.m. Weeknights 7:30p.m.
a "Come and find peace of mind and
healing for the body and soul" I
-. +*l liiml lilii lllllmlmli lilll l~ l


national covenants.
Many people, however, speak
of hope for the 1.3 billion peo-
ple who live in absolute pover-
ty, and the 841 million who are
chronically malnourished, in
view of the globalisation of the
market economy. The assump-
tion-or delusion-is that the
global economy will create a
middle class in developing coun-
tries, and that somehow wealth
will trickle down to the least
advantaged.
Market forces by themselves
do not, however, bring about
levels of reduction in either
hunger or poverty. There is
understandable feeling that gov-
ernment interference only guar-
antees inefficiency, but unless
market processes are subject to
some direction and control, the
results can be a creation of
wealth for a few, with benefits
for many others, but with
increasing insecurity and lack
of any meaningful access for
many more to national
resources.
Situation
The authors of the Interna-
tional Covenant on Economic,
Social, and Cultural Rights
anticipated this situation and
required officials of each signa-
tory nation to report at regular
intervals to the committee that
supervises compliance with the
covenant. Each country must
indicate in some detail how they
are meeting their commitment
to enhance the economic rights
of their citizens in the light of
international law.
It is unrealistic, however, to
imagine that most governments
today fully control the econom-
ic development of their nations,


as the reporting requirement
seems to assume. Quite often
more powerful forces are in
control, whose primary purpose
is not the well-being of the host
nation but that of stockholders
residing in one or other great
metropolis.
What is often lacking in the
host nation itself, however, is
the lack of political will to trans-
form the conditions of life
besetting the worst off in soci-
ety. It is an absolute scandal,
for instance, in oil-and"ga-Phch
Trinidad that the essential con-
cerns of some people in some ,
parts of the country remain "
water and lights, basic dimen-
sions of life without hunger.
The failure to make condi-
tions different may have some-
thing to do with poor delivery',,
systems, but much more to do' ,
with a lack of political will.
Political will, very often the
result of insistent pressures oif
the powers that be, is what pr
duced many of the social break-'
throughs we rejoice in today-
the proliferation of economic-..
rights themselves being a chief
example.
Intensified pressures by
NGOs-among other means-
can force governments to do
more to realise their national
and international obligations
where economic rights are con-
cerned. Among these rights, the
right to food is basic. Without it,
other rights can hardly get off
the ground.
The dream of a world free of
hunger, with no one, child or
adult, going to bed hungry, is
an enduring dreain of the
human race. It need not remain
a dream, especially today when
the resources to realise it lies
fully within our control.


DISTINGUISHED



LECTURE

SERIES


Thursday, Sept. 8th : 7pm

Parish Hall, Lewis Street








PANELLISTS


Livingston Bostwick

Tim Munnings

-Ternia Wright

"Celebrating 160 Years of Service to the Community"


S/ Sunday, September 11
2005 at 2:30pm





PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


T


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TRIBUNE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,2005, PAGE 50
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 5C


E TRIBUNE


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Chisi ttetd


0 By CLEMENT JOHNSON
A few days ago I
had one of the
strangest expe-
riences of my
life. I was vis-
iting a friend in her office
downtown but was held up for
a bit at the reception's desk.
My friend later informed me
that they were having a prayer
meeting, because some of her
co-workers were going through
some "trying times".
What was so strange about
this was that all of the women
involved in the prayer meeting
were wearing faces that
masked anger and bitterness.
The whole office seemed void
of any semblance of Christian-
ity.
Later on I asked one of the
women a question, which was
met with a quick snub and a
look that read, "why are you
bothering me". I left that office
with a bitter taste in my mouth.
About half an hour later I
decided to go into a eatery to
grab a bite to eat. It took the
waiter about 20 minutes to ask
me if I was interested in order-.
ing something from the menu.
She mumbled in a low and
painful, "you wan' order
sumtin'". Not the slightest hint
of a smile. The ironic this was
that she was wearing a pin


which read "I am too blessed to
be stressed", and gospel music
was playing in the background.
The paradox of Christian
music coupled with a pin filled
with religious jargon amidst a
room filed with people with
bad attitudes was overwhelm-
ing, so I got up and left the
restaurant in search of peace
and a friendly face.
This small journey of mine
only got worse as I sought to
satisfy my hunger at a fast food
restaurant, where the service
and attitude was even more
pathetic. This negative attitude
within our country is cause for
great concern. We were taught
to always be polite, because it is
the Christian thing, the right
thing to do.
According to the Merriam
Webster dictionary, the word
"attitude" is defined as "an
internal position or feeling with
regard to something else". Oth-
er words often used as syn-
onyms are: "disposition, feel-
ing, mood, opinion, sentiment,
temper, tone, perspective,
frame of mind, outlook, view,
or morale."
When I asked my friend why
most of her co-workers had
such a bad attitude, she told
me that they were going
through some problems. This
did not hold much water with
me, because problems don't


equate to a "bad attitude",. in our words or actions, i
Our attitude is our inward example negativity, criticis
disposition toward other things, rebellion, defiance, impatien
such as people or circum- uncooperative, apathetic, d
stances. I remember reading couragement, arrogance rud
somewhere in the bible, "when ness and others.
one becomes a Christian a part It is a responsibility of
of our new creation is the Christians to maintain a po
development of new attitudes". tive and proper attitude. Chi
Our attitude should become tians must display the tangil
like that of Jesus. image of Christ at all tim
The bible also says, "your regardless of problems, moc



"T negative attitude within our
country is cause for great concern.
We were taught to always be polite,
because it is the Christian thing, the
right th ing to do..". ohnso



attitude should be the same as or difficulties they are goi.
that of Christ Jesus" (Philippi- through. This is often easi
ans 2;5). "You were taught, said than done but it is possib
with regard to your former way A kind word or smile
of life, to put off the old self, always welcome.
which is being corrupted by its I was standing in line at
deceitful desires; to be made shop in Palmdale, when
new in the attitude of your woman who had been stan
minds" (Ephesians 4:22). ing in a queue for about :
. Christians should always minutes shouted out, "My Gc
reject bad attitudes whenever we need to do something in tt
they are displayed outwardly country. We have such bad at


for
m,
ce,
lis-
le-

all
'si-
ris-
ble
nes
ids


ng
der
le.
is
a
a
d-
30
)d,
his
tti-


tudes. I don't need to take this,
I can go somewhere else and
get the same thing. I have a car,
money in my purse, plus I have
time so I need not take this."
And she was correct; many
businesses lose millions of dol-
lars every year because of poor
service and bad attitudes.
Leland R Ping, in his book
"The Christian's Attitude", lists
some dos and donts:
Caring Paul told Romans
to "bear with the scruples of
the weak" (Romans 15:1).
Each of us are weak and
"down and out" at some point
in our lives so it's important
that when someone looks out
for us we. should return the
favour. Furthermore, bearing
one another's burdens is part of
Christ's law (Galatians 6:2).

Productive Solomon
urges us to consider the ant for
its life of productivity (Proverbs
6:6). And, it is made clear by
Jesus' command in Matthew
28:19 that we are to be teaching
God's word.

Positive Nothing is worse
than someone who is always
complaining. We need to have
an attitude that expresses the
joy of being a Christian and
show that attitude in the way
we live our lives.


The Christian should not be:
Covetous In Paul's letter
to Timothy, he encourages the
young preacher not to "stray
from the faith", or as some ver-
sions word it, "covet" after the
world's goods (1 Timothy 6:10).
And, the Colossians were
informed that coveting was so
serious it was considered idol-
atry (Colossians 3:5).
Be degrading to one anoth-
er Titus was told "to speak
evil of no one" (Titus 3:2). This
most certainly goes for our fel-
low Christians. We need to
guard ourselves against gossip
and backbiting, knowing that
such action will hurt others and
shows a poor attitude on our
part.
Be negative equal to the
need to be positive is the need
for us to be negative. All of us
know people who always find
the bad in life. These people
are not encouraging to us at
all. Let's not be one of them!
It's important that as Chris-
tians we be the light of Christ in
the home, the workplace and in
the Church. We are called to
be the salt of the earth, we then
must encourage all of our fel-
lowmen, Christian or not. A
positive attitude is the secret
to a productive life.


Worshipping among the ruins

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'Man of faith answering


the call to serve'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
"Man of faith answering the call to serve" was
the theme of the 7th Pastoral Anniversary Ser-
vice for Rev Denzil J Clarke, pastor of the New
St Luke Baptist Church.
The service was held at the church on East
Street last Sunday before an up-beat crowd.
Church members and visitors alike thanked God
for allowing their pastor to experience another
year of "bountiful harvest".
The Praise Team led the congregation in pop-
ular chorus and the opening hymn "Trust and
Obey" was sung with enthusiasm and joy. Mem-
bers from the Fellowship Association were out in
full force, and sister churches also joined the
New St Luke's congregation for the special ser-
vice.
The moderator for the service was Brother
Elvis Demeritte, and the sermon was delivered
by Rev Godfrey Alfred Stubbs, pastor of End
Time Missionary Baptist Church in Milwaukee,
Wisconsin.
Rev Denzil Clarke is a member of the
Bahamas Defense Force, a native of Hatchet
Bay, Eleuthera and the son of the late Joe Clarke
and Iva Clarke. In his thank you address Rev


Clarke acknowledged all of those who con-
tributed to the day, and asked them for their
continued prayers.
In a written message he said:
"The work of God is not done by great people
but by ordinary people who are committed to
him. We may say to God, 'I am nothing. I have
no gifts. I often fail miserably. Do you really
want to use me?'
"The answer to that question is found in God's
word. He used the hesitant, inarticulate Moses to
lead Israel to freedom. He used men of herds
and flocks as well as fishermen and farmers to
accomplish His work and record.
"That's still the way God works. Although
we have 'mega methods', mass media and super
churches, it is ordinary people who do God's
extraordinary work.
"When we ask, 'Does God really want to use
me?' the answer is clear. God chooses the weak
things of the world to put to shame the things
which are mighty.
"God has been using ordinary people like you
and me for thousands of years. Why would He
stop now? Lord, I thank you for using me anoth-
er year."


PTEMBR TH 17TH 2005


Opening Eucharist St. Agnes
7 PM Thursday, September 15th


Workshops Holy Trinity
Friday September 16th,

6 PM (Registration)
Saturday, September 17th

8:30 AM


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005


I HI- I HltUNt-


[


*b -- --


ft







THE TRIBUNE .


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2005, PAGE 7C


THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 8, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Benjamin Franklin "The Chess Master" Benjamin Spy "The Confidence of Strangers" 9/11 Clear the Skies (CC)
U WPBT Franklin tries to persuade the French to lend support to The remaining recruits learn cultiva-
the Revolutionary cause. ) (CC) lion. (CC),
The Insider (N) Big Brother 6 (Live) ,) (CC) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "Endgame" C1
B WFOR n (CC) The team probes deaths that follow (CC)
cosmetic procedures. n
Access Holly- Joey Sara loves Will & Grace Scrubs J.D. initi- Scrubs J.D. falls (9:59) ER "Carter Est Amoureux"
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) Joey. A(CC) "Friends With ates a SARS for a bartender. Pratt rages at Neela; Carter reunites
Benefits" (CC) quarantine. (CC) ,1 (CC) with Kern in Paris. l, (CC)
Deco Drive The O.C. "Aftermath" Trey clings to Reunion "1986 (Pilot)" Several peo- News (CC)
B WSVN life, as police try to find the shooter. lie reunite at the funeral of a friend;
I__ ,_(N) (C) formative events in 1986.
Jeopardy! (CC) NFL Opening Kickoff 2005 (Live) NFL Football Oakland Raiders at New England Patriots. From Gillette
WPLG (CC) Stadium in Foxboro, Mass. (Live) n (CC)

(:00) American Cold Case Files "Cowboys on the The First 48 "Fallen; Texas Buming" The Real Exorcists Spiritual war-
A&E Justice 'Serial Case; Office Politics" Retired offi- Apparent suicide; motel room. (CC) riors battle purported cases of de-
Wife" A (CC) cers track down a killer. (CC) monic possession.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET BET Style The Parkers n The Parkers CA Blowin' Up: Fat- Girlfriends 3' Soul Food A (CC)
(CC) (CC) ty Koo (CC)
CB Coronation Breaking Point Behind-the-scenes of the yes vs. no forces on the 1995 (:10) BBC World ** JACK &
CBC Street (CC) Referendum. (N) (Part 2 of 2) (CC) Report (CC) JILL (1998) (CC)
Dr, C Late Night With The Apprentice n, (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
C>NBC, Conan O'BrIen,,, -
CNr (:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
NN Cooper 360c ,(CC)-
Comedy Central The Daily Show Comedy Central Comedy Central South Park But- Chappelle's Reno 9111
COM Presents Mike With Jon Stew- Presents (CC) Presents (CC) ters reveals a Show Snoop Wiegel's boyfriend
Birbiglia. art (CC) dark secret. Dogg; Big Boi. proposes. (C)
CCURT Cops "Coast to The Investigators "The Hunt for a Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators Civilian and cel-
SUT Coast (CC) Sea KillSerial killers. ldence ebrity stalking cases. (N)
That's So Raven ** x TIGER CRUISE (2004, Drama) Hayden Panettiere, Bill Pullman, Buzz on Maggie Sister, Sister
DISN "Bend It Like Bianca Collins. A teen visits her Navy father on Sept. 11,2001. 'NR' (CC) "Bugsitting; Le Tamera forms a
Baxter" Termite" singing group.
DIY This Old House Weekend Wood Works Home 10 Contractor: Va- DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
DClassics (CC) Handyman (N) cation Homes cue cue
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx
W ,,Depth Tagestema Depth
IE it's Good to Be * THE BIRDCAGE (1996, Comedy) Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, Nathan Lane. A That Was Huge
E! son's engagement throws a kink into a gay couple's life. 'Titanic" stars.
SE PN (:00) Sunday NFL Countdown (Live) (CC) 2005 World Series of Poker From 2005 World Series of Poker From
PriMiLas Vegas. (CC) Las Vegas. (CC)
ESPNI To Be Announced
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Back Stage The Holy Rosary Gospel of John In the Heart of
_Vv i Lady ____ ___the Church
FITT (:00) Total Body FitNation 'You Are What You Take" Ultimate Goals "Karate With Kid" The Extremists The Extremists
IT TV Sculpt Plus Supplements. n (IA (CC) ,1,) (CC) n (CC)
FOX-N Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
___ _, ,_Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL (:00) MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at Washington Nationals. From RFK Stadium in Wash- Best Damn Sports Show Period
rNF iL ngton, D.C. (Live) (Live) (CC)
GOLF (:00) Solheim Cup Opening Cere- Post Game Show (Live) Solheim Cup Highlights Solhelm Cup
GOLF mony (ive) .I. __Highlights
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire 0 The Amazing Race 1 (CC) Dog Eat Dog n (CC)
AG4Te h 1:00) Attack of X-Play "Ninten- Cheat "San An- Fastlane "Things Done Changed" Icons "Playsta- .Cinematech
4. iec he Showl (N) dogs. dreas" ,' (CC) tion" (N)
( 00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Lazarus" A MOTHER'S GIFT (1995, Western) Nancy McKeon, Adrian Pasdar,
HALL Texas Ranger "The Chairman" continues to elude Adam Storke. A wife gives up her dreams to go west with her husband.
(CC) a frustrated Walker. (CC) (CC)____
HGT Dream House Holmes on Homes "Bar None" A Real Renos House Hunters The Block "Tears, Tantrums & Tri-
HGTV '"The Waiting (C) "Stairway to (CC)Stairway to A (CC) umphs"Jaime awards the prize for
______ Game" C( CC) Heaven?" (CC) umproom number four. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Christians &
INSr '(CC) (CC) day.. Jews
SXlaolin Show- Sabrina, there The Fresh Friends Monica Friends Joe Everybody- Everybody
KTLA. down Cl (CC) Teenage Witch A Prince of Bel-Air dates a restaui- takes RaheLto Loves Raymond Loves Rmond
_f______ ___ first kiss. (CC) (CC) rant customer. the hospital C Cl (CC) "Tissues" (CC)
** HYSTERICAL BLINDNESS (2002, Drama) Uma '**s THE INCREDIBLE MRS. RITCHIE (2003, Drama) Gena Row-
LIFE Thurman, Gena Rowlands. Three women look for love lands, James Caan, Kevin Zegers. Premiere. An eccentric widow gives a
and a stable life in New Jersey. (CC) troubled youth life lessons. (CC)
MSNBC : 00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
i Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Romeo! n (CC) Full House C Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of The Cosb
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show A (CC)
NTV Will & Grace Big Brother 6 (Live) n (CC) The Cut The Final Four on a Trash News A (CC) News
(CC) Barge" (N) A (CC)
SI Survivor: Back Hunting Adven- The World of Benelli's Dream Buckmasters Survivor: Back From the Outback
OLN i From-Outback tures Beretta Hunts Cln (CC)
SPEED Auto Racing NASCAR Racin Craftsman Truck Series -- NCTS 200. From Richmond International NASCAR Be-
o c ___;_ Speedway in Richmohd, Va. (Live) yond the Wheel
Praise the Lord Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Ross Friends ( (CC) ** BLAST FROM THE PAST (1999, Comedy) Brendan Fraser, Alicia
TBS Loves Raymond seeks advice Silverstone, Christopher Walken. A man emerges from a bomb shelter af-
A (CC) from Guru Saj. ter nearly 35 years. (CC) (DVS)
(:00) in a Fix Un- Mostly True Stories: Urban Leg- Area 51: Fact or Fiction (CC) Exorcists: The True Story
TLC finished tasks. ends Revealed Cooked woman;
(CC) spider eggs in a cactus. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Slaughter" A meat ** A PERFECT MURDER (1998, Suspense) Michael Douglas,
INT der "Navy Blues" packer is suspected in a college ac- Gwyneth Paltrow, Viggo Mortensen. A man plots to have his wife mur-
CA tivisfs stabbing death. A dered by her lover.
TOON Camp Lazlo Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Mucha Lucha Yu-Gi-Oh! "Par- Zatch Bell "Zatch and Kiyo's
,,l'N Shower strike. tures Next Door (CC) adise Found" Odyssey"
TV5 Phenomania Les Grands duels du sport Les Enquites d'Eloise Rome TV5 Le Journal
TWC 6'00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
S'" w ,,, PMEdltMon (CC) (CC) ,(CC). _____,
UNIV 00) Inocentede Apuesta por un Amor La Esposa Vlrgen Aquiy Ahora

USA (:00) US. Open Tennis Men's Quarterfinals, From the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, NY. (ULive) (CC)
VHu1 Hogan Knows Hogan Knows Hogan Knows Hogan Knows Hogan Knows Hogan Knows AnnaNicole's
v___ Best C Best C Best Best C Best Best C Most Shocking
:... Home Improve- DARK DESCENT (2002, Suspense) Dean Cain, Scott Wiper, Maxim MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at
WGN ment Tim pulls a Genchev. An investigator probes a fatal underwater mining accident. C San Francisco Giants. From SBC
groin muscle. (CC) _____ ___ Park in San Francisco. (CC)
.. Everybody Smallville "Spirit" A wannabe prom Everwood "Where the Heart Is" WB11 News at Ten With Kalty
WPIX Loves Raymond queen's spirit is released, affecting Andy considers a prestigious post at Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Tissues" C) the behavior of others. a Chicago hospital (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
.... Jeopardy! (CC) Eve Shelly cooks Eve Coleman's Cuts Kevin starts Cuts "Rich Man, Dr. Phil
WSB Kl for Grant. C hair salon gets bondingwith Broke Man" C
(CC) shut down. (CC) Jack. (CC) (CC)
(6:15) *** * SHARK TALE (04, Coed Voces of Will THE GRUDE (2004 Horro Sarah Michelle
H BO-E MEN IN BLACK Smith, Robert De Niro. Animated. A ottom feeder pre- Gellar, Jason Behr. A woman and er boyfriend en-
(1997) 'PG-13' tends to be a shark slayer. C 'PG' (CC) counter vengeful spirits. 'PG-13' (CC)
H BO-P 6:30) *** Real Time Author Michael Eric ** THE BIG BOUNCE (2004, Comedy-Drama) Making Of:
WAITINGFORF Dyson. l(CC) Owen Wison, Gary Sinise. A woman asks a drifter to Rome (CC)
GUFFMAN 'R' help her con a developer. C 'PG-13' (CC)


H W (:00) ** LAST ACTION HERO (1993) Arnold (:15) *** MEN IN BLACK (1997, Science Fiction) Tommy Lee Jones,
HBO-W Schwarzenegger. A magic movie ticket plunges a boy Will Smith, Linda Fiorentino. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial activity
into on-screen action. A 'PG-13' (CC) on Earth. n 'PG-13' (CC)
B... (5:45) *** Rome "How Titus Pullo Brought *% THE CLEARING (2004, Suspense) Robert Red- :45) Just Like
SHBO-S PRESUMED IN- Down the Republic" Mark Antony re- ford, Helen Mirren. A man marches his kidnapping vic- eaven: HBO
NOCENT (1990) turns to Rome. Cl (CC) tim through a forest. C 'R' (CC) First Look (CC)
(:45) SPEED 2: CRUISE CONTROL (1997, Suspense) Sandra Bullock, Jason Patric, ** SHREK 2 (2004, Adventure)
MAX-E Willem Dafoe. A madman seizes the helm of a luxurious ocean liner. C( 'PG-13' (CC) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Mur-
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AV ALONG CAME POLLY (2004, Romance-Come- **s SECRET WINDOW (2004, Suspense) Johnny (:40 SAPPHIRE
MOMAX dy) Ben Stiller. A jilted newywed finds solace with an- Depp, John Turturro. A stranger accuses a troubled au- IRLS (2003)
other woman. C 'PG-13' (CC) thor of plagiarism. 'PG-13' (CC) Mary Carey. A
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on an all-gay cruise. 'R' (CC) Lem. A (CC) (CC) (CC)
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TMC Hose McGowan. A Colorado town is besieged by an Moira Kelly David Bowie. David Lynch's prequel to his quirky TV series.
ancient evil entity. Cl 'R' (CC) 'R' (CC)


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