Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00197
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: September 5, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00197
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"THE ONE & O


BIG MAC" F'"'
HIGH 88F
LOW 75F

SUN AND A
T-STORM


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.233


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005
----


PRICE 500


IN A RUSH Ti

BACK TO SCI
* SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE T


WILDCATS

IN TIE-BR
SEE TRIBUNE SP


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Contractor claims

to not have been

paid for five weeks


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
PARENTS with students
attending C C Sweeting Junior
High School have been asked
to personally report to the
school this morning in support
of the school's teachers, who
continue to stage a sit-out at the
The call from the school's
PTA president Dwight Rolle
comes after the teachers at C C
Sweeting Junior had staged a
week long sit-out complaining
of poor and unsightly conditions
at their school.
According to Mr Rolle, the
school will need to be closed
for "at least a week" to allow
the workers to complete the
renovations needed at the
school. Yesterday bathrooms at
the school had sections of the
roof and stall doors missing,
glass doors broken, sinks and
toilets unusable, and walkways
littered with sand, cement, shov-
els and other construction mate-
rial.


A group of prisoners from
Her Majesty's Prison at Fox Hill
were said to be at the school
late yesterday evening trying to
clean up the campus to facili-
tate an opening today.
Confirming this report, Ron
Pinder, parliamentary secretary
in the Ministry of Health, said
he was personally supervising
.the work being done.
"We are doing whatit tales,
to get the campus cleaned up,"
t he said.
"This is not unusual. We are
doing what it takes to get it in a
ready state. I have supervised
it before and I am doing it
again."
However, in spite of this
effort, Mr Rolle said that the
school needs at least another
week of work before they could
possibly expect to ask the teach-
ers to re-enter the classrooms.
Mr Rolle, a second year pres-
ident of the PTA, and school
board member for over four
years, said parents need to band
SEE page 12


Hunt continues for businessman


POLICE are questioning
several people as they try to
find a missing Eleuthera busi-
nessman.
The owner of Quality Inn
Cigatoo, Dwight Johnson, has
been missing since last Thurs-
day night.
After Mr Johnson vanished,
police found his white Ford
truck smeared with blood.
Officer-in-charge Asst Supt
Wendall Deveaux told The


Tribune yesterday that police
in Eleuthera and from New
Providence are continuing
their investigation and that
they were questioning several
people.
Mr Deveaux also said police
are following leads coming in
from various sources.
"So far there is nothing of
substance that would assist us
in locating him," said Mr
Deveaux.


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COB lecturer

claims to fear

for his life


M By JOHN MARQUIS.
THE College of the Bahamas faces more
bitter controversy today, with a senior lec-
turer refusing to return to the campus for the
new academic year "because my life will be
in danger."
Veteran lecturer Felix Bethel, a COB stal-
wart for nearly 30 years, says he fears for his
safety if he obeys an instruction by new act-
ing college president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson to report for duty this morning.
Mr Bethel yesterday'made it clear that
he will defy Dr Chipman-Johnson's order
and instead appeal to Minister of Educa-
tion Alfred Sears for protection. He said he
has an appointment with the minister this
morning.
Mr Bethel said that, as the only person
who officially called for the resignation of
former president Dr Rodney Smith follow-
ing the plagiarism scandal, he would be a tar-
get for some campus manual workers.
"The kind of people who supported Dr
SEE page 12


Accusations of'irregularities'

in government visa policy


MAJOR visa "irregularities" operating
through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
have created an alarming upsurgein immi-
grants entering the Bahamas over the last
three years, it was claimed last night.
The process allegedly short-circuits
immigration controls and has led to a
"massive and explosive" increase in the
number of non-immigrant visas granted
to Haitians, Chinese and other nationali-
ties.
The disclosures are made by the Free
National Movement, who claim to have
received information "which ought to give
every Bahamian cause for grave concern."
In a press release issued yesterday, the
party said: "In our Bahamas today there is
heightened fear and uncertainty about the
ever-increasing influx of foreign migra-
tion to our shores.
"Bahamians are justifiably concerned
that we are in danger of losing our nation-
al heritage and identity as more and more
immigrants seek refuge in the Bahamas,
whether for economic or political reasons.
"It is especially alarming when such a
massive increase in immigration appears to
have some kind of official sanction."
The FNM said it has information that
irregular visa schemes are operating
through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
These, it added, had short-circuited
Immigration Department controls and had
led to a massive and explosive increase in
the number of non-immigrant visas grant-


ed under the PLP government.
The release says: "In all of the year
2002, the last year of FNM governance, a
total of just over 100 non-immigrant visas
were issued to Haitian nationals. By
December, 2004, that number had grown
to more than 2,000 visas issued every year
by the PLP government, through the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs.
"In the first four months of 2005, the
number of non-immigrant visas issued to
Haitian nationals by the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs was about 1,000.
"At such a rate of growth in the first
four months of 2005 Bahamians could see
more than 3,000 non-immigrant visas
issued by Foreign Affairs to Haitian
nationals in one year alone."
The party explains that non-immigrant
visas are usually issued from within the
Bahamas only in extraordinary circum-
stances.
"Non-immigrant visas are meant to be
issued by Bahamian consular offices in
foreign countries after the individual
applies in that foreign country, not ordi-
narily by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in
Nassau, and not 'in bulk' to persons who
seem to be in the business of wholesaling
Bahamian entry visas.
"While the closure of our embassy in
Haiti would, of necessity, lead to the need
for visas to be issued in Nassau, rather
SEE page 12


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* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Christian
Council has expressed its con-
cern and heartfelt sympathy
for the victims of Hurricane
Katrina, many of whom still
suffer today in Louisiana, Mis-
sissippi and Alabama.
"The Christian community
in the Bahamas feel the grief
and pain of our brothers and
sisters in the affected areas
and indeed the entire United
States," council president Dr
William Thompson said.
"Our hearts go out to them
at this time of unprecedented
suffering," he added.

Congratulated
Dr Thompson congratulat-
ed and thanked the govern-
ment of the Bahamas for their
generous and quick donation
of $50,000 to the American
Red Cross to help in the relief
work underway in the flooded
cities.
Hurricane Katrina has com-
pletely devastated the coastal
Gulf area of New Orleans,
leaving millions of Americans
without food, shelter and oth-
er basic necessities.


The National Guard, along
with the Federal Emergency
Management Agency
(FEMA), has stepped in to,
bring much-needed relief to
those affected and airlift out
the thousands of injured per-
sons.
A special message of con-
dolence and sympathy from
the Bahamian Christian.com-
munity has been forwarded to
people of the United States
through the US Ambassador,
John Rood.
Starting this week, the
Bahamas Christian Council
has set aside this week as
"Pray for America"' week,
calling for all churches and
Christians throughout the
Bahamas to offer special
prayers for those affected by
the hurricane.
"Prayers move the hand of
God, and the hand of God
needs to be moved at this time
on behalf of the people of the
Gulf states," the release read.


O -4 0


'Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


E-mail relief for


Nassau family.


* THE Amoury family. From left: Libby, Richard and Christopher
Amoury. Both Libby and Christopher were said to be safe in
Shreveport after the passage of Hurricane Katrina. Richard, who
is in the US Army, was in Egypt during the hurricane.


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A NASSAU family was relieved
after receiving an e-mail indicating
that their relatives were safe from
the wrath of Hurricane Katrina.
The Tribune spoke with Dawn
Amoury whose aunt, Libby
Amoury, and cousin, Christopher,
lived in Slidell, near New Orleans.
Libby's husband, Richard, is in
the US Army and was in Egypt dur-
ing Katrina's passage.


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On the Sunday before the hurri-
|cane passed through, Dawrn
Amoury said she spoke with hei
aunt who indicated that their home.
was secured and that she and
'Christopher would ride out the
storm at home. She had also said if
things were to get out of hand they
would move away.
However, Ms Amoury tried to
contact her aunt on Monday, but
failed due to telephone lines being,
down.
"My relatives in Virginia listed
both Libby and Christopher on the
Red Cross list of missing persons,"
said Ms Amoury.
However, two days later the
Amoury family received an e-mail'
that put their fears to rest.
"By Wednesday, we received an
e-mail from my uncle Paul in Vir-
ginia to say that Libby and Christo-.
pher were OK and staying in.
Shreveport. Richard (Libby's hus-
band) also received the e-mail and
was relieved. He is currently on his
way back from Egypt to Shreve-
port," Ms Amoury said.
Ms Amoury said she does not
have any details on how her rela-
tives were moved from their home
to Shreveport.
A press release said that the
Bahamas Consulate General in
Miami is working to confirm the
safety of Bahamians known to be.
living or studying in the three state
areas affected by Hurricane Katrina.
Consul General Alma Adams
said they have been notified that a
young female student is safe bus-
stranded' in the Superdome in
Louisiana.
"We are presently working to
facilitate her return to the Bahamas
until the situation at her university
returns to normal. But, for the
moment, the American authorities'
have asked all those inside th6
Superdome to remain in the interest
of safety," noted Mrs Adams.
She added: "Our office has als6-
received a few other inquiries, par-
ticularly from parents of students
in the affected areas and we are
now working to contact the indi-
viduals concerned."
Mrs Adams also said that,
Bahamian nationals in Louisiana;
Mississippi and Alabama are safe
and accounted for.
There have been no reports to"
either the Miami Consulate or to'
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of
any Bahamians injured, noted the.-
press release.

TROPI C A


-XERINAOR


i


PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


No.w ,


:es throughout Ine Bahamas or submit online at www.caclqueawaras.com


THE TRIBUNE










THE TIBUNEMONDY, SETEMBE 5,C005,NAGES


Shootings:

pair in

hospital

N By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN ARGUMENT between
three men in the Ida Street area
resulted in two males being shot
over the weekend.
Shortly before 8pm on Satur-
day, Robert Collie, 26, of Coral
Harbour, was shot in both legs
and Kenneth Kemp, 28, of Ida
Street was shot in the face.
Both men were taken to hos-
pital and are listed in serious con-
dition. Press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans told The
Tribune that police are follow-
ing leads into the matter.
A man was stabbed while
attempting to exit a bus on Sat-
urday afternoon.
The 23-year-old'was attacked
by a group of men at around
5pm on Wulff Road. He was
wounded in the right shoulder
and lower back by a sharp instru-
ment. He was taken to hospital
and is listed in serious condition.
Police have also arrested two
males for possession of a firearm.
At about 1pm on Saturday,
officers on patrol in the Eneas
Lane area observed a suspicious
black Ford Taurus. Police con-
ducted a search of the vehicle
and the two male occupants. A
chrome .44 Smith and Wesson
revolver was found.
A 22-year-old man of Mead-
ow Street and 23-year-old from
Andros Avenue were arrested
but police are withholding their
identities until investigations
have been concluded.
Police are also investigating
the armed robberies of two
Super Value food stores on Fri-
day.
The first occurred at Super
Value East Street and Robinson
Road. At about 8.20pm two men
wearing stocking masks demand-
ed cash from an employee. The
men received an undetermined
amount of money and fled the
scene.
Forty-five minutes later, Super
Value in Winton was robbed by
two m6n who were also wearing
stocking masks. An employee
was held at bay and the store
was robbed of an undetermined
amourit of cash.
Mr Evans said the suspects
fled the store in, a black vehicle
Leading in an easterly direction.
Police are continuing their
investigations int6 these matters.




Woman

shot after

argument

* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GRAND BAHAMA
woman was shot over the
weekend after an argument "
with a man.
At 3.15am on Saturday,
Kenita Pinder, 24, of Garden
Villas, was near the wash
house at the apartment com-
plex when she was
embroiled in a heated row.
Police said the man pulled
out a handgun and Ms Pin-
der fled the scene. However,
he pursued her and fired
three shots, one of which hit
her in the buttock.
Ms Pinder was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital by
a neighbour for emergency
treatment. Her injury was
described as serious and she
was kept in hospital.
Police are seeking a man
known to Ms Pinder for
questioning.
Uniformed and plain-
clothes officers scoured the
neighbourhood in search of
the suspect, but without suc- .
cess.

Morning

Also, early Saturday
morning a man was report-
edly discovered lying on the
side of the Grand Bahama.
Highway with what
appeared to be a gunshot
wound to the face.
At about 1.40pm on Satur-
day an anonymous male
telephoned the central
detective unit and reported
that a tourist had discovered
the victim. The victim, Kevin


Simmons, was taken to
Lucayan Medical Centre
East for medical attention.
He was then taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital
where detectives saw hin
being taken insto surgery .
with a serious facial gunshot A
injury.
Officers said they haveno; i
further information regaryi
ing the incident t thistim .
Police are seeking public
assistance by calling the
Crime Hotline in Freeport at
352-1919 or in Nassau at
328-8477.


Rushing back to school


0 By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE One Family Junkanoo and
Community Organisation 'Rush Back
to School' event encouraged youth to
be warriors for excellence this school
year.
The community-minded Junkanoo
group on Saturday treated the children
of the Grants Town area to a back-to-
school jamboree.
The children of the area flocked to
the Hay Street Park where they were
given free food and school supplies.
The chairman of One Family, Darren
Bastian, said that from the group's
inception community outreach was
always an important part of its focus.
"A country is only as good as its com-
munities are. If you have very strong


SHAWAE RAMDANS receives her back to school package from a member of the One Fami-
ly Junkanoo Group.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


LISTED PROPERTIES RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL NASSAU

GLENISTON GARDENS POLHEMUS GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 0 Block 7 LOT NO. 17 Block LMNOP
PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed, 2 Bath (7,700 sq. ft.)
(10,875 sq. ft.) LOCATION: Nassau Street & Boyd Rd.
LOCATION: East Side of Jean St. off APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000
Prince Charles Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $165,000 COWPEN ROAD HOLLYWOOD
SUBDIVISION
STAPLEDON GARDENS LOT NO. Crown Grant A-66 (Incomplete Structure)
LOT NO. 544 PROPERTY SIZE: (10,875 sq. ft.)
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence. LOCATION: 350 West of Refuge Court
(9,600 sq. ft.) APPRAISED VALUE: $133,000
SITE AREA: 2,457 sq. ft.
LOCATION: 130 ft. North of Spitfire Rd. UNION VILLAGE SUBDIVISION
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000 LOT NO. 57
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
GARDEN HILLS ESTATE SUBDIVISION (6,820 sq ft)
LOT NO. 848 LOCATION: Union Village Road, 1,295 ft. from
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence Wulff Rd.
(6,000 sq. ft.) APPRAISED VALUE: $51,000
LOCATION: Orange Blossom Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $187,000

SHIRLEY STREET
LOT NO. 1 & 3
PROPERTY SIZE: Commercial Complex
(13,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Sears Rd. Southern Side of
Shirley St.
APPRAISED VALUE: $775,000



LISTED PROPERTIES VACANT LOTS I NASSAU


GLADSTONE ROAD ALLOTMENT
LOT NO. 24 Part of Crown Allotment A4-38
PROPERTY SIZE: (5,457 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 228 ft. South of Fire Trail Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE: $60,000

OLDE TOWN AT SANDYPORT
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: (1,300 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: North of Sandyport Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000


BERNARD TERRACE SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 20 Tract C
PROPERTY SIZE: (5,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Icelyn Blvd. off Bernard Road,
Fox Hill
APPRAISED VALUE: $45,000

ST. VINCENT ROAD
PROPERTY SIZE: Commercial/Mulit-Family
Parcel of Land (7,260 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Western Side of St. Vincent Rd.
off Faith Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $60,000


B


communities, you have a vibrant and
progressive country," said Mr Bastian.
Before congregating on the park the
Junkanoo group led a rush-out through
Taylor, Market and Hay Streets. At the
park prayers were said for the children
and the community.
Community outreach chairman of
One Family Cheryl Ford led the chil-
dren in a pledge to be warriors for excel-
lence.
"We realise we have to plant good
seeds in our community. Our kids have
to be inspired to want to learn and have
to understand that they can be anything
they want to be," added Mr Bastian.
Co-ordinator for the Farm Road
Urban Renewal Project Asst Supt
Stephen Dean described Saturday's
event as a "wonderful initiative" taken
by the Junkanoo group.


-,,v,,,nrno uni,,v,, n ...I IR u.uu ,u.-1a1 .
RED EYE C 1:l20 3J20 N/A 6.i 15. 30.J5
40YEAROLDVIRGIN C 1:30 N/A 4:30 7:30 N/A 10:40
VALIANT A 1:00 2:50 4:50 6:30 8:20 10:30
FOUR BROTHERS C 1:00 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:3010:50
THE SKELETON KEY T N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:20 10:40
SKYHIGH B 1:10 3:40 N/A 6:10 N/A N/A


TRANSPORTER 2 NEW 1:10 3:30 6:25 8:2510:30
UNDERCLASSMAN NEW 1:20 3:45 6:10 8:30 10:35
BROTHERS GRIMM B 1:00 3:40 6:00 8:20 10:40
RED EYE C 1:30 3:50 6:15 8:2 10:5
MARCH OF THE PENGUIN A 1:15 3:40 6:20 8:15 10:20
FOUR BROTHERS C 1:30 3:35 630 835 10:40


E SU YOUR E-CARD TO R M


....80 3 3 40


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


I


I








PAGE 4, MONDAY SEPTEMBERR5,205 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, CM.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


Press needs correct information


HEALTH Minister Dr Marcus Bethel gave
The Tribune a good shellacking at a press con-
ference on Friday, calling an article it pub-
lished on the number of foreign births at
Princess Margaret Hospital "inaccurate,
unfounded and irresponsible." And, he added,
the article was "clearly designed to create
alarm and promote fear amongst our citizens."
The article in question was based on infor-
mation that came looking for The Tribune -
The Tribune did not go in search of it, because
no reporter knew about the birth rates at
Princess Margaret Hospital. The information
came from impeccable sources sources that
should not have needed checking. However,
because of its rules, The Tribune did check the
information.
It also checked because it wanted to know
if the figures given by the doctors were just a
blip in the system for the month of August or
whether they in fact indicated a trend. The
only way to discdver that was to get official fig-
ures for several months. In the opinion of the
doctors, who alerted The Tribune to the story,
their figures indicated a trend.
According to our informants, Haitians are
producing babies at the PMH at a much higher
rate than Bahamians. One of the doctors
claimed that of the 96 live births recorded for the
month of August only three were Bahamian.
"The maternity ward at the hospital always
has a large group of Haitians," The Tribune
was told. "There have been many, many times
when I needed to find someone who spoke
Creole to deal with patients just because there
were patients who spoke no English at all,"
said a doctor.
Dr Bethel said that neither he nor other
members of the Public Health community,
such as PMH administration and the Public
Health Authority, were aware of any efforts
made by The Tribune to contact them for any
"valid information."
Did Dr Bethel check with the PMH press
officer, the person to whom members of the
press are always directed for information? If
he had he should have been told the number
of times on the day before publication that
our reporter tried to contact the press offi-
cer, leaving at least two messages on her voice
mail asking her to return his calls. When he
eventually caught up with her she said she
could not verify the birth statistics at PMH
for August because the ministry was just start-
ing to compile them. She promised to send
the relevant information the next morning.
She never did.
As she is the person who deals with the
press, we would have thought that she would


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have been the first person Dr Bethel would
have questioned.
Having failed with PMH's press officer,
The Tribune tried to verify the birth claims
with the Registrar and the Department of Sta-
tistics. After several conversations with Sta-
tistics officials, our reporter was told that the
last available birth statistics were for the year
2001.
Yet at his press conference Dr Bethel had
the statistics that The Tribune tried desper-
ately to get. Why were they not available to
us? If the people who should have had them
knew nothing of their existence, how was Dr
Bethel able to get them in time for his press
conference in which he refuted the informa-
tion that we were given by reliable medical
sources?
Dr Bethel called on all journalists and their
editors to be responsible and fair in their pre-
sentation of "information in order to better
serve the interests of this country and the
needs and desires of the citizens of the
Bahamas to accurate information."
How can the press be any more responsible
if the persons with information to help them
produce a fair and balanced report refuse to
give out the information?
Is the so-called "new" PLP reverting to type
in some of its. ministries by refusing to .coop-
erate with information? Are newspapers
going to be forced to publish "irresponsible"
stories to flush out the truth? Quite a different
article would have been written if Dr Bethel's
ministry had given The Tribune the figures
that it gave him for his press conference.
During the 25 years of the Pindling admin-
istration information was withheld from the
press.. A week after taking over the reins of
government in 1992, former Prime Minister
Ingraham, meeting around the Cabinet table
with his permanent secretaries in the pres-
ence of the press, issued a directive that min-
istries, permanent secretaries, and heads of
departments could no longer "duck" the press
on matters that touch or concern the public.
The only way that the press can publish
correct facts is if it is given correct facts by the
various government departments.
And so, on behalf of the press, we call on all
persons responsible in the various govern-
ment ministries for giving out information to
take their duties seriously.
If Dr Bethel claims that the information we
published on August 31 about the Haitian
birth rate is incorrect, he has only his own
ministry to blame. The persons to whom our
reporter spoke told him that such informa-
tion did not exist.


Rubbish and




pride in the





Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune
IT is now well over 18 months
since I last wrote about condi-
tions at the Montagu beach
area. During this time the clean-
up seems to have passed out of
the hands of government into
the hands of a private company.
Some very pretty landscap-
ing has taken place and there
is always a couple of people out
in the main area in the morning
doing their best to cope. How-
ever the garbage cans are
always overflowing and the
beach a disgrace until very
recently.
About three weeks ago I met
this wonderful man on the
beach at Montagu his name
is Captain Alphonso Smith. He
tells me he is a retired sea cap-
tain and he has resolved to
inake it his mission to clean the
beach area. What a Herculean


task he has. I met him there this
morning he has done an
amazing job of cleaning the
sand making piles of all the
flotsam, jetsam and seaweed
that he meets. Then he'returns
to the beach next day and finds
more piles of garbage just
thoughtlessly thrown around.
His main problem now is try-
ing to get someone from gov-
ernment to come and collect all
the little piles of trash he has
carefully gathered. It would be
great if someone could take a
few photos of what -Capt Smith
is trying to do.
Your editorial today asks
"What of Bahamian pride?" I
have come to the conclusion


that we have none. Your edito-
rial commented on the state of
Nassau airport. I had the misr
fortune to pass through there a
few weeks ago the person sup-7
posed to be cleaning walked
past the same heap of discarded
napkins and paper plates sev-
eral times, until finally in 'dis-'
gust I went and picked them up
myself. Her comment was -"I,,
hadn't finished". She hadn't
even started. Our late Prime
Minister's family would really
consider it an honour if this air-
port was named for him? ,
Today's headline reads
Bahamas Back on Top-ifor,
how long I wonder? Does any-.
one care other than Captainh
Smith? To him I say "thank
you".
N KNOWLES
Nassau
August 2005


Role of banknotes and



women in our country


EDITOR, The Tribune
I'd like to add another view-
point to the whole uproar over
the petty, idiotic removal of
Sir Stafford Sands from our
own Bahamian $10 bill.
Today we have a female
Governor-General, Deputy
Prime Minister, Central Bank
governor, Director General of
Tourism and BUT president.
We have female political and
religious ministers, pilots,
marines, motorcycle cops, gas
station attendants, fire-fight-
ers and business owners.
Basically, Bahamian women
are found everywhere, in tra-
ditional and non-traditional
roles. One place you won't find
a Bahamian woman? A


Bahamian banknote!
Why is that? More than half
of the population just ignored?
Sounds like sexism to me. Did
the "powers that be" even con-
sider a Bahamian woman
before they slapped QEII, a
foreign woman, back on the
banknote of our independent
Bahamaland?
Which sends me off on
another tangent. Foreign
women marry Bahamian men
and by law, are more or less
instant Bahamians, smooth
sailing, no problem. On the
other hand, Bahamian women
marry foreign men and, to
quote legendary great actress
Bette Davis, it's more like
"Fasten your seatbelts. It's
going to be a bumpy ride"


("All About Eve", 1950).
I also don't agree with the
"if yertborn here, yer born
here" mentality when it comns
to illegal immigrants; please
don't reward bad behavior.
That would mean that the
child of an illegal immigrailt
born in the Bahamas would
automatically be a Bahamian
while the child of a Bahamian
woman born abroad woutd
not. How could an illegal
immigrant automatically be
entitled to that which a
Bahamian woman would not?
Madness and something to
think about.
GINA CATALANO-PIERI
Nassau
August 23 2005 -,,


Rightful recognition of both the

Queen and the Commonwealth


EDITOR, The Tribune
CONGRATULATIONS to
the Bahamian government for
restoring Her Majesty Queen
Elizabeth II to her rightful place
on the $10 banknote. There was
no public input or discussion
with the Opposition when for-

MION COURSES I


When you are ready to venture over the horizon make
sure that you are prepared for the challenge. On Monday,
September 5th take the time to attend the free first
class of the TERRESTRIAL NAVIGATION
COURSE offered by The Bahamas School of Marine
Navigation at 7p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
Bay Street then consider enrolling in the 3-month
course designed to impart essential theoretical and
practical navigational skills. Other courses available
are Celestial Navigation and Marine Safety/
Seamanship.

Telephone: 364-5987, fax 364-5988
or
e-mail pgk434@netscape.net


Q^> / 4. &^


Nikita

eShiel-Polle

Amongst the greatest of all services that can
possibly be rendered by a man to Almighty
God is the education and training of
children.
Bahai' Faith


Valedictorian, June 2005, Nancy Campbell Collegiate Institute,
London, Ontario.
Graduated with Honours and made the Principals Honour Roll.
Recipient of a World Citizenship Award.
Welcome back home Nikita, you are a true leader!
Your proud family:
Parents, Winfield Rolle & Maggi Shiel-Rolle and your brother Johnathan.


mer Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham decided to remove
the Queen's portrait from the
various denominations and
place other persons whom he
thought were "national heroes"
on them instead.
Placing controversial figures
on the notes is a policy fraught
with problems. At Indepen-
dence in 1973 it was agreed by
both the government and the
Opposition that a constitution-
al monarchy would be the form
of government and the
Bahamas would continue its his-'
toric association with the


Crown. Stability and the rule of
law are two important reasons
why this system has worked well
here. The Queen as a neutral
figure above politics is wortlhy
of our continued support.'
Her Majesty has devoted her
life to dedicated Christian ser-
-vice to the Commonwealth and
its people of many racialand
cultural backgrounds. She is
deserving of her place, ,n
Bahamian banknotes.
THOMAS A WARDLE R
Nassau
August 19 2005


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005














Weakness of the FNM is a




lack of popular definition


AS the FNM faces-
the leadership
question once more, the same
old weakness in the party is
as glaring as ever. That weak-
ness is the fact that, when
compared with the PLP, the
opposition party remains
weak in its philosophical cre-



though the
FNM may
snipe at PLP
individuals, or
PLP under-
performance,
it offends
pillars of PLP
philosophy at
great political
risk to itself



dentials.
As speculation mounts as
to the list of possible candi-
dates, even the media has
bothered little to emphasise
any real distinctions between
them in terms of belief or phi-
losophy.
This is not to say that the
candidates themselves have
little to offer in terms of their
views. Rather, it is simply


that, when it comes to the
FNM, the electorate seems
to take little interest in what
these may be.
That bodes ill for the par-
ty's chances of ever challeng-
ing the philosophical domi-
nance of the PLP in Bahami-
an politics.










MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 5
6F30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
10:00 Colombia Trade Show 2005
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Health For The Nation
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2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Colombia Trade Show 2005
5:30 Cybernet
6:00 One Cubed
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
'8:30 Baker's Bay
8:45 Ardastra Gardens
9:00 Legends From Whence We
A' Came:
;10 00 Sports Life Styles:
10:,30 News Night 13
.11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Colombia Trade Show 2005
12:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
NOE ZST 1 esre
th rgh t. mkelat int


The basic difficulty with a
party which (in the popular
imagination at least) has no
defining philosophy, is that it
is most unlikely to be the par-
ty that wins electoral domi-
nance by default. In the
Bahamas, this position has
long been the PLP's to lose.
Unless something quite radi-
cal happens, it will continue
to be so.

In the Bahamas in 2005,
PLPism continues to set
the tone of Bahamian politi-
cal debate, with the FNM
simply reacting to its philos-
ophy. Never has the FNM's
philosophy (insofar as it has
even been clearly discernible
to the wider electorate) been
an effective political tool in
its own right, in the sense that
the PLP's undoubtedly has.
This has made the FNM
weak in the face of criticisms
that are grounded in widely
accepted elements of its
opponent's philosophy. It has
also meant that, though the
FNM may snipe at PLP indi-
viduals, or PLP under-per-
formance, it offends pillars of
PLP philosophy at great
political risk to itself.
Thus, the FNM, when in
government, proved spectac-
ularly vulnerable to charges
that it was either not placing
Bahamians first in the grand
scheme of its economic devel-
opment agenda or was "sell-
ing the country".
. This same charge, reversed
and used against the PLP, has,
by contrast, been couched
more in terms of imaginative
laziness than philosophical


untrustworthiness.
It has therefore been less
emotionally compelling,
despite the circumstances
actually making this charge a
more apt criticism of Mr
Christie's government than of
the FNM.
TIME FOR PARTIES TO
STAND ON THEIR OWN

T he main electoral les-
son of the last 40
years has been that, while the
philosophy of the governing
party has lost little of its fun-


PERSPECTIVES
......


AND


R EW


damental resonance with a
wide cross section of Bahami-
ans, the growth of the mid-
dle classes has tended to shift
electoral emphasis away from
political philosophy and
toward issues of competence
and trustworthiness.
For the FNM, this change
has been good up to a point.
Firstly, it gave Mr Ingraham
(a man whose strong 'PLP'
credentials remained untaint-
ed by the perceived under-
performance and venality of
the last PLP administration) a
virtually unbeatable formula
in 1992.


ALLEN

when the Bahamian elec-
torate reverts to its political
default settings. It has also
required of the FNM a far
higher standard of compe-
tence and cleanness in gov-
ernment, since performance
has been its only compelling
electoral advantage.
. Perhaps most disturbingly
for the entire electoral sys-
tem, the FNM's ideological
weakness has promoted the
politics of deception within
both parties, as politicians
scramble to clothe themselves
in what the other side sells
best.


While the philosophy of the
governing party has lost little
of its fundamental resonance
with a wide cross section of
Bahamians, the growth of the
middle classes has tended to
shift electoral emphasis away
from political philosophy and
toward issues of competence
and trustworthiness.


It has also allowed FNM
politicians to benefit from the
sometimes gaping inconsis-
tencies between the theory
and practice of PLPism.
Thus, a dominant theme in
the opposition's upcoming
campaign will inevitably be
the present government's
questionable record of
advancing Bahamian inter-
ests in the face of an acutely
(foreign) investor-friendly
economic policy.
Though this will be a trou-
blesome. matter for Mr
Christie to dismiss, it is worth
noting that the criticism will
essentially be grounded in a
philosophy pioneered by, and
associated with, Mr Christie's
own party.

F NMs will ask
Bahamians to casti-
gate PLPs for not being true
to PLP philosophy, or, even
worse, for being too much
like the FNM is held to be in
the popular imagination.
They will-not challenge the
settings and parameters of
that imagination itself.
This failure on the FNM's
part has ensured that the PLP
remains the party of choice


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
~) Harbour Bay Shopping Centre / -
"j/ ~Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 ,


The basic difficulty with a
party which (in the popular
imagination at least) has no
defining philosophy, is that it
is most unlikely to be the party
that wins electoral dominance
by default


eminent, this would mean an
administration that does
more to stand confidently on
the foundations of its own
philosophy.
The PLP, if it is to be true
to the electorate that brought
-it to power, should clearly
have constructed a national
,policy to reflect its broad and
strident pre-election words.,
So far, it has not.
Bahamians also require
and deserve a debate in
which two distinct and simi-
larly compelling political ide-
ologies are unapologetically
articulated, rather than one
in which both parties engage
in a heavily lopsided scramble
for a narrow and unimagina-
tive centre ground.

A looming leadership
contest gives the
FNM an opportunity to rede-
fine itself in a way that -will
allow it to promote such,., a
two-sided debate.
But first, it must face the
internal confrontations that
are required if it is to consign
to' history forever the doubts
that many Bahamians have
about its real agenda. It must
free itself from associations
and (financial) dependencies
that will continue to emascu-
late its social development
agenda and steer it toward a
rightist, neo-liberal pro-
gramme that has no place in
the modern Bahamian con-
text.
(Ironically, no party would


benefit more than the FNM
from the kind of campaign
finance reform that prevents
wealthy cliques from exert-
ing disproportionate political
influence through the party
system).
Whoever leads the FNM
following its next convention
would do well to remember
that until the party comes-
into its own ideologically, the
soul of the Bahamian elec-
torate will be the PLP's to
lose.


r-I^


Share

your

news
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from people who are
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


In the resulting tango, the
FNM seems at times to have
borrowed the PLP's words,
while the PLP has borrowed
many of the FNM's actions
once in office. In both cases,
something substantial has
been lost.

B ahamians require a
political environ-
ment in which a party, once in
office, does actual justice to
the distinctions of philosophy
that it claims to maintain. In
the case of the present gov-


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The FNM's ideological
weakness has promoted the
politics of deception within
both parties, as politicians
scramble to clothe themselves
in what the other side sells
best.


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER u,


THE TRIBUNE








PAE6 ODYSPEBR5 2005 TH TIUNE


CARICOM needs


a single


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S*-: Syndicated Content -

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SCHOOL




Q world sdichool
St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School,
invites applications for the position of teacher of English, with
effect from January 2006. Candidates should possess the
necessary academic qualifications and experience for the position,
including a full teaching qualification and at least a bachelor's
degree. Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach to
pre-university level and be familiar with the demands of the IB
Diploma programme. Preference will be given to candidates who
have experience in teaching English to IB Diploma level. Successful
BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT II experience
is also important.
Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mr
Dennison MacKinnon, by following the directions on the.school's
website at www.st-andrews.com.
D J MacKinnon
Principal
St Andrew's School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau
The closing date for applications is 30 September 2005.
Applications from unqualified candidates, applications arriving
without the full information requested or applications received after
this date will not be considered.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


g








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005, PAGE 7


nintuesday s


ARTHUR YFOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
., UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST READ COLUMN


merican Embassy welcomes



new number two on board


Brent Hardt has been
appointed as the new deputy
chief of mission at US Embassy
in Nassau.
The deputy chief of mission
is the Embassy's number-two
position, behind the ambas-
sador. When Ambassador
Rood is absent, Mr Hardt will
temporarily act as Chief of Mis-
sion, carrying the title of
Charge d'Affaires.
Prior to his arrival in The
Bahamas, Mr. Hardt served as
Deputy Chief of Mission and
Charge d'Affaires at the US
Embassy to the Vatican. He


was the ranking Embassy offi-
cial at the time of Pope John
Paul II's death and the inaugu-
ration of Pope Benedict XVI.
Mr. Hardt has extensive
experience with Caribbean
affairs, having twice served at
the US Embassy in
Bridgetown, Barbados. From
1996 to 2000, he was political-
economic section chief and act-
ing deputy chief of mission.
During this time, he helped
develop the 1997 Caribbean-
US Summit agenda and subse-
quently worked to implement
summit commitments with


countries in the eastern
Caribbean.
Mr Hardt's other foreign ser-
vice assignments include Berlin,
The Hague, and Washington.
He has received many Depart-
ment of State awards. He
earned a Bachelor's degree in
history from Yale University,
and Masters and Doctorate
degrees from the Fletcher
School of Law and Diplomacy
at Tufts University. He has
published numerous articles on
US foreign policy, and speaks
Dutch, Italian, French and Ger-
man.


* BRENT Hardt


THAT GETS TO THE POINT


Foundation seeking


time as well as money


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Lyford Cay Foundations
"Time Works" volunteer programme
is encouraging individuals to "volun-
teer their time as much as they vol-
unteer their money and other
resources."
The programme which initially
started in 2004, launched its Time
Works 2005 initiative last Thursday,
targeting persons in need in the com-
munity.
The mission of the organisation is
to address the needs of the commu-
nity by organising a group of caring
individuals to volunteer and engage
-with the community.
The president of the Lyford Cay


Foundation, Paul Sandford, said,
"The premise of Time Works 's that
your time is as important as your
money."
From September to mid-Novem-
ber the group will perform such com-
munity minded activities such as a
clean-up of Adelaide Beach, chil-
dren's fun day for the Nazareth Home
for children and the Children's Emer-
gency Hostel. Also on the schedule,
for November, the residence of three
homes for the age will be treated to a
picnic and the flamingo show at
Ardastra Gardens.
Persons can sign up online to reg-
ister as a volunteer for one the activ-
ities at www.lyfordcayfoundation.com
and click on Time Works logo.


PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021 2025


ISSUE OF B$75.000.000.00


Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 20th June, 2005.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 24th August, 2005 end'
will close at 3:00pm on 6th September, 2005. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 7th September, 2005.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of BS75,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.

The date of this Prospectus is th August, 2005

The Governmeht of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$75,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the. earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2025. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
price are given below:-


5/32% Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate
7/32% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate
9/32% Above Prime Rate


Amount
BS


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2022
Bahamas Registered Stock 2023
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025


15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
.15.000.000.00
.75.000.000.00


Issue
Price
BS$-

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 7th September, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 7th September, 2005, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 7th March, 2006 and thereafter on 7th September and 7th March in every year until the
Stock is repaid.
CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 24th
August, 2005 arid will close at 3:00 pm on 6th September, 2005, allocations will
commence at 9:30 a.m. on 7th September, 2005. All envelopes enclosing applications
should be labelled "Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks".

lhaI The Stock will be in units of BS100.00.

Applications Applications must be for BS100.00 or a multiple of that sun.

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:

1. Bank of The Bahamas International
2. First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
3. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibank, N.A.

PUBLIC DEBT
Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2005 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,627,218,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


FY2003/2004* FY2004/2005**
B$ B$


Revenue


Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


943,760,000


993,987,000



80,890,000


1,051,624,000


1,067,259,0.00



117,296,000


FY2005/2006**
B$
Approved Budget

1,132,774,000


1,145,691,000



132,901,000


** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June
S30,2005 totalled B$454,138,000.


THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021- 2025


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:


The Registrar
c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:


I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:


Insert'below the amount applied for
in Units of BS100


5/32%
3/16%
7/32%
1/4%
9/32%


Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2022
Bahamas Registered Stock 2023
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
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BS
B$
B$
BS
B$


and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.


I/We enclose BS


in payment for the Stock applied for.


In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:


% Bahamas Registered Stock
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BANK DRAFTS SHOULD BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.


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Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses, Telephone Nos.)







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below.)

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I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:


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Account Number


Rate Of Interest


....................................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................................................................


I r


-














Safe school environments


* By LINDSAY
THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services
A PRIORITY of the Min-
istry of Education is to
ensure a safe environment
for the estimated 49,000 stu-
dents in public schools, some
of which are under repair but
would not hinder today's
opening, says Attorney Gen-
eral and Minister of Educa-
tion Alfred Sears.
There are 176 projects
ranging from construction of
new schools, to major and
minor repairs to be carried
out at the ministry's 158
schools, including 22 in the
Family Islands and cays.
An estimated $27 million
has been budgeted for the
project $15 million for new
schools, $5 million for ongo-
ing repairs, $4 million for


176 projects to


be carried out


completion 6f additions and
the balance for other repairs.
At a press conference on
August 30, at the Ministry of
Education, Mr Sears, accom-
panied by Minister of Pub-
lic Works and Utilities
Bradley Roberts, and tech-
nical staff from both min-
istries, gave a status report
on works done, repairs
underway, and construction
plans for new institutions.
It was noted that the edu-
cational system, although
severely challenged, partic-
ularly in the northern
Bahamas by hurricanes


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Frances and Jeanne in Sep-
tember, 2004, continued to
operate. Repairs on Grand
Bahama are 98 per cent com-
plete.
Mr Sears said the national
education system also com-
prises teachers' cottages,
resource facilities and
libraries.
"We had incomplete
immobilisation of the infra-
structure in the northern
region. I went personally on
numerous occasions and I
saw the West End Primary e
School, which appeared, at
that point, not to be salvage-
able, beyond rehabilitation. I
saw Holmes Rock, Martin
Town, fixtures and blocks
blown out. In Lewis Yard, it
was assumed that we had to
abandon that site," he said.

Salvage
"We were able to salvage
an entire academic year
because we drew on the wis-
dom of all of the stakehold-
ers, using church halls, and
fraternal organisation facili-
ties in order for school to
continue," Mr Sears said.
He added: "I am so
pleased, really, when I look
at the results of the BJCs and
BGCSEs from those areas,
we see that it was due to the
extraordinary response, self-
lessness and commitment to
the national education pro-
ject by all of the stakeholders
that we were able to save this
year.
"It is in that context that
we have to look at those 178
projects. With the exception
Sofa few schools, mos.4o RM,
,schools will resume next
'week with minimal alteration
in their schedule.


THE Minister of Education and Attorney General Alfred Sears, left, confers with the Minister
of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts before the start of a press conference held to discuss the ongo-
ing and planned school repairs throughout The Bahamas on Wednesday, August 31,2005.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


"Given the year that we
have lived through, it is my
assessment that that is an
extraordinary achievement.
Notwithstanding the con-
straints, notwithstanding the
structural limitations in
which we function, and that
is what I consider to be the
national perspective."
Mr Sears noted that there
are challenges at Carlton
Francis Primary School and,
at A F Adderley Junior High
School as well as C C Sweet-
ing Junior High School. He
said the ministry is working
with the Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) and other
stakeholders in setting up
alternative arrangements to
ensure that schools open on
Monday.
"Even where work is con-
tinuing, our schools will com-
mence at those sites," said
Mr Sears. "A protocol will
be established between the


contractor and the principal
so that the work can be car-
ried out after school. Por-
tions of the school will be
cordoned off from the school
population...weekends and
recess periods during
school."

Surveys
He commended the Min-
istry of Works, the "enabling
ministry" that must conduct
surveys of each school every
year and prepare scopes of
works, negotiate contracts,
supervise the work and cer-
tify the completion of con-
tracts.
"Given the very narrow
window of opportunity the
Ministry of Education pre-
sents (three months) many
of the projects require more
than cosmetic work but
major structural work, and'
in some cases, demolition of


structures and the construc-
tion of new structures to
replace condemned build-
ings," Mr Sears said.
Minister Roberts said that
he is pleased with the level of
work done by contractors.
"The government's strong
commitment to education is
beyond challenge. We are
very fortunate to have in the
person of the Minister of
Education a man of tremen-
dous talent and patience," he
said.
, Mr Roberts noted that vir-
tually all Family Islands and
New Providence ediicational
infrastructures have, been,
and continue to be enhanced
with the impressive list of
works.
He said that a lot of dam-
age in schools could be mid-
imised with more co-opera-
tion from students and teach-
ers enforcing rules to adhere
to a particular programme.


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BLAND St. Louis paints a classroom door during renovations at C.C. Sweeting Junior High School
on Friday, September 2, 2005.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)




Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.


PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Kerzner praises best and brightest


Kerzner International recog-
nised hundreds of employees
for their stellar performance
over the last quarter during the
Amethyst Period Crystal
Awards luncheon in the
Atlantis' Grand Ballroom last
Thursday.
Leading employees from a
cross section of the resort's
operations were recognised
before their peers, managers
and senior executives at the
event themed "Building the
Customer Experience".
"The event's theme mirrored
Kerzner International's endeav-
ours to provide visitors with
memorable vacation experi-
ences through world class ser-
vice and out-of-this-world resort
attractions," said a spokesman.
Colorful replicas of the new
Marina Village at Atlantis dec-
orated the ballroom as well as
other attractions intended to
symbolise Kerzner Internation-
al's ongoing development on
the world stage.
On hand at the event were
George Markantonis, presi-
dent/managing director of
Kerzner International Bahamas
and Paul O'Neil, outgoing pres-
ident/managing director, who
praised the employees for their
accomplishments and presented
them with gifts.
Miyoshi Higgs, Manager of
VIP Services, was declared
manager of the period and Kent
Knowles, assistant director of
horticulture, was dubbed leader
of the period. Both Higgs and
Knowles will have an opportu-
nity to vie for the 'Manager and
Leader of the Year' titles at the
much anticipated Kerzner Inter-


national Long Service and
Employee of the Year Awards,
slated for February 2006.
An overjoyed Higgs said, "I
was surprised but very happy.
Surprised because there were
many good nominees in the
manager category and I felt
proud just being chosen as a
nominee."
Ernie Cambridge, vice-presi-
dent of VIP Services at Kerzner
International, commented that
Miyoshi "exemplifies the com-
pany's core values in every
interaction she has with internal
and external customers by
ensuring that every situation of
which she is involved, is han-
dled in a most professional and
caring manner."
"I was surprised when they
called my name because I was,
up there amongst great leaders,
so I really didn't expect to win,"
Knowles said.
He added, "I'm really proud
to represent the horticulture
department, because many of
the gardeners feel that their
work goes unnoticed, but with-
out them I wouldn't be here."
Conray Rolle, senior direc-
tor of horticulture/roads and
easements, congratulated
Knowles: "Kent has the ability
to see opportunities and go fbr
them," said Rolle. "He's a hard
worker who conscientiously
sees things through to the end. I
am.proud of him as a young
upcoming manager and look
forward to seeing more good
things from him in the future."
Althea Camille Fields,
employee programmes manag-
er at Kerzner International, said
that months of planning and


organization went into the
awards function. "Our aim is to
bring to life the myth of
Atlantis, the mission and vision
of Kerzner International and
the culture of the Bahamas. By
creating our themes based on
those values, we hope to blow
sway 'our internal customers',
and ensure that we recognise
all of the nominees."
Thirty-six of Kerzner Inter-
national's line staff employees
were selected as divisional win-
ners and are now eligible to win
either the front of house or sup-
port category for the Employee
of the Year Award.
The Amethyst Period divi-
sional winners are as follows:
Naomi McKenzie, Food and
Beverage Cashiering; Benjamin
Forbes, Coin Cashier; Anishka
Hunt, Administration; Monique
Cash, Cage Cashier; Kevin
Hanna, Table Games Opera-
tions; Glenroy Morley, Land-
scaping and Nursery; Leon
Pratt, POMEC; Sharlisa Saun-
ders, Events and Entertain-
ment; Harold Joseph, Mama
Loo's; Trevor Wallace, Ban-
queting; Vernetta Pinder-Jones,
Shark Bites; Jason Russell,
Atlas Grill and Bar; Charles
Smith, Room Service Beach
Tower; Patricia McKenzie,
Atlas Grill and Bar; Jeffery But-
ler, Water's Edge; Kervin
Jaques, Golf; Krista Bethel,
Troon Golf Pro Shop; Jana
Cash, Discovery. Channel
Camp; Don Major, Harborside
Houseman; Manera Rolle, Har-
borside Front Office; Claudette
Farrington, Employee Rela-
tions; Antonio Bain, Informa-
tion Technology; Keisha Rus-
sell, Water Features; Damian
Thompson, O&O Ocean Club
Telephone; Shon Missick, O&O
Ocean Club Front Office;
Jerold Adderley, Prompt
Response; Trevon Wilson,
Front Office Coral and Beach
Towers; Raino Eneas, Guest
Services Coral and Beach Tow-
ers; Carnetha Carew, Guest
Services Coral and Beach Tow-
ers; Mary Higgs, Housekeeping
Royal Towers; Juliette Brown,
Reservations; Lavaugna
Greenslade, Crystal Co1rtLggo.
Shop; La'Rose Hanna, Security
and Stephen Glinton, Security.


' PICTURED presenting Miyoshi Higgs, manager of VIP Services (third from the left) the
Amethyst Manager of the Period Award are (1-r): George Markantonis, president/managing direc-
tor Kerzner International Bahamas; Paula Clarke, accounting manager and winner of the Quartz
Period Award; and Paul O'Neil, president/managing director Kerzner International Bahamas.


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* KENT Knowles, assistant director of horticulture (second from the left) is presented wth his
award by(I-r) George Markantonis, president/managing director Kerzner International Bahamas;
Angela Culmer-Hinsey, Kerzner International's senior director of finance and 2004 Leader of the
Year; and Paul O'Neil, president/managing director Kerzner International Bahamas.



US authorities seize



mCore than two tos of


St "Copyrighted Material--


f Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"

a .


4D -q
4


*
S. e


Time to start digging



to get the best price


WHO built your home and
in what year?. How much are
your utility bills? Is there prop-
er insulation in the ceilings?
How old is the roof? Seem like
a lot of questions? If you plan to
sell your home, you're going to
need lots of answers.
Today's homebuyers make
their decisions based on facts,
not conjecture. The information
you provide can have a dra-
matic effect on how quickly
your home sells.
After choosing a BREA
agent, ask what information
should be provided to pur-
chasers. The agent should be
able to present a "laundry list"
of common questions.
Many of those questions will
be related to the construction
of the house and the perfor-


Bhm asyrea

estate toda


mance of its systems, ie air con-
ditioning, appliances, etc. Prop-
erty taxes, utility bills, and
recent repairs will also be
important. Get started right
away don't wait until a
prospect starts asking questions.
You may need to dig through
records and paid bills to come
up with some answers, while,
hopefully, if he is still around,
the builder can provide con-
struction details. If you have a
floor plan or blueprint, make
copies available. Have work


tickets handy if major building
components have been replaced
or repaired.
While your agent is responsi-
ble for attracting prospects, you
can help improve the likelihood
of an early sale. Work closely
with your BREA agent, and
then enjoy the results!


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the 4
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and. share your story.


41b






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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005. PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


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FNM accuses ministry of visa irregularities


FROM page one
than in Port-au-Prince, the
Free National Movement is not
satisfied that the increase in the
numbers of visas can be
explained merely by that cir-
cumstance."
The FNM is urging the gov-
ernment to explain the reason
for the "explosive" more than
2,000 per cent increase in the
number of visas issued to
Haitians by the ministry, from
just over 100 in 2002 to more
than 2,000, each year, in 2004.
"The government should
inform the people how many
visas were issued in Port-au-
Prince, and also in Nassau, dur-
ing the time period when the
embassy in Haiti was open, and
the total number of visas issued
in Nassau throughout the peri-
od when the embassy in Haiti
has been closed.
"The government must also
explain why it is that the same
groups of individuals, some PLP
MPs and their known business
associates or cronies, some
known PLP political campaign
generals and operatives and
also close family members of
senior government officials, are
apparently sponsoring different
groups of Haitian, Chinese and


other foreign nationals, num-
bering in the hundreds, over
and repeatedly, to obtain visas
from the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.
"The government must
explain why some visas are
being issued to Haitian nation-
als with no photographs
attached and without necessary
identification information, as
has occurred."
The FNM said the govern-
ment needs to address "the very
serious security implications".
Even terrorists could enter
the Bahamas using assumed
Haitian names when an entry
visa issued does not have any
photographs of the person to
whom it was issued by the min-
istry, says the party.
"The government must
explain why visas are being
issued to allow persons to come
to the Bahamas on 'shopping
visits' who cannot even sign
their own names, and who have
signed the form with an 'X', as
has occurred.
"The government must
explain what, if any, checks
are being made to ensure that
persons issued entry visas
have, in fact, left the Bahamas
before'the expiration of their
visas, and returned to their


country of origin."
It adds: "It seems strange that
while the Immigration Depart-
ment has repatriated about
3,000 foreign nationals last year,
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
over a comparable period of
time, has allowed an almost
equal number of Haitian, Chi-
nese and other foreign 'visitors'
to come in through the front
door, with an entry visa and
without any need to satisfy the
requirements of the immigra-
tion Department."
A ministry spokesman said:
"We will wait to see the specif-
ic allegations which are being
made, but there is a normal and
ongoing review at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs with regard
to the issuance of visas to
ensure that the process is a pris-
tine one.
"For example, the current
policy is that no middlemen or
brokers may apply for the
issuance of visas.
"The policy of review is ongo-
ing and if there is specific infor-
mation which alleges any.
impropriety, officers of the min-,
istry will undertake to investi-
gate those matters; or those who
are making the allegations are
free to take the matters directly
to the police."


Parents asked to report


to CC Sweeting school


* CONSTRUCTION workers yesterday mixing cement, as they installed windows and tried to
meet the deadline for the school's opening today.


* BATHROOM sinks are unusable, as parts of the school are still not tied into the school's
water lines.


FROM page one
together with teachers at this
point to ensure that some
speedy action is taken at the
school.
"The budget structure has
no bearing on the conditions
at CC Sweeting Junior. The
work at this school has been
going on for two years now.
Only through the dedication
of the teachers were the stu-
dents able to excel and get
good grades last year.
"The contractor said that
he had to hold off on work
for five weeks because he was-
n't paid. This needs to be
exposed so that we can get
results. We don't want our
children to be hurt by trying
to rush them into the class-
rooms. The safety of our chil-
dren is what we have at heart,


and that is our first priority,"
he said.
Echoing this sentiment was
the spokesperson for the
teachers, Michelle Hudson,
who pointed out that with all
the construction material still
at the school, there is too
much of a health risk for stu-
dents to be asked to report to
school.
"They have people with
nails and hammers all
around. Children at this age
don't care, they don't hear.
You could talk until you are
blue in the face. You could
put as many barricades up as
you like. If they see a sign
saying 'Do Not Enter' that
means 'go in' for them.
"Then the ministry will ask
why these measures were not
in place when something hap-
pens. We have already had


issues with the children last
year but last year we spent
half of the time trying to find
somewhere to have classes
while work was ongoing.
"Would you like your child
sitting down all day in dark-
ness?" she asked. "This is the
rainy season so we can't count
on opening the windows," she
said, claiming a number of
classrooms do not have any
electricity in them.
"Last year I must have tak-
en about 10 pieces of wood
and aluminium from children
taking the first thing they saw
to go and fight with."
H 0 Nash Junior High and
Carlton Francis Primary are
also in doubt for opening
today. Their repairs are even
more extensive than that of C
C Sweeting Junior, according
to education sources.


Lecturer claims not




to feel safe at COB


00
QnT9~~~O T^l(IDT


FROM page one
Smith as well as Franklyn Wil-
son (college council chairman)
are the people who work in con-
struction. They work with
sharp-edged instruments and,
in my opinion, my personal
safety would be. at stake.
"On top of everything else, I
don't want any intimidation of
myself or my two children who
are at the school."
Mr Bethel's defiant stand fol-
lows a 22-month suspension
over an incident in the college
car park involving himself and a
senior administrator, Dr Linda
Davis.
During an angry confronta-
tion, Mr Bethel is alleged to
have made threats to Dr Davis.
However, after several court
hearings, a "nolle prosequi"
was filed, meaning that the
prosecution was unwilling to
proceed.
Since then, Mr Bethel has
been trying to get his pay rein-
stated and secure a transfer to
another job within the govern-
ment service.
He feels a return to COB
would be impossible for several
reasons, one of which was that
some senior administrators had
portrayed him as a "madman"
who needed to be closely
watched.
His outspoken comments on
the Smith affair increased the
hostility of some people towards
him, he said, and this would
make his position even more
untenable.


In a letter dated August 30,
Dr Chipman-Johnson told him
that, as a result of court pro-
ceedings coming to an end, his
immediate return to work was
"mandated" under public ser-
vice regulations.
She also outlined specific
duties he was expected to
undertake including tasks
which, claims Mr Bethel, he is
not trained to perform.
She said his assignment was
"a direct result of your unau-
thorised absence from the col-
lege which has led to a schedule
being created without reference
to your availability."
Her letter warned that fail-
ure to report for duty would be
regarded as "a clear violation"
of his obligation to make him-
self available for work.
Mr Bethel said: "I would be
in physical danger if I went to
the campus. Even in my normal
everyday life, I have people
shouting at me in the street.
The acting president's letter,
he said, amounted to construc-
tive dismissal, as it had assigned
to him "a grab-bag of activities"
for which he had no training.
"There was no prior discus-
sion of this and there are refer-
ences to unspecified duties -
does this mean I could be doing
the work of the tea-lady?
"They want me out of the
classroom because they know
my work is effective. I challenge
them to put forward my entire
record from 1977 to 2003.
"They want to destroy my
career as an academic and this


is a crude attempt to achieve
that. Dr Chipman-Johnson was
always the one driving the dis-
ciplinary process against n5e
and now it has come full cir-
cle."
He said her proposals were
also in breach of his contract,
which called for 12 contact
hours with students per week,
plus five office hours.
Mr Bethel said he wants the
minister to give him alternative
work off-campus that he can do
or be trained to do. "I will not
allow them to get me to fire
myself," he added, claiming thit
senior academics had been
overheard saying this was their
intention.
The Bethel bust-up means
that COB cannot start the ndw
term with the "clean sweep";it
hoped for following a traumat-
ic summer caused by the pla-
giarism nightmare.
When he left COB, Dr Smith
blamed the media for "showing
no mercy" and singled out Nr
Bethel as one of the main cait-
es of his predicament.
Dr Chipman-Johnsoi,
responding to Mr Bethel's fears,
said: "I see no reason why lHis
life would be in danger. We
have restored his salary and we
expect him to return.
"I doubt very much that any-
one would do anything to him
and I'm sorry to hear that. This
is the first I'm hearing it but We
asked him to return and I'd like
to believe that there is no need
for that fear, but we'd have to
wait and see."


PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE.-





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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


The College of The Bahamas, as the national tertiary level education
institution of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is engaged in a major
expansion of its physical facilities, its programme offerings and its research
activities and is moving aggressively to incorporate distance learning
methodologies into its repertoire of strategies for delivering instruction
throughout the archipelago, all with a view to seeking a charter as a
university.
The Council of The College of The Bahamas and its Search Committees
invite applications for the post of President as described below.
PROFILE OF THE PRESIDENT
Bringing creativity, the requisite skills and experience and sterling character
to the position, the ideal candidate will
* be first among equals in his or her cabinet, a team player
and a consensus builder
bring a future-oriented appreciation of the role which an
institution of higher learning should play, particularly in a
knowledge-based economy, both in educating students and
the wider community and in creating new knowledge consistent
with the needs of The Bahamas and the role of individuals and the
nation in a global economy
lead in the implementation of the vision for the evolution of
the institution into the University of The Bahamas
* motivate a large and culturally diverse faculty and staff to
implement this vision as a team
* Relate with maturity, judgment, flexibility, patience, and
resourcefulness to individuals within The College and to
members of the many local and international constituencies
to which The College enjoys ties
* function as the leader of The College to internal, local and
international audiences
* be the public face of The College, projecting the institution,
acting as advocate for it, and attracting needed resources
* appreciate the unique role played by a national institution in
a developing society, including the special structural
relationship between The College and the Government, the
expectations that the public and the Government have of
The College, and the implications of those expectations in
terms of the institution's response
* function with commitment, energy, resilience, and imagination
in an environment of limited resources
Status/Qualifications/Experience
The candidate
* must be a citizen of The Bahamas
* if an academic should hold an earned Ph.D degree from an
accredited institution of higher learning or an equivalent
professional qualification and a minimum of five (5) years
experience at the level of President, Chancellor, Vice President
or Vice Chancellor of a recognized and respected institution
* If active in the private sector, should have a strong academic
background and at least five (5) years experience at the level
of CEO or an equivalent position.in a substantial organization.
* Applicants whose careers have been in the public service
should have a strong academic background, a minimum of
five (5) years experience at least at the level of Permanent
Secretary or its equivalent
* Those in the Foreign Service should have a strong academic
background and at least five (5) years experience at the level
of Ambassador, High Commissioner or an equivalent position.
All applicants should be familiar with educational systems in the British
Commonwealth (including the Bahamas and the Caribbean) and in North
America.
The application deadline is September 14,2005. To ensure full consideration,
all applications must be received by this date. A completed application
will include an up-to-date comprehensive resume (including evidence of
nationality and date of birth) along with a letter addressing the issues and
criteria included in the description of the position. To expedite the
appointment procedure, applicants are advised to request five referees to
send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
below without waiting to be contacted by The College. Please visit the
College of The Bahamas website at for more information about the
institution.
Applications should be forwarded in confidence to:
Council Secretary
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-4304
Note: Electronic applications will not be accepted.



School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES FALL SEMESTER 042005

COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR: DAYS TIME TUITION & FEE RESOURCE Venue Max. Enrol.
(ADDITIONAL $40 MATERIALS
APPFEEFOR
NEW STUDENTS)
1. BahamianCuisine COOK806 SeptemberS 6weeks ThUrs. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$12perweek SHTSMain 15
Kitchen
2. GoumretCookhgi COOK823 September5 6weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $20perweek SHTSMain 15
S _Kitchen
3. GourmetCoolkngli COOK824 September5 6weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $20perweek SHTSMain 15
Kitchen


The College of the Bahamas
Alumni Association invites nominations for its
2005 HALL OF FAME AWARD


Name of Nominee-------------------------------------------------------------------

Address---------------------------------------------------------------------

Occupation----- --------------------------------------------------------------

Year Graduated from COB (if known)------------------------------------------


Hall of Fame Criteria


To be considered for the Alumni Association Hall of Fame, nominees must

* Have distinguished themselves as students, academically and socially,
while at The College of The Bahamas
* Be among the best in their chosen fields of endeavour, displaying scrupulous
conduct that stands as an example to others
* Be a leader and a relentless worker whose success benefits co-workers,
those they supervise or employ and the community in general
* Excel in civic outreach and make a contribution to society that is easily
visible within their fields and the wider scope of Bahamian life
* Exhibit strength of character that translates generally into community
strengthening, personifying their alma mater's motto "Knowledge, Truth,
Integrity".

You may nominate more than one person, using a new form each time. All nominations
must be accompanied by the nominee's professional curriculum vitae (CV) and photograph.
Please forward all documents to


THE ALUMNI HALL OF FAME AWARD
The Alumni Affairs Office
The College of the Bahamas
PO Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas


For more information, please telephone 302-4365/6. Deadline for nominations is September
9, 2005.


CBETRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

& EXTENSION SERVICES


Fall Semester


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT


COURSE NO. SECT
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01
ACCA901 01
ACCA902 01


BUSINESS
BUS1900
CUST900

COMPUTER
coMP901.
COMP901
COMP902
COMP903
COMP 941
COMP953
COMP960
COMP930


COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01
COSM804 01
COSM807 01
DECORATING
DECO800 01
DECO801 01
FLOR800 01
FLOR801 01
FLOR802 01


ENGLISH
ENG 900
ESL 900


HEALTH AND FITNESS


Email: alumniassoc@cob.edu.bs


COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III


01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I
01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER
SERVICE W/S

01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
01 INFORMATION TECH. I
01 QUICKBOOKS
01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
01 MS POWERPOINT W/S
01 WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S


MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAILART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN Ill


01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG.


MASG900 01. MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS I
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS II
HLTH 800 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR


LANGUAGES
CRE 900
CRE 901
SPA 900
SPA 901
FRE 900
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900
MGMT901
MGMT902


MEDICAL
MEDT900
SEWING
SEW 800
SEW 802
SEW 805
SEW 811


CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I

HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. I
HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. II
HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENTW/S


01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I


BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II
DRAPERY MAKING I
UPHOLSTERY MAKING I


DAY START DUR.


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur


6:00-9:00PM Tue
,9:30AM-4:30PM Thur


6:00-9:00PM
10AM-I:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-7:30PM
9:30AM-4:30PM
9:30am-4:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Mon
Sat
Thur
Wed
Tue
Tue
Thur
Thur/Fri

Mon
Tue
Mon/Thur


26 Sep
26 Sep
27 Sep


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


27 Sep 8 weeks
13Oct 1 day


26 Sep
24 Sep
29 Sep
28 Sep
27 Sep
27 Sep
13 Oct
6 & 7 Oct

3 Oct
4 Oct
26 Sep


4 Oct
5 Oct.
3 Oct
6 Oct
4 Oct


12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
6 weeks
12 weeks
1 day
2 days

8 weeks
8 weeks
6 weeks


8 weeks
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


6:00-9:00PM Tue 4 Oct 8 weeks $225
6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10 weeks $250


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Thur
Mon
Thur


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fri


29 Sep
26 Sep
1 Sept


29 Sep
26 Sep
6 & 7Oct


10 weeks
10 weeks
10weeks

10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

12 weeks
12 weeks
2 days


6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $225

6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $225
6:00-9:OORM Mon 3 Oct 10 weeks $250
6:00-9:00PM Tue 4 Oct 10 weeks $225
6:00-9:00PM Wed 5 Oct 10 weeks $225


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936. or email All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of
your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course





This is an introductory course covering basic medical terms. Students will be exposed to terms that
will enable them to read and interpret medical reports, charts, and communications relevant to a
variety of health care environments. Major topics include Word Building Rules, Prefixes, Suffixes,
Whole Body Terminology, Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscles and Joints, Nervous
System, Blood and Lymphatic System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory System and Digestive
System.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Prerequisite:
Tuition:


Monday, 26 September 2005
6:00am 9:00pm
C.R. Walker Secondary
None
$225.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email
nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one
time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport.
CEES reserves the right to change tuition, fees, course content, course schedule and course
materials.


8. Cake&PasbyMaaIgl COOK813 September6 10oweeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15 per week SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
9. Cake&PastbyMakingll COOK814 September6 10weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $250.00 $10-$15 per week SHTS Pastry 15
.Kitchen
10. Bread Makn COOK810 September8 6weeks Thurs. 600-9.00pm $200.00 $5-$10perweek SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
11.CakeDecoratig I COOK817 September7? 10weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
12. CakeDecoration 11 COOK818 September7 10weeks Wed, 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSPastry 15
________________Kitchen
For further ifomaion please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804,323-6804 or fax 325-8175


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005, PAGE 15


SAIINTB RnATIO N WS


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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


I~i-Thiefi.


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Page 2B


$90m project Hopes for
J L i .* 1 ';- .;*^:^ m i'-*-ii*: :*- ***' s ^^^'


in


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Rum Cay Club resort a
tial community has tol
bune that the project
shape", with his compa
talks with two to three potential hotel
partners and having "surveyed and m
nine miles of hew roads for the islan
John Mittens, the investor behin
Holdings, said he was poised to "m
serious announcement regarding 1
very soon". He was also hoping to
necessary approvals and permits fo
Cay Club's various subdivisions in abo
"Touch wood, everything seems t
Mr Mittens said. "We've been puttiq
we've surveyed and mapped out nine
are in conversation with various ho


1 shape'

tors it's down to two, possibly three."
Mr Mittens declined to name the potential
operators Montana Holdings was talking to, but
$90 million added that the Rum Cay Club's two resort prop-
ind residen- erties were expected to generate direct employ-
Id The Tri- ment "in the hundreds" for Bahamians. When
t is in "Al the entire 870-acre project is completed in 2011,
ny holding it will feature a 290-room hotel the Rum Cay
el operating Club Resort Hotel and a 60-room hotel, the lat-
iapped out" ter known as the Club Green Estates.
id. Mr Mittens said investors had now bought
d Montana into the project, for which Montana Holdings
iake a very signed a Heads of Agreement with the Govern-
the project ment about 18 months ago, and the company
obtain the was looking to begin the main construction phase
)r the Rum towards the end of 2005.
out 10 days. He added: "We hope to start moving in the
o be 'Al'," heavy machinery by the end of the year."
ng in roads;
roads. We
otel opera- See INVESTOR, Page 5B


Devco stops 'all work with


Ginn on joint venture


THE Grand Bahama Devel- In an e-mailed response to
opment Company (Devco) has The Tribune's questions, Gra-
stopped "all work" on its multi- ham Torode, Devco's president
million dollar five-star resort and chief executive, said that
and residential joint venture while "a considerable invest-
development with the Ginn ment" had been made by both
Development Company, in a sides on their joint venture, the
.mote-to allow the latter to focus- .halt was designed to allow the
full attention on its talks with Ginn Development Company
the Government. to sort out the future of its sep-


arate West End project.
Mr Torode said: "Devco orig-
inally identified the Ginn Com-
pany as its joint venture part-
ner for the development of a
five-star residential and resort
development several years ago.
SEE page 3B


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
TOTAL arrivals to the Bahamas fell 7.7 per cent during July
2005, compared to last year, falling from 505,4555 to 466,737,
according to statistics from the Ministry of Tourism.
However, total air arrivals for July increased slightly by 1.7 per
cent to 164,282, although this was not enought to counteract the
drop in sea arrivals by 12.1 per cent, dipping from 343,965 in July
2004 to 302,455 this year.
But Gary Young, director of planning, research and statistics: for
the Ministry of Tourism, warned that looking at arrivals figures
alone could be deceptive if not placed in the right context.
Looking at year-to-date figures
for arrivals by sea in New Provi- SEE page 2B
dence, inclusive of cruise ship vis-


Long-awaited

policy release

a capital markets

'watershed event'


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter and
NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE long-awaited release of
the Government's Public Sec-
tor Capital Markets Develop-
ment policy, which has taken
almost two years to bring to
fruition, was described as
"another watershed event" for
this nation, although other mar-
ket observers said they wanted


the measures unveiled to be
.implemented much more quick-
ly than this statement.
Speaking with The Tribune
following the statement's
release, the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange's
(BISX) chief executive, Keith
Davies, said: "I am satisfied that
the Government. of the
Bahamas put in writing its
intention to broaden and deep-
en the Bahamian capital mar-
SEE page 6B


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* FIDELITY MARKET WRAP


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

el of trading
activity took
place in the
Bahamian
market this past week, as
more than 23,000 shares
changed hands. For the week,
the market saw nine out of its
19 listed stocks trade, of which
three advanced, one declined
and five remained unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Commonwealth
Bank (CBL), with 13,431
shares changing hands and
accounting for 57 per cent of
the total shares traded.
The big advancer for the
week was Bank of the
Bahamas (BOB), whose share
price gained $0.30 to close at
its new 52-week high of $6.90.
On the down side, FINCO
(FIN) declined by $0.01 to
close at $10.60.

COMPANY NEWS
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(BAB) -
For the 2005 second quar-
ter, BAB posted net income
of $392,000, which represents
an increase of $57.6,000 or
17.2 per cent over the same


FROM page 1B


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.80
$1.10
$0.80
$6.90
$9.50
$12.25
$1.40
$ 8.80
$ 9,10
$1.69
$ 9.50
$2.46
$4.12
$1.15
$9.00
$10.60
$9.60
$ 8.50
$5.70
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


$-
$-
$-
$0.30
$0.15
$-
$-
$-
$0.10
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$ -0.01
$-.
$-
$-0.16
$-


0
0
0
1000
1000
0
0
631
13431
4698
700
0
0
0
300
1624
500
0
0
0


-27.27%.
14.58%
-5.88%
20.00%
18.75%
-5.77%
-22.22%
23.94%
28.17%
-23.18%
26.84%
64.00%
4.04%
-42.21%
12.50%
9.28%
-2.93%
3.41%
-5.94%
0.00%


DIVIDENDIAGM NOTES:
Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN) has declared
a dividend of $0.12, payable on September 8,2005, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record date September 2, 2005.


period last year.
Net Interest income grew
by $53,900 or 4.1 per cent to


total $1.4 million, while non-
interest income increased by
$191,000 or 30.5 per cent to


total $818,000.
Operating expenses for the
period grew by $69,000 to
total $1.7 million. The increase
in operating expenses is attrib-
uted to the one-off costs of re-
branding the bank, which took
place earlier in the year.
However, bank officials
have said the introduction of a
number of expense reduction
initiatives, some of which
started in the 2005 second
quarter, will help to reduce
operational expenses in the
upcoming periods.
The bank's renewed effort
to grow a quality loan book,
has begun to pay off. As at
June 30, 2005, total loans
stood at $97.4 million, up $5.2
million from fiscal 2004. It
should be noted that BAB has
finally reached a settlement
on the Rolling Hills issue, and
it hopes the transaction will
be completed before the end
of 2005.

RND Holdings (RND) -
For the 2005 first quarter,
RND posted a net loss of
$109,000, compared to a loss
of $308,000 in 2004. Revenues
increased by $29,000 or 8.73
per cent to total $361,900,
while direct costs rose by
$14,500 or 34.5 per cent.


Int

FOREX Rates


Weekly%


CAD$
GBP
EUR


1.1874
1.8434
1.2537


Change

-0.94
2.35 ':
2.11 1


Commodities


Crude Oil
Gold


Weekly%

$67.57
$445.40


International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly%


DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


10,447.37
1,218.02
2,141.07
12,600.00


RND managed to reduce its
operating expenses by $33,000
to $328,000 as at the end of
May 2005. Management has
expressed optimism that its
Ticket Express arm will fur-
ther boost its revenue base as
time progresses, and is hop-
ing to achieve a break even
position within the next 15
months.

Premier Commercial Real
Estate (PRE) -


Change'

2.18
0.00



Change'

0.48
1.07
0.96
1.29


For the quarter ending June
30, 2005, PRE posted net
income of $269,000, repre-
senting a decline of $6,200 or
2.25 per cent over the compa-
rable period last year.
Total income rose by
$18,000 to total $435,000,
while total expense grew by
$24,200 to total $165,800. Net
Asset Value as at June 30
stood at $11.45, compared to
$10.26 for the equivalent peri-
od last year.


itors, the numbers dropped by
4.3 per cent, dipping from
1,196,151 for the year ended
July, 2004, to 1,144,875 for the
year ended July 2005.
But air arrivals to New Prov-
idence during the same period
rose by 8.1 per cent to 693,264,
an increase of some 52,000.
Mr Young explained that, on
average, cruise visitors spend
between $60 $70 per person
on shore in New Providence.
Stopover visitors, however,
spend on average $1,000 per
person. This means that on
average, the spendinh of one
stopover visitor (air arrival) is
equivalent to the spending of
14 cruise visitors.


As a result, this means that
the total spending by the 52,000
extra air arrivals to New Provi-
dence for the first seven months
in 2005 is equivalent to the
spending of 728,000 cruise visi-
tors. .

Spending
Therefore, the spending by
the extra air arrivals more than
cancels out the almost 52,000
drop in cruise arrivals, and will
reflect an actual increase in rev-
enue seen by various Bahamian
businesses and entrepreneurs
on New Providence.
Year-to-date figures for July
for total arrivals showed a dip in


arrivals by 5.9 per cent.
Looking at the destinations
within the Bahamas, total
arrivals to the Nassau/Paradise
Island destination improved by
10.1 per cent for July, with
290,395 visitors coming to the
destination, compared to
263,674 in July 2004.
The increase in arrivals for
the month was seen in both air
and sea statistics, with air
arrivals increasing by 12.9 per
cent and sea arrivals increasing
by 8.4 per cent when compared
to the same period in 2004.
In Grand Bahama, which
continues to struggle because
of insufficient room inventory,7
total arrivals fell by 32.8 per


cent in July, dropping from
nearly 100,000 visitors in July
2004 to 65,605 this year.

Arrivals

Sea arrivals also saw a signif-
icant dip, at 33.2, dropping from
67,041 in July 2004 to 44,776 in
July 2005. As might be expect-
ed because of the fall off in the
number of available rooms, air
arrivals decreased by 31.9 per
cent, from 30,594 in July last
year to 20,829 for the current
period.
Mr Young said that for
Grand Bahama, the dip in
cruise arrivals was, in part, the
result of a repositioning of Dis-


support of our scheduled service between
the Turks & Caicos Islands and the Bahamas.
Travelers have benefited like never before from


ney Cruise Lines' ships to
another destination.
Also, other destinations, such
as Alaska, have become very
popular, and to some extent
there has been a shift with more
cruise ships coming out of Seat-
tle. An increasing number of
ships are now also visiting New
York and Canada.
In the Family Islands, a simi-
lar pattern could be seen as sea
arrivals experienced a substan-
tial downturn from 116,835 for
July 2004 to 84,186 this year.
Total arrivals dropped by
more than 23 per cent for July,
standing at 110,737, while
arrivals by air were able to
maintain their position, dipping
only slightly by 2.8 per cent to
26,551 for July.
In the Family Islands, which
held their own in terms of air
arrivals to the end of July, the
decrease in reported sea arrivals
could be the result of the way
the statistic is reported.
Mr Young said sea arrivals
are reported by first port of
entry, so what the data actually
reflects is the fact that a number
of cruise ships are now stopping
first in New Providence and
then moving on to the Family
Island destination.
Mr Young also pointed out
that cruise ship arrivals
increased significantly last year
when the region was threatened
by a number of hurricanes, par-
ticularly those ships that offered
seven and 14-day cruises and
previously did not include a stop
in the Bahamas.
He said that if the Caribbean
islands south of the Bahamas


are again threatened by a num-
ber of storms, then the
Bahamas may be able to sus-
tain the number of cruise visi-
tors it is experiencing heading
into the autumn period.
If, however, there are no hur-
ricanes, then it is likely that the
cruise ships will resume their
usual port schedules and a fur-
ther reduction in cruise visitors
will result for the Bahamas.. ,
Other factors to be consid-
ered are the ongoing war in Iraq
and the devastation that
occurred in Louisiana, Missis-
sippi, Alabama and South Flori-
da as a result of Hurricane Kat-
rina. The huge financial burden
on the area may also have the
effect of limiting the amount of
travel to the Bahamas.

Hurricanes-

"Putting it into context, we
have to understand that going
forward, depending on what
works out with the economy
and hurricanes in the region,
that the level of cruise arrivals
may continue to decline," Mr
Young said.
"Also, we have to recognise
that unless we address the con-
cerns expressed by the cruise
lines about the destination, we
could be negatively impacted,
because the cruise lines are the,
people who are interacting with
cruise passengers and it is they
who determine whether we
remain a popular destinatioui.
If we don't fix the experience,
then the drop could be for real
because those customers won't
want to come back."


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

SUN GEMINI NAVIGATION LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation


NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, SUN GEMINI
NAVIGATION LIMITED, is in dissolution as of
August 31, 2005.

Mr. Toshifumi Inami of 16-3, Konan 2-Chome,
Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan is te Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR i


ernational Markets


~-"I- ;""""""I"~'~ ""- '~' ~ ""~" '~""""" "~~' ~""""'~ """'""~"" "~'


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE














Winn-Dixie says Bahamas




Supermarkets 'not for sale'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
WINN-DIXIE has denied
that it is actively seeking to'sell
its 75 per cent majority stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets,
although a company spokes-
woman ad: itted she would not
be "surprised at all" if potential
buyers were circling the latter.
The Tribune revealed on Fri-
day how potential bidders were
circling Bahamas Supermarkets,
operator of 12 stores in New
Providence and Grand Bahama
under the City Markets and
Winn-Dixie brands.
Some sources had suggested
that Winn-Dixie had put
Bahamas Supermarkets into


FROM page 1B

A considerable investment has
already been made in this pro-
ject by both companies.
"However, at this time both
Government and Ginn are
focusing their efforts on the
planned project at West End.
Under the circumstances all
work on the Devco project has
stopped. We remain hopeful
that this project will proceed at
some time in the future."
The Government and Ginn
Development Company have
resumed talks on the West End
project, after The Tribune
revealed earlier this year that
the investors almost walked
away in frustration at their
inability to bring negotiations
for a Heads of Agreement to a
conclusion.
The Ginn Development
Company was set to submit its
latest version of the proposed
project, together with an analy-
sis of its projected economic
impact, to the Government at
the end of August, and further
talks were due to start at the
beginning of this, month.
Meanwhile, Mr Torode,
replying to another Tribune


play, but this was denied.
A spokeswoman said: "It's
absolutely not for sale. They are
mot entertaining any discus-
sions, and are not negotiating
with anybody. There's nothing
on the table."
But she added: "I would not
be surprised, given the circum-
stances surrounding the compa-
ny, having field for Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection, for
someone to be looking at this
particular area and looking to
pluck it [Bahamas Supermar-
kets].
"It could be ripe for plucking,
but it's not for sale. People think
they can get the healthy part,
but that is not the case."
One source close to a party


question, said Devco had "a
clearly defined policy" to sell
land and provide quality afford-
able housing to Bahamians, but
that an "inevitable" effect of
investment and development
was to push real estate prices
higher.
The Tribune contacted Mr
Torode after real estate sources
had expressed concern that
Bahamians, particularly in
regard to coastal property, were
being priced out of the market
by an influx of wealthy foreign
second home owners.
Committed
Mr Torode said: "The Grand
Bahama Development Compa-
ny (Devco) is firmly committed,
to Bahamian ownership of land
on Grand Bahama. It is essen-
tial that Bahamians are stake-
holders in the development of
the island. In this regard, Devco
sells between 300 to 400 lots
every year to Bahamians, both
in Freeport and Nassau, at dis-
counted prices. Devco also
offers in-house financing.
"Devco has initiated the


interested in the company last
week told The Tribune: "I can
confirm there is interest in
Bahamas Supermarkets."
Winn-Dixie has repeatedly
said that Bahamas Supermar-
kets and its staff are unaffected
by the Chapter 11 situation,
which is forcing the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) listed
company to close 35 per cent of
its stores and make 28 per cent
of the workforce redundant.
Bahamas Supermarkets has
always been among Winn-Dix-
ie's most profitable arms, with
net earnings for the three
months to April 6, 2005, ahead
of last year at $2.2 million com-
pared to $1.7 million. Year-to-
dateto April, earnings for 2005


development of quality hous-
ing developments at Heritage,
Chesapeake and Lincoln Park.
We are working with many
Bahamian partners, including
the Ministry of Housing, local
contractors and banks, and are
creating some of the best hous-
ing developments on the island.
In addition to providing quality
affordable homes to Bahami-
ans, local contractors have also
received contracts in excess of
$25 million over the past three
years."
Mr Torode then added:
"Devco is actively pursuing for-
eign investors to develop high
quality residential and tourism
projects on Grand Bahama. The
development of high quality
large scale projects is essential
to create new skilled jobs and
economic development.
"However, one of the
inevitable side effects of further
investment and development
will be escalating real estate
prices.
"This is simply a fact of life
the world over. The only way
to ensure that prices do not go
up is to do nothing."


were $5.9 million or $1.28 per share, compared to $5 million,


or $1.09 per share, last year.


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228
beautifully
appointed Junior Suites
and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.

Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
just steps away.

In-room amenities
include: king size or
double double beds,
sitting area
with sofa bed,
cable tv, refrigerator,
in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer,
complimentary deluxe
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served daily,
Pool with swim-up bar,
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breakfast and lunch,
Bamboo cocktail bar.

Ask about our local
corporate, group and
wedding rates.

Contact our
management team
for a site inspection.


PARADISE ISLAND
BAHAMAS


1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


Esso





ESSO is looking for Talented Candidates to fill the following position.
The successful candidate will receive Exceptional Career Development.

OPERATIONS ENGINEER

Rode

Achieve success and flawless execution in Terminal Operations through
managing operations personnel on a day to day basis. Responsible for
product receipt, storage and distribution and all operations related to
them. Ensure terminal activities are carried out safely and in accordance
with Esso's standards and government regulations at an acceptable cost
and at an extraordinary service level.

NECESSARY SKILLS:

- Bachelor's Degree in Engineering (Industrial, Electrical or Mechanical)
or Related Fields
- 4 5 Years of experience in areas of study
- Strong Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills
- Cognitive/Technical/Business Knowledge
- Must possess Analytical Thinking, Innovation, and SoundJudgement
- Commitment to High Standards
- Result Oriented, Committed, with Drive and Perseverance
- Exercises Influence Demonstrates Self Confidence and Personal Impact
- Demonstrates Leadership


If you fulfill the position requirements, please send your resume by email
to linam.driguez@exaonmobil.com.


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, o,., .








PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamians discover




importance of wills


8 CBC.( tr a N.l) -AN attorney has emphasised
S FOR) Miami cable televisin in New ProvidenceOnthatday you that changes in the inheritance
1' ABClWPLG) n 'l will discover your basic cable channels have been laws have made it increasingly
---anewo0rderto make, iteasier for you important for Bahamians to
S 2 arranged in a new order to makit easier for you to make a will, as the new legis-
13 PBS New York find the programming you are looking for! nation gives equal considera-
tion..to all children whether
14 .. NTV (St Jh s NFLD) they are born inside or outside
Drama of marriage.
15. A rs & Entea ienment G. Diane Stewart, a partner
9 fm 5.5. Bn of at McKinney, Bancroft &
17 LN Lif etime mNetwork 60 HB2Hstory C nlHughes, told British American
18 Oxygen 61 HBUWest 96 Turner Classic Moviezs Insurance Company's Mid-
i-19 TNT 62 Shotme 98 DIY summer Night School the rules
210 USA Netwi 63 Shtimeest 100 Ba of intestacy had changed so
21. Sci 64 HB Signar 107 BBC cathat all children now inherited,
Learning & Special interest 65 HBO Famrri as well as the spouse.
22 HGTV Home & G .arden 'TIe 66 Cins ax SptsPak.I "It's important that every
23 Food Network Bm a 8 8 6TSNperson makes a will because
24.20 - The Lramin hn iCinelg 16 L .69Pyou then dictate how your
25 Discovery C oha n weial Ban 9.07 89,10 0.estate is distributed upon you
26 Nation graphic FamilyPak 4.89 ESPNdeath. But it's also important
Children. & Family 91 Disne Channel 90 Gof Channel that you recognise the respon-
271 Nickelodeon 93 C Ld 108 S o .sibility of looking after your
28 Cartoon Network 94 ...lam' children; all of your children,"
291 Boomerang g IA' E t e Ms Stewyart said.E
nExtIa $ 2 We no longer have legiti-
3:. 0 Spe 0 :o glie "n t 9te and illegitiinat children,
30 4SP p nered n tr ti o101aStarz and it's also the duty of every
31 E''t'S2:,ow Intet -102 S t z-2l competent adult or spouse to
ews & Information 103 Black Starz look after their spouse. If you
32 CNN HeadB n ; ls S104 Sudance Channel don't make a will, the rules of
33 SNBC 105 BET intestacy apply, which say that
4 CNN 10 ~ ed all the children will inherit
35- Fox News Network 109 CB equally and the spouse will get
36 BBC W orld a half and the children will get
1 37 The father Chainel a half, or if they don't exist
636 Cola TV then their closest relatives will
39 B orberg inherit."
40 Parliamentay Channel WHERE ARE MY CHANNELS?
S- r StationsiTV Guiden Replaced by Cable Guide Cha5nnel M or gag
41 TBS outdoor tLite Available on Digital
42 KTL (West) D y Moved to Digits e and HomePAK l .Midsummer Night School's
43 WPIX i The ( i(East) Re ilaed y Discir Health on Digital mortgage session was led by
44 WWOR / UPN Co~ en D i viable on Dgital and Entertainment E .. Violet Perpall, supervisor for
i 45 Super.station I WIGN C Available on Digial.and EntertainmentExtra mortgages and accounts at
Variety S de This Channe is No Longer Available British AmericanInsurance
4 EEnralmtV 5 Av ailable on Digital Company, and John Wilson,
ee En ointg pice r Available on D gia attorney and partner at McK-
4 Tepo(Co in0 e Replaced by Univision Available on Digita inney, Bancroft and Hughes.

49 VH Available on Digital Ms Perpall underscored the
01 itUZIv i need for Bahamians to
p ITiity Brodca ting NEW CHANNELS ON BASIC increase savings and reduce
A51 New i~ n Nioa 2 Nork A T uChanYel Tempo consumer debt, such as car
M' '-ii Sia nb a *es-l MT V. ..ntnloans and credit card debt, in
"h52 EIN (i'Catholic:Channel) *-NA ,.etno.rk Bloomberg order to prepare themselves
:53 3AN (Seventh ayAdventst ocor annel to qualify for a mortgage.

"Some of the misconcep-
tions we find are persons who
find a house, let's say valued at




Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information AsOf:
I51 september 200

52wk-Hi 2wk-.o Symbo Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
1.10 0.80 Abaco Markets 0.80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 000%
9.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.50 9.50 0.00 1.452 0.340 6.5 3 58%
.690 5.55 BankoflBahamas 690 6.90 0.00 0561 0330 12.3 4.78%
0,85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0,187 0.010 4.3 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.4 0 0.00 0,126 0000 11.1 429%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0,066 0.030 18.7 2-73%
881 6.90 Cable Bahamas 8.80 8.80 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.2 2.73%
2.20 1.69 Colinar Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9,10 6.,75 Commonwealth Bank 9.07 9.10 0.03 1,000 0.705 0.410 129 4.51%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.7 0.00%
.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 000 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.61 9.25 Finco 1.0.60 10.60 0.00 0.695 0.500 15.3 4.72%
9.50 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.50 96,50 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.00 8.31 Focol 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.3 556%
1.99 1.,27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1. 15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 000%
10.20 9.50 ICD Ulilities 960 9.60 0.00 0.526 0,405 18.3 4.22%
8.50 8.25 J.S. Johnson 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.561 0.560 15.2 659%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.70 5,72 0.02 0.122 0.000 46.7 0.00%
10.00 10,00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10,00 0.00 2L010 0,760 5.0 7.60%
2wk-Hi 62wk-Low mbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 1225 1325 11.00 1,488 0.960 9.1 7.25
10.14 1000 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings. 0.29 54 000-0.044 0000 NM 0 00
43.00 28.00,ABDA 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 (1 9.4 000
16.00 1300 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13,00 1.105 0.810 14.6 693%
0.60 0.35 RAND Holdings 0,29 0.54 0, 35 -0,103 0,000N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI owk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months DIv $ Yield %/
1.2496 1.1822 Colin a Money Market Fund 1.249581"
2.3810 2,0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.381 -
10.4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4855W...
.2636 2.1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2263627-
1.1273 1.0576 Colina Bond Fund 1.127305 ...

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX- lgDec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelff
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and Wdelitl
Previous Close.- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's C ose Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change- Change in closing price from day to da) EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share ror the last 12 inth*
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Oividends per share paid in the lest 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamning FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 10
- AS AT JUL. 31, 2005/*- AS AT JUL 31, 2005
- AS AT AUGUST 28.-2005/** AS AT-JULY 31", 2008. -...*AS AT JULY 31, 200C


$200,000, and because they feel
that because they make $2,500
a month and the payment on
the house is $1,500, they can
readily afford or obtain a mort-
gage," Ms Perpall said.
"They don't realise that
there are a lot of closing costs
associated. And we also would
like for them to also look at
the other factors, for example
their expenses, to ensure that
they will be able to make their
payments comfortably."

Addressed

Mr Wilson addressed stu-
.dents' legal questions. Con-
cerns focused on questionable
activities by legal professionals
and realtors, for example
"shady realtors,"-who took
down payments but did not
follow through on their
responsibilities, and lawyers
who represented both the sell-
er and the vendor in real estate
deals.
There were also general
questions about the mortgage
application and approvals
process, interest rates and the
closing costs associated with
mortgages.
Gilbert Williams, vice-pres-
ident for home service sales at
British American Insurance,
told students that "life insur-
ance is not a luxury but a
necessity", because of the pro-
tection it affords families in
the loss of the main breadwin-
ner and as a.requirement to
obtain a mortgage.
Mr Williams discussed the
importance of understanding
current laws concerning life
insurance and beneficiary des-
ignations.
He said: "Right now, if you
name a spouse, for example,
under the current law a spouse
is an irrevocable beneficiary,
which means you cannot
change that spouse as a bene-
ficiary or you cannot assign
that policy as collateral for a
bank without, that spouse's sig-
nature.
"So, if, for example, you


have a situation where:the
relationship is no longer there
between the spouses, ,it
becomes a problem when, you
want to use that particular,
insurance policy for collater-
al." .
One of the most popular ses-,
sions at Midsummer Night.
School was the financial plani-
ning. and investment seminar,
that was led by I. Chester,
Cooper, chief operating offi,.
cer and chief executive desig-,
nate, British American Insur-
ance Company, Ken Pyfrom,
chief financial officer, British.
American Insurance Compa-
ny, and Cecilia Cox, manager
of financial services and invest-
ments, British American Insur-.
ance Company.
Mr Cooper emphasised the
need for individuals to plan
their finances carefullym and
said sound financial planning,
involves budgeting, looking at,
personal expenses iand finding
ways to reduce expenses, as
well as finding supplemental.
ways to increase income;
through extra jobs, hobbies-g
that might become a job 'anid
through rental income. --, 'I
Mr Cooper, Mr Pyfrom and
Ms Cox also highlighted the'
importance of savings'aftfd
investing, and said the key'is'to`
get started today and aimntti;
save at least 10 per cent of"
your income regardless of hioww
much you make. '.

Planning,

"Get started planning,- g
started saving, get started
investing and then be consis-
tent and persistent. Even if you
do only $50 a week it will accu-i
mulate, and the power of pom-;
pounding will come into play,,
and eventually you will be able
to look at your nest egg. ,
"And once you establish a
habit you will be abl'e'to
increase the amount that
you're saving or investingland
eventually you will be able to
retire comfortably," Mr Coop,
er said.


Receptikoist/ Typist

Business Office has an immediate Opening for a
Receptionist & Typist. The successful candidate must
possess exceptional telephone etiquette, good attitude,
ability to work independently or as team; with a minimum
typewriting skill of 60 wpm; and about Two Year Olfice
experience w/excellent communications and Computer
Skills; and be proficient in use of Windows XP or 2000
environment; particularly w/ software such as M.S. Word,
Excel and Quickbooks.

This position is not limited to Bahamians only

Please Fax Resume to 394-4458



Freeport Based Construction Company
requires an experienced.

CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR/PROJECT MANAGER
for a short term or" permanent mployment.

Salary commensurate with qualificat n & experience.

Applications in writing summarizing qualifications & experience to
Box F-43569 or fax to (242) 385-7573.
You may call (242) 352-6700 ext 4 or 5 details of position.


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
No.45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
DENCO INVESTORS GROUP INC., is in dissolution.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC., is the Liquidator and
can be contacted at No. 2 Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box
#71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
October 1st, 2005.




J B. Foster
For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator


i


BUSNES


Pi_7-










THE^ TRIBU NESONDAYNEPTE M BES5,2005 PA GE


Investor, from Page 1B
The Tribune had contacted locals will be very happy with
[r Mittens after sources with what is going on. I think the
um Cay connections had islanders are keen for it to start;
-ported that islanders were we all are. The project is fine,
Dicing concerns that Montana and we're happy with it."
oldings had dropped the pro- Mr Mittens acknowledged
ct's resort components and that Rum Cay's residents may
possibly walked away from the have been disappointed that
project outright. Montana Holdings had not
begun construction sooner, but
RumourS pointed out that as developers
they had to complete environ-
Saying he was "gobsmacked" mental studies and Environ-
hear of the rumours, Mr Mit- mental Impact Assessments
ns replied: "One, we're not (EIAs) to the satisfaction of
opping the project. We will the Bahamas Environment,.
makingg a very serious Science and Technology
inouncement regarding the (BEST) Commission.


project very shortly. We will
not .be dropping the hotels. I
don't know where these stories
have come from, but they're
not true.
"We have a plan in place,
investors in place, and the


FROM page 1B

after Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne devastated the island.
Separately, The Tribune
understands that the Govern-
ment is expected to make a
major announcement concern-
ing a new multi-million dollar
investment project for Grand
Bahama within days possibly
as early as today. This project is
not connected to the Royal
Oasis situation.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Wilchcombe said Dr
Baltron Bethel, the Hotel Cor-
poration's managing director
and deputy chairman, was in
negotiations with Lehman
Brothers and an interested
buyer over the sale of the Roy-
al Oasis, which has now been
closed for exactly one year,
leaving 1300 employees out of
work.
Mr Wilchcombe said some
movement towards resolving
the Royal Oasis's future should
be seen by this autumn.
He added: "Our expectation
is to have the hotel operating,
at least a tower, by end of the
year, or early next year."
The need for a positive solu-
tion to the Royal Oasis saga is
increasing daily, due to the
wider economic impact its pro-
longed'closure and resulting
unemployment has had on the
Grand Bahama economy..
There have been reports that
the International Bazaar, which
relied heavily on Royal Oasis
guests for much of its business,
may close by year-end if the
issue is unresolved.
'Despite the Government's
best efforts, any sale and reso-
lution of the Royal Oasis situ-.
ation ultimately lies in the
hands of Lehman Brothers' pri-
vate equity arm, based in New
York, which holds the mort-
gage on the property.
As well as effectively own-
ing the resort through its
financing of Driftwood


Surveys
Other surveys that had to be
completed included a topo-
graphical study and an oceanic
study, the latter concerned with


(Freeport's) purchase of the
property, Lehman Brothers'
private equity arm also holds
a substantial stake in Drift-
wood, operator of the Royal
Oasis, and is also the first-in-
line creditor.
There have been concerns


that Driftwood and Lehman
Brothers were seeking to high a
price for the Royal Oasis, due
to the need to pay off its mas-
sive liabilities, which in January
this year totalled more than $22
million.
Talks with Harcourt Devel-


M
R
re
vo
H
je
PC
pr



to
te:
dr
be
an


opments, the Irish property
developer that already has
interests in Grand Bahama,.
failed earlier this year, although
business sources are still hold-
ing out hopes that negotiations
with the company might
resume. They view Harcourt
Developments as, holding out
the best long-term solution for
the Royal Oasis, although some
said the Government is now
talking to a potential New
York-based buyer.
Meanwhile, Mr Wilchcombe
said the previous FNM gov-
ernment had failed to concen-
trate on the development of
the Grand Bahama's tourism
industry, instead looking to
develop the island as an indus-
trial centre.
He added that his Govern-
ment intended to make tourism
Grand Bahama' first pillar,
repositioning its industrial sec-
tor, which now serves as the
primary driver of the econo-
my.
Meanwhile, the Tourism
Minister said the single-year
extension granted by the US
government, in regard to its cit-
izens requiring passports to
return from the Bahamas and
the Caribbean, was good news.
He said the Bahamas would
use the extra year to inform
US passengers of the need for a
passport to travel home from


the floorbed for a planned
marina and its flushing. His-
torical studies were also car-
ried out.

Islanders

"I think the islanders may be
disappointed that we have not
started digging, but unfortu-
nately we have to go through
these planning processes," Mr
Mittens said. "They do take
time, but they are necessary."
He added that the full gamut
of utilities telecommunica-
tions, electricity and water and
sewerage would be installed
as the Rum Cay Club evolved.
Mr Mittens said that so far
the developers had only sold
"a couple of units" to buyers,
saying this had been done just
to ensure prospective investors
that there would be a demand


this nation, and would work
hard to get the message ott.
"America has to protect its
borders, I'm not going to quib-
ble over that. We are market-
ing to that part of the World,
and if we do our jobs properly
the message will get out," Mr
Wilchcombe said.


erties, 34 lots; Buttonwood
Loch Estate, 52 acres; Cam-
belltown Loch, 60 lots; Loch
Moor, 38 lots; and Three Fin-
gers Estate, 127 lots.
"Montana Holdings' website
says that pre-development lot
sales are starting from
$300,000.
Some 50 acres are being set


aside for an equestrian centre,
as the developers seek to rein-
troduce horses to Rum Cay,
which was once renowned as a
horse breeding centre. Part of
the equestrian attractions will
also be a Polo Club and playing
field, built to international stan.
dards.


for the Rum Cay Club's resi-
dential properties.
Aside from the two hotels,
the development will include
St George's Marina, featuring
75 slips and able to accommo6-
date boats up to 230 feet in
length. The marina will be built
to Blue Flag standards, and the
surrounding Marina Village.
will include 72 two and three-
bedroom condos.
The marina will also include
dock-side fish cleaning stations,
retail outlets, restaurants and
bars, and a nightclub.

Communities '!

The Rum Cay Club will have
nine estate communities Club
Green (Queensgate), 12 lots;
the marina condos; Ocean
Ridge, 26 lots; Bradford Plan-
tation, 37 lots; Shoreline Prop-


NOTICE

ESTATE OF NEVILLE EMMANUEL HART

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having claims
or demands against the above-named Estate are requested to send
the same duly certified to the undersigned on or before the 3rd day
of October, 2005.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration
opfthe- time mentioned above, the assets of the late NEVILLE
EMMANUEL HAR will be distributed among the persons entitled
thereto having regard only to the claims of which the Executrix
shall then have had notice.

MICHAEL W. HORTON
Attorney for the Executrix,
Chambers,
Arianna House,
Dunmore Lane,
P.O. Box N-3822,
Nassau, Bahamas


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CARL HENRY METELLUS, PINE
DALE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.


CONSUMER ADVISORY-PRODUCT RECALL

Solomon's SuperCenter, Nassau, wishes to advise its valued customers of a recall notification
from. Flanders Provision Co, Georgia, producers of the Grill Masters frozen beef patties. Flanders
Provision Co. is recalling the product because of possible E. coli 0157:H7 contamination. The
following product is included in the recall issued by our suppliers:

Grill Master Frozen Beef Patties
with production date codes "05060," "05062," and "05066"
Sold at Solomon's SuperCenter, Nassau
between August 12, 2005 and August 30, 2005

Solomon's SuperCenter has destroyed the. product in question and is asking customers who may
have purchased any of the above product to not consume it and return it to Solomon's
SuperCenter for a full refund. It is important that customers understand that this recall is
related to specific Grill Master frozen ground beef patties with very specific date codes only.
Customers can check their Grill Masters frozen beef patties by looking on the side of the box to
see a 5-digit product date code.

Solomon's is committed to our customers' health and safety and while this advisement is a
precautionary action, we want to ensure this commitment is fulfilled. Customers are urged to
see. Customer Service at Solomon's SuperCenter or call the following hotlines if they have any
questions: 1-888-674-6854 (USDA) or 912-283-5191 (Steve Stripe, Flanders).


FOOD SAFETY TIPS
Solomon's also advises customers that following safe handling tips and cooking ground
beef well will ensure that any harmful bacteria, including e. coli, is eliminated and such
practice should be followed whenever consuming ground beef. According to the US
Department of Agriculture's Food & Safety Inspection Service, cooking ground beef
products at an internal temperature of 160 degrees F is the only way to ensure that
harmful bacteria has been killed. In addition, the US regulatory service advises the
refrigeration of raw meat and poultry within 2 hours after purchase or one hour if
temperatures exceed 90 degrees F. Cooked meat and poultry should be refrigerated
within 2 hours after cooking. Log on to http://www.fsis.usda.cqov for additional safe
handling suggestions and information on this specific recall 033 2005.









Old Trail Road. Monday-Saturday, 8am-9pm; Sunday, 8am to noon. Tel: 242.393.4041


The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahantas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

LEGAL OFFICER

Responsibilities

Conducting litigation onbehalf of the SCB for the enforcement of the
civil penalty regime under the Securities Industry Act.(SIA) for all forms
of market misconduct

Working closely with other regulators and enforcement agencies in the
investigation of suspected rharket misconduct

Conducting examination of witnesses and preparing cases for court

Contributing to the enhancement of the enforcement regime of the SCB
and to safeguarding the reputation of The Bahamas as a premier financial
centre

Qualfications and Experience

Member of The Bahamas Bar for at least 5 years
Civil/commercial. litigation experience
Prior working, experience in the securities industry would be an asset


Competencies:

Ability to mindepedently conduct and lead investigations
Excellentanalytical kildlls and attention to detail
Capacity oi work -at both the conceptual: and operational levels
Innovation and creativity in probleri solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
securities markets
Excellentioral'ar written communication skillsand strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Proficiency in oqiif ter skills (Microsdft Office applications, particularly
Word)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
*.,.. ..: ,^* *. :. Fax:.356-7530


Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005

( lI.>-.l, j-SS^* *


I


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005, PAGE 5B










PAE BMODA, EPEBER5BSI,2005ESH THEIBN


FROM page 1B


WItNDING BAy


REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE


The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.
' **


Vacant Lot No. 5 Block 18 Section B 9,600 sq. ft. on Avacado Drive in Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision in North Eleuthera.

Property is close to Eleuthera Main Highway with available utilities; electricity, city water and
telephone.















For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: The Commercial Credit
Collection Unit at: Phone: 356-1686 or 356-1608, Nassau
Interested peirkis'kidsliubint offers i4 writing qddres ,; ,, "
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7.518,$Nassau, Baamlasa ,
h. us bho later than September 30, 2005
Financing available for qualified purchaser


kets.
"I've always stated that this is
not about BISX, but the devel-
opment of the Bahamian capital
markets, and the statement
speaks to that. I am grateful and
satisfied that what now has to
take place is to give effect to
those words, which will take
place through the implementa-
tion of certain measures that
the Government has indicated
its willingness to do.
"In terms of how you cate-
gorise this event, this is yet
again another watershed event
in the existence of BISX, but
more importantly the Bahamian
capital markets."
The Government's policy
measures include:
1) Consideration of amend-
ments to the Government of the
Bahamas' exchange control pol-
icy.
2) Progressive implementa-
tion of an exchange-based, sec-
ondary market in fixed income
instruments issued by Govern-
ment corporations and state-
owned authorities.
3) Governmental confirma-
tion of its intention to exchange-


list equity securities issued by
privatised state-owned enter-
prises;
4) Governmental review of
the advisability of the National
Insurance Board's (NIB) direct
participation in the exchange-
based trading of equity securi-
ties.
5) Governmental financial
support measures, to be under-
taken in c-operation with BISX
shareholders, to assure finan-
cial and operational growth of
BISX.
Other policy measures were
not released, and discussions
are being held on their imple-
mentation. The statement is a
move to underscore the Gov-
ernment's commitment to the
development and sustainabili-
ty of the capital markets and,
in more immediate terms,
expand it.
Mr Davies said the Govern-
ment had faithfully supported
the recommendations put for-
ward by BISX's shareholders,
and had given effect to them
through the issuance of its pol-
icy statement.
He said the statement, devel-
oped by BISX, the Central
Bank of the Bahamas, the Secu-
rities Commission and the' Min-
istry of Finance, stood as a sig-
nal to the broader Bahamian
capital markets that things were
really going to start happening
now.
Asked whether he was con-
cerned that the length of time
taken by the Government two
years to respond to the rec-
ommendations put forward by
the initial 2003 report on secur-
ing BISX's future, was likely to
represent a similar time frame
for the policy measures' imple-
mentation, Mr Davies said he
was not.
He added that based on his
work with the Ministry of
Finance, the Securities Com-
mission and the Central Bank,
the issuance of the policy state-
ment jump starts everything else
that is supposed to happen in
regard to BISX and the capital
markets.
Mr Davies said that based on
the measures that can be imple-
mented, the result will be a
more organised, transparent
and fully functional capital mar-
; 'Other capitil if 'ar'kets
sources, who spoke to The Tri-
bune on condition of anonymi-


ty, were not as optimistic as Mr
Davies, though, saying that
while the release of the Gov-
ernment's policy statement was
a good first step, they wanted
the implementation phase to
move more rapidly.
One source said: "This is the
furthest we've ever been. I hope
we can move a bit quicker to
bring these items identified to
fruition. I welcome it, but we've
waited a little bit too long to
have it."
Identified

On the first measure identi-
fied, The Tribune has previous-
ly reported that the Govern-
ment has approved in principle
the exchange control amend-
ments, and it is now down to
the Central Bank to choose
when to implement them.
However, the second policy
measure, referring to a 'sec-
ondary market' for listing fixed
income instruments issued by
government corporations and
agencies, does not go as far as
the BISXTeport, which recom-
'"mended that all government'
'debt issues including registered;,
stock (bonds) and Treasury bills
be placed and underwritten


by the private sector. This is
seen as critical to creating a
yield curve, which profiles the
different yields of securities
that have the same maturity
date, and attracting more pri-
vate sector debt issues.
The language used in the
statement, though, indicates
that the Government may still
have reservations about using
the private sector to underwrite
and place debt issues. Current-
ly, they are handled by the'Cen-
tral Bank on an auction basis,
even though its jobs is to be a
regulator and not an investment
bank.
Sources have previously told
The Tribune-that thelisti-g of
government-registered stock
and Treasury Bills could, gen-
erate an extra $290,000 in listing
and transaction fees per ahnum
for BISX in the first few years.
Bonds issued by the Paradise
Island Bridge Authority and
Bahamas Education Authority
could also be listed on BISX.
The Government is also a
long way from privatisingstate-
owned corporations, while in
,200,ithe- NIB. held dnly $8.3
million in equity investments as
part of its total investment port-
folio of $990 million.


has a vacancy for the position of

PUBLIC RELATIONS

&

MARKETING COORDINATOR

Do you have experience in Public Relations and Marketing,
and want a career with an expanding, fast paced, financial
products and services company?

If you are a good writer, creative thinker and have the ability
to organize and mutli-task we would like to hear from you.


PROFILE:
Bachelors Degree from a recognized college preferably in
U1 Marketing or Communications
Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access,
Outlook and Internet. Explorer
Good communication and writing skills
Strong organizational skills
Excellent work ethic and attitude
Ability to work flexible hours and travel


RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

[ ] Assisting the Marketing/PR Director
Ability to create and manage database files
An understanding of market research
Media placement experience
Media clipping reports
Copy, Press Release and Report writing skills
SGraphic arts background a plus


Competitive salary, Pension Plan, Health and Life Insurance,
internal and external career development/training programmes.

Send resume no later than September 6th 2005 to:
The Human Resouce Manager
Fidelity
51 Frederick St.
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


* KEITH DAVIES


The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

FIELD EXAMINER

Responsibilities

Working as a part of a team responsible for monitoring the activities of
licensees and registrants of the SCB, assessing the institutions' internal
controls and risk management systems, as well as their financial soundness,
and compliance with applicable laws and regulations through the conduct
of on-site inspections
Identifying breaches in legislation and making recommendations for
corrective action
Recommending action to help maintain high prudential standards and
promote sound risk management and best practices in the markets

Qualifications and Experience

Bachelor's degree in Business, Finance, Economics or Accounting
Experience in compliance, auditing in the securities industry

Competencies:

Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
capital markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to multi-task
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and Excel)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:


MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


THE TRIBUNE
















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may hurt US jobs


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QUALIFICATIONS
Associates Degree in Business/Accounting;
Computer literate with proficiency in MS
Word/Excel;
Strong analytical skills;
Excellent verbal and written skills;
Previous accounting experience a plus;
Sound knowledge of debits/credits;
Outstanding customer service skills
required.

POSITION SUMMARY
The successful candidate will:
Coordinate the audit and payment of foreign
vendor accounts;
Coordinate the audit and payment of
physician accounts.

Salary commensurate with experience
.. Excellent benefits.. ..

D t op t a tI. Box N 3:. 8e Balia mas


The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

MARKET SURVEILLANCE OFFICER

Responsibilities

Working as a part of a team responsible for monitoring the activities of licensees
and registrants of the SCB, assessing the institutions' internal controls and
risk management systems, as well as their financial soundness, and compliance
with applicable laws and regulations.
Reviewing financial statements, annual reports, proxy material and other such
documents
Monitoring payment of fees
Compiling statistical data
Recommending actions to help maintain high prudential standards and promote
sound risk management and best practices in the markets.

Qualifications and Experience

Bachelor's degree in Business, Finance, Economics or Accounting
3 years experience in the Securities Industry.
Candidates with working experience in the financial services sector will have
an added advantage


Competencies:


Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
capital markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to multi-task and juggle on-site inspection with off-site supervision
(as required)
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and excel)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005


citigroup

CITIBANK, N.A. BAHAMAS BRANCH
CORPORATE & INVESTMENT BANK

Citigroup (NYSE: C), the preeminent global financial services company has some
200 million customer accounts and does business in more than 100 countries,
providing consumers, corporations, governments and institutions with a broad
range of financial products and services, including consumer banking and credit,
corporate and investment banking, insurance, securities brokerage, and asset
management. Major brand names under Citigroup's trademark red umbrella
include Citibank, CitiFinancial, Diner's Club, Primerica, Smith Barney and
Banamex.
.... We are currently accepting resumes for the following position:

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
Duties
Aggressively market the Bank's products and services to businesses in
the Northern Caribbean Region that meet our target market criteria;
Achieve established revenue targets by developing and maintaining
strong customer relationships through the delivery of the highest level
of customer service;
Work with Product Specialists to identify opportunities and to deliver
innovative structures and solutions to clients while ensuring compliance
with the control environment;
Analyze, evaluate and assess financial statements; and
Conduct due diligence on new clients and monitor clients' accounts to
ensure that activity is in line with established parameters.
-Knowledge/Skill Requirements
Strong knowledge and experience in Capital Markets & Corporate Finance
(need to demonstrate management and execution of these type of
transactions);
Strong marketing/sales and technical financial skills;
^ High energy, motivated individual, ability to think outside the box and
to adapt in a dynamic work environment;
Strong analytical skills, good knowledge of accounting, finance and
financial instruments;
Bachelors degree in Accounting, Finance, Business or Economics (certain
types of Engineering may be consider). MBA and / or CFA;
Excellent communication skills and ability to work across units within
the Bank to ensure customer satisfaction;
Previous experience as a Credit Analyst and/or Risk Manager and/or
Relationship Manager and/or Transactor; and
Travel required.

Starting salary will be commensurate with experience. Interested applicants may
deliver, fax or e-mail resumes to:
Business Head
Citigroup Corporate and Investment Bank
110 Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8569
E-mail: tadesee.anja.mckenzie@citigroup.com

Resumes should be received by September 12th, 2005


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


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CLE/GEN 00993


IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land containing Six and Nine Hundred and twenty nine
hundredths (6.929) Acres bounded on the NORTH by a Ten
(10) foot wide road reservation and running thereon 263.43
feet on the SOUTH by Crown Land running thereon 114.19
feet on the EAST by a Fish Pondtunning thereon 211.43 feet
more or less and on the WEST by the Sea running thereon
554.17 feet more or less which said piece parcel or tract of
land is situated on the Island of Cat Island one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
THE ESTATE OF EDDISON MILTON SEYMOUR

ORDER

BEFORE the Honourable Justice Jeanie Thompson, Justice of the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

DATED the 27th day of July A.D., 2005.


UPON HEARING William P. Holowesko for the petitioner

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED as follows:-

1. That an advertisement be inserted in The Nassau Guardian
and Tribune newspapers on Three (3) separate occasions at
intervals of Ten (10 days stating, inter alia, that copies of the
filed plan may be inspected at the Registry of The Supreme
Court, the Office of the Administration of New Bight Cat
Island and at the office of Holowesko & Company. And
further stating that the time limited for adverse claims shall
be 30 days from the date of the last advertisement.

2. That the Notice shall be directed to any adverse claimants.

3. That a copy of the said Notice be affixed and maintained on
the notice board of the Administrator of New Bight, Cat
Island for a period of Twenty one (21) days prior to one
week for filing of adverse claims.

4. That the petitoner shall be at liberty to file a sworn list of
adjoining owners and occupiers and shall also serve the same
with a copy of the general notice and shall also serve a copy
of the general Notice that may be inspected during normal
office hours at:

a. The Public Board of Works for Cat Island;
b. The Treasurer;
c. The Department of Lands and Surveys;
d. The Attorney General's Office.

5. Adjourned sine die with liberty to restore and reply.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT

This Order was drawn up by Messrs Holowesko & Company,
Attorney for the petitioner.

A. Sept 5,16,27


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


FAUSTUS CORPORATION


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution
of FAUSTUS CORPORATION, has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CHOTEAU LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution
of CHOTEAU LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator





LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH SERVICE LTD.,
is in dissolution. PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES
(BAHAMAS) LTD., is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-
3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
the 30th day of September, 2005.


Signed:
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
"Liquidator ; '


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CARLART INVESTMENT INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution
of CARLART INVESTMENT INC., has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator







LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


MANAT HOLDINGS LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution
of MANAT HOLDINGS LIMITED, has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SCHIVON NICOLE HALL,:
KEMP ROAD #8 WILLIAMS LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,:
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of AUGUST, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BRILLIANT ROSE

INVESTMENT INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution
of BRILLIANT ROSE INVESTMENT INC., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


Strcct cb.it-t]


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER,5, 2005, PAGE 9B


MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 5, 2005
7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow Chippendale Frank Sinatra a Man and His M- History Detectives in lion's claws
S WPBT show'Buxton" desk; Gibson mandolin; daguerreo- sic Plus Ella lus Jobim C, (CC) could be from the Steeplechase
type of Edgar Allan Poe. (CC) Park in Coney Island. (N)
The Insider (N) The King of Everybody Two and a Half Two and a Half CSI: Miami Detectives uncover a
S WFOR n (CC) Queens Catch- Loves Raymond Men )l (CC) Men (CC) complex counterfeiting operation
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Access Holly- Fear Factor "Best Friends" Four Las Vegas Colorful billionaire Fred Medium "Pilot" Joe tries to prove
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Fear Factor chicken." (CC) tecito. ( (CC) lated. ( (CC)
Deco Drive Nanny 911 Tieso Family" Three un- Prison Break Michael becomes News (CC)
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the help of his cellmate. (N)
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BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
computers.
BET BET Awards '05 Honoring outstanding achievements in music, sports and entertainment, at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles.
C oronation ** AGENT CODY BANKS (2003, Adventure) Frankie Muniz, Hilary :06) BBC World 36) La Vie, La
CBC Street (CC) Duff. A teenager leads a secret double-life as a spy for the CIA. (CC) Report (CC) ie(CC)
Late Night With The Apprentice The Writing on the Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC ConanO'Brien Wall'" 1(CC)
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[SP N I Live) '
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EWTN Lady Nicholas.
IT 00) FitTV's Diet Chasing Lance Chasing Lance C The Extremists The Extremists
T T Doctor (CC) 11 (CC)
FOX-NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
SCMI: The Chris Poker Superstars Invitational MLB 2005: A Season on the Wire Nothin' But Best Damn
FSNFL MyersInterview Tournament Knockouts Sports Show
GOLF :31)Golf Channel Academy Live :43) Playing Lessons From the Playing Lessons (08) Champions Tour Learning
LF Live) Cros ICenter
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G ing Race (CC) and Mental Limit" (CC) Last Minute" C (CC) Finish" C (Part 1 of 2) (CC)
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** KING SUPERNOVA (2005, Science Fiction) Peter Fonda, Luke Perry, Tia Carrere. Premiere. A scientist discovers
HALL SOLOMON'S that the sun will explode in a week. (CC)
MINES (2004)
Holmes on Rooms That Design U New Debbie Travis' Facelift Nadia's Holmes on Homes "Semi Dilemma"
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Xiaolin Show- Sabrina,the The Fresh Friends Monica Friends Picture- Everybody Everybody
KTLA down Dream- Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air runs into Richard perfect Christmas Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
scape" (CC) First concert. n (CC) atstore, card. (CC) Debra's mother. "Raybert"(CC)
THE SECRET LIFE OF ZOEY (2002, Drama) Mia Far- * SPEAK (2004, Drama) Kristen Stewart, Michael Angarano, Robert
LIFE row, Julia Whelan. Divorced parents learn their daugh- John Burke. Premiere: A 15-year-old keeps her rape at a party a secret.
ter is a drug addict. (CC) (DVS) (CC)
MSNBC Investigates: MSNBC Investigates: Storm Rita Cosby Live & Direct MSNBC Investigates: Fireworks:
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TNT der"Floater" C man with an active life online is misconduct; investigating aHolly-
(CC) (DVS) gunned down on his route. A. wood producer's murder. (N)
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UNIV
USA 0C? U'.S Open Tennis Men's & Women's Round of 16. From the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. (Live)

VH1 *t ROCK STAR (2001, Drama) Mark Wahlberg. A Rock Star: INXS SHOWGIRLS (1995) Elizabeth Berkley. An ambi-
singer lands a gig with his heavy-metal heroes, n n (CC) tious dancer makes a bid for Las Vegas success.
G :15) The 2005 *** SWIMMING WITH SHARKS (1995, Comedy) Kevin Spacey, WGN News at Nine C (CC)
WGN erry Lewis Frank Whaley, Michelle Forbes. A Hollywood hotshot endlessly torments
MDA Telethon his eager assistant. C (CC)
Everybody 7th Heaven Zoe thinks Ruthie be- 7th Heaven "Leaps of Faith" C WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond strayed her confidence when Martin (CC) Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
'"Raybert" (CC) ends their relationship. (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) One on One Allof Us "Sail Girlfriends The Half & Half Phyl- Dr. Phil
WSBK "Cap and Frown" On" C (CC) Bridges of Fresno is gets into trou-
C (CC) County" ble. C (CC)
(6:30) *i* THE TERMINAL (:45) Just Like The Comeback Entourage Vince *S THE DAY AFTER TOMOR-
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(6:45)*** SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004, Action) Tobey rome The Stolen Eagle" Two sol- Rome "How Titus Pullo Brought
H BO-P Maguire Kirsten Dunst. Peter Parker fights a man who diers are enlisted to find the stolen Down the Republic" Mark Antony re-
has mechanical tentacles. C 'PG-13' (CC) gold standard. C (CC) turs to Rome. C (CC)


(:15) *x BATMAN & ROBIN (1997, Adventure) Amold Schwarzenegger, *** THE TERMINAL(2004, Comedy-Drama) Tom
H BO-W George Clooney, Chris O'Donnell. The dynamic duo returns to take on an Hanks, Stanley Tucci. A European livingin an airport
icy vi ain. 'P G-13' (CC) befriends a stewardess. C'PG-13' (CC)
(6:15) *** SCENT OF A WOMAN (1992, Drama) Al *** THE PRINCE OF TIDES (1991, Drama) Nick Nolte, Barbra
H BO-S Pacino, Chris O'Donnell. A blind man introduces a stu- Streisand, Blythe Danner. Streisand directed this tale of a dysfunctional
dent to life's pleasures. n 'R' (CC) family n 'R (CC)
(6:00) ** NO ** * TITANIC (1997, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane. Oscar-winning account of the
MAX-E ESCAPE (1994) doomed 1912 ocean liner. l 'PG-13' (CC)
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6:30) **A TIME TO KILL (1996, Drama) Sandra ** STUCK ON YOU (2003, Comedy) Matt Damon, Greg Kinnear, Eva
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an uptight giri. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) at a party a secret. C 'PG-13' (CC) business.
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(1992) clones a couple's dead son. C 'PG-13' (CC) guy a new outlook on life. 'R'


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS









PAGElOBMONDY, SPTEMER 5 200 TRIUNEOPORT


Brave

Wreckers

fall short

of Herds

* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE faith of the Y-Care
Wreckers team against the
Marshall University Herds
rested in the hands of John
Rolle on Saturday night, as
he stepped to the free-throw
line with an opportunity to
bring his team within one
point.
With less than two minutes
remaining in the game, Rolle
took it strong alongside the
baseline hoping to score and
draw the foul.
The ball, which rotated
around the rim finally
dropped in just to be waved
off by the referee, who sig-
naled that the contact was
made before the shot.
The converted basket
would have brought the team
within one, with a chance to
tie.

Taller
The Wreckers took on the
much taller Marshall Univer-
sity Herds in the feature
game, eventually falling to
the Herds 85-79.
This would have been
Rolle's first appearance on
the free throw line; stepping
to the line to overshoot the
first, with the second dancing
around the rim and finally
dropping in the hands of the
Herds' Chris Ross.
Before Rolle raced down
the court in hopes of helping
his team, the Wreckers lost a
golden opportunity to hold
the Herds to a score of 80
points.
The taller Herds team had
successfully snatched a
rebound out of the hands of
Ian Pinder, for the put back.
The Herds out-rebounded
the Wreckers both offensive-
ly and defensively, having a
total of 48 rebounds to the
Wreckers' 28.
But the short comings for
the Wreckers didn't rest in-
the hands of the rebounds.
Wreckers had played a close
game with the division I
NCAA college team.
Although the first quarter
scores reading was 25-20 in
favour of the Herds, the
Wreckers came storming
back; outscoring the Herds
21-16 in the second.
Wreckers, who picked up
the pace in the second, went
16-37 in that half, shooting
43.2 per cent. The Herds
were 16-42 with a percentage
reading of 38.1.

Comfort
And it was all tied up head-
ing into the third quarter
Launching from behind the
arch to establish a comfort
zone, the Herds went on a 9-2
run behind the hands of Joe
Miles.
Miles was four-for-seven
from behind, the arch and six-
for-14 on the night.
He led all scores with 19
points, three assists, and a
steal.
Chipping in was teammate
Mark Patton, who scored 16
points and two block shots.
For the Wreckers, the hot
hands on the night went to
Clayton Miller with 14 points,
two assists and steals a piece.
Marvin Emmanuel also con-
tributed with 13 points and
an assist.
Rolle said: "It's about com-
ing out and playing hard ever
second and minute of the
game. When you've done that
you've succeeded.
"I don't know what hap-
pened to me on the free
throw line. I wasn't nervous
or anything, from the release
I knew they weren't going to
fall.

Guard
"It's a hard pill to swallow,
but as point guard I'll have to
take that one.
"I am disappointed that I
didn't make them though."
Rolle who said playing in
exhibition games like these is


helping his game, stating he
wished the
Bahamas Basketball Feder-
ation would give persons like
him more opportunities to
display their talents.
"This is what we need, we
need to play more games like
these against teams that we
don't know, just to see where
we are," said Rolle.
"This is a great opportunity
and for a person like me who
really wants to go off to
school, the exposure is
great."
Rolle finished the game
with seven points, two assists
and three steals.


Advantage of experience




leads Sands to victory


Straight sets final triumph over young Taylor


1 TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

COLLEGE-bound Matthew
Sands made sure that rising young
star Johnathan Taylor didn't rain
on his parade.
In a battle of "Goliath versus
David," the 18-year-old Sands
used his height and experience to
slay 11-year-old Taylor in an easy
6-1, 6-2 victory to clinch the men's
title in the AID Clay Courts
Championships on Saturday at
the Gym Tennis Club.
"He was a tough little competi-
tor," said Sands. "In a couple of
years, I won't be able to out-pow-
er him the way I did today, so I
just took advantage of it."

Aggressive

Southpaw Sands was a little too
aggressive for Taylor, who made
some errant passes and wasn't as
impressive as he was in the quali-
fying rounds.
"He didn't seemed to play as
good as he did in the other match-
es," Sands reflected. "I didn't
know if he was nervous today or
what, but he can play much better
than he did today. He didn't, so I
just out-powered. And I felt good
out there."
But Sands, who is expected to
enter Old Dominion University
in January on a tennis scholarship,
said he was concerned going into
the match because he "didn't want
to lose to him."
This was Sands' first tourna-
ment victory for the year, which
gave him the confidence he needs


as he prepares to travel to the
United States to play in a few
tournaments in October.
The 2003 Davis Cup team
member jumped on Taylor from
the beginning of the first s. t when
he went up a break for a 3-0 lead.
Despite having problems with his
service as he did in the second
game, Taylor managed to hold for
a 3-1 deficit.
But Sands regained his momen-
tum and he went up two breaks, 5-
1 and held serve on an ace to close
out the game and take the first
set.
In the second set, Taylor
opened with a double fault, but
he was able to hold serve for a 1-0
lead.
However, it was short lived as
Sands got another ace, double
faulted and then held for a 1-1 tie.
Sands went on to break Taylor
twice, the last time as he landed a
couple of drop shots, to snatch a 4
1 lead.
Both players held serve the rest,
of the way before Sands put the
game away to clinch the match.
Taylor, who will be entering the
seventh grade at St. Anne's High.
School, felt he didn't play well at
all.
"I thought I played bad. I was
nervous too," he insisted, "He was
a much better player than me, so I
was nervous. I couldn't keep the
ball in play."
Despite the loss, Taylor said his
performance just showed him that
in the future, he needs to "be
more aggressive." Having gained
some experience playing with the
"big boys," Taylor said he's look-
ing forward to a rematch next
year.


* TOP seed Matthew Sands reacts as he return a volley to
Johnathan Taylor in the men's final of the AID Clay Court
Championship on Saturday at the Gym Tennis.Club. Sands
pulled off a two-set sweep over Taylor for the title.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


INSIDE

TENNIS:

Sands eases past

young Taylor


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


-Second

place for

Chandra
* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
CHANDRA STURRUP
clocked an impressive time in
the 100 meters at the final leg
of the TDK Golden League
Jackpot hunt, on Sunday
evening, while triple jumper
Tatyana Lebedeva claimed
the one million dollar prize.
The sixth leg of the races
took place in Berlin, Ger-
many.
Sturrup clocked a time of
11.02 seconds for a second
place finishing behind Chris-
tine Arron, who ran 11.01 sec-
onds. Coming in third was
Me'Lisa Barber in 11.16 sec-
onds.
The 100m was one of the
events listed in the hunt for
the one million dollar jackpot,
but all athletes were eliminat-
ed from the chase after failing
to win at least one of the six
legs.
Lebedeva of Russia sur-
vived the strenuous meets in
her event and soared to 14.85
metres for the win.


Exit in semis

for Sweeting

M TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
RYAN Sweeting's run
through the Canadian Open
Junior Tennis Champi-
onships came to a halt in the
semifinal on Friday.
The sixth-seeded player
got knocked out 6-4, 6-1 to
top seed Leonardo Mayer
from Argentina at the Club
de Tennis de Repentigny in
Quebec, Canada.
Sweeting, 18, admitted
afterwards, "It was not
good. Conditions were very
bad. I didn't play well at
all."
Preparing for the junior
version of the US Open this
week in Flushing Meadows,
New York, Sweeting said he
would have perferred to put
up a much better showing
on Friday.
But, he stated, "I wasn't
consistent at all. Couldn't
get a rhythm. He served
well. But I was very incon-
sistent the whole match."


National softball players




facing action over absence


* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE men's national softball
team returned home, having
qualified for next year's Central
American and Caribbean
Games in Cartagena, Columbia,
but were just shy of securing a
medal.
Bahamas Softball Federation's
first vice president Burkett
Dorsett said, while they are
commending the team for their
performance, 'they are rebuking
a couple of players who refused
to travel at the last minute.
Only eight teams participated
in the tournament, which meant
that all of the teams would have
automatically qualified for the
games. Playing for position, the
Bahamas ended up fourth after
losing 2-1 to Cuba.
It was the second time in the
tournament that. the Cubans
beat the Bahamas. The first time


Men's team returns


from Columbia


was during the regular play when
the Cubans shut out the
Bahamas 7-0 as Edmund 'Binks'
Bethel suffered the loss.

Playoff
In the playoff game, his little
brother and workhorse Edney
'the Heat' Bethel got the ball
and suffered the loss as he
walked in the game's winning
run with the bases loaded.
Dorsett said, "We expected
.that from the team, but if one
or two other pitchers had gone,
we feel they would have done
much better."


Despite the absence of Long
Island's Pedro Marcellus and
Abaco's Frederick Cornish,
Dorsett said the pitching staff
did a remarkable job. He noted
that Nassau's Cardinal Gilbert
was also scheduled to travel, but
he didn't.
In the case of Cornish, Dorsett
said he had informed the feder-
ation that he was unable to trav-
el. But he said they didn't get
any confirmation from both
Marcellus and Gilbert at the last
minute when tickets had already
been purchased for them to trav-
el.
"It was an all-expenses paid


trip by the federation and we.
had even gotten the time off
from work for them to travel,"
Dorsett revealed. "The tickets
are non-refundable, so some-
where along the line, the feder-
ation will seek to recoup the
money from those guys who did
not travel."

Option
One option of repayment,
according to Dorsett, will be to
prevent those players to partici-
pate in the National Round
Robin Tournament in October,
if their respective teams quali-
fies, and the other will be to send
letters to their member associa-
tions, banning the players from
participating in their leagues
until the funds have been repaid.
Any action taken, will take
effect as of this week once the
team has returned, according to
Dorsett.


Dorsett said that they were
really surprised to see Gilbert
playing for the Del Sol Arawvas
on Saturday night at fth
Churchill Tener Knowelp
National Softball as, two days
before the national team left, he
had his arm in a sling. *
"He waited until Monday,just
before the team left, and he :dil-
n't even inform the managertilha
he wasn't going. He told one of
the players," Dorsett said. "IHe
even had a sponsorship sheet to
solicit personal funding. Yet he
decided at the last minute not
to go and didn't even properly
inform the team. But he's out
here playing."
While Gilbert was the only
player affected from the NPSA,
Dorsett said Marcellus also
decided at the last minute not
to travel.
The men's national team,
managed by Godfrey 'Gully'
Burnside, is scheduled to return
home today.


.1.









MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5,2005


The stories behind the news


Dr Rodney Smith, ousted presi-
dent of the College of the Bahamas,
said last week that he was ordered
by council members to resign or be
fired over the plagiarism scandal.
At a closed meeting held in the col-
lege's auditorium, Dr Smith report-
edly told college staff that he was
given the grim choice by council
chairman Franklyn Wilson the
man who had hired him last year
with a pay package topping
$200,000...


The Bahamas government last
week pledged $50,000 to help victims
ravaged by Hurricane Katrina in the
American states of Louisiana, Mis-
sissippi and Alabama. Government
also announced that emergency aid
is to be made available for Bahami-.
ans living in the southern states who .
are in distress as a result of the "
storm that has plunged New
Orleans and other Gulf Coast cities '
into a state of emergency..


Miss Teen Bahamas 2004/2005 Gari McDonald last
week launched a campaign which she hopes will con-
tribute to the end of discrimination against other gay and
lesbian teenagers.
The 18-year-old beauty queen, who was crowned Miss
Teen Bahamas in November 2004 has claimed that
because she is a lesbian she has been asked to step
down, without ever having received the prizes and schol-
arship promised to her.
Ms McDonald said she was called to a meeting with
the pageant committee in April where she was informed
that "we cannot have a lesbian Miss Teen Bahamas rep-
resenting the country"...


Schoolroom


blues


T*chr suff W~~1 e#rauidings1U~~ZMW crum]b[e


SThe art teacher at a Nas-
sau secondary school
could not believe her
fate. She was working in
a stifling classroom with
no air-conditioning and a crooked ceil-
ing fan that barely turned.
Window shutters were kept down
to screen the agitated, restless students
from the midsummer sun. Light flick-
ered from a few fluorescent tubes. It
was, she said, like the Black Hole of
Calcutta an airless, ill-lit cave of a
room filled with broken, ramshackle
furniture.
,When the teacher asked for equip-
ment needed to do her job, it was
rarely forthcoming. Instead, officious
administrators who invariably adopt-
ed lofty airs towards faculty used
their authority to press home their
imagined superiority.
"Every request for the basics was
regarded as a major inconvenience,"
she said, "Office staff regarded pol-
ishing their nails and smartening their
lipstick as far more important than
giving teachers what they required.
"In fact, they used to turn up for
work each day dressed up to the nines,
preening themselves and looking the
part, but in fact doing nothing but
obstructing the teaching staff who were
trying to make the school a better
place.-
"They, of course, had air-condition-
ing and fancy furniture. We, by con-
trast, had to make do with what we
had. One teacher used to come to
work with his toolbox so that he could
fix chairs and tables as we went along.
"It was the most appalling hole I've
ever worked in a place where teach-
ers were treated with contempt, and
the needs of the students were seen
as of no account."
If all this were not enough, the
teacher was expected to buy her own
pencils, paint, brushes and paper -
equipment which, in any self-respect-
ing establishment, would be regarded
as fundamental to the job and there-
fore the responsibility of the school.
Instead, she was seen not only as a
teacher, but a school supplier at her
own expense. Far from being regarded
as seasoned professionals, she and her
colleagues were exploited ruthlessly
by an administration that didn't care.
Her salary? Twenty-one thousand
dollars a year, minus whatever she was
obliged to pay out each week to buy
the equipment necessary to ensure her
students were given the tuition they
deserved.
Throughout her stay at the school,
she was promised an allowance
towards her expenses, but apart from


If you listen to politicians, teachers are among the

most important professionals in society. So why are

they treated so badly? As schools reopen after the long

summer recess, INSIGHT reports on the continuing

plight of Bahamian educators...


one meagre and begrudged contribu-
tion this was not forthcoming.
Was her situation exceptional? No.
All the staff at this particular school
had similar appalling tales to tell. And
they were working in an institution
overseen in theory, at least by the
Bahamas Ministry of Education.
"The truth is," she said, "that indi-
vidual teachers were prepared to
spend their own money on making
things better because they wanted the
children to have a proper education.
"But the administration clearly did-
n't care either way. They were inter-
ested only in flaunting their status and
making things difficult for the teaching
staff. It was an utter disgrace."
Listen to politicians and they will
pay lip service to the status of the
teaching profession. After all, the edu-
cation of the populace is the key to
the nation's future. Listen to the teach-
ers, and they will tell you of low pay,
poor working conditions and a dis-
turbing reality seriously at odds with
the supposed importance of their role.
Teachers at C C Sweeting Junior
High School, who last week staged a
sit-out because their school building
is in a state of disrepair, are only the
tip of a much larger problem.
The tales they tell of water pouring
through the ceilings and light fittings
are not far-fetched. In fact, building,
standards are so poor at some schools
that leaks, cracked walls and faulty
plumbing have become part of the
teacher's lot, an unpalatable "norm"
they have to live with day-after-day.
Long-suffering staff find themselves
having to make a choice accept the
unacceptable or find another job.
INSIGHT was told: "The conditions
at my school were so poor that I
yearned to tell parents at parent-
teacher meetings to get their children
out of there.
"If I were to be totally frank with
them, that's the only realistic advice I
could give. Yet the administration used
to spend their time 'talking up' the
achievements of the school when, in
fact, there were none.
"The whole thing was a charade.


* WITH the A F Adderley School
like a building site, and repairs to
Carlton Francis and C C Sweeting
unfinished, hundreds of schoolchild-
ren are effectively being denied the
classroom conditions necessary to
pursue their work. Here, a mason
repairs the wall at the Garvin Tynes
Primary School.
(The Tribune archive photo)

The facilities were non-existent, the
classroom conditions were a disgrace,
the management was complacent and
inefficient, and the children were the
victims."
At the end of the long summer
break, Nassau parents are under-
standably dismayed to discover that


much-needed building work on sev-
eral government schools has not been
completed. This was being blamed
largelyon funds not'being made availv
able to contractors.
With the A F Adderley School like
a building site, and repairs to Carlton
Francis and C C Sweeting unfinished,
hundreds of schoolchildren are effec-
tively being denied the classroom con-
ditions necessary to pursue their work.
"It is demoralising," said one
teacher, "that we are considered so
low-priority that our workplace is not
ready for the new semester. Politicians
talk constantly about the importance
of education and children having high
aspirations, but the reality is that many
are having to endure shocking condi-
tions.
"There have been many times in
recent years when I have considered
the wisdom of my decision to go into
the teaching profession. I wanted to
make a contribution to my country,
but I wonder now whether it was all
worth it."
At one time, and certainly if you go
as far back as the 1950s, teaching was
considered a noble calling, and its most
notable practitioners were among the
most revered figures in the land. In
fact, 'some of the schools now crum-
bling into a semi-derelict state are
named after illustrious educators of
the past.
Pay was never spectacular, nor did
teachers expect it to be, but it was suf-
ficient to allow them to live a life of
sedate gentility. More importantly, the
job was valued as a key contributor
to the country's future, and therein
lay its real rewards.
Children who went through the sys-
tem during that time emerged with far
higher standards of literacy and
numeracy than are evident today. Now
middle-aged, they reflect wistfully on
teachers who made a lasting, and very
positive, impression on their lives.
Today, the status of teachers is in a
tailspin, accelerated by a perception
that educational standards are abysmal
and students ignorant, semi-literate
products of a failing system. When


things go wrong it's the teachers, not
the administrators, who get the blame.
For every child who earns a straight-
A scholarship to a top university, there
are scores who emerge from 12 years
or more in the classroom with barely a
working knowledge of the English lan-
guage. The A-C achievers in the
BGCSE stream are still a small if cher-
ished elite in the education system,
and most are products of the private
schools.
At state school level, the overall per-
formance is generally poor to
mediocre, and low staff morale must
be considered a significant factor in
producing such depressing results.
Despite its past traumas, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas is seen as the
nation's premier educational institu-
tion, and this is reflected in its pay
scales. Teachers there are the coun-
try's "elite", with salaries ranging
roughly from around $30,000 a year
up to $50,000 or more.
In addition, working conditions are
generally reasonable, and improve-
ments are being made to the COB
campus all the time.
At government schools, however,
the story is different. Not only are
salaries generally lower, the burdens
placed upon teachers in some instances
are almost beyond belief.
One told INSIGHT: "Many teachers
start the new school year by spending
between $400 and $500 of their own
money decorating their classrooms.
They actually buy the brushes and
paint and do the job themselves.
"This is because they want to create
the right environment for teaching. At
primary schools, in particular, it's nec-
essary for children to have a homely,
colourful environment.
"Most people entering the profes-
sion are committed and want to do a
good job. But the funds are simply not
coming through from government in
sufficient quantity to make this possi-
ble."
As a result, many good teachers find
themselves seeking an escape route.
Some quit after 30 years service, thus
qualifying for a pension. Others can't
wait that long.
INSIGHT was told: "When you con-
sider that most teachers enter the pro-
fession with at least bachelor's degrees,
you are talking about a skilled and
well-educated workforce.
"But teaching does not have the
standing it used to enjoy and it's true
to say now that teachers are treated
with contempt. This has a demoralising

See TEACHERS, 3C


I


MT heBT"Tif *Bi~ii"ill ~ 'iii~ill lirurr<~ifne7]ii


i. Z 7








P E0M D E R


College suffers





from the Smit]


fall-out





Li affair


Those who wanted
Dr Smith out
believe last
week's extraordi-
nary closed meet-
ing was called so he could cast
himself as the martyr of the
moment a man wronged by
conspirators working to a
destructive agenda.
Others who believe his ver-
sion of events now see the col-
lege council and specifically its
chairman, Franklyn Wilson -
as the real culprits in this sad
affair, people who were pre-


Dr RODNEY SMITH'S behind-closed-doors meeting with faculty to
explain the background to the plagiarism scandal has left the College
of the Bahamas in a state of deep unease. Administrators, lecturers and
students are now experiencing mixed emotions in an atmosphere of
self-examination and recrimination. INSIGHT reports...


pared to destroy a man's career
on a flimsy pretext.
Between these two extremes
are an odd mixture of emotions
which have left lecturers, stu-
dents and ancillary staff with


feelings of anxiety, regret and
confusion. "The COB campus
is not the place to be right
now," a student complained
last week as the Smith affair
continued to create aftershocks


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to tloce i,. ,,ee<.


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around Oakes Field.
"There is suspicion all
around, a mixture of anger and
frustration. Some students just
want out of here."
The most significant disclo-
sure in Dr Smith's valedictory
address was that he was forced
to resign as president under the
threat of dismissal. Some fac-
ulty believe this was mentioned
as a prelude to possible court
action, with the ousted college
chief intent on seeking legal
redress.
Those who feel strongly that
Dr Smith was architect of his
own demise believe the speech
had other motives: to cast him-
self as the fall guy in a wicked
plot, and thus begin a rehabili-
tation process aimed at retriev-
ing his academic career.
Outsiders and especially
those with knowledge of how
the media works see the
entire debacle primarily as a
public relations catastrophe, a
situation which might have
been saved had the president
been better advised.
That Dr Smith was brought
down by plotters is beyond rea-
sonable doubt. COB has a rep-
utation as a snakepit: some
senior staff make the Borgias
and de Medicis look like Pinky
handPerky when.it comes to
venomous conspiracies.
However, Dr Smith present-
ed the plotters with the most
lethal weaponry imaginable -
solid evidence of intellectual
property theft, which academia
views as the ultimate felony.
Once Dr Smith confessed to
plagiarism and offered virtu-
ally nothing by way of mitigat-
ing evidence COB's vipers
moved in quickly to devour
him. By the time they had fin-
ished, there was little left but
bones and tail.
"Whatever you think of the
original crime, Dr Smith was
given no real chance by the col-
lege council or the investigating
panel to explain himself,", a
Smith supporter told
INSIGHT.
"Yes, the original charge
sounded terrible, but the more
you hear from Dr Smith, the
less terrible it seems. It's begin-.
ning to look more and more
like 'technical plagiarism'
rather than a calculated


REGARDING the
INSIGHT article on
Haitians, the government
needs to realise this is the
single biggest issue facing the
Bahamas today. Immigrants
need to be properly regulat-
ed, otherwise we could find
ourselves engulfed by an
alien culture. By mid-centu-
ry, the Bahamas as we know


attempt to deceive."
Since Dr Smith's original
press conference mea culpa,
when he misguidedly believed
that a swift confession without
explanation would put it all
behind him, he has disclosed
information which, properly
presented, might well have
softened the barrage of con-
demnation which followed.
Firstly, he said Dr John Sex-
ton, the New York University
chief whose speech he plagia-
rised, gave him permission to
use the text as he pleased. Had
this been explained at the tim6,
his failure to cite Dr Sexton as
the source might well have
been construed merely .as an
oversight, a relatively harmless
mistake. In the event, it looked
like straightforward larceny of
another academic's ideas.
Disclosed
Secondly, Dr Smith disclosed
At last week's meeting that he
was under enormous pressure
at the time, doing several peo-
ple's work. The speech in ques-
tion, he said, was compiled at
four o'clock in the morning
against a tight deadline. The
six paragraphs of Dr Sexton's
speech which he grafted into
Shis own convocation address
therefore went unattributed. -
Handled by a seasoned PR
adviser, this information would
have provided ample cushion-
ing against whatever criticism
was to follow. However, no
such mitigation was forthcom-
ing, so Dr Smith had to take
the full heat of the media
firestorm. There is no doubt
that some people at COB, for
reasons of their own, are glad
to see Dr Smith out of the way.
Others, however, are furious
with the college council even
to the extent of threatening
demonstrations.
Whatever Dr Smith's faults,
he was seen as a reformer with
a mission. And, in the ten
months he was in charge, there
was clear evidence of improve-
ments in many areas, according
to his supporters.
Some faculty say he suc-
ceeded in neutralising corro-
sive elements in the college
hierarchy, people who had
established power-bases of


it will probably not exist.
J L Roberts
WITH Haiti itself a con-
tinuing nightmare, Haitians
have every incentive to come
to the Bahamas, and there is
evidence that those who have
been here for some time now
feel proprietorial about their
rights.


their own over many years to
everyone else's detriment.-
Others say he took an egali-
tarian approach to college
affairs, eliminating the intel-
lectual "elitism" which had cre-
ated bitter divisions in the past.
"He was very approachable,
a person who got things done,"
said one student who drew flat-
tering comparisons with cef-
tain senior staff who, he said,
were bereft of "people skills"
and left wreckage in their
wake.
"However," he added, "pla-
giarism is plagiarism. It's hard,
to be head of a college when'
you've confessed to copying
other people's work. How do
you reprimand a student for
plagiarism when you've done
it yourself?"
Non-academic observers;
meanwhile, gaze on bemused
as COB tries to extricate itself
from its latest crisis. They won-
der how this hapless institution'
would fare were it to face the
harsh commercial realities of.
the private sector.
"It's always the students who
suffer," said one observer,
"there is too much power-play
there, with people more intent
on bolstering their own posi-
tions than doing what they're
supposed to be doing prepar-
ing young Bahamians for their
future lives."
Meanwhile, Dr Smith him-'
self contemplates an uncertain
future, having sacrificed ai
lifestyle which was grand by
most standards.
Apart from a rent-free
seafront mansion on the East-
ern Road, membership of Old
Fort :By,,access toqJforr Ga,
free education for his children
at St Andrew's'School and'
sundry other perks, he says
goodbye to a job which might
well have had a lasting benefi-'
cial impact on the Bahamas'
education system.
He was offered the chance
to take COB to university sta-
tus, an achievement which,
would have ensured his name,
was enshrined in the annals of.
Bahamian education forever.
Now he has to live with pro-
fessional ignominy and a
$240,000 pay-off.
Whatever view you take of
the Smith affair, no-one can
deny that this was a sorry tale
with a very sad ending.
What now remains to be.
seen is whether COB and Dr
Smith can recover from the
trauma and get back on track
for better times ahead.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


It's conceivable that the
Bahamas could be overrun
in a generation or two. What
strategy is in place to deal
with this impending crisis?
From where I'm standing,
the government seems to be
utterly clueless as to the size
of the problem, or the means
of combating it.
G Lee, Concerned citizen


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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2005


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THE TRIBUNE


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FEEDBACK









THE TIBUN MONAY, EPTEBLK 2INSIGHT 3


THE Bahamas government
last week pledged $50,000 to
help victims ravaged by Hurri-
cane Katrina in the American
states of Louisiana, Mississippi
and Alabama.
Government also announced
that emergency aid is to be
made available for Bahamians
living in the southern states who
are in distress as a result of the
storm that has plunged New
Orleans and other Gulf Coast
cities into a state of emergency.
The aid is available through
the Consulate General in Mia-
mi, the Bahamas Embassy in
Washington or the Bahamas
Tourist Office in Houston,
Texas, to assist stranded
Bahamians in making their way
home and to supply their imme-
diate short term needs.


THE Clifton Heritage com-
mittee last week started impor-
tant preparatory work to pre-
serve ruins on what it hopes will
be the Clifton Heritage Site.
Committee chairman Sean
McWeeny said the historically-
rich site should be a source of
pride and joy for all Bahamians.
Bahamians have always been
very protective of the site, espe-
cially witnessed in recent years
when they staged the massive
Save Clifton appeal, which
helped to push for legislation
which guaranteed the historic
ruins would always be the prop-
erty of the government and
become an historical park, he
said. The Clifton Act was passed
in March.
In the next few weeks, a team
of experts will painstakingly go
through the remains to restore
as many of the stones as possible
and to remove trees whose roots
are causing the ruins to be uplift-
ed.
The committee decided to
restore as many of the ruins that
exist in their current state, rather
than try to reconstruct the build-
ings. Once literature is printed,
visitors to the site should be able
to use that and their imagina-
tions to visualise life, as it was at


the plantation in the early 19th
century.
Pericles Maillis, a member of
the committee, called on per-
sons to volunteer for the clean-
up effort, calling Clifton a place
of great natural beauty and a
wonderful asset to the country.


DR RODNEY SMITH,
ousted president of the College
of the Bahamas, said last week
that he was ordered by council
members to resign or be fired
over the plagiarism scandal.
At a closed meeting held in
the college's auditorium, Dr
Smith reportedly told college
staff that he was given the grim
choice by council chairman
Franklyn Wilson the man
who had hired him last year
with a pay package topping
$200,000.
Mr Wilson described the
controversial meeting in COB's
auditorium as "unforttinate
and unbecoming".
Dr Smith's resignation came
after it was revealed that he
had used portions of a speech
written by New York Univer-
sity president John Sexton at
the COB's Honours Convoca-
tion ceremonies without
attributing the quotes to Mr
Sexton.
The past president told for-
mer colleagues that he was
forced to resign on August 4,
several weeks after the college
was rocked by his plagiarism
confession at a press confer-
ence.


MISS Teen Bahamas
2004/2005 Gari McDonald last
week launched a campaign
which she hopes will contribute
to the end of discrimination
against other gay and lesbian
teenagers.
The 18-year-old beauty
queen, who was crowned Miss
Teen Bahamas in November
2004 has claimed that because
she is a lesbian she has been
asked to step down, without-
ever having received the prizes


and scholarship promised to
her.
Ms McDonald said she was
called to a meeting with the
pageant committee in April
where she was informed that
"we cannot have a lesbian Miss
Teen Bahamas representing
the country".
However, Ms McDonald
said that the issue of sexuality
was never' addressed within the
rules of conduct of the Miss
Teen Bahamas contract, and
that she had no idea that it
could become a problem.
The pageant committee has
admitted that it did not favour
contestants "portraying homo-
sexuality", but denied that Ms
McDonald was stripped of her
crown because she is a lesbian.


TEACHERS at C C Sweet-
ing Junior High School
announced last week that they
are determined to continue
their sit-out until the Ministry
of Education properly repairs
the school.
Michelle Hudson, spokesper-
son for the teachers, said they
have the full support of the
entire Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) and will not
be moved on the issue.
Alternative accommodations
are currently being arranged
for a number of public schools,
due to delays in repairs, said
Education Minister Alfred
Sears.
Mr Sears reported last week
that after diverting millions of
dollars last school year in
repairing and refurbishing
schools, the public education
system continues to be very
resilient.
He said that of the 158
schools scattered throughout
the 22 inhabited islands and
cays in the country, 13 schools
have been awarded contracts
for repairs to be conducted this
year and five schools have
received contacts for improve-
ments to be made to school
grounds.
So far, of the $27 million dol-


* DEFENCE FORCE officers last week apprehended 29 Dominicans for allegedly poaching in
Bahamian waters. The men, along with their 60-foot fishing vessel Everest, were escorted by the
HMBS Yellow Elder to the Potter's Cay dock.
(The Tribune file photo)


lars spent this year on the
refurbishment, construction,
and repair of schools through-
out the country, repairs and
new construction account for.
$15 million, ongoing repairs for
$5 million, and the completion
of additions and refurbishment
is estimated at $4 million.


THE College of the
Bahamas' acting president,
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson said
last week that COB is not in
crisis and has been "too mod-
est" about its successes.
Speaking at a Rotary Club
South Eastern Division meet-
ing yesterday, Dr Chipman-
Johnson said the college "is
alive, well, ready and eager to
move into the new academic
year."


Teachers, from Page 1C


effect and leads to a high
turnover of staff. Some simply
resign at the end of August and
go into other professions. Some
start small businesses."
Inevitably, such disenchant-
ment affects the students and
the quality of their education. A
source said: "If you go to a doc-
tor who is unhappy about his
job, you would not feel com-
fortable with getting a physical
or diagnosis from him.
"The same thing can be
applied to teachers. There is a
lot of absenteeism because of
the difficulties teachers have to
face."
Told of the art teacher cited
at the beginning of this article,
and her having to buy equip-
ment for the class, he said:
"That is not unusual. Most
teachers start the term with a
couple of sheets of chart paper,
a marker or two, a box of sta-
ples and that's about it.'
"Most students buy their own
exercise books and pens, but
teachers get very little equip-
ment from the ministry. Not.
much of the ministry money is
getting down to where it should
go."

Profession

All this has to be endured in
a profession where pay is far
from generous. A senior edu-
cator told INSIGHT: "A salary
of $35,000 is considered a lot
of money in teaching. This
would be for people with mas-
ter's degrees and working in
secondary schools.
"At the lower end of the
scale, you're talking about the
eariy twenties, so the general
range is from around $25,000
to $35,000. Trainees would be
getting less than that."
Primary school staff are on a
lower scale, so teaching is not a
profession for those wanting to
accumulate riches in life.
Only a small minority of par-
ents are aware of the true state
of education, according to a
Bahamas Union of Teachers
member.
"The majority don't care.
They deliver their kids to
school and collect them later in
the day, but many have never
even been inside their chil-
dren's classroom. They just
want to get rid of them for a
titne." i
if conditions are bad in Nas-
sau with A F Adderley, C C
Sweeting, Carlton Francis,
Gambier and Adelaide Prima-
.ry cited among the worst thly
aref pristine alongside some of
their Family Island count r-
C


parts.
On some islands, teachers
and children are still occupy-
ing trailers as a result of last
year's hurricane damage. These
have no air-conditioning and
very limited space.
On other islands, lessons are
held in church halls because
there are no facilities laid on.
"In one or two islands, there
are no actual school buildings at
all," said the teacher.
Poor premises are a major
problem, but other challenges
make modern teaching a much
more demanding profession
than it used to be.
The massive influx, of
Haitians into the Bahamas has
created enormous extra bur-
dens for teachers, who are now
faced with language and cul-
tural differences that impede
the learning process for all.
Moreover, security has now
become a major issue. As
schools reopen today, police
are assuming new responsibili-
ty for clamping down on cam-
pus crime.
Teaching has grown harder


as discipline in society has
unravelled. Quelling the influ-
ence of unruly elements, usu-
ally the products of dysfunc-
tional families, has now become
as much a part of the job as
chalk and talk.

Problems

Two months ago, Minister of
Education Alfred Sears con-
fessed that late salary payments
for Family Island teachers had
become a "personal embar-
rassment" for him. So, in addi-
tion to all their other problems,
island teachers have to wonder
whether their pay cheques will
arrive on time.
The minister also admitted
that the high student drop-out
rate, a shortage of male teach-
ers, and the reluctance of staff
to move to the Family Islands
were causing difficulties, along
with a "brain drain" into
tourism and other areas.
To combat teacher shortages,
the ministry has launched a
cadet and mentoring pro-
gramme, class size limits and


an English tuition scheme for
Haitians. And an extended
learning programme is now in
place to boost performance
among low-achievers. All this,
however, will count for little
unless the government can get
to grips with what appears to
be its own destructive mindset.
If teachers are, as Mr Sears
told the National Education
Conference in July, of "critical
importance" to the nation, they
must be treated as such.
Expecting them to work in
dilapidated classrooms, pay for
their own interior decoration,
buy their own supplies, and
accept open exploitation of
their commitment and dedica-
tion is not the way forward.
At the moment, teachers feel
like the forgotten, or at least
disregarded, fringe of the edu-
cated workforce. Until things
get better for them, it's unlike-
ly the nation's education sys-
tem will make much progress.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


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RECOVERY EFFORTS


NEIGHBORLY DINNER AMID ANDREW'S HAVOC: At the Goldcoaster Mobile Home RV Park in Florida City, a group shares a
meal on what's left of a patio. Small yet significant acts of kindness often eased South Floridians' recovery. Other
communities in the nation have also pulled themselves out of chaos created by massive natural disasters


COPING WITH


At the moment a disaster strikes, especially one of Hurricane
Katrina's magnitude, it is tempting to succumb to despair. A com-
munity warily but confidently faces a growing storm. And then
the worst-case scenario plays out but it's worse than anyone imagined.
It is hard to fathom the transformation a community endures after such
an onslaught, such a blow to the collective self-confidence. Neighbors and
family are dead, washed away without a trace. An entire, iconic city,
appears utterly destroyed, indefinitely uninhabitable. In the absence of
*TURN TO DISASTERS, 2C


HURRICANE ANDREW I AUG. 24,1992

Best lesson learned was how

a community unites in tragedy


The first person at my doorstep
after Hurricane Andrew decapi-
tated my house was a red-headed
neighbor whose name I could only
vaguely remember. She came bearing
gifts of food. Thirteen years later, after
Hurricane Katrina blew through, my
husband chain-sawed two fallen trees
that were blocking her front door.
I attribute the friendship that blos-
somed in between the two events to
high winds and driving rain.
If any good comes from destruction,
if any hope is to be gleaned from desper-
ation, surely it must be how a commu-
nity a block, a neighborhood, a city -
unites in tragedy.
Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5
storm that caused $25.2 billion in dam-
age and was directly or indirectly
responsible for 40 South Florida deaths,
forced us to open the windows and let in
unfamiliar noise. It forced us to make
new friends.
We recovered from calamity in fits
and spurts, with small yet significant
acts of kindness. But the process also
brought out the worst in some. How can
we forget the looting, the price-gouging,
the unscrupulous contractors?
Along the way, of course, we learned
invaluable lessons: the county's emer-
gency team has been reorganized, flood-
ing in some cities is under control and,
perhaps more important, the building
code has been fortified. "Dade County


has pioneered a strict hurricane-resis-
tant building code," says Herb Saffir, a
Coral Gables structural engineer who
co-designed the system that rates hurri-
canes' strength as Categories 1 through
5. "I can't stress enough how important a
strong building code is and strong
enforcement of that code, too."
Thankfully we've got both. Yet, in
many ways, we've also forgotten what
required so much pain
to learn. Many residents
still don't have a hurri-
cane response plan. We
still build towering high
rises along the beach.
And, to a large
ANA VECIANA-extent, we've pushed
SUAREZ aside the spirit that
helped us rebuild. We
rarely venture out of
closed-up homes for neighborly com-
panionship. The same community that
united to rebuild has been known to
split viciously in ethnic strife.
If only I had bottled up that feeling
when, bound by a common goal, we tore
down invisible walls and surprised each
other with generosity. If only we still
had the eau de community that was so
fragrantly uplifting, so reminiscent of all
the best in us.
Veciana-Suarez was part of The Herald's
Pulitizer-Prize winning team that covered
Hurricane Andrew.


SHerald.com
U EEBSE


Go online to share your
personal stories about
hurricanes or other
disasters in a special
readers' forum


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ISSUES & IDEAS


RECOVERY EFFORTS





Disasters hold lessons


*DISASTERS

food, water and public order,
it descends into animal anar-
chy.
"What angers me the most
is disasters tend to bring out
the best in everybody, and
that's what we expected to
see," Louisiana Gov. Kathleen
Babineaux Blanco said at a
news conference. "Instead, it
brought out the worst."
But it is possible to
recover, sometimes for the
better. In seeking out lessons
from others places that have
suffered through natural
disasters, we asked writers
from five Knight Ridder
newspapers that have borne
witness to recent calamities
to reflect on the experiences
of their communities.
In Wilkes-Barre, Pa., civic
leaders rebuilt the city after
floodwaters from Tropical
Storm Agnes destroyed much
of the downtown in 1972. But
the new construction has
proved to be no long-term
cure for a faltering economy.
Near San Jose, Calif., the
Loma Prieta earthquake deci-
mated the Bay Area in 1989.
Despite Silicon Valley's
vibrant 1990s economy, the
scars still haven't healed.
In Grand Forks, N.D., the
city's leadership united to
rebuild after flood and fire
forced virtually the entire
population to evacuate in
1997. And civic leaders say
they're better for the experi-
ence.
In Miami-Dade, while Hur-
ricane Andrew left square
miles of rubble in 1992, survi-
vors helped their neighbors
pull through. Now, however,
the largely rebuilt city's sense
of common purpose has
faded.
Fort Wayne, Ind., rolled up
its sleeves and built greater
defenses after a devastating
flood in 1982.
Of course, none of these
catastrophes can compare
with Hurricane Katrina. Once
must reach back further in the
national consciousness for
parallels. Nearly a century
ago, an earthquake struck San
Francisco. But, much like
what happened in New
Orleans last week, the initial
blow was only a feint: The
real destruction occurred in
the three days after the quake,
when a firestorm, largely trig-
gered by firefighters' misuse
of dynamite, destroyed three-
quarters of the city. As many
as 6,000 people died. Pan-
icked at the prospect of loot-
ers, the acting commander of
the Presidio put the city
under martial law. The mayor
ordered the troops to "not
take any prisoners... Shoot
anyone caught looting," wrote
Philip L. Fradkin in his
recently published history
The Great Earthquake and
Firestorms of 1906: How San
Francisco Nearly Destroyed
Itself.
It took years to rebuild San
Francisco, and no small mea-
sure of graft and corruption,
according to Fradkin. Busi-
ness leaders even sought to
expunge the word earthquake
from public records and
newspaper accounts, to lull
investors about the safety of
their city.
Nearly 100 years later, little
trace of the destruction
remains. The terror San Fran-
ciscans suffered is largely for-
gotten, the event just another
piece of city's lore.
While the strength of
human engineering is some-
times as frail as a levee, the
strength of the human spirit
recovers and lives on.
ANDREW MAYKUTH
Knight Ridder News Service

TROPICAL STORM AGNES
Lawmaker, federal funds
helped Wilkes-Barre in '72
In June 1972, Tropical
Storm Agnes roared up
from the Florida Panhan-
dle and stalled over Pennsyl-
vania, releasing an unrelent-
ing deluge over the
Susquehanna River basin.


The river rose more than
35 feet in downtown Wilkes-
Barre, spilling over the sand-
bagged levee, enveloping
homes and businesses.
Although the storm


PENNSLVANIA FLOOD, JUNE 23, 1972: In the deluge created by Tropical
Storm Agnes, Harrisburg victims use boats to flee to higher ground.


SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS/FILE PHOTO, 1989,
LOMA PRIETA, CALIF., EARTHQUAKt,'199: Rescue workers and police arrive
at the scene soon after roadways collapsed in Oakland.


affected states from the Gulf
of Mexico to New York, Penn-
sylvania was hardest-hit, with
48 deaths and $2.1 billion in
damage. Wilkes-Barre, where
six people perished, was dev-
astated.
More than 70,000 residents
were evacuated during the
flood. Fires ravaged entire
blocks. Rushing water
unearthed 2,000 caskets and
and scattered body parts
along the valley.
When the waters receded
several days later, gritty river
mud coated the devastation.
At the time, Wilkes-Barre
was in economic decline, its
anthracite mines closed.
U.S. Rep. Dan Flood, a mas-
ter of appropriations for
Northeastern Pennsylvania,
pushed through the $220 mil-
lion Agnes Recovery Act in
the weeks after the disaster.
Two months later, schools
reopened on time, and the
federal dollars poured into
the city for renewal.
Ornate early 20th-century
buildings built when coal
mines fueled the city's growth
were replaced by nondescript
architecture of the 1970s. The
downtown looked distinctly
different. But it was alive
again.
"It was absolutely vibrant,
and that is because the
improvements that were
made after the 1972 flood, the
millions and millions that
were expended, acted as a
sort of pacemaker that gave
downtown about a decade
more of life," said Larry New-
man, the Greater Wilkes-
Barre Chamber of Business
and Industry's vice president
of economic and community
development.
Residents of nearby Scran-
ton jokingly called for a flood
of their own to usher in a
wash of federal renewal cash.
But Wilkes-Barre's rebuilt
downtown did not revive its
economy. The population has
declined from 58,000 to less
than 42,000 residents. Young
people are leaving 20 per-
cent of the population is older
than 65, nearly double the
national rate.
Local officials now strug-
gle with a stagnant downtown
of vacant storefronts. Wilkes-


Barre is going through the
sort of urban decay other cit-
ies in the region faced a dec-
ade ago.
"You know, people were
very proud of what happened
here," Newman said. "The
problem was that what hap-
pened here was a physical fix.
When we crashed, we crashed
10 years later than everybody
else."
JON FOX
Fox is a reporter for The
Wilkes-Barre Times Leader.

.GRAND FORKS
After '97 floods, government
aid helped region to recover
Eight feet of accumu-
lated snow began to
melt in spring, and
Grand Forks flooded in early
April. Then it caught fire. The
images of firefighters unsuc-
cessfully battling the blaze
while chest-deep in floodwa-
ter attracted national atten-
tion.
Damage to Grand Forks
and neighboring East Grand
Forks, Minn., was estimated at
$1.5 billion. There was no
potable water for 23 days.
Approximately 50,000 of the
two cities' 60,000 residents
were evacuated, 85 percent of
homes sustained damage, and
60,000 tons of debris were
hauled to the landfill.
Now, local officials say the
cities are better than ever.
Government support was the
key and examples are
everywhere.
A $393 million dike, 12 feet
higher than the one protect-
ing the city in 1997, is nearly
complete. Downtown, which
lost 11 buildings to fire, has
been rebuilt. Much public
infrastructure is new; several
schools were built at no local
cost; new homes on high
ground replaced flooded
houses near the river.
The former low-lying
neighborhoods are now a
2,200-acre park. The city's
main public golf course was
rebuilt.
Both cities' populations
have returned to pre-flood
levels.
"East Grand Forks is a bet-


GRAND FORKS, N.D., APRIL 20, 1997: Blazes follow floods, destroying at least
six buildings; firefighters battle them while waste-deep in water.


KRT FILE/MARCH 1i, 1
FORT WAYNE, MARCH 16, 1982: Volunteers who shore up a wobbly dike to
prevent more flooding are visited by then-President Reagan.


ter community now, thanks to
the help we received from
government and people
around our nation," Mayor
Lynn Stauss said. "We're also
better because we pulled
together. We were a dying
community, but the disaster
opened our eyes to it and
made us look to the future."
There were rough spots.
Personal loss led to anger,
jealousy and fighting about
how assistance was spent. But
local leaders kept the civic
spirit intact.
"It was the defining
moment of our community,
which became stronger, more
vibrant and more diversified
than before the flood," Grand
Forks Mayor Mike Brown
said. "It also reminded us of
our human spirit of not giving
up."
Brown said his heart goes
out to Katrina's victims.
"Although now it's chaos,
they need to understand that
recovery will come. We have
to keep in mind that some of
our people lost everything.
But as a community, we
pulled together and are better
now."
Perhaps the clearest exam-
ple of the recovery is that
conversations about "the
Flood" are rare or they
were until last week.
RYAN BAAKEN
Bakken is a columnist and
senior writer for The Grand
Forks (N.D.) Herald in North
Dakota. The Herald won a
Pulitzer Prize for its coverage
of the 1997 Red River Valley
flood. Bakken wrote the book
Come Hell and High Water.

LOMA PRIETA QUAKE
Damage of '89 nearly all
fixed, but recovery was slow
W hile millions of
Americans watched
on TV, the violent
shaking at San Francisco's
Candlestick Park began at 5:04
p.m., just before the first pitch
in Game Three of the World
Series.
When it ended 15 seconds
later, the Loma Prieta Earth-
quake had devastated North-
ern California. It was the larg-
eseuakonthn SanAnres


fault since the great San Fran-
cisco earthquake of 1906. The
Oct. 17,1989 disaster killed 62
people, injured 3,757 and
caused more than $6 billion in
damage.
Hundreds of buildings col-
lapsed in the beach town of
Santa Cruz and nearby Wat-
sonville, wrecking historic
downtowns. A section of the
San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge, the busiest in the
United States, fell.
In Oakland, a double-deck
section on the Nimitz Freeway
toppled, killing 42 motorists.
Residents joined bucket bri-
gades as homes burned in San
Francisco's Marina District
and water mains failed.
Today nearly all the dam-
age is fixed, but the recovery
took far longer than most peo-
ple expected.
"It's exhausting," said Neal
Coonerty, whose family busi-
ness, Bookshop Santa Cruz,
was destroyed in the quake.
He sold books in a huge tent
for three years before rebuild-
ing the store. It took 14 years
to pay off the loans.
"It is such a huge effort to
get back to where you were
that it's better not to know
how much will be required to
get through it, and just move
ahead," he said.
Today, a rebuilt downtown
Santa Cruz is hipper and more
vibrant, but three vacant lots
remain. The Oakland freeway
was never rebuilt, rerouted
instead around that city. After
years of bickering between the
mayors of Oakland and San
Francisco, work to construct a
new Bay Bridge is underway.
The cost has ballooned to $6.3
billion project, and it won't be
finished until 2012.
Time passes, new people
arrive, and the,quake fades
into Bay Area history. But not
forever. The U.S. Geological
Survey says there is a 70 per-
cent chance of an earthquake
the size of Loma Prieta occur-
ring in the area in the next 25
years.
PAUL ROGERS
Rogers, a reporter for The San
Jose Mercury News, was part of
the Pulizer Prize-winning team
that covered the 1989 Loma
Prieta earthquake. -


FORT WAYNE FLOOD
Volunteers, and new dikes,
helped after '82 disaster
A massive melt of nearly
six feet of snow trig-
gered the Great Flood
of 1982 in Fort Wayne, built at
the confluence of three rivers.
In a matter of days, 9,000 of
the city's 173,000 residents
fled their homes. Property
damage exceeded $56 million.
But no one died, and the
hundreds of volunteers who
shored up a wobbly clay dike
to prevent worse flooding
earned Fort Wayne a reputa-
tion as "the city that saved
itself."
Amid the disaster, Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan visited
and joined the sandbaggers,
focusing national attention on
northeast Indiana.
New dikes now protect the
shores of the St. Joseph and
St. Marys rivers. The Pember-
ton Dike near the Maumee
River has been reinforced and
its height increased by six
feet.
Has the investment of
more than $50 million paid
off? John Roche and his neigh-
bors on Pemberton Drive
think so.
"It looks pretty safe now,"
he said during the city's last
big flood, in 2003, when
no sand-bagging was
required.
Some residents along the
St. Mary's south of town com-
plain that the new earthworks
has shifted the risk down-
stream. "There's no evidence
of that," insisted Mayor Gra-
ham Richard. "But in a city
with three rivers, you always
have to be prepared for flood-
ing."
Only a few reminders of
the damage remain after 23
years. About 15 homes were
demolished. A section of
ruined businesses near down-
town were bought out and
replaced by a 30-acre, $17 mil-
lion park.
KEVIN LEININGER
Leininger, a columnist for The
News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne,
Ind., helped cover the city's
flood in 1982, for which the
newspaper won a Pulitzer
Prize.


6C' SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


THE MIAMI HERALD










OPINION
JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXEUIIVE EDITOR I JOE G06LESBY, EDITORIAL PAKE EDITOR


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