Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00196
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: September 1, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00196
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text





'THE ONE &
ONLY
BIG MAC" ,,
HIGH 91F
LOW 78F
CLOUDS, SUN,
T-SHOER


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.230 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005 PRICE- 500


ueen in


Pageant winner

'asked to step

down because

of sexuality"


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
CLAIMING she was asked
to relinquish her crown because
of her sexual orientation, Miss
Teen Bahamas 2004/2005 Gari
McDonald has launched a cam-
paign which she hopes will con-
tribute to the end of discrimi-
nation against other gay and les-
bian teenagers.
The 18-year-old beauty
queen, who was crowned Miss
Teen Bahamas in November
last year, said that because she
is a lesbian she has been asked
-to step down, without ever hav-
ing received the prizes and
scholarship promised to her.
"Is that not discrimination?"
she asked.
Speaking yesterday at a press
conference at the new head-
quarters of the Rainbow
Alliance of the Bahamas, she
said: "It's almost the end of my
reign, and I have been given the
ultimatum of gracefully step-
ping down or having to deal
with the embarrassment of
being stripped by the Miss Teen
Bahamas committee."
Ms McDonald said she was
called to a meeting with the
pageant committee in April
where she was informed that
"we cannot have a lesbian Miss
Teen Bahamas representing the
country."
SHowever, Ms McDonald said


that the issue of sexuality was
never addressed within the rules
of conduct of the Miss Teen
Bahamas contract, and that she
had no idea that it could
become a problem.
She said she was "very sur-
prised" when the committee
first questioned her about her
sexual orientation.
Ms McDonald said that she
is unaware of having broken
any rules of the pageantry.
"Had I thought I had
behaved in a manner that was
unfitting for a queen I would
have graciously stepped down
to avoid having to go through
all of this," she said.
As Miss Teen Bahamas, Ms
McDonald said, she has only
put in a handful of appearances,
including a meeting with the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture and a Junkanoo event.
Ms McDonald, who won the
crown on the platform of 'AIDS
awareness amongst teenagers',
said that since March she has
been excluded from events that
Miss Teen Bahamas normally
attends.
"Why haven't I been given a
contract about the international
(teen) pageant, or even the Miss
Teen Bahamas pageant. I have
not signed a contract. The inter-
national (teen) pageant was held
in July, I was not contacted, I
SEE page 11


* RESIDENTS in Hanna Road are furious about the illegal dumping which goes on in their
street as shown in front of someone's home in this picture. See page six for the story
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


'90 per cent Haitian births'

claim rejected by lawyer


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
OPENLY challenging the
claims of Tribune sources that
over 90 per cent of births at
Princess Margaret Hospital are
to non-Bahamians, lawyer
Eliezer Regnier said last night
that he feels 33 or 50 per cent
would be a more realistic fig-
ure.
Mr Regnier told The Tri-
bune that while Haitian cou-
ples in the Bahamas tended to
have more than two children,


he felt they accounted for a
much smaller percentage than
claimed by a Nassau medical
source.
"I could easily understand
50 per cent or 33 per cent. That
seems reasonable but it's
impossible for it to be 90 per
cent. If indeed that is the case
I would have to see what hap-
pened nine months ago and
see what conceivable factor
could have contributed to giv-
ing birth.
"I know when I travel to
Trinidad for Carnival the peo-


pie there have what they call
Carnival babies which con-
tribute to a surge in births after
a few months," he said
Earlier this week, a con-
cerned doctor told The Tri-
bune that more than 90 per
cent of births at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital were to non-
Bahamian parents. The doc-
tor claimed that of the 96 live
births recorded in August, only
three were to Bahamians.
Minister of Health, Senator
SEE page 11


Taxi

driver

shot

dead
* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
A TAXI-DRIVER who
made a dramatic call to his base
after being shot was later found
dead at the wheel by police offi-
cers.
The killing happened in the
early hours of yesterday morn-
ing when the driver received
several gunshot wounds to the
body.
He became the 31st homicide
victim of the year.
Police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans said the
male driver of a 1985 Mercedes
Benz cab contacted his dis-
patching office (Bahamas Taxi
SEE page 11

College

'not in

crisis'
E By KARAN MINNIS
THE College of the
Bahamas' acting president says
the institution is not in crisis -
and has been "too modest"
about its successes.
Speaking at a Rotary Club
South Eastern Division meet-
ing yesterday, Dr Rhonda Chip-
man-Johnson said the college
"is alive, well, ready and eager
to move into the new academic
year."
She said: "This institution
does not depend on any one
person. Its successes are the
result of teamwork. For the past
three and half years, we have
benefited from the powerful
synergy generated by a talented
council and gifted administra-
tion, faculty and staff.
"Lest we forget, the college
also stands on the foundation
SEE page 11


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PAG 2 TURSAYOSPTMBE 1205ETESRIUN


Rainbow Alliance



moves into HO


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transgendered support
group Rainbow Alliance of the
Bahamas (RAB) is reaching out
to people as it expands its com-
munity work.


For the first time, RAB has
finally acquired a headquarters,
known as the Zemi House.
Named after the Arawak
spirit Zemi, the agent of change,
the house is "a centre based in
spirituality", Helen Klonaris of
RAB said yesterday.
Ms Klonaris said that the


house has now been open for
two months and serves as a
meeting place for the alliance,
but is intended in future to
serve a "broader audience."
"We plan to use this house
to host workshops and discus-
sion fora. Generally we hope
that this will become a centre
for social change," she said.

Resources

Ms Klonaris said that in
addition to offering counseling
and support for gay, lesbian,
bi-sexual and transgendered
(GLBT) individuals, the
alliance also plans to offer the
centre's resources for groups
interested in social justice,
especially women's rights
groups.
"We want all people to feel
included, we have felt what it
feels like to excluded. So this
centre emphasises respect of
diversity and differences. No
one is excluded.
"In future we hope that we
will not be the.only group that is
housed here," she said.
RAB spokesperson Erin
Greene said that the centre,
which is a strictly alcohol,
smoke and drug free environ-
ment, will eventually also be
home to an Internet radio sta-
tion which will reach out to
GLBT people in the wider
Caribbean.
Further she said, worship ser-
vices for people of all faiths will
be held at the centre.
"We call it the 'People
Church'. We are trying to find a
new liturgy that speaks to the
lives of the GLBT community,"
said Ms Klonaris,
Ms Greene added that
although many churches in the
Bahamas do not mind homo-
sexuals attending their ser-
vices, many in the GLBT com-
munity feel that they "want to
worship at a place where we
are not made to feel invisi-
b le ." . : I


Flooding continues after Katrina


FLOODING continued across New Provi-
dence yesterday in the wake of Hurricane Kat-
rina despite assurances from the Ministry of
Works that there is no problem with the
island's drainage system.
In yesterday's Tribune, Director of Works


Melanie Roach said: "There are some chal-
lenges, but nothing major, We are, however,
constantly upgrading. It's an ongoing battle."
She added that every new building creates
new problems, as drainage pipes are blocked by
cables and utility pipes.


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 3
LOANW


'Suspicious package'


forces slight delay

TRAVELLERS to the Bahamas suffered only a slight
delay when a "suspicious package" brought Miami Interna-
tional Airport to a standstill for one hour yesterday morning.
According to Associated Press reports, Transportation
Security Administration (TSA) agents found the package in
a passenger's luggage.
The discovery prompted officials to evacuate Concourse H
while a bomb squad investigated.
Gates H3 through H20 were closed for over an hour. Con-
course H serves Bahamas Air, Delta, Delta Connection,
ConAir, Gulfstream, US Air and Continental Airlines.
According to Bahamasair officials, only one Bahamasair jet
was affected by the delay: The 11.40am flight, which only had
to wait ten minutes before being cleared to takeoff.
MIA officials later confirmed that the package.appeared to
be harmless.



Public education

system 'resilient'


* By KARAN MINNIS

ALTERNATIVE accom-
modations are currently
being arranged for a number
of public schools, due to
delays in repairs.
Speaking at a press confer-
ence on the status of public
school repairs yesterday,
Minister of Education Alfred
Sears announced that "after
diverting millions of dollars
last school year in repairing
and refurbishing schools, the,
public education system con-
tinues to be very resilient".
According to Mr Sears,
because of "the adversity that
we suffered as a result of two
hurricanes, Frances and
Jeanne, in August and Sep-
tember of 2004," the ministry
has been given the "oppor-
tunity to build even better
schools."
Mr Sears said that of the
158 schools scattered
throughout the 22 inhabited
islands and cays in the coun-
try, 13 schools have been
award contracts for repairs
to be conducted this year and
5 schools have received con-
tacts for improvements to be
made to school grounds.
"Of the projected repairs
contracted, works at five
school appear to be on sched-
ule," he said. "We have, how-
ever, faced and continue to
face challenges due in part
to the lack of certain materi-
als and the recent rains. Fur-
ther; it was only recently dis-
covered that the procure-
ment of certain window lou-
vers is a challenge therefore
we are in the process of hav-
ing these windows replaced."
So far, of the $27 million
dollars spent this year on the
refurbishment, construction,



TROICA


and repair of schools
throughout the country,
repairs and new construction
account for $15 million,
ongoing repairs for $5 mil-
lion, and the completion of
additions and refurbishment
is estimated at $4 million.
Even through there will be
some delays in the re-open-
ing of school campus, Mr
Sears said the work is about
98 per cent complete.
In reference to AF Adder-
ley high school, Mr Sears said
that the Ministry of Works
and an independent contrac-
tor have already evaluated
the area and have confirmed
that the A Block building is
structurally sound.

Process

"At the Carlton E Francis
primary school we have
experienced some delays in
the tender process," he said.
"Mr Sylvannus Petty, a con-
tractor with 41 years experi-
ence is now on site.
"It was proposed that alter-
native accommodations be
secured in area churches and
negotiations are underway
with Church leader in the
immediate irea," Mr Sears
said.
He added that the repairs
to the Hope Town primary
school in Abaco and Deep
Creek primary school in
Andros are still underway
and will have to be "extend-
ed over several months".
Therefore alternative
accommodations have been
found for both schools. Hope
Town primary will be oper-
ating from a Church of God
in that community and Deep
Creek primary will be oper-
ating at the Youth Centre in
Kemp's Bay until the work
is completed.
The minister added that
the repairs .are expected to
be completed as soon as pos-
sible, and that the ministry is
dedicated to completing
them in timely matter.


Assurances



given on







SMINISTER of Education Alfred Sears (left) and Minister of
Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts were at yesterday's press
conference.


T By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
ALL schools will open on
Monday whether -repairs are
complete or not, it was
announced yesterday during a
press conference at the Ministry
of Education.,
Accompanied by technical
staff, Minister of Works and Util-
ities Bradley Roberts and Minis-
ter of Education Alfred Sears
outlined the work that has been
completed on schools so far and
explained what remains to be
done.
According to Mr Sears, the
contractors at the various schools
where construction is continuing
will speak with the school's prin-
cipals to schedule when work can
be done in an attempt to limit
the effect on classes.

Affected
The schools in New Provi-
dence that will be most affected
by the work are CC Sweeting
junior high school, Carlton E
Francis primary school and AF
Adderley junior high school -
possibly the most unstable of the
three.
Last year, reports of falling
concrete were issued by AF
Adderley management, result-
ing in the school being investi-
gated to see if it was structurally
sound enough for classes to con-
tinue.
According to Creswell Stur-
rup, the Permanent Secretary at
the Ministry of Education, the
reports returning to the ministry
confirm that the building is stable
and with proper refurbishment,
can continue to be used.
"The H-block catwalk, has
been removed and there will be
ongoing development at the site,
which ought to be completed by


next year. But the school is safe
at this time," he said.
Since the beginning of the
week, teachers at CC Sweeting
have engaged in a sit-out at the
school, stating that they will con-
tinue their demonstration until
construction of the school is com-
plete.
The teachers claim that the
school has been under
construction for the past 12
years.
The teachers' spokesperson
Michelle Hudson told The Tri-
bune that there are a number of
concerns at the school, including
the need for working bathrooms
for the students and female teach-
ers, along with the need for run-
ning water in a particular section.
"I doubt very much that school
will open on Monday, and we
have the full support of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT)," she said.
However Minister Sears stated
that he is working along with the
BUT to ensure that school com-
mences on Monday without
interruption.
"Yes we have challenges at
Carlton Francis, AF Adderley,
and CC Sweeting, but there has
to be a balanced perspective. We
have to look at what we
addressed this year after the dev-
astating hurricanes of Frances
and Jeanne.
"If we look at two or three
schools we loose perspective on
what has been accomplished. We
were able to salvage an entire
school year by drawing on the
wisdom of the stake-holders
(teachers and parents) and use
church halls and other buildings
to save that year.
"It's in that context that we
have to look; that an over-
whelming number of schools will
open with limited interruptions,"
he said.


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 005TTHE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-


Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


The downside of Harbour Island


JUBILANT Harbour Islanders took off two
days to celebrate winning Travel + Leisure
magazine's Best Island in the Caribbean
Award.
'Brilahders should be proud of this achieve-
ment, but they must remember that this award
does not give them the luxury of resting on
their laurels, particularly if they want to main-
tain their superlative position. "This award
just means that we have to tighten up our
game and keep it going ahead," remarked one
'Brilander.
Another wondered if the majority of those
rejoicing really appreciated the responsibility
that the award has put on the shoulders of
each and every resident of the island.
"For example," said one, "after the feasting
and celebrations, the cans and paper cups had
to be picked up. after the revellers. If they
really understood what this reward meant,
and if they are the proud people they claim to
be, no one would have had to have picked up
their garbage the next morning their pride
would not have let them drop it."
That was last week. This week we were
talking with a young woman just back from a
Harbour Island honeymoon. She and her hus-
band had a wonderful time their friends saw
to that but she furrowed her brow as she
wondered how long 'Briland would retain its
charm.
"The island is dirty and the young people
seem to be a problem -there's too much
stealing," she said.
"They are jumping up and down about this
award," said a resident. "But all this award
means is maintenance of this island, and they
will have to keep working on it."
We have heard many comments about the
welcome sign on the arrival dock "Wel-
come to Harbour Island, home of the friend-
ly people" and beneath it a large garbage
bin, usually overflowing with garbage.
In the past, attempts have been made to
beautify this area, but as often happens in
Nassau the plants have been. stolen and
trucks now park where grass once grew.
For an island only three miles long and half
a mile wide, many residents wonder about the
need for the many SUVs now clogging the
narrow streets. Some believe that the potholes
have been caused by these four-wheel vehi-
cles that are too heavy for the soft roads.
In Nassau they complain about roaming
dogs, in Harbour Island wild chickens are the
talk of the town. These chickens contribute to
the garbage. They are smart enough to know
that hidden goodies are inside plastic bags


Ba


awaiting the thrice weekly garbage collection.
And so they attack the bags, pecking away for
food until the once packaged garbage is strewn
all over the street. Of course, when the garbage
collectors make their rounds, they only empty
the bins and collect the bags that are intact. No
one sweeps up the scattered garbage.
People talk of the broken sidewalks that got
a quick patch-up with a few splashes of paint
to buildings here and there to spruce up the
area for the victory celebrations.
Posters of candidates contesting the June
town council elections are still stuck on posts
and trees. And when it's time to announce a
new event, new posters are plastered over the
old ones. No one takes signs down they
are just layered, one on top of the other. "It
just looks squalid a dirty little town," was
how one person saw it. Not to mention the
abandoned golf carts and cars on some side
streets.
Some complained that more garbage bins
were needed, but we wondered what good
this would do because, if what we were told is
true, almost as soon as they are put down they
are stolen.
Many now believe that the small island is
getting more development than the infra-
structure can support. Almost every night
there are power cuts, and a serious water
shortage.
"Everyone complains about Romora Bay
and Valentine's, but go into the narrows and
see the massive homes going up there this
island doesn't have the infrastructure to main-
tain them," said the resident.
Many think that large developments like
Valentine's and Romora should provide their
own generators and water system. This would
relieve much of the pressure on the commu-
nity's limited supplies.
But everyone still talks of the beauty of the
famous Pink Sands beach.
"At least the beach is clean," said one res-
ident with pride, "but the town and the dock,
well go take a look for yourself!"
Now that the residents have had their two
days oi celebrations, it is time to get down to
work and remember that each and every res-
ident is responsible for keeping their small
island clean, quaint and charming so that it will
continue winning those coveted international
awards.
And, by the way you parents, you would
be doing yourself and your island a favour if
you would take your foul-mouthed youth to
the wood shed and teach them some man-
ners.


to School


MK*SWISS


CHILDREN'S SIZES
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INFANTS' SIZES
4- 10 $38.00


it ;S


Rosetta St. Phone: 325-3336


Property and




the price of




gasoline


EDITOR, The Tribune
IN a letter to The Tribune, J
Moore warns of impending
crises due to high oil prices. He
calls for government action
because the oil shortage is
"haunting the world with possi-
ble world recession". A "short-
age of refineries" adds to the
crisis because "no one wants
them in their back yard", and
the oil importers (Esso, Texaco
and Shell) take a "holier than
thou" attitude.
The writer suggests an
"urgent" need to reroute traffic,
by passing downtown Bay
Street and "offer incentives" to
"large businesses" to relocate
to the suburbs. Government
incentives are either a form of
tax relief, or a cash subsidy.
However defined, it is taxpay-
er's money.
The writer fails to note that
rerouting traffic "cutting just
under the arch south of the hill"
would require the expropria-
tion of private property for the
new roadway. The tax dollars
for the "incentives" to business
are also private property until
they are "taken" by the state.
It is a grand scheme that
would require radical changes
to established norms, a classic
example of "the end justifying
the means" and is particularly
repugnant as it involves the
arbitrary confiscation of private
property.
Private property and the asso-
ciated rights form the bedrock
for civil society. In the libertar-
ian tradition political and eco-
nomic freedoms are insepara-
ble from the principle of the
right to private property.
The price of gasoline may be
straining our pocketbooks, but
as the following chart illustrates
oil prices change over time. In


real dollars they are lower now
than they were in the seventies
and eighties. Current or even
higher prices for gasoline do not
justify increasing taxation or
expropriating private property.
Real Crude prices* Jan 1970
to July 2005:
120 -------------

100. ... .


OPEC. .C


5 I0 -
L)


Thomas Sowell a Hoover
Institute scholar, in his book
"The Vision of the Anointed"
describes the key elements of
visionaries:
The oil price framed as a "cri-
sis" is the pretext for the "anoint-
ed" to impose their "visions" on
everybody else. Hype it up to
convince the innocent and
gullible of impending disaster and
the need for action. Follow this
with a government solution to
"curtail the dangerous behaviour


7b71,7273%745767:778.s79s8061828384 8s5e88 9SO 6219S934 959697 989600: O102030400s6


I *West Texas Intermediate in
constant (July 2005) US dollars.
Sources: Federal Reserve
Bank of St Louis, and Bureau
of Labour Statistics.
Julian Simon in his remark-
able book "The Ultimate
Resource II" challenges the
conventional beliefs about
scarcity of energy and natural
resources. Careful quantitative
research, and economic logic
rebut widely held Malthusian
judgments related to declining
resources and population size.
His work shows that resource
prices have steadily decreased
over time, and he predicted
their continuing decline.


of the many". Then "dismiss any
arguments to the contrary as
either misinformed or motivat-
ed by unworthy purposes".
As tough as it may be to pay
for gas these days, it will be
much tougher for the persons
who lose their property and for
everyone else having to pay
higher taxes.
The preservation of liberty
and property requires us to
identify and refute bad ideas
that invoke government action
to correct prices that are arti-
facts of the free market.
THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau
August 2 2005


Developing demand for crafts


EDITOR, The Tribune
I LAUD your story of Fri-
day, August 12, "Market veter-
an on modern challenges,"
interviewing straw vendor,
Diana Thompson. It followed
on the heels of other recent arti-
cles requesting a boost from the
Ministry of Tourism for the
Bahamian straw industry.
Related to these stories was
an earlier story published a few
weeks ago, recounting a very
successful workshop held by the
Ministry of Agriculture on straw
weaving held with 30 partici-
pants on one of the Out Islands.
With all this in mind, I
thought of an idea for develop-
ing the Bahamian straw indus-
try. Ask the Ministry of Agri-


culture to hold a series of work-
shops with the COB in the Col-
lege of Art and Design and
maybe also at the National Art
Gallery of The Bahamas to join
the talents of young profession-
ally bound artists and design-.
ers with veteran straw-weavers;
something like the very suc-
cessful straw workshops men-
tioned previously, but with a
twist.
This endeavour would
encourage young Bahamian
artists and designers to work
with straw weavers/vendors to
develop fresh, trend-setting,
innovative straw products,
including hats, wallets, brief cas-
es, computer cases, cell phone
cases, etc. These items could
attract medium to high-end sales


to tourists who want quality
fashionable Bahamian products.
This would also connect
young artists and designers into
a new movement to advance
Bahamian artisans and their
craft in a fruitful way. This
could help develop the
Bahamas straw industry, and
keep young professional artists
and designers involved with
another aspect of their culture.
It could also help develop a
competitive Bahamian-grown
industry that could produce
more pride in Bahamian craft,
and jobs and profits in the
Bahamas straw industry.
JULIA P AMES
Nassau
August 12 2005


I


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Rosetta St.


Phone: 325-3336









THEAL TT A T


Teenage girl

is charged

with murder

A TEENAGE girl
has been charged with
murder before the
courts in Abaco.
The 13-year-old girl
of the Mudd settlement
in Marsh Harbour was
arraigned before the
Juvenile Panel chaired
by Magistrate Crawford
McGee.
The young girl, who
was accompanied by
her mother and her
lawyer Godfrey "Pro"
Pinder, was not
required to enter a
plea.

Records
Court records allege
that on August 28 in
Marsh Harbour, the girl
intentionally caused the
death of Yvenader
Sainvil, 18, also of the
Mudd.
The court adjourned
the case to September
13, at which time a rul-
ing will be made on a
submission by the girl's
attorney.
Mr Pinder submitted
that due the age of the
defendant, a charge of
murder cannot be made
in the absence of a fiat
from the Attorney Gen-
eral's office.
The girl has been
remanded to the
Willimae Pratt Centre
for Girls in the mean-
time.


I
I


THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 1


6:30am
10:00
11:00
12:00
12:03
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1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
4:58
5:00
6:00
6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30
9:00
10:00
10:30
11:00
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Community Pg./1540
Colombia Trade Show 2005
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Update
Immediate Response
Ethnic Health America
Spiritual Impact
Mr. Ballooney B.
Treasure Attic
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
Gilbert Patterson
Video Gospel
Gospel Grooves
ZNS News Update
Colombia Trade Show 2005
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
You & Your Money: "Back
To School Special"
Da' Down Home Show
Dance Nia Pt. II
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Colombia Trade Show 2005
Community Page


SS
th rigt.o ak lstmiut


Bahamians will play 'active role'




in shaping Clifton Heritage Site


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Clifton Heritage com-
mittee has begun important
preparatory work to preserve
ruins on what it hopes will be the
Clifton Heritage Site.
Committee chairman Sean
McWeeny said' the historically
rich site should be a source of
pride and joy for all Bahamians.
He said that Bahamians have
always been very protective of
the site, especially witnessed in
recent years when they staged
the massive Save Clifton appeal,
which helped to push for legisla-
tion which guaranteed the his-
toric ruins would always be the
property of the government and
become an historical park. The
Clifton Act was passed in March.

Active
Mr McSweeney added that as
the plans progress, Bahamians
will play a very active role in
determining how the site will
look. He said the sculpture gar-
dens recently built in the area by
local artists such as Antonious
Roberts prove that the area has
the potential to emerge as a
main centre for cultural expres-
sion.
. In the next few weeks, a team
of experts will painstakingly go
through the remains to restore
as many of the stones as possible
and to remove trees whose roots
are causing the ruins to be uplift-
ed.
It is a process that is essential
for the preservation of the site


AN HISTORIC stone structure standing at Clifton Cay. Clifton Heritage Committee chairman Sean McWeeny said the historically
rich site should be a source of pride and joy for all Bahamians.
(Photo: Mario Dincanson/Tribune staff)


said historic architect Colin
Brooker. He told The Tribune
that the ruins tell the Whylly
plantation story in the smallest
terms, such as inscriptions written
on walls by former slaves and
journals left behind by Lord
Whylly. Even the stones them-
selves show that, following eman-
cipation, the slaves remained at
the plantation and built a differ-
ent type of structure for a new
life.


The committee decided to
restore as many of the ruins that
exists in their current state, rather
than try to reconstruct the build-
ings. Mr Brooker said that once
literature is printed, visitors to
the site should be able to use that
and their imaginations to visu-
alise life, as it was at the
plantation in the early 19th cen-
tury.
Eleanor Phillips, executive
director of the nature conser-


vancy, stressed the need to pre-
serve the wetlands while con-
serving Clifton.
That partnership will also
include the help of the Bahamas
Nassau Trust said Eric Carey
who spoke on behalf of the
trust.
Pericles Maillis, a member of
the committee, called on persons
to volunteer for the clean-up
effort, calling Clifton a place of
great natural beauty and a


wonderful asset to the
country.
Colin Higgs; permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Tourism,
noted the importance the site will
have to cultural tourism.
About six weeks ago, signs
were erected which clearly
defined the sites and warned
against illegal activity such as
dumping, diving from the cliff,
removing stones or other items
or starting fires.


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1 By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BACK to school jamboree and rally is set
to entertain while at the same time providing
valuable information on the dangers of drug
abuse.
The event is being held under the theme:
"Celebrate Life Value Yourself".
It is being sponsored by the Garden Hills
Community Development Association in con-
junction with the Bahamas National Drug
Council.
MP for Garden Hills Veronica Owens said
that she is excited to partner with the Nation-
al Drug Council in this venture.

Mission
She said the council's mission is "one of
assisting our children and young people to pre-
vent them from falling into the snares of getting
involved in drugs and negative habits. g
S"It is wonderful to be working with a group
of people who promote positive activities, pre-
vention of negative habits and family fun and
k


entertainment" said Ms Owens.
The day of fun will be held on September 3 at
the AF Adderley Park beginning at noon.
Co-chairman of the Bahamas National Drug
Council William Weeks said that a wealth of
information on issues such as drugs, self -
esteem and decision making will be imparted.
"We are particularly concerned that it is not
just the illegal drugs that are a problem in our
community. Also some of the prescription
drugs and legal drugs, especially alcohol," said
Mr Weeks.

Gateway
"We want to sensitise both the children,and
the parents to the fact that alcohol and mari-
juana are gateway drugs to even harder drugs.
We want to inform them about the negative
consequences of getting involved in these
drugs."
Snacks and gifts will be available for the chil-
dren.
Entertainment will be provided by the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force Reserves band and
the Prodigal Son Junkanoo group.


Entertainment with a


CseriDlu smessage at back


to school jamboree


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER i, L.


THE TRIBUNE








AGE .%, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NES


Clinic offers


cheap breast


testing to


women

N By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

A LOCAL health care facility has
launched a campaign to encourage
Bahamian women to get mammograms
by offering the services at a discounted
rate.
Throughout September the Walk-in-
Medical Clinic holding its "Get in the
Pink" campaign and inviting all Bahami-
an women to visit their Collins Avenue
location to receive mammograms for half
the usual cost of the service.
"We hope that this will ensure that as
many Bahamian women as possible get
their mammograms done this month, as
early detection is key to winning the bat-
tle against breast cancer," the company
said in a release yesterday.
In addition, each Wednesday during
September women can take part in health
seminars held at the clinic's Sandy Port
location.
Staff members also plan to go into com-
munities and conduct a number of infor-
mational sessions on breast health and
other women's' health issues at various
church and civic organisations.
At the end of the month, the Walk-in-
Medical Clinic intends to make a dona-
tion to the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas' Cancer Caring Centre, in
recognition of the "great work" that
organisation is doing.
The discounted mammograms will be
offered from September 5 onwards and
appointments can be made by calling 328-
0783 or 328-2744.


Call for government to





crack down on dumping


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A HANNA Road family
is renewing its calls on the
government to deal with the
indiscriminate dumping that
continues in the area.
The concerned family
members, who wished to
remain anonymous, told The
Tribune last month that they
have been dealing with the
dumping problem since
1997.
They said they were very
disturbed yesterday morn-
ing when they again discov-
ered trash in the area this
time in a grassy patch in
front of their home.
The Tribune visited the
family yesterday and was
escorted to the front of their
yard, where food cartons,
soda and juice cans and a
bag of cole slaw had been
dumped along with other
refuse.
According to the family,
the trash was deposited
there on Tuesday evening.
"I want some preventative
measures in place. If they
have to, hire a security guard
for six days out of the
week," suggested one of the


family members.
"After four or five months
of it, everyone will realise
you can't go up to Hanna
Road any more (to dump) -
they have a security up
there. Do something man,"
he said.
"Put inspectors on this
road," shouted another fam-
ily member.
The Tribune spoke with
parliamentary secretary in
the Ministry of Health Ron
Pinder yesterday afternoon
about the problem.
Mr Pinder said he would
make a point of meeting
with Hanna Road residents
to come up with a solution.
He added that the prob-
lem cannot be solved by
government alone, but must
be tackled by the residents
as well.
Last month, Mr Pinder
said the Department of
Environmental Health Ser-
vices have responded at least
three to four times to com-
plaints about dumping in
Hanna Road in the past
three-and-a-half years,
He said that each time,
department workers cleaned
up deposits of trash and
vacant lots in the area.


* THE scene of scattered garbage on Hanna Road


PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021- 2025
ISSUE OF B$75,000,000.00


Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 20th June, 2005.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 24th August, 2005 and
will close at 3:00pm on 6th September, 2005. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 7th September, 2005.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$75,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.

The date of this Prospectus is th August, 2005

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$75,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2025. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
price are given below :- -


Rate Of Interest


5/32% Above Prime Rate
3/16% Above Prime Rate
7/32% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate
9/32% Above Prime Rate


Amount
BS


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2022
Bahamas Registered Stock 2023
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025


15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15.000.000.00
.75.000.000.00


Issue
Price
BS-

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 7th September, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 7th September, 2005, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). .Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 7th March, 2006 and thereafter on 7th September and 7th March in every year until the
Stock is repaid.


CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 24th '
August, 2005 and will close at 3:00 pm on 6th September, 2005, allocations will
commence at 9:30 a.m. on 7th September, 2005. All envelopes enclosing applications
should be labelled "Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks".

Units The Stock will be in units of BS100.00.

Applications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:

1. Bank of The Bahamas International
2. First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
3. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibank, N.A.

PUBLIC DEBT
Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2005 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,627,218,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


Revenue

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


FY2003/2004*
B$


943,760,000


993,987,000



80,890,000


FY2004/2005**
B$

1,051,624,000


1,067,259,000



117,296,000


FY2005/2006**
B$
Approved Budget

1,132,774,000

1,145,691,000



132,901,000


** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.

The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June
30, 2005 totalled B$454,138,000.


THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021- 2025


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No___
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:


The Registrar
c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:


I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:


Insert'below the amount applied for
in Units of B$100


5/32%
3/16%
7/32%
1/4%
9/32%


Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2022
Bahamas Registered Stock 2023
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025


and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.


I/We enclose B$


in payment for the Stock applied for.


In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:


% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock


BANK DRAFTS SHOULD BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.


Ordinary Signature

Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)


Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses, Telephone Nos.)







(Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should be given
below.)

Ordinary Signature

Name in Full

Address

Telephone No.

Ordinary Signature

Name in Full

Address

Telephone No.

I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:


Bank Name

Bank Branch


Account Type.

Account Number


- -~-~----


I _










LOA6 NW


Organisation gains entry





into Miss World pageant


By KARAN MINNIS
SCHOOL snack vendors
are being protected from the
threat of "stolen business" at
the hands of teachers, accord-
.ing to the Ministry of Educa-
tion.
SIn June, the Bahamas Food
..Vendors Association alleged
That teachers from several
.schools were "stealing their
Business" by selling food to
:students.
The association sent a dele-
,gation to the House of Assem-
L,'bly demanding that the gov-
ernment take action to pre-
serve the livelihood of the ven-
Adors.
Speaking to The Tribune in
June, association spokesper-
son Dr Clement Saunders said:
S"If a child has a dollar to
spend, the teachers and cus-
todians are getting to them
'first. They are not being sen-
1sitive to our needs."
I "It is really hurting ven-
.dors," he said. "When you
break it down; taking into con-
sideration school breaks like
summer, Christmas and East-
Ser, holidays, mid-term breaks
'and fun day, vendors really
,only work six months out of
-the year."
According to Ministry of
Education official Ralph
Bowe, the situation is now
,under control.
"There was a problem, but
we brought it to the attention
of the principals to monitor
the situation throughout the
school year and it has been
sorted out," he said. "The
problem was in just one or two
schools, so it wasn't a major
problem."
When asked what would
happen if it were to become
an issue in the future he said,
"Where we have found the
school at fault we have already
advised the principals not to
let it happen again. If that does
not work we would take the
proper measures against the
individuals."


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE newly launched Miss
Bahamas Organisation (MBO)
announced yesterday that it
has been offered the chance to
take part in the coveted Miss
World Pageant franchise.
MBO president Michelle
Malcolm told the press that just
one week after launching the
organisation, she was contacted
by the organisers of the Miss
World competition, one of the
most prestigious pageants on
the international scene.
"We were pleasantly sur-
prised to receive an e-mail from
Miss World exactly one week
after our launch, saying they
wanted to know more about
us," said Ms Malcolm. "We
immediately responded and the
rest, as they say, is history."
Miss World asked that a lady
be chosen to represent the
Bahamas at this year's inter-
national pageant, which is


being held Sanya, China in
December.
"We would have liked to
have six months' training, but
they wanted a girl for this year;
so she has to have a lot of ener-
gy, she can't afford to get
tired," said Ms Malcolm.
Screening for the represen-
tative will begin on September
17 at British Colonial Hilton,
and about a week later, MBO
plans to announce the winner.
The lucky lady will leave
Nassau on November 11 for
the competition.
MBO's talent director Pia
Glover will be responsible for
working closely with the cho-
sen lady in order to have her
prepared in time.
Ms Glover said the right can-
didate must have charisma,
poise, natural beauty and intel-
ligence. She intends to enhance
these natural skills by adding
good stage presence and inter-
view technique to the list.
"When they leave our pro-


gramme, you will see that she's
been through a stringent pro-
gramme, coming out polished
and ready to represent the
Bahamas," she said.
Suitable young women
between the ages of 17 and 24
are being sought to compete
in a private screening, said Ms
Malcolm.
Entrants should be "beautiful
in form and face, graceful, intel-
ligent and charming, possess
poise, a pleasing character, and
high moral convictions".
Candidates also must be sin-
gle, must not have children, nor
have ever been pregnant or
given birth.
Application forms may be col-
lected from Michelle la Nuit or e-
mail missbahamasorg@aim.com.
Ms Malcolm said MBO
plans to garner support from
the public in order to sponsor
travel to China, as has been
done for Channa Cius, who will
be representing the country at
Miss Earth this month.


The Miss World franchise, she
added, doesn't mean that MBO
is giving up its quest to attain
the Miss Universe franchise.
When the first MBO national
pageant is held in August 2006,
the plan is to crown three


queens who will represent the
country at seven pageants
around the world.
That number may increase to
nine, depending on whether two
other franchises become possi-
ble.


* MICHELLE Malcolm, Miss Bahamas Organization president, shows the press the contract
that was sent to her by the Miss World pageant yesterday in the British Colonial Hilton.
(lIoto: FeliptiMajor/Tribuue Staff)
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* HOTEL union president Pat Bain


Union chief calls for



focus on stopovers


M By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THERE needs to be stronger
marketing to encourage more
tourists to make overnight visits
to the Bahamas according to
hotel union chief Pat Bain.
Mr Bain, president of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering an I
Allied Workers Union, said that
if this does not take place, the
country can expect to lose its
market share in stay over visi-
tors.
In a statement released yes-
terday, Mr Bain noted that
while the country has been rat-
ed the number-one vacation
spot for "stay over and cruise
arrivals" among English-speak-
ing Caribbean countries,
stopover arrivals have not
increased in the past four years.
He said hotels are feeling the
financial implications of this
fact.
Mr Bain said he would feel
a "whole lot better" if the
Ministry of Tourism could
find the right formula to
attract more people to plan


stayover vacations.
The Radisson Cable Beach,
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Nas-
sau Beach and the Hilton hotels
have all reduced their work
weeks to three days, he said.
"How do you convince me
that the numbers are getting
better with each passing year
and still major hotels are filing
letters to the union informing
that the work week for employ-
ees has been cut down to three
days?" he asked.

Cruises

Mr Bain said that while cruise
ship passenger numbers can be
impressively large, cruise visi-
tors are not known to be big
spenders.
"Is tourism cooking up a real
workable strategy to better tar-
get and increase the numbers
that really count and benefit the
country the stopover visi-
tors?" he asked.
Mr Bain urged the ministry
.to find such a strategy as there
are more than 20,000 hotel-


workers employed throughout
the country.
"Tourism has a responsibility
to see to it that the occupancy
levels in local hotels remain in a
healthy state," he warned.
According to the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation, the
Bahamas hosted 826,500
stopover tourists and 1,728,895
cruise ship passengers from Jan-
uary to June this year. Howev-
er, the numbers indicate a 2.5
per cent drop in stopover visi-
tors and a 5.7 per cent drop in
cruise ship passengers com-
pared to the same period last
year.
"This indicates that we have
cause to be concerned," said Mr
Bain.
He claimed that while the
country is boasting about the
most arrivals and stay over vis-
itors, the numbers also show
that the Bahamas is losing mar-
ket share when compared to the
numbers of the. last four years.
"We need to get serious and
stop playing their number game
for good PR. We've got real
work to do."


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N THE press conference at the Ministry of Health


Developing the




health practices




in the Bahamas


By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
SIR George Alleyne, the
chancellor at the University of
the West Indies and formerly
the first black director general
at the Pan American Health
Organisation is in the Bahamas
this week to present a health
report complied by the
Caribbean Commission on
Health.
Sir George and 10 other
senior health officials from
around the region spent two
years compiling the data which
examines health trends in the
Caribbean.
The report was commissioned
by the CARICOM Heads of
.;Government and was first pre-
sented at their meeting in St
Lucia earlier this year.
Since then, Sir George and a


team of technical assistants have
visited several Caribbean coun-
tries to discuss the findings.
Yesterday he met with Cabi-
net and senior officials at the
Ministry of Health.
He said that governments
must take an aggressive stance
to protect the health of their
citizens by facilitating an envi-
ronment in which individuals
can make responsible health
choices.
He said the cost of not doing
so would have a direct and neg-
ative impact on the economy as
the health-of the nation is the
wealth of the nation.
The commission identified


three major areas which gov-
ernments in the region need to
focus on.
They are: obesity, HIV/AIDS
and violence and injury.
He said governments can
reduce the number of persons
affected by these problems by
stronger marketing, changing
laws such as drunk driving laws
and increasing taxes on harmful
products.
He also recommended that
Caribbean countries focus more
on garnering health tourism by
marketing the region as a recu-
peration spot and as a relaxing
place for elective procedures
such as plastic surgery.


* SIR George Alleyne


0w -


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


I r11 I r-IIUIMI


~I~







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2000, r-,uE I i


I LOC AL NEWSI


Miss Teen Bahamas



'asked to step down'


FROM page one
did not go and I wasn't given
any reason as to why I did not
attend this pageant," she said.
She added that she has not
been able to travel to the Fam-
ily Islands to talk about the sub-
ject of her platform, for which
she had interrupted her stud-
ies at the College of the
Bahamas.
A sponsor for Ms McDonald
during the Miss Teen Bahamas
pageant, Trequain Rahming,
said that this incident reflects
badly on the pageantry system
in the Bahamas.
"What is pageantry in this
country? Do we just have
pageants to make the money,
or are we really concerned
about the future of these girls
who really want to become
either models or top-class beau-
ty queens? Are we really seri-
ous about pageant in the
Bahamas?" she said.
Ms McDonald, who has since
retained a lawyer should her
case require legal action to be
taken, said she has attempted
to contact members of the
pageant committee for the past
several months without success.
The young beauty queen,
who wishes to study forensic
psychology, said she feels she
is a good role model for
teenagers in the Bahamas.


"I don't represent just straight
teens, that is being biased and
discriminative. I feel that
whether you are straight, gay,
male, female, lesbian, hetero-
sexual, transgendered, what-
ever it is, I feel that I'm a
spokesmodel for teens, period,"
she said.
Ms McDonald said that being
a gay teenager is very difficult -
"you have to deal with stereo-
types and discrimination" and
that coming out to family and
friends is a very difficult deci-
sion to make for young people.
"There's a lot of pressure for
a teenager having to deal with
that," she said.
Ms McDonald said she has
received many calls from gay
teenagers who have asked her
for advice on "how to talk to
people, to their parents."
She said that despite the cur-
rent situation, she harbours no
resentment towards the pageant
committee, but would like to
see justice done.
"The prizes and the scholar-
ship are really not concerns of
mine, but the justice is," she
said.
Ms McDonald said she does
not regret going public with her
case and is prepared to with-
stand possible ridicule and crit-
icism from the Bahamian peo-
ple.
"I am strong a person, I won't


let anybody or anything deter
me from what I want to do. As
much as people would ridicule
and criticise me, I'm not the
kind of person that you can
break that way," she said.
Spokesperson for the gay, les-
bian, bi-sexual and transgen-
dered (GLBT) support group,
the Rainbow Alliance, Erin
Greene said the organisation
supported Ms McDonald in her
"fight against what appears to
be discrimination on the basis of
her sexual orientation."
Ms Greene said the Alliance
feels that Ms McDonald is an
"excellent role model for young
people everywhere."
"In a society that still does
not recognise the human rights
of gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and
transgendered persons, young
people are especially at risk,
having very few visible role
models and fewer persons to
turn to for support. Gari is one
such role model, vital to the
society and the teen GLBT
community and the youth com-
munity at large," she said.
Ms Greene added that "to
ignore or demonise" the exis-
tence of homosexual teenagers
"only contributes to the rejec-
tion and despair that so many
young people in this society are
experiencing."
The pageant organisers
declined to comment.


Acting president




defends college


FROM page one
bequeathed to us by the talent-
ed council members and college
employees who came before us.
"The foundation is so pow-
erfully built that we have weath-
ered many a storm and the
growing pains that have been
the lot of all great institutions."
Dr Chipman-Johnson said
there have been many improve-
ments and developments to the
college's campus in order to
prepare for the new school year.
"This year students will enjoy
the benefit of quite a few brand
new classrooms and more ren-
ovated and air-conditioned
classrooms," she said.
"We are particularly pleased
. to have acquired and renovated
the former Boulevard Building



Driver


found


shot in


vehicle

FROM page one
Cabs) around 2.30am stating he
had been shot.
The driver, identified as
Stafford Bain, reported that he
was shot in Barbs Road, Golden
Gates, at the rear of Carmichael
Primary School.
Police were notified and,
4 according to Inspector Evans,
they found Mr Bain sitting
behind the wheel in a slumped
position.
S"When the officers arrived the
' male driver was slumped over
the wheel and it appears that he
had received a number of gun-
shot wounds about the body.
The circumstances around this
incident are unclear. However,
investigations are continuing
into this matter," he said.
In other police news, the
identity of a gardener report-
edly struck by lightning while
pruning a tree at the US
Ambassador's residence on
Sandford Drive has still not
been identified. The male gar-
dener is believed to be in his
late 30s or early 40s.
The US Embassy released a
statement extending "deepest
and heartfelt condolences" to
the family of the gardener on
Wednesday.
The man is a Haitian whose
wife has been contacted. A visa
is now being sought by a local
attorney to allow her to travel
from Haiti to identify his body.


complex on Thompson Boule-
vard, across from the present
administration block."

Facilities

The new building will house
the school of education, the
office of graduate programmes,
state-of-the-art classrooms, lec-
ture theatres, a new college
bookstore, a copy and business
centre and a cafe.
Dr Chipman-Johnson said:
"If the college receives bad
press, I'm the first to admit that
it's our own fault. We have been
too modest about our successes
and have failed to communicate
them properly to the Bahamian
public. This academic year, we
intend to remedy this."


According to Dr Chipman-
Johnson, the college's plan to
become a university by 2007 is
still in progress.
'- In. rder to achieve this: goal,
the college is continuing its
work on "several major pro-
jects", such as the new library,
the completion of the prelimi-
nary plans and work on the
construction of a new campus
for the northern Bahamas, and
the renovation of the auditori-
um.
"We remain focused on our
goal to become a university,"
she said. "This is your College
of the Bahamas; it will become
your University of the
Bahamas. We do not build for
ourselves or personal glory. We
build for greater opportunities
for all Bahamians."


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Haitian birth claim rejected


FROM page one
Dr Marcus Bethel, said:
"Such a gross misrepresenta-
tion of the facts is both unfor-
tunate and counter-produc-
tive, particularly for the coun-
try's health services, where
the emphasis is on maintain-
ing the national health for the
benefit and general health of
all Bahamians.
"In this regard the policy
of the Ministry of Health and
the Public Hospital Author-
ity is to provide care to all
persons presenting them-
selves to any of the govern-
ment health facilities regard-
less of nationality or ability
to pay. This is in the inter-
est of protecting not only the
health of the individual but
also in the interests of the
public health.
"Far from the woefully
incorrect claim of a 90 per
cent Haitian birthrate by
some unnamed doctor in The
Tribune article, factual data
obtained from Princess Mar-
garet Hospital's Prenatal
Information System indicates
that the actual number'of
births for the maternity ward
for the period August 1st
through 22nd stood at 222.
"Of this number, 166 or
74.8 per cent were docu-


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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S. ...-


mented as Bahamians. Those
documented as Haitian nation-
als accounted for 18 per cent,
with a further 4.5 per cent being
Jamaican nationals and the
remaining percentage of 3.4 per
cent comprised of various other
nationalities."
Statistics further reveal that,
for June of this year, 73.3 per
cent of the births on the mater-
nity ward at PMH were docu-
mented as Bahamians with the
overall rate of Bahamian births
for the year 2005 averaging 73.5
per cent of the total births in this
ward so far this year, he said.
The relative concentration of
non-Bahamian births is in the
public wards and should not be
generally extrapolated as a
reflection of the nationality dis-
tribution of total births in the
country, the minister added.
A group of Bahamian
lawyers say they learnt from a
doctor that for the month of
June only five of 64 live births
were to Bahamian parents.
The only available official sta-
tistics on live births in the
Bahamas finish at 2001.


In 1999, 20 per cent of all live
births in the Bahamas were for-
eign. In 2000 the figure was 21
per cent, which dropped again
to 20 per cent in 2001.
Mr Regnier said that, as with
any people from a low socio-
economic background, many
.Haitians would have more than
one or two children but not with
the kind of frequency the doc-
tor's numbers would suggest.
"There is little planning
among the Haitian community
inasmuch as Haitians of a lower
socio-economic status, as with
other lower income persons
around the world, invariably
have a large number of children.
But in order to have a more
than 90 per cent, it would be a
mammoth.
"There are a number of expe-
rienced mid-wives in the com-
munity and, like any rural peo-
ple, Haitians are accustomed to
giving birth at home. They sup-
port themselves from many
angles and deal with it at home.
Some do use the hospital for
the final stages of childbirth,
however," he said


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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005


Militant acknowledges


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THE TRIBUNE


ref


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___eq


% dbh It mo sob


"Copyrighted Material...


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


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THE TRI^BBUNE THLOCALIHURSDYNEPTMBEE1,005WPAES1


Sears calls

for creativity

in classroom

* By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information
Services
FREEPORT Education
Minister Alfred Sears officially
opened a two-day teachers pro-
fessional seminar in Grand
Bahama on Monday evening
calling on teachers to encourage
more socialisation in schools and
become more creative in the
classroom.
The seminar, organised by
the Ministry of Education's
Grand Bahama district, brought
teachers together from through-
out Grand Bahama, Bimini and
the surrounding cays, and was
held at the Our Lucaya Resort.
The minister told educators
they should attempt to focus on
every child they come in contact
with, and he stressed the need
for creating a plan for every stu-
dent.
"In other words, why should
we begin with the presumption
that one size should fit all; not
everybody learns the same way.
Some people can learn by audi-
tory, others by visual,' he said.
Mr Sears said every student
should have some attention paid
to his or her rate of learning and
his or her specific needs.
He told the more than 300
educators assembled that a "one
size fits all" approach not only
leaves slower children behind,
but holds back gifted children as
well.
Ms Sears also had some
strong words about the upkeep
of schools.
He questioned how students
could be properly socialised
when some schools are dirty and
in disrepair.
"How do you socialise a peo-
ple to assume a sense of stew-
ardship for their own environ-
ment? The way the school looks
does not only reflect on the Min-
istry of Education; it reflects on
everybody in that school," he
said.
"I look at our country and I
see how we tend to abuse it; how
we are oblivious to the degrada-
tion of our environment. And it
means that as teachers, part of
socialising is developing this
sense of stewardship for the
school, for the environment and
for the country."
Mr Sears also called on teach-,
ers to be mindful of students
who may have suffered abuse in
one form or the other.
"And part of teaching must
involve rehabilitation; must
involve healing," he said.
SHe reminded teachers that
the very civilisation of the
Bahamas, and the very existence
of the Bahamas, depend upon
what they do every day in the
classroom.


Minister reveals



vision for new



education complex


* By DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
Services
WEST END, TOURISM
Minister Obie Wilchcombe
visited Grand Bahama to artic-
ulate his vision for a bold and
dynamic new educational com-
plex for the West End com-
munity.
Mr Wilchcombe said the
complex should include both a
primary school and a high
school, as well as a technical
school, an information tech-
nology school. track and field
facilities and a gymnasium.
Mr Wilchcombe,-who is the
MP for the area, presented the
optimistic scenario as he
addressed the first annual
'Operation Protect Our Chil-
dren Rally' held at the West
End primary school on Sun-
day.
The rally commemorated
the repairs done to the school
since last year's hurricanes,


and is one of several similar
functions being hosted by the
SMinistry of Social Services and
Community Development
across the Bahamas.
Mr Wilchcombe said his
vision for a new school com-
plex is important in light of the
current programme to give
West End and West Grand
Bahama the most substantial
economic uplift in 30 years.

Upliftment
He explained that the par-
ticipation of West Grand
Bahama's youth was a key
ingredient to the upliftment
project, and that therefore, it
would be necessary for them
to be academically and athlet-
ically among the best in the
Bahamas.
"It is for all of us to reach
deep down inside to give our
children a fair opportunity for
a wonderful life, having earned


Ministry of Tourism,
orts and Culture



NIGHTS


BAHA.


A full Authentically

Bahamian Cultural Revue


the education that is being pro-
vided for them free of charge.
"And that is why we must
stop and give our teachers a
rousing round of applause
when we can. There is a reason
for that.
"Teachers, coaches, are per-
haps the two most important
persons, more than anyone
else, particularly to young peo-
ple," he said.
Said the minister: "It is my
view that every young child
should have the opportunity
that I had, and even more
opportunities if they are going
to play the role they must
pila "". ...... .... .


WEST END PRIMARY Standing outside a section of the
West End Primary School where renovations are just about
complete in time for the reopening of the facility are (L-R)
Phillip Smith, chairman, West End Township Committee; Obie
Wilchcombe, Minister of Tourism and MP for West End and
Bimini; Betty McCartney, principal of Hugh Campbell prima-
ry school, Freeport; Hezekiah Dean, district superintendent,
Ministry of Education; and Debra Strachan, chief welfare offi-
cer, Department of Social Services, who was director of cere-
monies for Sunday's first annual 'Operation Protect Our Chil-
dren Rally' at West End.
(BIS photo by Vandyke Hepburn)






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T E 2 4 ) 2- 1I 6 7 5 M o n- S t.* I 6 u


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Do you have experience in Public Relations and Marketing
and want a career with an expanding, fast paced, financial
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If you are a good writer, creative thinker and have the ability
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PROFILE:
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Good communication and writing skills
Strong organizational skills
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Ability to create and manage database files
An understanding of market research
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Media clipping reports
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internal and external career development/training programmes.

Send resume no later than September 6th 2005 to:
The Human Resouce Manager
/ Fidelity
51 Frederick St.
I P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


FIDELI i TY


. ....:?Z. 44 4;* rI :ZYY r.I2


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 13








PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005 THE TRIBUNE


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I AM happy that I was
able to provide fellow-
'columnist Nicki Kelly with a
"lucid explanation" of what a
"D" means in the context of
the BGCSE.
I regret, however, that she
thought I was "making excuses
as to why a D is not really a
failing grade". I did no such
thing.
In fact, I wrote quite clearly
the following: "This is not a
matter of whether a D-grade is
good or not, it is understand-
ing how the grade was obtained
and what it means under the
BGCSE system."
That notwithstanding, if, as
Ms Kelly says, a D-grade will
not "cut it", she needs to take
that up with the professional
educators,'who set the grading
standards for the examinations,
among whom are those from
The University of Cambridge.
According to these profes-
sionals, a D-grade is a pass in
Both the GCE and the BGCSE.
Somehow, these professional
.educators and examiners, not
*me, determined that students
who score at a level that
achieves a D-grade have cut it
or have passed their exams.
Why they do so is for them to
explain but they set the stan-
dard.
Ms Kelly wrote that the fal-
lacy in my reasoning "is that
employers, conditioned to think
of test scores in very simplistic
terms, are not interested in dis-
secting a 'D' for its deeper
meaning. For them a 'D' rep-
resents a failing grade, and I
can assure Mr Laing that view
is shared by colleges and uni-
versities abroad."
I agree with Ms Kelly but not
that there is some fallacy in my
reasoning. I agree that employ-
ers think of grades in simplistic
terms. Ms Kelly, however,
seems interested in maintain-
ing the status quo of employ-
ers' simplistic and ignorant


STRAIGHT Up TALK


Z H I VA R


approach to assessing human
potential on the basis of a
flawed view of grades under the
BGCSE system.
I have no such interest and
it seems that some employers
do not. I received a number of
long distance calls from top
executives of a number of the
largest firms in the country
thanking me for my "lucid
explanation" of how the grad-
ing system under the BGCSE
works and pledging to make a
greater effort to take it into
account when assessing poten-
tial employees.
One of them even went so
far as to tell me that having
received two Ds on his GCE
exams and feeling demoralised
by the aspersion cast upon him
by those who considered his
passing grade a failure, he has
since gone on to become the
managing director of one of the
largest financial institutions in
The Bahamas. Who would have
thunk it?
Ours must be the business of
illuminating ignorance, not per-
petuating it. Even tertiary insti-
tutions are now trying to reach
out to students with only mar-
ginal academic scores because
research shows that academic
scores might not accurately
reveal college success.
Indeed, any number of stu-
dents turned down by one uni-
versity have gone on to excel
in another and even achieve
world-class expertise in their
chosen field of study while
many other students eagerly
accepted by certain universities
have failed miserably altogeth-
er.
At least if employers, col-
leges and universities under-
stand correctly what a grade
means they can better assess
whether the person with a cer-
tain grade meets their require-
ment or not.
Ms Kelly asked whether it
ever occurred to me that
despite having received the
English award on graduation
from high school, my English
was not as good as I thought it
was, or that I just happened not
to do well on that particular
exam.
I did consider it and I con-
cluded that perhaps my Eng-
lish was as good as the teacher
who gave me the award
thought it was and that the
exam that I took was laden
enough with cultural biases to
cheat me of points that might
have put me in Ms Kelly's more
acceptable C and above.
Ms Kelly also pointed out,


GO


LAING


rightly I might add, that it could
have been the case that my
speaking and writing talents
were honed over time through
practice. This only serves to
make my point further, which is
that grades do not always


sions tests put on it, IQ alone
explains surprisingly little of
achievement at workor in life.
When IQ test scores are corre-
lated with how well people per-
form in their careers, the high-
est estimate of how much dif-
ference IQ accounts for is'
about 25 per cent.
"A careful analysis, though,
suggests a more accurate fig-
ure may be no higher than 10
per cent, and perhaps as low as
four per cent." IQ tests are far
more rigorous than BGCSE


reflect a person's potential, so
that the student who gets a D-
grade, which does not cut it
according to some people,,
should not be condemned to a
life of failure.
They can improve at a skill
through practice and perhaps
if employers, colleges and uni-
versities recognise this more,
they might elevate human
achievement to new levels.
But alas, for many employ-
ers, colleges and universities,
what they do is about business
and in business time is money.
Who therefore has time to
spare trying to make the right
choice about human potential.
The "simplest" thing to do is
stare at a grade and weed out
those with "D" or less from
those with "C" and above.
One interesting thing that Ms
Kelly should take note of is that
research confirms that more
"C" and above students end up
working in the real world for
"C" or below students because
the latter become the entre-
preneurs of society.

Does this mean that
students should strive
to become "C" or below stu-
dents? Far from it but it does
mean that we might take anoth-
er look at what makes for suc-
cess in the real world and take
that into account when we
begin to talk about who cuts it
and who does not.
In fact, as author Daniel
Goleman pointed out in his
book Working with Emotional
Intelligence, "Given how much
emphasis schools and admis-


-exams. What then of BGCSE
grades being predictors of suc-
cess at work or in life?
Ms Kelly pointed out a num-
ber of interesting things in her
column in response to my com-
ments. However, none caught
my eyes or raised my ire like
her pointing to the tragic inci-
dent that occurred in Freeport
the other day involving the
shooting death of a young
mother.
Neither Ms Kelly or I were
present at the place where this
incident occurred and neither
of us know what circumstances
led to the shooting. We do not
know any of the persons
involved and it is simply a fail-
ure of good sense and common
decency to speculate under
those conditions.
The Bible says: "He who
answers a matter before lie
hears it, it is folly to him."
This notwithstanding, what
the heck does that incident
have to do with a D-grade? I
can take Ms Kelly today to teen.
mothers with A, B and C
grades in BGCSE whose lives
are spiralling out of control. I
can point her to A-students
around the world incarcerated
for some of the worst atrocities
of man's inhumanity to man.
There are college students
who, according to Ms Kelly,
"cut it" enough to be accepted
by those D-hating colleges, who
have been convicted of all man-
ner of crimes, including mur-
der, rape and armed robbery.
Indeed, there are highly intel-
ligent, academically accom-
plished, married people who
have been the victims or per-
petrators of terrible crimes. So
what is Ms Kelly's point, that
the 15-year-old, single mother
of a 10-month-old infatif found
her unfortunate demise because
she did not get better than a D-
grade? How ridiculously
absurd.
I know thousands of people
without GCEs, BGCSEs and
other academic qualifications
who are doing well in the work-
place and who are achieving
much in life. Some are my clos-
est friends and associates.
Ms Kelly invited me to tell
her what I think the chances
are of that infant of the 15-year-
old shot .to death achieving its
potential in the BGCSE or any-
thing else. Well I will tell her. I
live in a real world.
Today, I work with a young
man whose mother died when
he was ten years old and whose
father was accidentally shot to
death in his home when the
young man was six years old.
That young man has completed
college, is a dynamic youth pas-
tor of a successful church in
Freeport and has just authored
a book for which I wrote the
foreword.
If Ms Kelly wants to see this
young man's book she can to'
go www.xuldnpress.com and
check the online bookstore,
under recent titles and search'
for Dreams are Not Meant to,
Die. That is what I think that
child's potential is.
THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
The world of the arrogant
leaves little room for the hum;
ble to rise from the muck and
mire of their misfortunes.
zhivargolaing@hotnmail.co


on


"I received a number of long
distance calls from top executives
of a number of the largest firms in
the country thanking me for my
'lucid explanation' of how the
grading system under the BGCSE
works and pledging to make a
greater effort to take it into
account when assessing potential
employees."


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA TRBNNTUSAEWETMER120,SAE1


* PICTURED here is
team JP Morgan, winners
of the Rotaract Club's
first annual Charity Beach
Volleyball Tournament,
receiving their one-month
membership gift cards to
Bally Total Fitness.


Mi- w











"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




A-









4w W
a
~ii


p ^^^^?*




.- -




Family fitness



first at beach



volleyball event


tEk Rotaract Club of
Soitfeast Nassau Centen-
nial held its first annual
charity Beach Volleyball
Tournament with the help
of Bally Total Fitness in an
effort to encourage family
recreation and assist others
in the community.
Bally provided free mem-
berships to those willing to
give tleir time and test
their fitness level for a wor-
thy cause.
A Bally spokesman said
they decided to donate the
memberships as part of the
company's "continued
effort to promote health
and fitness throughout the
communities of New Provi-
dence and the Bahamas."
The event was held at the
Rock 'n' Roll grounds,


Cable Beach.
General Manager at Bally
Brian Goudie said he was
happy that his company
could help in making the
event a success.

Healthy
"We at Bally were more
than happy to assist in such
a worthy cause that not
only involved people par-
ticipating in a healthy activ-
ity like playing volleyball
but also raised funds for a
service organisation that
continues to help many
Bahamians," Mr Goudie
said.
All funds raised by the
beach volleyball tourna-
ment will go directly into


THE PLACE TO
T O M .:''* KS-" -.*''' ' '


community programmes
currently being planned by
the Rotaract Club, includ-
ing: The construction of
wheelchair ramps, the pro-
motion of Bahamian cul-
tural awareness and support
for the Bahamas Red Cross
youth department.
Team JP Morgan won the
charity beach volleyball
tournament and each player
received a one month mem-
bership to Bally Total Fit-
ness.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


'


_ -i.,oIY Cot I vtjo


trwujjki








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005

A .Yig


PROMOTIOiNAL PARTNERS:


a


~









THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Real estate boom





sparks price fear


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
A RECENT surge in the
number of foreign investors
buying prime pieces of real
estate in the Freeport/Lucaya
area has left some realtors con-
cerned that Bahamians may be
priced out of the market, with
interest from Florida buyers
having increased by 35 per cent
over the last few years.
Other realtors, though, are
arguing that prices are rising at
an acceptable rate, and that the
income derived from construc-
tion and retail activity generat-
ed by these new resident has
helped improve the well-being
of Grand Bahamians.
"They have basically put the
real estate market in Grand
Bahama out of the reach of
average Bahamians, because
eight years ago, canal front
property in the Pine Bay area
was going for $20,000 to
$30,000. The market went up
to $120,000 and has now
dropped. to. $&0,000," said
Charles Frith, a broker with
Bay Shore Realty.
"In the Fortune Bay area,
canal-front properties, 125 x
150, are on the marketfor
$175,000 to $265,000, depend-
ing on their location to Spanish


Main, which is a beach
front/canal front community,
like a millionaires row."
Mr Frith said there has been
a sharp increase in the number
of investors, particularly from
Florida, interested in purchas-
ing land for timeshare resorts,
second home developments
and condominium projects.
He was currently putting
together a proposal for a group
looking to build second homes
or a timeshare facility on an
. island in the Bahamas, similar
to the Grand Isle Villas resort
in Exuma.

Increasing
Mr Frith said property prices
in Grand Bahama were rapidly
increasing to the same level in
Nassau, largely because there
were more foreigners buying
canal front real estate than
Bahamians.
In some areas, he said, beach
front property in Freeport starts
at about $460,000. In areas such
as Spanish Main and Princess
Isle, property is being priced at
a minimum of $980,000, with
some lots going for as much as
$2 million.
Property in the West and
East End communities of
Grand Bahama remains rela-
tively less.expensive. Howev-


er, with rumours of the Ginn
Development Corporation's
project finally getting approval,
as well as the construction of
the Grand Bahama Film Stu-
dios and the Bootle Bay pro-
ject in West End, real estate
prices are beginning to move
up.
Calling it a matter of supply
and demand, Mr Frith said
long-time property owners in
those areas were now looking
to get a return on their invest-
ment.
To demonstrate the rise in
the cost of real estate, he said a
canal front property located in
Bahamia that was purchased
for $34,500 in 1987, is now on
the market for $120,000.
The increase in the value of
the property has the potential
to give the owner a substantial
return on their investment. If
the owner had put the same
amount $34,5000 in the bank
and received even a 5 per cent
return on their savings account,
they would have received some
$36,000 -$37,000 in interest over
the same 18-year period.
But Mr Frith said the value
of their property investment
grossed them some $44,000
more than they would have
made if they had put the money
in the bank.
While the escalating cost of
real estate may be cause for


concern for some, Lanelle
Phillips, regional sales manager
for H.G. Christie Real Estate,
with responsibility for Bimini,
Andros, Grand Bahama and
the Berry Islands, disagrees
with that position.

Economy
"Grand Bahama has so much
available land. We don't feel
foreign confidence in buying on
this island affects us in that way,
if anything it's the exact oppo-
site. The more people that eat
in our restaurants, that use
Bahamian contractors and shop
in our retail stores, the more
money put in the economy,"
she said.
"The price of real estate is
increasing, but not at a rate that
Bahamians can't afford to buy.
The prices in Grand Bahama
are more affordable than Nas-
sau, Abaco and Exuma. The
average person in Hope Town,
maybe they own a piece of
property, but they can't afford
to build. Our building costs are
low, and the land costs are low-
er than some of the more pop-
ular islands. It's a great place
for young Bahamians to look
for land, get a job, and have.
that mobility and a better way
SEE page 7B1


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
THE Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities'
Exchange's (BISX) chief
executive yesterday told
The Tribune that the
exchange was "pushing"


.Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) to address the
issues raised by the audi-
tors' qualification of its
2004 financial results, with
the company being "moni-
tored on an ongoing basis".

SEE page 7B


US investor

pleads guilty to

.$20m Bahamas


based fraud
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ANOTHER crook who abused the Bahamian financial
services sector has pled guilty to 18 counts each of mail
fraud and wire fraud, charges relating to a $20 million
investment scam that lost a large chunk of investor funds
when two Nassau-based banks were liquidated.
T. Gene Gilman, 62, also pled guilty to criminal charges
brought against him that he violated the US Investment
Adviser Act, when he appeared before the Massachusetts
District Court.
Sentencing
A release from the court said Gillman faced sentencing
on November 8, and possible fines of $9 million in addition
to jail time.
Meanwhile, the Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) is pursuing a civil action against Gillman in relation
to the same scheme, which it alleged used a Bahamian-
incorporated International Business Company (IBC) as the
central cog in a plan that
defrauded investors of SEE page 2B




Enforcement, not


more committees,


for work permits


Nassau cruise visitors down 6.4% irstalf


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business editor
CRUISE ship passengers calling in at
Nassau/Paradise Island declined by 6.4 per
cent for the first six months in 2005, drop-
ping from more than one million visitors a
year ago to 966,485, according to Ministry
of Tourism data.
Statistics for the half year to June 2005
showed that cruise arrivals to the Bahamas


were down across.the board, with the num-
ber of passengers stopping at the cruise
lines' private islands in the Family Islands
falling by 5 per cent year-on-year to
590,487, compared to 621,720.
Grand Bahama, which is still suffering
from the after-effects of the 2004 hurri-
canes, suffered the greatest decline in
cruise ship visitor numbers by first port of
entry, declining by 17.4 per cent year-on-
year to 147,253.


'Although arrivals numbers do not tell
the whole story, per capita spending by
both cruise and stopover visitors in the
Bahamas perhaps being a better indicator
of the tourism industry's performance and
attractiveness, the decline in both cruise
and air arrivals is again likely to cause con-
cern that this nation is not growing as


SEE page 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A LEADING opponent of
the Financial Services Consul-
tative Forum's immigration
report has disagreed with Civ-
il Society Bahamas' call for a
new committee to approve
work permit renewals, but
backed its demand for "greater
enforcement and follow
through" of existing regulations
to combat permit abuses.
Paul Moss, managing direc-
tor of Dominion Management
Services, a Bahamian financial


services provider, said the pro-
posal for a committee com-
prising representatives of the
Government, trade unions and
the private sector to vet and
approve work permit renewals,
so that Bahamians were not
deliberately deprived of jobs,
would only add red tape and
bureaucracy to the process.
But he backed Civil Society.
Bahamas' calls for better appli-
cation of existing immigration
laws and regulations as the
"starting point" in dealing with


SEE page 8B


a SI


M KEITH DAVIES


BISX



pushingg'



Colina


--- --


I I















Stopping computer


worms


in


their tracks


W hat do
Nimda,
Code Red,
Sasser and
Zotob all
have in common? These are
all computer worms, which
have inflicted literally billions
of dollars in damage and lost
productivity worldwide, infect-
ing millions of computers in
small and large organisations
such as CNN, British Airways,
the New York Times, Finnish
banks, government offices in
Hong Kong, and even local
businesses in the Bahamas.
With such large organisa-
tions being impacted, I'm not
surprised that most businesses
are left feeling like it's just a
matter of time before they,
too, become infected. After
all, if the big companies can-
not seem to protect them-
selves, how can anyone else?
The truth is, however, that
Nimda, Code Red, Sasser and
Zotob could all have been
stopped in their tracks. I
know it's hard to believe, but


in each of these cases, security
warnings were issued and
patches made available sever-
al months before these worms
struck.
So what can you do to pro-
tect your computer systems
against worm attacks? In this
article, I will share with you
some of the key steps to take
in order to prevent your com-
pany from being added to the
long list of those infected by
worms.
What is a Worm?
The first step in preventing
worm attacks is to understand
what a worm is and how it
goes about infecting your
computer systems.
In the simplest of terms, a
worm is a program just like
Word, Excel or QuickBooks.
Unlike these useful tools,
however, a worm's intentions
are malicious, resulting in data
loss, data theft or system fail-
ure. Unlike a computer virus,
which spreads by attaching
itself to programs and files it


comes into contact with, a
worm spreads by exploiting
known vulnerabilities or
'holes' in your computer's
operating system to copy itself
on to your computer. E-mail
and computer networks, such
as the Internet, provide an
easy means for the worm to
rapidly copy itself from one
computer to the next, and thus
inflict damage on a global
scale.
The Key to Prevention
Based on your knowledge


of how a worm spreads, it
should be clear that the key
to preventing worm attacks is
to identify vulnerabilities or
'holes' in your computer's
operating system and patch
them well before a teenager
halfway around the world cre-
ates a worm to exploit it.
Fortunately, operating sys-
tem developers such as
M i c r o s o f t
(www.microsoft.com) and
Apple (www.apple.com), in
co-operation with security
organisations such as CERT


support of our scheduled service between
the Turks & Caicos Islands and the Bahamas.
Travelers have benefited like never before from
our premium service and we look forward to


Call your travel professional for reservations and tickets


(www.cert.org), continue to
do a very good job in identi-
fying vulnerabilities, alerting
the public and making patches
available on a timely basis.
However, it is up to you or
your network administrator to
download and apply these
patches, and this is where
most organisations, large and
small, fall down.
Steps to Take
The three most important
steps you can take to prevent
worms therefore, are (1)
automate patching, (2) auto-
mate patching and (3) auto-
mate patching.
I cannot overstate the
importance of making sure
that patches are applied to
your computer systems as
soon as they are available..
And the only way you can
ensure that this is indeed hap-
pening is to automate the
process.
Fortunately, there are a
number of effective patch
management solutions for
both small and large organi-
sations, and if you are running
a version of Microsoft Win-
dows there are two tools that
you or your IT provider can
deploy free of charge.
The first tool is best for
standalone PCs or small net-
works, and is known as Auto-
matic Updates. Built into
Windows XP and Windows
2003 Server operating systems,
and available as a free down-
load for earlier versions of
Windows, Automatic Updates
keeps individual computers


FROM page 1B

about $14 million.
The SEC said: "From
November 1998 through Octo-
ber 2003, Gilman was associ-
ated with Arbor Securities, a
purported IBC that was incor-
porated in the Bahamas and
headquartered in Needham,
Massachusetts, and operated
as an unregistered broker/deal-
er and investment adviser..........
Gilman owned and controlled
Arbor Securities."
The SEC lawsuit against
Gilman alleged that funds
belonging to customers of
Arbor Securities were illegally
diverted to accounts at two
Bahamian banks, Surety Bank
& Trust and Americas Inter-
national Bank Corporation,
and these were lost when both
institutions were put into liq-
uidation.
The SEC alleged that
between December 1998 and
October 2003, "without any-
one advising his customers and
contrary to representations
made to them, [Mr Gilman's
son] deposited customer funds
into Arbor Securities accounts
at three small foreign banks
based in the Bahamas and
Antigua & Barbuda".
Surety
The two Bahamas-based
banks were named as Surety
Bank & Trust and Americas
International Bank Corpora-
tion (AIBC).
The SEC lawsuit added:
"Surety Bank & Trust and
Americas International Bank
Corporation went into liquida-
tion in 2000 and 2001 respec-
tively, and Arbor Securities
customers' funds were lost in
connection with the liquida-
tion."
Both banks have somewhat


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controversial reputations,
although they have not been
accused of wrongdoing in the
Arbor Securities case.
Liquidation

Surety Bank & Trust's liqui-
dation raised $3.7 million for
creditors of Evergreen Securi-
ty, the $214 million mutual
fund that became a giant
'Ponzi' scheme. Evergreen
Security's president alleged
that two Surety Bank & Trust
directors, Thomas Spencer and
Robert Boyd, had stolen $3.6
million from the fund to pur-
chase shares in the bank.
The Tribune reported yes-
terday that Mr Boyd had been
sentenced to 37 months in
prison, and ordered to pay $124
million in restitution, for his
role in the Evergreen Security
debacle.
His conviction, and Mr
Gilman's guilty plea, under-
score that the Bahamas still has.
some way to go in ensuring its
financial services industry and
products and company vehicles
it incorporates cannot be
abused by dubious foreigners.
Meanwhile, Americas Inter-
national Bank Corporation
(AIBC) was moved from a vol-
untary liquidation to a court-
supervised liquidation in 2001.
The bank, which was run by
Gary Christie, the Prime Min-
ister's brother, had been "in
financial straits" for some time,
with liabilities exceeding its
assets.
And Clifford Culmer,
AIBC's liquidator, previously
told The Tribune that some
AIBC clients had used the
bank as a vehicle to launder

SEE page 4B


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THE TRIBUNE


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Downtown Nassau

<*rklm~r1^vtf m~n1 .-f ---i ^^^


IaILddVw SfIJlIILn





address flooding


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
T he Nassau
Tourism Devel-
opment Board's
(NTDB) chair-
man, Charles
Klonaris, said yesterday that
the excessive flooding experi-
enced along parts of Bay
Street on Tuesday, and the
potential for serious damage
and losses to businesses, was a
high priority that will be
addressed in the downtown
redevelopment plans.
"Those stores where the
water is extremely high, they
have a right to complain; these
drains should be looked into,"
Mr Klonaris said.
"It's really a matter of the
proper function of the city,
where you don't have the
excess of overflowing water.
It is part of the redevelopment
plans. Those areas where
there is excessive flooding, it
will be and is a high priority
for both EDAW and the Gov-
ernment. If you look deeper
into the problem more may
be needed than drainage."
Drainage

Mr Klonaris told The Tri-
bune that the Ministry of
Works was looking into the
situation to see whether the
drainage system that usually
carried water into the harbour



FROM page 1B

rapidly as its main Caribbean
and global competitors.
For June 2005 alone, total
cruise passenger arrivals by first
port of entry fell by 14.5 per
cent on average for the entire
Bahamas.
Dropping

In Nassau/Paradise Island,
total cruise arrivals fell by 16.5
per cent in June, dropping from
148,211 a year ago to 123,700.
The Family Islands saw a 7.2
per cent decline in total cruise
passenger arrivals to 74,965,
while Grand Bahama saw a


was partially blocked with
debris.
At present, all that can be
done is the temporary clean-
ing and clearing of the drains,
but to solve the problem, Mr
Klonaris said, would likely
require downtown Nassau's
redevelopment. The NTDB
chairman said he expected
some type of movement in
regard to the masterplan for
the redevelopment by the end
of September.

Extensive

On Tuesday, an early after-
noon storm caused water to
rise in the streets of New
Providence, with several areas
experiencing extensive flood-
ing. Some stores along Shirley
and Bay Streets locked their
doors, and in some cases
placed boards in front of them
to keep the water out.
Mr Klonaris said that when
it began raining he walked
along Bay Street, and found
the sidewalks were covered in
water within 15 to 20 minutes,
likely to have been caused by
the drainage system not being
cleared. This created a situa-
tion that made it difficult for
pedestrians, both tourists and
Bahamians, to manoevere
through the area.
The areas that seemed to be.
the most affected by the heavy
rains and flooding were the
cross section of Elizabeth
Avenue and Bay Street, and
the northern side of Charlotte


22.7 per cent fall to just 26,164.
Arrivals

On the air arrivals and by
extension stopover visitor
side, June proved to be a better
month for the Bahamas, with
air arrivals for the entire nation
up by 5.9 per cent on the 2004
comparative at 149,025.
For June, air arrivals to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were up
14.2 per cent, breaking the
100,000 barrier at 102,818.
However, this was not good
enough to counteract the
decline in cruise passenger


Street.
At Athena's Greek Restau-
rant, located on the intersec-
tion of Bay and Charlotte
Street north, general manager
Peter Mousis did not see the
heavy rains and the tempo-
rary flooding of the sidewalk
as a problem.
He said that the downpour
was needed and welcome,
even, because it helped to
clean Bay Street of all the
trash that had gathered there.
Across the street, June Hall,
manager of luxury goods bou-
tique Fendi, said when there
was torrential rain, "the water
rushes down from the top of
Charlotte Street like a river".
She said that while the store
does not usually experience
any flooding, it closes the
doors to prevent any 'unwant-
ed guests' from coming in and,
once the rain stops, the water
clears pretty quickly.
Customers

At Coles of Nassau on Bay
Street,. sales associate Sarah
Dean said that during heavy
rains, the water level tended to
come up to the door, but the
floods never seemed to stem
the tide of customers at the
boutique.
She said that, as might be
expected, sometimes people
stopped in the store for shelter
from the rains and browsed
around. Ms Dean added that
in general, the tourists did not
seem to be bothered by the


arrivals.
Elsewhere, other islands
showing an increase in air
arrivals were Abaco, up 1 per
cent; the Berry Islands, which
were ahead of 2004 by 57 per
cent; Cat Cay, which was ahead
10 per cent; Cat Island, up 36
per cent; Eleuthera, ahead by 9
per cent; Exuma, up 32 per
cent; and Inagua, up 36 per
cent.

Surprisingly
However, Grand Bahama,
not surprisingly, led the islands
that were down on the June
2004 comparative, with air
arrivals there off 23 per cent.
For Andros, air arrivals were
down 7 per cent; Bimini was
off by 6 per cent; Long Island
down by 9 per cent; and San
Salvador down by 10 per cent.


water.
In a previous interview with
The Tribune, director of works
and utilities, Melanie Roach,
said that despite the flooding
there was no significant prob-
lem with the drainage system
in New Providence.

Simply

She said Nassau's drains
worked but that water simply
took time to run off.
"We are a low-lying, heavi-
ly built-up area. And there
are, of course, some chal-
lenges, but nothing major,"
Ms Roach said.
"We are, however, con-
stantly upgrading. It's an
ongoing battle. Downtown,
especially, we have had some
problems with people clogging
up our drains with all kinds of
things, sometimes even hook-
ing up their septic tanks to our
well systems."
Every new building that is
constructed was also said to
add to the difficulties with
drainage pipes being blocked
off by, cables and other utility
pipes.
"Many times we end up
having to re-route our pipes,"
she added.


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
31 Auiust 2005

S2wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Pruvious Close Today' Close Change Daly VoL EPS $ Dlv $ PIE Yield
1.10 0.80 Abaco Markets 0.80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 NIM 0.00%
9.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9050 9.50 0.00 1.452 0.340 6.5 3.58%
.90 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 8.90 8.90 0.00 0.561 0.330 12.3 4.78%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0,00 0.00 0.187 0.010 4.3 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.126 0.060 11.1 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
8.81 6.90 Cable Bahamas 8.80 8.80 0.00 500 0.618 0.240 14.2 2.73%
2:20 1.69 Colina Holdings 1.869 1.69 0.00 4,698 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.00 9.07 0.07 11,431 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.52%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.7 0.00%
.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.81 9.25 Flinco 10.60 10.60 0.00 0.695 0.500 15.3 4.72%
9.50 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.895 0.380 13.7 4.00
9.00 8.31 Focol 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.-675 0.500 13.3 5.56
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.3 42.
8.50 8.25 J.S. Johnson 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.561 0.560 15.2 6.59
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.70 5.70 0.00 0.122 0.000 47.6 0.00
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.760 5.0 7.60
2wk-Hi 2wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Lst Price Weekl Vol. EPS Dv $ PE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdn 290 90.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.8 6.93
0.60 0.35 RND Holdin g 0.29 0.54 0.35- 0 .000 NM 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months DIV $ Yield %
1.2496 1.1822 Colina Money Market Fund 1.249581"
2.3810 2.0131 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.381 |*
10.4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4855*" **
2.2638 2.1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.263627"**
1.1273 1.0576 Colins Bond Fund 1.127305* j

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing prior
52wk-HI Highest closing price in fast 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colins and Fidelit|
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and lldelitI
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter pdorice
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to dai EPS $ A company's reported eamings per share for he st 12 mintt
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamingt FINEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 10(
- AS AT JUL. 31, 20051 -AS ATJUL 31. 2006
-AS AT AUGUST 26, 20061 AS AT JULY 31,20061~ AS AT JULY 31, 200f
imn. -AL


Second Senior Officer

A progressive offshore bank with an unrestricted bank
and trust licence is looking to engage a capable
individual to fill the position of Second Senior Officer
as required by the Guidelines on Minimum Physical
Presence of the Central Bank of The Bahamas.

The individuals must meet the following qualifications:
* Minimum of FIVE (5) years employment in a senior
capacity with a licensed financial institution;
Ability to take charge of the entire back-office
administration of our institution;
Experience liaising with The Central Bank of the
Bahamas;
Familiarity with AML and KYC procedures
Highly organized
University degree required, post-graduate degree
preferred;
Knowledge of Canadian income tax and business
practices
Computer literacy is required

We offer a flexible work schedule with very desirable
job benefits and a very satisfying work atmosphere.
Salary is commensurate with experience and is
negotiable. We are an equal opportunity employer and
do not discriminate on the basis of gender, age, race
or religion. We prefer to hire Bahamians but will
consider hiring a non-Bahamian if they have the right
credentials.

Please reply in confidence via email to:
SecondSeniorOfficer@Yahoo.com


*-O Atlaintic Medi cal


Atlantic Medical Insurance of ices n Freeport

and Nassau will be CLOSED
to the general public on


FRIDAY September 2nd, 2005 for our
Annual Staff Fun Day


For the verification of benefits please use our FaxBack
service by dialing #328-2031

AFTER-HOURS back-up #457-3539


We will reopen on Monday September 5th @ 8:30 a.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

Please be advised that medical providers will still be able to obtain benefit verification.


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
P.O. Box N-4378'
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Kingsway Academy High School

invites qualified applicants for the following positions
immediately.

Art and Design
Business Studies
Librarian/ Media Specialist
Bible/ Christian Values (Needed for one semester)

SSuccessful applicants must:
Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
Have minimum qualifications of a Bachelor's
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from a recognized college or university
Have a valid teacher's certicate or diploma where
appropriate
Be willing to participate in extra curricular activities,
etc.

Applications must be made in writing together with full
curriculum vitae, a recent color photograph and names of
at least three references, one being that of your church Pastor
to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O.Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas

For further information, please contact the Business Office
at Telephone numbers 324-6269 or 324-6887.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS THURSDAY,
September 1, 2005


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,'2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE













Local realtor finishes




listings course held by




US-based Council of




Residential Specialists
_^< _^^ ^- ^^j| ^^^ ^^^^^^^^~~~ ~ ~~~~K e^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^S:;::;^:^!^^^^


* ZACK BONCZEK


PARADISE Real Estate's
sales manager, Zack Bonczek,
has completed a course on
obtaining and servicing real
estate listings that was held by
the US-based Council of Res-
idential Specialists (CRS), part
of the National Association of
Realtors (NAR).
Qualify
The class was held at the
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort, and is one of the
required courses that must be
taken by real estate agents and
brokers to qualify for the cov-
eted Certified Residential
Specialist (CRS) designation.
The course included tech-


FROM page 2B

funds obtained from fraudu-
lent schemes. No accusations,
though, have been made
against Mr Christie, the bank's
directors, officers or share-
holders.
Also named in the SEC law-
suit was Alliance Investment
Management, a Bahamas-
based broker/dealer, as Arbor
Securities allegedly established
a brokerage account with it
using its customers' funds.
This was allegedly done
"without anyone [at Arbor]
advising the customers and
contrary to representations
made to them".
The SEC further claimed
that while Arbor Securities did
not use the account it opened


niques in seller counselling,
pricing, client servicing activi-
ties, marketing techniques and
other programmes designed
to close sales on residential
properties.
Complex
"Today's real estate market
is more complex then ever
before and the listing process
has become the key in the
movement of residential prop-
erties," said Mr Bonczek.
"This course provided me
with new input to enable me
to serve both buyers and sell-
ers of residences more effec-
tively."


to trade securities, it ordered
Alliance Investment Manage-
ment to deposit its customers'
funds in foreign bank accounts.
Alliance Investment Man-
agement is registered with the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas as a broker/dealer,
and is owned by Benchmark
(Bahamas), the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) listed company.
Again, Alliance Investment
Management is not named as a
defendant in the SEC or crim-
inal cases, and there is nothing
to suggest that its staff, former
owners or Benchmark
(Bahamas) have done anything
wrong in relation to Arbor
Securities.


To advertM ise! 'in ThelI' iiimsei

I cal 322-986


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RENE, WILMER TIBE, #36 WISTERIA
ROAD, P.O.BOX F-43800, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1ST
day of SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.


Receptionist/ Typist

Business Office has an immediate Opening for a
Receptionist & Typist. The successful candidate must
possess exceptional telephone etiquette, good attitude,
ability to work independently or as team; with a minimum
typewriting skill of 60 wpm; and about Two Year Office
experience .w/excellent communications and Computer
Skills; and be proficient in use of Windows XP or 2000
environment; particularly w/ software such as M.S. Word,
Excel and Quickbooks.

This position is not limited to Bahamians only

Please Fax Resume to 394-4458


NOTICE


The immediate family members of Mr.
Clarence Ferguson, Mr. Garnet KnoWles,
and Mr. Arlington Brown Jr., deceased
employees of The Bahamas Electricity
Corporation are kindly asked to contact
the Human Resources Department, at
telephone numbers 302-1303, 302-1304
or 302-1720 urgently.


FINTER BANK & TRUST. (BAHAMAS) LIMITED



FINTER BANK & TRUST (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, is presently seeking to
recruit a suitably qualified Individual to fill the position of

BACK OFFICE / SECURITIES ADMINISTRATION

Requirements for the post:
Several years experience in the field of securities
administration, execution of payments, deposits, foreign
exchange and coupon transaction, etc.
Reconciliation of custody / bank accounts
familiar with SWIFT
extensive PC knowledge
The successful candidate should:
be highly self-motivated
be a team-player
work Independently and reliable

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume, with
coyer letter and references, to:
Human Resources
Finter Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Umited
P.O. Box N-9932
Nassau, Bahamas


ESSO is looking for Talented Candidates to fill the following position.
The successful candidate will receive Exceptional Career Development.

OPERATIONS ENGINEER

Role,

Achieve success and flawless execution iq Terminal Operations through
managing operations personnel on a day to day basis. Responsible for
product receipt, storage and distribution and all operations related to
them. Ensure terminal activities are carried out safely and in accordance
with Esso's standards and government regulations at an acceptable cost
and at an extraordinary service level.

NECESSARY SKILLS:

- Bachelor's Degree in Engineering (Industrial, Electrical or Mechanical)
or Related Fields
- 4 5 Years of experience in areas of study
- Strong Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills
- Cognitive/Technical/Business Knowledge
- Must possess Analytical Thinking, Innovation, and Sound Judgement
- Commitment to High Standards
- Result Oriented, Committed, with Drive and Perseverance
- Exercises Influence Demonstrates Self Confidence and Personal Impact
- Demonstrates Leadership

If you fulfill the position requirements, please send your resume by email -
to linam.rodriuez@exaonmobil.com.


CRAFT APPRENTICES
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL

Vacancies exist in the Corporation for Craft Apprentices. Craft Apprentices are
trained to become Electrical and Mechanical Craftsman. Upon successful
completion of the programme, candidates will be assigned to New Providence
and Family Island Operations.

To qualify as a Craft Apprentice the following criteria amongst other things
should be met:

Must be between 18 and 25 years

Have a minimum of five (5) BJC's including Maths, English Language
and General Science with grades of "C" or better or

Preferably, persons recruited from the Family Islands should be a resident of
that island. Once the formal training has been completed, Apprentices will be
returned to their respective island.
Application forms can be collected from our offices located at BEC's Head
Office located at Blue Hill & Turker Roads, Nassau Bahamas. Family Island
applicants can also collect these forms from their locAl BEC office. Applications
should be returned duly completed with all of the supporting documentation
to The Manager, Human Resources, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas,
on or before Friday, September 2, 2005.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, SEPTREMBER 1, 2005, PA,. oo


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill overlooking the
Atlantic Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of two apartments.
One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom
one bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden porch
approximately 8 6 feet wide on the upper level secured with a
wooden handrail. The garage area has been converted into a
efficiency apartment and now houses one bedroom/frontroom in
one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could
be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency rented
at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00



MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft.,
above sea level but below road level and would flood in a severe
hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft partly of
wood and partly of cement blocks with one section virtually finished
and occupied with blocks up to window level and floor ready to
be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls and ceiling
are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles: The finished work
is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath, living/dining. The occupied
portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00


HAMILTON'S
(LONG ISLAND)

Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house of
solid concrete floors, foundation column and belt course with
finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen, dining,
and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft., utilities available
are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00






EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200
sq. ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.
Appraisal: $141,716.40


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex with a floor
area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section consist of a master
bedroom, bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms,
one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and
two efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning
on flat land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's
Extension Road, just over one hundred feet north of the roadway
known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road, turn left
onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the
deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction
and turn left, then first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN
(ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area for
a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of the
Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest Drive
to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and on the
lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and
L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft.,
2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet
rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.


Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then
1st right, house is second on your right with garage.



LOT #17237 BAHAMA
SOUND NO. 18
(EXUMA)

All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq. ft. being lot #17237
of Bahama Sound of Exuma no. 18 said subdivision is situated
on the southern side of Queen's Highway about 2 miles northwest
of Georgetown. This property comprises of a 25 year old single
storey single family residence.

Appraisal: $110,250.00

This property is located on the southeast side of Periwinkle Lane,
about 100 ft east of the junction of Periwinkle and Zareba Circle.


NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft.
(77.5 x-100) situated in the.southern district of New Providence,
being lot No. 3 in an areakRnown as Richville of Malcoli Road
west...This property; is spacious and: can, probably accommodate,
another house at the rear, It is landscaped and enclosed bya wall
in front with fence on the side. The property consist of a single
story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room and dining rooms,
combined, family room and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof
covered front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then
third corner on the right, the house is the 4th on the left painted


LOT #127 WINTON MEDOWS
(NASSAU)

All that Lot of Land Having an area of 8,000 sq. ft. being lot #127
Knollwood Drive of the Subdivision known as Winton Meadows,
Situated in the eastern district of New Providence this property is
.' comprised of a*7 yr old single family residence consisting of
approximately 2,149 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 4 bedrooms,
2 1/2 bathrooms, living, dining room and kitchen. There is 619 sq.
..-. s ~ft. dirveway and a 125 sq. ft. patio at the rear and an enclosed 2
car garage also included. The land is on a grade and level and
appear to be sufficiently elevated to dissallow flooding during
annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept with fairly
maintained lawn and low shrubs. Yard is not enclosed.

Appraisal: $275,747.43

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just before Winton Super Value (Jasmin Drive), then 2nd
corner right (Knollwood Road) drive all the way around the curve the subject property is the 4th property left green trimmed
white.


LOT #15 BLOCK #2 WINTON HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land haivng an approximate area of 18,647 sq. ft.
being lot # 15, block #2. The lot is a corner lot and is odd shaped
and is situated at the southeast comer of Culbert's Hill and Spencer's
Close, this property is comprised of a 2 storey residence with
ground floor consisting of foyer, living room, dining room, a guest
sutie, family room (equipped island cook top and walk in pantry),
breakfast nook, laundry room, storage room and a 2 car garage
and back pation. The upper floor consists of the master suite that
includes a bathroom and a walk-in closet. The floor throughout
are ceramic tiled except the bedrooms, This house equipped with
central air and burglar bars the house is well laid out and tastefully
decoroated. Also numerous cracks were observed in the southern
walls of the bedrooms upstairs.
Appraisal: $502,236.73

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive to corner on the left just before Winton Super Value (Culbert Hill), travel north on
Culbert Hill to the 4th corner right, (Spencer's Close), said house is #55 on the corner beige trim pink.


(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft. being lot no 7 of
the subdivision known as Millars Heights subdivision situated in
l the south western district of new Providence. This property Is
comprised of a 7 year old single family/multi family single storey
duplex consisting of approximately 1,533 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area inclusive of living room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms
: and 1 bathroom. Both apartments have a wall unit in one bedroom.
The building is well maintained and has an effective age of 3 years.
The land is on flat terrain and appear to be sufficiently elevated
S* above road to disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods.
.. The grounds are fairly maintained and site Improvements includes
a grass lawn with fruit trees and a concrete paved driveway leading
to the carport. The yard Is open along the front with its back and
side boundaries enclosed with chain link fencing.

Appraisal: $231,806.40,

Traveling west along Carmichael Road, take the third corner left after the Carmicheal Road Police Station then the first
right then first left again which is Margaret Street the subject property is the third property left painted white trim green
with green doors.



LOT NO 220 TWYNAM HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

-_1N.All that lot of land having an area of 9,595 sq. ft. being lot 220 of
the subdivision known as Twynam Heights, situated in the eastern
district of New Providence this property is comprised of a single
family residence consisting of approximately 2,880 sq. ft. of enclosed
living area inclusive of porch, foyer, living room, dining room, kitchen,
breakfast room, family room, study utility, room, powder room, three
bedrooms, three bathrooms and double garage. Ventilation includes
central air conditioning the land is on a grade and level and appear
to be sufficiently elevated above road to disallow flooding during
annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with fairly
maintained lawn and low shrubs, yard enclosed with low wall with
open drive way and walkway in front.

Appraisal: $238,400.00
Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just after Winton Super Value, take 1 st corner left the first
left again, the subject property is the is the 4th property. left painted yellow trim white opposite unpainted house on the
right.


BAHAMA PALM SHORES
(ABACO)

Lot #27, Block #26, 80 x 125 being section 4, at Bahama Palm
Shore, 6 miles, southwest of Cherokee Sound and 18 miles south
of the township of Marsh Harbour. The land is situated on Ocean
View Drive. It is one of the better elevated lots in the subdivision
having an excess of 30ft above sea level, but have no view of the
sea, but is about 1,800 feet from the public beach. This property
is comprised of a single storey residence with Bermuda Style Roof
containing a large living and dining area split level, with kitchen in
the corner. Three bedrooms and two bathrooms, this building is
approximately 7 years old.
Appraisal: $233,000.00


LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION
,l(NASSAU)
All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194
of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the central
district of New Providence this property is comprised of a 35 year
old single family, single story residence encompassing approximately
1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living area and inclusive of separate living
and dining rooms, and an average size kitchen, three bedrooms,
two bathrooms and an entry porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft.
ventilation Is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade
and level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting
of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone
walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and a
wrought iron gate in front there Is a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway
leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site
also has a concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately
143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $126,000.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right, (Roland Ave.)
the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim.




LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 15,403 sq. ft.
being lot 172 In the subdivision known as Blair Estates, this property
is comprised of a single family split level resident consisting of
approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with three
Si bedrooms, two bathrooms, on the second level and on the first a
living and dining room, kitchen, utility room, family room, bathroom,
4 an office, a rear uncovered porch, a covered door entry, walkway
and a driveway. Also located on the first level in a 616 sq. ft. one
bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room, rental unit. The
building is in excellent condition with recent renovation done, there
is no signs of structural defects or termite infestation the building
is adequately ventilated with central air conditioning installed on
the second floor and in the rental unit the land Is rectangular in
shape and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to
disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block
wall and fence enclosure on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.

Appraisal: $642,222.00


Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner right Into Blair Estates (St Andrews Drive).
Drive to the t-junction and make a left which is Commonwealth Street, continue traveling to the 7th corner which Is Clarence
Street then drive to Richmonid Road and make a right. The subject property is the list house on the left no 44 painted green
trimmed white.


white trimmed green with wall in front.


INVSTEN OPOTUIT


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HA( ^^E ^2b, IHUNSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005 THEBTRIBUSE


Gas prices surge





in Katrina's wake


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LEADING LAW FIRM

invites applications for attorneys for our Nassau Office.

Applicants must have a minimum of 5 years experience
in the area of Conveyancing, demonstrate an ability to
work independently and possess a thorough working
knowledge and technical competence in the mentioned
area.

Successful applicants can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits.

Apply in confidence to:

Vacancy
P.O.Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to:
gbastianl@maill.coralwave.com


- -.4 o -


A well established Bahamian-owned business is looking for a Financial Controller.
Applicants must demonstrate their ability to handle the entire accounting cycle including
the preparation of monthly financial statements. Applicants must possess a Bachelor's
degree in Accounting and a professional designation or at least five years of experience
as a financial controller. Salary commensurate with experience.

Send a cover letter explaining in detail why you would be right for the position. Please
forward your resume with professional references and phone numbers to:

DA 15662
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


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citigroup-

CITIBANK, N.A. BAHAMAS BRANCH
CORPORATE & INVESTMENT BANK

Citigroup (NYSE: C), the preeminent global financial services company has some
200 million customer accounts and does business in more than 100 countries,
providing consumers, corporations, governments and institutions with a broad
range of financial products and services, including consumer banking and credit,
corporate and investment banking, insurance, securities brokerage, and asset
management. Major brand names under Citigroup's trademark red umbrella
include Citibank, CitiFinancial, Diner's Club, Primerica, Smith Barney and
Banamex.
e are currently accepting resumes for the following position:

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

citiess
Aggressively market the Bank's products and services to businesses in
the Northern Caribbean Region that meet our target market criteria;
Achieve established revenue targets by developing and maintaining
strong customer relationships through the delivery of the highest level
of customer service;
* Work with Product Specialists to identify opportunities and to deliver
innovative structures and solutions to clients while ensuring compliance
with the control environment;
* Analyze, evaluate and assess financial statements; and
* Conduct due diligence on new clients and monitor clients' accounts to
ensure that activity is in line with established parameters.

Knowledge/Skill Requirements
Strong knowledge and experience in Capital Markets & Corporate Finance
(need to demonstrate management and execution of these type of
transactions);
* Strong marketing/sales and technical financial skills;
* High energy, motivated individual, ability to think outside the box and
to adapt in a dynamic work environment;
* Strong analytical skills, good knowledge of accounting, finance and
financial instruments;
* Bachelors degree in Accounting, Finance, Business or Economics (certain
types of Engineering may be consider). MBA and / or CFA;
* Excellent communication skills and ability to work across units within
the Bank to ensure customer satisfaction;
* Previous experience as a Credit Analyst and/or Risk Manager and/or
Relationship Manager and/or Transactor; and
* Travel required.

Starting salary will be commensurate with experience. Interested applicants may
deliver, fax or e-mail resumes to:

Business Head
Citigroup Corporate and Investment Bank
110 Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8569
E-mail: tadesee.anja.mckenzie@citigroup.com


Resumes should be received by September 12th, 2005


Share your news


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so. call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Available from Commercial News Providers"


The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

FIELD EXAMINER

Responsibilities

Working as a part of a team responsible for monitoring the activities of
licensees and registrants of the SCB, assessing the institutions' internal
controls and risk management systems, as well as their financial soundness,
and compliance with applicable laws and regulations through the conduct
of on-site inspections
Identifying breaches in legislation and making recommendations for
corrective action
Recommending action to help maintain high prudential standards and
promote sound risk management and best practices in the markets

Qualifications and Experience

Bachelor's degree in Business, Finance, Economics or Accounting
Experience in compliance, auditing in the securities industry

Competencies:

Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
capital markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to multi-task
Excellent oral and written communication skills'
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and Excel)


Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:


MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs


"~` ~"~"":' '- ' '


~sasaP~a~--~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


/S~al;a~i~a~


Q


0


Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005








THE TIBUN THUSDAY SEPTMBER1,205,IPGESS


Colina


Holdings to address issues


FROM page one

Keith Davies said: "We are working and
pushing the company to get its affairs in
order, and to address the issues raised by,
its qualification."
He added that when such a situation
arose with any of its listed stocks or enti-
ties, BISX "stays closer to them"' and does
"what's best in the interests of investors
and the public".
"When there's been an incident like this,
the company is being monitored on an
ongoing basis," Mr Davies said.
Colina Holdings twice had to ask BISX
for an extension to the time allowed six
months' from year-end to publish its 2004
financial statements, and there was a sug-
gestion that the company be referred to the


exchange's listing committee over possi-
ble penalties to be levied for the delays. No
action is thought to have been taken yet,
though.
Colina Holdings (Bahamas) 2004 annu-
al financial statements were qualified by
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), which
detailed concerns over whether all related
party transactions concerning the compa-
ny had been disclosed and were accounted
for. The auditors noted that there were
problems with the mechanisms for report-
ing related party transactions to the Colina
Holdings Board of Directors.
Mr Davies said that when such situa-
tions occurred, BISX would monitor the
listed members involved to ensure
they were complying with rules and regu-
lations on transparency and timely disclo-
sure. *


The concerns raised by the PwC auditors
report all largely relate to corporate gov-
ernance issues. Colina has appointed a
Canadian law firm to review its internal
corporate governance procedures in the
wake of the audit's publication, while
Bahamian financial services regulators
have hired KPMG including personnel
from Canada to conduct an independent
review, focusing on whether Colina is com-
plying with the 21 conditions imposed upon
it in return for approving the Imperial Life
Financial (Bahamas) acquisition.
The regulators led by the Securities
Commission of the Bahamas are thought
to be waiting upon the conclusion of the
review, and subsequent report from
KPMG, before deciding what action to
take in relation to the Colina Holdings
matter.


Real estate boom



sparks price fear


FROM page one
of life than on the other
islands."
Ms Phillips said that while
Grand Bahama was getting a
much larger percentage of
Florida buyers than before,
she credited this interest to an
appreciation rate in Florida
that is up 35 per cent over the
last few years..
It was not just beach front
property that was impacted by
escalating rates, but homes in
general, while in the Lucaya
and Freeport area, properties
are tax exempt, making
Freeport the only place in the
Bahamas where foreigners can
take advantage of that situa-
tion.
Meanwhile, Ms Phillips said
one thing that is negatively
-impaeting the Grand-Bahama


real estate industry was Gov-
ernment's inability to speed
up the approvals process for
foreign investments.
She said realtors at H.G.
Christie have been informed
in regard to a number of
deals, that properties under a
certain price range or in a cer-
tain area are reserved for
Bahamians, a position she
sees as counterproductive to
the economic advancement of
Bahamians.
This is because the land
being identified is already
owned by Bahamians who are
interested in maximising a
return on their investment.
Ms Phillips criticised the
policy, saying it was wrong for
Bahamians to continue to
invest in real estate,but not be
allowed to grow their wealth
by selling that land to for-
eigners.


And she added that the
restrictions could cause them
to lose customers to other
countries that made it easier
for foreign investors to come
in and purchase or develop
land.
In general, Ms Phillips said
real estate in Grand Bahama
was doing well, with H.G.
Christie tripling in size over
the last few years.
However, growing concerns
over Government policies and
the subsequent impact on
their business continued to
grow.
"We aren't keeping buyers,
we're scaring them away. Our
island has grown from 20,000
to 70,000. The extra people
run the retail stores, the gas
stations, the grocery stores.
The idea is to grow and build
a population of quality peo-
ple," Ms Phillips said.


Vacant Lot No. 5 Block 18 Section B 9,600 sq. ft. on Avacado Drive in Eleuthera Island Shores'
Subdivision in North Eleuthera.

Property is close to Eleuthera Main Highway with available utilities; electricity, city water and
telephone.


For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: The Commercial Credit
Collection Unit at: Phone: 356-1686 or 356-1608, Nassau
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us by no later than September 30, 2005
Financing available for qualified purchaser


WINDING SAV


REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE


The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.
{.. *


GIS USER CONFERENCE
The Bahamas Government and The Inter-American Development Bank,
Land Use Policy and Administration Project
16th- 17th November 2005
NASSAU BEACH HOTEL
New Providence, Bahamas

The Bahamas Government in collaboration with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) implemented a Land use Policy and Administration Project
(LUPAP). As part of the Land Information Management Component of the project, The Bahamas National Geographic Information Systems (BNGIS)
Centre, Office of The Prime Minister, is charged with the responsibility of hosting a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) User Conference.

This year's theme is "GIS Technology in and around The Bahamas". The primary objective of the conference is to provide GIS-related informational
and educational opportunities for anyone in business, government, or in the academic arena who is interested in the use of GIS technology in and around
The Bahamas. It is also an opportunity to join us in celebrating GIS Day 2005 which is an international event celebrated around the World. The
Conference Program Committee is therefore requesting interested persons/organizations/agencies to respond to:

a) The call for abstracts for presentation: All papers should address broad subjects of interest to Geographic Information topic areas including:

Infrastructure; The environment; Land administration; GPS; GIS Policy and implementing enterprise GIS; and Student Presentations;

All pr sentations should be non-commercial. The Program Committee will select presentations that represent a wide range of interests. The
subm ssion deadline for presentations including titles, author/presenter name, presenter's biography, company name, address telephone, fax and
abstr cts (150-300 words) is September 9tn 2005. Persons who are selected to present at the Conference will be contacted by the Program
Co ittee. Presentations will be allotted 40 minutes.

b) Th call for exhibitors: Exhibits may be GIS posters and maps. Exhibits may also be market specific products or services which may be accepted
as endor exhibits. Promotional products or services are also welcome in our exhibit foyer. Commercial exhibits (only) require a registration fee
of 250.00. Information regarding exhibit space will be mailed to selected exhibitors/vendors by end September 2005.

c) T e call for Sponsors: Sponsors are needed to support the following Conference activities:
Sea shell globes;
GIS Map gallery;

Conference totes;
Giveaways: Pens, Pencils, Mouse pads, Candies; and

GIS Youth Club Program.

d) GIS User Conference Attendee: Register your interest in attending the conference.

GET INVOLVED HELP US SPREAD THE WORD ON GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

THE TECHNOLOGY OF THE 21st CENTURY!

REGISTER YOUR INTEREST TODAY!

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS EVENT PLEASE CONTACT GIS USER CONFERENCE PROGRAM COMMITTEE!

Telephone 242,-326-8536, Fax: 242-326-8535, P.O. Box CB-10980, Office of The Prime Minister, Nassau, Bahamas


i THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 7B








I I IBUSINI.SSI I


THE MEDICLINIC CABLE BEACH
Requires: (1) Full Time Registered Nurse
(2) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
in Primary/Urgent Care Facility
Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.
Attractive Benefit Package
Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
P.O. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas
I I


Enforcement, not



more committees,



for work permits


FROM page 1B

work permit issues, saying: "I
don't necessarily think you
need to get another bureau-
cracy that's adding more red
tape to the process. What has
to be the starting point is
enforcement."
Mr Moss said he had spoken
to Prime Minister Perry
Christie shortly after the pre-
sent government had taken
office in 2002-2003, urging him
to ensure that the Immigration
Department "followed up" on
companies and expatriate
workers who received work
permits.
Mr Moss explained that his
suggestion involved Immigra-
tion officers visiting companies
that had hired expatriates on
work permits to "ensure" these
employees were performing
the functions and had the skills
they were supposed to.
However, he added that the
Prime Minister told him he
"did not want to enforce [the
immigration laws] in that fash-
ion".
Without such follow through,
Mr Moss said a number of
Bahamian companies were
"getting away with it" in rela-
tion to abuses of immigration
and work permit regulations.
But he added: "I can't blame
those companies for doing
what they're doing because no
one is interested."
Mr Moss suggested that
when a work permit applica-
tion was made; the first move
should be to look at a 'Skills
Bank'. If Bahamians with the
., apprqp riate .gualification, and
slki~ls were avalablle, t ey


should be the "first inter-
viewed" for the post.
If these candidates proved
unsatisfactory, Mr Moss said
the Immigration Department
would then needed to "make
a determination on all the evi-
dence before them whether a
work permit was needed".
Acknowledging that large
employers imposed pressure


nies set aside funds for training
Bahamians, and said work per-
mit holders who became either
Bahamian citizens or perma-
nent residents often received
preferential treatment.
As an example, he said these'
people were allowed to hold
dual or multi-currency
accounts. Bahamians, on the
other hand, had to apply for


upon the Immigration Depart- Central Bank permission,
ment to approve work permit which was often rejected.
applications, Mr Moss also Among the recommenda-
called for more rigorous tions made by Civil Spciety
enforcement of stipulations Bahamas for dealing with ille-
regarding timeframes, during gal immigration and work per-
which Bahamians be identified mit abuses was for the Gov-
and trained to replace expatri- ernment to be careful in grant-
ates, attached to work permits. ing citizenship to former work
,Ie added thatthereLwasilit- 4 penrmitholders, on the grounds:


Bahamians who have spen4'
thousands and thousands .qf'
dollars qualifying themselves',
for the same position being
unable to find work in this.
nation. Among the recommen-
dations were that the Depart-i
ment of Immigration publish.
the number of work permits
issued every six months, along
with the professions or crafts
that received work permits.
Other recommendations rel-
evant to the Bahamian busi-
ness community were that the
Government must ensure there
were no qualified Bahamians'
available to fill jobs for Which
work permits were being
squght, "to prevent Bahamians
being deprived of legitimate
lucrative positions".
By having just 182 Immigra-
tion officers for the entire
Bahamas, Mr Moss said, the
Government was showingit
was not serious about tackling
illegal immigration and abus-
es of the work permitsy-stenim.-
The Ifimmigration Depart-
ment was understaffed, and he!
recommended transferring
members of an "overstaffed"
civil, service to it as a means of
beefing it up. .'.
"The real fear I have is that
Bahamians are saying they are
not getting the best of th&if
country, and that is not goop
for society," Mr Moss said.,
"I believe that in our soci-
ety, if you walk up and down
this country and speak to pe,o-,
ple, you find they have a jaun-,
dice eye view of the immigra-,
tion laws andipolicies. Because
of the way in the past that the
laws have been abused, people,
have no respect for them-:aid
give them no oredeiice'!'li


We can help you:


* Plan and Set Goals


Guaranteed 'Budget


Outline for


Planning a


Successful


Future


* Reduce expenses

* Turn your debt into-

riches

* Make good investment

decisions

* Become a Millionaire

* And much more......


FoP MoPe Information on

Consultation or Seminars Contact:








P.O. Box N-4110

Nassau, The Bahamas

(242) 326-3160 (Tel) (242) 322-4592 (Fax)

cmc@eaglegroupco.com

www.eaglegroupco.com


FINTER BANK & TRUST (BAHAMAS) LIMITED



FINTER BANK & TRUST (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, is presently seeking to
recruit a suitably qualified individual to fill the position of

INVESTMENT FUND OFFICER

Requirements for the post:
several years experience in Investment fund administration
including calculation of NAV, updating shareholder register,
filing with authorities, compliance, etc
being familiar with Investment Fund Act/Rules 2003
extensive PC knowledge
The successful candidate should:
be highly self-motivated
be a team-player
work independently and reliable

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume, with
cover letter and references, to:
Human Resources
Finter Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Umited
P.O. Box N-9932
Nassau, Bahamas -
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IF You NEEDo:
> Secretarial/Administrative Support
< Temporary Employees
a Bookkeeping
< Special Project Assistance
a Research Assistance
> Marketing Support
a Travel Arrangements
a Event Planning and
Coordination
> Employee Recruitment & Screening
:- PC Support & Administration
a Public Speaker Support
a Hotel Bookings. & Travel Arrangements

a Executive Concierge Services
Mail Collection & Deliveries
Messenger Services
Chauffer Services
Banking Services

CONTACT US TODAY SO WE CAN ASSIST YOU:






SERVICES LIMITED
Tel: (242) 323-6087 Fax: (242) 323-6085
E-mail: cmc@eaglegroupco.com
www.eaglegroupco.com
Suite Z, Kings Court, Bay Street
P.O. Box N-4110
Nassau, The Bahamas
sa'b *4e, >4t4Vdwese4(b, iC


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 9B


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FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATiONAL BANK
Caribbean Pride. Intern atiional Strength. Your Financial Partner

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

HUMAN RESOURCES BUSINESS PARTNER
THE BAHAMAS, TURKS & CAICOS AND THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS
Qualifications:
Mandatory Minimum Bachelor's degree in Human Resources or a related field
PC skills: Advanced Excel and Word mandatory; Access is a plus
Strong background in employee and industrial relations
A broad knowledge/experience base in several HR areas, (e.g. training, recruiting, employee relations, policy review, etc.)
Excellent organizational skills
Skills in problem solving as it relates to identifying and resolving personnel issues
Knowledge of the Employment and Industrial Relations Acts
Excellent communication skills to facilitate the flow of information between the line and HR strategic and operational groups
Strong leadership & negotiation skills
Strong communication and presentation skills both written and verbal
General Requirements/Responsibilities:
1. Supports performance management culture (includes coaching, documentation & consultation
2. Direct responsibility for day-to-day industrial relations, including health and safety matters
3.Provide accratel inf6tmiahtin t customers and ensures that internal and external customers are provided with the
highestqualihty service at all times in the are of Human Resources
4. Maintain program/project records; provide data for monthly reporting
5. Responsible for all entry-level recruitments including management of requests from the business
6. Research & analysis of HR benefits and policies
7. Oversee Benefits/Payroll functions
If you are interested:
Submit your resume and private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before September 2, 2005 to:
Jamise Sturrup
Human Resources Assistant
P.O. Box N-7125
Nassau, Bali~as
Or e-mail: Jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com
FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their interest, however only those under consideration
will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.


II .I


Legal Notice of Dissolution


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
PAGLIO LIMITED is in dissolution. Joneka A. Wright is the
Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-3025, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
23rd day of September, 2005.



Sid* _
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Freeport Based Construction Company
requires an experienced.
CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR/PROJECT MANAGER
for a short term or permanent employment.
Salary commensurate with qualification & experience.
Applications in writing summarizing qualifications & experience to
Box F-43569 or fax to (242) 335-7573.
'You may, call (242) 352-6700 ext 4 or 5 details of position., ,


't,

SThe Secuities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

MARKET SURVEILLANCE OFFICER

Responsibilities

Vorking as a part of a team responsible for monitoring the activities of licensees
mid registrants of the SCB, assessing the institutions' internal controls and
nisk management systems, as well as their financial soundness, and compliance
with applicable laws and regulations.
Reviewing financial statements, annual reports, proxy material and other such
documents
o Monitoring payment of fees
Compiling statistical data
Recommending actions to help maintain high prudential standards and promote
sound risk management and best practices in the markets.

SQualifications and Experience

-*o-Bach .lor's_ degree in Business, Finance, Economics or Accounting
3 years experience in the Securities-Industry.
Candidates with working experience in the financial services sector will have
an added advantage

Compefencies:

Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
capital markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to multi-task and juggle on-site inspection with off-site supervision
(as required)
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
'Word and excel)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P.O 0. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005


I VACANCY[NOTIC I


TECHNICIAN APPRENTICES

ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL


Vacancies exist in the Corporation for Technician Apprentices.. Technician Apprentices
are trained to become Electrical and Mechanical Technicians. Upon successful
completion of the programme, candidates will be assigned to New Providence
and Family Islarld Operations.

To qualify as a Technician Apprentice the following criteria amongst other things
should be met:

Must be between 18 and 25 years

Have a minimum of five (5) BGCSE'S including Maths, English Language
and Science with grades of "C" or better or

An Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical or Mechanical Engineering
with a grade point average of "B" or better or

Preferably, persons recruited from the Family Islands should be a resident of that
island. Once the formal training has been completed, Apprentices will be returned
to their respective island.

Application forms with supporting information can be collected from our offices
located at BEC's Head Office located at Blue Hill & Turker Roads, Nassau Bahamas.
Family Island applicants can also collect these forms from their local BEC office.
Applications should be returned duly completed with all of the supporting
documentation to The Manager, Human Resources, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau
Bahamas, on or before Friday, September 2, 2005.

Human Resources Department
MDMS/asf








PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005


THE TRIBUNE


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THE MEDICLINIC ATLANTIS
Requires: (1) Full Time Registered Nurse
(2) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
-in Primary/Urgent Care Facility

Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.

Attractive Benefit Package

Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
P.O. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas


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The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (SCB), is the statutory agency responsible
for regulating the securities industry in The Bahamas.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY:

LEGAL OFFICER

Responsibilities

Conducting litigation on behalf of the SCB for the enforcement of the
civil penalty regime under the Securities Industry Act (SIA) for all forms
of market misconduct

Working closely with other regulators and enforcement agencies in the
investigation of suspected market misconduct

Conducting examination of witnesses and preparing cases for court

Contributing to the enhancement of the enforcement regime of the SCB
and to safeguarding the reputation of The Bahamas as a premier financial
centre

Qualifications and Experience

Member of The Bahamas Bar for at least 5 years
Civil/commercial litigation experience
Prior working experience in the securities industry would be an asset


Competencies:

Ability to independently conduct and lead investigations
Excellent analytical skills and attention to detail
Capacity to work at both the conceptual and operational levels
Innovation and creativity in problem solving
Highly self-motivated with a keen interest in developing expertise in the
securities markets
Excellent oral and written communication skills and strong inter-personal
skills
Ability to work well independently as well as in a team
Proficiency in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word)

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. We offer a comprehensive
benefits package. Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:

MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Deadline for applications is September 9, 2005,


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NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUFORT NESTOR, MIAMI
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of-the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25TH day of AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Public Utilities Commission


on

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company

Limited Application to increase its Monthly

Rates/Prices For Telephone Lines



The PUC will hold a PUBLIC MEETING on the Eahamas

Telecommunications Company's application to increase the

monthly rates/prices for telephone lines on Thursday 1st

September, 2005, from 7-9pm in MARSH HARBOUR

ABACO, at St. John's Anglican Parish "Hall.


The purpose of the public meeting will be to afford

consumers and interested parties the opportunity to ask

questions or make oral comments on the application.



Copies of the Commission's Public consultation document

on BTC's application can be obtained from the PUC's office

located in the Agape House 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue

or downloaded from the Commission's website at

wwwPUCBahamaqsgov.bs.


BUSINESS


Front Page

Highly motivated
but busy executive
requires individual
tutor far
Microsoft Front Page.
Two hours per week
far eight weeks.


Call 393-4002 days


9--


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-










THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 1, 2005
1 7:30 | 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 1 9:30 10:00 10:30
SNew Florida Benjamin Franklin Franklin helps Spy 'The Murder Machine Defec- Nova 'Origins: How Life Began'
WPBT draftthe Declaration of Indepen- tion into West Bedin in 1961. Primitive organisms. 1) (CC) (DVS)
dence. 1)(CC)
SNFL Preseason Football Atlanta Falcons at Miami Dolphins. From Pro Player Stadium in Miami. (Live) Dolphins
0 WFOR Postgame Show
Access Holly- Joey "Joey and Will & Grace Scrubs J.D. initi- Scrubs J.D. falls (9:59) ER "You Are Here" 'A (CC)
S WTVJ wood (N) (CC) the Temptation" "From Queer to ates a SARS for a bartender.
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0 WSVN rows plans to free him. 0 (PA) (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) SHANGHAI KNIGHTS (2003, Comedy) Jackie Chan, Owen Wil- Primetime (CC)
Og WPLG son, Aaron Johnson. Premiere. Chon Wang and his comrades shake up
Victorian England. / (CC) (DVS)

:00) American Cold Case Files "Kidnapped & 95"A kidnapper torments a child's par- The Anatomy of September 11th
A&E Justice "Vigilante cents. (N)(CC) (CC)
Justice"
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
I .B T Access Granted The Parkers The Parkers 1 Blowin' Up: Fat- Girlfriends cc Soul Food A (CC)
BET (N) (CC) _(CC) ty Koo (CC)
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'CBC ocs (CC) (CC) (2001) (CC)
Late Night With The Apprentice "Soap Dopes" ,n Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien (CC)
CNN oo00)Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN Cooper 360 (CC) .
Steve Harvey The Daily Show Comedy Central Comedy Central South Park Kyle Comedy Central Roast "Pamela
COM Comedian per. With Jon Stew- Presents (CC) Presents Drew and Ike go on a Anderson" Pamela Anderson. (CC)
forms in Dallas. art (CC) Fraser. camping trip.
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COUR Chameleon Stolen identities. dence
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ESPNI To Be Announced
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EWTN Lady the Church
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FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
F N :FL :00) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Boston Red Sox. From Fenway Park in Best Damn Sports Show Period
BFSNFL oston. (Live) (Live) (CC)
Wonderful World of Golf Classic match between Fred Quest for the Golf U.S. Amateur Championship-- Final Round. From
GOLF Couples and Tom Watson. Card Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa. (Taped) /
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i HALL Texas Ranger Rangers' battle with the Ortega Quaid, Natasha Richardson. Reunited twin girls try to get their parents
(CC) brothers moves to Mexico. (CC) back together. (CC)
Dream House Holmes on Homes "Kitchen Real Renos House Hunters The Block Phil and Amy battle their
HGTV C (CC) Coleslaw" (CC) "Baby Makes Man wants to builder and everyone is at odds over
Three" C (CC) move out. (CC) the landscaping. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Christians &
(INSPCC) (CC) day Jews
Xiaolin Show- Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends Monica Will & Grace Everybody. Everybody,
KTLA down "Sizing Up Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air invites pal for "Lows in the Mid- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
O ii" (CC) "Trial'byFury,-' *' (CC)' Thanksgiving. Eighties'i .,A "The Invasion" Cl '(GCO)'.i
** THE HUNTED (1998, Suspense) Harry Hamlin, LIES AND DECEPTION (2005, Suspense) Madchen'Amick, AndrewW.
LIFE Madchen Amick. A woman becomes a killers prey in Walker. A woman uncovers secrets about her dead husband. (CC)
the Canadian wilderness. (CC)
MSNBC :00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
','j`MSN13C c)mann
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'NICK Boy Genius SquarePants r Week" (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show C (CC)
Will & Grace C Big Brother 6 (Live) C (CC) The Cut Two teams barter for cloth- News C (CC) News
(CC) ing in the five boroughs. (N)
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SLN A (CC) tures Beretta Hunts
NASCAR Be- Jeep Test Drive Car Crazy (N) Barrett-Jackson 2005: The Auc- NASCAR Nation NASCAR Be-
SPEED yond the Wheel tions (N) yond the Wheel
Praise the Lord Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop TD. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
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TBS OTHERS (2001)
Nicole Kidman.
(:00) In a Fix Un- Little People, Big Dreams (CC) World's Strongest Boy An 11-year Supersize She (CC)
T"LC cut tiles in old boy is capable of lifting three
kitchen. (CC) times his own body weight.
(:00) Law & Or- *** THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. A
TNT der"Pro Se" n mild-mannered banker is sent to prison for murder. (CC) (DVS)
(CC) (DVS)
TOO Grim Adven- Grim Adven- Grim Adven- Mucha Lucha Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) Teen Titans Ti- Dragon Ball Z
T ON tures tures tures C (CC) tans East"
TV5 Passe-moi les jumelles Les Grands duels du sport Les Enqu6tes d'Eloise Rome TV5 Le Journal
S (6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
FWC PM Edition (CC) (N)(CC) (CC)
UNIV o00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Noticias Univisl6n Presenta..

(:00) US. Open Tennis Men's & Women's Second Round. From the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y.
USA (Live)(CC)
VH 1 Great Red Car- * DIRTY DANCING (1987, Drama) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze, Jerry Orbach. Pre- Hogan Knows
v pet Moments miere. A sheltered teen falls for a street-wise dance instructor. C Best l
G ,,Home Improve- **' DIPLOMATIC SIEGE (1999, Action) Peter Weller, Daryl Hannah, WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WGN ment Tim sells Tom Berenger. Serbian terrorists capture the U.S. Embassy in Bucharest.
his hot rod. C A (CC) .
Everybody Smallville "Lucy" Lois' younger sis- Everwood Ephram rethinks his WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond ter, Lucy, comes to town and plans when Andy reveals the secret Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
A (CC) charms everyone. C (CC) Amy has been keeping. (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
WSBK Jeopardy! (CC) WWE SmackDown! (N) C (CC) Dr. Phil


(630) A** Children of Beslan: Russian **! CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Comedy) Steve Martin, Bonnie
HBO-E BREAKIN' ALL School Siege (N) C (CC) Hunt, Piper Perabo. A man must handle the chaos surrounding his 12
______ THE RULES l, children. C 'PG'(CC) .


(6:30)** THE Six Feet Under "Eat a Peach" Ruth Six Feet Under The Rainbow of Six Feet Under "The Silence" Ruth
HBO-P GRUDGE (2004) finds a new way to unwind. C (CC) Her Reasons" Brenda takes a break fills her schedule with activities. C
n 'PG-13 (CC) _for some fun. C (CC) (CC)
* MILLENNIUM (1989, Science Fiction) Kris Kristofferson, Cheryl ** BREAKIN'ALL THE RULES (2004, Romance-
HBO-W Ladd, Daniel J. Travanti. An unusual device is found in the wreckage of a Comedy) Jamie Foxx. A man writes a successful how-
downed jet. C 'PG-13' (CC) to book on breakups. C, 'PG-13' (CC)
S(6:15)** LIB- Rome "The Stolen Eagle" Two sol- * A BRONX TALE (1993, Drama) Robert De Niro, Chazz
HBO-S TYSTANDS diers are enlisted to find the stolen Palminteri, Lillo Brancato. A youth favors a flashy mobster over his hard-
STILL (2002) 'R' gold standard. Cl (CC) working dad. C 'R' (CC)
.6:15) **x MA- *** WITNESS (1985, Drama) Harrison Ford, Kelly McGillis, Josef *** RUNAWAY JURY (2003)
MAX-E JOR EAGUE Sommer. A big-city cop protects a young Amish murder witness. fC 'R' John Cusack. A man tries to manip-
(1989) (CC) ulate an explosive trial. (CC)
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cover stolen jewels. C 'PG' (CC) Trinity battle vicious machines. n 'R' (CC)
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(1995) 'R' was hired to play. C 'R' (CC) into a seductive lifestyle. l 'R' (CC)


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 11B


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OPINION


is a bold initia-
tive by a group called
C.O.P.S. to put on the Church
Games.
The Church Games are intend-
ed to be a smaller version of the
Bahamas Games, which is
expected back either next year
or in 2007 after a long break.
Both the Bahamas Christian
Council and the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture are
throwing their support behind
C.O.P.S., a group headed by Col-
in and Oria Knowles, Prince Ellis
and Stanley Mitchell.
The Church Games are expect-
ed to include all of the core sports
and will comprise of divisions for
all ages, including a 45-years and
older group. Teams will only be
allowed to participate as a
denomination. For example, Bap-
tist, Catholic, Methodist, Angli-
can and Church of God.
It's a bold initiative, consider-
ing that it will be staged over a
week-long period from October
21-27.


"The challenge is, can all
those games involving
basketball, softball, baseball,
cycling, boxing, swimming,
volleyball, tennis and track
and field be completed in that
short space of time?"


The challenge is, can all those
games involving basketball, soft-
ball, baseball, cycling, boxing,
swimming, volleyball, tennis and
track and field be completed in
that short space of time?
Consider this: It's not a holi-
day time, as the Bahamas Games
are held during the summer, play-
ers will have to get time off from
work and school to participate
and the volunteers themselves
will have to get time off as
well.
It's estimated that it will cost


the organising committee some
$155,000 to successfully host the
games.
That might sound like a lot,
but when one considers what is
being offered, it's a small price.
The denominations should
really be the ones to benefit the
most, because, while it will gives
each of them an opportunity to
showcase the talent in their
assemblies, it will also provide
another avenue to recruit players
who may not be a member of any
Church.


We all know that, like music,
sport is leisure pursuit that
attracts the masses.
No doubt, there will be plenty
of spectators coming out to sup-L
port the athletes representing
their respective churches.
And members of the various,
Churches participating should be"
able to show that there is still ar
clean atmosphere in which one'
can compete and not have to deal-
with foul language and the drink-
ing of alcohol the norm at 4
,regular sporting event. -
If planned properly, the
Church Games could turn out to'
be a grand affair.
*But if the organisers aren't
careful to ensure that the atmos-'
phere is conducive to those
persons who are looking forward
to watching some wholesome,
activities, it could be a
,disaster.
It's not the Bahamas Games
or a regular sporting event. It's
the Church Games and, as such;
it should be viewed and displayed
in a completely different light. -


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TRIBUNE SPORTS




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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


cahamas

















coll..egiate


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter.
ONE of the biggest basket-
ball showdowns in the
Bahamas is just days away. :
The Bahamas Basketball
Federation (BBF) has invit-
ed three of the leading teams
in the National Collegiate
Athletic Association
(NCAA) down for two days
of competitive basketball.
Hitting the hard courts over
the weekend will be the Uni-
versity of North Carolina
Tarheels, Marshall University
The Herd and Troy Universi-
ty Trojans.
The three teams will face
top teams from the local New
Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation (NPBA) the Real
Deal Shockers, Y-Care
Wreckers, Coca-Cola Explor-
ers, Wolverines and- the
Grants Town Tarvan Giants.
The two days of exhibition
games are set to take place at
the Sir Kendal GL Isaacs
gymnasium on Saturday Sep-
tember 3rd-4th and are
designed to give the teams
more exposure, and an oppor-
tunity to polish up on their
weaknesses.
According to vice president.
of the BBF Larry Wilson, the
first time the federation
decided to host collegiate
teams for exhibition games,
the University of Alabama,
one of the' visiting schools,
went onto compete in the
NCAA top 16.
He said: "We are trying to.
encourage events like this.
Not only is this good for the
sport, but it assists in the.
sporting tourism aspect as
well.
"The federation is aware
that these are top ranked
teams, and having them come
to the Bahamas to play is a
boost in the sport and pro-
motion of the islands.
"We are extremely pleased
to host these schools, and I
have to breathe a sign of relief
because it wasn't a difficult
task. It was quite easy for i
"It's really not hard. to sell.
the Bahamas to anyone.
When the athletes found out
that the games were set to
take place in the Bahamas.
they were excited."
The number. of persons
confirmed in the Tarheels del-


WEEKEND
SCHEDULE
Saturday
September 2nd
11 am Real Deal
Shockers and UNC
Tarheels
1.3opm Y-Care
Wreckers vs Marshall
University .....
4pm Coca-Cola
Explorers vs Troy
University
7.30pm Wolverines
vs Marshall
University
Sunday
September 4th
12 noon Y-Care
Wreckers vs UNC
2.30pm Giants vs
Troy University
6pm Shockers vs
Marshall

egation is said to be over 100,
including athletes, coaches,
trainers and fans.
He added: "When you look
at how close in proximity all
the teams are to the Bahamas,
securing their, participation
was smooth sailing.
"We are no strangers to
hosting tournaments, in fact
we are looking forward to
hosting other tournaments
and exhibition games."
Wilson said that the feder-
ation's ultimate goal is to one
day host a full division I tour-
nament in New Providence.
Sp far, an annual women's
tournament is played in
Freeport between division I
teams.
The tournament is held
during the team's Thanksgiv-
ing break, November 23rd-
26th.
After seeing the success lev-
el of this tournament, Wilson
believes that the BBF can
extend to teams in the Wom-
en's National Basketball
Association (WNBA) and the
National Basketball Associa-
tion (NBA). -
"We are trying to utilise all
the assets of the Bahamas,"
said Wilson. "The average
team would not mind the fact
of them coming to a beautiful
island to play.


"Copyrighted Ma
SyndicatedCo nt
Available from Commercial Ne


"They are staying at one of
the world leading hotels, and
we are expecting some very
good games from the local
teams.
"The last time we brought
teams down the coaches were
very impressed with the level
of play in the Bahamas."


Wilson encouraged local
Bahamians to become a part.
of an historical event for the
BBF, saying that the fanfare
from the colleges is expected
to be high.
He further confirmed that
persons coming in from the
colleges have been asking for


terial

ent d
ws Providers"

























tickets and that tickets will
be sold on a first-come-
first-served basis at the
gym.
The tickets will cost $3.00
for children and $5.00 for
adults.
A coaching clinic will also
be held during the event.


o hold

















earms


Golf elections

are on course

* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas Golf Federa-
tion (BGF) is seeking to elect a
new president and slate of offi-
cers.
A new president will be elected
in the BGF on October ninth, in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, where
the federation will host their
annual general meeting.
Residing president Neville
Adderley will not be seeking re-
election, stating that the new
commitment to his job will not
allow him to serve the way he
would like to.
He said: "I am not seeking re-
election this time around due to
the commitments I have with my
job. We are very proud of the
accomplishments of the BGF and
I know the new president and the
elected officers will take the fed-
eration to another level.
"Having looked at my sched-
ule, I don't believe that I can
commit the sort of time both ven-
tures will require from me."
Adderley will relinquish his
seat in December, with the offi-
cers elect being sworn in during
February 2006.
No stranger to the executive
board of the BGF, Adderley has
served as secretary for four years
and vice president for eight years.
He did confirm that he will
assist the federation with pro,,
grammes and that his involve-;
ment level will still be at a mini:'.-
mal high.

Officers
Election of officers for the divi--
sion will also take place during.
the executive board elections.
There are five divisions up for
grabs.
Although Adderley only heldI
the presidency position for twb'
years, his term saw major
improvements in the sport.
Under Adderley's watch, the
BGF was able to invite coaches to
the Bahamas to assist with the
development of the younger
golfers, successfully host the
Caribbean Amateur Golf Cham-
pionships in Freeport and coach-
ing clinics.
Over the past year or two the
Bahamas was represented in
every Caribbean tournament, in
which they faired well and saw
enormous growth in the sport. -
Adderley said: "I must agree
that in the two years under my
presence that the sport has taken
off, but there was also progress
while I was serving as vice presi-
dent.
"This is the first time that I can
recall in our 41-year history that
we were able to host two inter-
national tournaments, "back to
back.
"In addition to that, we have
added a very serious programme
of training, where we have a num-
ber of persons come down to
assist us.
"We were able to secure more
golf courses where persons can
come out and play. We have now
embarked on a formal golf devel-
opmental programme."
The BGF has recently forged a
relationship with the Royal and
Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews
and the PGA of Europe.
As a result of the relationship,
the BGFis trying to implement a
formal golf developmental pro-
gramme, which will be centered
on the development of the
younger players.
Elections in the federation are
held every two years.
Although the elections are a
little over a month away, inter-
ested persons are asked to submit
their forms into the BGF. All
forms must. have at least two ag-
natures from acurrent executive
board member.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities,


Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Pope prays for


Katrina victims


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


its an




Emergency:




The Difference




Between Life




and Death'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
IThe youth depart-
ment of Trinity
Assembly "City
of Praise" has
embarked on a
mission to encourage young
people to make better choices
and to stay committed to God
in a conference held under the
theme: "It's an Emergency:
The Difference Between Life
and Death".
The annual youthconfer-
ence, which is in its fourth year,
opened last night at the church
on HarroldRoad . ; -
Cliit Watson; youth pastor;
spoke on how to understand
the difference between life and
death, and how the decisions
that are made can impact one's
life.
Tonight, Minister Brenda
Pratt of Trinity Assembly will
give young people practical
advice on how to live success-
fully as a Christian young per-
son.
And closing out the confer-


SS


ence tomorrow night will be
Pastor Rochelle Moss of
Mount Tabor Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church, who will be sharing
skills on how to overcome .the
challenges and struggles that
life may present, as well as giv-
ing "prophetic impartation" to
those in attendance, says Pastor
Watson. Each service begins at
7.30pm.
Transformed
Each year, Trinity's sanctu-
ary is transformed to fit the
theme of the youth conference.
In 2000, an oil tanker was built
- "forthe church, and the young
people wore camouflage gear
to stay true to its "War is On"
theme.
Then in the following year,
the church was transformed
into a movie theatre to fit the
cinema theme. Last year, under
the theme "F.I.T (Fighting
Inner Temptations) Gym", the
sanctuary was decorated like a
fitness centre and those attend-
ing dressed appropriately.
So this year is no different.


Those who attend the confer-
ence might feel as if they are in
a hospital, since the church
will be decorated as such -
complete with a triage, waiting
rooms, doctors' offices, drips
and other emergency room
equipment. The operating
room will serve as the stage,
and to top it off, the staff will
be dressed in surgery attire and
scrubs.
It's quite dramatic, but
according to Pastor Watson,
the decor serves a purpose, and
that is to bring the theme to
life, while putting the young
people at ease.
"We use these kinds of
themes and these kinds of set-
ups because what it does, it not
only attracts young people each
year, but it also gives them a
whole different scenery from
the usual church setting. So
that they are not being so tense
like, 'Oh I'm in church'.
Instead, they are able to be in a
comfortable environment...,"

SEE page 7C


Price of discipleship very


costly, says Father Brislin


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
POOR Pete! Imagine, soon after having
been entrusted with the keys of the king-
dom of heaven (Matthew 16:21-27) he is
scolded by Jesus who refers to him as an
"obstacle in my path".
In a recent homily, Father Tom Brislin
said the price of discipleship is very costly.
It demands that Christian Catholics make
difficult decisions.
The cross, he said, is a constant reminder
that the Christian journey involves
endurance and perseverance.
Many Catholics today can be referred
to as "lite Catholics", meaning they want to
choose what they believe and practice.
They go to church if they "feel" like it or
their children are allowed to do whatever'
they "feel" like doing.
When we look at Jesus in the gospel that
Father Tom spoke about we see how Jesus,
in preparing his disciples for his imminent.
demise, is confronted with opposition from
an empowered Peter who wants to change


the direction that Jesus' life must take.
We might ask ourselves, what is this to
me? Well this passage has significant rele-
vance to our lives. It serves to remind us
that personal achievements bring empow-
erment that seeks to distract and cause us
to wander from the path of discipleship.
We, like Peter, become distracted from
the path we must travel as disciples. We do
not want to hear of a suffering and dying
Jesus. We prefer the Jesus who is hailed as
King of the Jews, or the Jesus who was
transfigured on the Mount. It is easy for us,
like Peter, to lose sight of our Christian
calling and resort to thinking in a worldly
manner and not how God expects us to.
I remember growing up on a Family
Island, and at most funerals the hymn "I
am glad I counted the cost" would be sung.
When first I started to seek the Lord,
I'm glad I counted the cost;
I fully measured to Jesus' word;


0 FATHER TOM BRISLIN See CHRISTIAN, Page 3C


Old Trail Road Mon-Sat: 8am to.9pm & Sun: 7am to 12 noon
Credit Cards accepted Gift Cards available Offers good for a limited time


The Tribune


I









PAGE 20, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBERE1,2005GTHEOTRIBUNE


ZION
METHODIST
MINISTRIES
ZION Methodist Ministries
in the South Beach Shopping
Centre, East St South is holding
the following services:
Sunday, September 4 New
Methodist Church Year: Sun-
day School, 10.15am; Eucharis-
tic Service, 11am. The Preacher
will be Pastor Charles Lewis.
Monday Ladies Ministry,
*7.30pm
Wednesday Prayer and
Bible Study, 7.30pm
Thursday Music Ministry,
7.30pm



7-I ama,


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Saturday Dance Ministry,
3pm and Children's Choir Min-
istry, 4pm.

CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
September 4, 9:15 am -
Church School, 10 am Divine
Worship Service with Pastor
Charles Lewis, 7 pm Divine
Evening Service with the men
First Monday of each month,
7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-
ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30 pm
- Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
September 4, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School


and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pastors'
Training, Laying A Solid Foun-
dation, Adult Band Practice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrichment
Class, 7 pm Prayer Band and
Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice, 7
pm Senior Choir Practice ,
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins and
Mass, 4 pm Confirmation
Classes, 6 pm St Ambrose
Guild, 6:30 pm Christian
Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm -
Youth Alpha (every third Sat-
urday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm Boys
Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm -
Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confessions

EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class, 11


am Morning Celebration, 7
pm Communion Service, 8 pm
- 'Jesus, the Light of World'
Radio Programme on ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Midweek
Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Conquerors
for Christ Club (Boys & Girls
Club), 8 pm East Street Youth
Fellowship Meeting
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of September 4-10:
Sunday (Feast: Pentecost 16),.
9 am Family Eucharist, 6:30
pm Usher Board Anniversary
Service.
" Monday, 7 pm Band Prac-
tice at St Matthew's
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 7 pm Lay
Ministers' Dinner Meeting
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 6 pm Telephone
Ministry, 7 pm Chotale Prac-


tice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice, 7:30 pm Senior Choir
Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 6:30 pm to 7:30
pm Dance Camp at the Com-
munity Centre
Saturday, 6 am Intercessory
Prayer Meeting, 2 pm -
Acolytes Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian
Campbell)

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK
YOU are invited to worship
with.the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the 11
am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST HOLINESS
CHURCH OF
GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:


Church Notes


Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Me ting
Wednesday, noon Prayer &
Praise Service, 7:30 pm Bible
Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise &
Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30 pm
- Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day Ser-
vice

CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, September
4:
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Service,
7:45 pm Men's Fellowship
Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI
Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Bishop V G Clarke is ihe
senior pastor.


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNETHURSDAYSEPTEMBERREI1,ON


'Let's Get





it Started





in Here'


theme, "Let's
Get it Started
in Here", St
Matthew's
Anglican Parish met at the St
Anne's School Auditorium for
its annual Planning Confer-
ence.
The conference began at
8am on Saturday, August 20
* with a short devotional period
led by "Roosie" Godet and
remarks by St Matthew's Rec-
tor, Father James Moultrie.
Retreat
Aided by the summary
reports of the Church's recent
vestry retreat groups dealt with
five issues:
Increased Spiritual Aware-
ness and Development/Christ-
ian Foundation
Youth Council activities
Fellowship and Communi-
ty Outreach
Education for Laity


Property Enhancement
and Fundraising
Groups were made up of a
wide range of people to keep
the discussion as inclusive and
constructive as possible, while
moving toward some specific
actions that could make a dif-
ference.
Priority
Each group gave key goals
describing the priority areas of
its task in order that the church
would live out its mission and
achieve its vision. These were
discussed and recommenda-
tions made in a pictorial and
verbal presentation to the
whole conference.
From this event a follow-
up/implementation team head-
ed by Thomas Evans Sr, Dr
Austin Davis and other volun-
teers will begin work on the
reports with the view to their
implementation in the very
near future.


* PEOPLE'S Warden Stephen Mitchell (centre) was presented with a special gift for his participation in St Matthew's Parish Plan-
ning Conference last weekend. Offering the gifts were members of St Matthew's Players, Faye Johnson (left) and Laurena Finlayson
(right).


kRlijon role in Ipxlitict.


Copyrighted Material

CSynd icated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


S *. 4. 4 -
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* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
ON Friday night, August 26,
I had one of the most refresh-
ing and fulfilling spiritual expe-
riences that I've had in a long
time. It was at IGNISHUN
Youth Conference at Holy
Trinity Anglican Church in Sta-
pledon Gardens.
The young people were
allowed to dress any way they
chose and came wearing gang-
ster gear, T-shirts and conserv-
ative clothing. The crowd was
most impressive and it was
encouraging to see so many
young people out to a religious
function on a Friday night,
when most of their friends were
probably at the movies or some
party.
The enthusiasm was conta-
gious and had an old man like
me'jumping up and praising
.God.
Ministry
GeneratioNext, the youth
ministry established at the
Parish Church of the Most
Holy Trinity in 2000, held its
annual Youth Conference last
weekend. The young and"
young at heart from all denom-
inations came together to wor-
ship God.
Dynamic .guests speakers,
outstanding musicians, dancers
and dramatists reached out to
the young people for the Lord
Jesus.
According to a spokesper-
son from Holy Trinity: "The.
goals of IGNISHUN are to


Christian (From page IC)


reach therlost, with God's help
heal'the wounded and provide
hope to our nation's youth.
Our main goal is fori;us to stand
as a united body #f believers
for the Lord."
Successful
"'All of the conferences held
,ii*ce 2000 have been success-
"iul, said the spokesperson. In
2000, the theme was "Putting
Jesus in the Driver's Seat" and
featured speakers Pastor
Christopher, Hill and Lady Joy
Hill from the T D Jakes Min-
istries and Minister Kevin Har-
ris from the Bahamas Faith
Ministries. In 2001, the confer-
ence was held under the theme,
"Answering the Call". Speak-
ers included Elder Timothy
Ross from Potter's House Min-
istries Dallas, Texas. "Get out
of the Boat" was the theme for
2002; "Storm the Gates" in
2003; and "Invasion walk into
your season" was last year's
theme.
IGNISHUN 2005, held
under the theme, "Fan Dem
Off" was truly inspirational.
The scripture lesson was tak-


en from Hebrews 12:1-2 and
Elder Ross, once again deliv-
ered a powerful message on
each night he spoke.
Marie Cooper, who was part
of the conference planning
team, said: "Planning for
IGNISHUN began many
months before the start date of
late August. The youth council,
led by Rev DeAngelo Bowe,
was responsible for this year's
conference. Events leading up
to this year's conference were
'Jesus in the Park' on Satur-
day, August 13 and T-Shirt
Day on Sunday, August 21st."
Sessions
The conference sessions
began on Friday. And. the con-
cert on Saturday was described
by one young person as "off da
chain". Featured artists at the
closing of the IGNISHUN con-
ference included Holy, Trinity
Praise Team, Levert/Perez,
Simone Beneby, Holy Trinity
Chorales, Kenyatta Taylor,
Shekia Lightbourne, Shaback,
TYC Dance Team, Taberna-
cle Christian Choir, Prophecy,
Tanaja and Monty G/ Mr Lynx.


Installation Service


I'm glad I counted the cost
I've paid the price and obtained the prize,
He saved my soul that was lost;
And now my treasures are in the skies,
I am glad I counted the cost.
I was not able to understand this song as
a child,'but as I grew older and my Chris-
tian journey became deeper, I realised the
importance of this hymn by William J Hen-
ry.
Faithfulness
It outlines faithfulness as the main ingre-
dient in being a good disciple. It reassures
us that once we remain faithful we will
receive treasures that are in heaven.
To be a disciple of Christ we are called to


be "in the world and not of the world".
We are expected to be ambitious not
for worldly goods but for eternal life. The
world as we know it measures success by
earthly achievements. But in the hymn we
are asked to look beyond earthy treasures
and focus on heaven and eternal life.
Endurance
We as Christians must remind ourselves
at all times that earthly success is not as
important as the crown to be gained in
following Jesus to the cross. It is not about
the big house or fancy cars or flashing
clothes, it's about endurance.
Jesus' message of a 'Suffering Messiah'
and costly discipleship helps to remind us
of the hardship we must endure.
We live in a "dog eat dog world", where


everyone is seeking the "almighty dollar".
Our focus on the cross can be shifted very
easily. The mad rush to achieve our earth-
ly goals distracts us.
We do not think God's way when our
own desire for a piece of the pie allows us
to get totally caught up in the madness of
the workplace. We must keep our eyes
focused on Jesus.
Disciple
The last verse in the hymn "I am glad I
counted the cost" sums of what a true dis-
ciple can expect.
T'will not be long till the Lord shall come,
I'm glad I counted the cost;
And bear my soul to that heav'nly home,
I'm glad I counted the cost.


Greater Bethel Cathedral
Faithway, off Blue Hill Road
(corner of Carlton E. Francis Primary School)

Pastor: Bishop Dr. David Dawkins


- -- --- -


- -


THE TRIBUNE


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 0, TURSDY, SPTEMBR 1, 2005HEITIBUN


Is ur miistry aStu


YO*I




I,. I II I sHJrose


* By REV JAMES
MOULTRIE
Get behind me, Satan. You
are a hindrance to me; for you
are not on the side of God, but
of men.
(Matt. 16:23)
The scene is Cae-
sarea Philippi.
Jesus had just
asked His disci-
ples for the popu-
lar opinion of His ministry and
received various answers,
referring to Him as one of the
prophetic heavyweights. Some
thought He was John the Bap-
tist; others that He was Elijah;
others that He was Jeremiah,
and still others that He was
one of the prophets. This list
was very impressive but missed
the mark entirely.
Then Jesus turned the table
on them, asking them the same
question. He knew their
thoughts and their inability to
define Him, but He waited for
a revelation. It came to Peter
in some of the most important
words of the entire New Tes-
tament. Peter had gladly
received the revelation of Jesus
as the Messiah, the Son of the
Living God, but he rejected
out of hand the revelation of a
'Suffering Messiah'. In this he
represents the typical Christ-
ian, caught between faith and
doubt, for whom the cross is a
tumbling block. For his lack of
faith Jesus stunned Peter with
the harsh words of our text.
What had Peter done to
deserve such a stern repri-
mand? Peter had ulterior
motives; he wanted a Messiah
who would be a liberator from
Roman occupation, but Jesus
was a liberator of a different
sort. He was a liberator of the
human spirit, a liberator from
sin.
The story is told of an
exchange which Nelson Man-
dela had with another lawyer
when he was trying to estab-
lish himself inhis native South
Africa. He was told that wealth
and money equaled happiness,
and that he should try to
obtain as much of it as he
could. Once he had enough
money, there was nothing else
he would want in life. This
would have been tempting to
most young lawyers and any
other young professional, espe-
cially here in the Bahamas


where to have a lot of money is
the primary and essential goal
of most people. It is a ticket to
a better life and comfort in
retirement.
The advice which Mandela
received was well-intentioned
and was given in good faith.
But Mandela was an intelligent
man with a keen sense of his-
tory and service. If he had tak-
en the advice of the more
senior lawyer he could have
amassed a great fortune for
himself. Luckily for his native
South Africa and the rest of
the world, he did not take the
advice. He was destined for
greater things than having a
lot of money. Instead, he
decided to dedicate himself to
serving his country and even-
tually the world. We who have
money as our ultimate goal
would find this choice unbe-
lievable. Why would Mandela
want to make this kind of
choice when he could have it
made in the shade? Many in
the Bahamas made a similar
sacrifice. What would you have
done?
This incident helps us to
understand today's Gospel and
Our Lord's sharp rebuke of
Peter. A short time prior to
this Peter had recognised Jesus
as the Messiah, the Son of the
Living God. According to pop-
ular expectation, the Messiah
would be a great military com-
mander, another King David,
who would restore Israel to its
former military glory. This is
probably what Peter had in
mind and therefore he could
not fathom Jesus being the
'Suffering Messiah' of Isaiah
53. But this was not the kind of
Messiah Jesus had in mind. He
had predicted His suffering,
;death, and resurrection. That
was His divine mission and it
was what God wanted. He was
a servant Messiah, hot a spec-
tacular or military Messiah. He
was indeed a King, but He
reigned from a cross, not an
earthly throne. Not that God
wanted suffering for His Only
Son, but He wanted to show
the world the depth of His love
for us through the faithfulness
and love of His Son, a faith-
fulness and love which cost
Jesus His life.
The idea of a 'Suffering Mes-
siah' who would lay down His
life for the sins of the whole
world was foreign and totally
unacceptable to Peter. So, out


* REV JAMES MOULTRIE


of concern for Jesus and his
own ulterior motive, he tried to
talk Jesus out of it. Thus Peter
became a stumbling block to
Jesus and His ultimate mission.
And although Peter had a spe-
cial role to play in Jesus' plans
for the. church that was to be
established at Pentecost, Jesus
was prepared to lose his friend-
ship and support rather than
allow Peter to dissuade Him
from His destiny. It was that
important to Jesus and the
Father in Heaven.
Jeremiah did notknow what
he was getting into when he
agreed to be a prophet, When
Nelson Mandela decided to
devote his life to the struggle of
freedom of his people from
apartheid, did not know what
he was getting into. He did not
know that he would spend 27
years of his life in prison on a
deserted island and that later
he would become President of
the apartheid-free Republic of
South Africa. But when Jesus
set out for Jerusalem from the
Mount of Olives, He knew the
consequences of his decision.
Because He knew, that made
His sacrifice that much greater.
It was not an easy decision, as
His experience in Gethsemane
tells us. He underwent a terri-
ble agony, and in fact asked
the Father to reverse the deci-
sion. Nevertheless, He
remained faithful to His mis-
sion.
Jeremiah underwent a simi-
lar struggle. He too was over-
whelmed by the demands of
ministry and he wanted to pack
it in. His experience is the
same as anyone in a difficult
ministry today. Many pastors
have considered packing it in
at some time in their ministry.
It is never easy to witness in
the face of indifference and
even hostility which some min-
isters face. Only a profound
conviction of vocation causes
us to hold on. But it is com-
forting to know that even Jere-
miah, and for a brief moment,
even Jesus, wanted to pack it
in.
This is an experience which
all Christians, especially lead-
ers, face. There are things
which we do not like doing,
but we have to do them if we
want to be faithful to our call-
ing. Sacrifice is not an easy
road, especially for people who
have choices. That is why some
of us, laity and clergy, discon-


tinue serving in the ministries
to which we are called. It is a
level of frustration we do not
wish to endure if we do not
have to. But it is when we
make the sacrifice in ministry
that we find it most rewarding.
It is also then that we become
persons of integrity and char-
acter. And, ironically, this is
also the road to happiness and
fulfillment in ministry. It is.
rewarding when we succeed
despite the odds, and it builds
our characters and our Christ-
ian resolve. Our happiness
does not lie in doing what we
want to do, or what we feel
like doing, but in doing what
God wants us to do.
Love makes sacrifice easy.
Think of what we do for the:
ones we love. Love enables us
to turn the crosses we bear
from stumbling blocks into
stepping stones. What Jesus
did was an. expression of His
love for us and for His Heav-
enly Father. We would do the
same for our children, spouses
and families. The road to
Jerusalem brought Jesus to
Calvary. But it did not end
there. If Jesus had stayed in
the tomb, He would have been
no different from any of the
other prophets. But after Good
Friday there is Easter Sunday.
Jesus rose from the dead for
our redemption, and He stands
with all who walk in His paths
of sacrifice for His name's
sake. He shares the Easter vic-
tory with us. How are you like
Peter? Is your ministry'a stum-
bling block to God's purpose?
Are you a help to the ministry
of your choice here, or are you
a hindrance? If you love like
Jesus, your ministry will be
rewarding. The message of
love is service, even if it is the
ultimate service. What ArepyoUil
prepared: tobd6-for
like Peter. Despite'his;f'ults"'
and shortcomings, he went on
to be one of the greatest lead-
ers of the church for which he
was given primacy at Caesarea
Philippi. I don't know about
you, but I may have doubts
like Peter sometimes, but I
want to be just like Peter. Like
Peter, the one who was not
perfect, but who proved to be
faithful.

Father Moultrie is the Rec-
tor of St Matthew's Anglican
Parish.


Solidarity


THE BAHAMAS UNION OF TEACHERS






Mrs. Ida Potier-TurnqustPrsdn




reust


An. attcmpt to allow


annw-wx anrrUTa% i% a














"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005














Encouraging oung people


better choices


U-PRAISE Dancers and members of Trinity's youth ministry
exercising to be FI.T. for the Kingdom of God at last year's
youth conference.


SiGOSPEL artist, DJ Counsellor, ministers in music at the FIT (Fighting Inner Temptations)


* FREEPORT-based gospel artist, Simeon Outten, ministers at Trinity's F.I.T
(Fighting Inner Temptations) Gym conference last year.


* PASTOR Clint Watson, youth minister at Trinity Assembly "City of Praise", and SHABACK
minister at last year's youth conference under the theme, F.I.T (Fighting Inner Temptations) Gym.


FROM page 1C

Pastor Watson tells Tribune
Reifigion.
"And when you have that
environment already set. up, it
Sh&ps the message to become
more Visual to theme and they
r .e able to actually see the
Issues that you discuss as young
people "
IgEmergency
ft's an Emergency" was
-chosefn as this year's theme
because it is the place where
'aany young people are at now
In"their spiritual walk, Pastor
Wa tson believes.
This is something that we
itfeieeded to be addressed,
4bhfact that there are a lot of


Christian young people out
there who have struggles and
difficulty and are falling back
because they don't have
enough information to keep
them strong and fervent as they
work in the ministry."
This conference, he adds, is
an opportunity to "offer life" to
persons who are dying spiritu-
ally because they are so busy
doing church work that they
are not able to deal with the
"real issues" that they are fac-
ing.
And (hat's why organisers
are using the emergency room
analogy. It's a place where
young people can come to find
remedies and prescriptions for
their daily issues to enable


them to be successful in min-
istry as young people.
But as much as the theme is
an analogy, it is a description of
a real scenario, Pastor Watson
tells Tribune Religion.
"We are showing young peo-
ple that at the end of the day, if
you make bad decisions, you
end up in a hospital, whether it
be from drugs, alcohol, illness-
es, you end up in this emer-
gency room. And what hap-
pens in that room literally
determines if you live or you
die, the difference between life
and death..."
Ministered
According to the youth mih-


ister, Shaback, a singing group
out of Trinity, who has minis-
tered in various churches in the
Bahamas, has discovered in the
past year somewhat of an epi-
demic in many churches -
young persons are not consis-
tent in their walk with God.
He says that many young
persons are not equipped with
knowledge of how to stay faith-
ful. "So you find that these
young people are out there
working for God, doing this
and doing that in the church
one week, and the next week,
they are falling back in their
walk with God. There is no
persistence, no consistency,"
he observes.
But by the end of this con-


ference, Pastor Watson hopes
that those who attend will walk
away with a greater sense of
wisdom, useful information for
Christian living, a "greater
impartation" that they can do
anything through Christ, and
remain holy even as young
people "essentially we want
them to obtain keys that will
allow them to have that
strength to last in their Christ-
ian walk," he adds.
Devotional
Above everything else, Pas-
tor Watson believes the key to
a constant walk with God is a
"strong devotional life", which
includes prayer and reading the


word of God.
"(Christian) music can't
keep you," he warns. "You
need a strong prayer life and a
strong Bible life because every-
thing that you need to over-
come everything that you go
through is in the word of God.
Christian life is based on prayer
and the word of God, and
we've moved away from that
because we are so busy going
to girls' club, boys' club, to
choir practice to youth group -
we spend so much time doing
everything in the church that
we forget to spend time at
home in prayer and in the
word."
"And that," he adds, "is
causing us to fall."


to make


I


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 7C


E :TRIBUNE








PAGE 0, TURSDY, SETEMBR 1,2005EHEITIBUN


Burrows



hopes to



maintain



'high level



of worship'



among



Anglicans


Henderson Bur-
rows, the new-
ly-elected pres-
ident of the
Guild of Saint
Ambrose, hopes to build upon
the accomplishments of his pre-
decessors and continue to
maintain the high level of wor-
ship and fellowship among
Anglicans in parishes all over
the Diocese.
The Guild, named for for-
mer Bishop Saint Ambrose, is
made up of acolytes or "altar
servers" from various parishes
who assist priests in the con-
duct of divine services, and as
the clergymen minister to the
needs of church members.
Under the direction of the
president of the Guild, the
acolytes periodically come
together to assist during dioce-
san services. Their role is sig-
nificant to the overall order of
worship in the Anglican
Church.
Mr Burrows, a member of
Christ Church Cathedral for
more than 30 years, a firm
believer in the Anglican faith,
and a loyal family man, joined
the singing choir in 1966 and
eventually moved into the serv-
ing choir. He succeeds outgoing
guild president Neil Nairn, who
is presently preparing for the
sacred priesthood after three-
and-a-half years of dedicated
and faithful service to the
Guild.
Honoured


CUTIVE members of the Guild of Saint Ambrose pictured, from left: Henderson Burrows (Christ Church Cathedral), pres-
feil Nairn (St Gregory's) past president; Katie Longley (St Gregory's), public relations; Monique Millar (Christ the King),
er; Martin Symonette (St Christopher's), vice-president; Jamal Turnquest (St George's), secretary; and Jack Adderley
Church Cathedral), assistant.secretary. Missing from photo, Chaplain to the Guild of St Ambrose, Archdeacon I Ranfurly
Rector of the Church of Christ the King, Ridgeland Park.


Said Mr Burrows: "I am hon-
oured to assume this new posi-
tion after spending a great
number of years as part of the
Guild of Saint Ambrose. I
salute the work and accom-
plishments of my predecessors
and past president Nairn. He
was very devoted and I wish
him well in his new endeav-
ours. I plan to continue where
he left off, so as to assist with
maintaining a high level of ser-
vice and fellowship during wor-
ship services."
The new president noted
that members of Guild play a
vital role in the worship ser-
vice as they assist the priest and
are "serving to the honour and
glory of God".
He commended the new
executives of.the Guild of Saint
Ambrose and encouraged all
servers to continue to be rev-
erent and perform their ser-
vices to the best of their ability.
Mr Nairn, who is attending
Codrington College in Barba-
dos, took time out to reflect on
his time as president of the
Guild of Saint Ambrose before
leaving the country. He noted
that he was pleased with the
level of fellowship which came
about when the acolytes had
an opportunity to participate
in the "lock-ins" at the Holy
Trinity Activity Centre.
He was also pleased to
administer over some services,
saying that those occasions will
forever remain dear to his
heart, as will his experiences in
assisting with training members
in some of the Family Islands.
The future priest believes the
greatest challenge facing the
Guild today is a decline in
"male presence" within the
Guild. "It seems as if the males
are pretty much stagnated and
the females are coming forward
more, and I feel that males
need to get more involved in
serving."
He was nevertheless quick
to point out that while he wel-
comes women, men need to
make their presence felt,


CHEVROLET




FOR ALL LIFE'S ROADS


PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE




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