Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00189
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: August 24, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00189
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"START YOUR / 'I
MORNINGS I TH
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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.223


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


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TO SCHOOL SUPPLE


Girl reported to

have been killed in

shotgun accident


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A GRAND Bahama teenag-
er is dead today after a shot-
gun, being examined by her
boyfriend, is reported to have
accidentally gone off in her face.
According to police reports,
the boyfriend was showing off a
shotgun his brother had found
in bushes behind-his apartment.
The police report said that
when the young man "cranked"
the gun a shot was launched,
which hit the girl in her face.
The 14-year-old victim's
name was not released to the
press, but police say that her
22-year-old boyfriend and his
24-year-old brother are assist-
ing officers in their investiga-
tions.
Police are now questioning
the two brothers in connection
with the girl's death, which took
occurred at 12.50am yesterday.


The police were alerted to the
incident when an unidentified
woman telephoned the police
dispatch centre to report that
she had heard shots inside an
apartment off Gambier Drive,
Grand Bahama.
When officers arrived at the
location they discovered a
young girl, dressed in a black
tank top and brown corduroy
trousers lying on the floor of a
bedroom in a pool of blood.
The officers reported that the
14 year old had suffered from a
gunshot wound to her face from
a 12 gauge shotgun, which offi-
cers found lying on a bed.
During their investigations
police discovered that the girl,
who is believed to have lived in
Bartlette Hill, and her 22-year-
old boyfriend had just arrived at
his apartment and gone into his
bedroom when other occupants
SEE page nine


BEWU and management

go back to negotiations


THE Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union and executive
management are to go back to
the bargaining table today to
iron out some pressing issues
in their industrial agreements.
Yesterday a management
spokesman said that while he
could not go into the specifics of
what the meetings might bring,
negotiations between both the
BEWU and the Bahamas Elec-
trical Utilities Managerial
Union (BEUMU) are being


conducted in harmoniously.
Both unions had threatened
to take "aggressive" industrial
action if a number of issues were
not resolved by August 30. In
fact the unions had claimed that
executive management had
expressed an unwillingness to
negotiate which had resulted
in the worst relationship
between labour and manage-
ment in BEC's history.
Executive management has
denied the claim.


Tropical storm
warning likely
THE Bahamas is expected
to be under a tropical storm
warning today,
Basil Dean, chief meteoro-
logical officer at the Bahamas
Meteorological Office told-
The Tribune yesterday that
it was possible that a warn-
ing would be issued for
the north-west and central
Bahamas.
"The thing is with it devel-
oping right over us, it will take
SEE page two


Tourism group's
concern at Bimini
Bay development
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
BIMINI Bay resort has again come
under fire. It has now been put on the
watch list of the United Kingdom's action
group, "Tourism Concern".
Environmentally conscience travellers
are now calling for construction to be
stopped on a development they consider
SEE page nine


Man dead and two injured after crash


* By KARAN MINNIS
A CAR crash in Andros has left one man
dead and two others injured one criti-
cally.
According to residents, early Monday
evening Pedro Knowles, a 46-year-old resi-
dent of North Andros, with his 14-year-old
daughter as a passenger, was driving on San


Andros Highway when he was involved in a
head-on collision with another car.
It was reported by the sister of the woman
who accompanied the victims to Nassau
that one of Mr Knowles' legs was broken in
two places. He is listed in stable condition.
His daughter, on the other hand, has
severe internal bleeding and, as of yesterday,
was listed in critical condition.


It was also reported that the driver of the
other car, a male resident of Mastic Point,
Andros, died upon impact.
According to police reports, Mr Knowles
was driving a white Chevy truck when it
was hit by the green van.
Inspector Walter Evans, police press liai-
son, could not confirm the injuries of either
Mr Knowles or his daughter.


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Torrential rains and storms



expected in next 72 hours


* By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
LOCAL forecasters warn
that over the next 46 to 72
hours, the Bahamas can
expect torrential rains and
thunderstorms as the rem-
nants of Tsopical Depres-
sion number 10 looms over
the southeastern Bahamas.
The remnants of the
storm, which dissipated on
Sunday, are moving north-
west at about 10 miles per
hour.
Experts now say however
that it could reorganise and
reform into Tropical
Depression number 10, pos-
sibly by as early as tomor-
row.
According to meteorolo-
gist Jeoffrey Greene,
Bahamians should allow the
fact that there have been no
direct hits so far this year
to lull them into taking a
relaxed attitude to tropical
storms.
As we are still in the
height of the Hurricane sea-
son, everyone should con-
tinue to be prepared vigi-
lant, he warned.


"The remnants of Tropi-
cal Depression number 10 is
now in the area of the
southeast Bahamas, caus-
ing some showers along
with a upper level trough.
We are watching the system
as it's possible over the next
day or so for it to redevelop
into a tropical depression.
Movement
"It's moving over eastern
Cuba and then the central
Bahamas. It should move
over Andros in the next 48
to 72 hours and then move
towards the north," he said.
Over the next two days,
Mr Greene warned that
with the heavy showers and
thunder storms expected,
there is a strong possibility
of flooding in low lying
areas throughout the
Bahamas.
"We expect more storms
to form between now and
throughout September. This
is the time to be on your
guard and before the end
of next month we expect a
few storms to form," he
said.


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Tropical depression 12


brewing in SE Bahamas


FROM page one
the sting out of it but we will
get heavy rainfalls and the wind
should not be too bad," he said.
Up to press time, tropical
depression 12 had developed
near the southeastern Bahamas.
The initial five-day forecast
by the National Hurricane Cen-


tre shows the depression
strengthening into the season's
llth named storm Katrina
- before striking.
The storm could further
strengtheii into a hurricane as it
continues a northwest track in
the Gulf, the report stated.
An Air Force Reserves Hur-
ricane Hunters aircraft found


winds reaching 35 mph in a
poorly defined system, the Hur-
ricane Centre reported.
The depression's estimated
movement was west-northwest
at 12 mph, forecasters said.
One track has the system
sweeping northeast in the
Atlantic on the edge of a high--
pressure system.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
,.and share your story ,,,
* : ...... i i 'I W .


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* A GROUP of staff
members at the Department
of Meteorology are shown
yesterday during a five-day
Doppler radar training course.
Jim Brock, senior sales
manager and a&ialyst at
Enterprises Electronics
Corporation, (standing, third
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instructed the course, which
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including various software
products which can be applied
to enhance the use of Doppler
radar in the Bahamas.
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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRBUNE EDNESDY, AUUST24,NEWS ~


Hugo Chavez

demands

apology from

religious

broadcaster

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
VENEZUELAN leader
Hugo Chavez, who signed
the PetroCaribe accord
with the Bahamas, has
demanded an apology
from American religious
broadcaster Pat Robert-
son.
While appearing on
television on Monday, Mr
Robertson, suggested that
American operatives'
should assassinate Mr
Chavez to stop the coun-
try from becoming a
"launching pad for com-
munist infiltration and
Muslim extremism", it was
reported by the Associat-
ed Press.
In June the Bahamas
signed the PetroCaribe
accord with Venezuela
and 13 other Caribbean
countries, cementing a
multinational deal for
cheaper oil from
Venezuela during a his-
toric meeting in Puerto La
Cruz.

Criticised
Sitting in on the meet-
ing was President Chavez
and Cuban President
Fidel Castro, who both
have criticised the US and
President George Bush.
"We have the ability to
take him (Chavez) out,
and I think the time has
come that we exercise that
ability," Mr Robertson
said Monday night on the
Christian Broadcasting
Network's "The 700
Club".
"We don'tneed another
$200 billion war to get rid
of one, you know, strong
arm dictator," he contin-
ued. "But if he thinks that
we're trying to assassinate
him, I think that we really
ought to go ahead and do
it. It's a whole lot cheaper
than starting a war ...
and I don't think any oil
shipments will stop," he
said.
Mr Robertson, 75, is the
founder of the Christian
Coalition of America and
a former presidential can-
didate. His "700 Club"
programme reaches an
average of 1 million
American viewers daily.

Alleged
In recent months, the
US has alleged that
Venezuela is using its oil
wealth to undermine
democracy in Latin Amer-
ica. Venezuela, the US's
fourth-largest oil supplier,
has threatened to cut off
supplies.
According to CIA esti-
mates, the United States
absorbs almost 60 per cent
Venezuela's oil exports.
Since the signing of the
PetroCaribe agreement in
June, several Bahamian
critics have lashed out at
the accord andthe
allegedly close connection
with Venezuela it would
create.
Commentators have
also highlighted its possi-
ble effect on Bahamas/US
relations.
Government spokesper-
son Al Dillette said that
the comments by Mr
Paterson, a private citi-
zen, do not warrant
comment from the
government of the
Bahamas.
Venezuelan Ambas-
sador to the US Ambas-
sador Bernardo Alvarez
yesterday demanded the
strongest condemnation
of Mr Robertson's com-


Suspended COB




lecturer: I'm




being victimised


Felix Bethel speaks out


A SENIOR lecturer who was
suspended nearly two years ago
after a bitter row with a colleague
claims he is being victimised by
the College of the Bahamas.
Felix Bethel says he is still on
half-pay, even though court
action against him over alleged
threats to college administrator
Dr Linda Davis ground to a halt
three months ago.
"I am suffering real hardship,"
the 55-year-old academic told-
The Tribune yesterday. "This has
caused considerable anxiety and
distress for my family. My elder-
ly parents are very upset about
it."
Mr Bethel, a COB stalwart,
having been a faculty member
since the 1970s, was suspended
on half-pay in January, 2004,
after a blazing argument with Dr
Davis in the college car park.

Accused
Dr Davis subsequently accused
him of making threats and sever-
al court hearings were held. How-
ever, in May this year the Attor-
ney General made it clear he was
not interested in pursuing the
matter.
Despite that, Mr Bethel claims
no attempt has yet been made to
restore his salary or pay the huge
backlog of money owed to him,
estimated at about $270,000.
As a result, he has been
plunged into debt and now faces
school and college fees for his six
children.


"There is no proportion
between what is happening-now
and the dispute between me and
Linda Davis," he said.
"This is causing me continuing
anxiety. It has also distorted my
work because I have been
obsessed with survival."
He said his parents, both in
their seventies, had been partic-
ularly hard-hit by the situation.
His father, he said, was very ill
and deeply affected by it.
"The court matter was
resolved on May 28,2005, yet still
my pay has not been dealt with.
That should have been done
automatically.
"I am being victimised. It is a
case of wilful neglect on the part
of the college. I am now in a sit-
uation where I can't meet my
responsibilities.
"I have been challenging them
for ages to pay me what is due to
me. Now I am stretched to the
limit."
Mr Bethel said his children's
school fees were now in arrears
and his whole life had been upset.
"They (the college) should have
moved with the same haste to
restore my pay as they did to sus-
pend me," he added.
Mr Bethel said his work
for COB had been exemplary,
yet his rights were being
ignored.
The lecturer said he has full
confidence in his attorney,
Wayne Munroe, to eventually
secure justice, but he said the
matter was now urgent because
the school fees were imminent.


During the plagiarism scandal
involving college president Dr
Rodney Smith, Mr Bethel was
the only member of the faculty
and staff to call for his resigna-
tion.
"I felt it my duty as a citizen
and educator to do so," he said.
Now, he believes, college
authorities are victimising him
"even though I have tenure and
have earned it."

Possibilities
Although Mr Bethel said a
return to COB was unrealistic
because of the college council's
prejudice against him, he
believed a sabbatical or second-
ment to the Ministry of Educa-
tion were possibilities.
Meanwhile, he is scraping
along on part-time earnings from
a local newspaper.
Yesterday, The Tribune
approached both college council
chairman Franklyn Wilson
and acting president Dr Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson for
comment.
Dr Chipman-Johnson said: "I
am not in a position to discuss
this matter. Our lawyers are talk-
ing to his lawyers.
'"We are going to get to this
matter as soon as possible.
"Right now it is not appropri-
ate for Mr Bethel to be going to
the press and discussing his hard-
ships."
Mr Wilson was unavailable for
comment.


I SUSPENDED senior lecturer Felix Bethel


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* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Organisation of American States yesterday
launched a trade reference database at the College
of the Bahamas which should prove to be a valuable
asset to civil society.
The database, which was set up in the College's
library, is one of two systems which the OAS has
donated to the Bahamas.
The other is to be installed at the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce.
The specific objective of the trade information
database is to provide a simple and user-friendly
mechanism to access regional.and country-specific
information related to trade and trade negotiations
and to help governments bring this information to
the public.

Presentation
The official presentation took place in COB's
library, where OAS personnel demonstrated the
use of the database.
Acting COB president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson said the new system will help to meet the
college's trade capacity-building needs and will.
enable users tp participate more fully in trade nego-
tiations and discussions in the hemisphere.
"As we create a university library, the college
will welcome the receipt of resources of this nature."
Ms Chipman Johnson said the college commu-
nity is extremely grateful to the OAS for providing


the technical team to assist with the installation of
the reference center and the demonstration of the
database.
"We look forward tq continued collaboration
with the OAS as well as the Ministry of Trade and
Industry. It is through partnerships such as this that
we will be able to strengthen and upgrade the
resources of the college as we continue our march to
university," she said.

Economy
Juliet Mallet Phillip, the director of the OAS Nas-
sau office, noted that trade is an integral part of
the global economy, and said that the OAS is
pleased to provide the service.
She cautioned however the mere existence of the
database is not enough. She said it will only prove
beneficial if it is fully and properly utilised.
Helen Ebong, Permanent Secretary in the Min-
istry of Trade and Industry spoke on behalf of Min-
ister Leslie Miller who was unable to attend.
Mrs Ebong expressed thanks on behalf of gov-
ernment, saying that the database will provide use-
ful information in government analysis and trade
policy formulation.
She noted that the OAS has always been on
the forefront of providing assistance in the
Caribbean.
Following the acceptance speeches, Barbara
Kotschwar and Agustin Cornjo, foreign trade infor-
mation systems co-ordiirators, gaye a demonstra-
tion of the new system.


ments by the Bush
Administration and for a
safety guarantee for Presi-
dent Chavez when visiting
the US.
"We are concerned
.about the safety of our
president... especially
when he is visiting the
US," he said.
President Chavez has
stated in the past that he
believes the US is conspir-
ing to assassinate him, a
claim that US officials
have denied, calling the
accusations "ridiculous".


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THE TRIBUNE







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336


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. :H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.
Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
,Contributing Editor 1972-1991
EILEEN DUPUCHCARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama
TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department- (242) 502-2387
-Nassau Fax:.- (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352 -6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348


Unbelievable tale of rugby bleachers
AT THE end of June six men arrived at the reason I feel really bad," he said
Winton Rugby pitch with a flat bed truck and a Mr Wisdom might feel "really bad" and is
crane. They lifted the security gate off its hinges: undoubtedly sincere in wanting to bring a "lev-
and drove truck and crane onto the newly refur- el of comfort back to the association", but obvi-
bished rugby pitch, damaging both pitch and ously he has no control over his own ministry.
sprinkler system. -. It is now about nine weeks since the rugby
Asked where they thought they were going, complex was broken into, and their bleachers
they replied that they had been sent by the removed ithoutpermission. The only"leve of
Ministry of Youth to remove the club's bleachi- comfort" that they have had so far has been
ers which were needed for a national event, acknowledgment that the bleachers are in the
When a member of the club tried to stop them, Ministry's possession, accompanied by the arro-
he was threatened with "a slap around the gant message: "If you want them, come get
head". them '
The rugby club without any help from- Just who do these people think they are?
government -:had spent $75,0p0 preparing its First their agents break and enter private prop-
complex for the Northern Caribbean World erty, damage that property, threaten a person
Rugby Cup 2007 qualifying round, whichihad who. asks ,them niot to drive over the playing
been held at the Winton pitch in June withthe; field, removes' all the bleachers -- including
Bahamas winning the series. Playing wer e s those loaned by thi Hockey Association 4
from Bermuda, Jamaica and the Caymans., with not so much as.a "by your leave.
The irony of it was thatthecl players hd ,The rugby.clubcould have brought criminal
asked the Ministry for the l6oa of sotiie ofits, charges., Although the police'were notified, no
bleachers to help them withitheir eveht further, action was taken. ,
"To that request," said one.`f the players, "It u'st blows my inind," said a club meinmber,
we got 14 different stori fr oii 13 di erent "they didn't have the common: decency to send
people." us a letter from the Ministry to ask to borrow
Eventually someone from the Ministry gave the bleachers, and now they have the nerve to
them permission to borrow the bleachers. And tell us to come get what they broke into our
so a few club members got a flat bed and a proaertyand'took from s- I can't get over it,
crane and wentto collect'thepromisedbleach- it just blows my mind!"
ers. When they arrived, a Ministry employee Club members said they would have been
told them what would happen to them if they happy to have loaned their bleachers to the
touched even one of the bleachers. Ministry if someone had -madea simple request.
"We went back with our tail between our .' But they wonder what kind of a country we
legs," said a club member. "There seemed to be are now living in that private property is not
confusion as to who was in charge we got the een respected by a government ministry. The
impression that there was no one -~ and ~ we: fact that the six men had to break-in to get the
decided that we would survive without them rugby.bleachers, must have alerted them that
and from now on keep our distance," whoever sent them had no authority to do so. It
The tournament was a success without gdv- should have been a signal that they were break-
ernment's bleachers. The Hocey Association ing the law the moment they removed the secu-
came to the team's assistance with the loan of its rity gates. That should have been all the red flag
own bleachers. that they needed to send them back to the min-
The day after The Tribune reported the istry to report what they had found. They must'
unauthorised removal of the 10 Winton bleach- be complete dim-wits if they felt that anyone -
ers and the serious damage to the pitch and even the minister himself had the power to
sprinkler system, Sports Minister Neville Wis- send them onto private property.
dom quickly distanced himself from the high.- Our advice to the angry members of the
handed behaviour of those who identified them- rugby club is to hire a flat bed truck and a
selves as sent from his ministry. rane, collect your bleachers and send a bill to
He pledged to take "whatever steps are nec- the Ministry of Sports a bill that will include
essary to bring a level of comfort back to thehe he cost of collecting your property, and the
association." '': ; damage done to yourrugby pitch.:
Mr Wisdom said that his ministry will con- Theonly level of "comfort" that will now
tinue to support rugby. "I have found that they satisfy the hardworking players is that their bill
are one of the most organised and cooperative for the damage done be paid promptly with
organisations and have asked for very,e very no more nose-thumbing from arrogant little
minimal governmentassistance and that is de, ,pipsqueaks.


EDITOR, The Tribuine
THE foreign media is com-
menting and warning us of the
possible economic conse-
quences if oil prices continue to
rise yesterday a barrel of oil
which was a year ago priced at .
$25-$30 today the same identi-
cal barrel is priced at $66.
In quite recent times we saw
just how 'oil prices determine
the wellness of the global econ-
omy remember back in the
1980's and 1990's when the
developed world was hijacked
by oil production and. world
recession set in?
. The unfortunate consequence
of'hybrid environmentalism, the
illogical mental approach to"
what, really. negatively affects
the environment seems now
after 10-12 years to be coming
very close, tohaunting the world
with .the possibility that there
could be a world recession.
The prime factors that are the
cause of the speculative pil mar-
ket are as follows lack of
refining capacity, refineries are
producing no surplus product;
no one wants a new refinery in
their backyard (environmental-
ists); the environmentalists
don't want exploration even
where it would have limited
footprint, Alaska however that
production would 'improve US
self-sufficiency and reduce the
reliance on external sources; the
insecurity in many oil producing


countries; an over demand for
consumption; the American and
our love for high consumption,
vehicles, SUVs; our love for air-.
conditioing and refusal to con-,
serve and seek alternative ener-
gy sources.
Yes we get annoyed when
$60'will not fill up the SUV but
let's think a bit of what we could
do to reducelconsumption?
The petroleum importers,
ESSO, Shell and Texaco can-
not hide behind what they seem
to perceive is a holier than thou
position they must cause and
create dialogue to reduce the
first cost of gasoline.
.We need to evaluate how
many driving trips are simply
not necessary? Do you know
how much gas you will save if
you drive within the speed lim-
its? Government has to bite the
bullet and complete an island-
wide road improvement pack-
age immediately (forget local
contractors, let them learn side
by side a foreign contractor but
let's get the job done).
: We need urgently a bypass to
downtown cutting just under
the arch south of the hill which
would eliminate the require-
ment to use Bay Street. We
must be willing to accept some


radical solutions an island 21
by 7 cannot continue to have a
vehicle count of over 115,000
without bursting! Decentralise
all non-essential downtown
commercial offices and busi-
nesses. Yes, consider the relo-
cation of all large downtown
employers (offer incentives gov-
ernment) we have no alterna-
tive but to go with taller com-
mercial office buildings in the
Oakes Field area for Govern-
ment and private.
Will a recession' come? The
jury is out however this time it is
fortunate that much of the sud-
den windfall of massive oil prof-
its are seemingly quickly being
expended by OPEC countries
in upgrades of oil production
facilities and heavy increase in
consumer spending which dri-
ves western, developed country
production which accounts for
the lack of any visible drop in
gasoline consumption in the US
over the past months.
We had better hope this con-
tinues as our expanded tourism
sector this time around has a
big problem' as we cater to a
much higher profiled customer
and we have more beds. Will
we be able to attract enough
visitors to avoid shorter work.
weeks and lay-offs -ask ESSO,
Texaco and Shell?
J MOORE.'. ,.:
Nassau
August122005 .


Toremove Sir Stafford


S-to .


in.Baha.mian histo


EDITOR, The Tribune
PLEASE allow, me space in
your valued column to express
my outrage to an article in your
paper of 28/7/05 under the
heading 'Smith': Sir Stafford
should stay on note.
It is a shame and disgrace that:
someone has to come to
defence of this sort of thing
because'before he was put on
the $10 bill, it was debated in
parliament. '
There were those who
opposed, but in the end he was
placed on, the'bill and ini my
opinion he should remain there.,
The currency of a country is
'sacred in my opinion and should
never'be used as a political foot-
ball.
Sir Stafford was none of my


favourite Bahamians, but I
would be a hypocrite if I said
"he did not make valuable con-
tributions to the Bahamas". He
was the architect of tourism and
"'finance, it was he who had the
vision to change our currency
from pound shillings and pence
to dollars in 1966 to make it eas-
ier for the tourists the major-
ity then, as now are Americans.
This type of political spiteful-
ness must stop.What" are we
going to do next when the gov-
ernment in power is of another
.political party? Are we going
to take Sir Lynden off the $1
bill, or Sir Milo off the $20?
What about Sir Cecil, and Sir
Roland?
.Please politician, let us be
fair and let history be our guide.
It was Sir Stafford Sands and


Roy Solomon in' the old days
who were the powers in the
colony. It was those two men
who negotiated with the British
and the American governments
for Bahamians to go and work
in the US.
It was later known as the
Contract/Project during that
time the hotel in Nassau used to
be open only three months out
of the year. I am not saying
what I heard, I'mt tellingwhat's'
known. I left school in 1954 and
went on the Contract.
Where is the Christian com-
munity? Particularly the Chris-
tian Council? Come on out of
hiding..,
PRINCE G SMITH.
Freeport, Grand Bahama
August 2005


Questions




on both oil




and traffic


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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


i


!


THE TRIBUNE







WEL)UNIv:UAY, AUtUUb I24, UUo, rtAUb b


THE TRIBUNE


r- LOCAL NEWS l I


Public 'may

soon have

access' to

restaurants'

health grades

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE option of giving the
public more insight into the
health practices of restau-
rants is under review, direc-
tor of Environmental Health
Ron Pinder told The Tribune
yesterday.
He explained that the pub-
lic may soon have access to
the grades-that, restaurants
receive during health inspec-
tions.
*"At present results of
health inspections are confi-
dential and are generally giv-
en to the restaurant's owner
or manager. The public is not
informed about infractions
that are discovered during
health inspections," he said.
The environmental health
director said that a change in
policy would serve the pur-
pose of educating the
Bahamian public.
"People would be able to
act from a more informed
position it is their health
after all that this concerns,"
he said.
Mr Pinder said that the
publication of the restaurant
grades will generally bring
more transparency to the
health inspection process.
"Also owners, through this
process of public scrutiny,
will be encouraged to main-
tain sanity and safety at their
restaurants," he said.
Mr Pinder said he has as
yet not received any feed-
back from restaurateurs
regarding the possible policy
change.
He pointed out, however,
that this approach should not
be anything new to restau-
rants with franchise branches
in the United States.
"It is common practice in
the United States, and in
Europe," he added.

Ratings
He further emphasised
that the publication ofe
ratings AQIS :tot ]i~altl
one whoiprepares, h1nfdrs"l'e
and sells food products."
"This would apply to
supermarkets, delis, coffee
shops, eateries, even to
'occasional vendors,' which
we call' road-side vendors'
in the Bahamas. In New
York, even the hot dog stand
receives ratings," he said.
Mr Pinder said that he
does not "necessarily" feel
that the publication of the
'health inspection grades will
make business more difficult
for smaller restaurants and
* street vendors, but rather
make them "adhere to a cer-
tain standard."
He said that the idea of
making the restaurant grad-
ing system public is only part
of an extensive review of the
Environmental Health Act
"The aspect of the restau-
rant grading system is part of
the 'current review of several
proposed amendments to the
Environmental Health Act,"
he said.











WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 24
2:00am Community Pg.1540AM
8:00 Bahamas Sunrise
9:00 Mr. Ballooney B.
9:30 Treasure Attic
10:00 CMJ Club Zone
10:30 Fun
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Health For The America
1:30 Wheelin
2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 TramaineHawkins


3:30 J. Douglas Wiley
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Cybernet
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Baker's Bay
8:15 Sea Rangers: Dolphin
Encounters
8:30 Dance Nia Pt 2
9:00 Perscription For Health:
Dimentia
10:00 Souled Out
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Pg. 1540 AM
NOE0 N -V3rsre


Harrold Road project





'is in its final stages'


* By NATARIO McKENZIE

AFTER several delays to the
Harrold Road reconstruction
project, officials at the Ministry
of Works say the roadway could
be completed by the end of the
month.
The delays have mainly been
due to complications caused by
underground utilities, but
according to Works Deputy
Director Khader Alikhan, the
project has been going ahead
steadily and is in its final
stages.
"Barring something com-
pletely beyond our control we
should be ready to open the
roadway by months' end or
soon thereafter," said Mr
Alikhan.

Marking
Mr Alikhan told The Tribune
yesterday that the final layer of
asphalt has been laid and the
process of painting lane mark-
ings is underway. He said how-
ever that inclement weather
may play a factor in this process.
"We are trying our best and
hopefully the weather will not
deteriorate and we will be able
to complete that portion of the
project," Mr Alikhan said.
He said BEC also has to con-
nect the street lights so that they
can become operational.
The nearly $6 million road
project was awarded to local
contractors Bethel's Trucking
and Bahamas Hot Mix .in
March of 2004 and was expect-
ed to be completed earlier this


* THE Harrold Road project may be completed by the end of the month.


year. Several delays however
pushed back the project's com-
pletion deadline.
The project was initially
included in the New Providence
Road Development Project
which was scrapped when the


parent company of Associated
Asphalt, which was contracted
to do the work, went bank-,
rupt.
Following the announcement
of Associated Asphalt's inabil-
ity to proceed, government


decided to separate the Harrold
Road work from the larger pro-
ject.
Among the road works
included in the Harrold Road
project are the reconstruction
of 1.5 miles of the existing two


traffic lanes, construction of two
new lanes, as well as the con-
struction of two roundabouts -
one at the junction of Sir Milo
Butler highway and Bethel
Avenue and one at the junction
of Yellow Elder Way.


Man pleads not guilt


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
A 32-YEAR-OLD Augusta Street man
charged with possessing of over $10,000 worth
of drugs was arraigned in Magistrate's Court yes-
terday.
Haitian national Ludner Telus pleaded not
guilty to possessing three quarters of a pound
cocaine and six grams of marijuana with the intent
to supply.
Telus, who appeared before Magistrate Roger
Gomez, was not granted bail and was remanded
to Fox Hill Prison until August 31 when he is
expected to appear before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel.
A CHIPPINGHAM man was granted
$10,000 bail after denying that he stole over
$80,000 worth of cigarettes.
It is alleged that on Thursday August 18 while


Man's body -

still not

identified we are lo
person to
By KARAN MINNIS necessary

POLICE are still unable to
.identify the body of a black man
found floating near Arawak
Cay on Monday morning.
It is believed that the young
man drowned, however an
investigation is still on going as
to the reasons behind his death.
According to Inspector Wal-
ter Evans the young man,
believed to be in his 20s, was
dressed in blue jeans, a white
shirt and white tennis shoes at
the time he was found.
POLICE report conduct-
ing a raid on Monday that lead
to a firearm arrest.
Officers conducted a search
at a Yamacraw residence after
receiving what .they said was
valuable information.
Upon conducting the search
the officers found a .40 Ruger
pistol and a .9 mm pistol were
found along with 230 rounds of
live ammunition.
A 24-year-old male is in A
police custody in contention
with this matter.
S*POLICE also reported that
the KFC on East Street South
was robbed by two armed men
around 8 am on Monday.
The men, allegedly robbed an
employee of an undetermined
amount to cash and fled in an
unknown direction. The matter
is currently under investigation.


at Sea Board Marine on East Bay Street, 40-
year-old Sylvanus Williams stole 59 cases of Roth-
mans King Size Blue cigarettes valued at $02,600,
the property of Addington Cox. WiUliams
appeared before Magistrate Marilyn Meers and
was granted bail with two sureties. He is to return
to court on November 15.
A 38-YEAR-OLD Fox Hill man was
arraigned in Magistrate's Court yesterday on an
armed robbery charge.
It is alleged that on Friday, July 18 Wayne
Thompson robbed Kenya Rahming of $240 cash
which was the property of Builders Mart on
Prince Charles Drive.
Thompson was allegedly armed with a shot-
gun at the time.
He was not required to enter a plea to
the charge and will return to court on November
15.



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Rising oil prices and the





response of the Bahamas


When buying and selling are
controlled by legislation, the first
things to be bought and sold are
legislators. P. J. O'Rourke.

R ATHER than forcing
some much-needed
clear thinking, record high oil
prices are being used by our
politicos as an excuse to grab
more power for a public sector
that barely works as it is.
Experts say high-priced oil
will soon drive up costs for
everything from food, to man-
ufactures, to transportation.
And as this inflation works
through the economy, it will
upset voters no end.
So our government which
has "controlled" rising fuel
prices by legislation since the
1970s is seeking to escape
economic reality yet again.
Oil prices have doubled in
the last two years and are like-
ly to stay high. We are about


to break the psychological bar-
rier of $4 for a gallon of gas -
and we are already paying big
surcharges for electricity.
Sustained high fuel costs -
or a sudden supply shock -
could trigger serious conse-
quences. Our government's
response has been to join an
anti-American alliance whose
goal is to restore discredited
confrontationist policies of the
past.
HAS OIL PEAKED?
The question of whether oil
production has "peaked" is hot-


ly debated around the world,
with some predicting the end
of civilization as we know it
when the anticipated energy
crunch begins perhaps as
early as the end of this decade.
But the debate is clouded by
a lack of reliable data: "The
definitions of oil reserves are
different in many countries,"
according to a recent French
government report. "The
capacities of sustainable pro-
duction by OPEC countries are
very difficult to estimate."
But even big oil companies
are warning that the world is
running out of petroleum and
calling on the public to help the
industry do something about it.
ExxonMobil, the world's
largest energy group (which
trades as Esso in the Bahamas),
said in a recent ad: "The world
faces enormous energy chal-
lenges. There are no easy
answers."
The intensifying debate over
peak oil comes amid a slew of
news stories highlighting how
high oil prices are beginning to
impact the American economy
by hurting low-income workers
and cutting into corporate bot-
tom lines.
The Vfew York Times
recently reported that some
Americans are cutting back on
discretionary driving in
response to record pump
prices.
And Wal-Mart reported that,
its profits. are growing at their
slowest rate'fn Tour years,
in part because of costly gaso-
line.
Some analysts say this is a
good thing, because higher


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prices will help restrain demand
and make it easier for oil com-
panies to invest in new produc-
tion that will expand supply.
But there are fears that a
major oil supply shock may
consign us to a deep recession.
Experts point to a shortage of
refining capacity, security fears
about Irag, Iran and Saudi, Ara-
bia, and the volatility of the
Chavez regime in Venezuela,
which has already threatened
to cut off oil exports to the
United States.
CHAVEZ AND
THE UNITED STATES
According to one US com-
mentator, "High oil prices have
made Chavez an antagonist to
be reckoned with, and we
ignore such a menace at our
peril. Chavez is dangerous,
underestimated and capable of
almost anything. He is actively
working to recruit'terrorist
nations and developing coun-
tries into his campaign against
the United States."
Earlier this year Chavez
went on al-Jazeera television
to call for Arab and developing
nations to unite against the US.
And he has tried to forge clos-
er ties with Iran, which is
embroiled in a dangerous dis-
pute over nuclear development
with the US and Europe.
Chavez recently called the
United States the "most sav-
age, cruel and murderous
empire. that has existed in the
history of the world."
Experts say there is a. clear
bid by Venezuela to become a
'small major power' committed
to diminishing Washington's
power in Latin America and
the Caribbean.
Just this month the US
expressed concern that
Venezuela was using its oil
,wealth to-destabilize neigh-
,bours. And Chavez recently
ended co-operation with the
US Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration, claiming its agents
were spies.
And some think Chavez
may be able to tip the strategic
balance in the hemisphere
enough to wrest control of the
Organization of American
States from Washington. This
could lead to the re-entry of
Cuba, which was expelled in
1962, further eroding US influ-
ence in the region.
According to one analysis:
"The inroads made by Caracas'
oil diplomacy have sharpened
the divide in the Caribbean
region. With Washington seem-
ingly unwilling to offer incen-


tives to oil-dependent states in
the region, Caracas is free to
create its 'solidarity' coalition."
Whatever view you may
have on these matters, the pol-
itics involved are not insignifi-
cant. We can only speculate as
to whether our government has
considered the implications, but
we note that both Barbados
and Trinidad declined to sign
on to PetroCaribe.
CHAVEZ AND
THE BAHAMAS
Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Leslie Miller has been the
sole promoter of PetroCaribe,
which seeks to draw Caribbean
nations into an alliance based
on government-to-government
deals. His line is that we should
take what is on offer and ignore
the noise in the market.
But the local political and.
commercial ramifications are
equally significant and remain
largely unexplored. Can we
trust our jbok-jook government
to do the right thing?
According to a West Indian
commentator, "spiralling oil
prices have the potential of
undermining our economic sta-
bility and long term growth.
The PetroCaribe initiative rep-
resents a possible lifeline (but)
there are hurdles in the way."
The first hurdle is that we
must sign a bilateral treaty with
Venezuela to set up a jointly
owned state energy agency.
And then presumably we would
need storage facilities and a dis-
tribution network expensive
infrastructure that is currently
in private hands.
We have yet to hear any rea-
soned account as to how Petro-
Caribe's requirements for state
control can be reconciled with
our existing privately owned
energy sector.
Meanwhile, Esso, Shell and
Texaco have yet to see details
of how PetroCaribe will work,
although a government-
appointed advisory board has
been looking at the issue for
months.
This handpicked body is
likely to endorse a new energy
regime handing Mr Miller
some much-needed political
cover.
Mr Miller says the Venezue-
lan government will ship oil
around the region, selling to
governments in each country
at a savings. This fuel will then
be re-sold to BEC and the pri-
vate oil distributors at lower
mark-ups, producing lower
prices.
But the actual impact on


pricing is unknown. Petro-
Caribe offers cheap credit, not
cheap oil. Countries will be able
to finance half their oil imports
over many years at nominal
.interest rates, and even pay for
their oil with bananas if need
be.
But for this to work we have
to believe that governments can
provide better prices than the
private sector --- without tax
subsidies.
VISION FOR THE
FUTURE

Recent trends suggest that
high oil prices will continue
until spare production capacity
increases if that is possible.
But rather than a costly search
for more oil, some experts rec-
ommend conserving its use and
focusing on alternative energy
sources.
In its last budget, the gov-
ernment eliminated import
duty on solar panels, but there
has been no follow-up to pro-
mote solar power. And only
one local outfit currently deals
with this technology.
Proposals for wind farms on
Grand Bahama and Abaco
have been lingering on the
table for years --just as the
proposed LNG terminalshave'
remained-stalledsiiice 2002.
A proposal for a multi-mil-
lion-dollar waste-to-energy
plant on New Providence is also
gathering dust on some minis-
terial desk.
And our policymakers still
can't come up with a decent
energy strategy that takes,
account of alternative fuels and
new technologies.
Lack of vision is a big prob-
lem. There are few renewable :
energy systems operating in the
Bahamas today other than i
isolated research stations and.
resorts. usig ro0qft pgpr cells
for water heating.
Meanwhile, energy experts
around the world advocate an:.
alternative future where more:'
.efficient-use--of-powerrnew
technologies and green archi-
tectute replace the current cen-
tralized energy system based
on fossil fuels that dates back to-
the early 20th century.
Instead of playing geopoliti-.'
cal games, taking huge risks
with our US-dependent econo-
my and trying to control basic,
economics, this is where we.,
should be going.
What do you think?

Send comments to?
larry@tribunemedia.net'


Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:

Accounts Clerk IV (Northern Bahamas Campus)

The successful candidate will report to the Assistant Vice President, Northern
Bahamas and to the Supervisor, Accounts Receivable, Oakes Field Campus and be
responsible for the following duties:

* Daily collection and daily banking of all monies in accordance with Accounting
Department Procedures.
* Receiving, recording and receipting cash and receivables from tuition, fees,
grants, rents, ancillary enterprises, etc. Issuing official receipts for all income.
* Balancing daily end-of-day batches from revenue collections.
* Analyzing & Reporting all daily revenue and collections by bank account,
mode of payment and receipt category.
* Proper and timely reporting and documenting of all overages and/or shortages
to the supervisor.
* Keying in all transactions into the Management Information System.
* Disbursing petty cash
* Any other related duties as required.

Qualifications/Experience/Personality Traits


An Associate Degree in Accounting or Business.
Minimum of two (2) years experience in a similar position
Experience with automated financial application is an advantage
Trustworthy and of good character
Meticulous and ability to work under pressure


Salary Scale: $16,900 x $500 $25,900

Interested candidates should submit a resume with supporting documents through
their Head of Department by Wednesday, August 31, 2005, to:

The Director
Human Resources Department
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, Bahamas


Visit our website at www.co


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE:







THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 7


Hope fades

for finding

missing

migrants

DR. PABLO DELVIS
RUIZ PORES left his home in
Cuba onAug. .Tmhi!an s for
a treacherous boat trip to th-e
United States and hopes of
reuniting with his wife in Mia-
mi.
The physician had a U.S. visa
that could have allowed him an
easier passage to Florida, but
the Cuban government would
not let him leave because his
profession is considered too
valuable, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Relatives
He hasn't been seen since
and his relatives feared Tues-
day he could have been one of
the 31 Cubans believed to have
gone down in the deadliest
migrant boating accident in
years.
"They're all going crazy try-
ing to find out what's happen-
ing. They know he's on a boat
and they think it may be that
boat. They're absolutely falling
apart," said Mania Perez, a
family friend.
The Coast Guard spent a sec-
ond day Tuesday searching the
Florida Straits for survivors, but
hope was fading for finding any
of the missing migrants, who
likely had no life jackets and
were traveling as part of an ille-
gal smuggling operation.


Dr Bethel: meetings with Caribbean




experts 'not attempt to force CSME'



Minister responds to 'mixed messages'


* By KARAN MINNIS

MEETINGS held in the
Bahamas to harmonise health
leglislation across the
Caribbean do not represent
an attempt to force the CSME
on the Bahamas, said Minister
of Health Dr Marcus Bethel.
Dr Bethel spoke to The Tri-
bune yesterday, saying that he
was taking the opportunity to
respond to any "mixed mes-
sages" that the may have
arisen over the issue.
He said that meetings
between Bahamian health
professionals and Caribbean
experts organised by govern-
ment earlier this month were
"not a consultancy to help us
draft legislation."
He said that the meetings
were rather "an exercise in
harmonisation of proposed
legislation."
During the week of August
8, over 80 professionals from
various health sectors partici-
pated in the draft model leg-
islation consultations with sev-
eral CARICOM officials at


"CARICOM is simply doing
what is has been mandated to do
by government heads and are
seeking to find ways to better
the harmonising legislation."

Dr Marcus Bethel


the Ministry of Health and
Environment headquarters on
Meeting Street.
The week-long consulta-
tions focused on draft model
legislation for doctors, den-
tists, nurses and midwives, and
pharmacists, and generic pro-
fessionals.

Drafts

Modifications were made to
the existing drafts for health
legislation and two new Bills
were developed; one for vet-
erinarians and the other for
medical laboratory technolo-
gists.


Speaking to the press last
week, Dr Marcus Bethel said:
"What you are witnessing
really is the impact of global-
isation with respect to the
health services sector where
there is greater strength in
having some degree
of uniformity with respect to
professionals, their
registration and other mat-
ters."
In a ministry statement
recently released it was said
that the consultations
provided "valuable exchange,
not only on what is being
done in CARICOM,
but the significant advance-
ment of work in the


Bahamas".
"Noteworthy is that the
Bahamas already has several
pieces of legislation regulat-
ing the sector and is also in
the process of updating exist-
ing legislation or establishing
new legislation for areas not
yet covered," the statement
added.
"It is now expected that
consultations will continue
among the stakeholders with
the aim of arriving at a con-
sensus on the regulating for


their sector," the statement
said.
According to Dr Bethel, the
Bahamas is under no obliga-
tion to participate in any of
the proposed harmnnonisations.
"CARICOM is simply
doing what is has been man-
dated to do by government
heads and are seeking to find
ways to better the harmonis-
ing legislations," he said.

Health

"We already form legisla-
tions in reference to health
and as a result we are just
sharing information about it."
The CARICOM team,
which was in the Bahamas last
week, is now moving on to
other Caribbean countries
such as Barbados, Dominica,
Trinidad and Tobago, and
Belize.
Their plans are to continue
the same tasks of gathering
information about bettering
of the legislations in the same
format as they have conduct-
ed in the Bahamas.


PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


---... BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021- 2025
ISSUEOFRBS75.000-000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Sctt-and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 20th June, 2005.
Applications will be poeived by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 24th August, 2005 and
will close at 3:001imDn 6th September, 2005. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 7th September, 2005- -
If the total subscriptions exceed th ofB$75,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refaid will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.
The date of this Prospectus is th August, 2005
The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$75,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2025. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue

Issue
Rate Of Interest Amount Price
B$ B$-


5/32%
3/16%
7/32%
1/4%
9/32%


Above Prime Rate Bahamask-Rgistered-Stock2021
Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2022
Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2023
Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2025


15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15,000,000.00
15.000,000.00
.75.000.000.00


* j


n**!!Sf..


100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 7th September, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 7th September, 2005, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 7th March, 2006 and thereafter on 7th September and 7th March in every year until the
Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
the principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS
Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 24th
August, 2005 and will close at 3:00 pm on 6th September, 2005, allocations will*
commence at 9:30 a.m. on 7th September, 2005. All envelopes enclosing applications
should be labelled "Application For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks".

lUnits The Stock will be in units of BS100.00.
Applications Applications must be for BS100.00 or a multiple of that sum.
Appileation Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:
1. Bank of The Bahamas International
------ 2--_F~- irst Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
3. Finance Ctoriration-of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibank, N.A.
PUBLIC DEBT
Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2005 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,627,218,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE
The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


Revenue


Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)
Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


FY2003/2004*
B$

943,760,000

993,987,000



80,890,000


FY2004/2005**
BS$

1,051,624,000

1,067,259,000



117,296,000


FY2005/2006**
B$
Approved Budget
1,132,774,000

1,145,691,000



132,901,000


** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at June
30, 2005 totalled B$454,138,000.


THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF'A'plE BAgAMAS


BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021- 202


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOATENT No.
DATE:


The Registrar
c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868
assau, s


I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stockl


(." "l^ N-l?; -* ,} ^^ l'


5/32%
3/16%
7/32%
1/4%
9/32%


Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2022
Bahamas Registered Stock 2023
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025


and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.


I/We enclose B$


in payment for the Stock applied for.


In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stockl


Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock


BANK DRAFTS SHOULD BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.


Ordinary Signature
Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)


Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses, Telephone Nos.)






(Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should be given
below.)
Ordinary Signature
Name in Full
Address
Telephone No.

Ordinary Signature
Name in Full
Address
Telephone No.

I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:


Bank Name
Bank Branch


Account Type.

Account Number


I U -" I I I i I I I I I


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA INEWSIII IIII II I


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PAGE f ^^ 8, WNESDY AUGUST^ 24,B 2005B THE TRIBUNE
'^^^?~~~~~~~ A^^ ^rfi B jj


-- UH UH -BS~ -^ U.'^^ ^ ^^^ '^T^ ^P^~.ag


Minister pleads for



end to boating feud


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with the purchase of scratch resistant lenses


* BY BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
FREEPORT Minister
for Youth Sports and Cul-
ture Neville Wisdom has
called for leaders in the
sport of sloop-racing to
put their petty differences
aside for the good of the
sport.
Mr Wisdom was refer-
ring to tensions that have
surfaced of late between
different factions in the
sport.

Problems
The problems have.
reportedly arisen as a
result of disagreements
between the three sailing
associations that exist in
the Bahamas.
The minister's com-
ments came at the official
opening of the 11th Annu-
al Grand Bahama Regatta
on Friday at Tranquility
Shores on Taino Beach.
The event proved very
successful attracting four


s(mfcol-*


MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom


'A' class boats, four 'B'
class and seven 'C' class
racing sloops.
At the end of the three-
day competition, is was the
Southern Cross, -winning
the A class division, fol-
lowed by the New Coura-
geous, Red Stripe and the
Lucayan Lady.
The Heath Cliff took top
honours in the B class, fol-
lowed by the Eudeva,
Cobra and the Passion.
The Fugitive won the 'C'
class followed by the Lady
Ruthnell and the Sacrifice.
Minister Wisdom began


his remarks by asking the
audience to observe a
moment of silence for the
late E Mark Knowles, a
popular boat builder and
sailor from Long Island
who passed away follow-
ing and accident on his
fishing vessel a few weeks
ago.

Hurdles
He told the organisers
of the Grand Bahama
Regatta that he was
pleased to see the event
back on track, after many
hurdles and setbacks.
"Regattas has become a
major national sporting,
cultural, community and
economic event through-
out all of the islands of the
Bahamas.
"It has the tremendous
potential to generate eco-
nomic actiXity in the
islands and in many cases
regattas are the major eco-
nomic activity on some of
our islands.
"It brings other Bahami-
ans and visitors to the
islands to fill the hotels
and money is spent with
local businesses, the taxi
drivers and food vendors,
and the entire island gets a
good economic boost," he
stated.
He said that regattas
allow Bahamians to pre-
serve the indigenous sport
of sloop sailing and is


exciting for sailing fans
and spectators.
"My ministry will do all
it can to keep this indige-
nous sport alive," he said.
"The time has come
gentlemen ... that we put
away all of the nonsense
that we are associating
with this wonderful
Bahamian sport of sloop
sailing."
Using the children as an
example, he told sailors
that they ought to remem-
ber the young ones who
want to learn and be apart
of the sport.
"I am at the point where
I have to say these things.
Grown men, intelligent
men, who argue about the
most trivial nonsense, and
we want to destroy and
disturb the sport, not
understanding that it's
now for them (children).
"And you know, most of
the people that sail, that
really do the sailing, not
the talkers, the real
sailors, they don't engage
in all this controversy and
all this nonsensjica4,talk
and all of the f.bolishpess.
They should be the, one to
enjoy this sport," he
said.
He assured sailors that
the government, sensible
thinking Bahamians; the
corporate world and the
private sector will all do
their part to ensure the
success of regatta sailing
in the Bahamas.


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Headquarters and Commercial complex with responsibility for quality
control, design and construction coordination and contract management.
Project Manager will be expected to:

* Participate in the planning and formulation of design alternatives and solutions of
construction, plans and specifications from planning and design, phase to completion
of construction documents, process to include full: interpretation and review of
proposed designs, architectural drawings and building specifications, including
assessment of structural and electrical, engineering;
* Develop and administer project budgets, estimates and fiscal controls, monitor
contracts and quality and cost control provisions;
* Oversee all aspects of the day-to-day management of construction, including
coordination and monitoring of work performed by architectural, engineering and
construction subcontractors to ensure quality and maximize meeting of deadlines
* Liaise with institutional, government and local entities and initiate and coordinate
revisions where appropriate after review with client;
* Ensure project operations comply with design specifications and government
regulatory policies and regulations;
* Establish performance and delivery, criteria, ensuring that client and institutional
requirements are being met; coordinate procurements as appropriate;
* Advise and make recommendations as they relate to contracts, purchase orders,
change orders and contractor payment invoices;
* Research and prepare various reports as they relate to operations, equipment, policies.
* Perform miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.



Bank of The Bahamas
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To obtain a copy of the Project Plan, letters of request with credentials should be sent to
Laura Williams P.O Box N 7118 Nassau, Bahamas
Requests must be received no later than Friday, September 2, 2005.


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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








TH TRIBUELWEDESDAYAAUGUTE24N0NEWS I~


C copyrighted Material.



*Syndicated Conte4nt


vailal from Commercial News Provi


UK tourist organisation



concern at Bimini Bay


FROM page one
will lead to the destruction
of eco-systems and threaten the
local community.
The London-based organisa-
tion "Tourism Concern" has in
its most recent efforts launched
a campaign urging tourists to
speak out against the construc-
tion of the Bimini Bay Resort
and casino and contact Prime
- Minister Perry Christie with
their concerns.
On the group's website they
call ion people to "please take
urgent action to stop the con-2
struction of a tourist resort
which threatens the people of
Bimini in the Bahamas."
The organisation, an envi-
ronmental action group, found-
ed in 1989, has established con-
nections with agencies through-
out the world. It claims that the
resort will result in the loss by
local residents of rights to land,
water and beaches.
"Water supplies are being
used for the tourism develop-
ment resulting in water to local
communities being frequently
turned off.


14-year-old

girl 'was

shot in

the face'


FROM page one
in the house heard a very
loud blast.
On rushing into the bedroom
they saw the girl dead on the
floor.
Her boyfriend told investi-
gating officers that he had just
taken the shot gun from the
closet to show his girlfriend
when he "cranked it" and a shot
went off.
His 24-year-old brother, who
also lives with his brother at the
apartment, told detectives that
he had found the short handle
Mossberg shotgun in the bush-
es at the rear of the building
three days ago and had kept it.
The tragic incident yesterday
prompted police to issue a gen-
eral warning about handling
unfamiliar firearms.
-"If you don't know anything
about a weapon you are prone
to have an accident, even a fatal
one. If you are not an expert
on weapons do not, please do
not attempt to handle them, call
the police," said Assistant Com-
missioner in charge of crime,
Reginald Ferguson.
Mr Ferguson also said that it
is an offence to keep a gun that
one has found.
"(A person) is duty bound to
take it to the police and endeav-
our to find the right owner," he
said. "If after six months no one
claims it you have a right to it,
other than that you are in con-
travention of the law."


"Mangroves have been bull-
dozed, land has been carved up,
the sea floor dug and destroyed
and the North Bimini lagoon
has been silted with dredge
effluent," the organisation fur-
ther states.
The group raised the concern
that the destruction of the man-
groves will endanger the habi-
tats of species, including those
of dolphins, turtles and sharks
and some which are seriously
threatened.

Extinction

Earlier this week, Dr Samuel
H Gruber, a University of Mia-
mi professor and renowned
shark biologist, told the Wash-
ington Post that he fears that
the resort development will
lead to the start of the extinc-
tion of lemon sharks, just one of
the species that breed in the
waters around Bimini
"At the end of my career I
get to document the destruc-
tion of the species I've been
documenting for 20 years -
wonderful," he lamented as he


watched the bulldozers do their
work at Bimini Bay.
Based on an 11-year survey,
starting in the mid-90s, Dr Gru-
ber documented that between
2000 and 2001, during the heav-
iest dredging of the ocean floor
for the resort's construction, the
survival rate for lemon sharks
fell 30 percent, and sharks in
the dredging area had higher
toxin levels. He has yet to assess
the impact of the mangrove
destruction, which-began on a
large scale this year.
President of the Bimini Bay
Resort and-Casino; RafA'el
Reyes, told the Post that he
understands the concern, but
questions Dr Gruber's statistics
and the idea that "sharks and
development don't mix."
"We have a vested interest in
making sure things remain as
they are," Mr Reyes said,
adding that he is demolishing
mangroves in a place that is
"basically not a sensitive area. I
have to make sure the environ-
ment's pristine because my
clients are fishermen."
In the last few months the
controversial Bimini Bay devel-


opment has also come under
sustained attack from Ameri-
can environmentalists and the
prime minister's office and The
Tribune have been bombarded
with letters from protesters con-
cerned with the island's delicate
eco-system.
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe, however, assured
The Tribune in June that gov-
ernment would not have
approved the Bimini Bay pro-
ject if it endangered the envi-
ronment.


- a


1d ers'



zm-



#Moog


ones*


-
- ___
~
~ .
- .~. -
..~ ~

-
-



0
-
~- -
-


"-Scotiatrust


VACANCY

Scotiatrust is inviting applications for the following
position:

Senior Client Accounting Officer

Responsibilities include:

Prompt and accurate preparation of financial statements
for trust, company and agency accounts, especially those
of a complex nature.
To comply with and contribute to the maintenance of
effective internal controls relating to accounting functions.
Provide effective assistance to account administrators.
Contribute to the development of the Client Accounting
Section.

Qualifications and skills required:

A minimum bachelor's degree with a major in Accounting
CPA or other similar qualifications preferred
Knowledge of accounting for trusts and related structures
Strong PC software skills
Good analytical and communication skills
Ability to work within given time constraints

Interested persons should-submit applications by August
26, 2005 to:

Manager Operations
The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3016
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 326-0991

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 200, rAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY EVENING AUGUST 24, 2005
7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
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n (CC) (CC) (CC)
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ceres. (N) ) (CC) by careless liposuction.
Deco Drive So You Think You Can Dance The top 14 contestants perform. (N) t1 News (CC)
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Jeopardy "Col- Brat Camp Some contestants open Brat Camp The remaining students Lost Michael accuses Jin of burning
B WPLG ege- Pittsburgh" up like never before during the the the c allenges of a igh Ropes down the raft the survivors had
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ovich female fugitive. Chances" (CC) (CC) (CC) barrel escape.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Fast Track BBC News Asia Today
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C Late Nght With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
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Comedy Central The Dally Show Comedy Central Mind of Mencia South Park South Park Mind of Mencia
COM Presents Henry With Jon Stew- Presents(CC) "What Women Church atten- "Goobacks"(CC) (N)(CC)
Phillips. art (CC) Want". (CC) dance drops off.
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ESPN nLittle League Baseball World Series U.S. Semifinal -- Teams to Be An- Baseball Tonight From Williamsport, Pa. (Live) (CC)
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FOX C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
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(:00) Rock Star: BAD FAITH (2000, Suspense) Michael Moriarty, Gloria Reuben, Patti News C (CC) News
NT NXS (N) (CC) LuPone. A reporter suspects a cover-up as he tracks a serial killer.
OLN Survivor-Aust. Outdoor Investi- Bull Riding USSTC Challenger Series. From Des Survivor: The Australian Outback
OLN utback gations Moines, Iowa. "The Merge" n (CC)
D Street Tuner NOPI Tunervi- Pinks! (N) NASCAR Racing Craftsman Truck Series -- O'Reilly 200. From Bristol In-
SPEED Challenge (N) sion A temational Speedway in Bristol, Tenn. (Live)
:00) Billy Gra- Behind the Hal Lindsey Taking Authority Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN am Classic Scenes (CC) (CC) Presents (CC)
Crusades
Everybody everybody Everybody Seinfeld Gang Seinfeld George Sex and the City Sex and the City
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond volunteers to dates Elaine's A share in the Big gets en-
n (CC) A (CC) ( (CC) comfort seniors. friend. t (CC) Hamptons. gaged. (CC)
:00) In a Fix While You Were Out Unfinished Miami Ink The Family" Biker Build-Off "Jerry Covington v.
TLC Cozy Kitchen basement gets a Califomia beach Warren Vesely" Jerry Covington. (N)
Comer (CC) look.(N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Grief Briscoe and **, aJURASSIC PARK III (2001, Adventure) Sam Neill, William H.
TNT der"Mad Dog" Curtis investigate a brutal beating. Macy Tea Leoni. A search party encounters new breeds'of prehistoric ter-
n (CC)(DVS) ln (CC)(DVS) ror. (6C)
TOON Home for Imagi- Life& Times of Camp Lazlo Mi- MuchaLucha Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) One Piece n Dragon Ball Z
TO N nary Friends Juniper Lee grating tree. C (CC) I(CC) I Iu
uP5 Policlers sous I'occupation (Partie Compl6ment d'enquite Les h6pitaux et la semaine Ombres et lu- TV5 Le Journal
S 2de 2) _de35 heures. milres
TWC 6:00) Weather: S StoriStores Stortories Weather: Forecast Earth Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
M Edton (CC) (CC)(CC)Evening Edition
(:00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Don Francisco Presenta Entrevis-
UNIV 1i tas con celebridades del deporte y
el entretenimiento.
as BILLY MADI- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA SON (1995) (CC) A socialite's daughter stands ac- A reluctant witness may set a child Benson and Stabler attempt to trap
caused of murder. (CC) molester free. n (CC) Internet pedophiles. (CC)
VH1 (:00) The Alter- 40 Greatest Reality Show Moments Memorable occurrences on reality The Surreal Life Anna Nicole's
VH 1 native television and the stories behind them. n ln (CC) Most Shocking
Home Improve- a* WISHFUL THINKING (1998, Suspense) William McNamara, Amy Lo- WGN News at Nine C\ (CC)
WGN ment Jill's mother cane, Frederic Forrest. Two spa installers' kidnapping plot spins out of
visits, control. Cl (CC)
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WPIX Loves Raymond their most intimate secrets to an U visits Clark to try to recruit him for Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
Ally's birth. (CC) anonymous video camera. the football team. n (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! "Col- R U the Girl With T-Boz & Chilli Veronica Mars While looking for a Dr. Phil Adoption.
WSBK lege- Pittsburgh" The contestants choreograph origi- missing dog, Veronica learns of a
(CC), nal dance routines. (N) (CC) plot that affects all pets. (CC)
(:15) * SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004, Action).Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dun- One Night Stand Entourage Vince The Comeback
H BO-E st, James Franco. Peter Parker fights a man who has mechanical tenta- Louis C.K. n. acts out of char- Valerie ets a
des. n 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) acter new lo.(CC)
(6:15)* s THE The Wire "Mission Accomplished" * THE DEVIL'S OWN (1997, Drama) Harrison Ford, Brad Pitt, Mar-
HBO-P FINAL CUT Avon readies his troops for a war garet Colin. A New York cop unknowinglyshelters an Irish terrorist. C\ 'R'
(1995) 'R' (CC) against Marlo. Cl (CC) (CC) (-)


(:00) ** LOONEY TUNES: ** GARFIELD: THE MOVIE (2004, Comedy) (:15) *** SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004,
H BO-W BACK IN ACTION (2003) Brendan Breckin Meyer. A cat tries to save-a kidnapped dog. Action) Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dun-
Fraser. C 'PG' (CC) Live action/animated, C 'PG' (CC) st. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) ** GREASE (1978, Musical) John Travolta, * TAKING LIVES (2004, Suspense) Angelina (:45) The Island:
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again as high-school seniors. C 'PG' (CC). helps detectives search for a killer. 1) 'R' (CC) Cl (CC)
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MAX-E Conaughey. A lawyer's defense of a black man arouses the Klan's ire. C 'R' (CC) Berry. A shy artist acquires feline
strength and agility.'PG-13'(CC)
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his beloved fiancee. C 'PG-13' (CC) Cl 1 'R' (CC)
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Cube. iTV. C 'PG-13' (CC) swers to their SATs. C 'PG-13' (CC) baked goods, baked goods.
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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


g-fcrr~'tl -I.WTfxc'r~k


THE TRIBUNE







THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA TRBNNENEDYEUUSW4S05,P(Li


* CECIL Armbrister E GERMAINE Bullard


Kiwanis Club


of Over the


Hill installs


two members


THE importance of service
to the community was empha-
sised as the Kiwanis Club of
Over the Hill installed two
new members last week.
During the general meeting
on Thursday, Cecil Armbrister
and Germaine Bullard were
formally inducted into the
club.
The induction ceremony
was performed by the club's
lieutenant governor Melford
Clarke. He encouraged them
to familiarise themselves with
the work of Kiwanis and the
motto: "Serving the children
of the World".
Mr Clarke said that Kiwanis
is not a social club but a ser-
vice movement that "requires
the use of your time, talents
and resources in order for you
to fully be a part of this global
organisation".
The board of directors of
the Kiwanis Club of Over the
Hill approved the men's appli-
cations for membership on
Tuesday August 9
Cecil and Germaine were
sponsored by president desig-
nate Frederick Rodgers and
presidenfi7|ntin Percentie.
Mr ,Rodgers .said that Cecil
is a muti-talented individual


who is a plumber by profes-
sion, but prides himself on
being a chef and a boat cap-
tain. He said that he is sure
Cecil would be beneficial to
the organisation.
Cecil Armbrister is a native
of Smith's Hill, South Andros.
He is presently employed in
the Ministry of Works main-
tenance section.
Quintin Percentie said that
prospective member Ger-
maine Bullard wouldcbring his
youthfulness, energy, ideas
and experience to assist the
club with its objectives and
mandate, "and fulfilling our
global mission of serving the
children of the world."
"He is a very civic-minded
individual who enjoys helping
others," he said.
Germaine is employed by
the Royal Bank of Canada as.
a relief officer, and he gradu-
ated with a bachelor's of sci-
ence degree in economics
from Lincoln University in
2002.
For further information
about Kiwanis, please visit
weekly meetings at the
British Colonial Hilton on
Thursdays at 8pm, or e-mail
vqpl975@yahoo.com."


New fter-school karate



centre teaches discipline


WHEN Bahamian martial arts instruc-
tor D'Arcy Rahming returned home nine
years ago he knew he wanted to make a
difference in his community.
This dream has materialised in a new
training facility on Joe Farrington Road
dedicated solely to the practice of martial
arts.
Rahming, the founder of the All-Star
Family Karate and Jujutsu Centre, now
runs a network of in-school and after-school
self-discipline programmes.
He and his dedicated staff of qualified
instructors teach more than 400 students
each month while raising funds for various
pre-schools and primary schools.
The new All-Star Centre was specifically
designed for the martial arts.
It boasts a raised floor with special
Olympic-style padding that allows students
to practice safely. "Students," says Rah-
ming, "shouldn't have to worry about' being
injured during their training."
The centre also features a waiting area
with a snack room and lounge. "' also
important for students to relax, i ialise
and feel at home. In this way, leair g can
be a fun experience," Rahming say
In addition to the after sch ,.pro-
grammes, the All-Star Centre als ches
adult classes and seminars.
Students can benefit from cour es spe-
cialising in female self-defence ai.anti-
bullying techniques, as well as t'f nore
traditional classes of karate, jud utsu
and classical weaponry.

Seminars

The school also hosts a variety of semi-
nars by both local and foreign martial arts
experts.
The Bahamas Judo Federation and the
Bahamas Karate Federation will host work-
outs on a regular basis at the new centre.
.The centre sits on over a quarter-acre of
land, allowing for outdoor activities as well
as indoor training.
"I love it here," says Sandra Kemp, who
has enrolled her entire family, husband Phil
and three children. "All-Star is a family-
oriented environment that reinforces the
values we are trying to instill in our kids at
home."
All-Star is currently registering students
for it's after school and adult programmes in
the fall. Interested persons should visit the
campus on Joe Farrington Road near Sea
Breeze or call 364-6773 for information.


* D'ARCY Rahming with one of his students


Rahming says: "Having a lifelong skill
that gets you in great shape, increases your
confidence, self-discipline and self-control
has benefits that extend way beyond self-
.defence." n,,. ..


D'Arcy Rahming is the holder of a black
belt in three disciplines and has been prac-
ticing martial arts for 28 years.
He is the author of series of self-defence
books that are used in over 30 countries.


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
Established 1950
P.O. Box N-1222, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas




MR. H. MICHAEL
CAREY, 77

offHighland Park,
Nassau, The Bahamas
will betwo sons, Rayheld at The
Chapel of Love, Kemp's
Funeral Home Limited,
Palmdale Avenue and
Bradley Street, Nassaud on Thursday, 25th
August, 2005 at 10:30am.

Pastor Martin Loyley will officiate and interment
will follow in Ebenezer Methodist Cemetery,
Nassau.

Mr' Carey is survivedna Knowle by his wife, Florence
Carey; two sons, Raymond and Paul Carey;
one daughter, Helen Roberts;, four
grandchildren, Chad Roberts, David, Thomas
and Alan Carey; two brothers, Morton and
George Carey; one sister, Coarlyn Weetley; and.
four sisters-in-law, Ellen and Cora Carey, Zula
Carol and Rowena Knowles; one son-in-law,
Leverne Roberts; two daughters-in-law, Mary
Jane McKay-Carey and PriscillaCarey;
caretakers, Dawn Bowe and Alinx Joseph;
many nieces and nephews and a host of other
relatives and friends, he was pre-deceased by
a brother, John (Jack) Carey and a sister, Patricia
Albury.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
Ebenezer Methodist Church, RO. Box SS-6145,
Nassau, especially for The Soup Kitchen and
The Focus Group in Memory of Mr. H. Michael
Carey.

Friends may pay their respects at Kemp's
Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas on Wednesday, 24th
August 2005 from 4:30pm to 6:00pm.


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 11







PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUS F24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


* SOUTH Africa's High Commissioner to CARICOM states and Ambassador to Haiti,
Thanduyise Henry Chiliza told of trade and investment opportunities during Monday's seminar.




Focusing on trade



with South Africa


By Gladstone Thurston
Bahamas Information
Services
TRADE and investment
opportunities between South
Africa and the.Bahamas were
showcased on Monday at the
British Colonial Hilton.
The well-attended seminar
was held in conjunction with the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the
Ministry of Trade and Industry,
the South African High Com-
mission and the Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Corpo-
ration.
"This seminar has created yet
another valuable link between
our nations," said Trade and
Industry Permanent Secretary
- Helen Ebong.
"It provides an opportunity
to promote trade and bring
about greater awareness of the
wide range of products avail-
able from South Africa.
"It also brings about an
exchange of ideas and promotes
the many opportunities that the
Bahamas can offer South
Africa."
South Africa's High Com-
missioner to CARICOM and.
Ambassador to Haiti, Than-
duyise Henry Chiliza who head-
ed the four-member delegation,
agreed.
"We are looking at trade that
is two way," he said. "We
believe that what we should do
is what will benefit both coun-
tries because we think that it is
high time that African countries
are empowered and are liber-


ated from the colonial attitude
of depriving people economic
rights. We think that this is what
we need to achieve."

Potential

Economics Minister Mudun-
wazi Baloyi added: "This is the
beginning of bigger things to
come. We believe strongly that
there are opportunities in the
Bahamas and there are people
who are ready to begin to
explore partnerships with South
Africans."
A business delegation out of
the Caribbean and the Bahamas
is slated to visit South Africa
by May next year.
"We guarantee that a won-
derful programme will be
organised for them where, on
average, people are going to
have four meetings a day per
business person for five working
days," he said.
"We will also expose them to
some of the capabilities, exper-
tise and technology that we
have developed in different sec-
tors of our economy.
"We hope that our own peo-
ple would look at this day as an
opportunity to begin to part-
nership with Africans in the
diaspora for bigger things to
come.
"South Africans are going to
look at the Bahamas as an alter-
native place to grow their busi-
nesses to come and invest here
in partnerships with Bahami-
ans. So, we are very excited."


* SOUTH Africa is encouraging trade and investment links with
the Bahamas. Pictured, from left, during Monday's seminar are
First Secretary (Political) Karabo Letlaka, Dr Melanie
Thompson, Foreign Affairs Senior Assistant Secretary Ordette
Wells-Simms, Ministry of Trade and Industries permanent
secretary Helen Ebong, High Commissioner to all CARICOM
states and Ambassador to Haiti Thanduyise Henry Chiliza,
Minister (Economics) Mudunwazi Baloyi, Ministry of Foreign
Affairs Under Secretary Philip Miller, BAIC's manager of
handicraft and marketing Donnalee Bowe and First Secretary
(Political) Mpho M M Mminele
(BIS photos: Eric Rose)


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,bsiness@,ibu.emedia.ne, Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Government revenues



$ 7m ahead of forecast


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Government's revenue intake is
some $7 million ahead of forecasts almost
two months into the 2005-2006 fiscal year,
due in part to strong economic activity and
improved collection efforts, the secretary of
revenue, Ehurd Cunningham, said yester-
day.
For the fiscal year ended June 2005, Mr
Cunningham said government revenues fell
just $2 million short of Budgetary forecasts,
which were $1.52 billion. Despite falling
short of budgetary expectations, however,
total revenue intake for 2004-2005 was well
in excess of the previous year, as collec-
tioris showed encouraging signs of strength-
ening despite having to overcome the Sep-
tember 2004 hurricanes.
The improvements in revenue intake
were said to be due to a combination of
factors, including improved economic activ-
ity through the multi-million investment
projects already underway. There was con-
tinued growth in the tourism sector, and
revenue enhancement measures undertak-
en by the Ministry of Finance, which
involved UK Crown Agents installing rev-
enue tracking and collection systems in the
Customs Department, had provided a fur-
ther boost.
Mr Cunningham said the movement of
government revenue was dependent on a
number of factors that were plotted on a
daily and monthly basis within the Ministry
of Finance.
He said revenues depended heavily on
what was happening in the US and world
economy, as growth here could result in
more visitors than ijual coming to the
Bahamas.
Additional revenue had also been col-
lected through amendments to the Stamp
Act. Mr Cunningham said that where there
previously was a gap in the legislation and
leakage due to legal avoidance procedures
the new amendments would close some of
the gap.
Additional revenue enhancement exer-
cises conducted by the Ministry of Finance
have also had a positive impact. The man-
ual cash receipting system used throughout
the Government system has been replaced
with a mechanised receipting system, along
with the tightening of internal processing
and controls, Mr Cunningham said.
He added that as general improvements
*were made throughout the Government
system, the result will be improved revenue
performance.
Another tool being advanced is the use of


Improvement in first two months

of fiscal 2005-2006 picks up

where previous year left off,

with 2004-2005 just $2m off


* EHURD Cunningham

credit cards being accepted by all govern-
ment agencies. Mr Cunningham said the
Ministry of Finance was working with the
Royal Bank of Canada and Commonwealth
Bank to ensure the pilot programme's suc-
cess. The project will initially be launched in
New Providence, and then rolled out to the
Family Islands.

Revaluation

Meanwhile, Mr Cunningham said the
revaluation of properties in New Provi-
dence for Real Property Tax assessments
was being undertaken to ensure that all
properties in the Bahamas were included
on the register. Properties, in general,
were being revalued because there had


been no revaluation since the 1980s.
With the process on-going for several
months, Mr Cunningham estimated that
about one-fourth of the properties in New
Providence have been evaluated. He said
that one of the things that is causing the
project to perhaps not move at the rate
they would like is a shortage of manpower.
The Real Property Tax office was said
to not have the physical space to take on
additional staff, although it was in the
process of trying to identify a space out-
side downtown Nassau where it can relocate
to.
Mr Cunningham said that once this was
completed, the reassessment exercise will be
brought along further, with the Govern-
ment anticipating a significant level of
growth in revenue collection as a result.


Bank eyes stake in

Colina Holdings


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A COMMERCIAL bank
has made an approach to
acquire a stake in Colina
Holdings (Bahamas) from its
parent, the Colina Financial
Group (CFG), multiple finan-
cial services industry sources
told The Tribune yesterday.
The approach from Scotia-
bank has resulted in no agree-
ment, and has not been trig-
gered by any financial diffi-
culties at CFG or Colina
Holdings, which is the
Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange (BISX) listed
holding company for Coli-
nalmperial Insurance, the life
and health insurance compa-
ny.
The Tribune understands
that Scotiabank's initial
approach petered out largely
due to a disagreement over
who would have the largest
stake in and control Colina
Holdings, but the offer
remains on the table.
Anthony Ferguson, a CFG
principal, could not be reached
for comment last night
although The Tribune left a
detailed telephone message.
However, there are good rea-
sons why CFG might consider
selling part of its Colina Hold-
ings stake to an outside buyer.


One of the 21 conditions
imposed by the financial ser-
vices regulators and the Gov-
ernment in return for approv-
ing Colina's Imperial Life
Financial acquisition was that
CFG would reduce its stake
in Colina Holdings to at least
51 per cent from its current 66
per cent.
This requires CFG to divest
at least 15 per cent of Colina
Holdings' issued ordinary
shares, which total 24.73 mil-
lion. This has to be accom-
plished within 12 months of
CFG having accepted the 21
conditions, but a major.obsta-
cle to achieving this is the lack
of liquidity and relatively low
trading volumes on BISX.
It would therefore be much
easier for CFG to comply with
this condition if it was able to
sell that 15 per cent to a pre-
arranged institutional buyer
such as Scotiabank, especially
since it would take some 25
years to accomplish such a
divestment based on current
BISX trading volumes.
In addition, any investment
by Scotiabank would inject
additional capital and equity
into CFG, providing it with
extra funds that could help
buy out former principal and
Colinalmperial president,
SEE page 6B


Call for laws to


protect company


'whistleblowers'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government has been
urged to implement 'Whistle
Blower' legislation to protect
employees who expose
Bahamian firms that infringe
this nation's environmental
laws.
The draft National Envi-
ronmental Management
Action Plan, prepared by"


Canadian consultants, SENES
Consulting, said such legisla-
tion should protect the identi-
ty of those involved in expos-
ing illegality, and was part of a
strategy to beef up enforce-
merit of this nation's environ-
mental laws through provid-
ing "incentives for employee
and public participation".
SENES Consulting's report
SEE page 5B


Olympus liquidator

needs Bahamian

relocation to succeed


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE re-location of a former
Bahamas-based entity to this
jurisdiction will have a major
bearing on whether the volun-
tary liquidation of a $375 mil-
lion Bahamian-registered
investment fund will be suc-
cessful, The Tribune can reveal.
Clifford Culmer, of BDO
Mann Judd, the liquidator for
the Olympus Univest Fund, said
it was critical that the main
counterparty to the funds in
which it invested, Mosaic Com-
posite Ltd (MCL), return to this
jurisdiction.
It had moved from the


Bahamas in January 2005 to
Anguilla, and was now domi-
ciled in Minnesota, where it had
merged into a US company.
Mr Culmer said: "It is of sig-
nificance to the issue of co-oper-
ation that the liquidator has also
requested that MCL be re-
domiciled in the Bahamas, and
thus far this request has not
been acceded to by the direc-
tors of MCL.
"It is anticipated that failure
to accede to his request affects a
major part of the liquidation."
The Tribune revealed yester-
day how the Olympus Univest
Fund had breached regulations
SEE page 6B


Investors must

know environment


costs from the start


M By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
FOREIGN investors would
find it more acceptable to pay
costs involved in complying with
environmental regulations and
management plans if legisla-
tion detailed what they would
be, plus the degree of environ-
mental analysis required for
their development.
The biggest concern of devel-
opers is to know what the rules


are from the start, so that they
can factor in any costs to their
business plan, Andrew O'Brien,
a partner in the law firm
Lennox Paton, said.
He told The Tribune, that
the plan put forward by the
Ontario-based SENES Con-
sultants, which would involve
the Bahamas enacting legisla-
tion making it mandatory for
multi-million dollar investment
projects to at least partly fund
SEE page 6B


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Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
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How businesses can...






deter armed robbers
e .I. r--r imVeWdiYi-"^yv^""fii--|l^-.l^r"^\lI['^nI-^1--"-1*---^__^-,--


Following my series on How
Not to Become a Victim of
Crime, I received requests for
actual pointers and recommen-
dations on what one should do.
The following recommenda-
tions are not guaranteed as
every business, home and per-
son may need to modify the list
provided to accommodate their
various environments.
We shall first look at armed
robbery response. This serious
crime, as classified by the Roy-
al Bahamas Plolice Force, has
been given its own special team
of investigators. The police have
targeted it as a key crime for
intervention, it is widely report-
ed in the media, and convicted
armed robbers receive long
prison sentences.
Yet despite the significance
of armed robbery in the crimi-
nal justice system, there remains
a large gap in knowledge and
understanding of the subject.
What are some of the motivat-
ing factors for the robber?
Armed robbery is seen as a
fast and direct way of getting
money.


*The robber may need mon-
ey for drugs, or to pay debts,
In the case of some young
offenders, the 'thrill' of the inci-
dent and the feeling of power
are enough to make them re-
offend. It may soon become a
'lifestyle' or a 'profession'.
Case files have shown that the
majority of armed robberies are
not thoroughly planned. How-
ever, the professional armed
robber will sometimes go to
great lengths in the preparation
and planning of the armed rob-
bery, and will case the premises
extensively before the event.
Studies have shown the
involvement of bothodrugs and
alcohol to be significant in inci-
dents of armed robbery.
In the case of the drug addict
who desperately needs to finance
the next 'hit', the decision to
stage an armed hold-up is poten-
tially lethal. The armed robbery
will probably not be well-
planned and there is no guaran-
tee that the individual is rational.
Violence might also increase
when there is more than one
offender. In these instances, you


LEGALNOTICE



NOTICE

MERRI INC.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 MERRI INC. is in
dissolution.

The date of the Commencement of dissolution was 22nd August
2005. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308
East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of MERRI
INC. All persons having claims against the above-named company
are required to send their address and particulars of their debts to
the Liquidator before the 22nd September, 2005.



uid r .


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE .

MARILIA HOLDINGS LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 MARILIA
HOLDINGS LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of the Commencement of dissolution was 22nd August
2005. DavidThain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308
East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of MARILIA
HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars
of their debts to the Liquidator before the 22nd September, 2005.


are at a much heightened risk.
It is important to understand
these points when formulating
prevention and response strate-
gies.
Armed Robbery Prevention
Cash Reduction
Limit the amount of cash held
and publicise it. Research sug-
gests that limiting the amount of
cash held on the premises and
publicising the fact will signifi-
cantly minimise the risk of
armed robbery.
Cash Handling
Small amounts of cash being
held at any one time will reduce
the attractiveness of a target.
More frequent deposits to
banks or secure holding units
will assist.
Money should be kept out
of sight.
Cash should never be
counted in view.
a Takings should never be
discussed in public.
Advertise the fact of mini-
mum cash holdings.
Don't Advertise Profits
As a businessperson you


believe in advertising armed
robbers also look for advertise-
ments. Don't advertise to the
potential armed robber that it
will be profitable to rob you. Nev-
er, ever 'flash' a large roll of bills.
Cash Drop Box with Time
Delay Lock
This will help deter the
would-be robber. Signs should
be used to advertise this fact.
Cash Registers
It is desirable for cash regis-
ters to be located where they
are highly visible to passers-by.
This increases the possibility of
identification of the robber. The
more visible, the better, and this
acts as a deterrent,
Avoid Routine
Where it is necessary to trans-
port cash, do not establish a rou-
tine. Staff should not wear uni-
forms that identify the business or
security personnel. Ensure that
times and routines are varied. Be
mindful of the human element
of complacency in this area.
Credit Facilities
Provision of credit facilities
should effectively reduce the
quantity of cash held. An Elec-


THE MEDICLINIC ATLANTIS
Requires: (1) Full Time. Registered Nurse
(2) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
in Primary/Urgent Care Facility

Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.

Attractive Benefit Package
Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
P.O. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas


LEGALNOTICE



NOTICE

EMERAL POWER INC.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 EMERAL POWER
INC. is in dissolution.

The date of the Commencement of dissolution was 22nd August
2005. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308:
East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of EMERAL
POWER INC. All persons having claims against the above-named'
company are required to send their address and particulars of their
debts to the Liquidator before the 22nd September, 2005.


O l i : 'i ' i r "

Pric iformat AsFinancial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of.

r2wk-H S2wk-4Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change .-Daily Vol. EPS $ Div$ P16 Y $ldF
1,10 0.80 Abaco Markets 0,80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
9.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9:25 9.25 0.00 1.452 0,340 6.4 3.68%
9.60 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 8.60 8;60 0.00 1,000 0.61 0,330 11.8 5.00%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0,79 0.79 0.00 0.187 0,010 3.7 1.43%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1,40 0.00 0.128 0.060 11,1 4.29%
1.15 0.87 -Fidelity Bank 1.05 105; 000 0.080 0.040 14,4 3.48%
8.81 8.70 Cable Bahamas .80 ,80 0,00 0.618 0,240 14,2 .73%
2.20 1,94 Collna Holdings 1.80 1;80 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.08 6,75 Commonwealth Bank .. 8.7 8.57 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.2 4:78%
2.50 0,67 Doctor's Hospital 2.24.' 2.24 0.00 0.429 0,000 5:2 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard .'412 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9:8 6.83%
106.81 9,19 Finco, 10.61 10,61 0.00 0.670 0.600 15.8 4.71%
9.30 7.00' FirstCaribbean 9,30 9.30 '0.00 0.695 0380 13.4 4.09%
9.00 8.31 Fool 9 00 00 0 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.3 5.50%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 115 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.,00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities .9 80 9;60 0.00 0.526 0.405 48.3 4.22%
8.30 8,25 J. S.Johnson 8.27 8.27 0.00 0.561 0.560 14.7 6.77%
B.69 4.36 Keraner Intemational BOR. 5,81 5,83 0.02 0.122 0.000 47,6 0.00%
10.00 10:00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10,00 0,00 2,010 0.760 5,0 7,00%
Iwk-HI 52Wk4.ow Symbol Rid$ As S LetPrIce Weeky o EPSS Dlv$ PIE YIeld
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12 25 1.25 1100 1.488 0,900 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10,00 Caribbean Crossings (Praf) 10.00 1035 1000 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%

16,00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 1300 1400 1300 1,105 0.610 14.6 6.93%

1.2454 1.1798 ColIna Money Market Fund 1.245429" '
2.3810 2.0058 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.381 *
10.4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prim Income Fund 10,4855
2.2836 2.1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.283627"'
1.12468 1.0544 Colna Bond Fdund F.1,4578

BIAX ALL SHARE INDEX* 19 Dec02 = 1,000.00 YIELD- last 12 month dividends divided by losing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price n last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Collna and FIdellt4
2wk,,Low Lowest closing price In last 52 Weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidellth
Previous Close Prvious day's weighted price for dally volurt Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close.- Current day's weighted price for daily volufht Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior weekly
Change Change in closingprice from day to da) EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 month. NIM Not Meaningful
Pie Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 10
* -. AH AT JUL, 31, 2008**** AS AT JUN 30, 2005
12- AS AT JULIY 2ee %t01 As AT MJULY 31, *Mot AS AT JULY 1,2 soo


tronic Funds Transfer at Point
of Sale (EFTPOS) system is also
an excellent way of reducing
cash held on the premises. Ask
for information from your bank.
M Open environment
An open and uncluttered
environment that provides a
clear, well-lit view of the sales
area from the outside is a deter-
rent to armed robbers, who pre-
fer to remain unobserved;
Rear access
Any rear access should be
fully secured. Appropriate locks
should be employed. Illuminate
backyards and lanes leading to
the premises. Curtains, posters
and advertising material that
obscure vision should be used to
a minimum. These provide cov-
er'for any would-be bandit.
Doors and Windows
All exterior doors should be
of solid construction with good-
quality locks fitted. To guard
against forced entry, consider
fitting bars to windows. Lou-
vered windows are a particular-
ly weak point. If counting mon-
ey at night, this should be done
out of view and the premises
should be secured.
R Counters
Behind the counter is your
territory, and there should be
no opportunity for access by the
customer. Counters should be
designed to provide as much
distance between customers and
staff as practicable. Deep coun-
ters with raised floors behind
the counter make it difficult for
offenders to assault staff.
Surveillance cameras
Surveillance cameras may
not deter armed robbers but


they will certainly contribute to
their arrest. If activated during
a hold-up, the resulting pho-
tographs can greatly increase
the chances of apprehending
the offender. It is important that
these cameras are maintained
and serviced regularly.
Lighting
Lighting can be used to advan-
tage making the target highly
visible and increasing the chances
of offender identification.
Mirrors
Mirrors can be useful in oth-
erwise obscured areas, allowing
staff to fully monitor floor
space. However, be careful that
mirrors do not allow potential
robbers to see your cash area
from the customer's side of the
counter.
Electronic sensors
Electronic sensors can alert
staff that customers are entering
or leaving the premises.
This list is by no means com-
prehensive, and some of you
may already have several of my
recommendations in place. Next
week, we will look at some sug-
gested responses during the
actual event. This is critical,
because the concern of the pre-
vention plan is cash retention.
However, during the robbery
the most important concern is
the preservation of life.
NB: Gamal Newry is presi-
dent of Preventative Measures, a
security and law enforcement
training and consulting compa-
ny. (Comments can be sent to
PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas or e-mail: prevent
it@hotmail.com


LEGALNOTICE



NOTICE

BRANFORD INTERNATIONAL LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 BRANFORD
INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of the Commencement of dissolution was 22nd August
2005. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308
East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of BRADFORD
INTERNATIONAL LTD. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their address and
particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 22nd September,
2005.



uhis


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE

SAUZA HOLDINGS LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 SAUZA HOLDINGS
LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of the Commencement of dissolution was 22nd August
2005. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308
East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of SAUZA
HOLDINGS LTD. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars
of their debts to the Liquidator before the 22nd September, 2005.



Tha I
ra tte


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE

EAST StNRISE VWESTMENTS LTD
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 EAST SUNRISE
INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution.

The date of the Commencement of dissolution was 22nd August
2005. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., 308
East Bay Street, P.O, Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of EAST
SUNRISE INVESTMENTS LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their address
and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 22nd
September, 00.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005








THE TIBUN WEDESDA, AUUST 4,205,IPGES3


Seminar to address




mortgage qualifying


BRITISH American Insur-
ance Company's Midsummer
Night School will this evening
provide advice to Bahamians
on how they can qualify for
mortgages and deal with asso-
ciated legal issues.
The event, scheduled for
tonight between 6.30-8pm at
British, American Insurance's
Independence Drive headquar-
ters, aims to provide advice and
information on financial issues.
On the topic, How to Get the
Most from Your Mortgage,
attendees Will hear from Violet
Perpall, supervisor for mort-
gages and accounts at British
American Insurance Company,
and John Wilson, a partner in
the McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes law firm.
Ms Perpall said the Midsum-
mer Night School will address
the main impediments to quali-
fying for a mortgage, which are
lack of savings and too much


consumer debt.
In addition to the presenta-
tions by Ms Perpall and Mr Wil-
son, British American Insur-
ance will run a special mortgage
campaign tonight. Attendees
will be able to qualify for mort-
gages at the event with special
incentives onsite, including pre-
ferred rates and exemptions on
some of the closing costs.
Midsummer Night School
seminars will be led by finan-
cial, insurance and law experts
from British American Insur-
ance Company and McKinney
Bancroft & Hughes, and will
include I. Chester Cooper,
British American Insurance
Company's chief operating offi-
cer and chief executive; Ken
Pyfrom, British American
Insurance's chief financial offi-
cer; Diane Stewart and John
Wilson, attorneys at McKinney
Bancroft and Hughes;
Stephanie Carroll, assistant


vice-president for group
employee benefits, at British
American Insurance; Hugh
Newbold, vice-president of the
ordinary division at British
American Insurance; Gilbert
Williams, vice-president of
home service sale's, British
American Insurance; Cecillia
Cox, manager, financial services
and investments, British Amer-


ican Insurance; and Phyllis
Meeusen, client relationship
adviser, British American Insur-
ance Company.
In addition to the adult sem-
inars there will also be a BA
Headstart session to teach chil-
dren the importance of saving
and investing, and a session on
Healthy Lifestyles by Dr Jud-
son Eneas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WILLIAM PASCAL, P.O. BOX
SS-6789, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24TH day of AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice


NOTICE

TRABUCO LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation


NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
TRABUCO LIMITED., is in dissolution as of August 22nd,
2005.

International Liquidator Services Inc., situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR
rr'


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL DELHOMME, #6,
7TH STREET, THE GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of AUGUST, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






Water analysis Technician needed to

conduct daily Analysis of water facility.


Please send resume and references to

P.O.Box N-1836-A040 Attention:

Chemist



Please apply before

September 5th, 2005





THE MEDICLINIC CABLE BEACH
Requires: (1) Full Time Registered Nurse
(2) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
in Primary/Urgent Care Facility
Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.
Attractive Benefit Package
Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
P.O. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas


It can happen quickly. All of a sudden you've got more debt than
you're comfortable carrying and "...more month at the end of the
money." Let a Scotiabank representative help you become
financially fit. We offer practical solutions to consolidate your debt
into one affordable monthly payment; access some of the equity
in your home to lower your interest costs; or transfer to a lower
interest credit option. We can introduce you to credit life
protection and even help you start saving for your childrens
education. Start building a stronger financial future today.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CARIBBEAN TRAVEL COMPANY LIMITED


Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 14th July, 2005.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
CARIBBEAN TIAy CMPAYJIMITED


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner

CAREER OPPORTUNITY


for

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE
TURKS & CAICOS ISLANDS

Qualifications:

Experience in the financial services industry with cash
and/or administrative exposure

Some experience with customer service delivery

Status to work in the Turks & Caicos Islands

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Pay out various currencies and coin against authorized
debit vouchers, cheques and drafts

Accept and process withdrawals, deposits, utility bills, loan
payments, credit card cash advances, local drafts, travelers
cheques, foreign drafts, money orders etc from in branch
customers

Perform currency conversions by apply current exchange
rates

Respond to basic inquiries from customers

If you are interested:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY
before August 26, 2005 to:

Janise Sturrup
Human Resources Assistant
P.O. Box N-7125
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: Janise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their
interested, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 3B


So--


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


China's oil


demand


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NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY ISRAEL OF GROVE
SECOND STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of
AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RICARDO DELHOMME, #6,
7TH STREET, THE GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of AUGUST, 2005 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


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A well established Bahamian-owned business is looking for a Financial Controller.
Applicants must demonstrate their ability to handle the entire accounting cycle including
the preparation of monthly financial statements. Applicants must possess a Bachelor's
degree in Accounting and a professional designation or at least five years of experience
as a financial controller. Salary commensurate with experience.

Send a cover letter explaining in detail why you would be right for the position. Please
forward your resume with professional references and phone numbers to:

DA15662
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas





FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL SANK ,
Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for

HUMAN RESOURCES BUSINESS PARTNER
THE BAHAMAS, TURKS & CAICOS AND THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS
Qualifications:
* Mandatory Minimum Bachelor's degree in Human Resources or a related field
* PC skills: Advanced Excel and Word mandatory; Access is a plus
* Strong background in employee and industrial relations
* A broad knowledge/experience base in several HR areas, (e.g. training, recruiting, employee relations, policy review, etc.)
* Excellent organizational skills
* Skills in problem solving as it relates to identifying and resolving personnel issues
* Knowledge of the Employment and Industrial Relations Acts
* Excellent communication skills to facilitate the flow of information between the line and HR strategic and operational groups
" Strong leadership & negotiation skills
" Strong communication and presentation skills both written and verbal
General Requirements/Responsibilities:
1. Supports performance management culture (includes coaching, documentation & consultation
2. Direct responsibility for day-to-day industrial relations, including health and safety matters
3. Provides accurate information to customers and ensures that internal and external customers are provided with the
highest quality service at all times in the are of Human Resources
4. Maintain program/project records; provide data for monthly reporting
5. Responsible for all entry-level recruitments including management of requests from the business
6. Research & analysis of HR benefits and policies
7. Oversee Benefits/Payroll functions
If you are interested:
Submit your resume and private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before September 2, 2005 to:
Jamise Sturrup
Human Resources Assistant
P.O. Box N-7125
Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail: Jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com
FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their interest, however only those under consideration
will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.


*- .. .
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Parish Hall.


ANS BACH ER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

SENIOR CLIENT ACCOUNTANT
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited is part of the
Ansbacher Group of private banking and wealth
management specialists, providing tailored financial
solutions to an international client base_
The company seeks to recruit a Senior Client
Accountant. The successful applicant will report to
the Client Accounting Manager and will be
responsible for:
Ensuring that the client's ledger is complete
and accurate and posting relevant adjusting
entries.
Ensuring that financial statements are
prepared in an accurate and timely manner
and in accordance with International
Accounting Standards.
Ensuring that Company policies and
procedures relating to client accounting
are being adhered to.
REQUIREMENTS
CPA or equivalent with;at ast-three-ya
pratical accQu'ting experience gained
within the financial services industry/public
practice.
Excellent written and oral communication
skills and a practical knowledge of
computer applications.
High energy levels, proactive and
enthusiastic.
Interested persons who meet the above requirements
should, along with an attached resume, apply in
writing to:-
Human Resources Manager
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas


Public Utilities Commission


on

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company

Limited Application to increase its Monthly

Rates/Prices For Telephone Lines


The PUC will hold a PUBLIC MEETING on the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company's application to increase the
monthly rates/prices for telephone lines on Thursday 25
August, 2005, from 7-9pm in MARSH HARBOUR


The purpose of the public meeting will be to afford
consumers and interested parties the opportunity to ask
questions or make oral comments on the application.


Copies of the Commission's Public consultation document
on BTC's application can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
or downloaded from the Commission's website at
www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs.


BUSINESS I












Call for legislation to


protect whistleblowers


FROM page one existing environimiental regula-
tions and compliance, it was vir-
said that when businesses were tually impossible to see how
found guilty of environmental they could implement the addi-
infractions, "liability should tional measures proposed.
extend to both employees and SENES Consulting acknowl-
management", as was proposed edged that there was a need for
in an earlier draft Bill to cre- "well-trained and properly
ate a Ministry of Environmen- equipped investigative and
tal Planning and Protection. enforcement staff", recommend-
The Government has reject- ing that they be deployed "to
ed creating a Ministry on the allow for the most rapid response
grounds of cost, and is instead throughout the Family Islands",
proposing a Department of rather than the current structure
Environmental Planning and that has left most personnel based
Protection, but it is unclear on New Providence.
whether this liability recom- The report referred to a pre-
mendation will be adopted. vious document prepared in
To help protect the Bahami- 2000 for the former FNM admin-
an environment, the draft istration by another consultancy,
-reportsaid:-"Fines-and-penal-__ Washington-based ICF, which
ties should be severe enough su -gg&te-d-an-environmental
to deter potential offenders, enforcement staff of 40.
Penalties for a first conviction Their total combined per
may include a fine not exceed- annum salary was pegged by
ing $10,000 or imprisonment ICF at $977,000, with addition-
for a term of up to six months,
or both. Fines and prison terms
should increase with subse-
quent convictions."
The consultants, report also .
urged the Government to "for-
malise" the process for inves-
tigating claims and charges of --
non-compliance with environ- WiN
mental laws.
It acknowledged that the
Bahamas' existing safeguards REAL ES
lacked "teeth" to enforce and REAL ESTT
implement the requirements of REPRES
international treaties this nation
had sighed up to, and said this
nation had "insufficient" pier-..
sonnel in the areas of investi- The Abaco Club on Windin
gation and enforcement.
Inadvertently, the SENES International Members Golf
Consulting report backed up is seeking a senior-level
the concerns voiced by the
Bahamas Chamber of Corn- REPRESENTATIVE. Can
merce in its review of the Gov- of 5 years experience in lux
ernment's draft Bills to create
the Department of Environ- license is preferred. Succ
mental Planning and Protec- exceptional communication
tion, plus introduce regulations
for Environmental Impact Must be personable, profess
Assessments (EIAs) and pol- or relocate to Abaco. The A
lution and waste management.
The Chamber of Commerce from $875,000 to more then
and other organisations repre- letter and resume to info@th
senting the Bahamian business
-aity-pmn.eout 367-2930, Attn: Sales & Ma
given th problems theiiuihtno -.


al expenditure needed for
equipment, travel and supplies.
Fourteen of those 40 staff would
be employed by a Laboratory
Section, part of an Environ-
mental Monitoring and
Enforcement Division.
Among the problems identi-
fied earlier this year at a Nation-
al Workshop on the draft
National Environmental Man-
agement Plan was that interfer-
ence from politicians could
compromise investigations,
while officers were often shown
little respect by those under
investigation and were "often
subjected to intimidation tac-
tics".
The report added: "While the
major industries in the Bahamas
are tourism and finance, it is
not always made clear how
these important industries are
dependent on environmental
protection and sustainability."





IG BAY


ATE SALES
TENTATIVE


ig Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
f & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
1 REAL ESTATE SALES
didates must have a minimum
xury market sales. Real Estate
essful candidate must have
skills, both verbal and written.
sional and willing to commute
kbaco Club's estate lots range
$4 million. Please email cover
eabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
arketing.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 5B


Applications should be forwarded in confidence to:
Council Secretary
The College of The Bahamas
P. 0. Box N-4912
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-4304

Note: Electronic applications will not be accepted.


iTHE COLLE J :Om BJAA "s


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


- '>***~'


ANS BACHER

The Ansbacher Group, specialists in private banking,
fiduciary services and wealth management, has openings in
The Bahamas for the following positions:


_RELATlONSHIP MANAGER AND RELATIONSHIP OFFICER

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:
Client relationship management on high net worth banking portfolios.
Ability to manage projects
Ensure execution and follow-up of bank reviews to minimize risk.
Analyzing of financial requirements of prospective and existing clients.
Participate in continuous quality improvement initiatives in the department.
SLeading team in the achievement of department objectives
Developing and maintaining relationship with other departments to ensure efficient
and timely customer service.

RELATIONSHIP OFFICER
SManage a small banking portfolio
Preparation of debit/credit-vouchers, term deposits, overdraft.
Ability to analyze bank files to obtairifull grasp of client transaction history and
relationship with the Bank; ensure full bank review is documented and followed-
up to completion.
Monitor overdraft sanctions and ensure the clearing of the same.
Participate in continuous quality improvement initiatives

REQUIREMENTS:
5-7yrs proven experience in the financial/ Banking field
SA Bachelor's or Master's Degree in Banking or Finance
SStrong problem solving and leadership skins.
Must be customer service orientated
Highly. proficient in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Outlook
So id analytical skills with keen attention to detail
i Strong communication skills both spoken and written
t nvestigative-skillsk.._
Must be able to multi-task ------..
Must be able to work under pressure in a fast-paced environment
Must have the ability to establish and maintain strong working relationships with
key personnel and work effectively in a team.

f interested, please send C.V. to:
lead of Private Banking.
P.O. Box N-7768
assau, Bahamas
Application Deadline August 30,205i
at De dln g4 0 ". :,r .' *: -" ":*"* ** ..
Ad *


THE TRIBUNE


The College of The Bahamas, as the national tertiary level education
institution of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is engaged in
a major expansion of its physical facilities, its programme offerings
and its research activities and is moving aggressively to incorporate
distance learning methodologies into its repertoire of strategies
for delivering instruction throughout the archipelago, all with a
view to seeking a charter as a university.

The Council of The College of The Bahamas and its Search
Committees invite applications for the post of President as described
below.

PROFILE OF THE PRESIDENT

Bringing creativity, the requisite skills and experience and sterling
character to the position, the ideal candidate will

* be first among equals in his or her cabinet, a team player
and a consensus builder
bring a future-oriented appreciation of the role which an
institution of higher learning should play, particularly in a
knowledge-based economy, both in educating students and
the wider community and in creating new knowledge
consistent with the needs of The Bahamas and the role of
individuals and the nation in a global economy
lead in the implementation of the vision for the evolution of
the institution into the University of The Bahamas
motivate a large and culturally diverse faculty and staff to
implement this vision as a team
Relate with maturity, judgment, flexibility, patience, and
resourcefulness to individuals within The College and to
members of the many local and international constituencies
to which The College enjoys ties
function as the leader of The College to internal, local and
international audiences
be the public face of The College, projecting the institution,
acting as advocate for it, and attracting needed resources
appreciate the unique role played by a national institution in
a developing society, including the special structural
relationship between The College and the Government, the
expectations that the public and the Government have of
The College, and the implications of those expectations in
terms of the institution's response
,.UDctiQin ithjcomjitmen enetrgy,resilience,and imagination
in an environment of limited resources

Status/Qualifications/Experience

The candidate
* must be a citizen of The Bahamas
* if an academic should hIld an earned Ph.D degree from an
accredited institution of higher learning or an equivalent
professional qualification and a minimum of five (5).years
experience at the level of President, Chancellor, Vice President
or Vice Chancellor of a recognized and respected institution
* If active in the private sector, should have a strong academic
background and at least five (5) years experience at the level
of CEO or an equivalent position in a substantial organization.
* Applicants whose careers have been in the public service
should have a strong academic background, a minimum of
five (5) years experience at least at the level of Permanent
Secretary or its equivalent
* Those in the Foreign Service should have a strong academic
background and at least five (5) years experience at the level
of Ambassador, High Commissioner or an equivalent position.

All applicants should be familiar with educational systems in the
British Commonwealth (including the Bahamas and the Caribbean)
and in North America.

The application deadline is September 14, 2005. To ensure full
consideration, all applications must be received by this date. A
completed application will include an up-to-date comprehensive
resume (including evidence of nationality and date of birth) along
with a letter addressing the issues and criteria included in the
description of the position. To expedite the appointment procedure,
applicants are advised to request five referees to send references
under confidential cover directly to the address listed below without
waiting to be contacted by The College. Please visit the College
of The Bahamas website at for more information about the
institution.


. 0^







PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


GN-253

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR FISHERIES OFFICER
(CONSERVATION, AQUACULTURE)
DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES,
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE,
FISHERIES AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
to fill the position of Fisheries Officer (Conservation
and Aquaculture), Department of Fisheries, Ministry of
Agriculture, Fisheries and Local Government.

Requirementsfor the post:

Applicants must possess a Bachelors Degree in
a biological science such as Marine Biology,
Marine Ecology, Fisheries Science, Aquaculture
or related field and at least five years relevant
experience.
A Masters degree in a relevant field and three
years relevant experience

Possess the ability to work with minimum
supervision and proper time management skills.
Computer skills and SCUBA Diver Certification
would be an asset.

The successful candidate will:
Be assigned duties relative to the conservation of
marine resources and environments, and the
culture of marine and aquatic resources.
Be required to travel within The Bahamas from
time to time.

The salary of the post is in Scale AF11 $24,800 x 600
$31,400 per annum. Starting salary will be
commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Serving officers must apply through their Heads of
Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Department
of Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Local
Government, East Bay Street or the Public Service
Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street.
They must be returned compete with original
qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to reach the Secretary, Public Service
Commission, Poinciana Hill, Meeting Street, not later
than 29th August, 2005.

Secretary
Public Service Commission


VACANCY FOR ASSISTANT FISHERIES
OFFICER (SEAFOOD INSPECTION)
DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES,
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE,
FISHERIES AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
to fill the position of Assistant Fisheries Officer (Seafood
Inspection), Department of Fisheries, Ministry of
Agriculture, Fisheries and Local Government.

Requirements fbr the post:

Applicants must possess a Bachelors Degree in a relevant
biological science such as Food Science, Microbiology,
Chemistry, (Marine Biology, Marine Ecology, Fisheries
Science) or related field.

Computer skills would be an asset.

The successful candidate will:

Be posted at the Food Safety and Technology
Laboratories, Gladstone Road, Nassau;

Be required to travel within The Bahamas from
time to time.

Duties of the post include the following:

Inspecting and monitoring seafood and seafood
processing facilities. This will involve the
sampling and physical examination of seafood
products.

Issuing of relevant export documentation.

Reviewing and analyzing processing and all
related practices at seafood processing facilities,
to ensure compliance with standards relative to
food safety, hygiene and quality control.

Assisting with the training of workers in the
seafood industry.

The salary of the post is in Scale AF14 $21,050 x 600
- $26,450 per annum. Starting salary will be
commensurate with qualifications and experience.


Serving officers must apply through their Heads of
Departments.

Application forms may be obtained from the Department
of Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Local
Government, East Bay Street or the Public Service
Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street.
They must be returned complete with original
qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to reach the Secretary, Public Service
Commission, Poinciana Hill, Meeting Street, not later
than 29th August, 2005.


Secretary
Public Service Commission


Information on environment costs importantr


FROM page one
costs associated with ensuring
they are in compliance with
environmental regulations and
management plans, included
reasonable proposals. Most
developers factored in costs for
environmental compliance.
The plan was included in
SENES' .recommendations to
the Government for a draft
National Environmental Man-
agement Action Plan. The pro-
posal waspart of a plan to


ensure there was "stable fund-
ing" for environmental man-
agement in the Bahamas.
Calling it responsible to have
such legislation in principle, Mr
O'Brien said its impact would
boil down to what the actual
costs for a developer were, and
to what degree an environmen-
tal analysis was required.
"Some [developments] will
be low impact by their nature,
while others will be high impact,
so there are a lot of factors that
will go into determining what


is a reasonable assessment," Mr
O'Brien said.
He added that developers
would naturally rather not have
that cost, but giving them a rea-
sonable idea of what it will be
upfront will enable them to
determine if this is a factor in
whether or not to proceed with
their investment.
While he is all for responsible
development and ensuring the
environment is protected, Mr
O'Brien said it comes down to
creating regulations that are bal-
anced enough to provide pro-
tection for the environment
while not discouraging devel-
opment that will benefit the
Bahamas.
President of the SandyPort
Development Company, Garth
Buckner, said it was his under-
standing that current laws
already provide for the type of
protection being sought by the
draft plan.
He added that what is needed
is greater coherence so that the
general public and investors can
know what the national stan-


GN 257

OFFICE OF THE JUDICIARY REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Magistrate Appeal Division



TAKE NOTICE that the following Magistrate Appeals have
been set for hearing in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau before
the Honourable Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall at 10:00 am on Thursday
the 25th day of August, AD, 2005.



APPEAL NO. PARTIES ATTORNEYS

Clinton 0. Clarke Vs. Jim Holron (c/o
2005/MAG/APP/4 Executive Flight Support) Clinton 0. Clarke & Co.
.. ., Basil Moss Vs Lee Callender & Arnold Forbes & Co.
2004/MAG/APP/48 Joan Callender .,. Desmond Edwards & C.
Kendal Forbes (t/a Forbes Electrical) Vs.
2004/MAG/ABP/39 Vanessa Strachan C. F. Butler & Associates
Janet Smith Vs. Jason Darville &
2005/MAG/APP/8 J&L Auto Lockhart & Munroe
Trans Island Express Ltd. & Techmash
2002/MAG/APP/16A Air S.A. & Mary Darville & Michael Cole Maxwell S. A. Turner & Co
Vs. Bannister & Co. (Ruth Bowe Darville) The Law Partnership
Trans Island Express Ltd. & Techmash
2002/MAG/APP/16B Air S.A. & Mary Darville & Michael Cole Maxwell S. A. Turner & Co
Vs. Bannister & Co. (Ruth Bowe Darville) The Law Partnership
Obie Ferguson (served for
2004/MAG/APP/11 Commonwealth of The Bahamas Trade Lockhart & Munroe
Union Congress Vs. A. Leonard Archer Collie & Collie

2005/MAG/APP/17 Clement McKinney Vs Jannice McKinney Collie & Collie

2005/MAG/APP/12. Lamont Dean Vs. Kevin Romer R. A. Farquharson & Co.

2005/MAG/APP/1 Bernard Saunders Vs Arica Dean Richard Boodle & Co.

2004/MAG/APP/19 Perry Gilbert Vs. Pansy Lewis
Eugene Collie Vs. Central Gas Mackay & Moxey
2003/MAG/APP/27 Company Ltd.
2004/MAG/APP/30 Mr. & Mrs. Johnson Vs. Mr. Jason Turner
2004/MAG/APP/44 Foster Knowles Vs. Valerie Darville Mackay & Moxey
Bethel Moss & Co.
2002/MAG/APP/30 Bernard Paul Vs. John E. Pinder Jerone Roberts
Dwayne Wells & Geneva Dorsette Vs. Davis & Co.
2004/MAG/APP/18, Carol Johnson Collie & Collie
W. Warren Watson
2005/MAG/APP/16 Alfred Gray Vs. Colin Dean Michael Hanna


AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to

attend the aforesaid hearing on the date and at the time fixed therefor,
such order may be made in you absence as the Court deems fit.


Dated this 22nd day of August, A.D. 2005


(Signed.)
Estelle G. Gray Evans
Registrar


dards are, instead of the confu-
sion that currently exists,,par-
ticularly regarding the BahaMs
National Trust. 3.
"This is a government ag^-^
whose mandate is to repoxtW
government and not to the i
eral public. It has done a g o4
job of doing this in the past
recent public demands for,4tt
be accountable to the geiial.
public have led to a misur
standing of its mission,
has resulted in confusion,'V
Buckner said.
An activist who believeM
environment is an important
part of the quality of lifeag.
the business of tourism inrtmi
Bahamas, Mr Buckner said that
what was needed was i
hard science and clearly eiabi
lished standards.
He added that the amougof
time it takes to get appro0 s
for investment projects in-,.
Bahamas was unnecessary, a.
streamlining the process with
coherent environmental `o1i
cies would be a benefit to I tj
the environment and busiias


BDO Manhi

Judd says,

relocatiorl

essential

FROM page one
by operating without a Bahami-
an fund administrator for the
last five months of its life, while
its auditors had failed tosi
off on the 2004 accounts.
Grant Thornton had refused
to sign off on the accou-ritk
because of its "inability to conm-
plete" an audit of MCL. MCL
was the counterparty to the 1 )
hedge funds that Olympus U4-
vest, a fund-of-funds, was inve|-
ed in, and Mr Culmer saf
MCL's records were "not ci
rent" at the date of the Olympus
Univest liquidation in May 2 .
The Tribune reported ye" -
day that Grant Thornton -was
the same company as Gomeiz
Partners and Co. However, jis
is incorrect as the two compa-
nies are separate firms, and
Gomez Partners & Co has ottfi-
ing to do with.ther.fit
Thoriton or the Olympus Uni-
vest Fund. The report was bs
on seemingly incorrect inftr-
mation in the liquidator's report.
Meanwhile, Mr Culmer's
report said he had demanded
the redemption of all the Olym-
pus Univest Fund's investments
in the various underlying he e
funds.
He described explanatii0s
from the Olympus Univest
Fund's former manager, Nor-
shield Asset Management, as'to
the "commercial viability" of its
structure as "plausible at this
stage", but more time with hie
company and the fund's fornrer
administrator, Cardinal Inter-
national, was needed to cj3n-
plete the liquidation. '
Mr Culmer said he was t4ld
by the Olympus Univest FunKl's
directors that all the fund's Nas-
sau bank accounts were closed
before the liquidation, aiad
remitted to an account attl e
Norshield-owned Olymp's
Bank & Trust in Barbadosto
be held on trust. a
Some $32,713 was remitted
from that account to Mr C.-
mer on June 17, 2005, foll w-
ing his instructions. In additiE,
Mr Culmer subsequently 1o0 -
ed an account in the Olym0 ls
Univest Fund's at Scotiatrust
Nassau, containing $5,433 Cap -
dian dollars and an overdraun
balance of $2,166 in US currve-
cy.


ScotiabanR

looking

at Colina

FROM page one
James Campbell, who was oWst-
ed in a bitter shareholder di-
pute with Mr Ferguson 4"d
Emanuel Alexiou earlier Ns
year.
Mr Campbell held a 45 4jr
cent stake in CFG and, l'y
extension of CFG's 66 per cnpt
holding in Colina Holdings, iliis
in effect gives him a staked of
around 30 per cent in the BI$X-
listed entity.
Based on Monday's BIC
closing price of $1.80 per shtre
for Colina Holdings, Mr Carhp-
bell's share of the CFG hql4-
ing is valued at $13.421 million.
This means that the value ofpis
involvement in CFG is not ihe
45 per cent stake in the hqld-
ing company, but that compa-
ny's underlying shareholding in
Colina Holdings.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT DELHOMME, #6,7TH
STREET, THE GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 24TH day of AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citienship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


BUSINESS 17








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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 7B


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PAGE8B, EDNEDAYAUGUT 24 200 TRIUNEOPORT


Newly formed

organisation

hosts its

first regatta

By BRENT
STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter
THIS weekend, the B
Class will sail their first
two races, while the A
Class will pick up their
second race in the new-
ly formed National
Sailing Association's
regatta.
The regatta was orig-
inally organised by the
Ragged Island Affili-
ates Sailing Associa-
tion. But Kurt Wallace,
association vice com-
modore, said they
decided to make the
change to the NSA
because of the islands
involved.
On Saturday, starting
at 11am, the B Class
boats will compete in
two races back-to-back.
The A Class will be
back in the water on
Sunday, starting at
1pm.
The regatta, the first
of its kind, got under-
way on Sunday, August
14 and will run through
Saturday, November 5.

Race
In the initial race of
the A Class series, the
Good News won with
the Pieces of Eight sec-
ond and the Lucayan
Lady third.
According to Wal-
lace, this is an unique
regatta because "each
class will have six races
to compete in, but we
will only judge them
over five races.
"They will have the
opportunity to discard
their worse race," he
said. "We will then
combine their scores
and determine the win-
ners based on the new
low point scoring sys-
tem."
While there are cur-
rently two bodies in
sailing the Bahamas
Boat Owners and
Sailors Association and
the Commonwealth
Sailing Association -
Wallace said the NSA,
headed by Richard
Munroe, won't effect
their operation.
"Our goal is to coop-
erate with every sailing
body in the Common-
wealth of the
Bahamas," Wallace
noted. "This associa-
tion will involve all
boats from all organi-
sations."

Boats
While they are
expecting boats from
the CSA to participate
this weekend, Wallace
said they haven't got-
ten any response as yet
from the BBOSA
about their involve-
ment.
Ants Nest, the
Cobra, William's Auto,
Bahama Life, Passion,
Eudeva and the Lady
in Red, Lady Nathalie,
will all be coming out
to sail on Saturday.
At the end of the
series, which will fea-
ture an Ocean Race for
both classes, Wallace
said they intend to pre-
sent the prizes to the
various winners.
"We have some very
attractive prizes," Wal-
lace lamented.


To ensure that they
get the maximum par-
ticipation of both the
spectators and sailors,
Wallace said they
intend to provide
roasted fresh pork and
chicken.
"We got off to a good
start on Sunday and we
intend to continue
where we left off this
weekend," he summed
up. "We invite the pub-
lic to come out."


Ellis takes centre




stage for Stampeders


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AS THE National Football
League (NFL) gets set to
kick-off its season in Septem-
ber, the action has already
started for Godfrey Ellis, in
the Canadian Football League
(CFL).
Ellis, has earned a starting
spot on the Calgary Stamped-
ers line-up the first week in
July, after -teammate Jamie
Crysdale was placed on the
injured list.
Crysdale was sidelined with
a knee injury at the Stamped-
ers third game.
This opened.up the spot for
Ellis, who was originally draft-
ed as an offensive linesman.
The move into the starting
spot had Ellis playing the left
tackle position at first, but
now has him playing the cen-
ter position.
In the game, which Ellis was
inserted into the line, the
Stampeders went on to win


Bahamian's CFL football


season gets underway


21-15, over the Winnipeg Blue
Bommers.
Ellis is responsible for snap-
ping the ball to the quarter-
back, assisting with blocks and
watching blitzes.

Bobbled
His first snap came on Fri-
day August, 5th, at a practice
session, but during his game
on August 7th, he bobbled the
snap, which was intended
for quarterback Henry Bur-
ris.
Ellis became the first
Bahamian to be drafted into
the CFL, Thursday, April
28th, as the 10th pick in the


second round to the Stam-
peders.
He became the third
Bahamian to be drafted into
the professional ranks in two
years.
He will suit up today in the
game against the Toronto
Argonauts.
Ellis was among a trio who
were drafted into the profes-
sional ranks in the two year
span. Devard Darling and
Alex Smith, were the first to
sign on.
Darling, who went to the
Baltimore Ravens after opt-
ing not to-complete his final.
year in college, became the
second Bahamian to be draft-


ed behind Edwin Smith, Alex
Smith's father.
Before moving to the
Ravens, Darling played for
Washington State, where his
performances helped him to
sign a three year agreement
on July 26th, in the profes-
sional ranks.
He was drafted to the
Ravens in the third round as
the 82nd pick, but missed sev-
eral games due to quad
injuries.
The Ravens are set to play
their first pre-season games
against the New Orleans
Saints and Washington Red-
skins, Augiist 26th and Sep-
. tember 1st, respectively.


Alex, has signed with the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers in
April, after being drafted in
the third round, 71st pick.
On Saturday past, Alex,
who is playing the tight-end
position, made an open field
block on a fellow draftee, has
he attempted a long touch-
down ramble.

Plays
Alex has been making up
grouns at the Buccaneers
training camp, hoping to make
big plays when he is inserted
into the line-up.
The Buccaneers pre-season
started last week, matching
them up against the Ten-
nessee Titans.
Their final pre-season game
will be played on September
1st against the Houston Oil-
ers.
Regular season is set for'
Sunday September llth, with
the Minnesota Vikings.


jumping


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vailablenfrom Commercial News P.rovn ers"


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


















England's Simon Jones has






a 'reverse' swing in step


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 9B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


4f









WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


SECTION 4



Bi
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


* HEADING FOR FINAL: Tonique Williams-Darling, Christine Amertil and Lavern Eve.


OP


8s


E By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
DESPITE losing the last
two races after the IAAF
World Championships to
American Sanya Richards,
Tonique Williams-Darling is
still leading the way in the
women's 400 metres'head-
ing into the IAAF World
Athletics Final.
As of Monday, Williams-
Darling (1397) has an 18-
pointdead over Richards
(1379) with Mexican Ana
Guevara (1364) not too far
behind for the season end-
ing meet from September 9-
10.
Williams-Darling,
Richards and Guevara fin-
ished in that same order at
the IAAF World Champi-
onships in Helsinki, Finland.
But since the impressive
showdown in the rain,
Richards came back and has
turned the tables twice on
Williams-Darling.
Richards, 20, has the
world's two fastest times of
48.92 and 49.28 seconds
respectively. Williams-Dar-
ling, 29, follows with the
next four best times of 49.30,
49.55 and 49.69 which she
managed twice.

Jackpot
It was a similar scenario
for Williams-Darling last
year. She won the Olympic
Games' gold medal in
Athens, Greece and then
earned half of the $1 million
jackpot.
But at the end of the sea-
son, she was knocked off her
pedestal when she was
defeated by Mexican Ana
Guevara, her rival all season
long.
Another Bahamian, Chris-
tine Amertil, is sitting in sev-
enth spot in the standings
with 1298. She has secured
her berth in the IAAF
World Athletics Final.
Amertil, who tried to qual-
ify for the 200 final after she
missed an appearance in the
400 final in Helsinki, is
ranked at No.11 in the half-


Tonique leads in

400m rankings


lapper. Only the top eight
will qualify for a trip to
Monaco.
Veteran Lavern Eve is
also in line for the trip to
Monaco. She is fifth on the
women's list in the javelin
with 1151. Cuban Osleidys
Menendez, who lowered her
world record in Helsinki,
heads the list with 1336.
Eve, 40, turned in a sub-
par performance as she
failed to reach the final eight
in the javelin final in Helsin-
ki.
Although she made it to
the final of the women's long
jump in Helsinki, finishing
ninth, Jackie Edwards is on
the borderline. She is cur-
rently at No.13 with 1171,
just two points behind Rose
Richmond from the United
States.
Three Russians lead the
way in the standings. Helsin-
ki silver medalist Tatyana
Kotova is on top with 1289,
Irina Simagina with 1245 and
Tatyana Lebedeva is third
with 1237.
On the men's side, Chris
Brown and Leevan 'Super-
man' Sand are in a good
position to head to Monaco.
Brown, who ran his heart
out in lane eight, only to lose
out on a medal in the final
stretch of the men's 400
final, is sixth on the list with
1300.
American Olympic and
world champion Jeremy
Wariner, challenged by
Brown on the final leg of the
men's 4 x 400 relay that
brought the curtain down in
Helsinki, is out in front of
the pack with 1362.
And Sands, who dropped
to first to fourth in the men's
triple jump final, has 1269
on his ledger to maintain his
qualifying spot at this point.
if


Romanian Marian Oprea,
who came from behind on
his sixth and final jump to
clinch the bronze and
knocked Sands to fourth in
Helsinki, leads with 1347.
Sands, however, won't be
eligible for the long jump.
He is sitting in 29th position
with 1147. The 12th spot is
occupied by Sands' former
collegiate rival American
John Moffitt with 1197.
Helsinki gold medalist
Dwight Phillips of the Unit-
ed States is out front with
1378.
Qualify

In Helsinki, Sands tried to
bounce back to qualify for
the long jump, but the emo-
tions from the triple jump
final the night before was
too much to bear.
Sands, 18, was unable to
post a legal jump in his three
attempts in the qualifying
round.
By virtue of also failing to
advance through the rounds
in the men's 200, Dominic
Demeritte won't be heading
to Monaco. He is 28th on the
list that is led by the Ameri-
can trio of silver medalist
Wallace Spearmon, double
sprint champion Justin
Gatlin and bronze medalist
Tyson Gay.



Aw 4b --
.ii


I


0


U/


- I -I








*MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT


1


* WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY: Filmmaker Kevin Taylor's future appears to hold a lot of promise.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


Kevin's knoc





documenta ry


kout





puts


him in


the


frame


* By ERICA WELLS
FILMMAKER Kevin Tay-
lor believes in taking chances.
Three months ago he left a
safe, secure job at Atlantis to
pursue a career in film-making
in a country that generally
offers little support and even
fewer resources for budding
producers, directors and
actors. And while it remains to
be seen if that chance has paid
off, if his latest project is any-
thing to go by, Taylor's future
as a filmmaker appears to
hold a lot of promise.
The 33-year-old hais recent-
ly completed a compelling
.documentary about a Bahami-
an boxer's championship fight,
Chu Chu Meets Marvellous,
which will premiere at the
Bahamas International Film
Festival in December, and he
has his sights set on one day
directing a feature film.
"(In the Bahamas) it's a
blessing and a curse," Taylor
told the Arts in an interview.
"You can get instant access
because there's not many peo-
ple to do it, but then there's
not many people who do it
well either, judging by 80 per
cent of what you see on tele-
vision. Once people start to


Film to premier at Bahamas

International Film Festival


make money off it they
become complacent it's
either news or propaganda
driven."
Taylor is not afraid to speak
his mind and, like others, is
not afraid to criticise arts fund-
ing in the Bahamas or push
for more tangible support for
local film makers. While he
believes that the talent and
subject matter are here, the
resources are scarce and there
is little sign that that will
change soon. But that's not
stopping him.

Freelance
Before turning to freelance
work in April, Taylor did the
Kerzner Today television
show for Atlantis, following
stints at the Counsellors and
the Bahamas tourism channel.
Taylor, born and raised in
Canada, got his start in film


at an early age, making movies
with his friends, using his par-
ents' VHS camera.
It was an interest he had for
a long time, and one that
would also help him get
through high school.
"I was a terrible student,
just terrible. My teachers
would let me hand in final
reports and projects by letting
me hand in movies," said Tay-
lor.
"I would end up doing real-
ly well, but I was probably
working twice as hard as oth-
er students, shooting and edit-
ing everything."
Following high school, Tay-
lor travelled for a while and
ended up playing baseball for
a college in Arizona.
His academic schedule
revolved around baseball but
he jumped at the chance to
take a few broadcasting cours-
es that were offered there.
"It was the only time I


excelled at anything at
school," recalls Taylor.
"So I stuck with it and when
I moved back to Canada I fin-
ished my degree in broadcast-
ing."'

Nassau
Not long after that, Taylor
met his wife, a Bahamian, and
moved to Nassau, where he
has been living for close to
nine years.
Taylor has paid his dues in
the industry, working his way
tip from carrying cables and
equipment to producing his
own documentaries, which he
has so far described as "prac-
tice" for bigger projects.
He has managed to keep
busy by going out on his own,
shooting commercials, pro-
ducing a documentary for
John Bull's 75th anniversary
celebration this year and cov-


ering special events, but his
teal passion lies in using his
talent in telling the story of
the Bahamian people.
"I think in the Bahamas,
everyone has a story to tell.
You couldn't fling a dead cat
without knocking someone
down who had a good story
to tell," said Taylor.
"We are surrounded by
good stories everywhere. This
country is made up of all these
beautiful, interesting people."
Taylor recognised one of
those good stories when he
decided to take a boxing class
at a local gym. That was where
he met Jermaine "Chu Chu"
Mackey, the subject of his sec-
ond documentary.
Taylor follows the super-
middleweight contender
around for about three weeks
leading up to his bout with
title holder "Marvellous" Mar-
vin Smith and ends up telling a
story, not only about a young's
man journey as a boxer, but
a touching account of the
human spirit. "I thought
(Mackey) had a lot of person-
ality and would make a good
subject, and it just became a
story."
The boxing documentary,
written, directed, and pro-


duced by Taylor -"there was
nothing in this movie that I
didn't do"- shows all the trap-
pings of the sport, the gru-
elling training sit-ups, long
early morning runs the trash
talking leading up to fight
night, and the determination
of both athletes to win. It fea-
tures interviews with Mack-
ey's coaches and mentors, like
boxing champion Ray Minus
Jr, and follows him on his
press tour leading up to what
becomes a much anticipated
bout.
Boxing has since become
one of Taylor's passions.
Without fancy equipment
and a big budget, Taylor man-
ages to capture a classic
underdog story. Even if you
already know the outcome of
the fight, by the time the
match comes around the view-
er is glued to the screen with
anticipation, a credit to Tay-
lor's skill as a filmmaker.
Taylor shot the documen-
tary on his hand held Mini
Sony DVD camera and edited
it on his laptop.
He bought 14 hours of tape,
(each tape was $8) and bor-
rowed the additional equip-
SEE page two


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


EXHI BIT IONS












Knockout documentary


FROM page one

ment needed.
Taylor says he did not want to use any-
thing he did not already have. He wanted
to see what he could do with what he
had. "I didn't want to fall into the trap of
sensationalising the (story) and I didn't
want to tell anything that (the viewer)
couldn't see for himself."
His first documentary "Robert and
Harry go to Sea" was shot about two
years ago during a school at sea adventure
and tells the story of two Bahamian boys
both from difficult backgrounds and how
their experience changed their lives. That
story developed out of another subject
that fell through, and Taylor was able to
recognise its potential.
"Robert and Harry go to Sea" would
go on to win in the best documentary cat-
egory in last year's Bahamas Film Festival
(not the Bahamas International Film Fes-
tival) and made it into film festivals in
New York and Canada.
Taylor's goal is to get his boxing docu-
mentary into as many film festivals as
possible, and he is working towards


directing a feature film.
So far, he has been a one man show-
shooting, writing, editing, narrating, inter-
viewing but would like to work with
other local artists who share his passion
for film and doing good work.
Taylor says he appreciates the support
of organisations like Cablebahamas,
which airs locally produced programmes
on Channel 12, including his "Robert and
Harry go to Sea", and the local film fes-
tival, which features Bahamian film mak-
ers showcasing their work to a Bahamian
audience.
But despite the limitations that exist
for local artists of all kinds trying to live
off their passions, Taylor is grateful that
he is living in a country that has allowed
him to come this far.
"If I was still in Canada I would prob-
ably still be rolling up cable wire for a
TV station. I would not be shooting, edit-
ing, directing."

To contact
Kevin Taylor e-mail:
taylor_made@coralwave. corn


*S T


Oscar-nominated



film showcased


THE National Art Gallery of
The Bahamas in collaboration
with The School of English
Studies, College of The
Bahamas, will feature Terry
George's Oscar nominated film,
Hotel Rwanda, on Thursday,
August 25, 2005 at 7.45pm at
the Gallery.
The drama stars gifted actor
Don Cheadle, who portrays the
real life Paul Rusesabagina, a
resourceful hotel manager
(Hotel Mille Collines) who
saves 12,000 Tutsis and Hutus
marked for death during the
1994 Rwandan massacre at
great risk to his own life.
At the height of the carnage
more than 40,000 people were


massacred. This screening
promises to be an enlightening
event for those interested in the
history of the Rwandan mas-
sacre and the poignant experi-
ence of one sole survivor.
Tamico Gilbert of Amnesty
International will lead the dis-
cussions following the screen-
ing.
The film is part of a series of
films showcased in the NAG-
B's summer-long film pro-
gramme (dubbed Wide Angle
Cinema) of issue-oriented cine-
ma.
Each presentation is designed
to educate, entertain and
engage the public on the possi-
bilities of the medium as a tool


of creative expression, and with
regard to the subject matter
being presented as the films are
not simply formal works of cin-
ema, but taunt explorations of
somewhat controversial issues.
Past films shown by NAGB
have included Stephanie Black-
's, Life and Debt and Raoul
Peck's, Lumumba.
Admission is free and open
to the public.
However, due to the graphic
nature of the film, parents are
strongly urged not to bring chil-
dren.
Secure parking is available at
the Gallery. For more informa-
tion, please contact the Gallery
at 242-328-5800.


Movie makes


debut at BIFF




find-raiser


THE 2nd Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival
(BIFF) once again celebrates
"Cinema in Paradise".
BIFF invites everyone to join
the second annual fund-raiser
at Nygard Cay, Nassau,
Bahamas Saturday, Septem-
ber,17,2005, .
On Saturday, September -17
come and meet the cast and
film-maker, Frankie Flowers, of
the film Haven. Shown at the
Toronto Internatioinal Film Fes-
tival, Haven will make its debut
in The Bahamas.
Haven is a thrilling feature
film shot entirely in the Cay-
man Islands and the culture is
vivid in every scene displaying
beautiful shots of the islands.
Frankie Flowers, first time
film-maker, is sure to be the
next modern maverick to come
out of the Caribbean and pave
his way to a very successful
career.
Haven is the story of two
shady businessmen (Paxton and
Dillane) who flee to the Cay-
man Islands to avoid federal
prosecution.
But their escape ignites a
chain reaction that leads a
British native (Bloom) to com-
mit a crime that changes the
nation. It's "Pulp Fiction in the
Islands".
There will be a big celebra-
tion as the 2nd Bahamas Inter-
national Film Festival Fund-
raiser kicks off a grand event.
Savour hors d'oeuvres, watch a
star-studded film, rub shoulders
with the who's who in Holly-
wood, buy authentic Bahamian
original paintings and bags, win
a trip of a lifetime on US Air-
ways and dance the night away
under the stars.
All this happens on one night
Saturday, September 17 at
Nygard Cay.
All proceeds from the fund-
raiser will benefit the Bahamas
International Film Festival
Film-makers Residency Pro-
gramme.
Be a film industry insider for
,a night, and discover what goes
into the making of a movie get
the: lowdown by engaging in a
question and answer session
with the film-maker and the cast
of Haven.
Tickets for the event are lim-
ited, so early reservations will
help to carve out your place in
"Cinema in Paradise".
Donations are $50. Anything
extra brings that wonderful
warm glow of knowing that
you've helped move the
Bahamas International Film
Festival one step closer to pre-
senting another fabulous film
festival.
To reserve tickets, call the
Bahamas International Film
Festival at 242-356-5939 or e-
mail your reservation request
to rsvp@bintlfilmfest.com.
Payment is by cash or cheque
payable to "Bahamas Interna-
tional Film Festival".
Nygard Cay is located in
Lyford Cay. There will be a
shuttle bus to pick you up at the
City Market Plaza to shuttle


____ ~ S
~ ~,


you to Nygard Cay.
The Bahamas International
Film Festival is a non-profit
organisation dedicated to pro-
viding the local community and
International visitors with a
diverse presentation of films
from around the world.


In addition to offering films
that might not otherwise be
released theatrically in the
Bahamas, BIFF will provide a
unique cultural experience, edu-
cational programmes, and
forums for exploring the future
of cinema.


PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













Coveted Harry Moore Scholarship



goes to young artist Heineo Schmid


A YOUNG artist whose work in
a variety of mediums from oil to
photography wowed a tough selec-
tion committee has become the
Lyford Cay Foundation's first recip-
ient of the coveted Harry C. Moore
Memorial Scholarship for the Arts.
Heino Schmid, assistant curator
of the National Art Gallery of The
Bahamas, painter, photographer,
framer, designer and craftsman, will
use his $10,000 award to earn his
Master's degree in Fine Arts at the
Utrecht School of the Arts in Hol-
land. A graduate of the Savannah
College of Art and Design in Geor-
gia, Schmid is awestruck that he won
the scholarship named in honour of
the late Harry C. Moore, the man
whose energy and tireless passion
for education propelled the Lyford
Cay Foundation into the region's
largest private educational funding
foundation.
"I honestly didn't expect the
scholarship," Schmid says. "There
were so many people I knew who
applied and they all had something
to offer. The fact that the committee
chose me above the other candidates
is not something I take lightly. I plan
to show the team who selected me
and those who recommended me
that I am willing to go above and
beyond with this great opportunity I
have been given. I am not just doing
this to benefit me. I am doing this to
benefit my country and those who
will come after me."

Curiosity
The Bahamas nearly lost this
potential national art treasure to .the
world of finance. A Finance major at
the College of The Bahamas,
Schmid was restless, wanted to
change and kept thinking about his
childhood curiosity about art. He
turned to internationally-known
Bahamian artist Antonious Roberts
who spotted his talent immediately
and agreed to become his instruc-
tor. Roberts also took note of his
new student's ability to accept criti-
cism and learn from it.
It was in this painting class,
Schmid says, that his photographic
skills took on a life of their own.
"In class, most people would take
photographs to transfer by painting
to canvas," he explained. "I started
to t 4aiin eest ilie photogra-
phy e Gla'ifdoriou knew it I


HEINO SCHMID, left, was awarded the coveted $10,000 Harry C Moore Memorial Scholarship for the Arts from the Lyfid Cay
Foundation. During a presentation last week at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, Schmid, who will study for a master degree
in the visual arts at an art school in Europe, met his benefactors, including Monique Moore, who established the scholarship ii iemo-
ry of her late husband, an avid art collector and fund-raiser for education, and Roger Kelty, director of educational programmes for the
foundation. An independent screening committee headed by Erica James, gallery curator, (not pictured) selected Schmid from a field.
of nearly 20 qualified artists.
(Photo by. Tim Aylen for DP and A)


was expressing art through that a seasoned artist with accomplish-
medium." ments many don't get until they've
The second of three boys, graduated. His present repertoire
Schmidt's early childhood memories includes magazine photography and
include attending Palmdale Primary being Curatorial Assistant at the
School in Nassau, and speaking Ger- National Art, Gallery of the
man in Europe. Bahamas (NAGB) where he is
"As soon as people see-me and I responsible for the documentation
tell them my name, they give me a and image organization of art work
look that says 'where on earth did and gallery events. He also designs
you get that name from?'," Schmid and maintains the gallery's website
laughs. "My mother is Bahamian and assists with educational events
and my Dad is German. I don't such as gallery tours and workshops.
speak German as well as I should Schmid is also a volunteer at Popop-
because I was only in Germany from studios and Gallery with Bahamian
age 2 to 9 and my level is that of a 9 artist John Cox.
year-old's. I think that because I "In the last year, my work at
don't know as much as I would like NAGB and Popopstudios have
to know about my European her- instilled in me a concrete belief in the
itage I am drawn to going there to rich talents of Bahamian artists and
study." .* ,!%z' the need for art education in
Schmid enters gradt ahamian art, in both a historical


and contemporary context," says
Schmid. "I have been inspired and
heartened by the recent international
success and exposure of Bahamian
artists.
"My desire to complete my Mas-
ter's-Degree is in part out of per-
sonal reasons to further my educa-
tion, but also, I see it as an opportu-
nity that I can continue the raise the
bar for Bahamian artists."
Through photography and art,
Schmid admirers say he is able to
communicate with a compelling
mixed media language that speaks to
the contemporary viewer.
"I am interested ih art' as a
metaphoric social observation," he
says. "I want to visually study how
people interact and react to the
media, each other and ultimately,
how this dictates the way we define


ourselves."
According to Schmid, art provides
a unique Opportunity for the visual
deconstruction and cultural analysis
of The Bahamas and what it means
to be Bahamian in ways thiatare
totally unique, and canndtie' con-
ventionally reproduced outside of
the isual arts.
S"Ifirmly believe in art asia lan-
guage and my personal mission has
always been to traiislate a fixpand
this vocabulary both persoiaily and
publicly," he added. "I hav^ttempt-
ed to surround myself wi institu-
tions and events that fosteit.e pub-:
lic education of art th iugh the
gallery experience, art edlation or
art related workshops. Thi is somine-
thing that I am passionate about and
hope to continue after my formal
education is complete."


Schmid has already made fans of
elite Bahamians who have paved the
way for art in the country. Roberts
agrees that Schmidt's determination
to further his art education speaks
well of his interest in developing
himself and his talents while Cox
considers him a valuable part of the
development of contemporary art
in The Bahamas.
Said Cox: "Whether Schmid is
working as a framer, a teacher, a
photographer or a designer, his ded-
ication to craft is unsurpassed. His
mind, heart and energy are dedicat-
ed to not only his development, but
also the development of an art com-
munity:"

Talented
The Harry Moore Memorial
Scholarship for the Arts is reserved
for talented Bahamian students
enrolled in colleges and universities
in the United States, Canada, the
. United Kingdom or Caribbean. The
recipient can be studying at the
undergraduate or graduate levels
and the scholarship encompasses any
of the following disciplines paint-
* :ng' drawing, sculpture, music, dance,
theatre and performing arts.
The Harry C. Moore Scholarship
fund-raising committee is chaired by
Mr. Moore's widow, Mrs. Monique
Moore, and includes Mrs. Nancy
Kelly, Mrs. Lynn Holowesko, Mr;
Maniel Cutillas and Ms. Patricia
Thomson.
"Currently, we have $550,000 in
the:scholarship fund," said Mrs.
Moore. "It is our goal is to raise
$800,000 so that we can eventually:
endow up to four scholarships in per-
petuity."
Arf independent screening conm-
mittee headed by National Art
Gallery Curator Erica James
includes artists and entrepreneurs
Dionne Benjamin-Smith and John
Cox, .cultural icons Cleophas
Adderley and Dr. Ian Strachan and
art collectors Dawn Davies arid Vil-'
cent'd'Aguilar. James, Benjamin-
Smith, Cox, Adderley and Strachan
were all- recipients of Lyford;
Cay Foundation scholarships or
grants.
According to Roger Kelty, Direc-
tor of Educational Programs for the
Lyford Cay Foundation, Schmid was
selected from among 19 qualified
applicants.


arts brief


For The Road


More Travelle


A/C Service
Check refrigerant pressures
Top up freon if low
S .* Clean condenser fins
Check compressor-drive belt

* (Extra charge for any refrigerant or leak detector dye L


Brake Service
Treat disc pads with anti squeak
** Check calipers and cylinders for
leaks & correct operation
Check vacuum booster operation
Check tyres for smooth, even
stopping
(Replacement parts extra)


Cooling System
Pressure test cooling system
Inspect radiator tanks and core
Check water pump drive belt;
unless driven by timing belt/chain


* Check terr
conditio


* De-dust and'a
* Check discs a
scoring and
* Check conditic


* Inspect hoses and fitl
* Check coolant condit
* Check radiator fan or


LOVE, an exhibition fea-
turing Bahamian artists Jason
Bennett (pictured), John Cox,
Blue Curry, Michael Edwards,
Toby Lunn and Heino Schmid
at Popopstudios and Gallery
on Dunmore Ave in Chip-
pingham, next to Dillet's
Guest House (1/4 mile south
of the Bahamas Humanes
Society).
Call 323-5220 or 322-5850
for more information.

Rhapsody an exhibition
of paintings by Trinidadian
artists Angelica and Marielle
Barrow @ Central Bank of the
Bahamas Art Gallery, Mar-
ket St. This mother-daughter
team has produced a compo-
sition of light, colour and ener-
gy descriptive of the, spirit of
the Caribbean people ,their
landscapes and lifescapes. The


exhbition runs until August
29 during bank hours.


Series. Call 328-5800 to book
tours.


The National Collection N The Awakening Land-
@ the National Art Gallery of scape: the Nassau Water-
the Bahamas, an exhibition colours of Gaspard Le Marc-
that takes the viewer on a hand Tupper, from the collec-
journey through the history of tion of -Orjan and Amanda
fine art in the Bahamas. Lindroth @ the National Art
It features signature pieces Gallery of the Bahamas.
from the national collection, The mid-nineteenth century
including recent acquisitions paintings that make up the
by Blue Curry, Antonius exhibition are part of one
Roberts and Dionne Ben- of the earliest suites of paint-
jamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to ings of Nassau and its
book tours. environs.
Tupper was a British mili-
Past, Present and Per- tary officer stationed at Fort
sonal: The Dawn Davies Col- Charlotte in the 1850s.
lection @ the National Art The works show a pre-mod-
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa ern Bahamas through the
Doyle, West and West Hill decidedly British medium of
Streets. ..., ,, watercolour.
The exhibition is part of !Call 328-5800 to book
the NAGB's Collector's tours.


ION]VDA
The Power of Dreams


Dowdeswell Stree
322-4626
E-mail: service@nassaumi


All Honda vehicles are serviced by NMC's factory-trained
technicians using manufacturer parts and recommended
service routines suitable for our severe driving conditions. Your
vehicle should be serviced every three months or 3,000 miles *
for maximum performance and safety.



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otor.com '


WEDNIEbum, uvuo, i 4, 2Uuo, rMat t.,


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


/10-


W HAT'S ON IN AND AROUND NASSAU















EMAIL. OUTTHERE @ TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET


W Parties, Nightclubs i
and Restaurants tiIM


Bahamas Byker 1st Annual Boat Cruise, on
board the Yellow Bird, Friday, August 26 @
8pm. Tickets, $15 in advance, $20 aftthe
boat. Purchase tickets at Hype Bykes, 7th
Street, The Grove. Music by Alpha Sound
DJs and DJ Ty, hosted by DJ Xtra Large.
For more information logon : to
www.bahamasbyker.com or call 328-
6586/477-7289/395-8162.

Summer Bounce Bikini Beach Bash, Sun-
day, August 28 @ Long Wharf Beach, 11am
until. Giveaways: one night stay at Atlantis,
and a cellphone. Also featuring cash prizes
and a money drop. Music by Barry Da Push-
er, Xtra Large, Selector Dominique, Sky,
Flava, CRX, and Donny Miller. Admission:
$10 in advance, $15 at the gate. Ticket loca-
tions: The Juke Box, Best of the Best, South
Beach and Barbies, East Street.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday
night @ Club Trappers, Nassau's "upscale"
gentlemen's club. Featuring a female body
painting extravaganza. Free body painting @
8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission:
Men free before 10 pm. Females free. There
will be free food and hors d'oeuvres between
9pm and 10pm. Open until 4am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid lounge, this and every
Thursday night. Doors open at 10pm. Ladies
free before lam, $10 after. Guys: $15 all
night. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacardi) Give-
aways and door prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night-
@ Club Fluid; Bay St. The biggest party of
the week, pumping all your favourite hits
all night long. Ladies in free before 11llpm.
Strict security enforced.:

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz
spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters
Sports Bar. Drink specials all night long,
including karaoke warm-up drink to get
you started. Party from 8pm-until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover
charge includes a free Guinness and there
should be lots of prizes and surprises.
Admission: Ladies $10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials,.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cov-
er charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring
late '80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of
the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights
and Go Go dancers. Admission: Ladies free
before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
every Friday 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1
shots. Bahamian Night (Free admission)
every Saturday with live music from 8pm to
midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to
midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all
night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo,
Charlotte St kicks off Fridays at 6pm with
deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl'wide
on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Saridyport,
from 4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill
moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge,


every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille,
British Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundais, every Sunday, noon-midnight
@ Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies
free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West
Bay St and Skyline Drive. Singer/songwriter
Steven Holden performs solo with special
guests on Thursday from 9pm-midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim
Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm-
10pm @ Hurricane Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Wednes-
day-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restau-
rant and Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana
Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key-
board in the After Dark Room every Sun-
day, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food and
drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at Traveller's
Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.


LOVE, an exhibition featuring Bahamian
artists Jason Bennett, John Cox, Blue Curry,
Michael Edwards, Toby Lunn and Heino
Schmid at Popopstudios and Gallery. The
gallery is located on Dunmore Ave in Chip-
pingham, 1/4 mile south of the Bahamas
Humane Society. Gallery hours: Mon-Fri
4.30pm-7.30pm or call 322-5850 for appoint-
ment.

Da Spot, a weekly comedy show, features


door.

The National Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the
history of fine art in the Bahamas. It features
signature pieces from the national collec-
tion, including recent acquisitions by Blue
Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Ben-
jamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book tours.
This exhibition closes February 28, 2006.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn
Davies Collection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West
and West Hill Streets. The exhibition is part
of the NAGB's Collector's Series. Call 328-
5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes
August 31, 2005.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tup-
per, from the collection of Orjan and Aman-
da Lindroth @ the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century
paintings that make up the exhibition are
part of one of the earliest suites of paintings
of Nassau and its environs. Tupper was a
British military officer stationed at Fort
Charlotte in the 1850s. The works show a
pre-modern Bahamas through the decidely
British medium of watercolour. Call 328-
5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes
August 31, 2005.


The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each
month at their headquarters at East Ter-
race, Centreville. Call 323-4482 for more
info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.


Doctors Hospital, the official training centre
of the American Heart Association offers
CPR classes certified by the AHA. The
course defines the warning signs of respira-
tory arrest and gives prevention strategies to
avoid sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that
can occur in adults, infants and children.
CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-lpm.
Contact a Doctors Hospital Community
Training representative at 302-4732 for more
information and learn to save a life today.

REACH Resources and Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm-9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.
C i k M R ~ ^ i- -

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7.30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road.
Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean
St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.
Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J
Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave.
Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and
fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder
Building, Collins Ave at 6pm.; Club 612315
meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets
every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
'"Sblbmon's Building, East-West Highway.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros. All are wel-
come.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi
Omega chapter meets every second Tues-
day, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every
first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord's Restaurant,
Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-
4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every
second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board RoomoLthe-Britissh-
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's
Monastery.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's
Monastery. For more info call 325-1947 after
4pm. ,

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ Super-
clubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third
Friday of the month at COB's Tourism
Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during-
the academic year. The group promotes the
Spanish language and culture in the com-
munity.


skits and spoofs on Bahamian life, with
improv by a talented young cast. The show is The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets Send all your civic and social events to
held Tuesdays @ The Dundas at 8pm. every third Saturday, 2.30pm (except August The Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
Admission is $10, and tickets are sold at the and December) @ the Nursing School, outthere@tribunemedia.net
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.


the main event






THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005, PAGE 5C


VAL


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P 6 ED A2 2T R


Sea Wind cruise




celebrates best




of Bahamian


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
THE best of the best in
Bahamian music will meet
aboard the Sea Wind on Satur-
day night. And all their fans are
expected to attend.
The fifth instalment of The
Best of the Best, a compilation
album of the Bahamas' hottest
artists, will be launched on the
cruise.
And while all of the 15
artists on the upcoming album
will be present for autograph
signing and picture taking, only
a few will grace the stage in per-
formances for the crowd. The
energetic Brilanders, Bazie,
Samantha and Traffic Jam will
be in performance that night.
And if you haven't heard
names like Samantha and Traf-
fic Jam, Leslie Turnquest, exec-
utive producer of The Best'of
the Best, says that you soon will,
with the release of the album.
In previous years, the album
featured mainly "big names"
that all Bahamian music lovers
would be familiar with. But this
year, organizers wanted to add a
few new names to the bunch,
five of them to be exact.
Sugar, formerly the lead
singer for The Soulful


Groovers, launches her solo
career; Kevin McKenzie of
Joy 101.9; D-Mac; Samantha
and the Traffic Jam group are
new artists who join house-
hold names like KB, Visage,
The Brilanders, Elon Moxey,
Clyde Pinder, Gino D, Ron-
nie Butler,The Falcons and
Xtra Band on this compila-
tion.

Deal

The album, which is "strict-
ly" Bahamian music with a
"Junkanoo groove" will be sold
on board the Sea Wind for $10 -
a deal, seeing that when the
album hits stores it will'be sold
at $15 or more, says Mr Turn-
quest.
"What we are trying to do
with these albums is to bring
lots of new music at one time so
that Bahamians can enjoy qual-
ity music from their favourite
artists," he adds.
"I think that more young
people will appreciate
Bahamian music moreif they
get all this music at one time
because when Gino D releases
an album, that's only Gino D
on that album, whereas you
get a taste of many more


artists on best of the best," he
said.
Tickets for Saturday's boat
cruise are available at the Hit
Spot, The Beauty Shack and the
Juke Box at a cost of $20. Per-
sons without tickets can expect
to pay more at the boat. A cost
has not been finalised, Mr Turn-
quest said. Group tickets, how-
ever, can be bought through
calling 394-0819.
According to the producer,
those who turn out can expect a
time filled with lots of partying
and a chance to mingle with
persons from Florida and other
Family Islands who have
already confirmed their atten-
dance.
But what is so interesting
about this year's album release
is the location, which Mr Turn-
quest feels will do much for the
festivities. "You can expect to
feel good because it's on the
sea.
"We wanted to do something
different this year because there
has never been a boat cruise
with this number of artists. It
has never been done, but this
year we are doing it and it's sure
to be an entertaining night."
The boat cruise runs from
8pm Saturday night to 12am
Sunday.


* RONNIE Butler's music will be featured on The Best of the Best


Sisters hoping drama workshop



will become an annual event


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
SINCE the beginning of this week,
Rhanna Productions in conjunction
with TYC, the youth arm of
Bahamas Faith Ministries Interna-
tional, has been conducting a Dra-
ma Workshop at the church on
Carmichael Road. The workshop
ends on Friday.
Designed to better equip those
who have an interest in drama and
acting, sisters Radell and Ranell
Hanna, who head the company, have
developed what they hope will be an
annual initiative.
The pair have produced a number
of plays which have been showcased
at their church's Youth Alive cele-
brations. For this year's Youth Alive,
they wrote and produced "Kim", the
story of an island girl coming to Nas-
sau, the big city for school, and'com-
ing to terms with life and God. Last
year, they produced "The Plunge",
which was the feature pesentation at
Youth Alive's opening night, and the
previous year, they assisted with the
production of "Log On, Stay Con-
nected".
Now the young playwrights are


bringing what they know, together
with the knowledge of those who are
arguably more established in
Bahamian theatre to help those who
are just setting out.
On Monday the workshop fea-
tured Kayla Edwards as the speaker,
and on Tuesday, poet Michael Pin-
tard shared words. Toinette Dean,
an active mime artist who has per-
formed both nationally and interna-
tionally, and current leader of the
TYC Dance Group, will also,speak.
Tahira Kemp, who has studied vari-
ous genres of music like jazz, ballet
and hip-hop, is also slated to speak
during the workshop.

Registration

For a $50 registration fee that
includes these lectures, all workshop
material, handouts, and a certificate
upon completion, participants seem
to be getting their money's worth, if
not more. One-day registration is
also available at a cost of $20.
The workshop runs from 9am to
3pm each day, and discusses the fol-
lowing topics: drama and its history;
improvisation; successful audition-


ing; character development; pan-
tomime, the foundation of drama;
and believable acting.
Ranell explains how the workshop
is structured: "At the core of this
workshop are the speakers and the
practical exercises. The first portion
is a lecture then each presenter gives
a practical exercise. We view past
productions and films, a question and
answer period, and then we critique
the films we watch."
Ranell says that while this work-
shop covers mainly drama in the the-


atre, next year's workshop will equip
participants in acting and producing
for film, which she says is a growing
medium in this country.
"Persons are definitely interested
in theatre and film, in acting as a
whole. It's evident in the number of
movies they watch. And then they
gravitate to productions like Men
Talk and Woman Talk. We know
that persons love a good show and so
we are helping these individuals to
know how to pull off a good show,"
she told Tribune Entertainment.


Spain's Bebe tops pack with



five L,'n !ww wnnettions

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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 6C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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The Tribune presents


Having the right food to






make it through the day


* By JANICE MATHER
SCHOOL isn't just a place to learn academics,
it's also part of the mealtime training ground.
Between classes, students learn and choose the
foods that help form the basis for a diet that's
either healthy, or not. Parents are nowhere in
sight, and even very young children can decide
what goes into their mouths.
But at many schools, standard tuck shop
options are far from nourishing: salty chips, sug-
ary sodas, and an array of candies, cookies, hot
patties and an array of high-fat, low-nutrient















PACKED luncheshold greatpotential to
be much more nutritious and perhaps
cheaper than anything a student can
get at altuck shop, corner store, cafete-
ria or back-trunk vendor. Not sure what
to prepare? Try these fun, tasty ideas:
Cold pizza Children can assemble
the ingredients when lunchtime rolls
around, using:
flour tortilla/English muffin/cooked
mini pizza base
pizza sauce
shredded cheese
Wrap/roll-up In a flour tortilla, wrap
up a combination of;
lean, lowfat meat
lowfat cheese, shredded
shredded lettuce
other vegetables
The Improved sandwich
You can get a quarter of the fat, and,
.four times the fibre into a simple lunch of
a sandwich, side, fruit, sweet snack, and
drink by making a few changes.
A standard lunch beef bologna
sandwich on white bread, with mayon-
naise; chips; fruit cup in syrup; choco-
late sandwich cookies; fruit punch drink
has 980 calories; 48g'fat; 13.5g satu-
rated fat; 125g carbohydrates; 59g sug-
ar; 3g fibre.
Upgrade it to:
Lean turkey sandwich on whole
wheat bread, with lettuce and mustard
carrots and celery with light dressing
fresh grapes
homemade trail mix
skim milk
725 calories; 13.5g fat; 2.5g saturated
fat; 120g carbohydrates; 52g sugar; 13g
fibre.
Source: Kidsheafth.org


foods that provide very little in the way of quali-
ty fuel for active bodies and expanding minds.
That, however, doesn't have to be the case;
whether kids and teens buy or bring their food, it
is possible to have tasty, economical meals that
are healthier, too.
Like their counterparts around Nassau,
Kingsway Academy students can munch on chick-
en, French fries, macaroni and peas and rice at
lunchtime. But with every hot meal, students
are guaranteed a side of corn, carrots, sweet peas
or other vegetables.
"Kids like the fried stuff, but we sneak some
healthy stuff in, too," says cafeteria supervisor
Donald Johnson. Younger children, he reports,
are finicky over their greens, but older children
are more likely to chow down veggies once
they're provided. And whether children eat all
their vegetables or not, at least they have the
option. Other options include five daily salads:
chicken strip, chicken, chef, and tossed, and fruit
salads.
Last year, whole fruits were also added to the
menu.
"They really sell," says Mr Johnson. "The
younger children love the fruit, they're the main
ones who buy the majority of the fruits."
That goes to show that, if nourishing meals
and snacks are available, children can and do.
make healthy choices. And at Kingsway, even if
Mommy isn't there to suggest an orange instead
of Oreos, Mr Johnson has been known to remind
children of what's best.
"I'll tell them, 'this granola bar is much health-
ier for you than the chips and the chocolate bar,
it has whole grains and that willahelp to clear you
out'. Some of them try it and they find,,that they
like it, and continue to buy it," he says.
With the introduction of healthier eats and
drinks, even soda sales have gone down. Instead,
many children at the school are choosing apple,
orange, grape and cranberry juices, Gatorade,
and flavoured waters.
"You have a few kids who are hooked on the
Coke sodas I had to row one girl who drinks,
two, three Cokes a day. I said, 'that's not good for
you! Drink a juice sometimes, that would be
better,' and at times I do break her down. Since
we've introduced the juices and Gatorade, the
soda sales have dropped." But is there any chance
that the school likely to go as far as some Amer-
ican schools, which have taken vending machines
out all together? Probably not.
"Kids complain, and they end up bringing sodas
to school. Some kids, if you don't sell sodas,
they will bring them from home," he explains,
"so I don't think we'll ever get to that place where
they'll eliminate it. All we can do is increase the
juices that are sold," he says.
Even that approach has made a significant
change; he estimates that, once other options
were made available, soda sales have fallen by 40
per cent.
Smart snacks from home,
Not all students have easy access to fruits,
veggies, lean meats and whole grains on their
school campus, and the simplest solution is to
come armed with smart snacks and lunches from
home.
Rather than feeling awkward about brown-
bagging lunch, kids with home-packed food can
become trendsetters, and influence their friends,
who may in turn influence their own parents to
make smarter eating choices, says Shandera
Smith, nutritionist in the Ministry of Health's
Nutrition Unit.
She recommends packing lunches that include
each of the major food groups; that can be simply
done with a sandwich on whole wheat bread, a.


lCo py r ig hted MaterialI

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fruit, and fruit, water, or reduced-fat milk. In
place of candy, try raisins or other dried fruit;
instead of cake, a banana or bran muffin.
To make home lunches more fun, Ms Smith
suggests getting children involved in putting
together the meal. :
"When children prepare their own lunch,
they're more apt to actually eating it, and seeing
the benefits of having a healthy diet, as opposed
to one that is not so healthy," the nutritionist
says.
Give young people incentives to eat healthy
Poor childhood diet can be a contributing fac-


tor in contracting diabetes, high blood pressure,
heart problems, and a host of other diseases that
have generally been associated with adulthood.
But words like 'hypertension' may go in one eat
and out through the other; in convincing chil-
dren to eat healthily, give, them reasons that will
pique their interest; for example, a good diet
helps ward off problems like morbid obesity,
being very, very fat.
"They are more interested in getting good
grades, performing in sports, weight control, and
healthy skin good nutrition contributes to all of
SEE page three


Making the right choices abut sexuality
A -


* By JANICE MATHER
IN school, they teach math, English,
history, and all those other subjects.
But many young people learn much
more than how to read and write.
In the 1998 Bahamas Youth Health
Survey (BYHS), which involved 2007
adolescents between 10 and 19 years,
almost a third of 13-15-year-olds had
sex, and 41.4 per cent of teens 16 and
over had been sexually active. Here
are some tips about sexuality as you
prepare for a new school year.
Know what sexuality is
Sexuality isn't just the act of sex it
involves mental and emotional aspects,
gender expectations and identity, and
much more, explains community nurse
Carolyn Russell, who coordinates the
Adolescent Health Centre.
When you think of sexuality, also
think of your personal values, morals,
beliefs and what you want out of life,
long-term and short-term.


"(It involves) the things that make
you who you are," says Nurse Russell.
"A part of that is goal-setting, and
deciding what you want ... We need to
be able to teach our children how to
negotiate sex effectively, and not just
(tell them) 'say no'. Yes, say no, but we
need to teach them how to negotiate
for themselves."
Negotiating skills and making
choices
Negotiating for yourself when it
comes to sex is vital in the BYHS, a
third of young people felt they had
been pressured or forced to have sex.
Nurse Russell points out that young
people can and should think about and
make their own decisions about sex,
and act accordingly.
"In yourself you have to decide what
is safe, and what is not... 'If I choose to
have sex now, this isigonna happen. If
I choose tb wait later, maybe I could
get a career, maybe I could finish
school, I can go off, I can plan for a


future.' It means you have to know
what is safe and what is not, and you
have to decide on what level of risk is
acceptable to you.
"Most people if they actually stop'
and think about the fact that the same
thing you do to have sex gives you
AIDS, gives you teenage pregnancy,,
gives you an unplanned event like an
abortion, they'd take more note of
it."
More about choices
Although many young people are
sexually active, there are also many
who are not. If you decide you don't
want to have sex at this time, you're
not the only one who's made this deci-
sion, regardless of how it may feel.
According to the BYHS, most young
people who haven't had sex made a
conscious decision not to, most com-
monly because they were afraid of
catching a Sexually Transmitted Dis-
ease (75.6 per cent), wanted to wait
for marriage (72.3 per cent), didn't


want to get pregnant (68.7 per cent),
were following their parents' values of
sexual abstinence (67.8 per cent), and
believed that they'd feel guilty (60.9
per cent).
"If you decide not to have sex,
there's nothing wrong with you I tell
adolescents, for all the persons who
have sex all the time, it's a lie most of
them are not. The persons who talk
about it the most are doing it the least,
or may not be doing it at all," says
Nurse Russell.
If you've decided not to have sex,
be sure that you know how to say no
clearly and forcefully.
"Some people say no, but the way
they say no is not the right way, they're
not clear, concise, forceful with their
decision. They have a verbal some-
thing but they have a nonverbal some-
thing that makes you realise, no is not
really no," says Nurse Russell.
Bear in mind, though, that even a
verbal 'no' should be respected by a
potential partner.


Other factors that influence deci-
sions -
Decisions you make and boundaries,
you set sexually may end up getting
tossed out of the window if you ind
yourself using drugs, or drinking.
According to the BYHS, "As the num-
ber of drinks normally consumer at
one time increased, so did the per-
centage of respondents who bad
engaged in sexual intercourse". e
"Once you start drinking or using
drugs, it impairs your judgmefit,"
explains Nurse Russell. "The way bow
you'd react in a sexual situation is&hot
gonna be the same as it would ifYou
did not take a drink."
Consider consequences
Learn that you have rights, choices
and need to take consequences and
ownership for your behaviour. ,
"Not all persons who have sex get a
SEE page two


emd 0 L















Sex education: pointers for parents


* By JANICE MATHER

MOMMY, Daddy: you may not like
to hear it, but young people are sexu-
ally active. Not all of them, of course.
But look at the last Bahamas Youth
Health Survey, which questioned 2007
11 to 19 year olds about their behav-
iour and attitudes: 41.2 per cent of par-
ticipants had "gone all the way". That
included a third of 13 through 15-year-
olds, and 57.4 per cent of those 16 and
older, according 1998 Bahamas Youth
Health Survey.
Short of locking an adolescent in an
underground dungeon and feeding
them through a small slot, there's no
guaranteed method for stopping your
offspring from having sex. The decision
to have sex, or to wait, is essentially
one each young person has to make,
but parents can and should pro-
vide guidance and influence in the
decision.
Teach and talk about sex or some-
one else will Information about sexu-
ality and sex abounds, whether it's on
TV, on the computer, or through peers
and other people. When parents fail to
provide facts, there will be a wealth
of other sources children can draw on,
says Nurse Carolyn Russell, commu-
nity nurse and coordinator of the Ado-
lescent Health Centre.
She encourages parents to discuss
more than just reproductive facts with
their children; include information
about changing feelings and emotions,
the need to make right decisions and
how to make them, and the concept
of choices and consequences.
Assuming that children are just
'good children' won't cut it; neither
will a mindset that 'my child would
never do that!'
"If you fail to teach them, the street
will teach them," says Nurse Russell.
"And it's not gonna be the right way.
You can't sit down and say 'well I
raised my child in the house and I
raised my child in the church, and I
raised my child to be a decent child'
because when your child goes out of
your four walls, that same morally
upright child's personality changes and
it's a different individual. You have to
actually educate your child."
Answer questions frankly and hon-
estly, and don't make a child or teen
feel that any question is a stupid one.
Instead, work to foster an environ-
ment where discussing sexuality is a
straightforward part of life; this is your
chance to defer myths and misinfor-
mation that your offspring may be get-
ting elsewhere.

Be comfortable discussing sexuality
In order to guide your son or daugh-


ter in his or her sexual choices, you
must feel comfortable discussing sex
- which many parents don't.
The first conversation about sexu-
ality may feel uncomfortable and
that's normal.
"The first time doing everything is a
little hard," says Nurse Russell, who
recommends finding a parenting
group, church marriage club, or other
organisation that teaches sexuality and
can help parents feel comfortable dis-
cussing the topic.
For some parents, this can require
being realistic about activities their
children are already involved in.
"You have parents who actually go
through a pregnancy with an adoles-
cent, have a whole child that they're
home raising, and... they tell you that
they don't want you to offer their chil-
dren birth control because they're not
gonna have sex anymore.... you have to
take your head out of the cloud and
say 'she had to have sex to bring this
child, and if she had sex once, chances
are, she's gonna have sex twice. She
didn't ask you the first time, and she's
not gonna ask you the second or third
or fourth."
Other parents still struggle with the
idea that giving children information
means that the youngster will feel
obligated to try that information out.
"There are still people who believe
'if I give my children information about
sex, they're going to go out there and
do it, so if I tell them about contra-
ceptives, I'm telling them to go and
get the pill or go and get condoms',"
says Nurse Russell.
She recommends that parents who
truly feel uncomfortable discussing sex
must know when ito seek help -
resources include the Adolescent
Health Centre, which can help pre-
pare parents for tackling touchy issues,
or talk directly, to teens.

Communicate effectively
In addition to talking specifically
about sexuality, parents need to com-
municate with their children.
Working late? Call home to make
sure that your son or daughter is there.
And if you've set rules, make sure you
enforce them.
"There must be positive and nega-
tive consequences for action.
Sometimes parents say, 'if you do
this, I'm gonna do that', the child does
it, and you do nothing," says Nurse
Russell. "Eventually, you're condoning
a behaviour."
During adolescence, it's normal for
a child to pull away from parents, and
rely more on peers. That's why form-
ing strong bonds early in life is vital; a
child who has always talked openly


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and often with her parents will still lescent life, get to know who your son
draw away to an extent, as she gets or daughter is spending time with. Try
older, but is more likely to continue opening up your home to these friends,
to let them know what's going on. so you can observe them for yourself.
That way, if you suspect there's a prob-
Know your children's friends lem, you'll., have tangible evidence to
Since peers play a big role in ado- confront your child with when you sug-


gest that this companion may not be
the best choice.
"All adolescents and this is a fun-
damental fact will reject advice that
is devoid of reason. If you're giving
them advice and you're not telling
them why, they will-reject it," says
Nurse Russell, who notes it's vital to be
able to show your child exactly what is
negative about a problem friend.
Try listening in on conversations
between your child and their friends,
and challenge your teen to think about
what their friends say.
Involved parents may shape behav-
iour
When sexual pressure or temptation
faces your teen, you won't be able to
make a decision for them. However,
parents who have a positive, active
role in their children's lives can shape
behaviour.
In the Bahamas Youth Health Sur-
vey, it was found that girls who felt
neglected by their families were one-
and-a-half times more likely to have
sex than those who felt they received a
lot of attention.
Fathers in particular can play a big
role in the decisions girls make, says
Nurse Russell.
"Some girls were telling me the oth-
er day that some guys were bigging
them up for being involved in some
very lewd behaviours. If they had pos-
itive male role models, you would not
have major problems going on," she
explains.
"Parents are the key, but a lot of
our kids don't have parents that are
there for them," says Nurse Lena
Clarke, clinic supervisor. "If (girls)
don't have a father to tell them in a
nice way, in an innocent way, 'you are
lovely', without any kind of motive or
anything behind it, when guys say that
to them on the street, they aren't used
to hearing this so they just fall into
something.
Girls, too, look for male attention
and if they've been used to getting that
male attention from their father and he
has made her feel 'you are all of that!'
then they don't fall for just any guy
who comes along and tells them 'you
are beautiful'."
The survey found that "for males,
no association was observed between
engaging in sexual intercourse and the
amount of attention paid to the stu-
dents by their families." That doesn't
,mean,,though, that boys should be left
to themselves.
Says Nurse Clarke, "if they don't
see the role of a male in the home,
they'll find a role model somewhere
else.".
See page 5


Considering



everything



about your



sexuality


FROM page one
sexually transmitted infection,
but adolescents have sex at a
younger age, it opens up a big
(can) of worms it exposes
them to so many of the risk
factors, and that goes not only
for teenage pregnancy; your
body's not fully matured to go
through what you're going
through so you can end up
having all kind of cervical
changes and abnormal pap
smears.
"You can have emotional
changes... you cannot deal with
the fact that... this person who
loved you and you're everything
to them, tomorrow is everything
to your best friend.... early sex-
uality leads to early delinquen-
cy, you may not think that your
parents are no longer responsi-
ble for accountable for you
because you're doing the same
thing your parents are doing,"
she says.

Parents, and other positive
resources
Ideally, you should be able
to talk with your parents about
sexuality whether you're
active or not. For sexually
active teens, though, communi-
cation with parents is vital
because without their consent
you won't legally be able to
access condoms to prevent
STDs and pregnancy. If you're
a girl, you won't legally be able
to get birth control, or go to a
clinic to get a Pap smear, an
important test for all girls and
women once they reach 21
years or start having sex (it
detects changes in the cervix,
and is vital in preventing cervi-
cal cancer).
Parents can also be useful in
offering guidance and advice,


and in answering questions -
which you may have, and which
your friends may not be answer-
ing accurately.
"If you don't find a voice at
home, nobody lives in isolation;
there are relatives .. you can
always find another concerned
(person)," says Nurse Russell,
who suggests finding someone
who'll be open to listening to
your problems or concerns.
"Make sure that adult.has pos-
itive values and is able to give
you the information that you
need."
If you're have questions or
problems and you don't know
who to ask, try:
The Adolescent Health
Centre, located on School Lane
(one corner west of The Tri-
bune and 10OJamz). They offer
services ranging from repro-
ductive health, family planning,
antenatal and postnatal care, to
counselling services and the
Adolescent Health Desk (Tues-
days at 4pm), a peer-education
programme that includes dis-
cussions, games, and other
activities. Phone: 328-3248/9.
Email:adolescenthealth_4@hot-
mail.com
The Ministry of Youth also
has an Adolescent Health Desk,
similar to the one offered at the
Adolescent Health Centre.
The Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre provides services and sup-.
port if you're being sexually (or
otherwise) abused. Contact
them at their 24-hour hotline:
328-0922, or by e-mail through
bahamascrisiscentre@yahoo.co
m.
Their website is www.baham-
ascrisiscentre.org.
Also, try resources like
school guidance counsellors or
church and youth group lead-
ers.


PAGE 2F


THE TRIBUNE













tart the mor ing right The correct
food and the


0 By JANICE MATHER
EVEN before lunchtime rolls
around, breakfast is an opportuni-
ty to start the day well.
Registered dietician Julia Lee, of
Doctors Hospital, says children who
have breakfast do better in school,
which should be incentive enough
for any parent to serve up a bowl of
cereal to their growing offspring.
Mrs Lee, consultant for
Kingsway Academy's cafeteria,
which has been working to provide
students with healthier foods, says
the school began offering break-
fast because of the impact a good
morning meal can have.

Nutrients
"Breakfast is a meal, and an
opportunity to get a third of the
day's nutrients," says Mrs Lee.
"Teachers have seen a difference
- the students are more attentive,
because they are not hungry."
Make sure the day's first food is
high-quality; that means sugary
cereals, and the soda-candy com-
bo that some students regularly
chow down on, are definite no-nos.
"A growing child needs to have
good food in the morning," Mrs
Lee says. "You see some children
stopping for candy and sodas that
is an example of missing an oppor-
tunity for nutritious food."
Some Bahamian breakfasts like
souse and Johnny Cake can also
provide a nourishing start, but
beware of the 99 cent variety, warns
Shandera Smith, nutritionist in the
Ministry of Health's Nutrition Unit.
Tuna, when not laden with may-
onnaise, is a better option than
corned beef, which is both salty and
fatty. For grits, hold up on the butter
-half a teaspoon of butter, if any.
Instead, get moisture and flavouring
from the tuna or corned beef.

Concentration

"It's absolutely vital that every-
one eats breakfast, especially chil-
dren, because when they go to
school, instead of having a hungry,
growly stomach, they can't con-
centrate on the lesson that's being
taught. That breakfast helps them


P9 ,Copyrighted Mate rial

5 Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


- * _* _
4 40-


to concentrate better and focus on
their schoolwork, rather than being
hungry even adults, when you're
hungry you just want to eat some-
thing and satisfy that," says Ms
Smith, who recommends whole
grain cereals, and eggs as great


morning options, along with fruit
and fruit juices.
While hearty carbs provide ener-
gy in the morning, Ms Smith advis-
es against loading up on too much
heavy food, which can leave a child
feeling luggy' and weighed down.


"If they go to school with a real-
ly heavy stomach, they may get
(sleepy) you don't want to laden
them down with a heavy brfak-
fast," she recommends. "Give them
sufficient so they wouldn't feel so
full that they can't concentrate."


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PAGE T8T ESCHRIBUSNEPLEMENT 20051


JOSEPHINE WHYLLY LIZINGA ROLLE LAMECH JOHNSON


Sasha Ferguson is off to the University of
Science and Arts of Oklahoma (USAO) in
Chickasha, Oklahoma this Autumn to pursue a
bachelor's degree in biology. Sasha is the recip-
ient of a full scholarship, awarded by USAO,
and will have all expenses paid to study for the
next four years. During her enrollment there,
she will add her basketball talent to the USAO
"Drovers" women's basketball team. She will
play the position of guard. Sasha was graduat-
ed from Saint Augustine's College with honours
in June 2005 and was the recipient of the Father
Prosper Myer Outstanding Female Athlete
Award. In sports, she has represented the
Bahamas in track and field at the 2003 Carifta
Games held in Port of Spain, Trinidad and won
a gold medal in the women's discus throw. The
following year, Sasha competed in the Junior
Central American and Caribbean (CAC)
Championship Games in Vera-Cruz, Mexico
where she also won a silver medal in the wom-
en's discus throw.
Sasha is a member of the Bahamas Junior
National Female Basketball Team and has con-
tributed in securing a bronze medal for the
Bahamas at the Caribbean Basketball Confed-
erations (CBC) Youth Championships held in
St Augustine, Trinidad in July 2005. Sasha is a


member of The Club Monica Track and Field
Club and has participated in the Governor Gen-
eral's Youth Award Programme. In academics,
as a consistent honour roll student, Sasha was
selected and recognised for her high academic;
achievements by the most outstanding students
in the Bahamas Award Programme for three
consecutive years, 2003-2005. She also success-
fully obtained seven BGCSE's this year. .
: Lizinga S Rolle, 14, was graduated from S
C McPherson Junior High School with special
honours. She served as Head Girl, vice-presi-
dent of the school's newspaper club and acting
NCO in the RBDF Rangers Programme.
* Lizinga has been a member of her school's
softball team, speech and debate club, choir,
dance troupe, band, and volleyball team at dif-
ferent points throughout junior high. She was
also a member of the Wahoo House Social
Studies Competition Team, won various awards
in Spanish, Language Arts and Computer Stud-
ies, maintained perfect attendance and
remained an honour roll student.
In her second year at the school she won the
Holistic Student Award. She earned eight BJCs:
Social Studies, (A); English Language (A):;
Health Science (A); Religious Studies (A);


Mathematics (B); Home Economics (B); Gen-
eral Science (C); and Craft Study (C).
Her ambition is to become a lawyer, special-
ising in the protection and rights of abused chil-
dren and adults.
N Melissa Prescious Fox, 14, was graduated
from S C McPherson Junior High School in
June and is excited about beginning classes at C
V Bethel Senior School come September.
During heryears at S C Mcpherson, Melissa
rose from scoring a less than two point average
in the eighth grade, to a three point average
during her first term in the ninth grade. She
made the principal's list and obtained second
highest GPA overall during her final term at the
school. She achieved all of this while partici-
pating i1 her school's dance club and singing in
the Bahamas National Children's Choir.
Melissa looks forward to joining C V Bethel's
debate team as well as the school's choir. Her
goal is to one day become an attorney and lat-
er a judge. "The sky is your limit and only you
can determine your destiny in your pursuit for
excellence" continues to be her motto.
Josephine Whylly was graduated from S C
McPherson Junior High School in June. She


has received a scholarship to attend Faith Tem-
ple Christian Academy in September. While
at S C McPherson, she served as a school per-
fect and was an honour roll student for six con-
secutive terms (2002-2005). Josephine earned 8
BJCs: English (B); Mathematics (B); Craft
Study (B); Religious Studies (B); Home Eco-
nomics (B); Social Studies (B); General Sci-
ence (C); and Health Science (C).
0 Lamnech Johnson, 13, was graduated from
S C McPherson Junior High School where he
served as Head Boy. He considers himself a
"follower of Christ'" and enjoys reading, par-
ticipating in sporting activities, journalism, and
modern technology. He has been accepted to
Bahamas Acedemy, where three years from
now, he hopes to graduate at the top of his
class.
Afterwards, he hopes to attend a university
abroad and obtain his master's degree in Jour-
nalism. Lamech was an honour roll student
throughout junior high school, following his
performance at Ridgeland Primary School
where he maintained no less than a 3.4 GPA.
His motto has always been, "Good, better best.
I shall never rest until my good is better and my
better is best."


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8F















Teen sexual health: a forgotten issue?


* By JANICE MATHER

WHEN we talk about young peo-
ple, we remember school, violence,
delinquency, and everything they do
wrong. What is often forgotten is what
many young people should be doing
right for their own health but are
hampered by doing so, by law.
A young person in the Bahamas is
legally able to consent to sex at age 16.
Ironically, until they turn 18, they still
need parental consent for any medical
treatment, including sexual health ser-
vices. That means teens can't receive
publicly available birth control, or
access condoms to protect themselves
in those consensual relationships, unless
their mother, father, or other guardian
...hassignda form agreeing to this. Nor
can they be tested for Sexually Trans-
mitted Infections and, for girls, receive
Pap smear tests (recommended at age
21 or as soon as sexual activity begins),
without parental consent.
The Bahamas Youth Health Survey
taken seven years ago found that 41
per cent of adolescents questioned had
been sexually active.
Whether those teenagers are likely
to inform their mother or father that
they're having sex, in order to access
health facilities, is highly questionable.
"I personally feel that until the laws
are changed within the commonwealth
of the Bahamas, sexual health in ado-
lescents really has a long way to go, We
have to actually do something to reduce
the rule that parents need to be (giving
consent), especially in the case of late
adolescents I'm talking about the 16
and 17 year olds... not the little kids,"
says Nurse Carolyn Russell, coordinator
at the Adolescent Health Centre.
"In my opinion, hardly any of them
are accessing services, because of that,"
she says. "I don't care how we glam-
orise it, young people are not coming
to a facility where your parents have to
(sign a consent form). Like a young
lady told me the other day, what?
She'll wait 'til she's 18 because she's
not going through that....they prefer
not to have to go through it because
they feel that it's a breech of their con-
fidentiality. Everybody thinks of ado-
lescents as being bold and brassy but
they respect their privacy as well."
Nurse Russell points out'that, in the
US, condoms are widely available to
the sexually active teen population in
bathroom dispensers, for example.
Their unavailability locally doesn't
mean young people aren't having sex -
even as far back as 1986, 16 per cent of
live births were coming from girls


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between 10 and 19 years (Vital Statis-
tics Reports, Department of Statistics).

Protection

Inability to discreetly access protec-
tion clearly doesn't mean all young
people are opting out of sex. Instead,
says Nurse Lena Clarke, administra-
tor at the centre's clinic, "children are
using baggies, plastic baggies".
"So the adolescents out there are
using baggies, the Saran Wrap baggies
- they're actually using baggies," says
Nurse Russell. "We don't even think
about this when we stand and we talk
about promoting sexual health among
adolescents, we don't think about the
restrictions that exist in our country
that cause persons to think twice


before they do something that's actu-
ally gonna protect their health."
Sexually active teens may also be
turned off from seeking health services
by the fact that a provider is obligated
to call the police if they find a minor
has been involved in sex.
"The laws in the Bahamas need to
be changed because without the laws
being changed, there's a major barrier
to adolescent health services," says
Nurse Russell. "A lady came in recent-
ly and she said she'll wait until next
month, in September, when she'll be
18. But by the time she comes in, she
may be pregnant. There are real issues
when we look at accessibility to ser-
vices foi the adolescent person. We
say that we have accessible and afford-
able services, but we still have barriers
in terms of how these persons can


access reproductive health issues...as
long as our laws don't really address
the issue of the adolescent, we're going
to continue to have major challenges."
Statistics for 2003 recorded 21 STDs
amongst 10 to 19-year-olds that only
reflects the number of cases notified.
At the end of last year, figures from the
Infectious Diseases Division of the
Princess Margaret Hospital and the
Department of Public Health showed
292 cases of non-AIDS HIV Infections
in persons of the same age range, and
16 AIDS cases.
"A lot of persons don't see the ado-
lescents at some point they are a for-
gotten group. They don't vote, most
of our statistics don't break them down,
and (some) parents don't want to be
confronted with the issues," says Nurse
Russell. "Some countries have con-


b o -.


dom machines, in bathrooms. I think
if you ever put a condom machine in
bathrooms in the Bahamas you'd have
a riot... a lot of parents, a lot of school,.
our culture, we prefer to have a blind
eye," she says.
Young people, she says, may turn
up needing sexual healthcare, but
because of legal factors, that often hap-
pens when a situation has become dras-
tic, and not in a proactive manner.
"They usually turn up to us pretty
much when the situation is out of con-
trol either a police has them for run-
ning away," says Nurse Russell. "Oi,
they're caught with somebody or the
orgies we are having some serious
things happening in our society. There
are major negative things that are ha) -
pening that are affecting the adoles-
cent population."


PAGE 9F


THE TRIBUNE














Cadet programme is launched




to boost foreign language study


IN February 2004 the Ministry of
Tourism launched its Foreign Lan-
guage Cadet Programme, designed to
promote the study of foreign languages
among high school students.
The programme, a national plan for
tourism development, seeks to stimu-
late and create an incentive for the
study of foreign languages, inevitably
"laying the ground work for the wide
spread acquisitions of foreign lan-
guages to address the growing needs of
the economy".
It offers 10 positions that allows
eleventh grade students of public and
private schools in New Providence,
who study Spanish and French, to take
part in the interactive three-phase pro-
gramme.
Some 80 students wrote the Quali-
fying Examination for entry into the
programme on November 27, 2004,


producing high results and competi-
tive scores.
The first segment of the programme
takes place every Thursday from Feb-
ruary 10 through March 17, from
4.30pm 6.30pm and exposes partici-
pants to seminars, workshops, field
trips, tours and excursions in Span-
ish/French.
The second phase, the internship
segment, assigns students to work at
the following establishments for five
Saturdays, for six to eight hours during
the month of April Atlantis, RIU
Resort (formerly the Sheraton Grand
on Paradise Island), Dolphin Encoun-
ters, the Hilton British Colonial and
Stuart's Cove Dive Bahamas.
The third phase, known as the Study
Abroad is funded by the Ministry of
Tourism and takes place in July. This
phase of the programme allows stu-


dents to travel to Costa Rica, Spain
and France for a month of immersion.
During the month abroad, students
are enrolled in a Spanish/French course
and are accommodated by families and
language camps. With 24-hour super-
vision students take 3-4 hours of class-
es during the morning, followed by
excursions, sporting and cultural activ-
ities in the afternoon.
This year, language centers include
France-Accord, a French Language
Camp, outside of Paris, and Ecole des
Roches in Normandy, Spain, the
Enforex Summer camp in Madrid and
Costa Rica- CPI- Centro American de
Idiomas in Heredia, a nearby suburb of
capital city San Jose.
Graduates of the entire Foreign Lan-
guage Cadet Programme are awarded
an official Certificate of Completion
during a graduation ceremony, sched-


uled for September 29, 2005.
It is hoped that the interaction of
the programme will help to "generate
an industry in which young profes-
sionals are bilingually equipped to ser-
vice the tourism industry".
Cadet graduates of the 2005 pro-
gramme along with the Ministry of
Tourism's Foreign Language Unit will
launch an inter-high school Foreign
Language Club in October, 2005. The
club will provide a monthly forum for
grade eleven and twelve students to
converse in Spanish and French.
Activities will include culture talks,
movie nights, field trips, games, trea-
sure hunts, cooking demonstrations,
grammar clinics and end of year trips to
a Spanish or French speaking country.
Foreign Language Cadets 2005 are:
Jemellia Anishka Baker of C V
Bethel Senior High School;


Philicia Crystal Ambrister of Doris
Johnson Senior High School;
Leneka Georginn Adams of Gov-
ernment High School;
Rashanda Louise Sands of Jordan
Prince William High School;
Carisma Anderia Tucker of St
Augustine's College;
Omar Jesse Mckenzie of St John's
College;
Claudia Gulce of C I Gibson
Senior High School;
Kerline Octave of C R Walker
Senior High School;
Marla Joy Wood of Queen's Col-
lege and;
Travis Martin Varga of St
Andrew's School.
SEE pages 10-13 for
profiles of the cadets


How important is your child's vision?


M By DR EBBIE SHEARER
JACKSON
VISION is one of the most pre-
cious gifts given to us. It enables us
to view our surroundings, interact,
communicate and socialise with
each other.
When one considers how much
energy is involved in the visual
process, how could we neglect to
take care of our visual health.
Generally speaking, Bahamians
do not pursue preventative health
care measures unless something
happens. This can be attributed to
previous generations who were not
able to practice preventative health-
care and therefore most of us have
continued the tradition.
However, we have developed as a
nation over the years and most of us
can afford to get all the things we
need and desire.
The question is, why do we con-
tinue to neglect our health as a
nation?
Vision care is one of the most


important primary healthcare ser-
vices available in our country today
and there are many individuals who
have never had an eye exam.
Yet, many of these individuals
use computers on a daily, have cell
phones which require them to focus
at small, near objects and many of
the technological gadgets that
require the need of the visual sys-
tem. Technology continues to
impact our visual system on a daily
basis and many individuals are
experiencing visual problems and
do not realise it.
In our school system, many of
our students are failing as a result of
vision problems that are impacting
their learning.
Poor handwriting skills, reading
difficulties, frequent mistakes,
headaches are just some of the
signs/symptoms these students are
experiencing on a regular basis. Yet,
many of these signs go undetected
and these students, continue to
struggle in school on a daily basis.
Many work institutions require'


their employees to use computers
on a regular basis and do not pro-
vide vision care or coverage for
them.
It is important for us as a nation
to recognise the importance of
vision and its effect on us as indi-
viduals. Many complain of
headaches on a regular basis and
are often misdiagnosed for some-
thing else when in fact it could be a
vision problem.
We must see the need to have
our vision checked on a regular
basis and have our children exam-
ined on a regular basis to rule out
any problems that could affect their
learning.
It is beneficial for us as a country
to become more involved in our
health affairs and do whatever is
necessary to promote good eye
health.
Your vision is one of the most
important gifts God has given to
us, ensure that yours is protected.
Contact Dr Ebbie Shearer Jack-
son dt Pahndale Visioi Centre


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 1 OF




PAGE 11F


THE TRIBUNE


B H IP N


OMAR MCKENZIE TRAVIS VARGA RASHANDA SANDS


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IDA LMDALE VISION
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PAGE 12F


THE TRIBUNE


BCTOSCHOLSUPLEEN 20


CARISMA TUCKER


JEMELLIA BAKER PHILLICIA ARMBRISTER


Augustine's College completed four weeks of
immersion at the (CPI) Centro Panamericano
de Idiomas in San Joaquin de Flores, Costa
Rica.
"The first phase of the programme involved
meetings and activities. I was partnered with,
Jemellia Baker and I tied for first place for my
cadet partner profile. The meetings and activ-,
ities were a lot of fun and I particularly enjoyed
the scuba diving
"During the second phase of the programme
I worked in the RIU hotel with Rashanda, we
worked in each of the different sections of the
hotel, (separately of course), and I was able to
practice a little Spanish with the boss. My
favorite section of the hotel to work in was the
pool section because it was fun.
"During thIc third phase of the program I
travelled to Costa Rica with Jemellia. Lene-
ka, and Philicia we studied in Heredia Campus
at CPI. It was quite a unique experience. Jemel-
lia and I had the same host family and they
were very nice. Costa Rica is place with many
hills, mountains, and valleys. To go from school
to the mall would be to change altitude many
different times.
"I was able to communicate in class with my
a-teachers in Spanish and to speak Spanish at
home, on the street and in stores if I needed to


make an inquiry. The food was very different
but it was a very good experience and I am
.glad for it."

M Spanish Cadet Jemellia Baker of C V
Bethel High School completed four weeks of
immersion at CPI Centro Panmericano de
Idiomas in San Joaquin de Flores, Costa Rica.
"During the first phase of the programme
the meetings took on different forms, for exam-
ple, once we had a Spanish Treasure Hunt and
another time we went to Stuart Cove's. These
sessions were great!
"During the second of the programme I
worked in the Sun Lounge at Royal Towers,
Atlantis, Paradise Island. I had the opportuni-
ty to meet some celebrities such as Bow Wow,
Donnie McKlurkin and BeBe Winans.
"The final phase of the programme involved
me venturing for four weeks on an all expense
paid trip to beautiful Costa Rica. One of the
first things that caught my attention was that my
colleagues and I were the only "coloured" folks
on campus at the Centro Panaameicano de
Idiomas, seeing that we were friendly people we
soon made friends.
,"4.4 hoS.-t amily was the Viquez Oviedo.
They were 'iqspitable and accommodating.
'After aty or two I began to feel homesick


Spanish Cadet Phillicia Armbrister of
Doris Johnson Senior High School completed
four weeks of immersion at (CPI) Centro
Panamericano de Idiomas, San Joaquin de Flo-
res, Costa Rica.
"I entered the Ministry of Tourism's For-
eign Language Cadet Programme with great
anticipation and enthusiasm. It was like a dream
that came true. I was finally in the programme
that I craved to be apart of for the last year.
"The programme afforded me many exciting
experiences and opportunities. For example,


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UNDERGRADUATE BUSINES vans
STUDENTS Evans
Farrington
Last Name First Name Init. Ferguson
Adair Camilla M.L. Ferguson
Adderley Deborah Y. Forbs
Adderley Sharon E. S. Forsythe
Allen Charlene M. Frazer
Bailey-Burrows Racquel M. Gabson
Bain Lynette W. Gibson
Bain Valencia P. Griffin
Bastian Deidre M. Hamilton
Beneby Pauline Hepburn
Benjamin Crispin H. Hepburn
Biggs-Russell Angelene A. Jameso
Bonaby Monique V. Johnson
Burrows Dwight R. Johnson
Burrows Vadalia R. Jolly
Butler Dionne V. Knowles
Capron Sherlane K. Knowles
Capron Alissa D. Knowles
Carey Marsha Lynch
Clarke Danika D. Major
Colby Rosita Malrticolm
Conliffe Adrian N. Martinez
Cox Tera L. McKinney
Culmer Archealaus Leonard
Curry David E. Miller
Curtis Natasha K. Moller
Darville Kathleen C Monroe
Davis Janice C. Morley
Dawson Deleta Moss
Dean Latoya N. Moss
Dean Kenyetta T. Moss
Deveaux-Daxor Leketa M. Moss
Dorsett Viviar G.D. Moultrie
Ellis Quinton V. Moxey
Munroe


Mebra
Nikisha
Arnette
Donna
Ulease
Chery
Carol
Jonathan
Sherene
Tiffany
Audrey
Maria
Beatrice
Italia
Patricia
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Berthia
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Shasta
Nakessa
Melisia
Patricia
Michelle
Renay H.
Sherene
Melenia
Christina
Corene
Keishalyn
Denise.
Geannie
Franklyn
Samantha


1L.
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H.

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A.
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Y.H.
A. W.
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L.
C. P.

R.


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La-Rukenique K.


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Poitier
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Smith-Clarke
Strachan
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Thompson
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Willamson


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Sarah
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Philippa
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Denise
Anthia
Shemique


G.
L.
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Y
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N.
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M. P.
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MASTERS IN BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION


Last Name
Braynen
Collie
Cooper
Cox-Ferguson


First Name
Vanessa
Aretha
Tashika
Neville


Init.
C.
N.


Davis
Durocher
Edden
Ferguson
Ferreira
Higgs
Lockhart
Mackey
March
Maycock
McKenzie
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McPhee
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Missick
Pinder
Qaasim
Romer
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Smith
Stuart
Thompson
Whyly
Wood


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Joneth
Anastacia
Alvord
Darlesia
Melinda
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Rodney
Colin
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Siran
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Adena
Desaree
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Sheryl
Siman
Tyrez
Tenecia
Luise


E.
M.
P.
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K.
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A.
M.

U.
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S.
J.

A.
P.
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MASTER OF SCIENCE
IN HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT


Last Name
Campbell
Charlton
Forbes
Francis
Gomez
Jones
Miller


First Name
Shrine
Sharon
Edward
Roselyn
Dorothea
Loniece
Denise


Init.
T.
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Munroe
Munroe
Rolle
Stubbs
Symonet
Virgil
Williams

MASTER OF
EDUCATION

Last Name
Brown
Adderely
Allen
Bodie
Campbell
Darville
Fawcett-Archer
Flowers-Thompsi
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Moss
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Russel
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Tsavoussis
Wilson- Roberts
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Picewell C.
Judith G.
Mitzie Y.
Crystal I.
,Lanisha T.
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Audrey C.

SCIENCE IN


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Oriana
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Beverly
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on Chakita
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 13F


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P. O. Box SS-6353
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k Telephone: 394-6000
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Email: chekard@batelnet.bs
The Bahamian Courtesy and Convenience Card


Shop safely and conveniently when you use your Chekard at any of these participating Merchants:


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5lI~IL~ 15IIIIIII W11111111 5 MMMM W-~---"W"'M-WMM







PAGE 14F


THE TRIBUNE


BACKTOSHOLSUPLEEN20


LENEKA ADAMS MARLA-JOY WOOD CLAUDIA GULCE


', France. many great people, cnecKig guests in, taKing amf
my life have them to their rooms and even getting tipped by of n














Pursuing education and taking




proper care of money matters


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
FOR the Bahamian student
who is making the decision to
study abroad, nothing affects
that decision more than
finances.
But if your child is on the
verge of a high school gradua-
tion or at the point where you
have just mailed in your appli-
cation and attachments, it may
already be too late to be think-
ing of how to fund your child's
college education.
Catherine Richards-Dean, a
financial advisor who has two
children in college, knows first
hand the demands of funding a
college education.
Her two daughters both
attend universities in the United
States and may have missed the
opportunity to further their
education abroad had their par-
ents not planned ahead of time.
"I'm talking about way ahead
of time," she says in an inter-
view with The Tribune. "When
they were younger we made
sure that we set aside money
every now and again for their
education.
"But a lot of persons don't
do that, because they are think-
ing that college is so far away.
You don't really realise how
quickly that time creeps up on
you, so it's best to start putting
yourself in the position finan-
cially, before you get to the
point where you cannot help
yourself," she adds.
Mrs Richards-Dean says that
she couldn't imagine how she
would have funded the thou-
sands of dollars spent for an
education at the "historically
black" universities they attend,
especially considering the fact
that fees for international stu-
dents are much steeper.
She explains: "You also have
to realise that a university edu-
cation in a foreign country -is
not the 1,000 odd dollars you


pay in COB, because our stu-
dents are foreigners in those
countries. And foreigners pay
more, a lot more. Sometimes its
double what the residents or cit-
izens in that country are pay-
ing for the same education.
"So saving, putting money
side for their education is what
you want to do. People are
always complaining that the cost
of education in this country is
going up, so what do you think
about the cost of education in
these other countries. It's sky-
rocketing.
"And if you want your child
to get that education, you can't
put all the pressure on them
when the time is already there,
to see if they can get a scholar-
ship."

Scholarships

For most college students, if
not all, a full-tuition scholarship
with no pressure to repay those
who issue it later down in life,
would be ideal to fund their
education. But the reality is that
these scholarships are often
very competitive.
Most colleges and universi-
ties do offer entrance scholar-
ships, but many of these are
very specific, for example, there
may be a partial scholarship
available for only Caribbean
students,
According to the financial
advisor, parents and students
who are thinking about an over-
seas college education should
never "bank" on the hope that
they may receive a scholarship.
Doing this, she says, only puts
the student at a disadvantage
in the event that the scholar-
ship that he/she was so sure of,
doesn't come through. "Then
what will you do? What can you
do?" she asks.
"A scholarship is an asset, but
there's no guarantee in apply-
ing. You have to think about


N SOME forward planing is essential when considering your child's education


these things when your children
are in primary school even
though that's pretty young
because the truth is that not
everyone will get a scholarship."


While everyone will not get a
scholarship, there is a chance
that more students will be eligi-
ble for student loans. Though
organisations that offer student


loans usually have GPA
requirements, they are much
more flexible, Mrs Richards-
Dean believes.
"That's because they are


loans and these groups can
make interest off of you the
same way that the bank would if
you took out a loan for a car or
to mortgage a house."


Poor study habits


Studying with Friends
While fun, sometimes you
may lose out on quality study
time by socialising. Find one
good study-buddy if you like
group studying.
M Too much music
Noise and music can interfere
with the brain's ability to com-
prehend new information. It can
also distract you from focusing
on the material at hand. If you
need music in the background,
find a specific type (usually clas-
sical) that works well for you.
Don't keep changing it around.
When there are no lyrics,
then it is easier to focus on the
words on the paper in your
hand.
Bad environment
A poor study environment
can ruin all quality time. If you
are uncomfortable at a chair,
desk, room, the temperature is
too cold or too hot, you will be
unsuccessful studying.
Test out different sites until
you find the best place for you.
It may be the library, it may be
your room, your bed, your best
friend's backhouse. Who
knows? Find what works best
for you and stick with it.
Cramming
While many people swear by
the cramming method, it is ulti-
mately terrible at long term


knowledge retention and can
cause undue stress. Study for
days up until the test. Or, if you
do prefer cramming, try cram-
ming two nights prior to the
exam so that the final night will
not consist of stress. Rather it
will be a night for review.
Eating
Eating too much food during
studying can disrupt retention
of material. It can also take too
much time away.
You may want to snack light-
ly during studying, but not eat
enormous meals. Keep a small
bag of snacks by your study
area. You won't have to leave
the area just to pick up food
when you get hungry.
Drinking
Drinking is a double-edged
sword. Never drink alcohol
while studying. However, it is
important to stay awake and
hydrated. Have a glass of water
(or soda with caffeine) by your
side. Be very careful not to spill
it onto your books and papers.
Working in your bed
While it may be comfortable,
your bed can also soothe you
to sleep instead of study. Sit at a
desk in your room instead of
on your bed.
Do not study on your bed late
at night, as you will be tempted
to fall asleep.


Multi-tasking
Many people are able to mul-
ti-task, meaning they can do
several different things at once.
This can be good for daily tasks.
When it comes to studying, you
may not retain as much materi-
al as if you were to focus purely
on one task. Before a big exam,
drop everything else for at least
24 hours and focus purely on
the studying. When it is com-
plete, you can return to your
multi-tasking.
Studying during a commute
Many people enjoy reading
on a train, bus or car to w6rk
and school. These environments
are wonderful for light reads,
but not necessarily for intense
studying. Use the commute (if
you have one) for light studying,
such as memorisation, repeti-
tion and review. Do not use this
time to learn new information.
1 Outside stress
It is inevitable to allow out-
side problems into your study
world. They exist and cannot
be turned off light electricity.
There is no perfect way out of
eliminating outside stress to a
study area. The best advice we
can give you is to find a location
that eliminates all superficial
stress enough that will allow you
even a few hours to focus on
writing, studying, reviewing.
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THE TRIBUNE


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* VALEDICTORIAN Chequita M Johnson (centre), who earned a BBA Accounting degree with magna cum laude (highest hon-
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c . '.A ...s l TE w n


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16F


I


Ol<








i ne inrlIuneI presents


Counselling, confidentiality





and preserving a reputation


By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
PROTECTING the student-coun-
sellor relationship can be challenging at
times, seeing that there is a fine line
between what information should actu-
ally be considered confidential and
what information should be handed
over to the authorities.
One local guidance counsellor
believes that though the counselling
systems within Bahamian schools is
not perfect, when it comes to confi-
dentiality it is "far better" than it was
years ago.
"Counselling, for a long time, had a
bad reputation because nothing could
be kept a secret. So it was difficult try-
ing to convince or re-direct children
to realise that what happens within the
office between the counsellor and the
child stays there between the counsel-
lor and the child," says Samantha
Evans, guidance counsellor at the
Garvin Tynes Primary School in Sunset
Park.
Ms Evans has been a counsellor at
the school for two-and-a-half years.
Though she believes that children in
today's school system are more com-
fortable disclosing information to their
counsellors, there still remains many
"challenges" in the form of other per-
sons leaking what a student discloses in
a closed forum, she says.
"When you come in with a student in
these meetings some things are out of
....y6e. ftrolbaegase other persons 'are'
- called in to these meetings aAd insist 'on
being a part of these meetings. Some-
times, they are the persons who take
the student's business out of the


office," Ms Evans claims.
"So you have to talk to the persons
in authority, mainly the administrators
in the school, to let them know that if
they are in a meeting, especially where
delicate situations like child abuse are
discussed, they need to know that this
stays within the office. And it's not to
be taken to your secretary. It's not to
be taken home. It's not to be taken
out of this forum."

Self-esteem

According to Ms Evans, when stu-
dents feel they cannot trust their coun-
sellors, or any school official for that
matter, it helps "deflate" their self-
esteem.
"It is very important to be confiden-
tial because depending on the serious-
ness of the situation, the child is
removed from the home. But they are
not removed from the school. So the
confidentiality needs to be protected
because you need to protect the child's
image since that child still has to live
within his own or her own shell. And so
we need to safeguard that child's self-
esteem," says Ms Evans.
"And we need to ensure as counsel-
lors that we protect them. We don't
have any control over what other agen-.
cies do or what administrators do, but
we took an Oath of Confidentiality
and so we need to ensure that it is
upheld," she adds.
Ms Evans believes that for the most
part, counsellors ~iderstaid eir-rs-"
sion" in the school system but it may be
others who need education on how
vital maintaining confidentiality is.


"Teachers need to know the impor-
tance of protecting that confidentiality
because these are the ones who want to
know information. Many counsellors
are pressed for information, but some
teachers don't realise that you can only
tell them the information that they
need to know. Anything else is the
responsibility of the parents."
The repercussions of not protecting
that child's private discussions can be
far reaching. The student may grow
up with feelings of low self worth and
because persons may ridicule them the
child genuinely believes that anybody
has the right to harm them again," Ms
Evans warns.
"It's because my teacher said I'm no
good and they are talking about me,
and my friends laugh at me because
this happened to me, maybe this is
what is supposed to happen. So they
continue to live a life with that type of
behaviour," she adds.
According to Ms Evans, children
who have been molested or victims of
incest often end up becoming rape vic-
tims or get involved in promiscuous
activities as a "spin off" of what hap-
pened to them earlier in life.
She feels that this is even more like-
ly to occur in cases where the coun-
sellor never effectively followed-up
with the student to ensure that "healing
took place".
Ms Evans' theory seems to be along
the lines of, 'it takes a village to raise a
child'. She feels that parents, teachers,
counsellors, school administrators and
'the 'ider community must world.
together, especially teachers and coun-
sellors, since the child is with the
teacher most of the day.


"Counsellors go into the classroom
for only a short period during the
year," she explains. "So what I do is let
teachers know what to look out for. I
also encourage teachers to get involved
in the students' lives ask them about
their day, ask them if they watched a
certain movie last night because
teaching falls on deaf ears if the child
isn't mentally ready or if something is
on that child's mind."

Vigilance

Ms Evans urges school guidance
counsellors to be "vigilant" because a
parent is "the main source of abuse in
the lives of children". And because
children generally love their parents,
regardless of how that parent treats
them, the counsellor must also build
a trusting relationship with their stu-
dents.
Says Nfs Evans: "Children will be
children, and even if you tell them that
if someone hurts them to talk, some-
times they won't because they are
scared. So you have to make them feel
comfortable with you;,..
"And they might not tell you right
away in the first session. You might
need two or three of four sessions
before they open up to you, but it just
depends on how deep the wound is.
So it's a task and sometimes it gets
really intense, but you have to be real-
ly grounded as a counsellor. Even if
you have to twiytt,tapdturn-it andask-
them a'qustion many times ifor them
to understand that you want the right
answer the truth you have to ask
them and make sure that you do."


When it comes to counselling ses-
sions, Ms Evans says that there is no
such thing as a counsellor becoming
too personal with the questions asked
of a student.
She feels that some things might be
too personal for teachers to ask, but
not counsellors, especially if the coun-
sellor has reason to believe that some-
thing is going on in the home.
"And parents may not understand
that either, but if we suspect that some-
one is being abused, we have that right
to ask them the questions even if the
parents feel like it is inappropriate,"
Ms Evans adds.
Though confidentiality is a major
aspect of guidance counselling, Ms
Evans agrees that some situations do
call for police involvement.
And Garvin Tynes has needed this
assistance on many occasions during
the last school year, she notes.
"If it requires sometimes getting the
police involved then you do that
because they have no tolerance for
abuse in the homes. They take the child
home and tell the parent that the child
was seen by a counsellor today, and if
the child is not in school tomorrow or
comes with bruises, tomorrow they are
coming to pick you (parents) up," says
Ms Evans.
"That is the point it is at now with
parents. Since we can't get them to the
court system we have to use the police
to get done what we need done. When
you are hearing messages from these-
..parents that they arot coming down
to no school to see no guidance coun-
sellor, and they ain't coming until
report card day, you have to get the
message across."


An education in :




the environment


N DR K Sealey, volunteers and Michael Brooks (right) prepare collected corals for transplant.


* MICHAEL Brooks (left), and co-principal investigator, Lester Flowers, lecturer at COB discuss
shoreline plants


THE Earthwatch Institute's
research expedition to Great
Guana Cay, Abaco this sum-
mer was quite an interesting
experience for North Andros
High' School teacher Michael
Brooks.
As part of Team III of the
Coastal Ecology of the
Bahamas data collecting
process, volunteers from around
the globe explored the
nearshore environments of the
coast of Great Guana Cay from
16-26 July.
The main areas of focus for
the principal investigators, staff
and volunteers were Near Shore
Marine Plants Diversity, Near
Shore Fish Surveys, Water
Quality Assessments, Coastal
Plant Diversity as well as
Coastal Mapping and Ranking.
The research seeks to docu-
ment the environment and use


this information to make deci-
sions regarding the health of the
ecosystems surveyed.
Using period field monitor-
ing techniques and satellite
imagery this research seeks to
map the entire country assist
the Bahamas when making
developmental decisions and
the impact these will have on
coastal ecosystems and fishery
habitats.
The programme is headed by
Dr Kathleen Sullivan Sealey,
Dean, Science, Technology and
Allied Health, at the College of
the Bahamas, and Lester Flow-
ers, lecturer in the School of
Science and Technology, COB.
Mr Brooks considers the
expedition's work very impor-
tant, not only to the ecology of
Great Guana Cay and the coun-
try but also to the world.
Information and data


acquired in this longitudinal
study may be applied to other
environments throughout the
Bahamas and provide a deeper
understanding as to the natural
resources and their sustainabil-
ity.
As an ardent supporter of
conservation efforts generally,
Mr Brooks thanked ANCAT
for its assistance and making it
possible for him to participate in
this unique and valuable expe-
rience. He looks forward to
deepening his association with
Andros Conservancy Trust
(ANCAT), the Bahamas
National Trust and other con-
servation organisations dedi-
cated to preserving the pristine
nature of the Bahamas. He also
looks forward to sharing his
experience with his students of
North Andros High School and
the community at large.


* MICHAEL Brooks (left), Mr Lester Flowers along with staff and volunteers of team III set out
for data collection in the waters of Great Guana Cay.















Using the power of reading





to teach life skills to children


N By PETURA BURROWS a
Tribune Feature Writer A Bahamian author and


LOCAL primary school stu-
dents will have the opportunity
to learn positive life skills and
glean tips for developing better
character and integrity with the
addition of a series of books
that will be added to their cur-
riculum come September.
What is interesting about
these books is that they are
. authored by a Bahamian who
is currently in the school sys-
tem and acquainted with the
needs of school-aged children
in this country.
Samantha Evans, who has
been a guidance counsellor at
the Garvin Tynes Primary
School for the past two-and-a-
half years, and who prior to that
worked in child welfare services
within the schools, is the author
of the newest addition to the
curriculum, the "Quiet Reflec-
tion" series.
The Ministry of Education
has extended a challenge to
Bahamians to write more mate-
rial to be used in local schools,
and the school counsellor saw
the need to answer this call.
"And now that I'm able to
contribute in this way to the
education of children in this
country, I'm very happy about
it... It's good that I'm. able to
share my unique way of coun-
selling with other students and
other counsellors too, so that
they can use it in their class-
rooms," she told The Tribune
in an interview.
Realizing that life lessons
have to be taught based on the
grade level of students, Ms
Evans developed her book at
different levels: Level A-1 will
be used by first graders; Level
A-2 by second graders; Level B
by Grades 3 and 4; and Level C
by Grades 5 and 6, ,,.
Levels B and C are currently:,..
available at NassautiStatiopers,
Rosetta Street, and i)eep South
Bookstore, Town Centre Mall.
Levels A-1 and A-2 will be
available at those locations on
August 22, says the author.
(The author plans to develop a
book to be used by kindergart-
ners.)
The series, which Ms Evans
refers to as "self discovery for
beginners", offers a practical
hands-on approach to guidance
counselling, in activity book
form;.
Level C (for Grades 5 and 6)
opens with a guidance prayer,
then delves into topics such as
defining true. friendship, then
into a powerfully positive poem
titled "Who Am I", which was
written to build the readers'
self-esteem.

Reflection

The importance of maintain-
ing good spirits, belief in one-
self, conflict resolution, appre-
ciating cultural diversity, respect
for peers and for authority, and
honesty, are some of the topics
addressed in "Quiet Reflec-
tion".
The books, which were ini-
tially intended to be an anthol-
ogy of motivational poems,
"evolved" into this fun and
interactive book for children,
.says the author.
She made it a point to involve


guidance counsellor has

drawn on her experience

to teach some life lessons


the primary level students who
often have short attention
spans. So each topic in the
books ends with an activity for
the student, and a "Let's Talk"
section where students are
asked to answer questions on
that particular lesson.
"I realised that the book as
it was written is particularly for
students, and in order for stu-
dents to understand and to
grasp what I am trying to get
across, I needed to make it so
that there could be some inter-
action or some activity, some
thing that they could do to
become a part of what it is I am
presenting," says Ms Evans.
"So the book evolved into
this activity, fun, question-and-
answer, role-playing kind of
book."

Aims

While Ms Evans has plans to
complete her series with an
advanced book to be used in
the junior and senior school sys-
tems, she believes that it is more
important to, tackle issues of
self-esteem and self-worth in a
child's formative years, and that
she says would be his/her pri-
mary school years.
Each student will be required
to purchase a copy of the book,
which they will use along with
their guidance counsellors dur-
ing Classroom Guidance peri-
ods.
During these sessions, coun-
sellors go into the classroom for
one or two periods (which is 30
minutes to an hour) within the
school day. Some of these class-
es are weekly, some once a
month, others twice per month,
all depending on the size of the
school, the guidance counsellor
explains.
The objective of these ses-
sions is to provide students with
a positive message. "We want
them to be aware so that when
we talk about self-esteem they
can know what that means.
How do you develop self-
esteem? What does self-esteem
look like to you?
"We want to help them to re-
direct their thinking to make a
situation work for them. How
about being more proactive?
That's what we want to equip


them with. How to take control
of their own lives and not wait-
ing for someone else to do it
for them," Ms Evans says.
But isn't this too weighty a
topic for primary school stu-
dents, who are noticeably more
concerned with lunch and break
times?
This guidance counsellor does
not seem to think so.
Training

In fact, she says that counsel-
lors in the school system often
find that in order for them to
promote prevention and "com-
bat the ills" that exist in the
junior and senior high schools,
they must focus on training chil-
dren in their more impression-
able years.
She explains: "If you wait
until that age (when students
are in junior and high school),
when children have already
formed their own identity and
they already have a more
defined sense of who they are,
its gonna be more difficult for
you to try and teach them these
concepts because they've
already learned the concepts
from somewhere else. And
chances are it could be wrong.
"But they already have a
sense of what they think self-
esteem is, or what type of man-
ners they should have or what
respect means to them. And
they may have learned it from
the wrong place.
"So our purpose now is to
teach the children the right way,
give them the choice so that
when they are faced with these
situations they will have the
tools to make the right deci-
sions. So that this generation of
primary school students, when
they go into junior and high
school, it is our hope that they
would make better choices
because they would have been
properly trained."
The books will be retailed
at Nassau Stationers, Rosetta
Street and Deep South Book-
store, Town Centre Mall at the
following prices: Level A-1 and
Level A-2 books at $15.63; Lev-
el B at $12.50; and Level C at
$14.68 at Nassau Stationers and
Deep South Bookstore.


For safe, fun Instruction in
GYMNASTICS DANCE CHEERLEADING
AND MORE!


Ask about our On the Move Pre-School Programl
Students from 18 months to adult Birthday Parties Available
Member of the Gymnastics Federation of the Bahamas
NOWThree Convenient Locations!l

Nassau gymNastics Nassau gymNastics
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Beside the Nassau Guardian Building In the Seagrapes Shopping Centre
Phone & Fax: 356-7722 Prince Charles Drive
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Phone & Fax: 356-7722
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FALL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 5TH! REGISTER NOW!


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


"Iv-


PAGE 18


THE TRIBUNE


~AZJ









BCTOSCHOOLSUPPEMNT00


Turning COB




from a college




to a university


* COB Bandshell, the hub for college and community activities.


M DURING the past three months workmen have been busy carrying out renovations to the
Boulevard Building to ensure its readiness for the Fall 2005 semester, which begins August 29


RENOVATIONS to COB's
Boulevard Building are ahead
of schedule. The newly acquired
40,000 square foot addition to
the College of the Bahamas'
main Oakes Field Campus com-
plex has undergone a massive
overhaul during the past three
months to ensure it's ready for
the Autumn 2005 semester,
which begins August 29.-
The building will house the
university bookstore, business
centre, a caf6, faculty and
administrative offices, office
space for President Emerita Dr
Keva Bethel, two lecture the-
atre rooms, seven conventional
classrooms, the Schools of Edu-
cation and Social Sciences and
the Department of Graduate.
Studies.
On April 15, the multi-build-


ing complex was purchased
from Boulevard Investments, a
Bahamian company at a price
of $3.2 million. This purchase
was significant because it rep-
resented the first asset which
the College of the Bahamas
holds in its own name. All oth-
er college properties are vest-
ed in the Bahamas treasury.
Renovations, inclusive of fur-
nishings and equipping the
building, are pegged at approx-
imately $4 million and are
expected to be completed by
the end of August, in time for
the Autumn 2005 semester.
Already, work on the exterior
of the Boulevard Building is
nearing completion and bears
the look of the College's main
campus complex.
In May, the College held its


annual Commencement exer-
cises on the newly built Band
shell, which will play host to
many COB and community
events and activities; The com-
pletion of the Band shell and
the renovations of the Boule-
vard Building are the first in a
series of physical expansion for
the College of the Bahamas.
On April 21, ground was bro-
ken for the construction of the
new state-of-the-art Harry C
Moore Library and Information
Centre; phase one, the straight-
ening of Tucker Road, is near-
ing completion. Phase two is
the development of the 260-
space car park.
Additionally, the College of
the Bahamas is engaged in a
substantial beautification pro-
ject of its campus grounds.


THE realignment of Tucker Road continues as workmen move swiftly to complete this phase of
the Harry C Moore Library & Information Centre. Phase two will be the construction of a 260-
space car park.


Busy year for school of English


THE School of English Stud-
ies at the College of the
Bahamas had a busy 2004/05
academic year.
In the past nine months, the
School has launched a number
of initiatives designed to
enhance students' language and
critical thinking skills, increasing
substantially its course and pro-.
gramme offerings and involv-
ing students in cultural and
artistic events.
The pinnacle of the School of
English Studies' many accom-
plishments is the establishment
of its Bachelor of Arts Degree
in English, which will be offered
this Fall semester at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. The cre-
ation of the BA in English
began under the careful stew-
ardship of the former School of
English Studies (SES) Chair
and present Acting Dean of
Liberal and Fine Arts, Dr Ear-
la Carey-Baines. Dr Carey-
Baines and the School of Eng-
lish Studies Bachelor of Arts
Committee worked diligently
to ensure that the BA in Eng-
lish satisfies COB's mission for
undergraduate education as
identified in the Strategic Plan
2002-2007.
Dr Ian Strachan, current
School Chair, proudly stated in
At Random, that the BA in
English degree programme will
in fact be "instrumental" in ful-
filling that mission, offering
courses that require students to
demonstrate critical, reflective
and creative thought. He said
that such courses will expose
students "to the diverse cultur-
al and intellectual traditions of
the peoples of the world, thus
broadening students' exposure
to 'diverse populations".
The BA in English offers a
variety of courses that strength-
en student competency in lan-
guage, and knowledge and
understanding of literature
local, regional and global.
Bahamian literature, Bahami-
an Creole and Studies in
Bahamian Culture, for exam-
ple, provide students with deep-
er knowledge of the Bahamas'
rich literary, linguistic and cul-
tural traditions. Courses in West
Indian and Caribbean literature
offer opportunity for the explo-
ration of Caribbean identity and
heritage, while a multiplicity of
other courses present opportu-
nities for analysis and evalua-
tion of numerous works of art,


including films.
An exciting aspect of the BA
in English is the inclusion of a
course devoted solely to film
studies. The BA programme
exposes students to the joys of
animation as in Finding Nemo;
the ingenuity of the sci-fi/fan-
tasy genre exemplified in the
Star Wars trilogy; and the indi-
vidualistic, thought-provoking
productions of world cinema.


Students, says Randall Pinder,
Head of Department, "are
going to be really stimulated by
this course". From B' Rabbie
and "the Gaulin Wife" to Toni
Morrison's Song of Solomon to
Grace Nichols' I is a long-mem-
oried woman to The Passion of
the Christ, the BA in English
offers students a diversity of
material to explore, ponder and
analyse.


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TEL: 328-7834/392-5803
STORE HOURS:
8:00 AM 5:00 PM MONDAY THRU SATURDAY















Working on a sports programme for



a stronger College of the Bahamas


THE College of the Bahamas
introduced a physical education,
health and nutritional compo-
nent to its general education
course outline in August.
This two-credit course is a
requisite for each student
enrolling into the College of
the Bahamas regardless of the
student's bachelor degree pro-
gramme. The new requirement
is a part of the College's com-
mitment to preparing students
to become productive and
thoughtful citizens by offering a
broad liberal arts education.
COB's general education
undergraduate curriculum is
multi-disciplinary in perspec-
tive. It seeks to broaden stu-
dents' knowledge, foster life-
long learning and nurture
reflective and analytic ability
through the examination of
underlying values and contro-
versial issues. Students become
equipped with a range of skills
that are honed through nine
strands, the newest being phys-
ical education, health and nutri-
tion.
According to COB's Physi-
cal Education lecturer Jenny
Isaacs-Dotson, the new general
education course requirement
in physical education, health
and nutritional is not only time-
ly but it will provide COB stu-
dents with an in-depth look at
health and nutritional concerns
from a personal perspective.
"This one is long overdue,"
said Dotson. "I fundamentally
believe that physical education,
health and nutrition is a part of
the holistic approach to student
development. We know how
important academics are but the
physical well being is equally
important to an individual's
future success."
Ms Dotson noted that this







Archie Burrows, 18, is a
full-time student at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and is
pursuing a BA in economics
and finance (double major).
Archie has made the
Dean's List every semester.
His current GPA is 3.35.
Archie was graduated Jor-
dan Prince Williams High
School with a 3.30 in 2003.
He received a "Most Out-
standing Youth Award" for
his achievement, and hon-
ours in the subjects of Eng-
lish, accounts and geography
upon graduation. He earned
nine BGCSEs, all with suc-
cessful passes.


New course for


every student


kind of course requirement is
normal for most universities in
North America and agrees that
the benefits derived from this
course will extend beyond the
classroom setting.
"One of the sporting disci-
plines that will be offered is
swimming," said Dotson. "It's
surprising to know that many
Bahamians cannot swim, and
so this obviously is a lifetime
skill that our students will
acquire. And while students will
have the opportunities to par-
ticipate in a number of the
sporting disciplines, I believe
the health and nutritional com-
ponent will be advantageous to
everyone enrolled in the
course."
This course, in particular the
health and nutritional compo-
nent, will require students to


develop a programme for
healthy lifestyles, inclusive of
fitness and diet. Students will
conduct research, analyze data
and advance recommendations
about health related issues.
To fulfill the general educa-
tion component requirement of
a bachelor degree programme,
students must complete a mini-
mum of 36 credits. Of these 36
credits, students must complete
at least 27 credits at the lower
level and nine at the upper lev-
el; the physical education,
health and nutrition course is
in keeping with the
College/University of the
Bahamas' commitment to pro-
vide students with both disci-
plinary and multi-disciplinary
approaches to the pursuit of
knowledge and solving prob-
lems.


* COB students participate in volleyball and basketball action as a part of the physical activities on
campus.


Plans to enhance the



environmental studies



programme at COB


AS the College of the
Bahamas looks to expand and
improve its academic pro-
grammes in the institution's
march to university status, fac-
ulties will be called upon to be
more innovative and creative
both in administration and the
delivery of instruction.
This summer, Lionel Johnson,
2004/05 chairperson of the
School of Science and Technol-
ogy, participated in an intense
three-day conference, which will
enhance the environmental stud-
ies programme at the College.
The Council of Environmen-
tal Deans and Directors
(CEDD), a professional asso-
ciation of academic leaders of
environmental studies, hosted
its fourth annual summer pro-
gramme conference July 13-15
in San Jose, California. The
conference provided partici-
pants with opportunities for net-
working with fellow environ-
mental programme leaders; to
share challenges and successes,
and learn about opportunities
to improve environment pro-
grammes at their respective col-
leges or universities.
A portion of CEDD's mis-
sion is to promote, encourage,


Science school chairman

attends three-day conference


develop and support efforts to
advance knowledge, learning in
the interdisciplinary environ-
mental sciences and studies
(physical, biological, social sci-
ences, engineering and human-
ities) and to disseminate such
knowledge to the scientific com-
munity and to the public.
This year's conference fea-
tured presentations and discus-
sions, including Creating Inter-
disciplinary Scholars; the Future
of Environmental Programmes;
the Future of Environmental-
ism; Curriculum; Careers and
Programme Administration;
Fundraising and Funding
Opportunities; and Internation-
al Partnerships/Collaboration.
"A number of breakout ses-
sions, some by size and type of
colleges, allowed participants
the opportunity to discuss com-
mon issues and to discover the
ways that different institutions
deal with the same problems,"
noted Mr Johnson. "The chal-


lenges of building, sustaining,
funding and evaluating envi-
ronmental programmes drew
intense discussions as partici-
pants tried to arrive at best
practices for hiring or otherwise
gathering sufficient faculty from
other disciplines to enable the
creation of an interdisciplinary
programme, while at the same
time minimising cost."
As the sole Caribbean repre-
sentative, CEDD president Dr
Brad Smith noted his intent to
encourage the College of the
Bahamas to assume the lead role
in fostering more support from
the region that would underpin
environmental education.
Mr Johnson addressed the
body on environmental pro-
grammes at the College of the
Bahamas. He stressed the need
for the College of the Bahamas
to play a leading role in provid-
ing informed, scholarly opinion
on matters of national develop-
ment.


* LIONEL Johnson, 2004/05 Chairperson, School of Science and Technology, the College of the
Bahamas.
(Photo: Andrew Seymour)


: :


PAGE 20


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, 16TH AUGUST, 2005
6:00 p.m 8:30 p.m .............................................................. Parents Evening

WEDNESDAY, 17TH AUGUST 2005
8:00a.m 2:00 p.m ..........................................................................O rientation
2:00p.m. 8:00 p.m...............School Meetings/Advisement/Registration/Payment

THURSDAY, 18TH AUGUST & FRIDAY, 19TH AUGUST, 2005
9:00a.m. 6:00 p.m....................Advisement/ Registration/Payment Continues

SATURDAY, 20TH AUGUST, 2005
8:00 p.m until............................................ Freshmen Dance COB Auditorium

All events without a venue listing, will be held
at the COB Band Shell, Poinciana Drive


Orientation is mandatory for all new students.


For more information, please call 302-4446 or 302-4342



NE SUDNTRGISRTO


SCHOOL


A13
E12
_Faculty Offices
Faculty Offices
T25
T25
T04
RECORDS


English Studies & Communication & Creative Arts
Education & Social Sciences (Including LLB Programme)
Business (Advisement in Faculty Offices)
Hospitality-&-Tourism Studies
Nursing & Allied Health Professions
Sciences & Technology
Continuing Education (CEES)
Graduate Students


PRINTING
MIS
MIS
RECORDS
RECORDS
T25
T25
T04
RECORDS


LAE EISRAIN OMg SSGMET


SCHOOL


PRINTING


A13 English Studies & Communication & Creative Arts RECORDS
E12 Education and Social Sciences (Including LLB Programme) "
Math Sciences & Technology
T25 School of Nursing & Allied Health Professions
Faculty Offices School of Business "
Faculty Offices School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies "
T04 Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES)
The Business Office Hours will be opening from 8:00am 6:00pm on the following dates
August 18th, 19th, 31st and September 1, 2005.


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Opportunities 2005/2006


What is your career goal?


V PROMOTION


QUALITY SERVICE

V INTERNATIONAL


CERTIFICATION


V SALARY INCREASE


V CAREER CHANGE/ ENHANC


The Professional Development Department can help you achieve your career goal! A wide array
of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can
become a pioneer in setting performance standards in your organization. We have secured
partnerships with leading international institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You
can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas. Success is
at your finger tips. Call us today.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
* Certified Professional Managers Programme, James Madison University
* Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
* A+ Computer Technician Certification Programme
* Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOUS)
* Certificate In Law Programme
* Certified Professional Security- Officers Programme
* Becker Conviser CPA Review (Certified Public Accountant)
* Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
* Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
* Journeyman Plumbing License
* Master Plumbing License
* Certified Security Officer Programme
* Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
* Ethics And Professional Responsibility
* Writing & Research Skills
* Introduction To Computers, Windows & The Internet

2005/2006 Programme Duration is 6 Months 9 Months
External Registration is required for UK and US Institutions.


Professionals holding the Bachelor or Master Degrees may apply for
exemption from specific courses.

FALL 2005 CLASS SCHEDULE


CLASSES BEGIN:


Saturday, 3rd September


For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am 12noon.
International programmes available. No entrance exams required.
Tuition may be paid per term or in full.

Visit The Centre For Continuing Education or Call for an interview today!
(242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0093


f rmi Invite you to

















q jrnownedCari66ean Poet d PWinner of
the Commonweathry WPrize for (Poetry


Lecture: TFriday, 26thAugust 7pm
S yPwace: iBahamas tourism training,
&Centre (BTfic) Lecture Teatre
Cost. Tree
Workshop: Saturday, 27tihAugust
10am- 1pm
Cost: $50.00
RefresAments Included
Deadline to fJgister '4ednesday 24th August

"goodison is among the finest poets writing today"
-WorfdLiterature Today






This is an introductory course covering basic medical terms. Students will be
exposed to terms that will enable them to read and interpret medical reports,
charts, and communications relevant to a variety of health care environments.
Major topics include Word Building Rules, Prefixes, Suffixes, Whole Body
Terminology, Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscles and Joints, Nervous
System, Blood and Lymphatic System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory
System and Digestive System.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Prerequisite:
Tuition:.


Monday, 26th September 2005
6:00am 9:00pm
C.R. Walker Secondary
None
$225.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Coordinatorat Tel: (242) 325-5714 ;1(242) 328-0093/
328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception
of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly
provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right
to change tuition, fees,, course content, course schedule and course materials.








All persons interested in enrolling in Academic Upgrading, Personal Development and/or
Professional Development courses offered by CEES are advised to register two weeks prior
to the starting date of class.
All students registering must provide a copy of the first five pages of their passport.
Persons registering after the starting date of class will be required to pay a late registration
fee of $60.
i). College Preparatory Programme
ii). Basic Upgrading Programme for Traditional Age Students (under 25 years old)


Classes Begin: August 29, 2005
New Student Advisement: August 17 19, 2005
Time: 9:00am 5:00pm
Venue: Room T4
iii). Mature Upgrading (25 years and older) Programme
Classes Begin: August 29, 2005
Advisement and Registration: August 17 19, 2005
Time: 9:00am 5:00pm


Mathematics 046, 047, 048 Mondays & Wednesdays 6:00 7:50 pm
English Language 015, 016, 017 Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00 7:50 pm
Venue: C.C. Sweeting Junior High School.
Tuition: $300.00 per course
iv). Preschool and Day Care Centre Practitioners Certificate
v) Infant/Toddler Day Care Educarers Certificate
Classes Begin: September 2, 2005
Wednesdays 6:00- 7:50 pm & Saturdays 9:00 am -1:30 pm.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
vi) Management and Administration of Infant/Toddler Day Care Centres


Classes Begin: September 3, 2005
Saturdays 9:00- 11:00am.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.


The Psychology Department, School of Social Sciences will offer the following course
the Fall Semester, 2005
PSY 310 Consumer Psychology -01 -Wednesdays 6-9pm
interested persons may contact the School of Social Sciences at 302-4489
Additional fees include one time application fee of $40, Insurance $25 (per annum),
ID Card $25 (one time), Technology Fee $100 (per semester), Student Activity fee $50
(full-time) $25 (part -time) (Fall & Spring Semesters), Drop/Add $20 per application.


-A : L,"...... :::::::::::::i L:: .i ::: !:' : ti \ :?


at www.cob.edu.bs


LAB








F BACKAL TO SCHOOL..SUPPLEMENT 2005


J 0I


,Fit Temple ChJITi1si


B By JANET HANNA


Faith Temple Christian
Academy, formerly
Beth-Phil School, was
founded in September
1985.
Leo Bethel, one of the founders,
saw the need for a true Christian Pre-
school with a foundation and philos-
ophy based on the word of God, and
a standard of education that made
it among the best in the Bahamas.
A member of Faith Temple
Church, Mr Bethel approached three
of his friends and fellow church
members Franklyn Bethel, Philip
Kemp and Philemon Wilson and
shared his dream.
The men approached Pastor Del-
ton Harne, then Pastor of Faith Tem-
ple Church, for permission to use the
church's facility on Prince Charles
Drive as a site for the school.
Permission was granted and the
dream became reality. Beth-Phil
Christian Pre-school was born.
In 1985, the school started with a
student body of 15. Sheila Kemp, the
wife of Pastor Larry Kemp, became
the school's first principal. In 1988,
Sylvia Ramming was appointed the
school's second principal.
The school grew from 60 to 125
and during this time the principal
owners approached Pastor James
Weaver, pastor of Faith Temple,
about the church taking over the
school and making it a part of its
outreach ministries.


The church agreed and the school
was renamed Faith Temple Christian
Academy.
After the death of Mrs Ramming
in 1990, Annabel Dean was appoint-
ed principal, followed by Dr Diane
Major who was offered a contract
for three years to restructure and
reorganise the school. At the end of
her three-year tenure, the student
population was at 49.
In September 1985, Melissa Groff
was appointed principal and under
her tenure the school experienced
its largest growth, from 49 to 852.
In March 2000, Pastor Thomas J
Sands took over as acting principal,
and in October 2000, Rev Daniel 0
Simmons was appointed principal,
effective January 1, 2001.
Today Faith Temple Christian
Academy (FTCA) has a student pop-
ulation of 685 and remains steadfast
in its commitment to provide quality
education which upholds a standard
of scholastic excellence and fosters
vital Christian living in preparation
for responsible citizenship, for stu-
dents of all backgrounds.
The vision of Faith Temple Chris-
tian Academy is to be recognised as
the "school of first choice for stu-
dents who desire a quality education
in a Christian environment".
It is the academy's belief that a
strong foundation in basic education,
in accordance with Christian princi-
ples, lays the groundwork of enabling
a child to become fully developed as
a whole person and to enhance


* PROMISE KEPT Faith Temple Christian Academy (FTCA) has
promised its clients an improved computer programme that would cater to
the needs of all students from pre-school to High School. The promise has
been kept and students now enjoy learning about computers in a spacious
and modern facility. FTCA's Grade Two students gain.the basics of Com-
puters through hands-on-learning approach in an environment that is con-
ducive for learning.


his/her quality of life and contribu-
tion to a compassionate and caring
society.
This past academic year 2004-2005,
the Academy made some inroads in
the overall advancement of educa-
tion through several key areas.
One such area was a state-of-the
art Computer Lab for the Elemen-
tary Division. This computer facility
allows students from Grades 1-6 to
gain hands-on learning experience
in a spacious, air-conditioned envi-
ronment.
Also, in keeping with modern tech-
nology, Faith Temple Christian
Academy computerised its grading
system and generation of report
cards.
FTCA first tested "Smart School"
for generating report cards in
December 2004 and fined tuned the
programme in January 2005. The
"Smart School" programme captures
and stores academic and other stu-
dent records.
According to the administrative
team, homeroom teachers are hap-
py about the system as it relieves
them of the task of calculating final
grades and GPA (Grade Point
Average) as well as overall aver-
ages. The time spent preparing


* FAITH Temple Christian Academy prides itself on providing quality
education while promoting Christian living and responsible citizenship


report cards is greatly reduced.
In a digital world where upgrades
are a constant feature, Faith Tem-
ple Christian Academy will continue
to make the necessary adjustments to
remain current, and the "Smart
School" will make these changes
much easier to be made.
In September 2004, the Academy
saw the need to hire the services of a


full-time Registered Nurse (RN).
Ruth Dixon, a veteran medical prac-
titioner with 18 years of experience
became the Academy's first full-time
Nurse providing medical assistance to
the students.
The Academy is looking forward
to celebrate its 20th Anniversary,
according to principal Daniel Sim-
mons.


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THEK TRIBUNELSUPPAGEN 223


Eleven-year-old's


accomplishments in


track and field are


'truly impressive'

0 By ANTONIA ROBERTS
rinjassia Johnson may
only be 11 years old but
her passion for and
accomplishments in In a meet in Freeport., Grand
track and field are truly Bahama Printassia once again cap-
impressive, tured first place wins in the 100 and
A graduate of Our Lady's Catholic 200 meter races as well as long jump.
School and present.member of Star There, Printassia anchored in the 15
Trackers Track and Field Club, Print- and under 4 x 100 relay, where she
assia hopes to become the "best ath- once again left victorious.
lete the Bahamas has ever pro- The BayTaf Meet, held in Tampa,
duced". Florida felt Printassia's fierce winds.
While the average "tween" may She won two silver medals and a
be spending their summer vacations bronze medal.
in front of the television, Printassia is
working diligently to obtain "tracker Received
pride", as coached by David Charl-
ton, Rudolph Ferguson and Trevor On July 23 and 24 of this year she
Strachan Jr. took part in the Blunt East Coast
Invitational 2005 in Durham, North
Compete Carolina. There, Printassia placed
first in the heats, semi-finals as well
Printassia has competed on many as the finals. She won two gold
tracks, locally and internationally. medals and received the MVP award
In May 2004 she took part in a for her age group.
track meet held in Tampa, Florida, So far, Printassia has won a total of
where she captured two gold medals 43 first places, 16 second places and
for the 100 and 200 meter races, and one forth place.
a third place finish in long jump. Printassia's love for track and
In July of the same year Printassia determination to succeed is spiritual
travelled to Greensboro, North Car- and physical, she says. "I can do all
olina, winning a silver and bronze things through Jesus Christ who gives
medal. me strength."
In February 2005, she took part in She is grateful for her parents'
various Track Club Meets, sponsored -..._encouragement and her coaches who
by the Bahamas Amateur Athletic Alhelp makee it look so E-A-S-Y".
Association, and brought home PrintaSiawill attend OQeefs Col-
numerous medals. 0 ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD PRINTASSIA JOHNSON "lege in the Fall on a full scholarship.


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PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24


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