Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00184
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: August 18, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00184
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.218


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


PRICE 500


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Infamous virus


infects computers


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A COMPUTER worm tar-
geting computer networks with
the Windows 2000 operating
system shut down certain
aspects of ScotiaBank's front-
end systems, Michael Munnings
the bank's senior manager of
sales and marketing, told The
Tribune.
ScotiaBank was caught yes-
terday in a worldwide computer
failure that hit the Microsoft
Windows 2000 system -less
than a week after Microsoft had
warned of the security flaw.
ScotiaBank's operations
throughout New Providence
were affected causing what
some customers called "severe
inconvenience".
However, the bank lost no
.cash in the process and was still
able to service its customers
through its back-up and support
systems despite this partial sys-
tem disruption.
"Our technology and systems
department has this matter ful-
ly in-hand and our team is
working to have the remaining 3
per cent of our systems fully
restored by (this) morning.
"We assure our customers
and the general public, that all
personal customer' informa-
tion is fully intact, and has not
been threatened by this dis-
ruption in service," said Mr
Munnings.
On Tuesday the virus also
attacked computer systems
worldwide using Microsoft
operating systems, also shutting
down the.computers of major


companies in the United States,
Germany and Asia.
Among those hit were media
organizations, including CNN,
ABC and The New York Times.
Caterpillar Inc, in Peoria, Illi-
nois, also had problems.
Microsoft said the worm is
relatively minor. Symptoms
include the repeated shutdown
and rebooting'6f a computef".'..'!.
Microsoft has a download-
able patch on its security home-
page, Microsoft.com/security,
which prevents infection from
the virus.
Experts believe that the prob-
lem was caused by a a new
worm called worm-rbot.cbq.
A press release from
Microsoft on Tuesday said that
their analysis has revealed that
the reported worms are differ-
ent variations of the existing
attack called Zotob.
Microsoft said that it contin-
ues to rate the issue as a low
threat for customers.
"Zotob has thus far had a low
rate of infection. Zotob only
targets Windows 2000. Cus-
tomers running other versions
such as Windows XP, or cus-
tomers who have applied the
MS05-039 update to Windows
2000 are not impacted by this
attack," said the release.
The company encouraged all
customers to apply the most
recent security updates released
by Microsoft to help ensure that
their systems are protected from
attempted exploitation.
Customers who have enabled
automatic updates will auto-
matically receive all Windows
updates.


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National GPA rises
to D+ once more
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE National Grade point average has,
risen to a "D+" for the first time in three
years, a change that the Ministry of Education
characterised as a "significant improvement".
This is only the second time that the aver-
age grade has reached this level. The first
was in 2000. '
From 2002 to 2004, the overall national
average for the Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Schools Examination (BGCSE)
remained at D.
The Ministry of Education said in a press
statement that it credits the improvement to
several factors, including the professional
development activities programmes initiated
for teachers at the school district and nation-
al levels.
At the primary level, the focus has been
on smaller classes, the implementation of
SEE page 12


Miller denies using
funds to pay for
personal expenses
* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
TRADE and Industry Ministry Leslie Miller
has denied misusing government funds to pay
for "personal" expenses almost two years ago
when Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration was in his ministerial portfolio.
The allegations were made in a daily news-
paper by former general manager Troi Fergu-
son, who recently won a Supreme Court case
against BAIC for wrongful dismissal.
Mr Miller has categorically denied the claims.
He has threatened to sue Mr Ferguson and the
newspaper for what he claims was "gross sen-
sationalism".
Allegedly in a report made by Mr Fergu-
son, it was claimed that the minister had
charged restaurant bills to BAIC and that the
SEE page 12


Workers

threaten

strike

at BEC


* DENNIS Williams


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union is threatening
to take "the most aggressive
industrial action ever to be
seen," if management does not
resolve all outstanding matters
before August 30.
"Most definitely," replied
BEWU president Dennis
Williams when asked if that
included employees striking.
Mr Williams called a press
conference yesterday to update
the public on "the perilous
times that loom ahead."
According to Mr Williams,
the union and BEC have been
in contentious contract negoti-
ations for the past year on a
number of issues, including safe-
ty, pension plans, family island
workers and a scale for pay
increases.
He claims that as manage-
ment has not acted in good
faith, the union feels it has no
choice but to take a strong stand
and show BEC that it cannot
disrespect its workers.
"Disputes and grievances are
resolved by BEC only when the
union applies extreme pres-
sure," he said in explaining why
the union has given the corpo-
ration the August 30 deadline.
Mr Williams said that
although BEWU hopes that
consumers will not be affected,
he is certain the public will
SEE page 12


N an d isp


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION




BAHAMAS EDITION


* BARF member Paul Moss in Rawson Square yesterday, calling for the government to
give illegal immigrants 60 days to leave the country or face being rounded up and
repatriated. See page three for the story.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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* THE ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION DEBATE



Round-ups: over


300 suspected illegal


immigrants detained


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
OVER 300 suspected illegal
immigrants have been rounded
up in the last five days, according
to Minister of Immigration Vin-
cent Peet.
Early yesterday morning, 120
Haitian and Jamaican immigrants
were detained at various loca-
tions throughout Nassau, he said.
Mr Peet was reluctant to iden-
tify the specific areas where the
round-ups took place, but The
Tribune learned that a few per-
sons were detained at the City
Lodge Hotel on Okra Hill, after
Immigration officials were tipped
off that some illegal immigrants
might be staying there.
Mr Peet told The Tribune:
"Although we caught some of
them at the hotel, most of them
were caught on the streets. We
rounded up a large amount of
Haitians and a few Jamaicans -
the vast majority being Haitians -
in several areas."

Raid
The minister said that the ear-
ly morning raid was a joint effort
between the Immigration
Department and the police to
"remove persons here illegally
off of the streets."
According to Mr Peet "the
operations will be sustained and
ongoing."
"You can be guaranteed: The
Bahamian public shall rest
assured that this will continue. I
have made a commitment and I
will honour that commitment.
Tell all the nay-sayers that the
minister of Immigration is work-
ing for the Bahamian people."
Mr Peet said he would decline
to name the specific areas where
the actions took place, because
officers plan on "going back" in,
the near future.
Yesterday's pre-dawn raids


come after 60 suspected illegal
immigrants were rounded up at
the straw market last week Fri-
day.
Another 130 were apprehend-
ed in islandiwide raids earlier that
day.
During these road operations,
drivers and passengers were


asked to produce documents indi-
cating their nationality and immi-
gration status.
Immigration officials conduct-
ed an operation at the straw mar-
ket after Bahamian straw ven-
dors claimed that the market is
becoming saturated with foreign
vendors.


BEWU president


makes staff claim

* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
IMMIGRATION Minister Vincent Peet urged Bahamas
Electrical Workers Union president Dennis Williams to share
any information he might have to support his claim that BEC
has illegal immigrants working at Clifton Pier.
Mr Williams told members of the press yesterday that the cor-
poration has a number of illegal immigrants, making repairs at
the Clifton Pier plant.
He alleged that the workers were hired by BEC sub con-
tractors.
In fact, he alleged, one of the workers was injured, but refused
medical care because he was scared his status would be revealed.
Mr Peet told The Tribune, that he was not aware of any ille-
gal immigrants being employed at the government run corpo-
ration.
He said if Mr Williams has any information regarding the
identity of the workers, he should inform him or the Depart-
ment of Immigration so that they can take the appropriate
action.
Yesterday's press conference was called to announced the
BEWU'S threat to take massive industrial action,
should management not resolve a number of issues by August
30.
Mr Williams claimed that the injured worker is just an exam-
ple of the union's claim that BEC has no regard for the safety of
its workers.
He maintained that ever since the death of a BEC worker sev-
eral months ago, BEC has not taken any steps to hire a safety
manager --.a position that has been vacant for more than a year.
BEC general manager Kevin Basden could not be reached for
comment.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 3


LOA0 NW


*THE ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION DEBATE


FAYNE THOMPSON, Phillipa Russell, Dr Elwood Don-
aldson, Linda Rahming, Paul D Moss and Elizabeth Thompson
- members of the Bahamians Agitating for a Referendum on the
Free Trade Area of Americas in Rawson Square yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.




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Group calls for illegal




immigration ultimatum


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
ILLEGAL immigrants should
be given an amnesty period of 60
days to leave the Bahamas or face
"humane style" round-ups and
repatriation, a group of lawyers
and concerned citizens demanded
yesterday.
Speaking at a press conference
held yesterday in Rawson Square,
members of the Bahamians Agi-
tating for a Referendum on the
Free Trade Area of Americas
(BARF) organisation, appealed
to government to take more
action in regards to the Bahamas'
illegal immigration problem and
divert more funds to the effort of
securing the country's borders.
"This is a national crisis,"
lawyer Paul D Moss said describ-
ing the issue of illegal immigrants.
Emphasising that the issue is
not a "political, but a Bahamian
one," Mr Moss said people should
be concerned that many of the
country's resources are being
spent on illegal immigrants.
"We know that 60 per cent of
the children in our public schools
are children of illegal immigrants.
This means that of the $260 mil-
lion budgeted for education, only
40 per cent goes to children of
Bahamians," he claimed.
The Tribune was unable to
reach Education Minister Alfred
Sears to confirm the statistics.
Mr Moss added that if the trend
continues, it will spell "disaster
for the country."
Addressing the question of suf-
ficient financing for the fight
against illegal immigration, lawyer
Fayne Thompson said that gov-
ernment needs to re-arrange its
priorities and find additional mon-
ey to assist the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force and Immigration
officials.
"The very survival of the nation
of the Bahamas as we know it is at
stake. We have to find a way to
cut here and cut there to make
the money available to police our
country. We will suffer a greater
financial loss, social and human
loss, if we do not do what we have
to do now," Mr Thompson said.


TR PICAL
EXTRMNATORS


Mr Moss suggested the estab-
lishment of a more sophisticated
Defence Force base on Inagua to
"deal with the natural path that
illegals take."
He pointed out however that
illegal immigrants also enter the
country through "our airports and
on yachts."
"We're not targeting any one
group. Illegal immigration must
stop and it must stop from the
top the bottom. We know too,
that there a persons who are ille-
gally up on Cable Beach, on Par-
adise Island and Lyford Cay," he
claimed.
Mr Moss said that an on-going
immigration problem could also
be detrimental to the Bahamas'
international relationships.
"With the Bahamas being a
tourist destination, one where we
are involved in international rela-
tions trying to stamp out terror-
ism, and we can't even say who is
in our country, that is a concern to
us. We need to keep terrorism
out of this country," he said.
He said that the Bahamas can-
not afford to be known interna-
tionally as a country that does not
frown, but "actually smiles on and
condones illegal immigration."
In addition to an amnesty peri-
od for persons who are in
Bahamas illegally, the group
called for "an immediate mora-


I0 I


torium on the granting of work
permits, save for essential services
and national emergencies."
The BARF members further
called for a special commission
of inquiry to be appointed, "with
wide powers to summons paper


and people in order to investigate
the full extent of the abuse of our
immigration department, laws
and policies."
"Out of this commission will
come recommendations for the
way forward," Mr Moss said.


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PAGE 4, THURSDYRAUGUSTT18, 005 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


The 'miracle' water and our relay girls


IN 1997 Joseph Darville, then principal of
Catholic High School in Freeport, angered at
how the church had been turned into a wheel
of fortune at the expense of its poor parish-
ioners, condemned some of its ministers as a
"bunch of charlatans".
Mr Darville was a guest on radio 100
JAMZ's talk show, and the topic was: "Will the
real reverend please stand up?"
A young Tribune reporter, never having
heard or seen the word "charlatan" written
before, wrote what she thought Mr Darville
had said. When she turned her copy into the
news desk, this is the quote she had attributed
to Mr Darville: "I think they are a bunch of
shallow tins."
Although an error, we thought it a perfect
description of some of them.
Mr Darville accused some of the ministers of
not only "leaching on the poor", but of pur-
chasing their titles for a "donation" Rev-
erend, Doctor, Bishop, you name it and for a
price not years of education to earn it a
man was ready to stand in the pulpit, preach to
the people and pass the collection plate.
The scandal of.that day was that through, a
mail order and a donation of $19.50, a man
- or woman- received by return mail from
an organisation in California the legal right to
use the title "Reverend" with "legal authori-
sation" to "perform all functions of the min-
istry, including marriages, baptisms funerals,
services, etc".
A doctorate degree in religion could also
be bought for a "donation" of $193 and for
a limited time the California group was "excit-
ed" to offer a "professional Ph.D" for half
price.
A good investment when the short-cut "rev-
erend" considered the rich collection plate
ready for the picking every Sunday never
mind that most of his parishioners were giving
their widow's mite to keep him in the style to
which he was quickly becoming accustomed.
And now we have the mad rush for a 12
ounce bottle of "miracle" water priced at $1.
This is meant to be a real bargain. Not only will
a few drops raise a man from the dead, cure his
aches and pains, but will also pay his mort-
gage. No wonder the dollar bills are floating
into the donation box faster than the minister
can count.
The "miracle" first leaked out when Bishop,
Ross Davis of Golden Gates Assembly World
Outreach Ministries, released a press state-
ment on August 9 announcing that "a man


Bae


to


was pronounced dead and taken to the mor-
tuary; the family member obeyed Prophet
Rolle's instructions and the man came back to
life, he is now receiving care at home."
For the past three weeks Bahamians have
been flocking to the "God working through the
water church" services of Bishop ("singing
prophet") Lawrence Rolle to get their own
miraculous blessing.
Naturally, like Doubting Thomas, The Tri-
bune reporter wanted to interview the modem-
day Lazarus. Turns out that our "singing
prophet" had no idea who he was and didn't
remember the woman who had told him such
a suspicious story.
Eventually, after much persistence, we got
the "singing. prophet" to admit that the man
never died, nor did his body go to the mortu-
ary. It seems that the sight of the hearse "shiv-
ered" him into life. And so what resurrected
"dead" man was Bishop Ross Davis talking
about? It seems that a responsible minister, of
the cloth would have checked his facts before
getting the public excited.
Miracles are being performed daily in this
island there are many near-death recoveries.
Whether through medicine, prayer, the inter-
vention of God or a combination of all three,
people do get better and miracles do happen'.
The deeper the faith, the better the chance of
healing. As Jesus said to the woman with the
issue of blood: "Daughter, be of good com-
fort; thy faith hath made thee whole."
But without faith nothing will happen.
When our reporter returned from the press
conference she brought back two small bottles
of the "blessed" water to show the staff. No
one wanted anything to do with the "cursed"
water except our Local News editor. This
brash young Bahamian decided to test the
waters. As reporters gathered around the TV
set Monday to watch our Bahamian girls run
the 4 xlOO women's relay race, he sprinkled
some of the "miracle" water on top of the tele-
vision set to help them win the race. As Tami-
ka Clarke, the starter, approached Chandra
Sturrup to pass the baton, Chandra collapsed
in a heap and Tamika had to jump over her.
The news room now blames its editor for
jinxing the race with the prophet's "cursed"
water.
And for the reverends who are turning a
fast buck with this "miracle" water, we rec-
ommend they read Matthew ch.18, v.5 as to
what should happen to those who "offend one
of these little ones who believe in me".


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Stop playing




games with




Sir Stafford


EDITOR, The Tribune
I CONSIDER Mr Oswald
Brown, editor of the Freeport
News, my friend and I am quite
sure if you were to ask him what
he thinks of me his answer
would be "Forrester is my
friend"; however Oswald and
Forrester don't always see
everything with 20/20 vision.
His vision, in my opinion, is
often blurred and I am sure he
would probably say the same
thing about me; but Oswald and
I are certainly on the same page
in condemning the government
for this move afoot to remove
Sir Stafford's image from the
country's $10 bill. Quite frankly,
I think it is a disgraceful exer-
cise, no matter what kind of
cock and bull story they come
up with in their defence.
No one screamed louder than
I did when Hubert Ingraham's
government made the decision*
to honour Sir Stafford in that
way, but right is right and wrong
is wrong.
While condemning Sir
Stafford's legacy of racism no
one, then nor now, can deny his
contributions to the rapid
growth and development of this


country, during his time at the
helm. Mr Brown was succinct
in stating the facts about Sir
Stafford he gave him his due,
both pro and con, and at this
stage of our development we
shouldn't be engaging in these
kinds of shenanigans.
Let me make my position
perfectly clear, the image of Sir
Stafford Sands would not have
been on our $10 or any other
bill if my vote was required, at
the time, to approve it; howev-
er now that it is a done deal, I
clamour to be among those who
have stepped forward, already,
in defence of keeping it there -
this is the right thing to do; as a
matter of fact this is no issue
and it shouldn't ever arise when
the Government has so many
other "real" problems to solve;
Get a life, for Pete's sake!
Psychoanalyse this govern-
ment and you will find heads
full of rocks no brain, no
thinking faculties and no politi-
cal sense. This government


doesn't even have the common
sense to protect its own political
fortunes. You don't cut off your
nose to spite your face. Tell
whoever made this asinine deci-
sion to fool with our $10 bill to
can it and get on with the job of
governance. Go find some of
those same $10 Sir Stafford
Sands bills and pay those mail-
boat operators who refused to
take the people's cargo the oth-
er day, saying that the govern-
ment owes them money.
Address those important issues
and stop playing hide-and-seek.
Everytime you see one, you
see the three of them; Obie
Wilchcombe, Gleyns Hanna-
Martin and Philip Galanis;
what's up with that? And
always in the company of that
same businessman-yeah, I
smell a rat.
My advice to you, Prime Min-
ister, stop playing games with
the Bahamian people with these
non-issues and try and put a
leash on some of these Minis-
ters you have who can't stop
sucking up.
FORRESTER CARROLL
Freeport, Grand Bahama
August 2 2005.


Woeful service by BTC


EDITOR, The Tribune
BTC has a new procedure for
dealing with customer requests
for service.
If you have a problem with
your telephone, internet or cell
phone you may now report all
of them by dialing 914.
After the bubbly, upbeat
recording.lets you know how
happy they are that you called
them you are then given a list of
options (sorry, "prompts") and
you are required to make a
selection. You do that-and then
listen to some further prompts.
After you have made a selec-
tion for the third time, you are
then connected to a recording
"sorry, all our agents are busy"
and you are then told that your
call is important to them so
"please stay on the line."
You very quickly learn how
important your call is to them
after you have waited 15 to 30
minutes for someone to answer.
They do make sure that your
time is not wasted because they
let you listen to a recording
every fifteen seconds telling you
all the reasons why you should


be happy with BTC.
They will then promise to
look into your problem and call
you back.
After they don't call back that
day, as promised, you will go
through all the number selec-
tions again and wait another 15
to 30 minutes because you real-
ly need to hear again the
recorded voice telling you how
important your call is to them.
Be prepared to repeat this
process until you have taxed the
limit of your patience.
If you eventually tire of mak-
ing them happy with your
phone calls you may wish to
speak with a manager of one of
the departments.
He/she will either be away
from their desk, at a meeting
or at lunch.
You may then decide to write
a letter.
Just don't expect an answer.
Perhaps they have now fur-
ther improved their service so
that they have a form letter
which will inform you that "no
one is available to reply to your
letter but your mail is important
to us so please keep writing"


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You will finally want to join
the rest of us who are feeling
nostalgic about the "good old
days"when we could diala
rotary phone and actually speak
to someone.
S T SWEETING
Nassau
August 11 2005


Action

needed

on house

EDITOR, The Tribune
THIS letter is prompted by
the shocking condition of Cas-
cadilla, the former residence
of Sir Harold Christie on East
Street at Miller's Court. This
once majestic example of
Bahamian architecture which
has reportedly been listed as
an historic building, has been
allowed to rot and fall apart,
its gardens overgrown and its
interiors a home to rodents
and vagrants.
It has really surprised me
that the multitude of so-
called environmentalists and
guardians of our heritage,
who are prepared to march
on Parliament demanding
protection for buildings
located 15 miles from the
city, for mangroves in Har-
bour Island and for dolphins
in captivity, appear to have
no concern whatever for the
tragic loss of priceless his-
toric buildings. Moreover, I
am shocked to hear the Min-
istry of Tourism citing "her-
itage tourism" as an impor-
tant market segment, and
express no concern whatever
for the impending loss of this
national treasure.
It must also concern other
members of the community
that a listed building can be
allowed to deteriorate, espe-
cially in such an important
location, without public com-
ment or recourse. Surely the
very purpose of listing build-
ings is to ensure their contin-
ued existence, and if an own-
er can frustrate that purpose
simply by waiting until the
building falls down, what's
the point?
The only responsible thing
for any government to do is
to acquire the property and
restore it, (perhaps for use
as the headquarters of the
Ministry of Culture). It must
by now be obvious, that the
present owners have no such
intention.
PATRICK RAHMING
Nassau
August 9 2005


----- --


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


c~ke


THE TRIBUNE


K4
...l..
l (








THE TRBUNE TULSCAL AUGUS


Pair charged

with armed

robbery of

tourists

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
THE pair charged with
the armed robbery of three
American tourists were
arraigned in the Magis-
trate's Court yesterday.
The accused are 18-year-
old Randy Rolle of Hospi-
tal Lane and 25-year-old
Shenique Ramsey of Hay
Street.
It was alleged that being
concerned together and
armed with a handgun, the
pair robbed Dianne Raysor,
Theresa Alstor and Crystal
Sumnors of more than
$2,000 in cash and other
valuables.

Reports
Initial reports stated
that the robbery occurred
shortly before 3 am when
the women were walking
on Paradise Beach Road
on the way back to their
hotel.
They were reportedly
accosted by two men, one
armed with a handgun and
the other with a razor
blade.
After robbing the
women, the men made their
escape in a getaway car dri-
ven by a woman, police
reports said.
. The car later crashed
while being chased by
police.
Ramsey and Rolle, who
appeared before Magistrate
Marlin Meers, were not
required to enter a plea to
the charge and were
remanded to Fox Hill
Prison. The matter was
adjourned to November 14
for a preliminary inquiry.


U


THURSDAY
AUGUST 18
6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 Spiritual Impact
2:00 Mr. Ballooney B.
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Gilbert Patterson
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
'5:30 Legends From Whence
We Came: Muriel Eneas
.6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Native Stew
8:30 Public Forum: Common-
wealth Education Minister
10:00 Dance Nia Pt. 1
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page


Bid to expand Nassau's




national park system


CHRISTOPHER HAMILTON, executive director Bahamas National Trust




Woman and boy in



court for allegedly



breaking into home


of businessman


* By NATARIO
McKENZIE


A 20-YEAR-OLD woman
and a 17-year-old boy
appeared in court yesterday
for allegedly breaking into
the home of businessman
and former MP Normon
Solomon and stealing a num-
ber of firearms.
Tredia Wilkinson and the


juvenile appeared before
Magistrate Marilyn Meers to
answer to the charge that on
Sunday, August 14 the two
broke into Mr Solomon's
Winton Heights home and
stole over $12,000 in guns
and ammunition.
According to the charges,
the pair allegedly stole sev-
eral shotguns, rifles and sev-
eral rounds of ammunition.


1 m" ww4 eA





"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


They both pleaded not
guilty' to 'th'e" chrgefs and,
were e ch.,granted $20,(7000
bail with. two sureties.
The matter was adjourned
to November 14.
It was also alleged that the
pair were found in posses-
sion of one pound of mari-
juana which authorities
believed they intended to
supply to others.
Wilkinson and the minor
also pleaded not guilty to
this charge.
The pair, who appeared
before Magistrate Roger
Gomez at the Victoria Gar-
dens courts, were each
granted $8,000 bail with one
surety. The matter was
adjourned to February 22,
2006.
A 35-YEAR-OLD St
James Road man appeared
in court on drug charges yes-
terday.
Eric Berkley Rolle was
accused of being found in
possession of nine grams of
cocaine on Tuesday, August
16, which police believed he
intended to supply to anoth-
er.
Rolle pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was grant-
ed $8,000 bail with one sure-
ty.
The matter was adjourned
to February 22


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas National Trust (BNT) is moving to develop and
expand the capital's national park system.
Addressing the Rotary Club of Southeast Nassau yesterday, the
Trust's new executive director Chris Hamilton said the effort is being
undertaken as part of the BNT's continuing effort to conserve the
natural resources of the Bahamas.
The four national parks in New Providence include Harold and
Wilson's Pond, the Primeval Forest, the Bonefish Pond and the Retreat.
The Trust is looking into the further development of these parks as
well as the creation of several new large-scale parks, he said.
"Our parks need to become places where people can experience the
natural environment. They also need to be places where children can
learn about our tropical ecosystems and get away from an urban and
over populated environment," said Mr Hamilton.
He explained that the BNT plans to build viewing platforms and trails
at the Harold and Wilson Pond, and a trail system at the Primeval For-
est.
The BNT is also working with the Bahamas Dive Association and
local fishermen to consider creating a new marine park off the south-
west end of the island, he said.
Mr Hamilton added that organisation is also working with govern-
ment to consider the establishment of a grand park around the shore
of Lake Kilarney, with picnic tables and playgrounds.
He stressed the importance of Bahamian individuals and corpo-
rate entities becoming members of BNT.
"These 'are exciting times, but we need your help because the
Bahamas National Trust is your national trust," said Mr Hamilton.
He went on to say that the BNT is working hard to become more rel-
evant to Bahamians of all ages.,



Busy 'freshmen week'

at College of Bahamas
AFTER a shaky summer, the and staff of his decision to quit the
College of the Bahamas started post.
the new academic year in a strong A number of students and fac-
fashion with 1100 new students tilty rushed to defend Dr Smith
enrolling, and point out his achievements
The very busy "freshmen week" during his short tenure as presi-
brought some sense of normalcy to dent.
the embattled institution. Many observers feared howev-
However the troubling events of er that the incident might have
the summer are not yet behind damaged the institution's at a cru-
COB, as students and faculty are cial time during its bid to attain
still waiting for the college council university status.
to name a new president. The academic community was
The institution was rocked notified of Dr Smith's plagiarism
when in June then college presi- by a whistle-blower, who hap-
dent Dr Rodney Smith admitted pened to be a college council
to committing plagiarism during member who attended a speech
'a pec.'i to students and faculty. given by New York University
'D'initth officia'lly resigned president Dr John Sexton. This
fi' rsm bis 6st earlier this month speech turned out to be the source
after a letter was circulated around of the quotes plagiarised by Dr
the campus informing the faculty Smith.


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THURSDAY, AUGUST


THE TRIBUNE


FOR 3 IN I LAWN SE
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MP claims Long Islanders yet





to receive hurricane relief


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
REGISTRATION FALL 2005

PAYING FOR IT ALL
(NEW STUDENTS)


COMPULSORY FEES
Security Deposit
Orientation
Technology Fee
ID Card
Insurance Fee
Student Activity Fee
Total


Bill Calculation:
3 co
(9C
Fees $
Tuition (for Bahamians)
Student Development
Total Bill $ 1
Deferred Payment Calculation NAv
Downpayment by Aug.19~
Installment due Sept. 30
1 Oct. 31


$ 100.00
50.00
100.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
$ 350.00


Refundable on Matriculation, $200 for non-Bahamians
One time fee, non-refundable
Payable each semester
One time fee, $15 to replace
Payable annually
Payable each semester


Lower Level Courses


)urses
redits)
325.00
900.00
75.00
,300.00


4 courses
(12 Credits)
$ 350.00
1,200.00
75.00
$ 1,625.00

$1,165.00
$255.00
$255.00
$1,675.00


5 courses
(15 Credits)
$ 350.00
1,500.00
75.00
$ 1,925.00

$1,345.00
$315.00
$315.00
$1,975,00


Upper Level Courses(Bachelor)


4 courses
(12 Credits)
$ 350.00
1,800.00
$ 2,150.00

$1,480.00
$360.00
$360.00
$2,200.00


3 courses
(9 Credits)
$ 325.00
1,350.00
$ 1,675.00


*Note: These are sample billings. Actual bills will differ based on courses selected.


TUITION REFUND POLICY
A Drop/Add form must be completed, approved by an authorized COB official and a $20.00 fee paid if a
student wants to withdraw from class(es)
Amount Refundable


Withdrawal before August 29, 2005
Withdrawal during week of August 29 September 2, 2005
Withdrawal during week of September 5 -9, 2005
Withdrawal after September 9, 2005



D .. .


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


5 courses
(15 Credits)
$ 350.00
2,250.00
$ 2,600.00

$1,750.00
$450.00
$450.00
$2,650.00


I


Larry Cartwright


echoes complaints


of residents


* By ADRIAN GIBSON

NO ONE on Long Island has
received any hurricane relief
from the Ministry of Housing
since the devastation of hurri-
cane Frances last year, accord-
ing to Long Island MP Larry
Cartwright.
Mr Cartwright said that per-
sons whose names were sub-
mitted on a list and those who
wrote to the Ministry of Hous-
ing and National Insurance
have "been ignored all togeth-
er." .
"People's homes and stuff
have been ruined, man, and
they have gotten nothing.
"When I first got into parlia-
ment the minister (Shane Gib-
son) assisted me with a pro-
gramme here, but there has
been nothing since then," Mr
Cartwright said.
"Andros was number 10 on
the islands that were the worst
affected by the hurricanes and
Long Island was number nine.
But I was surprised to hear Mr
Peet (North Andros MP) in
parliament thanking the gov-
ernment for sending relief there.
That made me question how the
number 10 worst affected island
could've received relief before
the number nine isn't nine
before 10?" he asked.
Mr Cartwright was echoing
the complaints of many Long
Island residents who say that
Minister Gibson has ignored
their pleas for assistance,
although he was on ZNS'
"Immediate Response" talk
show after the hurricanes saying
that all persons affected by the
hurricanes were being compen-
sated.

Appearance

In a previous appearance on
"Immediate Response" sever-
al months ago, Mr Gibson':
called for "the names" of all;.
persons affected by the hurri-
canes who had not received hur-
ricane relief.
Yesterday, The Tribune dis-
covered that such persons as
Bishop Edward and Lenora
Gibson, Lula Bethell and Sylvia
Knowles in the north down to
Colin and Krystal Cartwright in
the south had received no assis-
tance.
Bishop Gibson told The Tri-
bune that he had "been running
behind the ministry for assis-
tance since late last year" and
still has received no relief. He
said he. lost his kitchen roof,
kitchen appliances, such as a
stove and refrigerator, cup-
boards, floor tiles, their dining
table and seating in the hurri-
cane.
"We have called and written
to the Ministry of Housing and


ORAL'sI FASHION


has


NEW ARRIVALS


ly watched nine named storms,
two of which became hurricanes
and killed people in Cuba and
Haiti. Meteorologists have said
that these storms show an
unconventional peak in weath-
er systems.
The meteorologist said it was
surprising as it is not yet mid-
August.


* ACTING Minister
of Social Services
Shane Gibson


the minister, but nothing has
been done. We have been told
over and repeatedly that they
are looking into it but that is it
- all talk and no action," he
said.
Another resident, Lula
Bethell said: "I have gotten
nothing from them not a
thing and they don't seem to be
checking either."

Dollars

Colin Cartwright, a sailor and
resident of southern Long
Island, said the only relief he
had received "was a few dol-
lars, some fertilizer and mango
plants, that came from the min-
istry of Alfred Gray, and not a
soul else."
"If Minister Gibson help one
island, he needs to help others
too. They get Long Island for
a. scapegoat. They don't help
Long Island people 'cause they
get Long Island for last," he
complained.
"Larry was right it's true
- plenty people houses were
underwater after the hurricanes.
Some people lose appliances
and freezers and stuff, man, but
they aint get nothing yet," he
explained.
He said: "The minister aint
worrying about this island. He is
saying he is doing this and that,
but that aint true election
time aint far, so they will talk
anything to win."
Several weeks ago the minis-
ter told The Tribune that he
was not aware that Long
Islanders had suffered hurricane
damage, but on Tuesday he said
that "plenty other people
haven't gotten hurricane relief",
so they will have to wait.

Money

Many Long Islanders com-
plain that they have not
received any relief whether
in money or construction mate-
rial to secure their homes in
what meteorologists call the
most active hurricane season in
history. Residents fear that any
further damage to their homes
and property would have a
damaging effect upon their
livelihoods and "shallow pock-
ets."
Thus far in hurricane season
2005 meteorologists have close-


NOTICE




The Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited cordially invites all
2005 College of the Bahamas Teache Education Graduates
to attend a special meeting at the headfoffice on
Independence Drive and East Street.


The meeting will be held on

Tuesday, August 23rd 2005 at 6:00pm.
All 2005 C.O.B. Teacher Education graduates are encouraged
to attend.


The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the requirement for
membership and our Annual Trainee Teacher Loan program.

i 1 iI


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,,.:,i;:::21: ; :.:: ..;: -.K. :


Minister

announces

'Operation

Protect Our

Children'

ACTING Minister of
Social Services Shane Gib-
son yesterday announced
the second annual'Opera-
tion Protect Our Children'
rally.
The rally, which is set for
August 21 at RM Bailey
park starting at 3pm, will
provide information on
structured after-school
activities, as well as safety
tips for children and par-
ents.
Mr Gibson said gift bags'
with school supplies will
also be distributed and
entertainment will be pro-
vided by children and young
adults.
Bus transportation to the
event will be provided from
strategic locations on the
island. The bus stops
include the National Centre
for the Performing Arts,
Elizabeth Estates and South
Beach Police Stations, the
old City Market parking lot
opposite the southern recre-
ation grounds and Golden
Gates Shopping Centre.
"An invitation is extend-
ed to children, parents and
guardians and interested
persons to attend this event.
The ministry anticipates it
will be informative and
entertaining while convey-
ing the message that the
protection of children is a
shared responsibility," said
Mr Gibson.


;... ._


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


I F-I


/i






THE TRIBUNE


I n l i *S **, A .. .), A .


LOA NW


RELIVE ALL THE DRAMA WITH


THE TRIBUNE'S


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H I S


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Surveillance system donation for



Simpson Penn Centre for Boys


Minister praises

firm for being 'good

corporate citizen'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A LOCAL security store
has donated a state-of-the-art
surveillance system to the
Simpson Penn Centre for
Boys.
Security Plus Limited pre-
sented the system to the offi-
cials of the correctional facili-
ty yesterday in the presence
of Ministry of Social Services
personnel, including Shane
Gibson, acting Minister of
Social Services and Commu-
nity Development.
The system includes four
weatherproof, day and night
colour cameras, a 19-inch
colour monitor, a time lapse
VCR that can continuously
record up to 1,280 hours and
an eight-channel dual page
quad processor.
The total cost of the system
was $4,458.
Mr Gibson said Security
Plus should be commended
for being such a good corpo-
rate citizen and that the sys-


tem will be put to good.
"This is a vast compound
and there have been security
breaches in the past both in
terms of persons entering as
well as leaving the com-
pound," said Mr Gibson.
Deterrent
"This equipment therefore,
will greatly enhance the abili-
ty of the security staff to mon-
itor what is happening,
respond quickly to any per-
ceived breaches in security
and hopefully, it will also
prove to be a deterrent to
those who may have thoughts
of engaging in inappropriate
activities."
Security Plus manager
Claudette Bain said the com-
pany prides itself on giving
back to the community.
"This is one way to show
the community that we are
there when they need us to
offer any assistance," said Ms
Bain.


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If I were prime minister


THIS article is not the
launch of my bid for
leadership, either of a party or
of the country. In fact, I will
not be making any such bid in
the foreseeable future.
This article rather is about
what we should expect first and
foremost from those wishing
to hold the high office 'of Prime
Minister.


We should expect every such
man or woman to finish the
statement, "If I were prime
minister" with clarity, thought-
fulness and substance. It should
be immediately clear from the
aspirant's statement that he or
she understands the role and
functions of the prime minis-
ter in a Westminster system of
government and how that role
is distinct from yet married to


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the leadership of a political
party.
The seeker of the office of
prime minister must, as a mat-
ter of priority, reveal a clear
design for managing the often
ambiguous position of being
first among equals, as chair-
man of the cabinet.
He or she must be well-
equipped to delegate authority
dutifully but hold accountable


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diligently those who exercise
such delegated authority. The
management of this issue is crit-
ical to the efficient and effective
operation of the executive
branch of government.

From the statement of
someone seeking to, be
prime minister, it must be clear
that he or she sees himself or
herself as the chief servant of a
team of individuals whose col-
lective intellectual and social
capital will be used in govern-
ing the country.
While it is likely that anyone
bold enough to want to be
prime minister would have a
big ego, good aspirants should
be team players, clearly aware
of their unique role as leader
but fully conscious of the fact
that more is achieved by a
group working together than
any talented individual work-
ing alone.
The thoughts of someone
desiring to be prime minister
must reveal that he or she has a
clear sense of the realities con-
fronting the country; after all,
the first duty of any leader is
to assess reality. It is on the
basis of one's assessment of
reality that one acts.
Any wrong assessment on
this score will likely lead to
wrong action. In the aspirant's
assessment of reality, it must
be obvious that he or she has
gone beyond mere anecdote to
embracing a studied observa-
tion of the issues of importance
to the nation.
In this regard, he or she can-
not rely solely on individual
effort but must enlist the help
of many others, whose exper-
tise, talents and experience
bring adequate light to the
issues.

Q-uite frankly, more
can be told about an
aspirant s likelihood of success
by the team he or she builds.


than by the rhetoric they put
out. It is useful to note here
that an assessment of reality is
not merely seeing what is
wrong in the nation but also
observing what is right and
what opportunities remain


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STRAIGHT UP TALK

Z H I VAR G O L A I NG


unexploited.
When the seeker of the office
of prime minister has complet-
ed the statement, "If I were


It is not a simple matter to
desire to lead a nation. Indeed,
those who do so are either
courageous or ignorant. To


It is not a simple matter to
desire to lead a nation. Indeed,
those who do so are either--
courageous or ignorant. To
know the awful weight of
leading a nation and still
desire to do so requires great
courage.


prime minister" one should
have a clear sense of his or her
vision for the nation. Even as I
say "his or her vision", I do not
mean to convey the thought
that the aspirant holds some
self-constructed vision for the
country.
Rather, the aspirant articu-
lates a national vision that was
developed from a deliberate
consultative process and which
therefore resonates with the
people.

Of course, one does
expect that the aspi-
rant would have made great
input into the vision and that
such would be revealed by his
or her intimate and passionate
ownership of it.
It must be clear from they
who seek to be prime minister
that they not only have clear
goals to be achieved for the
nation but that they have clear


know the awful weight of lead-
ing a nation and still desire to
do so requires great courage.
To not know the weight and
desire to do so requires only
awful ignorance. In the end,
those who come to hold the
office of prime minister willnot
do so simply by their own
desire; they will do so by the
will of the people. It is the peo-
ple then who must be sure that
those wanting to lead them
adequately complete the state-
ment, "If I were prime minis-
ter..."
CONGRATULATIONS TO
OUR MEN'S 4x400 M
RELAY TEAM
Having once served as Min-
ister of State in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture I
felt badly for our men's 4 x
400m team when they came
ever so close but yet so far in
the attempts to medal at a
number of international track
meets.
I always knew, despite their
lack of medals, that they were
one of the top three men's relay
teams in the world. Mental
lapses, more than ability, most-
ly kept them from showing
their true potential.
But at long last, they have
the medal to prove what they
always knew in their hearts,
they are one of the three elite
relay teams in the world.
After almost a decade of
striving, our men won the silver
medal at the 10th IAAF World
Athletic Championships in
Helsinki, Finland, on Sunday,
August 14, 2005.
Congratulations to Nathaniel
McKinney, Avard Moncur,
Andrae Williams and Chris
Brown. For Chris, I know the
victory is even that much
sweeter, as he more than the
others has carried on his shoul-
ders the burden of past disap-
pointments.
They have all done them-
selves, their families and this
nation proud.
THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK


A mbition is no shame
but failure-to prepare
is. Blessed are they whose
preparation leads to high
achievement.
zhivargolaing@hotmail.com


strategies for achieving those
goals. In this regard there must
be no relenting.
Those who seek to become
prime minister must be drilled
about how they expect to
achieve any stated objective.
They should be made to pro-
vide reasonable details on mea-
surable outcomes, timelines,
necessary resources and
processes to be employed in
seeking to achieve their ends.
If it frightens any aspirant to
have this kind of a demand
placed upon them, they ought
to rethink their aspirations. It is
much to ask but we are talking
about leading a country and not
a social club.
Besides, having properly
assessed reality and engaged a
thoughtful consultation process,
fulfilling this demand should
follow naturally.


The thoughts of someone
desiring to be prime minister
must reveal that he or she has
a clear sense of the realities
confronting the country; after
all, the first duty of any leader
is to assess reality. It is on the
basis of one's assessment of
reality that one acts.


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUSTB18,2005,PAGE9OCAL


Celebrations to mark




life of Marcus Garvey


By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE birth and life Marcus
Mosiah Garvey, who made his
indelible mark on the world by
rallying more than six million
black people together, was cel-
ebrated in New Providence yes-
terday with a church service.
With the well known direc-
tive: "Up you mighty race",
Garvey commissioned black
people to refuse to accept them-
..selves as- an- inferior race and
with a united vision, to return to
the motherland.
On August 17, 1887, Marcus
Garvey was born in St Anne's
Bay, Jamaica. He became an
illustrious orator, printer, edi-
tor, politician, poet, motivator,
family man and preacher.
He formed the Universal
Negro Improvement Associa-
tion, which attracted millions of
members around the world,
including in the Bahamas.
His birthday was celebrated
in the Bahamas with an all-night
church service at the EABIC
(Ethiopian African Black Inter-
national Congress) True Church
of Divine Salvation on Fire
Trail Road.
Rastafarians in the Bahamas
seem determined to keep Gar-
vey's vision of a new Africa
alive and indeed, his legendary
contribution to black people .
The EABIC last night
reminded the public that in the
hearts of Bahamians lies the
potential to make a significant
impact on the African continent
through religious, cultural, edu-
cational, and industrial bi-lat-
eral relations.
They recalled the instrumen-
tal role that Bahamian Dr
Robert Love played in the life
of Marcus Garvey.
Garvey said it was Dr Love's
ideas about the restoration of
Africa and the importance of
unity that- inspired his own
' efforts towards those goals. *
Dr Love was known in the


Bahamas as a great philan-
thropist and intellectual.
The UNIA Bahamas branch
attracted a wide following in
Nassau during the 1920s.
Black heroes including CH
Reeves, AF Adderley, and
Carlton Francis were among the
UNIA executives.
However, the struggle for
black Americans was much
greater than that of their
Bahamian counterparts.
During the pre-emancipation
era, Bahamians did not face
major violence or outbursts of
civil unrest, and it was written
that certain white factions in the
Bahamas became wary of the
visit Marcus Garvey made to
Nassau.

Audience

Hundreds braved the rain to
hear the black leader speak in
Nassau, and the event passed
without violence, much to the
relief of Bay Street merchants.
However, his visit con-
tributed to the heightened self-
awareness of an oppressed peo-
ple.
His success was greater in
America and London than in
Jamaica, holding true to the
saying that 'a prophet is never
respected in his own country'.
The EABIC plans to keep
Garvey's vision alive with a
'Back to Africa' movement, but
even today, they say society
makes it difficult to achieve this
goal.
They attest to his saying:
"The Universal Improvement
Association represents the
hopes and aspirations of the
awakened Negro. Our desire is
for a place in the world, not to
disturb the tranquility of other
men, but to lay down our bur-
den and rest our weary backs
and feet by the banks of the
Niger and sing our songs and
chant our hymns to the God of
Ethiopia."


* BLACK nationalist Marcus Garvey is shown in a military uni-
form as the 'Provisional President of Africa' during a parades up
Lenox Avenue in Harlem, New Yorlk City, i. A ugist 1922.
(AP Photo)


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 9








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Accounts Clerk IV (Northern Bahamas Campus)
The successful candidate will report to the Assistant Vice President, Northern
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responsible for the following duties:
* Daily collection and daily banking of all monies in accordance with Accounting
Department Procedures.
* Receiving, recording and receipting cash and receivables from tuition, fees,
grants, rents, ancillary enterprises, etc. Issuing official receipts for all income.
* Balancing daily end-of-day batches from revenue collections.
* Analyzing & Reporting all daily revenue and collections by bank account,
mode of payment and receipt category.
* Proper and timely reporting and documenting of all overages and/or shortages
to the supervisor.
* Keying in all transactions into the Management Information System.
* Disbursing petty cash
* Any other related duties as required.
Qualifications/Experience/Personality Traits
* An Associate Degree in Accounting or Business.
* Minimum of two (2) years experience in a similar position
* Experience with automated financial application is an advantage
* Trustworthy and of good character
* Meticulous and ability to work under pressure
Salary Scale: $16,900 x $500 $25,900
Interested candidates should submit a resume with supporting documents through
their Head of Department by Wednesday, August 31, 2005, to:
The Director
Human ResourcesDepartment
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, Bahamas


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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


* -


Tel: 393-7111 Fax 393-0440 1


i













Five twins closes



after seven years


LAST Friday, employees
took their last orders, prepared
and served their last meals and
mixed their last drinks as the
staff of Five Twins.
The restaurant, which boast-
ed a fusion of French and Asian
cuisine and a sushi and satay
bar, closed at 11 pm for the last
time.
Five Twins was located on the
floor of the Atlantis casino for
seven years.
The space is now to undergo
a $7 million
Prior to opening that day, an
awards presentation was held
for the staff to thank them for a
job well done.
Present to share in this occa-
sion was the management team
and culinary staff of Five Twins,
along with Colin Johnson, direc-
tor of training for food and bev-
erage; Philip Ferguson, direc-
tor of food and beverage, who
opened the ceremony and pre-
sented awards; Mark Percival,
vice president of culinary oper-
ations, who presented the
awards to the culinary staff; and
Anthony Pratt, former manag-
er, who was invited to receive a
certificate of appreciation for
his outstanding contribution to
Five Twins.
When the doors closed that
evening, a champagne toast was
held in honour of the closing of
Five Twins and the opening of
Nobu, an internationally famous
restaurant that serves an innov-
ative fusion of Japanese and
South American cuisine.
Present for this event was
Paul O'Neil, president and man-
aging director Kerzner Interna-
tional Bahamas; Nan Palmer,
chief operating officer; Ian
Reid, senior vice president of
food and beverage; Peter Lahr,
vice president and general man-
ager of food and beverage
restaurant operations; Mark
Percival, vice President of culi-
nary operations; and Philip Fer-
guson.
According to Peter Lahr,


"Five Twins will undergo a
"seven million dollar renova-
tion to become Nobu. The
space will be expanded out over
the marina and will include a
sushi area, a full service bar and
a full scale dining room almost
twice the size of Five Twins.
Reservations for dining are
highly recommended," contin-
ued Mr Lahr. "Nobu has a rep-
utation of drawing movie and
sports stars as well as dignitaries
from all over the world.


"The Nobu in Las Vegas sells
out three months in advance
and we expect the same kind of
demand based on customer
feedback from those who have
already heard that Nobu is com-
ing to Atlantis."
Bartender Stephanie Pierre
said, "It's a sad day for us to
see Five Twins finally close.
However, it's still a happy day
because progress is always good
and we're looking forward to
giving Nobu the Five Twins ser-


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 11







PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Miller denies misusing funds


FROM page one
corporation was also being billed for
a cellular phone registered in his
name.
"The only problem with the claims is
that they are all lies," Mr Miller said.
"What I don't understand is if I was the
minister, why would I call the manag-
er to sign a cheque.for me when I have
more power than him? Philip McK-
inzie from Davis and Co who was rep-
resenting Kerr McGee, and Kevin
Gotchall, who is also a lawyer of Kerr
McGee, are the ones who invited me


out to lunch at the Green Shutters.
Upon my arrival I was informed that
some officials from BAIC had a room
reserved there and were having lunch.
"So I said 'They can't be spendin'
BAIC money again, eh?' That was my
remark, because my fight was always
with them for all their spending. So I
honestly don't know where he (Mr Fer-
guson) is coming from," he said.
Since the publication of the article,
FNM leader Senator Tommy Turn-
quest has called for the immediate
resignation of Mr Miller, claiming that
he has "no moral right" to serve in


the Cabinet of the Bahamas.
"The Prime Minister must now take
charge of his Cabinet and do the right
thing," said Mr Turnquest. He said if
Mr Miller is allowed to remain as a
minister, then it must be assumed that
Prime Minister Christie approves of
his behaviour, which sends out a wrong
message to the Bahamian people".

Rejection

"I don't know why Tommy keeps
asking for my resignation," Mr Miller


responded. "It seems he's called for
me to resign almost 30 times now," he
laughed.
However, in his defence, Mr Miller
said that he, as a minister and as a busi-
nessman, is more than capable of cov-
ering his own expenses.
"First off, as a minister you are enti-
tled to a cell phone. My cell phone was
lost or I think I dropped it and broke it,
so the then acting general manager
Luther Smith loaned me one from
BAIC.
"I had that for maybe a week or so
before returning it to the corporation


when I had replaced my old phone.
"But knowing Mr Ferguson's atti-
tude and his lifestyle, I don't even need
to respond to him about this. I'm an
easy target I guess, but I can take it,
I'm a potcake. But I wish him and Mr
Turnquest all the best in their future
endeavours. But it is a cowardly thing
to attack me when I had nothing to
do with his (Mr Ferguson's) firing.
Maybe I should send him down to the
good reverend (Singing Bishop
Lawrence Rolle) and let him sprinkle
some holy water on him," Mr Miller
joked.


BEWU threaten 'agressive action'


FROM page one
understand the workers' posi-
tion and sympathise.
"Everyone has been victim-
ized in some way," he said.
Mr Williams claimed that
under the current BEC man-
agement team, the union has
experienced the worst industri-
al relationship in the history of
BEC. This has created an
atmosphere of contentious, hos-
tile and broken industrial rela-
tions, he added.
He claimed that manage-
ment had made verbal promises
at the bargaining table, but
when executive management
confirmed their position to the
union, it was totally different.


Also, he claimed, BEC on
November 4, 2004 signed set-
tlement forms at the Depart-
ment of Labour to resolve all
matters, after admitting in the
presence of the Director of
Labour that it was at fault for
the length of time it was taking
to solve most disputes.
He said it was unfortunate
that they could not discuss issues
and numbers impartially.
Mr Williams said they have
the support of the other unions
and Labour Minister Vincent
Peet has been cooperative.
However, he stressed that
management must come to the
bargaining table with a more
diplomatic and collaborative
attitude.


Mr Peet would not comment
on the issue other than to say
that he had met with the union.
Late last night BEC general
manager Kevin Basden issued a
press release to say that talks
with the BEWU have been con-
tinuing and every effort has
been made for the continuance
of dialogue.
Mr Basden said that manage-
ment is working diligently to
resolve all outstanding issues
and bring closure to these mat-
ters.
The general manager said
that due to the nature of the
talks management would pre-
fer not to make any further
comments that could prejudice
the negotiations.


National GPA back to 2002 standards


FROM page one
Spanish and the expansion of
specialist subjects.
"This seven year programme
has resulted in an improved
education product and the stu-
dents from that programme are
those who have now written the
BJC and BGCSE exams," the
ministry said.
There were 5,762 students
who sat the BGCSE examina-
tions this year.
In all, 25 subjects were
offered with students sitting for
an average of six subjects each.
There were 78 schools,
including both independent and
public high schools in New
Providence and the Family
Islands, which entered students
to sit the examination.


Of the 25 subjects offered in
2005, 10 recorded an improve-
ment in student performance
compared to last year. They
include: chemistry, economics,
English language, literature,
French, Spanish, book keeping
and accounts, music, typewrit-
ing, carpentry, joinery and
clothing construction.
The school recording the
greatest percentage of students
obtaining five or more subjects
with C or higher was St
Augustine's College with 112
of 157 stfldeiit oi- 713 iper cent
receiving five oi' more subjects
with grade "C" or higher.


In addition, the ministry said
that there was a slight improve-
ment in the Bahamas Junior
Certificate (BJC) examination.
There were 7,062 students who
entered to sit the BJC exam.
In all, 10 subjects were
offered with students sitting an
average of five subjects each.
Of the subjects offered, how-
ever, only religious studies
showed an overall improvement
in student performance com-
pared to 2004. Conversely, only
one subject, health science,
showed an overall decline in
performance in comparison to
2004.


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NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GARRY JEAN LOUIS, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible' for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18th day of AUGUST, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELINOR HAVEN PAYNE GOODWIN,
OF SPIRIT CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16TH day of AUGUST,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.'















PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, LEONARDO
MCKINTOSH, of East Street South, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to LEONARDO ELIJAH
MCINTOSH BROWN. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-792,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


~k~k~i~


SUMM: V














Internal affairs unit opens at Fox Hill


* ASSISTANT Superintendent of Prison Neville Adderley, the new director of the internal affairs
unit, in front of the remand centre at Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill. Mr Adderley is also r
esponsible for the Remand Centre.
(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)


ASSISTANT Superintendent
of Prisons Neville Adderley has
been selected to head the new-
ly established Internal Affairs
Unit at Fox Hill Prison.
The unit began full opera-
tions on Monday
Mr Adderley, a 34-year vet-
eran of the prison service,
assumes responsibility for a unit
mandated to investigate its own
officers in an effort to maintain
accountability in the workplace.
Despite the negativity asso-
ciated with the job, Mr Adder-
ley says he looks forward to the
"challenge of being charged
with establishing the ground-
work for the future success of
the unit".
"I see this new position as
being both challenging and an
honour and privilege because I
will be responsible for charting
the groundwork for how this
unit will function from here on
in," said Mr Adderley.
"I am sure that there will be a
number of challenges that we
will face in the early stages, but
if we are as committed to the
job as I know we are, we will
not be deterred," he added.
The unit will be responsible


for investigating all complaints
of abuse and/or impropriety lev-
eled at uniformed and non-uni-
formed personnel at the prison
by the inmate population, their
families, or members of the gen-
eral public.
Their investigative powers
will extend all the way up the
ranks to the post of Assistant
Superintendent.
ASP Adderley said the unit's
job will be to ensure that any
"untoward behavior" that
would negatively impact the
reputation of the organisation
does not occur. He said officers
who follow proper procedures
will have nothing to fear from
his investigators.
He said all allegations filed
against uniformed and non-uni-
formed personnel at the penal
institution will be handled "with
the strictest confidentiality" by
his team. .
"We have been charged with
the responsibility of protecting
the image and the integrity of
the organisation and any unto-
ward behavior that would neg-
atively impact the reputation of
this organisation will not be tol-
erated," said Mr Adderley.


"It will be investigated objec-
tively and where there is no mer-
it, no action will be taken. How-
ever, where there is merit, action
will be taken against those staff
members, both uniformed and
non-uniformed, who are found
to be guilty of those charges. It's
as simple as that."
Mr Adderley said once a mat-
ter has been investigated by his
team of officers, their findings
will be forwarded to a manage-
ment committee board for fur-
ther action where necessary.
He, said persons lodging the
complaint and those being
investigated will be apprised of
the results of the investigations.
He said the unit will not be
used to conduct "witch hunts"
against officers or members of
staff of Her Majesty's Prison.
"I want to assure the public
that where there is merit those
situations will be dealt with and
they will be apprised of those
results.
"There will be no sugar-coat-
ing to balance the scale just
because an officer is involved.
Wherever the scale tips is where
we are going to let it remain,"
Mr Adderley added.


Project Manager wanted for the construction and delivery of new
Headquarters and Commercial complex with responsibility for quality
control, design and construction coordination and contract management.
Project Manager will be expected to:

* Participate in the planning and formulation of design alternatives and solutions of
construction, plans and specifications from planning and design phase to completion
of construction documents, process to include full interpretation and review of
proposed designs, architectural drawings and building specifications, including
assessment of structural and electrical engineering;
* Develop and administer project budgets, estimates and fiscal controls, monitor
contracts and quality and cost control provisions;
* Oversee all aspects of the day-to-day management of construction, including
coordination and monitoring of work performed by architectural, engineering and
construction subcontractors to ensure quality and. maximize meeting of deadlines
* Liaise with institutional, government and local entities and initiate and coordinate
revisions where appropriate after review with client;
* Ensure project operations comply with design specifications and government
regulatory policies and regulations;
* Establish performance and delivery criteria, ensuring that client and institutional
requirements are being met; coordinate procurements as appropriate;
* Advise and make recommendations as they relate to contracts, purchase orders,
change orders and contractor payment invoices;
* Research and prepare various reports as they relate to operations, equipment, policies.
* Perform miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.





To obtain a copy of the Project Plan, letters of request with credentials should be sent to
Laura Williams PO. Box N 7118 Nassau, Bahamas
Requests must be received no later than Friday, September 2, 2005.


2005 Lecture Series FREE Health Lecture
FREE Health Lecture


Schedule


August 18th
Mental Health
Alzheimer's Disease


September 15th
Children's Health


October 20th
Cancer


November 17th
Diabetes


December 15th
Managing Stress
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Time:


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Thursday, August 18th, 2005

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THE TRIBUNE


N.N.........A NN 0U NC:
ANDT


I! v 1


I


:olo rTV













CARICOM and



health sector



in search of



common ground


.i.--,--.--
GE Mechanical Room
Air conditioner, JONES &


Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.


* TIMOTHY Odle, deputy programme manager, service sector development, CARICOM; Dr
Evaneth McPhee, medical officer and national epidemiologist, Department of Public Health;
Jacqulyn Joseph, director of human and social development, CARICOM; Anthony LaRond,
officer-in-charge of the CARICOM Legislative Drafting Facility (CLDF); Senator Dr Marcus
Bethel, minister of Health and Environment; Elma Garraway, permanent secretary, Ministry of
Health and Environment; and Dr Baldwin Carey, director of Public Health.


* By Bahamas Information
Services
THE Ministry of Health and
Environment held consultations
this month on proposals for com-
mon rules for the registration
and licensing of professionals.
The consultations were held
in collaboration with the CARI-
COM Secretariat from August
8 to 15.
More than 88 professionals
from the medical, dental, nurs-
ing and midwifery, pharmacy,
veterinary, medical laboratory
technologist, allied health and
environmental health sectors
participated in the consulta-
tions, which were held at the
Ministry of Health headquar-
ters on Meeting Street.
The CARICOM Secretariat's
team consisted of Jacqulyn
Joseph, director of human and
social development; Anthony
LaRond, officer-in-charge of
the CARICOM Legislative
Drafting Facility (CLDF); Dr
Robert Brohim, programme
manager of health sector devel-
opment; and Timothy Odle,
deputy programme manager of
service sector development.
The consultations focused on
draft legislation for doctors,
dentists, nurses and midwives,
and pharmacists.


Modifications were made to
the existing drafts and two new
Bills were developed; one for
the veterinarians and the other
for the medical laboratory tech-
nologists.
A ministry spokesman said
the meeting provided valuable
exchange, not only on what is
being done in CARICOM, but
also significant advancements
in the Bahamas.
"Noteworthy is that the
Bahamas already has several
pieces of legislation regulating
the sector and is also in the
process of updating existing leg-
islation or establishing new leg-
islation for areas not yet cov-
ered," he said.


(BIS Photo: Raymond Bethel)

At the conclusion of the con-
sultation, the officials of the
health sector met in a debriefing
session with Minister of Health
Dr Marcus Bethel for discus-
sions on the way forward.
"It is now expected that con-
sultations will continue among
the stakeholders with the aim
of arriving at a consensus on
the regulating for their sector,"
the spokesman added.
The CARICOM team will
move to Barbados, Dominica,
Trinidad and Tobago, Suriname
and Belize over the next four
months, during which the work
started in the Bahamas will be
considered by counterpart
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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the.
area or have won an "r...
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share y'ur story.


-no


---------------- -....-.-...--~.......~....II. ..........................~....~.~...~~.


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE












$1 stamp in honour of John Paul II


THE Bahamas Philatelic Bureau of the
General Post Office will release a $1 stamp on
August 18, featuring the late Pope John Paul
II, who led the Roman Catholic Church from
1978 until 2005.
Pope John Paul II, born Karol Jozef
Wojtyla, visited The Bahamas in 1979, one


year after his election to the papacy.
Since the start of his Pontificate on Octo-
ber 16, 1978, Pope John Paul II completed
104 pastoral visits outside of Italy and 146
within Italy. As Bishop of Rome, he visited
317 of the 333 parishes.
John Paul II presided at 147 beatifica-


tion ceremonies (1,338 Blesseds pro-
claimed) and 51 canonization ceremonies
(482 saints) during his pontificate. He held
nine consistories in which he created 231
(plus one in pectore) cardinals. He also
convened six plenary meetings of the Col-
lege of Cardinals.


Some people will tell you otherwise.
They'll say it's whiter skin, perfect nails
or bouncier hair. Instinctively, you
know that confidence comes from a
deeper place...somewhere more per-
sonal and intimate.

Summer's Eve, the world's leading
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tel: 393-7111 fax: 393-0440


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAUE ,i


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


9 9. 1PURE CCOCNUT WAT R








JEM PLAZA PITT ROADONAUSTREET
TEL t2*Q ifo8840


THE TRIBUNE











Credit union



members meet



in Bahamas .


. ALMOST 200 members of
the African-American Credit
Union Coalition (AACUC)
were in Nassau for their sev-
enth annual convention at the
Wyndham Hotel.
The conference last weekend
featured an array of speakers
who addressed industry issues
critical to credit unions.
They included Pete Crear, a
founder of the AACUC who
now heads the World Council
of Credit Unions; Gary Officer,
president of Associated Black
Charities; and Fred Becker,
president of the National Asso-
ciation of Federal Credit
Unions.
The AACUC was formed in
1995 "to increase the global
credit union movement's
strength by adding the focused
perspective and energy of cred-
it union volunteers and profes-
sionals of African-American
and/or African descent".
Its membership includes a
diverse group of global credit
unions, trade associations, reg-
ulators and business partners.
. "Nassau was selected as the
first convention site outside of
the United States, because of
its, rich co-operative history.
Next year's conference will be
feld in Seattle, Washington and
Caribbean credit unionists have
been invited to participate," the
coalition said.
Leaders of the Bahamas
.Credit Union League met with
visiting dignitaries and took part
in some conference sessions.
Conference attendees also vis-
ited local credit unions.
"We are excited that the


Bahamas has been chosen to
host this important credit union
conference," a spokesman said.
The Bahamas co-operative


movement has total assets of
some $170 million, 98 per cent
of which is held by the nation's
credit unions,


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


At least 125 are injured as more


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How to slim



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with cycling


A PROBLEM area for many
persons looking to improve
their physical fitness is usually
the lower body, particularly the
hips and thighs,
This is especially the case for
those women trying to attain
that perfectly toned body.
According to Bally Total Fit-
ness, "now there is a way to
burn fat, increase muscle tone
and strengthen legs all in one;
cycling",
"Not the same old cycling
around the block, instead-a spe-
cially designed exercise class
called reaction cycling,"
explained Bally a Bally
spokesperson,
Recently, the local gym staff
participated in continued train-
ing in the Bally signature class,
'Reaction cycling is an excel-
lent activity that can improve
your cardiovascular endurance,
it will enable your heart and
lungs to function more effi-
ciently and help you reduce
body fat,
"The Bally Total Fitness reac-
tion cycling workout will
improve your muscular strength
and muscular endurance, which
will improve your performance
when participating in your daily


activities," said Bally,
Master trainer Elizabeth Gar-
cia came from Chicago to the
Bahamas to instruct the staff on
how to conduct the cycling class-
es.
The trainers participated in
two days of "intense training"
and spent most of their time on
the stationary bike becoming
comfortable with the cycling
positions.
Donn Carlos Knowles, the
only trainer at Bally that was
certified to instruct the old con-
tinuous cycling class, was
extremely thrilled about the
weekend training,
"It's good that more than one
trainer can teach a continuous
cycling class here at Bally. Now
if I'm not available there will
be someone to fill in for me,"
Mr Knowles said.
He also commented on the
differences between the two
classes,
"Reaction cycling is more
realistic and even the avid cyclist
can relate to the movements
done in a reaction class," Mr
Knowles said,
Reaction cycling is available
to all Bally members every
Tuesday and Thursday at 7pm,


4-mob* c
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Available from Commercial News Providers

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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005










Monk who founded


Christian community


b stabbed in church

-IL


-
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~
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~
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-


. "Copyrighted Material.

Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- r


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4
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Court clears Congo purity


officials In refugee case


* ~.

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005,PAGE 21
Um~


IWE


ACK-MTO- OSmmHO3 SPEIT ETRA,


BAR-B
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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THURSDAY EVENING AUGUST 18, 2005
7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- La Cocina Bebo y Cigala: Blanco y Negro
0 WPBT show "Newmar-
ket"
The Insider (N) Big Brother 6 Head of household. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "The Bogie Man"
0 WFOR n (CC) (Live) 1 (CC) The CSI unit investigates four fatali- (I (CC)
ties on one wild night. C)
Access Holly- Joey Joey falls Will & Grace Will Scrubs J.D, and Scrubs J.D. stirs (9:59) ER "Refusal of Care" ,
WTVJ wood (N) (CC) for his new neigh- is jealous. A Dr. Cox feel things up with CC)
bor. (CC) (CC) threatened. (CC) Neena.
Deco Drive NFL Preseason Football New Orleans Saints at New England Patriots. From Gillette Stadium in Foxboro,
WSVN Mass. (Live) A (CC)
Jeopardy! "Col- THE TUXEDO (2002, Action) Jackie Chan, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Ja- Primetime (CC)
S WPLG ege-Pittsburgh" son Isaacs. Premiere. A souped-up suit turns a cab driver into a super
(CC) spy. A (CC)
S(:00) American Cold Case Files "Weepy-Voiced Killer; The Mr. Big Sting; Officer Down; The First 48 Detectives probe the
A&E Justice "False Secret Twin" Prostitute helps police to track down a serial killer. (CC) shootings of four' men who were sit-
Witness" (CC) ting in a car. (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET BET Awards '05 Honoring outstanding achievements in music, sports and entertainment, at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles.
C:00) Distinct THE NEW BEACHCOMBERS (2002, Comedy-Drama) Jackson Davies.. The National (CC)
CBC Docs (N) (CC) Friends try to save their favorite eatery from demolition. (CC)
CNBC Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
NBC Conan O'Brien
CNN (:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN cooper 360 (CC)
Comedy Central The Daily Show Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Roast "Pamela Anderson" Pamela
COM Presents (CC) With Jon Stew- Presents Mike Presents "Greg Anderson. (CC)
art (CC) Birbiglia. Giraldo"
Cops "CoCo the The System Stings raise issues of Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators "Mystery in
COURT Clown" (CC) entrapment. "Killer Fog" dence Yosemite: Cary Staynei"
That's So Raven KIM POSSIBLE: SO THE DRAMA (2005) Voices of (:20) Buzz on Phil of the Fu- The Proud Fami-
DISN "Too Much Pres- Christy Carlson Romano, Will Friedle. Animated. Ron Maggie (CC) ture Phil alters ly Penny takes
sure" realizes he has feelings for Kim. 'NR' (CC) the future. (CC) up martial arts.
This Old House Weekend Wood Works Home IQ Contractor: Va- DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
DIY (CC) Handyman (N) cation Homes cue cue
DW Euromaxx Journal: in In Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx
____ ____ Depth Tagestema Depth
E Child Stars THS Investigates: Inside the Mind of a-Serial Killer Filthy Rich: Cattle Drive Cattle
E! Gone Bad drive starts.
ESPN 00) Baseball MLB Baseball Arizona Diamondbacks at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (Live) (CC)
ESPN TOnght (CC) I
ESPNI ATP Tennis US Open Series --Western & Southern SportsCenter International Edi- Simplemente F(tbol (N)
ESPNI Financial Group Masters--Day 4. (Live) (CC) tion (Live)
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock "World Youth Day 2005" Cologne, World Youth Day 2005 "Arrival" From Cologne, Ger-
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FITTV (:00) Total Body FitNation "Barefit and Pregnant" Ultimate Goals "Flying High" Aspir- The Extremists The Extremists
FIT Sculpt Plus A Healthy pregnancies. ( Iing trapeze artist. (CC) n (CC) CI (CC)
F v C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FO -N Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL :00) MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Florida Madins. From Dolphins Stadium in Miami. The Sports List Boxing Best
(N L Subject to Blackout) (Live) DamnChamp.
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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


Higher Heights

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wi.:ness each courageoiperforriance. 'heir passion ani

discipline remind us that despite the odds, even the most

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 18,2005


SECTION


BUSINESS


business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Colina defends auditor





report on Bond Fund


n By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
COLINA yesterday told The Tribune
that concerns raised by the external
auditors of one of its mutual funds, who
reported that the fund had not been
complying with its investment criteria
largely through loans to related party
entities, had been "pretty much"
resolved.
In its report to investors in the Coli-
na Bond Fund, which invests in fixed
income securities with both short and
long-term maturities, auditors Deloitte
and Touche said that through the relat-
ed party and other loans, the invest-
ment fund had breached its asset allo-
cation guidelines.
The Deloitte and Touche year-end
2004 report for the Colina Bond Fund
said: "At the balance sheet date
[December 31, 2004], the fund was not
compliant with the eligible investments
stipulated in its Offering Memorandum
in that approximately $2.63 million of
its net assets were loaned to related
party entities.


"Total losses amounted to $2.69 mil-
lion, which represents 55 per cent of
total assets and exceed asset allocation
limits."
However, Colina sources yesterday
pointed' out that the Deloitte and
Touche audit, which was only signed
off by the fund's Board of Directors on
July 15, provided just a "one-time snap-
shot" of its status. They pointed out
that the report was "not a qualification"
Much had changed in the seven-plus
months since the balance sheet audit,
they pointed out, and the Colina Bond
Fund, which is listed on the Bahamas
International Securities Exchange
(BISX), was now back in compliance
with its offering memorandum invest-
ment criteria.
In addition, most of the related par-
ty loans picked up by the Deloitte &
Touche audit are understood to no
longer exist.
There is nothing to suggest that
monies invested in the Colina Bond
Fund by outside Bahamian investors
are at risk, or that the fund faces finan-
cial problems. As at December 31,


2004, the fund had $4.767 million in
net assets, and going from a $496,000
retained deficit at year-end 2003 to pos-
itive retained earnings of $193,830 at
year-end 2004 indicates that it was prof-
itable last year.
Nor have the Colina Financial
Group, its affiliates and officers done
anything wrong in relation to the Coli-
na Bond Fund, which aims to preserve
investors' principal investment and
deliver rates of return about 0.25-0.3
per cent above Bahamian prime.
Nevertheless, the Deloitte & Touche
report is likely to be seized upon by
the Colina Financial Group's (CFG)
competitors and detractors to further
back up their campaign against the
company following publication of the
heavily-qualified audit for its life insur-
ance subsidiary, Colina Holdings
(Bahamas).
They are likely to question whether it
was prudent for the Colina Bond Fund
to have 55 per cent of its assets tied up
in loans, as this could have over-
exposed it to one type of investment,
especially if problems with the coun-


terparties occurred.
Hillary Deveaux, the Securities Com-
mission's acting executive director,
declined to comment when contacted
about the Colina Bond Fund by The
Tribune yesterday. Yet this newspaper
understands the regulator is reviewing
the issue as part of the wider consoli-
dated supervision of the Colina Finan-
cial Group.
And Colina's opponents are also like-
ly to point to the related party loans
as backing up the corporate governance
issues raised over Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), where the auditors in that
case, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
Bahamas, "were not able to satisfy"
themselves that all related-party trans-
actions had been disclosed in a year
when the latter's net earnings slumped
to just $313,687 from $5.577 million the
year before.
Colina Holdings paid out some
$4.431 million to purchase services
from related parties during the finan-
cial year to December 31, 2004, an
SEE page 2B


Think-tank wades into oil price battle


n By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AN economic think-tank yester-
day-released data showing the
Bahamas did not have the highest'
unleaded gas prices in the
Caribbean region, directly contra-
dicting Leslie Miller, minister of
trade and industry, who was advised
to refocus his efforts on increasing
oil industry competition and con-
servation.
Using purchasing power parity
as the basis for its statistical analy-
sis, the Nassau Institute produced
statistics (see table on page 6B)
showing that the average per gallon
price of unleaded premium gaso-
line in the Bahamas, as at August 8
this year, was $3.83 at the pump.
According to its analysis, the
equivalent pump price in the Cay-
man Islands was $4.64 per gallon
and in the Dominican Republic,
$3.91 per gallon, both higher than in


this nation. The price in the
Bahamas was only slightly more
than the $3.75 per gallon charged in
Haiti, according to the Nassau Insti-
tute.

Wholesale

The economic think-tank, which
has already locked horns with Mr
Miller over the issue of oil and gas
prices, plus his desire to sign the
Bahamas on to Venezuela's Petro-
Caribe agreement, also pointed out
that the wholesaler mark-up in
Aruba, some $0.66 per gallon, was
much higher than the $0.33 cur-
rently enforced in the Bahamas.
It added that refining costs in
Aruba, and the price charged for
supplying wholesalers of $2.31 per
gallon, also appeared to be much
higher than in the Bahamas.
The Nassau Institute, in analysing
the break down of the cost of fuel in


the Bahamas, said the "Govern-
ment's share of the pie" in relation
to the per gallon price, at $1.06 plus
$0.12 in stamp duty as at August 8,
was'tmuch larger than what was
received by the producer, whole-
saler and distributor.
The $.106 per gallon duty charge
levied in the Bahamas, when com-
pared to other Caribbean countries
using purchasing power parity, was
higher than all countries surveyed
except for the Dominican Republic
and Haiti.
Mr Miller earlier this week told
The Tribune that his ministry was
meeting with the Ministry of
Finance to assess whether the Gov-
ernment could lower the duty rate
from $1.06 per gallon to $0.90. He is
also looking to reduce wholesale
margins by $0.16 to $0.17.
The Nassau Institute said:
"While the mark-up allowed by the
SEE page


n LESLIE Miller


Profit

sharing

needed

to attract

managers


n By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
PROFIT-SHARING could
help entice more Bahamian
hotel workers to join the man-
agerial ranks, industry execu-
tives suggested yesterday, with
August and Christmas identified
as the two periods most affected
by employee absenteeism.
Robert Sands, vice president
of Administration and Exter-
nal Relations, Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company, told The Tri-
bune: "The automatic gratuity
has created a work ethic that is
perhaps not consistent with the
goals of many companies. With
more companies coming on
stream, training and motivating
their staff, that will go away. No
matter what you do, you will
always have a small percentage
of employees that are not per-
forming."
Mr Sands said that while
there are some persons who do
not want to go into tourism
management because they feel
their salary, inclusive of gratu-
ities, would be reduced, there
are many others looking to
break into those ranks.
Going forward, Mr Sands
said it was likelyjhewhole
dynamics of management and
the level of compensation
would change as hotels and
companies in the wider econo-
my looked to attract workers
equipped with the skills, edu-
cation and motivation to help
the organisation achieve its
goals.
He said a number of initia-
tives, such as profit sharing, are
being put in place as a way of
retaining those workers that
bring value to a company and
add to its competitive edge.
Like a number of other
Bahamas-based companies that
have implemented profit-shar-
ing as a way of increasing the


CIBC increases


Kerzner Q3 EPS


target by $0.07


n By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A WALL Street brokerage
has increased its 2005 third
quarter earnings per share
(EPS) estimates for Kerzner
International by $0.07 to $0.28,
just above the company's own
guidance, while maintaining its
'Sector Outperformer' and $71
stock price target on the
Atlantis owner.
CIBC World Markets ana-
lysts, William Schmitt and
David Katz, also increased their
2005 full-year forecast for
Kerzner International upwards
to $2.91 from $2.82, reflecting
the good results and ongoing
trends generated by the com-
pany's Paradise Island opera-
tions.
Kerzner International's man-
agement had previously indi-
cated it was "comfortable" with
the Wall Street consensus EPS
forecast of $0.27 per share fore-
cast for the third quarter.
In addition, the CIBC World
Markets duo also raised their
operating income forecasts for
the third quarter from $31.1 mil-
lion and $33.6 million. Howev-
er, they reduced their full-year
operating income estimates for
Kerzner International to $206.9
million from $207.1 million.
In a report to investors and
clients following Kerzner Inter-
national's second quarter


results, Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz
said: "Similar to the previous
few quarters, Atlantis, Paradise
Island, the company's core
asset, continues to drive overall
performance, coupled with
strong results from the
One&Only Palmilla.
"Despite the loss of a large
one-time group booking for the
2005 second quarter versus last
year, which resulted in a 2.2 per
cent decline in occupancy,
demand remains relatively
healthy at Paradise Island, as
evidenced by a 7.7 per cent
increase in average daily room
rate despite the occupancy per-
centage drop.
"We continue to believe that
the current set-up for the Phase
III development, which will
include a 600-room all-suite
hotel, 500-room condo hotel, as
well as 88 additional Ocean
Club units, should position
Atlantis to capture expected
growth at the property over the
next few years."
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz said
their calculations showed the
Phase III expansion on Paradise
Island had a net present value
of $6 per share, based on 2008
projections.
They added that the expan-
sion of Kerzner International's
Bahamas interests, plus the
Atlantis, The Palm project in
Dubai and proposed hotel/casi-
no near Casablanca in Morocco,
would help diversify the com-


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How 'IT' can help balance your life


Personal Financial

Services Officer
STrainee

The successful candidates should possess the following
qualifications:
* Bachelor's Degree in Banking, AICB or ABIFS Diploma
(or a related field)
* At least 3 or more years banking experience. Previous
experience in portfolio and liability administration
would be an asset.
* Strong Negotiating/Selling skills
* Strong problem solving, leadership and coaching skills
* Demonstrated written and verbal communication skills
* Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)
Responsibilities include:
* Leading the establishment and achievement of team
sales objectives, and related activities to achieve a
high standard of customer care, optimal business
retention, profitable growth and productivity.
* Developing relationships with service partners to
ensure customer satisfaction and efficient operations
of the branch/unit.
* Providing ongoing coaching and development of staff,
ensuring a high level of employee capability and
engagement through focused sales management
routines.
A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) will be commensurate with relevant experience
and qualifications. Persons who applied previously need
not to re-apply.


Please apply before August 22, 2005 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549
Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com


Ic


Trying to balance the
demands of home life and work
life has never been easy. And in
today's high-paced, on-demand
business environment it is
unlikely to get easier any time
soon.
I'm not surprised, therefore,
when busy executives and front-
line managers ask me whether
there is any way for them to
leave the office at a reasonable
hour (or not go in at all over
the weekend), yet still have
secure access to their in-office
network from home. Fortu-
nately, the answer is 'yes'.
In this article I will share with
you several effective solutions
that can help you work from
home and hopefully cut down
on those long hours in the
office.

Web mail
Access to in-office e-mail
from home is by far the most
requested, and arguably the
most important, of all the solu-
tions. Without it, you will
almost certainly be forced to
stay after hours more often than
you wish, waiting for important
e-mails that require your atten-
tion before the next business
day.
Fortunately, the growing
demand for remote access to in-
office e-mail has driven almost
every e-mail solution provider
to include some level of web-
based e-mail access within their
product. Some of the leading


or USB drive before leaving the
office, or have to drive back in
to copy the file or files you
missed.
With the click of an icon you
can be fully connected to the
office network with full access
to all the files you need.
Unlike web mail, which
makes use of a simple web
browser, you will almost cer-
tainly need to get help from
your IT provider in setting up
your VPN connection the first
time. Once you are set, howev-
er, your in-office network is
only a click away.

Remote desktop
There may be times when
you need access to specialised
programs installed on your in-
office PC, which are not or can-
not be installed on your home
PC (usually because of licensing
limitations). With Remote
Desktop technology you can


connect to your in-office PC
and see the files, programs and
resources exactly as you would
if you were sitting at your desk.
The real beauty of Remote
Desktop is that this capability is
built into Microsoft Windows
XP and is available as a free
download for all other versions
of Microsoft Windows.
In most cases, however, you
will need to connect your home
PC to your in-office network
first (usually with a VPN)
before you can use Remote
Desktop.

Check with your IT Provider
The solutions presented here
are but a handful of the growing
number of tools available for
helping more people work from
home. Check with your IT
provider to find out which solu-
tions are best for your network
environment; unless, of course,
you like spending long hours in
the office.

To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
glTwork@providencetg.com

About the Author:
Ian Hepburn is the founder
and managing director of Prov-
idence Technology Group, one
of the leading IT firms in the
Bahamas. Providence Technol-
ogy Group specialises in net-
working solutions, consulting
and advisory services and soft-
ware solutions.


Auditor says Colina fund is 'not compliant'


FROM page one
almost three-fold increase upon
the $1.658 million spent the
year before.
Out of this sum, some
$900,000 in management fees
and $921,000 in brokerage fees
went to the company's parent,
CFG, whose shareholders at
that time were Colina Holdings'
chairman, Emanuel Alexiou;
Colina Holdings then president,
Jimmy Campbell; and fellow
principal Anthony Ferguson.
Meanwhile, The Tribune


understands that CFG believes
a longer timeframe is required
for it to meet the remaining 21
conditions it has yet to comply
with, imposed by the Govern-
menit and financial services reg-
ulators in return for approving
the Imperial Life purchase.
Although CFG has said it is
80 per cent compliant, among
the conditions it still has to meet
are reducing its stake in Colina
Holdings from 66 per cent to,
51 per cent. While willing to do
this, CFG feels it is not unrea-
sonable to seek time, as divest-


ing part of its holding in an
orderly manner and at market
price will take time to organise,
particularly in a market where
selling 15 per cent would take
25 years based on BISX's pre-
vious yearly trading volumes.
And CFG is also seeking more
time for Colinalmperial Insur-
ance Company to undergo a
Dynamic Capital Adequacy Test
(DCAT), given that it is still con-
solidating the former Imperial
Life portfolio on to onelsystem.
CFC is also working on
repaying the loans that were


"upstreamed" to it and related
parties from Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), and is understood
to be unhappy that the regula-
tors have not moved more
rapidly to deal with approving
inter-group payments, such as
management fees due to CFG
from the insurance subsidiary.
However, with the departure
of Mr Campbell and recent
Boaid appointments, CFG is
understood to believe it has
complied with all the regula-
tors' corporate governance
requirements.


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean R
.R B oyal Bank
: g adS.R .o.,"Af oy ank aa of Canada-o
T h. Uon & Globe srnbJol and ROC..aetrademarksf Roy.1 Dank of Canada d aaa


providers, such as Microsoft
Exchange and Lotus Notes, go a
step beyond by providing access
not only to e-mail but also to
calendars, task lists, contacts
and meeting scheduling tools.
If your existing e-mail plat-
form does not support this func-
tionality, it may be time to seri-
ously consider upgrading to one
that does.

Virtual Private Networking
(VPN)
VPN technology allows you
to establish a secure encrypted
'tunnel' from your home PC to
your office network over a stan-
dard Internet link. Once con-
nected, your home PC is able
to access files and resources on
your office network just as if
you were physically in-office.
No longer do you have to
anticipate every file you will
need access to over the week-
end and copy them to a diskette


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













Bahamian union and


FirstCaribbean sign


'Partnership' deal


The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Union (BFSU) has signed
a 'Partnership Agreement' with
FirstCaribbean International
Bank, which sets out guidelines
and principles both sides have
committed to upholding.
"As the chairperson for the
Caribbean Trade Union repre-
senting workers at the 11
unionised territories where the
bank has offices established, it
was indeed a red letter day for
each of the countries and we
were all represented for this his-
torical day.
"Excellence in behaviour,
accountability, teamwork, flex-
ibility, employability, commit-
ment and professionalism are
only some of the characteristics
of this agreement," Theresa
Mortimer, president of the
Bahamas Financial Services
Union (BFSU), said.
Pledging to uphold the prin-
cipals of the agreement and
committing themselves to work-
ing with the management of the
bank to ensure FirstCaribbean
remained the first choice for
financial services in the region,
Ms Mortimer said the partner-
ship agreement holds great sig-
.nificance.
She said most human beings
learn by imitation, and a fairly
heavy burden rested on each
person to demonstrate the part-
nership works. She called the
agreement a collaboration of
words until both parties prac-
tised it.
Dr Kerry Higgs, northern
regional human resources direc-.
tor for FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank, said the past three
years had been marked by sig-
nificant change. She said the
relationship between manage-
ment and the BFSU had grown
from strength to strength.
Dr Higgs said: "The signing
of this partnership agreement
represents for the bank a nat-
ural flow in the course of our


Relationship between bank

management and BFSU 'going

from strength to strength'


relationship with the BFSU.
We have worked together dili-
gently throughout the past year
to pave the way for a strong
partnership, and have no doubt
that the principles of this part-
nership agreement will continue
to build as the foundation gov-
erning all of our interactions."
A number of persons were
on hand for the signing includ-
ing, Harcourt Brown, director
of labour, Ministry of Labour
and Immigration; Dr Kerry
Higgs, northern regional human
resource director, First-


Caribbean International Bank;
Theresa Mortimer, president,
Bahamas Financial Services
Union; Timothy Adderley, sec-
retary general, National Con-
gress of Trade Unions (NCTU);
Robert Farquharson, president,
Bahamas Public Communica-
tions Officers Union
(BCPOU); and Michael Reck-
ley, labour consultant for Indus-
trial Labour Advisor, First-
Caribbean International Bank.
The agreement was signed on
July 4 in Bridgetown, Barba-
dos.


THE MEDICLINIC ATLANTIS
Requires: (1) Full Time Registered Nurse
(2) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
in Primary/Urgent Care Facility
Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.
Attractive Benefit Package
Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
P.O. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 3B


Electronic Equipment
* (1) Calculator
* (1) Microwave
* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower

Cart
Hot Dog Cart with Umbrella


Sewing machines
(1) Fleet Wood Sewing Machine
(1) New Home Sewing Machine

Tents
(1) Canopy Tent (Plastic)


Tables
(2) Wood Tables (Round)
(1) Marble Table (Rectangle)
(1) Roll Away Bar Counter


Machinery Coolers/Freezers
* (1) Food Mixer (1) Two Door White Chest Freezer
* (1) Digital Scale (1) Silver Chest Freezer
* (1) Whirlpool Microwave (2) One Door White Chest Freezers
* (1) Wall TV Stand (1) Blue Coleman Cooler

Vessels Vehicles
* (1) 24' (2002) Chris Craft w/engine (1) 2001 Ford F-250 Truck
* (1) 29' (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece) (1) 1996 Ford Explorer
* (1) 28'Vessel (1) 1997 Dodge Stratus
* (1) 53' (1998) Vessel (Peagasus)
* (1) 125' (1978) Steel Hull Vessel w/1980 50 ton Crane
COOKING UTENSILS POTS, PANS, PLATES, CHAFFING DISHES

DRY CLEANING EQUIPMENT


Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked "Tender" should be submitted to:
Bahamas Development Bank
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
for additional information
Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be
received by August 29, 2005.
The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.


Fi RSTCARIB BEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

Carifbbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

MANAGER, RETAIL CREDIT CONFORMANCE


Qualifications:

* 3 5 years proven experience in retail credit risk
* Bachelors Degree preferred
* Knowledge of regional property market, economic situation and other influences
* Extensive knowledge of Retail Credit Risk Management with working knowledge
of securities

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Ensure implementation of and adherence to the Bank's retail credit and
International Banking policy guidelines
One of a team of managers responsible for carrying out retail Credit Risk
conformance through Risk visits and sampling
o To identify issues which may have a negative impact on the quality of the
lending book as well as making recommendations for changes to ineffective
or inefficient processor procedures.
Carry out sampling of retail and international lendings to ensure compliance
with policy, delegated authorities and terms of CRMD agreement
Involves travel

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before August 29
2005 to:

Jamise Sturrup
Human Resources Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7125
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
the interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only


THE TRIBUNE


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT iN
Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
|www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #13 (5,000 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,344 sq. ft.) white trim lime green Bancroft Lane Bamboo
Town (Appraised Value $147,000.00)
2. Lot #14, Blk. #7 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment Key West St & Balfour Ave.
Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $187,000.00)
3. Lot #171 (100'xl00') with two story building East Street opposite Deveaux Street. (Appraised
Value $300,000.00)
4. Lot #27A (55'x90') with incomplete split level house Boatswain Hill or Bosun Hill (Appraised
Value $139,580.00)
5. Lot #176 (40'x1l3') with 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom house (860 sq. ft.) Old Cedar Street, Yellow
Elder Gardens (Appraised Value $52,160.00)
6. Lot #109 (60'x70') with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms house Craven Street, Ridgeland Park. (Appraised
Value $80,000.00)
7. Vacant lot (18,644 sq. ft.) Situated on the western end of Carmichael Road about 250 feet east
of Unison Road. (Appraised Value $95,000.00)
8. Lot #52 (50'x80') with house (778 sq. ft.) Water Street, Big Pond. (Appraised Value $67,800.00)
9. Property (50'x100') with two houses (660 sq. ft. and 620 sq. ft.) Franklyn Ave. and Tyler Street
off Boyd Road. (Appraised Value $80,200.00)
10. Property (40'x36'xl00') with building Sutton Street next to St. Bed's Church, Kemp Road
(Appraised Value $73,000.00)

ANDROS

11. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 sq. ft.) in the settlement of Fresh Creek, Central Andros.
(Appraised Value $22,000.00)
12. Vacant Lots #14 29, 32, 33, 35 38 (290,400 sq. ft.) -in the settlement of Nicoll's Town, North
Andros. (Appraised Value $364,600.00)
13. Vacant Property 100'150 in the settlement of Pinders, Mangrove Cay, South Andros. (Appraised
Value $22,500.00)

GRAND BAHAMA
14. Lot #267 (12,795 sq. ft.) Caravel Beach Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Appraised
Value $20,000.00)

15. Vacant Lot #26 (115'x200'xl75') unit forty (40) Euville Drive, Lucaya Estates Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (Appraised Value $1,500.00)

ABACO

16. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco. (Appraised Value
$29,916.00)

ELEUTHERA
17. Property 31'xlll' with house Lord Street in the settlement of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera. (Appraised
Value $45,000.00)
18. Vacant Lot #22 (11,659 sq. ft.) in the settlement of North Palmetto Point in an area known as
Skull District, Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $9,000.00)

CAT ISLAND
19. Property 151'x145'x150'x123' with Hardware Building (3,640 sq. ft.) situated 0.4 miles south of
The Bight Airport, New Bight, Cat Island. (Appraised Value $192,000.00)
20. Property with twelve (12) room motel 1.39 acres in the settlement of Arthur's Town, Cat Island.
(Appraised Value $1.3 Million Dollars)

EXUMA

21. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story building 4,160 sq. ft., apartment upstairs and shop downstairs,
George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value $468,000.00)

INAGUA
22. Lot #43 (9,000 sq. ft.) with house Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street. (Appraised Value
$120,000.00)

LONG ISLAND
23. Vacant 10-acre land including 200' of beachfront property Galloway Landing, South of Clarence
Town, Long Island. (Appraised Value $975,000.00 O.N.O)









PAGE B, TURSDY, AGUST18, 005UHEITIBUN


NOTICE S

The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked to visit the
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance Board located in the
Board's Jumbey Village complex on Baillou Hill Road. For further information,
you may contact the Department at telephone number 502-1745:


NAME
FARQUHARSON, Raynaldo
MACKEY, Keyno
MUNROE-SHERMAN, Donnamae
PIERRE, Philome
ROLLE, Eleanor
THOMPSON, Margaret
THOMPSON-BROWN, Teresia
WILSON, Sheffield


ADDRESS
Golden Gates
Nassau Village
Deveaux Street
Shirley Street
#110 Fig Corner South East, Coral Ests.
Hanna Road
Crooked Island Street
Matwell Lane


Cable's digital TV



launch to increase


channels by 400%


CABLE Bahamas will start
rolling out its digital cable tele-
vision package on Eleuthera on
August 22, increasing total
channels available to sub-
scribers by "more than 400 per
cent".
Eleuthera is the first island
to receive Cable Bahamas' dig-
ital cable television service, with
the BISX-listed company set to
begin the sale and distribution
of digital programming, and
issue digital set-top boxes next
week.
David Burrows, Cable
Bahamas' director of market-
ing and pay-per-view, said in a
statement: "There will be more
than a 400 per cent increase in
total channels for this initial dig-
ital roll-out in Eleuthera, with
dozens of channels never before
available and nearly 300 chan-


nels with the full launch in
October."
Mr Burrows said basic cable
TV would be expanded by
more than 20 channels, while
digital cable would also give
Eleutherans optional premium
channel packages, pay-per-view
movies and events, and the NFL
Sunday Ticket package.
Carrie Collins, Cable
Bahamas director of customer
care, said: "Digital cable TV will
bring many new channels and
options to Eleuthera that peo-
ple have been wanting. Our cus-
tomer care staff will help our
subscribers sign-up and get what
they want quickly and easily."
Mrs Collins said the tempo-
rary distribution centres will be
the ideal place for interested
persons to experience digital
cable TV.


"We will have our new digital
cable set-top boxes on display
so people can see all the new
channels and see just how great
the digital cable TV experience
really is," Mrs Collins said.
The main distribution centre
for Eleuthera will be located in
the Destinations Travel office
in Bayfront Plaza in Governor's
Harbour. This will be open for
business on August 22 from
9am to 5pm, Monday through
Friday, and from 9am to .1pm
on Saturdays.
The company will also oper-
ate distribution centres on select
days in Rock Sound (dates and
location to be announced), Har-
bour Island (Arthur's Bakery,
August 24-25) and Spanish
Wells (Computer Concepts,
August 23-24, and Higgs Insur-
ance, August 30-31).


Profit-sharing 'could



entice more people



into management'


FROM page one
attraction of management
jobs, Mr Sands said Baha Mar
was also reviewing a number of
initiatives to help get the best
performance from its staff. It
was looking to create internal
partnerships throug h vaue-
added incentives and a possible
ownership stake.
Mr Sands said profit sharing
would likely become the norm.
He added: "It puts the initia-
tive on the individual. The hard-
er they work and the better the
results, the higher their salary.
It's a tremendous motivational
tool, and progressive companies
are utilising profit sharing as a
way of attracting management
material."
Mr Sands was responding to a
strategy paper on the establish-
ment of a National Productivity
Centre in the Bahamas, which
was produced by the Interna-
tional Labour Organisation
(ILO) and private sector stake-
holders.
The paper said that tipping
in the many tourism industry
jobs had "inadvertently fuelled
a resistance to promotion" to
executive jobs within the sec-
tor, which have a higher base
salary but no tips.
"Within the Bahamas there
is the widespread occurrence
where the customary habit of
tipping in 'front-line' tourism
jobs earns staff with low base
salaries good final earnings,"


Colina
Pricing Information As Of: Financial Advisors Ltd.
ust2005 I
.'.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
rHG -2-n240%CHG -0020,1 YTD 163.11 /YTD % 1&S
s52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily VoL EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.10 0,80 Abaco Markets 0.80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
9.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.25 9.25 0.00 1.452 0.340 8.4 3.68%
6.50 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.50 6.50 0.00 1,320 0.561 0,330 11.6 5.08%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.187 0.010 3.7 1.43%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.126 0.060 11.1 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.062 0.040 18.5 3.48%
8.73 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.73 8.73 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.1 2.75%
2.20 1.80 Colina Holdings 1.99 1.80 -0.19 5,805 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.62 8.62 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.2 4.76%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.24 2.24 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.0 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.50 9.19 Finco 10.49 10.49 0.00 0.670 0.500 15.7 4.77%
9.30 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.4 4.09%
8.98 8.31 Focol 8.91 8.91 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.2 5.61%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.3 4.22%
8.30 8.25 J.S. Johnson 8.27 8.27 0.00 0.561 0.560 14.7 6.77%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.82 5.82 0.00 213 0.122 0.000 47.6 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.o00 2.010 0.760 5.0 7.60%
le-counhte Securities
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.066 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00 %
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 u 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2454 1.1798 Colina Money Market Fund 1.245429*
2.3810 2.0058 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.381 ***
10.4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4855***..
2.2636 2 1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.263627**
1.1246 1,0544 Colina Bond Fund 1.124578**."

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
B2wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
62wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity'
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 10C
- AS AT JUL. 31, 2006/ AS AT JUN 30, 2005
S- AS AT JULY 29, 2005/ "" AS AT JULY 31, 2006/ """ AS AT JULY 31, 2006
2--70Qo I.) IDEL.ITY 242-3r6."64i.


the paper said.
"This has inadvertently
fuelled a resistance to promo-
tion to jobs which carry greater
responsibility, no opportunity
to earn tips, although with a
higher fixed base salary. There
is
no opportunity to enhance
earnings through tipping, and
thus there is the disincentive of
less monetary remuneration."
Addressing the issue of
employee absenteeism and
punctuality, which the paper
said were the biggest concerns
for Bahamian employees, Mr
Sands said the problem was not
a big one for the Cable Beach
Resorts, affecting only a minor-
ity of employees. He added,
however, that perception tends
to be reality and that for the
entire industry, there was
tremendous room for improve-
ment in terms of productivity
and the Bahamian work ethic.

Competition

As the level of competition
increases for new and better
paying jobs, Mr Sands said only
the best and brightest minds will
be selected. The threat of
imported labour into specialist
jobs will become a reality if
Bahamians cannot fill the jobs,
he added, as companies will not
put up with mediocrity.
As has been pointed out in
numerous public/private sector
dialogues, Mr Sands said edu-
cation was the key to changing
the face of the tourism indus-
try. He was satisfied that the
Bahamas was doing what was
needed to realise the necessary
changes in the long-term.
From a public sector stand-
point, he said they were incul-
cating in the minds of potential
employees the tools necessary
for success at a much earlier
stage than in the past. He added
that hotels were also paying
much more attention to attract-
ing the brightest minds for a
particular job.
Like Mr Sands, Jacob Asher,
director of operations at the
British Colonial Hilton, said
there was no shortage of line
staff at the Hilton who wanted
to be in management.
He added that while there
were some who did not want to
be promoted because of the lev-
el of take home pay and the
increased responsibility, that
there were many who wanted
to move up.
However, the problem was a
lack of experience and a lack
of exposure to processes in oth-
er Hilton properties around the
world.
Mr Asher said: "Some of
them think they are ready to
become managers, but they
either don't have enough expe-
rience or exposure at other
hotels in other countries. That
slows down the process to
become managers.
"Those who are willing to go
overseas and get more exposure


and show interest in additional
training, the Hilton University is
on line and we pay for them to
go on line to take courses.
Those who show interest and
invest time at home, they even
get certificates, we are able to
consider for a promotion."
Mr Asher said the problem
of staff wanting to retain their
tips is an issue all over the
world. He said some employ-
ees are unwilling to make a
short-term sacrifice to move
into the ranks of management.
He added: "A head waiter or
captain that is still participating
in the tip pool will probably be
making more money than a
starting assistant restaurant
manager, but maybe six or 12
months later when they become
a manager, they will get a high-
er salary and eventually will
pass the amount of money the
waiter is making. It's a little bit
of being in the right time and
place. In general, they also get
benefits that line staff might not
be making."
While the Hilton offered
numerous opportunities for
education and training, includ-
ing exposure overseas at other
Hilton properties, from a public
sector standpoint, Mr Asher
said there was a need for the
College of the Bahamas' School
of Hospitality and the Univer-
sity of the West Indies Tourism
Centre to put out better cours-
es.
He added that students and
potential employees needed to
come with better knowledge
and a better understanding of
industry practices.
Meanwhile, Mr Asher said
absenteeism and tardiness were
still major problems.
"Too many people are not
even calling in; they don't call
and they don't show up, he said.
"I've noticed it for a few years'
since I've been here. It's mainly
in August. Maybe it's a back to
school issue. Maybe they have
to buy clothes for their kids in
Florida, or they ask for vaca-
tion and extend it and don't
come back on time, or they call
in sick a day or two before their
vacation starts.
"A second time is during
Christmas. There are above-
average no-calls and no-shows.
Maybe it's a lot of Christmas
parties I don't know if it is
because we're busy and they
would have a lot of work to do -
but they don't capitalise on the
opportunity to make more mon-
ey."
Mr Asher said the downturn
in the number of staff during
certain times of the year defi-
nitely had a negative impact on
the quality of service offered to
the hotel's guests.
He added that it also impact-
ed the hotel's profits, with man-
agers having to either bring in
'on-call' people to cover for
those who do not come in, or
having to rely on employees
that are already on property,
which creates overtime situa-
tions.


Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation


Presents its 2nd Nassau



HANDICRAFT "STRAW" TRAINING PROGRAM


Date: Monday, August 22, 2005 Friday, September 2, 2005



Application Form

Name:


Address:


Telephone: Cellular: Fax:____


P.RO. Box Email:_



COST: $100.00
(SPACE IS LIMITED TO 25 PERSONS ONLY)


Contact Pam Deveaux, Antoinette Rolle or Antoinette Bain, BAIC


Telephone: 322-3740 Fax: 322-2123 or 328-6542



A PRODUCT OF

THE HANDICRAFT DEVELOPMENT/MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPT.


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













THTIBNEBUINESSOTHURAY,





.MUS0SEL


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

"..... Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill
overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one
downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom one.
bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is
a wooden porch approximately 8 6 feet wide
on the upper level secured with a wooden
handrail. The garage area has been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom.
Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The
efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft.,
6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below
road level and would flood in a severe hurricane
the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with
one section virtually finished and occupied with
blocks up to window level and floor ready to
be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is
average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the
structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00

HAMILTON'S (LONG ISLAND)
Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft.,
dwelling house of solid concrete floors,
foundation column and belt course with finished
plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is
1,237 sq. ft., utilities available are electricity,
water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00


EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera
Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains
incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room,
dining room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four
plex with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two
storey section consist of a master bedroom,
bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two
bedrooms, one.bath, living, dining, family room
and kitchen downstairs. The single storey
consist of one two bedroom, one bath
apartment and two efficency apartments, land
size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning on flat
land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one
hundred feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road,
turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first
right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second
building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
1 3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
At. 18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12
years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas
Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from
Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under
a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A
concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle
roof and L-shape in design with a total length
of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the
interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is
sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old
single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom,
living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.


Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main
entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left,
then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st
right, house is second on your right with garage.


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)
Crowr Allotment #70, singe storey wood and
concree commercial building approximately
758 sq. ft., about 20 years old.


Appraisal: $71,946.00


NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having
S an area of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated
in the southern district of New Providence
being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville
of Malcolm Road west. This property is
SB spacious and can probably accommodate
another house at the rear. It is landscaped
and enclosed by a wall in front with fence
on the side. The property consist of a single
Story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room
and dining rooms, combined, family room
and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof covered front porch (indented) with floor area
of 1,374 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the
right, the house is the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.


LOT #17237 BAHAMA
SOUND NO. 18
(EXUMA)

All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq.
ft. being lot #17237 of Bahama Sound of Exuma
no. 18 said subdivision is situated on the southern
side of Queen's Highway about 2 miles northwest
of Georgetown. This property comprises of a 25
year old single storey single family residence.

Appraisal: $110,250.00


of Periwinkle


I his property is located on the southeast side
Lane, about 100 ft east of the junction of Periwinkle and Zareba Circle.


LOT #127 WINTON MEDOWS
(NASSAU)

i All that Lot of Land Having an area of 8,000
sq. ft. being lot #127 Knollwood Drive of the
Subdivision known as Winton Meadows,
situated in the eastern district of New
Providence this property is comprised of-a 7
yr old single family residence consisting of
approximately 2,149 sq. ft., of enclosed living
space with 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms,
living, dining room and kitchen. There is 619
....:. sq. ft. dirveway and a 125 sq. ft. patio at the
rear and an enclosed 2 car garage also
included. The land is on a grade and level and
appear to be sufficiently elevated to dissallow
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept with fairly maintained
lawn and low shrubs. Yard is not enclosed.

Appraisal: $275,747.43

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just before Winton Super Value
(Jasmin Drive), then 2nd corner right (Knollwood Road) drive all the way around the curve the
subject property is the 4th property left green trimmed white.


LOT #15 BLOCK #2
WINTON HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land haivng an approximate area
Lof 18,647 sq. ft. being lot # 15, block #2. The
lot is a corner lot and is odd shaped and is
situated at the southeast corner of Culbert's
SHill and Spencer's Close, this property is
V comprised of a 2 storey residence with ground
floor consisting of foyer, living room, dining
room, a guest sutie, family room (equipped
S' island cook top and walk in pantry), breakfast
nook, laundry room, storage room and a 2 car
garage and back pation. The upper floor
consists of the master suite that includes a
bathroom and a walk-in closet. The floor throughout are ceramic tiled except the bedrooms,
This house equipped with central air and burglar bars the house is well laid out and tastefully
decoroated. Also numerous cracks were observed in the southern walls of the bedrooms upstairs.


Appraisal: $502,236.73

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive to corner on the left just before Winton Super Value
(Culbert Hill), travel north on Culbert Hill to the 4th corner right, (Spencer's Close), said house
is #55 on the corner beige trim pink.

BAHAMA PALM SHORES
(ABACO)

Lot #27, Block #26, 80 x 125 being section 4, at Bahama Palm Shore, 6 miles, southwest of Cherokee Sound and 18 miles south of the
township of Marsh Harbour. The land is situated on Ocean View Drive. It is one of the better elevated lots in the subdivision having an excess
of 30ft above sea level, but have no view of the sea, but is about 1,800 feet from the public beach. This property is comprised of a single
storey residence with Bermuda Style Roof containing a large living and dining area split level, with kitchen in the corner. Three bedrooms and
two bathrooms, this building is approximately 7 years old.
Appraisal: $233,000.00


.


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 5B


::














Institute contradicts Miller ongas


Chavez's government offered
favourable financing of oil pur-
chases from Venezuela, but not
better prices. It also questioned
whether the product purchased
under PetroCaribe would be
crude or refined oil.
Analysing the oil price as at
August 8 (see table), the Nas-
sau Institute said the cost of
crude was $1.45 per gallon. The
$1.77 per gallon cost of import-
ed fuel price showed it cost
middlemen the people Mr
Miller wanted to cut out
through PetroCaribe only
incurred $0.32 per gallon in
costs to buy crude, refine it and
ship it to Nassau.


NOTICEDOESALE


Thel Highl Vistal Managementl hereafteri d'the
CompanyE)Dinvitesloffers[forithelDpurchaseDoflALL
THATD Unit0 Numberl 60 ofl Thel Highl Vista
CondominiumsOComplexlsituateDonlEasternmRoad
inD theD Eastern0 Districtl off thel Islandl off New
Providence beingD aD twol bedroom/onel bath
condominiumln unit together withlALL THAT
1/24thD shareD inl theD commonD propertyD n off the
CondominiumiDComplex.

TheD CompanyD makesD noD representationsD or
warranties0withlrespect0toDthelstateloflrepairllof
thelbuilding0situateothereon.

TheD CompanyD wiliD sellD underD Powerl ofD Sale
containedlinlalDeclaration0offCondominiumlof
HighlVistalCondominiumlcomplexldated0thel26th
dayloflOctober,lA.D.,19780and0recordedlinflVolume
30090atlpagesD4570tol483

TERMS: Tenlpercentl(10%)DoffthefpurchaseO
pricelatftheltimefoffcontractlandDthelo
balancelupon0completionOwithinDl
Thirtyl (30)0 daysD ofl contract.

This saleD isl subjectO toO al reserveD price.0 The
CompanyOreserves0theOrightltolrejeetanyDaidlDall
offers.

InterestedD personsD mayo submitD written offers
addressedDtolAttorneylS.DSmith,DP.O.OBoxlN-272,
Nassau,DBahamasDto0belreceived[nollaterdthanDthe
closeD ofdbusinessD onl the04thl dayl ofD September,
A.D.,D2005.


Client Relationship
Manager
The Job
As a Client Relationship Manager you will manage
a portfolio of high-value business clients and will
be responsible for developing new business and
ensuring client satisfaction to exceed sales goals
in both Nassau and the Family Islands. Your role
is to analyze the financial and operating strategies
of clients to recommend appropriate financial
products and services to meet their needs. You
will ensure that clients maintain a favourable
perception of the bank for top-of-mind awareness
when product needs arise.
Required Skills
The Client Relationship Manager is expected to
take a leadership role in community activities.
This position requires a thorough understanding
of business financial statements and credit analysis,
as well as a proven track record in sales, significant
marketing presentation skills and advanced
customer relation skills. Candidates must have
proven capabilities in the areas of communication,
planning and organizing, closing sales, and
relationship building.
This is a client-focused and achievement-oriented
position. Proficiency in the use of Microsoft Office
is required. Only applicants with a minimum 2
years commercial credit lending experience will
be considered.
We offer an attractive compensation package with
outstanding career advancement opportunities.
And we promote a healthy work/life balance
through special benefits and programmes.
Please apply by August 22, 2005 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com


FROM page one
Government to distributors and
dealers here exceeds that in
most of the countries surveyed
(Cayman did not have those
numbers available), it can be
argued that the cost of living
and business operating costs are
higher in the Bahamas than in
the other responding countries
(except Cayman and Aruba),
so higher mark ups are neces-
sary."
The think-tank again criti-
cised Mr Miller's attempts to
sign the Bahamas on to the
PetroCaribe initiative, arguing
that the deal proposed by Hugo


controls and a moratorium on
gas stations, restricting the num-
ber of distributors to Shell, Esso
and Texaco.
It added that it was difficult
for oil industry outsiders to
determine what a "fair mark-
up" for oil producers, distribu-
tors and retailers was, and said:
"With any business, the mar-
gins between the producer, the
wholesaler and the retailer must
cover their costs, and ,of course,
include a profit.
"There are industry norms
that have been established over
many years that are accepted
by creditors and governments
alike all over the world. But, it
appears Mr Miller thinks he can
be successful with micro-
managing the oil industry in
spite of all the potential danger
in trying to manipulate a very
volatile (pun intended) indus-
try.
"If the Government goes
down this road, there will be no
stopping them. They will see
their way clear to micromanage
all economic sectors, with all
the opportunities for graft and
patronage that will imply.
"The world's market pricing
mechanisms must be left intact.
Any attempt at government
intervention is a fool's game
that ultimately leads to more
and more government control,
and eventually economic col-
lapse."
Instead, the Nassau Institute


THE MEDICLINIC CABLE BEACH
Requires: (1) Full Time Registered Nurse
(2) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
in Primary/Urgent Care Facility

Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.

Attractive Benefit Package

Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
RO. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas







Lot Number 8, Fox Hill Creek

Subdivision, Eastern District

of New Providence Being sold

pursuant to Power of Sale

Mortgage dated April 14,2003





Appraised value


$570,000



Interested parties, please submit

Bids to

British American

Insurance Co. Ltd.,



P.O.Box N-4815

Telephone 461-1037


urged the Government to work
"more closely" with the oil com-
panies to see where savings
could be acheived and energy
costs reduced, acknowledging
that prices at the pumps were
continuing to rise.

Change

It added: "As emerging
economies like China and India
demand more energy, experts
suggest that the supplies will


1 Barrel = 42 gallons
Crude Price Per Barrel
Crude Price Per Gallon

Crude Purchase
Crude to refine to Nassau
CIF Derived from average
selling price and working the
numbers backward to CIF
Bank Exchange, Stamp Duty,
Service Charge & Wharfage 4.4%
of CIF
Sub Total
Stamp Tax 7% of CIF
Sub Total
Duty
Landed Cost
Distributor
Sub Total
Dealer -...........
Selling Price 8/8/05

Distributor Mark Up
Distributor Margin
Dealer Mark Up
Dealer Margin

'Essb selling price
Texaco selling price
Shell selling price
Average selling price


diminish and other sources of
energy will be needed.
"In light of this, Mr Miller's
time night be better spent try-i
ing to bring competition into,
the market place, promoting
conservation efforts and alter-
native energy sources.
"The elimination of duty on
solar panels was a good start.
Ideas like car pooling, buying
more fuel efficient and, there-
fore, smaller vehicles and the
like also deserve considera-
tion."


$61.00
1.452380952

$ 1.45
$ 0.32

$ 1.77

$ 0.08
$ 1.85
$ 0.12
$ 1.97
$ 1.06
$ 3.03
$ 0.33
$ 3.36
-.-.- $-o$0 4.
$ 3.80

10.8846948
8.680144564
14.5129264
11.57352609

$ 3.83
$ 3.85
$3.72
$3.80


A LEADING SECURITY FIRM
IS SEEKING



ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

Be between the ages or 18-45 years.
Must be well-groomed and a good performer.
Must have the legal right to work in the
Bahamas
5 No history of Felony Convictions
Ability to read, comprehend, and perform
written orders, understands policies,
procedures, and instructions.
Must have a High School Diploma or
equivalent.
Positive attitude, great people skills, and
career-oriented. Ability to perform as a team
player and act independently.
5 Be able to pass a background investigation
and drug screening.
Must be willing to work nights, weekends,
holiday and overtime.

Interested persons can contact 325-6170/4
between the hours of 9a.m. 5p.m., Mon. -
Fri.


"This is obviously a very effi-
cient process, and if the esti-
mates here are representative,
this certainly would not indi-
cate that the middlemen are rip-
ping the consumer off," the
Nassau Institute said.

Delivery

"A mark-up of $0.32 per gal-
lon of gasoline to process from
crude oil to delivery at Clifton
Pier cannot be portrayed as
excessive, nor can it be consid-
ered gouging."
And it added: "Here is a cost
list supplied by an expert in the
field: Crude oil price; crude
transport, storage and ship-
ment to the refinery; refining
costs; refined product storage;
refined products broker fee;
marine loading terminal cost;
marine transport cost, Nassau
storage terminal costs; truck-
ing costs; sales point costs, sales
point profit and government
taxes.
"Of course, there is a margin
of error with these calculations,
but if the middlemen charged
a dollar per gallon to get the
product from crude to the port
here in Nassau, would that be
excessive when considering the
process involved?"
The Nassau Institute charged
that the Government had "dis-
torted" the Bahamian fuel mar-
ket "for decades" through price


uovt uuty Gov't Tax on Local Distributor Gas Station Price at Tank
Country Type of Fuel Per Gallon US$ Total Invoice Gross Mark Up US: Gross Mark Up US Per Gal US$
Aruba. Unleaded 2.31* 70.00% $0.66 $0.33 $3.30
Aruba Diesel 2.31* 70.00% $0.66 $0.33 $2.99
Bahamas, The Unleaded Premium $1.06 7.00% $0.33 $0.44 $3.83
Bahamas, The Diesel $0.25 + 27.5% 7.00% $0.18 $0.19 $3.05
Cayman Islands Unleaded $0.63 0.00% $4.64
Cayman Islands Diesel $0.75 0.00% $4,14
Dominican Republic Unleaded Regular $1.10 0.00% $0.08 $0.25 $3.51
Dominican Republic Unleaded Premium $1.32 0.00% $0.13 $0.27 $3.91
Dominican Republic Diesel Regular $0.37 0.00% $0.06 $0.19 $2.67
Dominican Republic Diesel Premium $0.46 0.00% $0.09 $0.16 $2.76
Haiti Unleaded Regular $1.25586** 0.00% $0.2398*** $0.20 $3.63
Haiti Unleaded Premium $1.4076** 0.00% $0.2878*** $0.24 $3.75
Haiti Diesel $0.2278** 0.00% $0.2258*** $0.16 $2.40
Venezuela Unleaded $0.012


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
Registred traaematk of Royal Bank of Canada
'" The Lon & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of
Royal Bank of Canada


- RBC
Royal Bank
. of Canada


~""""II~""~~""~""""""~~"~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005













Tourism industry aims to


boost high school curriculum


* FRANK Comito, executive vice-president, Bahamas Hotel
Association; Sharon Ferguson, curriculum officer, Department
of Education; Stuart Bowe, vice-president, Atlantis; Sammy
Gardiner, senior director, Ministry of Tourism; Beverley Saun-
ders, vice-president of training, Atlantis; and Veronica Owens,
parliamentary secretary, Ministry of Education.


Over 40 educators and
tourism industry professionals
were participating in a 'Core
Curriculum Workshop' this
week at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort to review and update
the hospitality programme and
subject-related curriculum in
the nation's public high
schools.
The effort is part of the ongo-
ing activities of the Tourism
Task Force on Education,
which is a cooperative effort
between the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA), the Min-
istry of Tourism and the Min-
istry of Education, established
18 months ago.
"Updating and revising the
hospitality curriculum offered
by the Ministry of Education is
a key goal of the task force"
according to Beverley Saunders,
vice-president of organisation


Vacant Lot No. 5 Block 18 Section B 9,600 sq. ft. on Avacado Drive in Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision in North Eleuthera.

Property is close to Eleuthera Main Highway with available utilities; electricity, city water and
telephone.














For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: The Commercial Credit
Collection Unit at: Phone: 356-1686 or 356-1608, Nassau
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us by no.later than September 30 2005
Financing available for qualified purchaser

-


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business?


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America and other international centres, the International Advisory
Group, a division of RBC Financial Group, is second to none. We have
developed a special rapport with our Portuguese and Spanish-speaking
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If you have exemplary skills in another language and a portfolio in
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Tel: (345) 814-8145
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Opportunities in Cayman and The Bahamas

Please respond by August 31st, 2005.


RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd.
RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd., is a member company under RBC Investments.
RBC Dominion Securifies (Global) Ltd., and Royal Bank of Canada are separate | R 3BC
corporate entities which are affiliated. Investment Advisors are employees of RBC investments
Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd. Member CIPf. Trademark of Royal Bank of
Canada. RBC Investments is a registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used Dominion Securities .
under licence. Copyright 2003. All rights reserved.


development and training for
Atlantis, who co-chairs the task
force along with BHA execu-
tive vice-president, Frank Comi-
to.
"The industry's needs have
changed dramatically in recent
years and the viable career
alternatives have broadened
considerably. We must become
vigilant in educating students
and parents on what tourism
has to offer as we grow this
globally competitive industry
that serves as the foundation of
economic vitality for the
nation", according to Ms Saun-
ders.
"We are so pleased that the
Ministry of Education has
embraced this partnership and
believe it will have consider-
able impact on getting rid of
the stigmas and mispercep-
tions of the industry. This will
also serve to better prepare
our students to compete in a
technically advancing global
village"

Pledge

At Monday's opening session
for the week-long workshop
Veronica Owens, parliamentary
secretary for the Ministry of
Education, pledged the Min-
istry's ongoing commitment to
work with industry. "This is so
important to education and to
our nation" she stated while
encouraging educators to "draw
from the week's exercise to
build a stronger and more rele-
vant curriculum".
Workshop participants were
given an overview of the exist-
ing curriculum by Faye Bascom,
Education Officer responsible
for Business and Computer
Studies and Sharon Ferguson,
Education Officer for the Hos-
pitality and Home Economics
Program. Stuart Bowe, Vice
President for the Royal Tow-
ers at Atlantis, provided an
overview of industry's needs
and expectations..
'The Mipistry,.dT Tourism's
Senior director for education
and training, Sammy Gardiner,
underscored the importance of
the workshop.
"We are in the tourism busi-
ness for four principal reasons:
to earn foreign exchange; to cre-
ate employment; to ensure the
broadest distribution of income
from tourism, and to Bahami-
anide the tourism industry as
far as possible."
"Our success in achieving
those objectives is clearly tied to
how well we prepare our people
to take advantage of the oppor-
tunities which the industry pre-
sents" he added. "The number
one industry needs number one
people.."


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAGE 7B


www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs.


PUBLIC MEETING
on
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited Application to increase its Monthly
Rates/Prices For Telephone Lines

The PUC will hold a PUBLIC MEETING on the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company's application to increase the
monthly rates/prices for telephone lines on Thursday 18 August,
2005 from 6-8 pm in FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA at PRO-
CATHEDRAL OF CHRIST THE KING, East Atlantic Dr., and
Pioneers Way.


The purpose of the public meeting will be to afford
consumers and interested parties the opportunity to ask questions
or make oral comments on the application.


Copies of the Commission's Public consultation document on
BTC's applications can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House, 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
or downloaded from the Commission's website at


-


THE TRIBUNE


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)


PANAX TRADING COMPANY LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137(8) of The
International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000 PANAX
TRADING COMPANY LIMITED. has been completed, a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 12th day of July, 2005.

Alexandre Cestari Ruozzi
Liquidator






is searching for an Executive Director
to join our organization.


The applicant must have a Masters
Degree with a concentration in Nonprofit
Management and a minimum of three or
more years of progressively responsible
experience managing a not for profit
organization. Salary commensurate with
experience.


Only qualified applicants need apply.


Resumes should be submitted to
infoq a @fn)jendsofth eenvironment. or.
by Wednesday August 31 2005.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)


GREEN IVY CORPORATION
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137(8) of The
International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution
of GREEN IVY CORPORATION, has been completed, a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
the 25th day of July, 2005.

Nicholas Juan Alonso
Liquidator








PAGE B, TURSDY, AGUST18, 005UHEITIBUN


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



PEPPERCORN INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of PEPPERCORN INC., has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



ASPHALT VALLEY INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of ASPHALT VALLEY INC., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


SHANTI VILLAGE INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of SHANTI VILLAGE INC., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


Colina appoints chairman



for its audit committee


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


GALLAWAY INVESTMENTS LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of GALLAWAY INVESTMENT LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


ings Bahamas."
A senior practicing member
of the accounting profession in
the Bahamas with over 40 years
experience, Mr Robertson has
many professional 'firsts' to his
credit. He was: the first Bahami-
an to qualify as a chartered
accountant in the Bahamas, cre-
ated the first Bahamian firm of
chartered accountants (Mac-
gregor Robertson & Co.), and
was a founder member of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants (BICA).
From 1992 to 1994, Mr
Robertson served on a pro
bono basis as chairman of the
Board of Bahamasair Holdings,
and from 1998 to 2001 served
as chairman of the Bahamas
Development Bank.


Legal Notice



NOTICE

WILLSTAR LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
WILLSTAR LIMITED is in dissolution, as of August 15th,
2005.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.


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Kerzner

target


increase

FROM page one
would help diversify the com-
pany's revenue streams and
make it less reliant on Paradise
Island.
Although budget increases
had been announced for a num-
ber of the projects, Mr Schmitt
and Mr Katz said these would
"eventually bring Kerzner Inter-
national to the next level" once
they came to fruition.
"Overall, we remain positive
on the future for Kerzner Inter-
national, as the company con-
tinues to strategically grow Par-
adise Island while selectively
pursuing both domestic and
international growth opportu-
nities," the CIBC World Mar-
kets analysts said.
"As such, our thesis of long-
term growth potential through
significant expansion projects
remains intact."
Reflecting that analysis, Mr
Schmitt and Mr Katz raised
their 2006 EPS and operating
income forecasts for Kerzner
International to $3.21 and
$220.8 million respectively, as
opposed to earlier estimates of
$3.13 and $217.7 million.
Kerzner International
incurred $1.4 million in pre-
opening expenses associated
with the new Marina Village at
Atlantis.


COLINA Holdings (Bahamas)
has named Deloitte and
Touche's former managing part-
ner for the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, Macgregor Robert-
son, as chairman of its audit
committee. He is already a
director of Colina Holdings.
Emanuel Alexiou, Colina
Holdings chairman, said the
audit committee would help the
company's Board fulfill its over-
sight responsibilities by pro-
tecting the integrity of financial
information disseminated to
shareholders.
Mr Alexiou said: "Mr
Robertson has a sterling pro-
fessional reputation and we
consider ourselves fortunate
to have his professional skills
as a resource for Colina Hold-


iankd on


to fimadl-



literacy at


1 "Copyrighted Material
SSyndicated Content %
Available from Commercial News Providers"


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



BRAMPTON INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of BRAMPTON INC., has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


FIRSTCARIB BEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbeann Pride, International Strengtlh. Your FinanrciaIl Partner

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for

INTERNATIONAL WEALTH MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR

BAHAMAS and TURKS & CAICOS, NASSAU
Job Profile

* Conduct initial strategic review for the Nassau International Banking Centre (IBC) and
be accountable for implementation of agreed strategy
* Lead development of the bank's international wealth management offering in Bahamas
and Turks & Caicos Islands (TCI), including transformation of existing international
business by migrating it towards a broader international wealth management offering
and business model
* Grow international mortgage business through deployment of disciplined sales
management
* Ensure that client service meets highest standards by motivating and developing a
team of 25
* Responsible for management and growth of all segments of International offering,
overall running of the IBC and serving as member of the bank's International
Management Team

Qualifications:

* At least 7 years of proven experience in the wealth management sector
* In-depth experience in International Banking, preferably from more than one offshore
jurisdiction
Knowledge of corporate sector (captives, fund managers, trusts and trading companies)
* Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
Superior ability to influence, lead and motivate teams
* Extensive knowledge of offshore products and services
* Clear understanding of operational and lending processes
* Strategy development and implementation
* Experience in development and delivery of wealth management offering
* Firm grasp of KYC, AML and state-of-the-art risk and control management in banking

If you are interested:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before August 31 2005
to:

Jamise Sturrup
Human Resources Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7125
Nassau, Bahamas
Or email: jamise.sturrup@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their
interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



VELLAS HOLDINGS INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, the
dissolution of VELLAS HOLDINGS INC., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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goals in

matches


tr In t lnr Il


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


I HURSDAY, AUGUST 1 ..









PAGE OB, THURSDAY, AUGU ST 18, 2005 TRIiI BUNE S PORTS


I BAHAMAS IAAF World Championship team members Troy McIntosh and Tamicka Clarke on [
their return to Nassau from Helsinki yesterday. The Bahamas finished 13th overall in the event out of
196 nations competing. See story page one.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Tennis association searches



for property on Eleuthera


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE newly formed
Eleuthera Tennis Association
(ETA) is hoping to take the
sport to a higher level.
The first thing on the ETA's
agenda is to locate property
on the island where tennis
courts can be built.
The ETA's agenda has
events planned until Novem-
ber, but the association is hop-
ing to have competition


Bid to take sport

to a higher level


throughout the year.
However, according to new-
ly appointed public relations
officer Kingsley Bethel the
limited number of tennis
courts available to the gener-


al public on the island has
resulted in a decrease in the
interest of the younger play-
ers.
Bethel stated that, in order
for the association to achieve


the success from the pro- Only two courts are made
grammes slated, more courts available to us.
will have to be made avail- "With the high interest lev-
able. el. the two courts aren't suffhix
He said: "We havehun- c 'ent, that's why: we. need to
dreds of campers attend our build more: The talent is in
local tennis camps, but what Eleuthera, even the interest
good is holding the camp only level, but we can't only have
in the summer and after the these two things, we need the
break is over the interest is other component."
gone? The newly formed associa-
"We need to build more tion is being led by president
-tennis courts on Eleuthera. Christopher Evans, and
Mind we have tennis courts, Tracey Knowles, as first vice
but they are all private courts. president.


Another members of the
ETA's executive board are
Susan Culmer, secretary; Sele-
na. Thompson, assistant sec-
ietary;, e~vin Copper, trea-
surer; Austin Knowles Jr.,
assistant treasurer.
The association has sched-
uled several tournaments
which will host top junior and
senior tennis players from
New Providence and Grand
Bahama.
These tournaments are set
for late November.


Cycling classic



offers 'Tour De



New Providence'

By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
LOCAL cyclists are getting into gear for a great showing at
the ninth annual Bertram 'Cowboy' Musgrove memorial
cycling classic.
The race, which is being dubbed the 'Tour De New Provi-
dence,' will take place this coming Saturday and Sunday at the
Coral Harbour roundabout.
Saturday morning's hike is mapped out for more
than 10 miles for juniors and at least 15 to 17 miles for,
seniors.

Lap
On that morning, junior cyclists are expected to ride one lap
starting from the Coral Harbour Roundabout, through to
the first roundabout by the airport, back through to the
airport heading into Adelaide, Clifton Pier, Lyford Cay, Old
Fort Bay, before returning back to the Coral Habour round-
about.
The senior men and women will ride the course mapped out
for the junior cyclists twice.
Sunday's race will start from Coral Habour, but will have the
junior cyclists riding five laps and the seniors seven.
The race, which is held every year in honour of the leg-
endary cyclist, is expected to attract some international com-
petitors from New York and Florida.
Among the new riders will be cyclists from Grand Bahama
and Eleuthera.
So far, more than 15 junior riders and 30 senior athletes
have confirmed their participation in the two day event.
The events are set up in three stages, two races and a time
trial.
The time trial is set for that Sunday evening at the Coral
Harbour roundabout.
The divisions for the meet are senior I, masters 40 and
over, senior II cyclists, open women, men over 18 years old,
junior boys and girls 17 and under, junior boys and girls 14 and
under and junior boys and girls 11 and under.
Prizes will be given to the first four overall winners and first
three finishers in the each category.
All races start at 7am, the time trial, which will be held late
Sunday evening will start at 5pm.


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PAGE 10B, THURSUAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS





I I ILr I MIlDoUIC


S.The Bahamas
Telecommunications
Company Limited


Bahamian


Sprint


Queen


Tonique Williams-Darling
on winning the Women's
400 metres at the IAAF
World Championships!


Send your Congratulatory


Message to


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ORKING


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a g a


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


MEMBERS of the Bahamas IAAF World Championship delegation and permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture Harrison Thompson (second left) pose during their press conference yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)







i1sink I ero es


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SEVEN of the 17 member
track and field team that com-
peted in the 10th World Cham-
pionships returned home yes-
terday evening.
Among those returning to
Nassau were Tamicka Clarke,
Savetheda Fynes, Nathaniel
McKinney, Shandria Brown
and Derrick Atkins.
These athletes, who now live
and train in the United
States, are taking a couple of
days rest before returning to
training.
For Shandria Brown, a trip
to her native land Exuma is on
her agenda before heading back
to college. Brown along with
Andrae Williams, Aaron Cleare
and Derrick Atkins will leave
for college on Sunday morning.

Flight
Home based athletes like
Troy McIntosh and Phillipa
Arnett-Willie were also on the
flight that brought back BAAA
president Mike Sands, Frank
Rahming, Tyronne Burrows
and team manager Ralph McK-
inney.
Although the athletes weren't
greeted by the large crowd and
the sounds of the cowbells and
goatskin drums, the Minister of
Youth Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom reminded them
that the celebration for their job
well done will be a gigantic one


Call for public to

applaud efforts


of athletes


that will be felt through the
entire chain of islands.
The Bahamas, who had their
best showing at the World
Championships, claimed a gold
and a silver medal.
The gold medal was won by
Olympic champion and world
leader in the 400m Tonique
Williams-Darling, with the silver
going to the men's 1600m relay
team comprised of McKinney,
McIntosh, Avard Moncur,
Chris Brown and Andrae
Williams.
Despite having a population
of a little over 300,000, the
Bahamas finished up in 13th
place ahead of countries like
Canada and Great Britain.
Besides the overall finishing,
10 of the 17 athletes were able
to make it through to the finals
in their respective events.
Out of the 10 athletes that
advanced through to the finals,
three finished up in the fourth
place and two in the ninth and
10th positions.
According to Nathaniel McK-
inney, the achievements of the


team might go unheard of, but
credit should be given to every-
one who sacrificed many days
for hard work.
McKinney said: "We did
extremely well when you look
at countries like India and
Canada.
"So I am asking the public to
credit the entire team, not just
the persons who were able to
medal. Giving credit where it is
due, I believe we did an excel-
lent job."
McKinney asked the general
public to applaud the efforts of
him and his teammates, stating
that better days are ahead for
the team.
"Being an athlete you strug-
gle so hard, especially finan-
cially, but this fact is never real-
ly pointed out by persons in the
public," he said.
"The negative criticisms are
going to come, no matter how
good the person or team per-
forms."
"But credit should be given
to everyone, not only the per-
sons who won medals."


* MEN'S 4 x 400 relay team member Nathaniel McKinney.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


RGER


S-i'm lovin' f


I - - I -- --I I I









THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


SECTION


Obituaries, Sermon's,


Church Activities, Awards


Reaction


to


the issue of


whether ministers are




'exploiting Bahamians'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
"...men of corrupt minds
and destitute of the truth, who
suppose that godliness is a
means of gain. From such
withdraw yourself."
(1 Timothy).
OVER the weekend we
received many and varied
comments about the article
that appeared in Religion on
August 11.
Some were positive, others
were cautionary.
One person said it was an
offence to attack God's
anointed. It was pointed out to
this person that the writer of
the article expressed no opin-
ion. He was only recording


"It seems that many young,
and not so young people, are
fed up with some of the
churches and pastors in the
Bahamas. One only has to
listen to the current opinion
on the streets."


what had been brought to his
attention.
The issue of whether some
ministers are exploiting
Bahamians seems to be a top-
ical issue in our nation at this
time.


A friend of mine told me
about her maid, who said she
could not afford to go to
church, because it was too
expensive. She claimed she
needed a new hat, dress,
shoes, plus enough for the col-


lection plate. She claimed that
her pastor said that Christians
should dress and look pros-
perous, because they are chil-
dren of the king.
Some people are upset,
about the sale of "holy water"
by an apostle, who claims that
the holy water heals those
who use it.
"I have a problem with that,
when since we supposed to
sell holy water blessed by a
minister during a service?" a
friend asked.
My friend had attended one
of the holy water services. She
bought a bottle of the water
for her father, who was sick
at home, to drink. "I have not
seen any changes in him since
he drank it," she said.


Thousands flock to




'miracle' water services


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
DESPITE the controversy surrounding
Prophet Lawrence Rolle's "miracle" water,
thousands of Christians turned out to the
Golden Gates Assembly Church between
Thursday, August 11 and Saturday, August
13, to receive "healing" for myriad illness-
es and "deliverance" from various prob-
lems.
According to Bishop Ros Davis, pastor of
Golden Gates Assembly, organisers were
very pleased with the turnout during the
services. There were capacity crowds each
night. The church seats approximately 3,000
persons.
People are charged $1 for the water which
is "blessed" by Prophet Rolle. After work-
ers are paid, the remaining money is donat-
ed to charity. A collection taken during the
service is kept by the church, Golden Gates
Assembly.

Leaders
While some religious leaders have out-
wardly bashed this idea of "miracle" water,
others say that they have no comment on
the situation.
Bishop Davis, however, is one of the few
pastors who has openly supported Bishop
Lawrence Rolle's newest mission, to the
point where he volunteered his own church
for the revival-type services.
"I had a prophecy that God would get
deliverance to us, his people, the people
who are seeking Him. And I felt that if it
came to me it would not just be for our
church, but for every Christian. So when I
heard about what Prophet Rolle was doing
it resonated with my spirit," Bishop Davis
explains.
But not everyone is as willing to partner


with Bishop Lawrence Rolle, at least until
the claims of "healing and wellness" are
substantiated.
There has been an amazing claim of a
man being raised from the dead after his
family sprinkled the water on his corpse
which was already at a local mortuary.
There are also claims that the water has
cured AIDS patients, healed the blind and
deaf and miraculously brought about the
payment of overdue mortgages.


At last Thursday's service a woman
claimed that her paralysis was healed after
she sprinkled the water around her waist.
Another woman testified that after sprin-
kling a few drops around her home and
praying, she saw a turnaround in her non-
chalant husband. In a third testimony, the
water was reportedly sprinkled around a
small apartment and the following day the
SEE page two


"And then I read in The
Tribune where Apostle Rolle
was quoted as saying the mon-
ey from the sale of the water,
would only be used to help
the poor. Well I have heard
and seen it all now, in my 62
years of living, when are we
going to have a cook-out sell-
ing holy water?" she asked.
"There are many ways we
can raise funds for the poor
other than selling something
that is supposed to be holy,"
she continued. "Let some of
those ministers give a portion
of their money to help the
poor.

Disappointed
"And I am disappointed in
what, supposed to be a
respectable church to allow
someone to make it a 'pop-
pyshow'," she exclaimed,
throwing her hands in the air.
-M~y-Qoat 's next.?" she
asked in disbelief.
While I was typing this arti-
cle, a television programme,
"Unsolved Mysteries", was on
in the background. The pre-
senter was reporting about the
miracles at Lourdes. The one
consistentfeature in the doc-
umentary was. that a miracle
had to be authenticated. So
when we checked out the
claims of Apostle Rolle as
reported in the newspapers
and on the radio, the question
still remains unanswered: Who
authenticated the healings and
miracles? If this question can-
not be answered by the


authorities, then we, in this
country leave ourselves open
to every Tom, Dick or Harry
who claims that he or she has
"special powers".
A few weeks ago NBC tele-
vision.reported on the exces-
sive lifestyle of a televange-
lists who was living lavishly,
spending $10,800 for one night
in a hotel's presidential suite,
giving away a thousand dol-
lar tips and vacationing in
exotic places all at the
expense of his followers.
According to a reliable source
similar practices are prevalent
in the Bahamas among many
local pastors and their fami-
lies.
We were told about a cer-
tain man who, with his cousin,
had migrated from a Family
Island to Nassau to open a
church, because, it was
explained, running a church
"is big business in the city".
The man in question is now
rich.,
It seems that many young,
and not so young people, are
fed up with some of the
churches and pastors in the
Bahamas. One only has to lis-
ten to the current opinion on
the streets. The fear is that
average people are being tak-
en advantage of and the only
ones benefiting are those who
control the accounts of these
churches.
A young man, who belongs.
to one of the more traditional
churches, claims that pastor.
and priests are too busy td
SEE page two


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The Tribune


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PAGEuR 20 TUA AS
-ru V6S


* THOUSANDS of Christians turned out to the Golden Gates Assembly Church





Thousands flock





to 'miracle'




water services


FROM page. one

woman learned that she had been approved for a
three-bedroom two-bathroom home. For anoth-
er person, the water was sprinkled on car keys and
she later received a bill of sale for a $27,000 Mer-
cedes Benz.
Tribune Religion spoke with a religious leader
who wanted to be referred to only as an "Angli-
can churchman". In his view, persons should not
form an opinion about the validity of the "mira-
cle" water until those involved have provided
"sufficient, evidence" to say that the "miracle"
water is authentic.
"I've read reports, but to form a personal opin-
ion, you need more information, more investi-
gation," he told Tribune Religion. "But there is a
possibility that this idea of miracles being trans-
ferred through inanimate objects could be true in
this case because the New Testament records
where Paul used handkerchiefs. Acts 19:11-12
states: 'And God wrought special miracles by the
hands of Paul: So that from his body were brought
unto the sick handkerchiefs or aprons, and the dis-
eases departed from them, and the evil spirits
went out of them'."
Though he admits that there is a chance that
persons may be experiencing healing as a result of
this "miracle" water, he believes that the public
should be wary of believing claims that have not
been verified by doctors. "We need more infor-
mation, more documentation, more medical evi-
dence because you have to be very careful with
these things. You have to be careful because you
have people who are only out to use religion as a
gimmick," he warns.
Asked if any of these testimonies have been
medically verified, Bishop Davis responds: "I
simply believe. If someone says that they were
blind and now they can see, that is enough for me.


What are we trying to prove by going to the doc-
tors. If it is authentic then in time we will know."
Bishop Davis says that he remains "dogmatic"
in his position, and is not bothered by the wave of
skepticism, since every miracle in the Bible was at
some point been questioned by someone, even
down to the resurrection of Christ.
Yet he maintains that all persons have the right
to believe what they want to believe. But none, he
adds, has the right to question another person's
testimony.
Christians internationally have been exposed to
prayer cloths that proMtise to bring about a
desired result; holy oil; anointed dollar bills; mir-
acle pictures of Jesus; rubber bands to help stretch
their faith, anointed water; miracle oil among
others. They promise miracles healing and finan-
cial blessings to those who believes.
So this idea of miracle water is nothing new.
According to Bishop Davis, water is the symbol
of the Holy Spirit throughout the Bible. When
Naman was sick, God sent the prophet with a
command for Naman to wash in the Jordan river
seven times.
Also, in the time of Jesus' ministry, it was a cus-
tom for the angel of the Lord to trouble a pool
and persons who jumped in would be cured. Jesus
also spat in dirt and made clay which he used to
heal a blind man.
"By these examples," says Bishop Davis, "I
know what I am believing. We are not moved
by the skeptics. There will always be skeptics.
But preachers ought to be the last ones against
this.
"This water is a point of contact and this thing
is working. If people are skeptical then let them
be. You'd find that there are some people who are
in need, they are desperate for God to fix their sit-
uation. These are the people who will believe."
Bishop Lawrence Rolle could not be reached
for comment yesterday.


Reaction to the issue


FROM page one
take phone calls from their
parishioners.
He claims that some act as
though "they are doing you a
favour when you are allowed
to see them".
The mood of the average
Christian in this country is one
of doubt and fear, because it
seems that both the commu-
nity and many of its religious
leaders are consumed by prof-
it.
I remember attending an
anniversary service sometime
ago when a pastor remarked
that it seemed that preachers
today are competing with each
another it's all about who


has the biggest house out west,
or who is driving the fanciest
car, or has the most church
members.
In his sermon the pastor
said that every true gospel
preacher is worthy of and
should have the generous sup-
port of God's saints, so that
he and his family are main--
tained comfortably, but cer-
tainly not lavishly.
The Church must continue
to be the voice of God in a
world that is filled with silence.
It must address those issues
that no one else dares to
touch. Preachers should not
live above, but live among
their people. The word of God
must not only be preached,


but lived by all who bear the
name of Christ. The message
of Christ should be clear, not
ambiguous, so as not to cause
confusion for those who
receive it.
There must be no ambiguity
in its delivery, the message
and messenger must reflect
the person of Jesus Christ and
his teachings.
In the Bahamas we have a
rich history of Christianity.
Despite the perception among
non-believers, it is important
that the tradition paid for with
blood not be contaminated by
the greed of some of those
who have either lost their way
or simply wish not to be
found.


CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH

THE church on East Street south is
scheduled to hold worship services at 7
am, 9 am and 11 am on Sunday, August
14:
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day Praise and
Deliverance Service, 7:45 pm Men's Fel-
lowship Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible Enrich-
ment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive Youth Meet-
ing

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill and Wulff
Roads is scheduled to hold the following
services:
August 14, 7 am Sung Mass, 10 am -
Sunday School and Adult Bible Classes,
11 am Praise and Worship, Sung Mass, 7
pm Solemn Evensong and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins and Mass, 4
pm Youth Band Practice, 6:30 pm Lay
Pastors' Training, Laying A Solid Foun-
dation, Adult Band Practice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins and Mass, 1
pm Mid-day Mass, 6 pm Prayer
Chapel, 7 pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass, 6:30 pm -
Marriage Enrichment Class, 7 pm -
Prayer Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins and Mass,
6 pm to 9 pm Young Adult Choir Prac-
tice, 7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins and Mass, 4
pm Confirmation Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm Christian
Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm Boys Brigade
(ages 5-9), 1 pm Youth Alpha (every
third Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm Boys
Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6 pm Altar Guild, 6 pm Con-
fessions


EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church a83ast SIeet, "wh
Jesus Christ is 'Erd; and everyone is spe-
cial", is scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday School &
Adult Bible Class, 11 am Morning'Cele-
bration, 7 pm Communion Service, 8 pm
- 'Jesus, the Light of World' Radio Pro-
gramme on ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Midweek Prayer
Meeting (Second Wednesday) Cell
Group Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells Choir
Practice, 8 pm Men's Fellowship Meet-
ing (Every 4th Thursday), ,7:45 pm -
Women's Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Conquerors for Christ
Club (Boys & Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meeting
. Saturday, 6:30 am Early Morning
Prayer Meeting


PARISH CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity Way, Staple-
don Gardens, is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy Eucharist, 9
am The Family Eucharist, Sunday
School, 6:30 pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benediction
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The Church At
Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Intercessory
Prayer, 6:30 am The Holy Eucharist,
7:30 pm
For further information, call (242)-328-
8677 or visit our website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org


~ =~slasapaa~i~a~u~~~:,


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ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship with the
church family at 9:30 am or 11 am on
Sunday. Sunday School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth Group
meets on Friday evenings.
The Kirk is located at the corner of
Peck's Slope and Princes' Street, across
from the Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the Kirk. Visit
us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD

THE church on First Holiness Way,
Bamboo Town, is scheduled to hold the
following services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday School, 11
am Morning Worship, 7 pm Evening
Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer & Praise
Service, 7:30 pm Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise & Worship
Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30 pm Youth
Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm SALT Min-
istry (Single Adults Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm SOME Min-
istry (Save Our Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths Day/Dedication
of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day Service

ST ANGES ANGLICAN CHURCH,
BAILLOU HILL ROAD
WEEKLY SERVICES AND
ACTIVITIES

Sunday
7am Solemn Sung Mass
& Sermon
10.30am Solemn Sung Mass
& Sermon
7.30pm Solemn Evensong,
Sermon & Benediction
Monday & Tuesday
6.40am Matins
7am Mass
Wednesday
6.40am Mass
12.30pm Mid-day Mass
Thursday
6.40am Matins
7am Mass
5pm Senior Boys Brigade
7pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday
6.40am Matins
7am Mass
12.30pm Mid-day Mass
7pm Prayer Band
Saturday
7.30am Mass
3pm Girls Brigade
4.30pm Junior Ushers Practice
5pm Bell Ringers Practice
5pm Primary Choir Practice

THE St George's Anglican Church
Youth Choir Concert will be held on Sat-
urday, September 10, 8pm at St George's
Anglican Church, Montrose Ave. The
theme of the concert is "A Praise and
Worship Celebration" and is a Back-to-
School event. Performing choirs include
All Saints Youth Choir, St Francis
Xaviers Cathedral Youth Choir, Blessed,
New Destined Voices and St George's
Anglican Church Youth Choir.
Tickets available at St George's Parish
Office, from choir members, Oasis
Music Center or call 454-4342 after 4pm
for reservations.

THE New Redeemed Church of God
in Christ, under the leadership of Pastor
Tony Leroy Hanna and Nancy Hanna will
hold its 10th anniversary and official ded-
ication on Sunday, August 21 at 3pm. The
service will also be aired on ZNS
1540AM starting at 3.30pm.


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE














Feast of the Assumption


* By CLEMENT
JOHNSON
ON MONDAY, August 15,
Christians all around the world
and in the Bahamas celebrated
the Feast of the Assumption.
This feast has a double object
- the happy departure of Mary
from this life and the assump-
tion of her body into heaven.
Assumption is known as the
principal feast of the Blessed
Mother.
It's interesting that still today


Importance of event


that honours Mary


many people who are not of
the Catholic faith would ask,
'so what? What's the big deal
about Mary?'
Many Catholics are bom-
barded with this question and


are often referred to as "Mari-
an" worshippers.
We seem to live in a world
where nothing is sacred, so
when Christians fight among
themselves over the role of


Discussing future goals
IN CONFERENCE Members of St Matthew's Anglican Church's Vestry held a powerful week-
end retreat to discuss the future goals of the church. The vestry outlined proposals and recommendations
that will take up discussion at the parish Planning Conference, which will be held this Saturday at St
Anne's School, from 8am to 4pm. The Planning Conference, an annual event, points out goals and
action steps the parish is to take over the next year.
Photo shows Archdeacon Keith Cartwright talking to members of the vestry on ways the church can
move forward. Also pictured is Father James Moultrie and Father Don Haynes.
(Photo: St Matthew's Communications Ministry)


Mary in the life of the Church
no one wins, except Satan.
Christianity holds forth a sur-
prising happiness and promise
of joy. It describes and offers a
mystery of life that is full and
forever.
Christians believe that the
magnificent Feast of the
Assumption of the Blessed Vir-
gin Mary proclaims the deepest
and most profound of these
Christian mysteries and promis-
es. Mary was the first and best
disciple of her son and lived a


long life in the presence of
God.
It is because of the relation-
ship that she enjoyed with her
Son, that the Church, from as
early'as 403AD, recognised
that Mary was taken into heav-
en.
It was on.November 1,1950,
All Saints Day, that the late
PopeuPhtis XII declared that the
Assu ptioi of the Blessed Vir-
gin Mary was a dogma of the
Catholic faith.
Any feast that honours Mary


is important to the life of the
Church and the world, as it
recognises the important role
women have played through-
out its history.
Most cultures, even today,
are elusive with regard to
women. In Greek mythology,
woman was 'Penia', or 'want'.
Man was 'Poros', or 'fullness'
and 'wealth'. Plato and Aristo-
tle never included women into
their scheme of human society.
Women lacked volition and
intelligence. They were cer-
tainly not capable of achieving
any equilibrium and good.
The readings that were used
during the Mass to celebrate
the Feast of the Assumption
speak of great signs and sym-
bols that fill the sky/horizon.
We all know that signs and
symbols are truths about an
unseen reality. Something is
being thrown before our eyes,
which we can only see dimly.

Reading
The first reading establishes a
fact that God works through
woman for good of human kind
and His universe. In God's
eyes, woman is no less a part-
ner of His than man. The sec-
ond fact is that woman is equal-
ly important to man in the ful-
fillment of creation, redemp-
tion and sanctification.
All of the readings were on
woman and God's creative,
redemptive and actions
through them.
It also establishes the fact
that although women in some
cultures are considered "low-
ly", God exalts her and he does
great and wonderful things
through women.
The readings also establish
that in God's eyes, man and
woman are not competitors. In
His eyes, both are his partners.
Consequently, man and woman
are also partners of each other.
To each a task, to each a fruit.
One of the greatest chal-
lenges of the Feast of the
Assumption is this: "woman
has her task and fruit to bear
forth human society. She is the
future that is as heavenly as
that of every man."


Asking questions



before we jump



to conclusions


* By REV ANGELA C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS
IN JOHN 2:1-12, we read the story of the mir-
acle in Cana when our Lord changed water into
wine. Though the master of ceremonies is the
one who determines the quality of the wine, it is
the servants who know its source: "When the
master of ceremonies tasted the water that was
now wine, not knowing where it had come from
(though, of course, the servants knew), he called
the bridegroom over. Usually a host serves the
best wine first, he said, 'Then when everyone is
full and doesn't care, he brings out the less expen-
sive wines. But you have kept the best until now!"
(John 2:9-10 NLT).
Sometimes, we are like the master of cere-
monies.
We think that we know what is going on around
us and we speak and act with authority, quite
oblivious to what is really the case.
We give credit to human beings for the miracles
that God is working, and so we may never find
out the deeper meaning of our experiences.
Perhaps, we need to ask more questions before
jumping to conclusions, or remain open to the
process of discernment to lead us to a fuller
understanding of God's active Presence in the
world.

Limitations
At other times, we are more like the bride-
groom who is embarrassed by his limitations,
confused by his blessings, and ignorant of the
great event that has occurred while he was
despairing over his predicament. Perhaps, we
ought also to turn to Jesus at the first sign of
trouble and allow Him to meet our needs, rather
than resorting to prayer as our final consideration.
Better still, if we invite The Lord to take control
of our lives through the power of the Holy Spir-
it as we begin to contemplate our initial stages of
planning, we may not run out of wine at all.
If we offer our services to God on a daily basis,
we will be privy to the movement of The Spirit in
the most unexpected of miracles. Of course, it is
the servants who are able to rejoice at the power
of God, who may have become disciples them-
selves, because it is they are were available to
be used, who obeyed promptly and assisted in
the launching of Jesus earthly ministry. Are you
one who will attempt seemingly impossible things
for God?
Finally, we may also consider the special bless-


ing of intercession, so that like Mary we invite
Jesus to make the difference in the midst of some-
one else's misfortune. Her motherly sensitivity
and perceptive eye enabled her to observe the sit-
uation and respond with alacrity. She did not
choose to gossip about the dilemma to those seat-
ed nearby, make suggestions the following day as
to what should have been done to avoid the prob-
lem, or remain silent because "she wasn't get-
ting in that".
Perhaps, we all may resolve to follow her exam-
ple and more intentionally become our brothers
and sisters keepers.
If by any chance, we are not called by God to
be involved at any level, there is always one role
that we all may play, as modeled for us by the dis-
ciples: "This miraculous sign at Cana in Galilee
was Jesus' first display of his glory. And his dis-
ciples believed in him" (v.11 NLT).


THE TRIBUNE


I HUraCJum\, n/uv ,- i o, .uvv,, i u...A-





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PAGE 60, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


^ ^


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2005, PAULt /u


RELGIO


Special services to mark


church's


THE historic church of St
Agnes Anglican Parish in
Grants Town is celebrating its
160th anniversary of dedica-
tion this year with a series of
special services.
Services began on Monday,
July 11 and continued
throughout the week with a
Friday service focussing on the
youth of the church.
On Sunday, July 17, the
Sunday within the octave of
the Feast of the Dedication,
the celebrations kicked into
high gear with a Family
Eucharist at 9am and Even-
song at 5pm.
Both of the services were
presided over by Archbishop
Drexel Gomez.
Celebrating the Pontifical
Mass and delivering the ser-
mon at the 9am service, the
archbishop drew the
congregation's attention to
the goodly heritage that is
theirs.
In the service of evensong
held at 5pm, parishioners were
joined by the Governor Gen-
eral Dame Ivy Dumont, Sen-
ate president Sharon Wilson,
FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest, and Diocese Chancellor
Rubie Nottage. Visiting mem-
bers of the clergy included
Canon Barry, rector of St
Agnes Church, Miami; Mon-
signor Preston Moss; Rev Dr
Tyrone McKenzie; and Canon
Warren Rolle.
Celebrations will continue
throughout the year.


160th anniversary


....................................................................... ................................................................ ,......................... ...................................................................... .... ,.................................................. .......... ..................... ........... .............................. ........ ............... ..................................

Mass celebrates ordination


anniversary of Bishop Eldon .


N BISHOP MICHAEL ELDON


A PONTIFICAL Concele-
brated Mass was held to mark
the 50th anniversary of the
ordination of the Rt Rev
Michael Hartley Eldon to the
sacred priesthood.
The service was held at St
George's Anglican Church on
Wednesday, August 10, at
6am.
Bishop Eldon is currently
recovering from a long illness.

Children

Born on August 8, 1931,
Michael Eldon was the first of
two children born to Mr and
Mrs Sydney Eldon. Dr Keva
Eldon-Bethel was the second
child.
He was ordained a deacon
on July 22, 1954 and was post-
ed at St Agnes Church. He
also taught at St John's Col-
lege.
Bishop Eldon was ordained
to the priesthood on August
10, 1955 at the age of 24. He
was then posted at St
Matthew's Parish, where he


served as assistant priest for
five years and priest-in-charge
for two years.


At the time, St Matthew's
Parish also included the mis-
sion churches of St George's
in the area know as The Val-
ley, and St Margaret's, Kemp
Road.
Bishop Eldon supervised
the completion of the new edi-
fice of St George's Parish.
In April 1972 he was elected
Bishop of the Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos Islands and


served this capacity for 24
years, retiring on August 31,
1996.
Bishop Eldon has made
numerous contributions to the
Anglican community, the
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands.

Photos: St George's
Communications Ministry


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Rachel

Elizabeth

Strachan
SUNRISE: ,A
JUNE 4TH, 1962
SUNSET:
AUGUST 18TH, 2004
In loving memory of a dear wife, mother, daughter, sister, aunt
and friend, Rachel Elizabeth Strachan, who went to be with
the Lord on August 18th, 2004.
Her memories linger everyday since her passing away her
J smile, her laughter, her frankness, her loyalty to family and
friends, her love, her cooking, her battles and her love for God
gives us reason to thank God for her life's testimony.
She is missed dearly but the twinkle of her eyes is alive in the
eyes of her children. Rachel Elizabeth is loving remembered
by her husband, Anthony; children, Raython and Torin; mother;
Rose, siblings, Ellen, Mellie, Franklyn, Judy and Shelly. nieces
and nephews, friends and families.


* SUFFRAGAN Bishop Gilbert Thompson shares a laugh with Sir Arlington Butler.


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