Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00183
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: August 17, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00183
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"START YOUR
MORNINGS WITH
McGRIDDLES" im'." ,.
HIGH 93F
LOW 80F


PARillY CLOUDY
----------o


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.217



Lillian picks up the
pieces for her art

SEE ARTS SECTION
... A ....................... .... ........ .... .!;

____________________________.____


price brea


Latest rise makes Unloading blocksay Street lne

Bahamian history Aeducedtoone
yesterday, while a -. 'I


inside


N By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOR the first time in
Bahamian history, the price of
gasoline has broken the $4 mark
as the latest in'a series of price
hikes for the year continues.
Yesterday the Trade and
Industry Minister Leslie Miller
announced that Texaco is
requesting a $0.17 increase on
the price of gasoline, pushing
their new price to $4.02. Also,
diesel oil will be increased by
$0.15 a gallon, bringing the new
price to $3.24 a gallon.
On the Family Islands and in
Grand Bahama, gasoline will
average anywhere from $4.25
to $4.50 a gallon, with prices on
some cays going well over $5.00
a gallon.
In remote fishing island com-
munities such as Moore's
Island, just south of Abaco, the
price is expected to jump above
6.50 a gallon. Mr Miller
warned that these prices will
come into effect by tomorrow.
"The increase in the US was
$0.08 cents a gallon and it goes
up $0.17 cents over here. In the
US people now have to decide
if they can buy additional med-
ication or fuel. People need to
get real and face what is upon
us. Somehow, some way, we
have to find the mechanism to
bring the cost of fuel down. Do
you have any idea what our sur-
charge will be now with BEC?"
Mr Miller asked.
Affecting almost every indus-
try throughout the country, Mr
Miller warned that as a result
of the new prices, jitney drivers,
shipping companies, airlines,


and naturally BEC would have
to raise their prices to cope with
the cost of fuel.
"This is really going to hurt
the fisherman. Those guys are
out there trying to earn a decent
living fishing, and now this is
going to cut into their profits.
You will see the price of fish,
conch and lobster increase. This
is going to permeate every stra-
ta of our economy," he said.
Mr Miller explained that
since its inception, the "mark-up
margins" currently enjoyed by
the local oil companies have
since doubled and in some cas-
es tripled.
"I was telling someone today
that when these oil companies
talk about their margins, the
Bahamian people need to
understand that these margins
came in effect when these retail
gas stations were pumping less
than 50,000 gallons of fuel per
month.
"The average station in New
Providence pumps now 80,000
to 150,000 gallons per month.
Which means the profit mar-
gins have doubled and even
tripled with this margin mecha-
nism. How is it that this mecha-
nism is still in place? We need
to revisit it to bring fairness to
the driving public," he said.
Currently, oil shipments
arrive in the country every 21 to
28 days. Therefore when a mark
up is passed, the price would
remain the same until the next
shliipment arrives, which would
then justify either a further
mark up or possible decrease
in price.
"This mechanism hurts the
SEE page 11


YESTERDAY morning The Tribune
caught a truck driver in the act of committing
what police say is a major traffic offence.
A semi-truck blocked the left lane of traf-
fic on Bay Street, while a crane offloaded a
large container at a shipyard on the north
side of Bay Street.
Sergeant 909 Pamela Carroll said that
when she received a report of what was hap-
pening she went to Bay Street where she
found truck M407 "infringing upon our traf-
fic 'laws."
"I went down there personally and asked


the driver to move the truck. There was law-
lessness going on the driver was not only
obstructing vehicular traffic but also obstruct-
ing pedestrians walking on the street," she
said.
"Because of his actions, I gave the driver a
ticket for $250 for causing obstruction," the
officer said.
The officer said that trucks are usually
loaded outside the shipyard when the ship-
yard is filled with vehicles and containers
brought in by the mv Betty K. On those occa-
sions the shipyard's security will close the
SEE page 11


Pastor joins debate Outstanding criminal


on 'miracle water'
* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A LOCAL pastor urged Christians not to
fall into witchcraft or be lured into evil as he
weighed in on the "miracle" water craze sweep-
ing the country yesterday.
Kas Brozozog, President and Chancellor of
Vision International College and an associate
pastor at the Chapel On The Hill, said that the
country is plagued with false prophets who
only preach darkness.
Mr Brozozog was the guest speaker oufthe
Issues of the Day radio programme hosted by
Jeff Lloyd.
SEE page 11


warrants problem is
steadily increasing
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE problem of the extremely high number of
outstanding criminal warrants in the Bahamas is
steadily increasing, with no relief in sight.
More than eight months after The Tribune first
reported that there were 40,000 outstanding crim-
inal warrants in the Bahamas, there has still been
no improvement in the personnel and resource
shortage, or the police's communication systems,
to help alleviate the problem.
In an interview yesterday, Inspector Derek
SEE page 11


How I trapped
Derek Turner
and prevented
a global scam
Exclusive interview on
pages six and seven.

Immigration

officers sick-out
continued
despite minister's
assurances
By ADRIAN GIBSON
IMMIGRATION officers
in Grand Bahama contin-
ued their sick-out yesterday
despite assurances by Immi-
gration Minister Vincent
Peet that their overtime
salary problem had been
corrected.
According to the union,
officers decided on the sick-
out when they were unsuc-
cessful in resolving their
overtime dispute with gov-
ernment. They had been
working on the problem
since May.
However, speaking with
The Tribune yesterday Mr
Peet maintained that it was
not a major problem, "just
an administrative glitch."
He said: "The issue in
Grand Bahama has been
resolved and the cheques for
back pay were issued today.
This was a hiccup, this was a
snag caused by an adminis-
trative glitch in terms of
making sure that they send
their bills directly to the
Treasury for pay rather than
them being sent to head-
quarters in Nassau."
"These actions (sick-out)
were unnecessary and we
want to make sure that
SEE page 11


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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Public 'must take a





hand in stopping





illegal dumping'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
PARLIAMENTARY secre-
tary in the Ministry of Health
Ron Pinder is calling on the
Bahamian public to take a more
active role in assisting govern-
ment and law enforcement
agencies in eliminating the
problem of indiscriminate
dumping.
On Monday afternoon, The
Tribune visited Hanna Road


where some residents were
angry about the sustained dump-
ing in their neighbourhood.
"The Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services is
aware of the high level of indis-
criminate dumping that occurs
periodically in the Hanna Road
and Cool Acres area," said Mr
Pinder.
"We have responded at least
three to four times over the
course of the last three-and-a-
half years in cleaning up a lot of


abandoned areas and vacant
lots in that area, at an enormous
cost to government," he added.

Assistance

The president of the Cool
Acres crime watch and home
owners association Allan Miller
said the association went to the
government for assistance in
cleaning the whole of the Holy
Cross constituency, which


includes Hanna Road.
He confirmed that govern-
ment did render assistance in
cleaning up the area by send-
ing a tractor and a few trucks.
Mr Pinder reminded the pub-
lic that indiscriminate dumping is
a criminal offence and individu-
als can be fined up to $10,000
and be sentenced to prison.
He said that government con-
tinues to respond to environ-
mental challenges as best as it
can..


Two men charged with robbery of tourists


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
TWO persons have been
charged by police with the ear-
ly morning armed robbery of
three women tourists from New
Jersey.
Randy Rolle, 18, of Hospital
Lane is accused of being one of
the robbery and Shenique Ram-


sey, 25, of Hay Street is accused
of being the driver of the get-
away car.
They were charged by police
and are expected to be
arraigned in court this week.
One count of armed robbery
stated that the pair robbed
Dianne Raysor of $1,019
in cash and other valuables


on Sunday August 14.
Court dockets also stated that
they robbed Theresa Alstor and
Crystal Sumnors of a total of
$1,425 in cash and other items.
Initial reports stated that
the robbery occurred shortly
before 3 am when the women
were walking on Paradise
Beach Road on the way


back to their hotel.
One of the men was report-
edly armed with a handgun and
the other with a razor blade.
After robbing the women the
men made their escape in a get-
away car driven by a woman,
police reports said.
The car later crashed into a
light pole during a police chase.


Man shot outside club
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* By ADRIAN GIBSONI
POLICE have identified the
young man killed at a local club
early Monday morning as Owen
Colebrooke.
It is reported that Cole-
brooke, 22, of Crooked Island
Street, was shot several times.
Police said they recieved
reports from persons who heard
gunshots near the Fifty Yard
Line Club on. Ragged Island
Street.
Shortly afterwards, Mr Cole-
brooke was seen running from


Man charged with sex

with a 14-year-old girl


GEORGETTE SWEETING

of Spanish Wells, Eleuthera

Georgette has recently graduated with honours
from Central Christian Academy
in Winter P- 71qr ridnl


A PINEWOOD Drive man
was arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday charged with
having sex with a 14-year-old girl.
It is alleged that Nikito
Green, 21, committed the
offence sometime between Jan-


uary and February this year.
Green, represented by lawyer
Fayne Thompson, was granted
$10,000 bail with two sureties.
The matter was adjourned to
October 20 when a preliminary
inquiry will take place.


mte oacK 01 the club to the front
area on the southern side of a
building.
It was reported that when he
reached the parking lot, he col-
lapsed and died. The man had
been shot several times in the
right side of his chest.
He was dressed in a white T-
shirt, long blue jeans and white
tennis shoes.
This incident pushes the num-
ber of murders for the year to
27.
Police investigations into the
matter continue.

















U HAITI
Port-au-Prince
A PROMINENT Catholic
priest who has been jailed
for nearly a month collapsed
in his cell and had to receive
medical treatment, his
lawyer said Tuesday, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Reverend Gerard Jean-
Juste, a prominent figure in
the party of ousted President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide and a
possible presidential candi-
date, passed out for 20 min-
utes Sunday at Haiti's
National Penitentiary, Bill
Quigley, Jean-Juste's Amer-
ican lawyer, told reporters.
Quigley said Jean-Juste
had been sweating profusely
before collapsing in his cell,
which the lawyer described
as hot and dirty.
Several other inmates car-
ried Jean-Juste to the prison
infirmary, where he was
treated for an unknown ail-
ment; Quigley said.
Quigley said he visited the
57-year-old priest earlier
Tuesday and found him
"very weakened." He pro-
duced a letter from Jean-
Juste, in which the priest said
he almost died from the inci-
dent, without giving details.


* 27-year-old Eldrice Gibson outside court


* BY NATARIO McKENZIE
THE 27-year-old mother who admitted to abandoning her
2-year-old son because she had nowhere for him to live was
sentenced to four months in prison yesterday.
Eldrice Gibson initially told Magistrate Susan Sylvester
that she left her son in the care of an acquaintance, 27-year-
old Kenneth Nathan, but denied that she told him that she
would return immediately.
Gibson had told the Magistrate that she had been trying to
make living arrangements.
Nathan was initially charged with deceiving police. He had
admitted to lying to police when he told them that he had
found the boy abandoned at the site of the Emancipation Day
celebrations in Fox Hill.
Further investigations revealed that the child had been in his
custody for two weeks.
Nathan was granted a conditional discharge last week.
The Department of Social Services was granted a "fit per-
sons order" by the court yesterday, which means that the
child will be in care of Social Services until a suitable caretaker
can be found.









THE TIBUNEWEDNEDAY, UGUST17, 2uE.,


Plans to transform Montagu




boat ramp revealed soon


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE eyesore which is the Mon-
tague boat ramp is finally to be trans-
formed.
Speaking with The Tribune yester-
day, Independent MP for St Margarets
Pierre Dupuch said the Montagu
Ramp Committee is in the final stages
of completing its report on the chal-
lenges of improving the ramp area.
"The report is done; it will now be
presented to the other committee
members who will be able to make
changes," he said.
Following this final consideration
by the members, the report will then
be presented to parliament when the
House of Assembly returns after sum-
mer recess.
Mr Dupuch said he if implemented,
the recommendations of the commit-
tee will lead to "a complete transfor-
mation" of the ramp.
Ron Pinder, director of Environ-
mental Health, said that he expects
government to move on the commit-
tee's recommendations sometime after
September.
"After we finish the Potter's Cay
project we will then move on to Mon-
tagu ramp," Mr Pinder said.
The Montagu Ramp Committee
was appointed in May by the Speaker
of the House.
Mr Dupuch, the chairman, said the
committee has had a number of suc-
cessful meetings and has come to sev-
eral conclusions.
He said that the committee is "very
hopeful" that its recommendations
will be implemented to bring about
the long-anticipated transformation
of the Montagu ramp.


E MONTAGU boat ramp needs to be repaired


(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


During its deliberation period, the
committee invited as much public
opinion as possible by launching the
Montagu Ramp Hearing Internet site.
People were encouraged to submit
their thoughts and suggestions to the
committee via the web page hosted
by the Bahamas portal,
bahamasb2b.com.
Some of the suggestions received
included:


Close the ramp and.turn the area
into a park.
Relocate the fish stalls to a large'
area of land East of the Royal Nassau
Sailing Club.
Leave the stalls on the ramp and
install a feeder road to the area, thus
drawing the boat and market traffic
from the main road.
Move both the ramp and the stalls
to the area just East of Potters. Cay


and West of the William Street dock.
Turn this area into a tourist attraction
with a building housing a fish market
on the ground floor and a restaurant
on a second floor.
In the past, vendors at the Montagu
foreshore have appealed to govern-
ment to give them a proper market,
rather than relocate them, which they
say would displace dozens of work-


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
MORTON Salt has announced that
all issues regarding its electricity cus-
tomers in Inagua have been resolved.
In yesterday's Tribune it was report-
ed that Morton, the only employer on
Inagua, cut the power to government
facilities because of a large outstand-
ing bill.
In an interview with The Tribune
yesterday, Walter Eweing, the finan-
cial controller at Morton, said the
company conducted island-wide cuts
of all delinquent customers.
Mr Eweing said that as of yester-
day, all outstanding issues have been
resolved.
He added that he was unable to
reach Glen Bannister, the managing
director of the company to see if he
wished to make additional comments.
It was claimed that the sum owed by
government might be as high as
$100,000 and that government had to
scramble to secure a cheque from the
Treasury to pay the bill.
Last night, ZNS News reported that
the outstanding amount was was in
fact $60,000.
Former administrator and FNM
candidate for the MICAL constituen-
cy Johnley Ferguson said that the issue
of government's management of its
finances on Inagua was "expected to
blow up" eventually.
He claimed that the southern
Bahamas has been treated in a "care-
less fashion" by the present govern-
ment.
The current MICAL MP Agricul-
ture Minister Alfred Gray is on vaca-
tion, and the government said
through a spokesman that it has no
comment.


Concern at prison bus 'hazard'


MEMBERS of the public
have voiced their concern about
the speed at which the prison
bus is driven from Fox Hill to
the courts on Bay Street, calling
it a safety hazard.,
However according to Act-
ing National Security Perma-
nent Secretary Peter Deveaux-
Isaacs, officers are instructed to
drive the route with due care
and attention.
For some time, The Tribune
has been receiving complaints
from members of the public
about what they feel is the
unsafe speed at which the
prison bus plows through the
streets of Nassau during rush-
hour.
Many of those who expressed
concern said they cannot think
of any good reason why the bus
needs to travel at such a speed.
Yesterday, several persons
spoke with The Tribune about


the issue on condition of
anonymity.
One person who lives near
Cable Beach pointed out that
a security breach might take
-place if the bus were to crash;
A woman who lives near Fox
Hill said that every morning,
the prison convoy "frightens"
her.
"It is unnecessary to carry on
like that to get from point A to
point B," she said.
"Yesterday at five (pm) they
came speeding through and
stopped all the traffic. There
was no reason to do that," said
an Eastern Road resident.
"It's kind of silly to do it in
the middle, of the day. If any-
thing, they should not do it dur-
ing traffic hours; that's ridicu-
lous," said one Bay Street mer-
chant.
A Gladstone road resident
said: "Its a traffic hazard and a


very tragic accident is going to
occur unless something is done
about it."

Fears

"I think that it is horrible and
one day someone is going to be
killed and all the prisoners will
escape when the bus turns
over," said a Winton woman.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Deveaux-
Isaacs said the officers involved
take their jobs seriously and
understand the importance of
the cargo they are transport-
ing.
Mr Deveaux-Isaacs said the
drivers of the prison bus are
asked to drive with "due care
and attention".
The drivers are also asked to
give regard to the number of
cars on the road, and with


school opening soon, to keep in
mind the number of children
who will be on the streets.
In 2003, it was reported in
The Tribune that the convoy
almost claimed a life, when a
pedestrian had to dive for cover
as a car mounted the pavement
after being forced off the road
by the prison bus.
Mr Deveaux-Isaacs said the
bus convoy is an emergency
convoy and the idea is to move
quickly from point A to B.
He also pointed out that gov-
ernment is looking at providing
a court facility nearer to Fox
Hill Prison.
"The government has deter-
mined that it will move in the
direction of establishing court
facilities nearer to the prison in
the future, so there wouldn't be
a need to move inmates into the
city and through the streets of
the capital," he said.


New X-ray machines



for Bahamas Customs


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* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Customs Department's
anti-terrorist initiatives are set
to get a technological boost
when two new X-ray machines
arrive in the Bahamas.
The machines, which will cost
$3 million each, have the capa-
bility of inspecting a 40 foot
container in about three min-
utes, thereby greatly increasing
the effectiveness of Customs
operations, Comptroller John
Rolle told The Tribune.
He said new machinery,
coupled with a newly installed
automated system, is the way
forward for the department.
Mr Rolle said the priorities
of the department have greatly
expanded in recent years, with
an increased focus on anti-ter-
rorism efforts.
"In today's world the duties
and responsibilities of the Cus-
toms Department have become
more varied and complex. Since
September 11, 2001, the world
has changed.
"Terrorism and its attendant
negative impact has heightened
the need for countries to tighten
border security aimed at min-
imising threats that can effect
the economy and citizens
severely," said Mr Rolle.
"Heretofore, weapons of
mass destruction were literally
unheard of.
"Today, terrorists are eager
to move across borders essential
components such as explosives
and other items capable of


developing weapons of mass
destruction."

Precautions

The Bahamas, being highly
reliant on tourism, stands to suf-
fer dearly should it be labelled a
country where such materials
can easily enter and exit, he
said.
"As Customs is recognised as
the first line of defence against
goods of all kinds crossing its
borders, our staff members
must maintain high ethical stan-
dards, possess interpersonal
skills, and requisite attitudes
among other qualities so as to
enable them to provide a ser-
vice that the public is entitled to,
and also effectively address the
many growing challenges."
The Customs Department is
now training brokers to
embrace the updated system,
and recently churned out 34
new brokers out of a class of
36.
Mr Rolle said one of the
greatest present threats is that
Customs workers are so familiar
with the old system that they
seem unwilling to embrace the
change.
He said "tightening the
screws" on the old system has
caused some brokers to feel that
certain privileges are being tak-
en away from them.
But for the sake of the
advancement of the Customs
Department, the 45 year-old
veteran said: "It's the music I'm


prepared to face".
"There is a tremendous
responsibility to make sure that
the Customs service is per-
forming its regulatory duties,
and that we have the right peo-
ple in the right place doing the
right things," he said.


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Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2u,,, ,


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4, W~ENLSDY, AUGUST 17, 005TTHE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


Marina Village, attractive new feature


IT IS with justification that Atlantis can
boast that its newly opened Marina Village
will be "one of the must-see attractions for
Nassau and Paradise Island guests".
Already it is a busy spot as Bahamians and
visitors enjoy the relaxing atmosphere of a
scene almost akin to Harbour Island's Bay
Street, but built around a marina filled with
mega-sized yachts. The towers of Atlantis
provide the backdrop. It is magical at night
with the lights from the yachts, the harbour,
and the town of Nassau reflecting on the water.
The sea breeze and the shade trees create a
cool oasis from the suffocating afternoon heat.
Benches are all around for those who just
want to sit, enjoy the scenery, and watch
humanity in all its moods pass by.
There is music during the day from a small
ensemble at Bimini Road. On the night we
were there for the pre-opening of Caf6 Mar-
tinique the cheerful music of an accordion
player outside brought back happy memories
of music-filled evenings in St. Mark's Square,
Venice.
Five restaurants offer a variety of foods -
steakhouse specials, Italian recipes, gourmet
seafood, Bahamian dishes, real American
hamburgers and hot dogs. The new Caf6 Mar-
tinique, its original made famous in 1965 in one
of the scenes in the James Bond movie Thun-
derball, is even more elegant than the first.
Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichren provides
the French gourmet dishes, while guests a&re
entertained from the keys of a Steinway piano.
Overlooking the harbour with its many boats,
Caf6 Martinique is the perfect setting for a
magical evening of good food and good music.
The restaurants are always full, and reser-
vations are recommended. Paul O'Neil,
Atlantis' chief executive officer, was pleased
that the new restaurants were attracting their
own large clientele. He didn't know where
the new guests were coming from, but they
certainly were not being drawn from Atlantis'
established restaurants, which were still filled
to capacity.
Many of Bay Street's exclusive shops are
represented in the Marina Village in addition
to such international names as JC Versace
and Dooney and Bourke. Bahamian artisans
offer attractive handicraft and food preserves
from retail carts in perfect settings around the
marketplace.
As we strolled along the marina front we
found Doongalik Art Gallery and one of the
gallery's owners who could give us the answer
as to why Atlantis had a shopping centre that
Bay Street merchants had talked about for


years, but seemed unable to produce.
Architect/artist Jackson Burnside said he
had gone to government years ago with a sim-
ilar idea for downtown Bay Street. He had
even provided plans. Although an interest was
expressed, nothing happened. Recently he
took his idea to Sol Kerzner of Atlantis. As the
artist talked, Mr Kerzner's eyes lit up. The
entrepreneur forgot his "worry beads" as he
grasped the idea. In no time bulldozers were
churning up the land for the 65,000-foot devel-
opment, which would give yet another dimen-
sion to his vast and varied Paradise Island
resort.
Obviously it has also caught the public's
imagination, because the Marina Village has
been busy from the day it opened. Downtown
Bay Street, which has been becalmed for many
years, now has real competition, and will be
quickly elbowed to the sidelines if its mer-
chants don't wake up. It is time for them to
pull out all of the many plans that have been
on various drawing boards over the years,
select one of them and start moving.
Another attraction at the Marina Village is
the fact that it is abuzz with life and music
late into the evening. One of the obligations of
each licence holder in the Village is that their
businesses must open by 10am and remain
open until 10pm later if they wish. Some
restaurants remain open until llpm and many
shops until midnight if'patrons keep coming.
Security, although unobtrusive, is always
present. And clean restrooms, the lack of
which has been a constant complaint over the
years about Bay Street, are provided at each
end of the Village. It is important for the man-
agers to ensure that they are always spotless-
ly clean.
Several years ago, Mr Burnside, assisted by
a committee, produced a detailed study about
how to preserve and develop "Historic Nas-
sau." The illustrated report took two years to
complete. It was launched with much fanfare
at a luncheon. It had good publicity and was
much talked about for weeks.
Although Nassau has lost many of its his-
toric buildings, it still has many worth pre-
serving and restoring. But as Bahamians on
their committees talk, history is crumbling
before their eyes.
While Sol Kerzner has an eye-catching
tourist attraction, Bahamians have wasted
everybody's time sitting around committee
tables in deep discussion. They have allowed
an opportunity to use their rich historical past
as a magnet for tourists to slip through their
fingers like so many grains of sand.


Sir Stafford:




brilliant man




but no racist


EDITOR, The Tribune
YOUR recent editorial spec-
ulates as to why Sir Stafford
Sands left the Bahamas after the
UBP Government lost the elec-
tion in 1967. The true reason
cannot be understood without
trying to understand his com-
plex personality and putting
aside the canards which now
surround his name.
Despite the handicaps of hav-
ing been blinded in one eye at a
young age and having received
all his education, including his
legal training, in the Bahamas,
Sir Stafford at a relatively young
age was acknowledged as the
best chambers lawyer in the
Bahamas and most powerful
politician of his time. The lat-
ter needs some qualification.
He was assisted by a keen and
incisive mind, a photographic
memory, and a willingness to
apply himself unsparingly in
undertaking both his client's
legal work and the duties of his
government offices. Those qual-
ities and his ability as a witty
raconteur put him on an equal
footing with the most sophisti-
cated visitors to the Bahamas
who universally found him an
unusual and engaging personal-
ity.
In truth, Sir Stafford was not
able to control his party, and.
the individuals who composed
it, and was even something of a
maverick in the UBP. He. was
to the UBP somewhat what
Winston Churchill had been to
the English Conservative party.
Many of the run-of-the-mill
UBP politicians did not trust
him, and, with some justifica-
tion, did not think he was one of
them. However they were too
dependent on him forithem to
do anything about it.
If Sir Roland Symonette car-
ried public favour as the trusted
political leader, Sir Stafford was
the brains and the successful
administrator/politician. At an
early stage Sir Stafford took
charge of the Development
Board (to become the Ministry
of Tourism) and, working long
unpaid hours with Vic Cheney,
personally converted the
Bahamas from a winter resort
for wealthy snow birds into a
mass market for year round vis-
itors. Many regarded the change
with regret, but undoubtedly
tourism and the economy
boomed and employment
opportunities grew.
His law office helped make
the Bahamas the first and lead-
ing off-shore financial centre
and the first to offer mutual
fund administration, thus
preparing the Bahamas for its


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second source of income.
But it must be recognised for
all that, that Sir Stafford and his
closer friends in the UBP,
Robert (Bobby) Symonette and
Roy Solomon, did not control
the majority in the party and its
way of thinking.
It has to be asked, was Sir
Stafford Sands a racist? It is easy
to argue that he was born into a
society in which the majority of
black Bahamians were disad-
vantaged and since he, a leading
political power in that society,
did not actively move to have
those disadvantages removed,
he must be a racist.
By that standard even Abra-
ham Lincoln can be called a
racist, and has been.
On a personal level I am sure,
he was not a racist. In the many
private hours we spent together
working in the office or socially
when he expressed himself
freely, I never heard him make
any gratuitous anti-black, or for
that matter, anti-Jewish or oth-
er anti- minority remark. It was
not just the politician in him,
but the way he regarded people
and life based on his own expe-
rience.
He expressed admiration for
black Bahamians who, like him-
self, had overcome their disad-
vantages to rise to a position of
standing and leadership in the
community. His many black
Bahamian employees, no dif-
ferently from his white employ-
ees, felt towards him the same
mixture of regard tinged with
trpi4ati-in for thb n.exttongue
lashing. He did not suffer fools
gladly. I am sure his many
staunch UBP black workers and
supporters in the City District
would not have given him their
support if they had sensed he
was, at.heart, a racist.
He was scathing about many
of the powerful in the UBP who
could not rise politically above
being wealthy merchants. I
believe, rightly or wrongly, he
was disappointed that the lead-
ers of the PLP, who did not have
disadvantaged backgrounds,
should feel it necessary to take
power advocating blatantly
racist policies. He was certainly
saddened that should be the
case, as he predicted that their
coming to power would unleash
long lasting anti-white racist
feeling.
I was with him at his home at
Waterloo on the night of the
1967 Election. He left the patio
table around which we were sit-
ting to take a telephone call giv-
ing him the Eleuthera results.
He returned to the table and
announced "we have lost".
An era had ended. The sound
of victory PLP car hooting up
and down Bay Street outside


could be heard, but Stafford was
not a person who stood in fear
of his personal safety.
I am convinced he made a
decision that night that he would
leave the Bahamas because he
felt rejected after all he had
done for the Bahamas and
Bahamians, black and white.
He could not see himself as a
leader in opposition to a Gov-
ernment composed of racist
politicians whom he could not
respect, and he had no desire to
have to sit in the House of
Assembly and listen to, and
have to attempt to answer, end-
less nonsensical rhetoric. He was
a man of action. Above all he
did not have patience for that.
He foresaw that the Pindling
government would remain in
power for longer than his life-
time. It would be a waste of his
remaining years to be a politi-
cian in opposition.
In this Sir Stafford's reaction
was similar to that of Winston
Churchill in 1945 when, despite
being the architect of the World
War II victory, his party was
roundly defeated in the election
by a strongly socialist Labour
Party.
Wallace Groves' Deep Har-
bour Project in Grand Bahama
had not proved a success. To
save Freeport Sir Stafford had
fought the UBP to get the new
Grand Bahama Development
Company to build the new
Lucaya Beach Hotel in order to
get Freeport going as a tourist
resort. He accepted what the
promoters maintained, and what
is now accepted as axiomatic,
that the Development could not
succeed without a casino licence,
and, that agreed, Freeport
boomed beyond expectation.
Despitephis accurate predic-
tions of what was to come, I sus-
pect the destruction of Freeport
with the "bend or break"
speech, was not one of them. I
believe that Sir Stafford made a
mistake in quitting the
Bahamas, a mistake that Win-
ston Churchill, who remained
as leader of the opposition, did
not make.
I lost contact with Sir Stafford
after he left the Bahamas, but I
do not think that his remaining
years spent in Madrid and then
in Italy were completely happy.
I do not think there was enough
in his life, restoring his large
home near Venice, to occupy
his active mind.
A true son of the Bahamas, I
know what his reaction would
be if he could be told that his
image had been taken off the
$10 dollar banknote. "G.damn
it, Lionel, I never asked to have
my face on the note, and I
would have told them, if you do
that, there will be some other
idiot who will think he can get
votes by taking it off again."
LIONEL LEVINE, LL.B.
Nassau
August 15 2005


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Support and maintenance of Group/ Company
infrastructure and properties.

To provide support for the maintenance of:
Plumbing
Electrical
Air-contitioning
Gardening
Garbage
Storage
Security

Skills:
Communication Written and verbal.
Personal Computer skills would be an asset
(for report writing).

General maintenance

Own transportation would be reqired.

Deadline for application: Friday, August 30, 2005

Addressed to: Maintenance Officer
P.O.Box SS-6238
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









TH TRBUEOCAL NEWS I1LO I .UJ~,I ~


US Coast Guard,

ministry and

Port Authority

open three

day workshop

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
A THREE-day work-
shop on marine safety and
environmental protection
was officially opened at the
Prince George Warf yester-
day by officials from the
US Coast Guard, the Min-
istry of Transportation and
the Port Authority.
The exercise, sponsored
by the US Southern Com-
mand and co-ordinated by
the Coast Guard, is being
held to discuss topics relat-
ed to environmental
response, commercial ves-
sel safety and cleanup
responsibilities.
Attending the workshop
will be members of the
Maritime and Port Author-
ities, along with marine
units from the Royal
Bahamas Police and
Defence Forces.
Lieutenant Commander
Terry Johns, the US Coast
Guard liaison officer at the
American Embassy, said:
"We have Lieutenant Mike
Russell and Chief Warrant
officer Brad Shoendower
to discuss maritime safety
and environmental protec-
tion.
"The three day confer-
ence will involve discussing
safety standards for com-
mercial domestic and inter-
national vessels, and pas-
senger vessels such as fer-
ries.

Knowledge
"We have about 25 indi-
viduals from the Port
Authority, Bahamas Mar-
itime Authority, Customs,
Immigration, Royal
Bahamas Defence Force,
and basically they are shar-
ing knowledge and skill in
order to better enforce
standards and implement
standards for safe opera-
tion of commercial ves-
sels," he said.
Commander Johns said
that the workshop will not
really focus on cruise ships,
as they are already strin-
gently regulated, but rather
on inter-island cargo ves-
sels such as mail boats.
"This has come up as a
more proactive measure to
reduce problems. We hope
that by sharing these expe-
riences we can help reduce
our future incidents that
may either cause injury to
pers6ns or damage to the
environment. It's nice not
to be in a knee-jerk mode.
it's nice to plan ahead,"
he said.
The workshop will build
on a visit by Bahamas port
officials to Miami, Florida
in December 2003, when
commercial vessel safety
information was shared
with members of the US
Coast Guard's marine safe-
ty office.
Discussion topics will
include passenger safety,
issues and challenges, dan-
gerous goods, and enforce-
ment.











WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 17
2:00am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
9:00 Mr. Ballooney B.
9:30 Treasure Attic
10:00 CMJ Club Zone
10:30 Fun
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
f2:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Health For The America
1:30 Portrait In Black
2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic


3:00 TyeTribbett
3:30 J. Douglas Wiley
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Cybernet
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Fishing The Flats of The Bah.
8:30 Milestones
9:00 Perscription For Health:
Breast Cancer
10:00 Souled Out
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Pg. 1540 AM
NOE N T 3rsre
therihttomak lstmiut


Programme focuses on detection




of ozone depleting substances


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

PREVENTING and detecting the
illegal trade of Ozone Depleting sub-
stances (ODS) will be the focus of a
workshop for Bahamian Customs offi-
cers in the upcoming week.
The training programme is the first
of its kind in the Bahamas and will
ensure that customs officers are
equipped with the right tools to iden-
tify and detect ozone depleting sub-
stances at ports of entry.
The workshop is being hosted by
the National Ozone Unit (NOU) of
the Department of Environmental
Health in conjunction with the United
Nations Environment Programme
(UNEP).
As a part of the country's interna-
tional obligations, it must establish an
import/export licensing system for
ODS.
It is the objective of the Montreal


Customs officers set for training


Protocol, of which the Bahamas is a
signatory, to reduce and finally phase
out the use of ODS.

Consumed

According to a report prepared by
the Customs Department along with
the NOU in 2003, the Bahamas con-
sumed approximately 86.24 metric
tonnes of ODS which corresponds to
30.15 ozone depleting potential
tonnes.
The refrigeration and air condition-
ing servicing (RAC) sector consumed
84.15 metric tones of ODS which trans-
lates to 27.85 ODP tonnes. This was
92.4 per cent of the Bahamas total
ODP consumption in 2003.


While admitting any abrupt non-
availability of Chlorofluorocarbon
(CFC) refrigerants will adversely
impact on the local economy, the
report said that it is essential for users
of CFCs to be able to reduce and sub-
sequently phase out their consump-
tion in a co-ordinated, planned and
cost effective manner in compliance
with the commitments under the Mon-
treal Protocol.
The Refrigerant Management Plan
(RMP) of the Bahamas was approved
by the 23rd Meeting of the Executive
Committee of the Multilateral Fund
to be implemented by the
United Nations Environment Pro-
gramme.
The RMP is a comprehensive
approach to phasing out the use of


ODS in the Bahamas RAC sector.
The Customs Department will be
expected to incorporate a Montreal
Protocol training module on control
an monitoring of ODS in its curricu-
lum to ensure that future customs offi-
cers are trained on this aspect.

Activities

This will be done within the ongoing
training activities of the Customs
Department.
The NOU, the Customs Department
and the local legal consultant will be
responsible for the implementation of
the training and for reporting progress
to the United Nations Environment
Programme.


Honorary Consul title




for Canon Neil Roach


* CANON NEIL ROACH


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM going through to have her pass-
Tribune Staff Reporter port renewed.
She said the presence of an
CANON Neil Roach is to honorary consul means that she
become the first Honorary Con- will no longer have to fly her
sul for the Republic of Trinidad passport to Trinidad.
and Tobago in the Bahamas. Canon Roach added that
After spending 43 years in the there are many Trinidadians
Bahamas as a priest and moving studying in the Bahamas, as well
up through the ranks of the as some Bahamians studying in
Anglican Diocese of the Trinidad.
Bahamas, Canon Roach was However, he said the main
afforded the title by Minister of links he would try to forge
Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell. between the two countries
His post will take effect after would be in tourism and
he meets with Prime Minister trade.
of Trinidad and Tobago Patrick When he goes to Trinidad, he
Manni.ig: at.hbis officecp .Por, plans to meet with tourism offi-
oSpj.p, ,O ......- ,,:. ,eials.there to begin plans for the
i-creation of travel packages that
PastOral would allow citizens of both'
countries to get to know one
Canon Roach, who has not another better.
been home to Trinidad for At present, he said, many
many years because of his pas- Bahamians go to Trinidad for
toral commitments here, will Carnival, spending three days
return for the official visit on at the festival without never
September 25, the country's really seeing what else the coun-
Republic Day holiday, try has to offer.
The Bahamas and Trinidad His duties will include dis-
and Tobago have had close con- seminating information on eco-
nections for decades, and the nomic, commercial, cultural and
appointment solidifies the rela- scientific matters and opportu-
tionship, Canon Roach said. nities in Trinidad and Tobago,
"We have always had a good with particular emphasis on
relationship, but that personal investment, tourism and the
contact, we never had," he said, export of goods and services.
adding that Trinidadians would He will also be responsible
be excited about the move. for answering matters pertain-
For example, Andrea Myers, ing to his birth country, and will
a marketing executive who assist in arrangements for vis-
moved to the Bahamas from its by officials and business per-
Trinidad several years ago, sons and facilitate artists and
explained the hassle she was performers from Trinidad


and Tobago.
His portfolio will also include
assisting Trinidadian nationals
in distress, difficulty or deten-
tion, within the terms of the
instructions of the Ministry of
Enterprise Development and
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
in Trinidad.
Canon Roach said that while
he was at college in Barbados,
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son, Archbishop Drexel Gomez
and Canon Dudley Strachan
encouraged him to come to the
Bahamas.

Working
During that time, Trinidadi-
ans were coming here as police-
men or prison officers, but they
stayed and began families here,
working as teachers when their
contracts expired.
While in Nassau, he met and
married his wife, Joan. They
have four daughters: Melanie,
Director of Public Works;
Marie, Director of Anglican
schools; Carol, an officer in the
Ministry of Finance; and
Michelle, a teacher in Abaco.
Trinidad and Tobago, which
became an independent nation
on August 31, 1962, will be host-
ing independence celebrations
in Nassau on September 2 at
the Cricket Club on West Bay
Street at 8pm.
The fete will be preceded by
a church service at St Matthew's
on August 28 at 10.30am.


WEUIv-oumrT, UUVO I I ciVJ, 1 in- o


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE WEDESDAY AUGST 17 2005THE TIBUN


'How I helped



catch Derek


Turner


-the


multi-million



dollar conman'


* By JOHN MARQUIS
AN ex-con turned pastor revealed last
night how he trapped the Nassau swindler
Derek Turner and prevented what could
have been one of the biggest global invest-
ment scams of all time.
Barry Minkow nailed the 55-year-old NeW
Zealand conman in a classic FBI sting oper-
ation, posing as an investor with $2 million to
risk in Turner's get-rich-quick hedge fund.
As a result, Turner who operated his
investment racket from his luxury home on
Paradise Island now faces seven years in
prison, having defrauded 30 investors of $16
million. He admitted the fraud in a plea deal
with the Feds to avoid a 20-year stretch,
which could have led to him dying behind
bars.
Mr Minkow, himself an ex-fraudster with
a seven-year jail term behind him, said Turn-
er finally confessed because incriminating
conversations between the pair had been
wire-tapped by federal agents.
And it quickly became clear that the flam-
boyant trickster had neither the trading
record nor funds to. back up extravagant
claims made in his business prospectus.
"If Turner had been allowed to go on
another year, he would have been involved
in a worldwide, multi-million dollar scam,"
Mr Minkow told me from the US head-
quarters of the anti-fraud agency he now
runs alongside his church activities.
"I hope fiv;ryears from p pw, that he will
realise we saved, him from'himself. A Wall
Street Journal guy exposed me, and although


RI STORANTE


How a former

convict aided

the FBI in a

sting operation

I hated him at the time, I came to realise it
was the best thing that ever happened."
Turner, a charismatic charmer who bam-
boozled small-time investors into risking,
their life savings in his phoney fund, lived the
high life in Nassau on other people's money.
After his arrival in the Bahamas in the
year 2000, he bought five properties, includ-
ing an office on East Bay Street, in an
attempt to "look big" in front of his wealthy
neighbours on Paradise Island.
Socialising
One of his tactics was to oil his way into
the company of celebrities and high-rollers,
and he was particularly pleased with him-
self when he bought an Ocean Club Estates
property near baseball ace Barry Bonds.
But, according to Mr Minkow, the plausi-
ble villain was cash-starved to the point
where he was desperate to lay hands on the
$2 million he (Minkow) pretended to hold as
a potential investment.
"He claimed to have a $500 million fund,
and to be generating a 40 per cent return.


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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE T WAG


ZHIVARGO LAING ENVISIONS


A BAHAMAS WHERE HE IS


PRIME MINISTER


Why, with a supposed $200 mil-
lion a year income, would he
be interested in my $2 million?"
asked Mr Minkow.
"At that rate, he could double
his money every two-and-a-half
years, yet he was pressing me
to invest and I knew he had a
need for cash. Perpetrators of
ponzi schemes always need
cash.
"What Turner was doing was
taking investors' money and
buying real estate. He needed to
look big because that's the only
way you can attract investments
from the genuinely wealthy.
"You can't operate a suc-
cessful investment fund and run
around in a Toyota. He knew
if he could build up an empire,
he could mix with the right kind
of people. Having a home near
someone like Barry Bonds was
very important to him."
'Turner, who called himself a
securities trader, and operated
from a gated property on Par-
adise Island which boasted a
bank of 42-inch plasma screens
to'track world markets, fell foul
of Mr Minkow earlier this year.
'That is when the FBI
installed the prisoner-turned-
preacher in a room at Atlantis
and began a four-day sting
operation that eventually
brought Turner to justice.

Meetings

Mr Minkow had two meet-
ings with Turner one over din-
ner at the New Zealander's
home, when promises of a 38
per cent return were made in
an attempt to lure the pastor
into his scheme. .
The dinner was ostensibly a'
pleasant social occasion, but Mr
Minkow was all the time wiring
the "smoking gun" evidence
that was to be Turner's down-
fall.
"Sadly, he reminded me a lot
of me," said Mr Minkow, "he
was charismatic and absolutely
sure of himself. He was one of
those guys who simply
protesteth too much.
"He claimed his Taiwanese
wife's family had $250 million in
the fund. He wanted to create
an image for himself. He had
to make sure that his image tied
in with his story."


* BARRY Minkow


So where did Turner go
wrong?
According to Mr Minkow,
the rogue trader erected a wall
between his investors and inde-
pendent corroboration.
"He never showed anyone
trading records that would inde-
pendently back up that he made
38 per cent a year. He had no
audited financial statements.
You were left with his charts,
his words and his personality.
"These investors had never
seen any independent corrob-
oration. No-one gets these
returns on a consistent basis."
Turner's portfolio was sub-
jected to the scrutiny of an inde-
pendent markets expert who
reported that it was impossible
to constantly generate the
results he was claiming on a
monthly basis:
"Not only did he never have a
losing year, he never had a los-
ing month," said Mr Minkow.

Authorities

Turner also erred in not dis-
closing his brush with Aus-
tralian regulatory authorities,
when he was barred from trad-
ing because he didn't have a
licence.
"He said in his prospectus
that for seven straight years he
generated huge returns, yet for
part of that time he was shut
down," said Mr Minkow.
When Turner was first arrest-
ed in New York, he denied
wrongdoing and tried to pin a
defence on Mr Minkow's under-
cover methods.
But the wire-tapped evidence


"I feel I forgive the guy. I
hope he turns his life over to
God. I have nothing personal
against him. I have a heart for

people who make mistakes. I
am a liar who was saved by
God's grace."


"You can't operate a
successful investment fund
and run around in a Toyota.
He knew if he could build up
an empire, he could mix with
the right kind of people.
Having a home near someone
like Barry Bonds was very
important to him."


against him was so strong, so
powerful, that he eventually
accepted the game was up.
Rather than face 20 years in
jail, he "fessed up" and plea-
bargained a seven-year term,
with formal sentencing expected
next month.
So how does Mr Minkow
feel, having tricked Turner into
the indiscretions which deter-
mined his destiny?
As a pastor who sees himself
as "just one bad decision away
from another prison term", Mr
Minkow does not gloat.
On the contrary, he wants
Turner to learn from the errors
of his ways, to accept his dis-
honesty and rebuild his life.
"What you must remember
is that people like us never go
into business with the intention
of defrauding anyone," he said..
"We don't think of ourselves
as villains. We always take the
view that one year from now
we are going to make the big
trade and that everything is
going to be okay.
"We always think people will
eventually get paid. We can
sleep at night because we don't
think of ourselves as crooks."
Does Turner's incarceration
give him personal satisfaction?
"I have a great satisfaction that
people are not going to be
defrauded anymore. I hope that
Turner's property gets liquidat-
ed and that everyone gets
repaid.
"I feel I forgive the guy. I
hope he turns his life over to
God. I have nothing personal
against him. I have a heart for
people who make mistakes. I
am a liar who was saved by
God's grace."

Change

Claiming Turner is a man
with "a lot of talent", Mr
Minkow said: "I believe that
people can change. I believe
that people can come back from
failure. I would visit him in
prison in a minute if asked.
"I am a pastor. I have a pas-
tor's heart. I pray that he will
pay back his victims and come
back from this failure. And I
would hope he would have a lot


more humility."
Reflectively, Mr Minkow
added: "All he had to do was
produce the trading records.
But he didn't have the trading
records or the money."
All he had, in, fact, was an
elaborate impression of wealth
which he used ruthlessly to
swindle others, causing heart-
break and anxiety among those
foolish enough to be taken in
by his blandishments.
Now he has seven long years
in which to contemplate .the
error of his ways.














Insight on
Monay


Government mourns

loss of Sri Lanka's

foreign minister








"Copyrighted Material
f Syndicated Content I 4
Available from Commercial News Providers"


- *-- mm-mw ff -lm
bwmjp omm0a u 111 4iem~b
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THE Bahamas has sent
condolences to the govern-
ment of Sri Lanka following
the assassination of its For-
eign Minister, Lakshman
Kadirgamar.
Mr Kadirgamar was a
member of the Common-
wealth Ministerial Action
Group (CMAG) of which
Bahamas Minister of For-
eign Affairs, Fred Mitchell
serves as vice-chairman.
In a letter foerthe gpvern-
ment of Sri Lanka, it was
noted that the Bahamas "is
aware of the contribution
made by Mr Kadirgamar to
the work of the Common-
wealth... [and] also con-
scioug of the contributions
[he] made on behalf of the
peace process in Sri Lanka.
Tragically, it appears that
this might have cost him his
life."


The letter continues with
the sincere hope, "that the
sacrifice of his life would not
disrupt the progress made to
date, but rather that it would
propel the process to a
speedy and amicable reso-
lution".
Relations between the
Bahamas and Sri Lanka, for-
mally established in July of
this year, are good, with the
Bahamas being among the
countries which started a
fund to assist some victims
of the recent tsunami that
affected that nation.
Snipers shot Kadirgamar
on Friday night as he
stepped from the swimming
pool at his Colombo home.
An ethnic Tamil, he was a
critic of the Tigers' rebellion
and later backed the peace
process. The Tigers have
denied the shooting.


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whichIlwilliallow0forgextensive0learninglopportunities.OYou willlassistlthe0teaminleaderllandtpossiblyOlead0engagement
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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005, PAGE 7






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


LOCALNWI


The power of the Internet and




what it means to the Bahamas


THERE'S been lots of
hype lately about the
10th anniversary of the World
Wide Web.
But the Internet has existed
in one form or another since
1969, and was conceived even
earlier. In fact, there are more
Internet birthdays and inven-
tors than you can shake a stick
at.
Yet for most of us the Inter-
net did appear 10 years ago,
when a start-up company called
Netscape introduced a com-
mercial browser to surf the
Web. And it was Netscape's
explosive public offering in
August, 1995 that marked the
birth of the Internet age.
Like the development of
radar in World War II the
Internet's roots go back to the
darkest days of the Cold War.
In a sense, it was Soviet leader
Nikita Kruschev who launched
the Internet in 1957 when he
sent Sputnik, the world's first
satellite, into Earth orbit.
Red-faced by this achieve-
ment, the Americans set up the
Advanced Research Projects
Agency to make sure it never
happened again. And in 1969
this agency created ARPANET
- the progenitor of today's
Internet.
Before then, computers were


like huge stand-alone calcula-
tors, and making them commu-
nicate effectively was a huge
leap. But this was not the con-
ceptual beginning of the Inter-
net.

even years earlier, in
1962, another founding
father named Joseph Licklider
envisioned a "network of net-
works", with online communi-
ties sharing a universe of infor-
mation. Licklider, a top ARPA
scientist, died in 1990 five
years before his prediction came
true.
Initially, the ARPANET
linked a handful of universities
in the United States. And it
expanded, improved and diver-
sified over the next decade or
so, but the big news was the
invention of the World .Wide
Web by British scientist Tim
Berners Lee in 1989.
This seamless hypertext-
linked electronic information
system went public in 1992. And
it made Licklider's dream of 20
years earlier become a reality.
But it wasn't the real beginning.
That's because the idea of
hypertext links dates back to
1945, when an American scien-
tist named Vannevar Bush sug-
gested a theoretical machine
that let people store and


Before Netscape, the online
world was just a few research
databases and proprietary
e-mail systems. For the average
person, it was both hard to use
and not very useful. But that
all changed dramatically in
1995


retrieve documents linked by
associations.
This concept was developed
by Harvard grad student Ted
Nelson, who launched some-
thing called Xanadu in the
1960s. By most accounts
Xanadu inspired the World
Wide Web a network of con-
nected documents that could be
accessed by anyone with a com-
puter.
But Nelson was not a sci-
entist like Berners Lee, so
most people ignored him.
Project Xanadu still exists
(http://xanadu.com/index.html),
kept alive by hackers, but little
is heard from its founder any
more. He is currently a visiting
professor at Oxford Universi-
ty.

With all these starting
points (and there
are many more smaller ones)
most experts say Netscape was
the true beginning of the Inter-
net. Before Netscape, the online
world was just a few research
databases and proprietary e-
mail systems. For the average
person, it was both hard to use
and not very useful. But that all
changed dramatically in 1995.
Netscape was based on a
piece of university software
called Mosaic that allowed users
to display Web pages graphi-
cally on their computer. And at
about the same time, the sci-
ence establishment began turn-
ing over network operations to
independent service providers.
Back then, there were about 2
million computers connected to
the Internet, compared to one
billion today.


Almost as soon as it was
launched, Netscape became the
browser of choice because of its
revolutionary ease of use. With-
in a year, three quarters of Web
users were using it. But after
only three years Netscape's fate
was sealed by Microsoft's free
Explorer, and it was bought out
by America Online for its
remaining subscriber list.
Today, Netscape no longer fig-
ures in the Internet world.
According to one account,
"when historians tell the tale of
the dot-comn boom, they will say
it began on August 9 1995. That
was the day shares of Netscape
Communications maker of the
first widely adopted Internet
browsing software, more than
doubled on their first day of
public trading.
"...even though the company
itself had yet to make a dollar of
profit, Netscape co-founder Jim
Clark's 20 per cent stake was
worth more than half a billion
dollars that day."
The dramatic five-year stock
market rise that began with the
Netscape IPO launched the
Internet age. But what exactly
did that mean for the rest of us?


nothing short of phenomenal.
What can you do with the Inter-
net today? The possibilities are
endless.
You can write your own
Weblog a personal online
journal that can turn you into an
instant pundit. You can select
which blogs to read from an
index of 15 million at Techno-
rati.
You can share your digital
photos on Flickr, you can con-
nect with friends, potential
spouses or interest groups on
Friendster. You can help write
an online reference guide at
Wikipedia.


A nd more and more
people in all age
groups are going online. In a
2004 survey, 22 per cent of
Americans aged 65 or older had
access to the Internet, up from
15 per cent in 2000. And 58 per
cent of Americans aged 50-64,
75 per cent of 30- 49-year-olds,
and 77 per cent of 18- 29-year-
olds currently go online. This
represents a total of 63 per cent
of US adults.
As you would expect,
teenagers live on their comput-
ers and cell phones today. But
Tough Call's father is from the


You can zoom in to a satellite
image of your own home at
Google Earth. You can buy and
sell junk on e-Bay, and shop
for almost anything on
Amazon. You can create,
upload and download your
own radio shows at Podcast
Alley


You can zoom in to a satellite
image of your own home at
Google Earth. You can buy and
sell junk on e-Bay, and shop for
almost anything on Amazon,
"XI -- --- 1 -A -A.


A You can create, uploaa ana
ccording to Canadian download your own radio
online editor Simon shows at Podcast Alley. You
Wickens, "it meant that virtu- can share music and software
ally anyone could publish or files with anyone via Limewire.
broadcast anything; it blurred You can get directions on how
the ability to register and con- to drive from point A to point B
trol intellectual property; it at MapQuest. And you can
changed the way we communi- book any kind of travel at sites
cate; it changed the way we like Expedia and Orbitz.
invest in and'track the markets; You can monitor your
it helped eliminate some of our teenager's driving habits over
last vesties of riva it ave the Internet with GPS-enabled
cars. You can do most of your
fi eicfe, hmanking online, as well as access
ernment services, retailers and government services. You can
auctions. And it has made it get all the news you want from
easy to create and profit from a zillion different sites, make
enormous scams within days." free phone calls using Skype,
For something that was and find an answer to just about
designed originally to let acad- every question under the sun,
emics share information with- including medical treatment
out time/cost barriers, this is options.


World War II generation, and
he too can't wait to check his
e-mail: "The Internet lets me
keep in touch with .people I
would otherwise contact rarely,
and it is a good family contact
tool," he says.
"As your interests decline
with age, the Internet lets you
find interesting stuff and keeps
you up-to-date with what is
going on in the world."
But apart from anecdotal evi-
dence.like that, little is known
about Internet usage in the
Bahamas. The estimated num-
ber of subscribers to local ISP's
is less than 40,000, mostly
broadband connections. Ques-
tion is: what are we doing with
this amazing tool to make us
more competitive in the modem
world?

What do you think?
Send comments to larry@tri-
bunemedia.net


o*w "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content *. .

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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- -


In respect of the passing

of


Mrs.Yolanda 1M. Roberts;


The City Lumber Yard will

CLOSE on Wedniesday

August 17,2005 at 1:00pra.


We will re-open at 7:30am
Onz Thursday August 18, 2005



THANK YUU.


I


- - ft .11mw .









S* *
uLOCALiNEWS


Ferry firm recognises


marketing student
FOR the second consecutive year, Bahamas Fast Ferries has
recognised the most outstanding marketing student of the College of
the Bahamas graduating class.
The company sponsors the marketing award to recognise the top
graduate in the bachelor of arts degree programme with a plaque, a
cash incentive and an internship with Bahamas Fast Ferries.
This year's recipient is Suncher Johnson, a 3.0 marketing graduate.
Khaalis Rolle, chief marketing officer at Bahamas Fast Ferries said
.that his company is involved in many community initiatives and the
sponsorship of this award is just another way of showing the com-
pany's commitment to young people.
J r"This is only the second year but Bahamas Fast Ferries is com-
mitted to keeping this award going," noted Rolle. "In fact, we see this
award blossoming into something bigger.
"As corporate citizens, we are going to do our part to give back to
the community, particularly, young persons. As our company grows,
so will our financial commitment," he said.
COB director of financial aid and housing Cheryl Carey thanked
Bahamas Fast Ferries for its commitment and assured Mr Rolle
that any monies donated for awards and financial aid is appreciated.
She informed him that many students depend on aid to assist with
college tuition.
0 PICTURED left to right during the presentation of the award
is Colyn Major, vice president of student affairs; Suncher Johnson,
2005 recipient; Khalis Rolle, Bahamas Fast Ferries; Mark Turn-
quest, 2004 recipient; Cheryl Carey, director, COB financial aid
and housing.


St Andrews


is a class act


ST ANDREWS, the "Inter-
national School of the Bahamas",
is off to a flying start this school
year.
As the school gears up for the
2005 to 2006 year, it is reporting
"outstanding" International Bac-
calaureate results by its year 13
students.
Principal Dennison MacKin-
non said the school is probably in
its strongest position ever.
St Andrews has always been
noted for its high academic stan-
dards and Mr MacKinnon point-
ed out that these have been
maintained in the BGCSE exam-
inations this year.
The school's benchmark for
good BGCSE passes (A to C
grades) is 70 per cent of students
sitting the examinations, which
at St Andrew's are taken at the
end of year 11.
"Yet again this year", the prin-
cipal stated, "the school has bro-
ken the 80 per cent barrier.

Record
The record of the geography
teacher Michael Brindle-Selle is
particularly impressive.
Mr Brindle-Selle has taught
BGCSE geography since the
examinations were introduced in
1993.
He has never had a student
with a grade below "C" and this
year he kept up that record.
However the school's real
achievement was the perfor-
mance of the first batch of Inter-
national Baccalaureate (IB)
diploma 'students.
They are the first students ever
to sit IB examinations in the
Bahamas.
The IB exams are respected
world-wide as the "gold stan-
dard" of pre-university educa-
tion.
They demand two years of
intensive study at post GCSE
level.
Students have to sit six papers,
three at standard level and three


'Outstanding'
International
Baccalaureate
results

at higher level. Included in the
mix must be English, mathemat-
ics, at least one science and at
least one foreign language, as
well as at least one arts subject.
Community service is also an
essential element of the course.
St Andrew's had 18 students in
the programme this year, of
whom 17 were studying for the
full diploma.
No less than 16 students
gained a full diploma and one
student, Alanna Rodgers, gained
43 points.
"The maximum number of
points possible is 45 and Alan-
na's score will almost certainly
prove to be one of the highest in
the world," the school said in a
statement.
It said that in 14 of the 23 sub-
jects offered at the school, the
school's average grade was high-
er than the world average,
according to statistics received
from ,the International Bac-
calaureate Organisation.
"This is a truly outstanding
achievement, both for St
Andrew's School and for the
Bahamas", stated Mr MacKin-
non.
"That students from such a
comparatively small school could
measure themselves against the
best in the world and pass muster
- indeed, punch above their
weight is a truly outstanding
achievement and our congratu-
lations are extended both to all
the students involved and to their
truly outstanding teachers."
"What gives us particular plea-
sure is that a number of our suc-
cessful IB students are scholar-
ship students, who have had the
last four years of their education


paid for by the St Andrew's
School community. These chil-
dren are now going, on scholar-
ships, to some of the best uni-
versities in North America. St
Andrew's continues to give back
to the community in this best of
ways an investment into its
future leaders."
Last year, the St Andrew's
School Foundation donated to
the school an impressive new $5
million library, research and IT
centre.
This followed the opening of a
new early learning centre, new
state of the art science laborato-
ries and a new swimming pool
in recent years.
The school said it believes that
much of its success can be put
down to quality teaching.
The biggest group of teachers
at the school is Bahamian but
they are joined by colleagues
who hail originally from four dif-
ferent continents.,
Currently, St Andrews enrolls
over 800 students, 75 per cent of
which are Bahamian and 25 per
cent foreign.


Bachelor's Degree Programs

Business Management

Accounting & Finance

Business IT

Information Systems & Management

Law LLB(Hons)

Business Law LLB(Hons)


Master's Degree Program

Business Administration (MBA)

Contact

Success Training College
324-7770
E-mail: courses@successbahamas.com web site: www.successbahamas.com


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST i7, 2005, iLrAc 9


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


AUGUST 17, 2005


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Freeze" truth spell. u n (CC) tranged dad. C the future. tC (CC) The Canister"
LIF '* MATERNAL INSTINCTS (1996, Suspense) Delta STOLEN FROM THE HEART (2000, Drama) Tracey Gold, Barbara Man-
LIFE Burke, Beth Broderick. An emergency hysterectomy drell, Lisa Zane. A desperate friend steals a woman s unborn baby. (CC)
plunges a woman into madness. (CC)
MSN C '00) Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MS iNB, (cc mann, ,
MNI K ** JIMMY NEUTRON: BOY GE- Unfabulous a Full House 'The Full House The Roseanne "Sat- Roseanne
N NIUS (2001) Mark DeCarlo (CC) Wedding" Wedding" urday"n (CC) "Canoga Time"
NTV (:00) Big Brother* NOW & FOREVER (2001, Drama) Mia Kirshner, Adam Beach. News C (CC) News
S 6 (N) Longtime soulmates must fight for their friendship.
OLN Survivor-Aust. Outdoor Investi- Bull Riding USSTC Challenger Series. From Survivor: The Australian Outback
,-a- Outback gations CheyenneWyo. 'Trust No One" C (CC)
ED Street Tuner NOPI Tunervi- Pinks! (N) Unique Whips NASCAR Nation Street Tuner
rSPEED Challenge (N) sion( C iChallenge
.. (:00) Billy Gra- Behind the Hal Lindsey Taking Authority Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (CC)
TEN am Classic, Scenes (CC) (CC) Presents (CC)
Crusades
Everybody Everybody Everybody Everybody Everybody Sex and the City Sex and the City
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond LovesRaymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Carrie dates a 'Was It Good for
"Sex Talk" (CC) "No Thanks" "Left Back" n Debra's sister. Ray can't sleep. writer. You?"
(:00) In a Fix "Ar- While You Were Out "Minneapolis: Miami Ink "The Apprentice" Yoji Biker Build-Off "Russell Mitchell v.
TLC chitectural Ambi- Industrial Europe" Loft project. (N) finds he still has a lot to learn. the Detroit Brothers" Russ Mitchell.
lions" (CC) : .
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order Briscoe and Green in- * STARSHIP TROOPERS (1997, Science Fiction) Casper Van
TNT der "Past Imper- vestigatethe case of a woman Dien, Dina Meyer, Denise Richards. Premiere. Young soldiers battle a vi-
fect" n foun dead in a car trunk. cious army of gigantic bugs.
T M Grim Adven- Life & Times of Life & Times of Mucha Lucha Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) Teen Titans Dragon Ball Z
i lN tures Juniper Lee Juniper Lee A (CC) "Crash"
TV Policiers sous I'occupation (Partie Complement d'enquite Les h6pitaux et la semaine Ombres et lu- TV5 Le Journal
T 5 1 de2) de 35heures. mieres
TW 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
Tv PM Edition (CC) (CC) Brushfire. (CC) ,I
:00) Ihocente de Apuesta por un Amor' 'La Madrastra Don Francisco Presenta Adal Ra-
UNIV i- mones; Beto Terrazas; Steve Starr.
* CLUE- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA LESS (1995) Ali- Benson and Stabler believe a cop Stablerand Benson get little help in Benson and Stabler delve into a
cia Silverstone., may be a serial killer. (CC) solving a murder, n (CC) modeling underworld. (CC)
VH1 :00) Metal Ma- SHOWGIRLS (1995, Drama) Elizabeth Berkley, Kyle MacLachlan. An The Surreal Life Hollywood Se-
S nia ambitious dancer makes a bid for Las Vegas success. C Cu (CC) crets Revealed
Home Improve- **x FUTUREWORLD (1976, Science Fiction) Peter Fonda, Blythe WGN News at Nine C (CC)
WGN ment Cu (CC) Danner, Yul Brynner. Robots in a theme park turn their sights against cus-
tomers.
Everybody One Tree Hill Lucas strains relation- Smaliville "Spirit" A wannabe prom WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond ships by deciding to move in with queen's spirit is released, affecting Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"The Canister" Dan. C (CC) the behavior of others. & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! "Col- R U the Girl With T-Boz & Chilli Veronica Mars Veronica Wallace Dr. Phil Molester; rape victim; gam-
WSBK lege- Pittsburgh" The final nine contestants'they open and Mac investigate a series of bier.
(CC) for the New Edition. (N) i bomb threats at the school. (CC)
Costas NOW n (CC) * PAPARAZZI (2004, Suspense) Cole Hauser, Entourage "Blue The Comeback
H BO-E Robin Tunney, Dennis Farina. An actor takes revenge Balls Lagoon" C Valerie hires a
on intrusive photographers. C 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) new publicist.
(5:45)*** The Wire "Middle Ground" Stringer * ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (2004, Ro-
H BO-P OTHELLO (1995) and Avon reminisce. CA (CC) mance-Comedy) Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Kirsten Dunst. A couple erase
'R' (CC) the memories of their relationship. C 'R' (CC)


(:00) *'/ HOME ALONE 3 (1997, (.45) ** NEW YORK MINUTE (2004, Comedy) Ashley Olsen, Mary- Costas NOW 0
H BO-W Comedy) Alex D. Linz, Olek Krupa. Kate Olsen, Eugene Levy. Twin sisters spend a wild day In Manhattan. (CC)
u 'PG (CC) u 'PG' (CC)
S:00) ** FATHER OF THE BRIDE PART 11 (1995) **/, THE DEVIL'S ADVOCATE (1997, Horror) Keanu Reeves, Al Paci-
H BO- Steve Martin. Dual pregnanciesplay havoc with an no, Charlize Theron. An attorney goes to work at a law firm run by Satan.
anxious family man. A 'PG' (CC) nC 'R' (CC)
(45) MAX on * LETHAL WEAPON (1987, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, *** SHREK 2 (2004, Adventure)
MAX-E et: Catwoman Gary Busey. A veteran detective is paired with an eccentric partner. C Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Mur-
(N) n (CC) 'R'(CC) phy. C 'PG' (CC)
. (6:30) **s MYSTIC RIVER (2003, Crime Drama) ** WELCOME TO MOOSEPORT (2004, Comedy) Gene Hackman,
MOMU AX Sean Penn. A detective probes the murder of his Ray Romano, Marcia Gay Harden. A man runs for mayor against a former
friend's daughter. C 'R (CC) president. C 'PG-13' (CC)
DICKIE ** ABSOLUTE POWER (1997, Suspense) Clint Eastwood, Gene Weeds "Free Weeds "Free
SHOW ROBERTS: FOR- Hackman, Ed Harris. iTV. A master thief stumbles into a presidential con- Goat" (iTV) A Goat' (iTV) C
MER CHILD spiracy. C 'R' (CC) (CC)
.TMC (5:55) **'A * NORTHFORK (2003, Drama) James Woods, (:45) * THE FALCON AND THE SNOWMAN
TMC STARGATE Nick Nolte, Claire Foriani. Six men try to evacuate resi- (1985, Drama) Timothy Hutton. Two friends conspire to
(1994) 'PG-13' dents of a Montana town. C 'PG-13 (CC) sell U.S. secrets to the U.S.S.R. Cu 'R'


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WEDNESDAY EVENING


~ILIL~IILI LI I I







THE TRIBUNE
"..., -1 ,.. .


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005, PAGE 11


Bay Street

laine blocked

FROM page one

gates and put the chain across.
Also seen in the photograph
.is the car of Member of Par-
'liament. Whitney Bastian
(MP40) with its blue licence
late .
a M sftian told The Tribune
that his car was "not parked
in the road but. at the eastern
end of the shipyard."
"I was looking for someone
:and no one would open the
chains," he said. "I was not
,obstructing traffic. I was off
main Bay Street. Iknow better .
than to park in the road. any
vehicle could have passed me
because I was inside the road
althiostini the area where the
bus stdps," he' Said.
"Man, I see the police and
they ain't say nothing to me. I
hopped in my car and pulled
off and left the police right
there conversing and laughing
with people: behind the gate.
They didn't say nothing to the
truck driver," he said.
Sgt Carroll pointed out that
when she arrived on the scene,
Mr Bastian's car was not there.
"Ifhe was there, I would have.
given him .a ticket as well.
Although his car is in the pic-
ture, I can't give him a ticket
now because a fixed penalty
ticket has to be served with
him on the scene," she pointed
out.
The Tribune spoke to an
employee of the shipyard, who
admitted that sometimes,
trucks offload in the road if
something is blocking the
entrance to the yard.
He said the operation only
lasts a few minutes and is only
done when it will cause little or
no-obstruction to traffic.
Road Traffic Controller Jack
:Thompson said that anyone
seeing such an act by a truck
driver should .report it to the
police immediately. f
"These guy' can t just take
6ver.,It's oiut'f order," he said.
"Thspector Thomas, a road
traffic inspector on Bay Street,
echoed Mr Thompson's com
ments saying the parking of
vehicles in a lane of such an
important thoroughfare "was
not supposed t hpp apen like :
that."..:. -. '


FROM page one


these type of things don't hap-
pen. This whole thing is unfor-
tunate. We are now putting in
place the mechanisms to ensure
this type of thing don't happen
'cause right now I'm not a hap-
py fellow over this because to
me it was unnecessary," Mr
Peet said.
The minister said he had done
all that he should have done as a
minister. He was now hopeful
that the officers would return to
work.
When asked about past com-
plaints and threats to conduct a
sick-out, an animated Mr Peet
responded: "I am annoyed at the
process. Right now I'm Minister
of Education for the week and I
don't have time for questions on
past events. I always make time
for the press but I am not going
further, man, because all I know


Sick-out

is that it happened, was correct-
ed, and is now done with."
On Monday a spokesman for
the officers said that 95 per cent
of the officers had called in sick
because their overtime had not
been paid.
John Pinder, President of the
Bahamas Public Services Union,
told The Tribune that "officers
were having a problem with
overtime payments for over a
year" and were "stressed out
over their overtime payments."
Mr Pinder pointed out that
many of the immigration officers
at Grand Bahama became dis-
enchanted after not receiving
their overtime payments while
knowing that their immigration
counterparts in Nassau and cus-
toms officers in Grand Bahama
had been paid.


'Miracle water'

FROM page one
He said he was not questioning if God had healed people
through "the water" or the validity of the claim by Bishop
Lawrence Rolle that water he had blessed had miraculous prop-
erties. He said Christians should not put strings on God.,
However, he noted that it is important that Christians use the
Bible as a point of reference.
"God gave us his word, to go by," he said, noting that as Chris-
tians if something does not line up to the word of God, it should
not be done.
He noted that if he had the water vision, he would have taken
it to several religious leaders and got a consensus before passing
it on to the public.
The "miracle" water craze began when Bishop Ross Davis,
Senior Pastor of Golden Gates Assembly World Outreach Min-
istries in a press release dated August 9, claimed "a man was pro-
nounced dead and taken to the mortuary; the family member
obeyed Prophet Rolle's instructions and the man came back to life,
he is now receiving care at home."
He also claimed that another man received healing for deafness.
The claim of the "dead man brought to life" sparked major pub-
lic interest and resulted in hundreds of Bahamians flocking to
special "God Working through the Water Services" to purchase
their own taste of miracles.
The story of the alleged "resurrection" in the Bahamas was even
posted on an Indian website.
However, in an interview with The Tribune on Monday, Bish-
op Rolle said that the man had not in fact died, nor was he ever
pronounced dead by a doctor or medical official.
Bishop Rolle said he did not know the person involved, but said
he heard the story through someone who had testified in his
church. He said what he was told was that the man had been
injured in an accident and was feared dead, but when a hearse was
called, the man shivered. It was realised that he was alive and he
was then taken to the ICO, where the man's family prayed over
him, sprinkling the water. Soon after the man recovered.
However, Bishop Rolle said thousands of Bahamians have
received miracles and financial blessings.
Bishop Rolle has vowed that all proceeds from the sale of the
water will be donated to the poor; although his Church gave all the
offerings from the water services to Bishop Ross Davis' Golden
Gates, which hosted the event.


Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Pinder said that
immigration officers would
return today after a resolution
was reached ensuring that their
overtime cheques would be
"ready no later than .Friday."
Deron Brooks, a BPSU shop
steward and immigration officer
in Grand Bahama, said "officers
are demoralised and fed up with
the empty promises of the gov-
ernment over the last few years.
Nothing has come to fruition.
We told them where the prob-
lem is and how best to rectify
our grievances but they have
not."
He questioned how customs
officers in Grand Bahama, who
used the same system could be
paid on time but immigration
officers are always "in the cold."
"Every few months we go
through this, especially this time
of year. This has happened more
than three times before and each


time we have threatened to strike
- we had a strike early last year.
We have repeatedly written let-
ters to the Minister of Immigra-
tion, Minister of Public Service,
the Permanent Secretary in
Immigration and the Director,
but nothing has happened. Every
few months we don't get paid,"
he said.
Mr Brooks said that they had
threatened a sick-out in April,
but were assured by the minister
that there would be rectification.
In April, a meeting to solve
the problem of stalled payments
between Mr Peet, Immigration
Director Vernon Burrows, Assis-
tant Director James Rolle and
officers in Grand Bahama was
held.
"No one in government who is
of any importance can say they
don't know of our problems. At
our meeting in April the minister
promised faithfully to take care
of us by July but did not, so there


FROM page one

Burrows, head of the warrants section of police
prosecutions, said that nothing has changed in'
the department to assist his officers in tackling the
high number of outstanding warrants.
"There has been no change in personnel or
equipment. If nothing changes in the system then
the number of warrants will continue to increase
and the problem will simply continue to mount,"
he said.
Mr Burrows-said that since last November,
when he estimated that there were approximate-
ly 40,000 arrest warrants for criminal matters,
the number has not decreased, but instead sig-
nificantly increased.
Although he could not give the exact number of
warrants currently outstanding, Mr Burrows said
that "roughly 4,000 warrants have been issued
this year alone, and that's not counting some of
the ones that the courts have issued and we've not
been able to collect yet."
In November Mr Burrows estimated that he


FROM page one

consumer. In the US the price
varies weekly. But here the
price is only adjusted from ship-
ment to shipment. So we will
'have this new price here until
the next shipment, which will
be in the next 28 days.
"This is only going to get
worse before it gets better.
Right now this is only Texaco's
mark up. I'm sure before Thurs-
day the rest (Esso and Shell).
will be on my desk demanding
that the price change goes into
place. There is no concern as
far as I'm concerned for the
consumer in this country. Just
the bottom line," he said.
However, Mr Miller warned,
.~~~ .* **'*T


is not much reason for us to have
faith in him now we are play-
ing a wait-and-see game," he
said.
Mr Brooks pointed out that
officers reluctantly had a sick-
out. "We took a vote because we
couldn't see why they didn't just
fix the problem. They just don't
care. I'll bet they can't just not
pay officers in Nassau how
many chances would the
accounts department mess with
their salaries?" he asked.
Immigration officers are par-
ticularly vital to Grand Bahama
as they ensure that the port con-
tainers are secure. They are also
on the front-line in the fight
against illegal immigration and
are needed to process tourists
entering the country whose trav-
el documents need to be
reviewed. Questions have been
raised about the effect it may
have on efficiency at Grand
Bahama's ports of entry.


Warrants
could have the situation under control in six to
eight months if his section was given more fund-
ing.
"I do not know if there is any provision for us
in the new budget, but until now we have had no
increase in funding," he said yesterday.
Mr Burrows explained that the difficulty in
executing warrants is largely due to staff shortage.
"We execute about 40 warrants a day, but one
single court can issue 40 warrants a day, so the
number just keeps growing.
"There is the issue of additional transporta-
tion that is needed, but that is not really the prob-
lem, we can always get a car from somewhere.
The major problem is always that we simply do
not have enough officers to send out," he said.
A further help in dealing with outstanding war-
rants, said the inspector, would be a computer sys-
tem that connects the police prosecutions depart-
ment .with the courts.


Gas price

that he expects with the arrival
of the new shipment of oil next
month, that the price of gasoline
will rise once again, possibly this
time to $4.20 a gallon.
"People have to appreciate
how serious this is. This is a very
serious problem that will affect
the way we do business and live
in this country.
"Tough times require tough
decisions and these are some
tough times. Some tough deci-
sions need to be made to pro-
tect the Bahamian people. I pay
for my gas just like everyone
else. We need to wake up to
this," he said.


Now Mr Miller said, the only
thing the general public can do
is to try to be conservative with
their driving, and to be as frugal
as possible.
"Whatever way we can, we.
need to try and cut down. Do
yourself a favour and do some
car pooling. I've been driving
my daughter's Volkswagen now
because that doesn't burn as
much gas. People need to not
make those unnecessary rides
and be as frugal as they can.
"Situations like this affect all
of our lives.
"It's already out of control
and we need to implement any-
thing we can to give the people
a break," he said, referring to
the recently signed PetroCaribe
accord.


Republi60th ANNIVERSARY OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF INDONESIA


MESSAGE FROM H.E. REZLAN ISHAR JENIE,
AMBASSADOR EXTRAORDINARY AND PLENIPOTENTIARY OF
...... THTHE REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA TO
THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

Sixty years ago, Indonesia emerged as an independent nation, breaking
away from the shackle of colonialism, and proclaiming its
independence on 17th August 1945 as the Republic of Indonesia.
Subsequent generations have recognized that the greatest challenge
has been to free the Indonesian people from poverty, ignorance,
B ASIC MS e backwardness and all other problems that present a hindrance to the
people's quality of life. Indon esia is developing a strategic posture
that contributes the strengthening of regional and international peace
President: PresidentSusoBabO and stability.

DVice Pres i dent:' 'Mum ad Yusuf /ALL Indonesia is a nation that is drawing on its past history in order to
Form of State: w nUnitary SfI define its vision for the future. The maintenance of unity and solidarity
Ideology: Pancasila of .s F P in i among the people of Indonesia is fundamental to nurture the spirit
Belief in'on,..aeo of our independence. The development efforts that Indonesia has
*Just a ndcvleg a undertaken have brought progress and changes as well as challenges
*' 1The Unity of nidonases to and for its people. In light of this, allow me to share some of the
*Democracy g changes experienced in the past year.

SocialJsticOn its 60th anniversary, Indonesia is facing the fact that it has entered a new chapter in its history.
ForeignPolicy: ndepenThe year 2004, was a significant year for Indonesia. Last year, Indonesia held one of the most
re;a4m (,4 s ambitious and most complex elections,anywhere in the world. Over a period of 9 months, 3
Poputatio: ;241,973 9(J rounds of elections were held: one Parliamentary and two Presidential rounds, resulting of a total
Capital and arges:Jakarta,17turn out of over 350 million voters. The election enabled the smooth. transition of power to
Monetary unit: Rupiah (5 President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and Vice President Jusuf Kalla. The President has set
Languages: Bahasa Indoe forth several economic target aimed at accelerating growth from 4.5% to 7.2% in 2009 over the
Javaneseandnext five years, and in targeting an annual economic growth of 6.5 % per year. Indonesia's
Religions:.. .slam 88%,Pro.oman C. economic expansion continued at a robust pace in 2005 with GDP growth reaching 6.35%.
Buddhist 1%1/0Economic growth was fueled by vigorous domestic demand. Indonesia has the lowest budget
EthnicIRgce 15 big ethnic group" re th m deficit in Asia and for the first time is seeing net capital inflows. With this encouraging development,
hundreds of smallerehnig Indonesia is maintaining its international profile, project itself as an outward-looking country
Literacy rate: 87.9% (2004 est.) very much eager to participate in the regional and international order.
GDP: $8274billion (2004 est.); p On the other side of the spectrum, Indonesia has had to endure one of its most trying moment
rate: 4.9%. when on 26 December 2004, a horrific earthquake and Tsunami struck the province of Aceh,
Inflation: 6.1% (2004 est.) claiming 131,000 lives and inflicted economic losses estimated at US $ 4.9 billion. We are
Labor force: 111S illion (2004est.) .....comforted by the fact that the challenge before us, is not one that Indonesia is facing alone. In
Unemployment: 9.2% (2004 est.) $ the face of this great human tragedy, the people and government of Indonesia will forever be
ctrl, caasaa) p e trf grateful for the outpouring of generosity in response to this disaster from the international
oil,, copra, poultry, beef, egg community, including Bahamas.
Natural resources: petroleum, tin, natural gas kI n In this commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the independence of the Republic of Indonesia,
fertile soils, coal, gold, silver. on the 17th of August 2005, it is important to reaffirm our commitment to developing mutual
Industries: petroleum and natural gas, textiles, understanding and strengthening good relations and cooperation between our two countries. This
cement, chemical fertilizers, plywo. r f motivates Indonesia to adopt an active and healthy engagement in economic and politic relations
Exports: $69.86 billion f.o.b. (2004 est.) as well as people to people contacts, not only with its neighbors, but with other regions as well.
Imports : $45.07 billion f.o.b. (2004est.) In the era of globalization, Indonesia is fully aware she cannot live by herself. The 1945
world.Constitution clearly stipulates that Indonesia shall contribute to the shaping of a better world, a
world of peace, social justice and equitable prosperity.
For Further Information:
Embassy of the'Republic donesat the Com on e ofT I would like to conclude by reiterating my firm conviction that the excellent relations of friendship
325 East 38 Street, New York, N. 00 and cooperation existing between our two countries will continue to grow stronger with the
Tel. 212-972-8333 Fax.21 passage of days. I renew the availability of my government and myself to further strengthen the
e-mail: ptriido"imorbonds of friendship and cooperation which so happily existed between our two countries.


.


IN


.........................................................................I....................................


.. LOCA NEWS...








PAGE12,WEDESDAOCAGUS 17E200 TH TRBUN


Scouts benefit




from donation




from Lyford




Cay Foundation


* ASSISTANT scout leader Perry Mortimor, international commissioner Drexel Major, chief
commissioner Brian Christie, John-Wesley Ingraham, Dvaine Strachan, Liam Davis, Rena
Raynard, president Winston Newton and Dwayne Strachan.


FOR eager campers, summer
means playing outdoors, mak-
ing new friends and learning
new things.
For Drexel Major, interna-
tional commissioner of the
Scout Association of the
Bahamas, it signals the start of
the busy season as thousands of
boys and girls enjoy an over-
the-top wilderness experience
at annual summer camps.
Making the 2005 camp sea-
son extra special is the generous


contribution to the 92-year-old
organisation from the Lyford
Cay Foundation.
"The Lyford Cay Foundation
Gifts and Grants Committee is
excited to assist this year's Scout
camps in Nassau and Abaco.
"By contributing to the
camps, we hope to enhance not
only the summer programme
for some 2,000 youngsters, but
encourage their allegiance to
the Scout Association of the
Bahamas, an extremely healthy


and worthwhile organisation,
throughout the year," explained
Alessandra Holowesko, chair-
woman of the committee.
The foundation's gifts
equipped camp-goers and
campsites with brand new tents,
lanterns, backpacks and stoves.
Winston Newton, president
of the association, said: "In
addition to enjoying our 34-acre
Adelaide camp site, scouts also
attended the national camp held
in Abaco."


* PLEASANT Bridgewater, MP for Marco City; Frank Levy, L and L Properties; Mr Wilch .
combe; and Gregory Isbell, project manager


GRAND BAHAMA The
community of West End got
another major boost last week,
when ground was broken for a
multi-million dollar resort pro-
ject.
Local businessman Mr
Vida Hepburn and the prin-
cipals of L and L Properties
out of Florida have teamed
up to create Blue Marlin


Cove at Bootle Bay.
The two storey upscale com-
plex will expand the existing
Bootle Bay Fishing Lodge by
some 30 units.
The units will consist of two-
bedroom executive style con-
dominiums, each of which will
be completed with its own
docking slip in the private
marina.


Other amenities on site will
include a reception and recre-
ational areas.
On hand for the ground
breaking was Minister of
Tourism West End and Biini-
ni MP Obie Wilchcombe.
FiES Construction have
been awarded the contract for
the project, which is expected
to take 18 months to complete.


Governor General praise


Kuwait's pledge to aid


* By Bahamas
Information Services
GOVERNOR General Her
Excellency Dame Ivy Dumont
has lauded the government of
Kuwait for its commitment to
assist Arab and other devel-
oping countries, including
some Caribbean nations, to
improve their economies.
"I am aware that our gov-
ernments share similar goals,
including a commitment to the
achievement of national pros-
perity," the Governor Gener-
al said as she accepted the let-
ters of credence from Nabeela
Abdulla Al-Mulla, non-resi-
dent ambassador of Kuwait to
the Bahamas during a cere-
mony at Government House.


"Your government, like
mine, believes that the devel-
opment of a national educa-
tional system is a defining factor
of economic development and
therefore allocates a large part
of its budget to education," the
Governor General said. "Your
progress in the areas of health,
education and welfare has been
applauded internationally."
The Governor General said
that the- phenomenon of glob-
alisation can adversely impact
the economies of developing
countries, unless North-South
economic relations are funda-
mentally restructured.
"The Bahamas honours the
state of Kuwait for its commit-
ment to assist Arab and other
developing countries to


improve their economies" a
commitment that emanates
from its stated belief that over-
all development, and widening
the base of participationafid
cooperation, are essential for
ensuring security and stability
for all countries of the world.
"More than four decades
ago the Kuwait Fund for Arab
Economic Development was
established. Over the years, it
has provided intermediate and
long-term loans and financial
grants fort many development
projects and programmes in
scores of developing countries
m among them being some of
the Bahamas' Caribbean part-
ners. In this regard, your kind
invitation to The Bahamas is
acknowledged with thanks."


Youngsters enjoy beach party


The Abaco Club at Winding
Bay has again opened its doors
to a grateful group of children.
"One would never imagine
that beauty of this magnitude
awaits you, behind that little
three feet high, Bahamian-
styled rock wall at the entrance
of the Abaco Club on Winding
Bay" said Sharon Greene, the
owner, manager and principal
of Cyber Learning Centre in
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.
Thirty children enrolled in
her summer classes enjoying the
food and the atmosphere during
a day visit at the Abaco Club.
Peter de Savary, the founder
and the chairman of the Abaco
Club on Winding Bay, sponsors
and supports a number of char-
itable efforts, especially those
which benefit children.
After the second annual
"Every Child Counts" beach
party held a few weeks ago at
the club, Mrs Greene asked Mr


de Savary to host a similar event
for the children from the Cyber
Learning Centre.
Given the green light, the
beach party was held on August
11, one day before the conclu-
sion of the summer classes.
Mrs Greene, who has 25
years of school and college
teaching experience behind her,
is married to Gregory Greene,
the resident tennis pro at the
Abaco Club.
The Greenes relocated to
Abaco from Freeport in 2000.
Upon their arrival, they both
began employment at St Francis
de Sales Catholic School in
Marsh Harbour.
He joined the factuality as the
physical education teacher and
she was awarded the position
of vice-principal.
Mrs, Greene said: "I was
shopping around Abaco for
decorations that are conducive
to learning for my class rooms;


there were none to be found."
This realisation originated the
idea for a store that carries
these items and other educa,
tional supplies.
"What began as a book store
is now a haven for children who
are slow learners and do not
have mental, physical or learn-
ing disabilities."
The school also accepts stu-
dents who have been excluded
from other schools, making it
possible for them to continue
their education.
Mrs Greene said she in the
very near future, she hopes to
construct a building to house
the school. This would allow her
to take on more students, assist
some of the underprivileged
free of charge and offer more to
the community.
She thanked Mr de Savary
and everyone else at the club
for creating an appropriate
finale to the summer classes.


School's new schedule


TEMPLE Christian high
school has announced the
schedule for 2005 orientation:
Orientation for teachers will
begin August 25 and continue
through August 31, at 9am each
day.
Between 9am and 11am on


Thursday, September 1, orien-
tation for new students will be
held. All students must be in
full uniform.
Orientation for returning
students will be held on Friday,
September 2, and all students
must be in full uniform.


A seminar for prefects will
be held on Wednesday, August
31, and all prefects are advised
that they must be in full uni-
form.
The school will reopen on
Monday, September 5, at
8.15am.


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Tipping 'fuels resistance'





to promotion in tourism


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TIPPING in many tourism industry
jobs has "inadvertently fuelled a resis-
tance to promotion" to executive jobs
within the sector that have a higher
base salary but no tips, a strategy paper
on establishing a National Productivi-
ty Centre in the Bahamas has revealed.
The paper, produced by the Inter-
national Labour Organisation (ILO),
said: "Within the Bahamas there is the
widespread occurrence where the cus-
tomary habit of tipping in 'frontline'
tourism jobs earns staff with low base
salaries good final earnings.
"This has inadvertently fuelled a
resistance to promotion to jobs which
carry greater responsibility, no oppor-
tunity to earn tips, although with a
higher fixed base salary. There is no
opportunity to enhance earnings
through tipping, and thus there is the


Bahamas needs 'radical transformation of work

ethic' to counter 'emerging culture of mediocrity


disincentive of less monetary remu-
neration."
The strategy paper on creating a
Bahamas Productivity Centre, part of
the ILO's Programme for Manage-
ment-Labour Co-operation (PRO-
MALCO) worldwide project, was
based on the responses gained from
various groups and companies via
questionnaire.
According to the paper, the respon-
dents were "unanimous" in their back-
ing for a National Productivity Cen-
tre, given concerns over low produc-
tivity in both the public and private
sectors.


To change this "will require a radical
transformation of work ethic and the
reorientation of an emerging culture
of 'mediocrity"', the strategy paper
said;
Given that the Bahamian economy
was heavily reliant on service indus-.
tries, particularly tourism and finan-
cial services, the ILO paper said any
productivity improvement "requires
that the society offer a more favourable,
environment for the development of
newer, more complex products capable
of commanding greater market share".
This Would also aid any government
initiative to further economic diversi-


fication, "and aid higher value-added
activities which can earn greater rev-
enue or can aid in the retention of for-
eign exchange revenue".
Respondents to the ILO survey iden-
tified tourism as the industry that need-
ed most attention in-regard to produc-
tivity improvement, with construction
ranked number two.i
The strategy paper said: "One finan-
cial.institution expressed serious con-
cern about .the low level of productiv-
ity in the construction industry and the
adverse impact it is having on cus-
tomers who borrow money and can-
not get the project completed for the


borrowed sum. The general feedback
indicated the belief that: there was a
low level of productivity in the public
and private sectors."
Agriculture and fisheries were iden-
tified as the third and fourth targets
for productivity improvement, ahead of
financial services, due to .the recogni-
tion of their linkages with Bahamian
tourism and the ability to generate bet-
ter revenue retention.
Among the obstacles identified by
respondents to the ILO questionnaire
as restricting productivity improve-
ments in the Bahamas were an inade-
quate education system; "historically
adversarial relationship" between
workers and management; and a lack
of attention to technical and vocation-
al training.
The questionnaire responses indi-
cated that about half of Bahamian
SEE page 2B


Decision awaited


on Shell disposal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SHELL has yet to take a
decision on the sale of its
Bahamian retail business, mul-
tiple sources told The Tribune
last night, with the group many
consider the favourite bidder
facing possible foreign owner-
ship concerns.
The SOL Group, headed by
wealthy Barbadian Kyffin Simp-
son, is considered by many to
be the leading contender to pur-
chase Shell's network of
Bahamas-based gas stations.
However, any sale to the
SOL Group could run into
opposition from the Govern-
ment, concerned about the
political effect from approving
any sale to a foreign purchas-
er. Leslie Miller, minister of
trade and industry, has publicly


said he would like the business
to be sold to a Bahamian pur-
chaser if a deal can be struck.
There are at least two
Bahamian contenders: the
BISX-listed Freeport Oil Hold-
ings Company (FOCOL) and a
group headed by independent
MP and businessman Tennyson
Wells.
However, there are obvious
reasons why Shell would favour
a sale to the SOL Group, given
that it disposed of its eastern
Caribbean, Guyana, Suriname
and Belize retail operations to
the company late last year and
earlier in 2005..
The SOL Group has now tak-
en over Shell's retail and com-
mercial fuel business in Barba-
dos, St Lucia, Antigua, Anguil-
la, Guyana, Suriname, Belize,
SEE page 4B


Atlantis RevPAR


set to grow 8-9%

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
KERZNER International is expecting revenue per avail-
able room (RevPAR) growth of 8-9 per cent at its Paradise
Island-based Atlantis resort, a Wall Street brokerage 'as
reported, although it is more lukewarm in its rating than other'
analysts, giving the stock only a 'Peer Perform'.
Bear Stearns analyst Joseph Greff, in a report for investors
following Kerzner International's second quarter results
announcement, said that while he liked the company's "long
term growth profile", the shares merited only a 'Peer Perform'
rating because of their relatively high current valuation.
This means that much of the potential earnings increase
from Kerzner International's expansion projects has already
been priced into the stock, meaning there is relatively little share
price upside.
Meanwhile, Mr Greff said Kerzner International's second
quarter 2005 results, which produced $0.98 in earnings per
share (EPS), better than his own forecast of $0.93, "actually look
better than they appear".
This was because the company had been forced by Interna-
tional Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to consolidate-
I *SHOPPERS visit Marina Village, the latest stage in the
SEE page 2B Atlantis development


Court backs fees.

award to Bahamas

financial institution


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Court of Appeal has
dismissed an appeal aimed at
overturning a Supreme Court
verdict that awarded a Bahami-
an financial institution $881,156
in fees and commissions for its
services as an escrow agent, rul-
ing the challenge had "no mer-
it".
The court backed the ruling
of Supreme Court Justice John
Lyons, who found that BSI
(Overseas) Bahamas was enti-


tied to receive fees and charges
from Geosurvey Holdings Ltd,
a Bahamian company, in rela-
tion to an Escrow Agent Agree-
ment for the period April 15,
1984, to December 29, 1989.
The Court of Appeal judge-
ment recorded that the dispute
began when Geosurvey Hold-
ings and its affiliates, secured
contracts with governments in
Tanzania and other African
countries in relation to their
"advanced computerised Geo
SEE page 2B


India links could help

Bahamian companies


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
TO upgrade information and
communications technology
platforms, the Bahamas and the
rest of the Caribbean are likely
to consider forging closer ties
with India, a nation both rich
in human capital and techno-
logical advances.
Tanya Wright, president of
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce, said a state-of-the-art
information and communica-
tion technology (ICT) platform
are important for any expand-
ing economy. From the Gov-
ernment's standpoint, various
ministries are in the middle of
improving their technological


base. And, for the private sec-
tor, rapid changes in technology
have resulted in them being left
behind.
She said India was deep in
human capital, with a leading
education system. This meant
that Indian-based companies,
staffed with highly educated and
well-trained individuals, could
look to exploit this under-devel-
oped sector by offer their ser-
vices at a highly competitive
rate.
Meanwhile, Bahamian com-
panies, in a move to increase
their competitive edge and meet
the needs of a demanding pub-
lic, would be able to place them-
selves on the cutting edge
SEE page 4B


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010









PAEUBWDNSDY AUGUS 17,l2005i I -IL IIIIINII


Ministries set




to meet on fuel




duty 'reduction'


By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
LESLIE Miller, Minister of Trade and Indus-
try, yesterday said the Petroleum Usage Com-
minuttee will be meeting with executives from the*
Ministsry of Finance tomorrow to consider
whether the Government can lower the duty it
charges on gasoline from $1.06 to $0.90 cents
per gallon.
Mr Miller told The Tribune that the committee
and Ministry of Finance personnel were working
in close collaboration to arrive at a consenseus as
to what should be done.
He said the suggestion has been put on the
table, along with the question of whether to
decrease the margins for wholesalers by $0.16
cents from their current $0.28.
Mr Miller addedthat the prevailing view is
that all options should be considered as the Gov-
ernment looks for a solution to rising gasoline
prices, which are expected to increase to an aver-
age price of $4.02 on Thursday. N LESLIE Miller


Atlantis RevPAR set to increase


FROM page one
the operations of a managed
resort in the Maldives, which
generated a $4 million operat-
ing loss during the second quar-
ter. A further $5.1 million loss
was expected to be produced
by the One&Only Maldives
during the rest of the year.
On Paradise Island, Mr
Greff said: "Forward bookings
for the core asset, Atlantis on
Paradise Island, appear strong
for the 2005 third quarter, and
Kerzner International sees
RevPAR growth at Atlantis in
the -9 per cent range.
"Moreover, new restaurants
and food and beverage offer-
ings at the new Marina Village
should help drive incremental
revenues."
Although the .openings for
manyffcilitifesifir61d iffthde'
mainf part of the Phase III
expansion on Paradise Island
have been pushed back to


April 2007, as opposed to ear-
lier projections of late
2006/early 2007, Bear Stearns
said it viewed this change as
"substantially immaterial".
Mr Greff added that the
pushing back of deadlines for
completing The Atlantis, The
Palm project in Dubai and the
Morocco casino/resort were
not "monumental negatives".
However, due largely to the
negative impact from the
One&Only Maldives property,
Bear Stearns reduced its third
quarter 2005 operating income
and EPS forecasts for Kerzner
International from $38.2 mil-
lion and $0.30 to $33.8 million
and $0.13 respectively.
Without the Maldives effect,
set to reduce third quarter EPS
by $0.10 to $0.12, Bear Stearns
said its estimate would be
'between $0.23 to $0.25.
But for the 2005 fourth quar-
ter, Mr Greff increased his EPS
and operating income estimates


THE MEDICLINIC ATLANTIS
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Qualifications:
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Must demonstrate strong public relations,
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Please send resume to:.
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to $0.39 and $40.9 million
respectively, from $0.27 and $37
million. He said this was to
reflect the impact from Kerzner
International's 37.5 per cent
stake in BLB Investors, the
vehicle that acquired gaming
company Wembley and its Lin-
coln Park race track assets in
Rhode Island, plus better-than-
expected performance at the
One&Only Palmilla in Mexico.
And for 2006, Mr Greff also
raised his EPS and operating
income estimates for Kerzner
International to $3.33 and
$234.9 million respectively, up
from $2.92 and $225.1 million.
Looking back at the second
quarter, Mr Greff said the $5,5
million "shortfall" between his
estimates of the operating
income for PI properties and
the actual result, $54.6 million
versus $49.1 million, chiefly
resulted from "a one-time pro-
vision for a supplier claim in
the amount of $4.8 million".


Court backs fees award


FROM page one
survey system", which used aerial photographs to
develop digital and computer information for geo-
logical and military usage. The African countries
were looking to use the system for mineral
prospecting.
However, Tanzania ran into difficulties in meet-
ing the payments due to Geosurvey, creating liq-
uidity problems for the company, whose chief exec-
utive was a Dr Gollmer.
Geosurvey, according to the judgement, owed
$10 million to Equator Bank in the Bahamas. The
situation was remedied by the arrival of an Egypt-
ian investor, Dr Kamel, a "prime client" of BSI
(Overseas) Bahamas, who advanced $10 million
to help pay off the Equator Bank loan.
By New Year's Eve 1984, Dr Kamel and his
partners, two Middle Eastern 'sheikhs', had decid-
ed to invest in Geosurvey Holdings and acquired 51
per cent of the shares in the company, in addition
to taking control of all its subsidiaries and the
monies owed by the governments of Tanzania and
Guinea.
The remaining 49 per cent of Geosurvey Hold-
ings remained in Dr Gollmer's hands through his
Bahamian company, Shanahan Limited.
An escrow agreement between Geosurvey Hold-
ings, its affiliates and BSI (Overseas) Bahamas
was executed on April 15,1985, whereby the bank
would act as an escrow agent to receive the funds
owed to the company by the African governments
would be paid in.
The funds would then be disbursed to Geosurvey
Holdings, with some $10.5 million plus interest to be
paid to Geosurvey Holdings, and the balance going
to an affiliate.
The Court of Appeal judgement recorded that
the Tanzanian government paid $2.697 million to
Dr Kamel in 1986, with this sum turned over to BSI
(Overseas) Bahamas in accordance with the escrow
agreement.
The judgement said: "BSI did not deposit the
monies received in a separate escrow account to be
disbursed in accordance with the agreements
between the parties. Instead, it deposited the
monies in the general account operated by Geo-
survey Holdings, thus allowing the monies to be
used by Geosurvey Holdings in its general opera-
tion. Dr Kamel, who was Geosurvey Holding's
financial controller at the time was aware of the
deposit but saw no reason to question it."
The following years saw Dr Kamel removed
from the Geosurvey Holdings Board following a
dispute with Dr Gollmer. In late 1989, Dr Gollmer


approached the Tanzanian government to resume
payments on the monies it owed Geosurvey, the
government having stopped payments during the
dispute.
However, these payments, totalling some $36
million, were directed to go straight to Geosurvey
Holdings and not through BSI (Overseas)
Bahamas, according to the Court of Appeal judge-
ment. In addition, some $30 million from the
Guinea government went to a Geosurvey affiliate
despite BSI's claim that it was the beneficial own-
er of the debt.
The judgement added: "Although it had been
agreed that BSI would be paid for its services as the
Escrow Agent under the Escrow Agreement, no
fees had been agreed.
"Sometime in 1990, BSI rendered a bill to Geo-
survey Holdings for services rendered as escrow
agent under the Agreement. The bill was not paid
so it commenced proceeding for fees and commis-
sion it was entitled to under the Escrow Agree-
ment."
The Supreme Court found for BSI (Overseas)
Bahamas, rejecting Geosurvey Holdings' defence
that the Escrow Agreement had been terminated in
May 1991 and that all debts receivable under the
agreement had been paid.
That defence was submitted under Dr Gollmer,
but when Dr Kamel got back in control he filed a
counterclaim, alleging "breach of contract, breach
of fiduciary duties and for damages for negligence".
Justice Lyons dismissed the counterclaim,
describing Dr Kamel's evidence at trial as "unreli-
able". But Geosurvey Holdings appealed on the
grounds that the Escrow Agreement had been ter-
minated, BSI (Overseas) Bahamas was not entitled
to any remuneration under the Agreement, and
that the Judge "erred in law" in dismissing the
counterclaim.
The Court of Appeal, though, said it found "no
reason to disturb or interfere" with the Judge's
findings on whether the escrow agreement had
been terminated and that BSI (Overseas) Bahamas
was entitled to remuneration.
In addition, the Court of Appeal backed the tri-
al judge's verdict that BSI (Overseas) Bahamas
had done "all it could" to collect outstanding
monies from the African countries under the
Escrow Agreement, but could not begin litigation
against them without the consent of Geosurvey
Holdings.
As a result, the Court of Appeal ruled: "BSI
(Overseas) Bahamas could not therefore be liable
in damages for breach of its obligations under the
Escrow Agreement, as claimed by the appellant.


Tipping 'damaging tourism promotion'


FROM page one
employers rewarded their work-
ers using a formal evaluation
system. The strategy paper said'
that performance appraisal sys-
tems were "commonplace" in
larger financial institutions,
communications and tourism
businesses, but outside of these


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZETTE CYRIL OF BLUE HILL
ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of AUGUST,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NADEGE JEAN, HANNA HILL, EIGHT
MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of AUGUST, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
F-41085, Grand!Bahama, Bahamas.


BISI Colina
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Piaing Information As Of:

82wk- I 2wk-Low Symbol Preayous Close Yoday's Close Change Daily Vol EPS $ Div PIE Yield
1.10 0.80 Abaco Markets 0 80 0.80 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0o.,'0o
9,25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.25 9.26 0.00 1.462 0.340 6,4 3A68%
6.50 68.6 Bank of Bahamas 6.60 6.80 0,00 0.561 0.330 11.6 5.08%
0.85 0,70 Benchmark 0,70 0.70 0.00 0.187 0.010 3,7 1.43%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1,40 0.00 0,126 0.060 11.1 4.29%
1.16 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.16 1.15 0.00 0.062 0.040 18.6 3.48%0
8.73 8.78 Cable Bahamas 8.73 8.73 000 0.618 0,240 14,.1 2756%
2.20 1.87 Coliln Holdings 1,99 1.99 0.00 0.004 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.62 8,62 0.00 0,705 0.410 12.2 4,76%
2.0 0.67 Dotor's Hospital 2.24 2.24 0.00 .0.482 0.000 6,50 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 8.83%
10.80 9,19 Finco 10.49 10.49 0.00 0.670 0.600 15.7 4,77%
9.30 7.00 FirstOaribbean 9,.30 9030 0.00 0.696 0.380 13.4 409%
8.98 8.31 Focol 8.91 8.91 0.00 0.676 0.,00 13.2 8.61%
1.9 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1,15 000 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.3 4,22%
8.30 8.25 J. Johnson 8,27 8.27 0.00 0.561 0.60 14,7 6,77%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BORs 5.93 5.82 -0.11 0.122 0,000 48.6 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10. 00 0 0.00 2.010 0.760 5,0 7,60%
.W..... 25Wk-LoweSbol, Bidt LasPrices eekly V EPS ,,Div YI @i
13.00 12,60 Bahamas Supermlarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1,488 0.960 9.1 7,26%
10.14 10,00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10,35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.80 0.40 RNO Holdings 0.20 0.54 0.00 -0.086 0.000 NM 0.00%
43,00 28.00 ABOAB 41.00 43.00 4100 2.220 0.000 19,4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6 .93%
0o0 0.36 RNO Holdings 0.290.35 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
.wTk4. t k-LOW .. Fund Name NAV Y-D% Last 12 Months1 2 v$ td
1.2454 1.1798 Colina Money Market Fund 1 245429
2.3810 2,0068 Fidelity Bahamas 0 & I Fund 2.361""
10,4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4855**
2.2636 2,1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.263627"*
1.1246 1,0544 Colina Bond Fund 1.124578-*
DIOX ALL SHARE INDEX 10 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
twk-Ht -lHighest losing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit
2twk-.Low Lowest closing price In last 52 WeeKs Ask $ Selling price of Colina and tidelft
Previous Cloe Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
1Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to daV EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthi
Datly Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
AB AT JUL. 31, 200t" AS AT JUN 30, 2008
-AS AT JULY 20, 2008 1"* AS AT JULY 31, 20081 ***** AS AT JULY 31, 200s


sectors there was a "relatively
slow rate of implementation".
On the other side, employee
absenteeism and punctuality
were the biggest concerns for
Bahamian employers.
Some 92 per cent of respon-
dents to the questionnaire said
the National Productivity Cen-
tre should not be an agency or
department of government, due
to concerns that it should be
independent to avoid undue
political interference and being
"tainted by a public sector cul-
ture that does not seem to focus
on productivity".


As a result, 96 per cent rec-
ommended that the Centre be
independent and governed by
a Board of Directors that
included representatives from
government, civil society, the
private sector and trade
unions.
They also recommended that
the Centre be given "the legal
status of a statutory body":
In its recommendations, the
ILO suggested that the Board
include three members each
from the private sector, labour
and government, and one from
civil society.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY ISRAEL OF GROVE
SECOND STREET,' NASSAU, BAHAMAS., is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts wlthin.twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of
AUGUST, 2005to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship; P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VANIDA SEVELETA ROBINSON OF
SEQUIDA STREET, P.O. BOX EE-16541, .NASSAU, BAHAMAE,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of AUGUST,
2005to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.





is searching for an Executive Director
to join our organization.


The applicant must have a Masters
Degree with a concentration in Nonprofit
Management and a minimum of three or
more years of progressively responsible
experience managing a not for profit
organization. Salary commensurate with
experience.


Only qualified applicants need apply.


Resumes should be submitted to


by Wednesday August 31 2005.


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


i ME 'TRIBUNE








i IC I fr'IlLJIUL-


CARICOM retains



its value for



Bahamian business


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
TANYA Wright, president of
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce, said yesterday that in
assessing the value of the
Bahamas' membership in
CARICOM, this nation had to
appreciate that business and pol-
itics on a global scale was done
with blocks of nations rather
than individual jurisdictions.
"There is no question of the
value of the Caribbean to the
rest of the world from social,
economic and political fronts.
However, when the world
reaches out to the Caribbean it
does so through CARICOM.
Business and politics on a glob-
al scale is done with blocks of
nations, not individual nations,"
she said.
Declining to state whether it
was a mistake for the Bahamas
not to have signed on to the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME), and
whether the country should still
sign on, Mrs Wright said the
Bahamas still had a lot. to
explore in terms of the poten-
tial benefits that could be
derived from the regional trade
agreement.
She added that the Chamber
of Commerce was looking for-
ward to assisting the education
process, and would be spear-
heading this effort through a
globalisation conference,
expected to be held later this
year.
The conference is expected
to have the support of all the
relevant ministries, including
the Ministry of Trade and
Industry, Foreign Affairs and
Financial Services and Invest-
ments. Also on hand will be
members of the CARICOM re
gional negotiating machinery.
"We need to represent the
voice of the private sector in


* TANYA Wright


all this because there is still a lot
to be told to appreciate the full
scope of the globalisation
process," Mrs Wright said.
She .explained that the glob-
alisation process involved far
more than just trade relations,
and also involved helping com-
panies to recognise indications
of globalisation, such as the
technological advance that
allows cell phone users to take
photographs, where once this
could only be done by cameras.
"We need to participate in
the globalisation process. We
still have to change the percep-
tion and let people know that
its more than the CSME; it's
about making sure that we
advance. It is more than trade


agreements, it's about indica-
tors of globalisation, which
have to be analysed," Mrs
Wright said.
From the Chamber's per-
spective, Ms Wright said it
receives a lot of communica-
tion requesting its participation
in regional meetings, but the
correspondences are never
addressed to the Bahamas, but
to CARICOM.
She added that although the
country has questioned the val-
ue of the Bahamas' member-
ship in CARICOM, it is impor-
tant to look at the regional
body as a whole and see that
the Bahamas does participate
in CARICOM fully to the
nation's benefit.


Established "Out Island" resort is undertaking an active
repositioning in the marketplace and is now seeking an Executive
Chef. This is an exciting opportunity to become a part of the
management team of a well established resort and marina
operation, currently renovation and expanding its operation

JOB REQUIREMENTS:

To be considered for this opportunity, you will be an experienced
Executive Chef with a strong hotel background, preferably with
Caribbean experience. We also welcome applications from
Executive Sous Chefs, looking for their first Executive Chef
position.

CANDIDATE MUST.

Possess a successful career history
Hold certification from an accredited culinary training
institute
Have a minimum of 8 10 years of culinary experience
Be a hands on leader with the willingness to motivate,
train and develop your brigade
Have the highest possible standards both personally and
professionally
Ensure the quality preparation and presentation of all
menu items to the highest standards
Ensure that the preparation, handling, and storage of all
food items are in accordance with sanitation/health
regulations; experienced with HACCP would be a very
definite asset
Develop menus, with a creative flair, combining local
ingredients with overseas products
Maintain approved food and labour costs; purchases all
food and food related items and equipment
Be a strong goal oriented organizer
Be an excellent communicator and a team player
Believe in a Core value of Guest Satisfaction
Be culturally sensitive and willing to learn and follow local
labour laws and regulations
Have the ability to work and live on a small island

Resumes, with cover letter and references, should be sent to the
attention of:

The General Manager
Fax: 1-242-367-4633
Email: manager@oii.net




THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
REGISTRATION FALL 2005

PAYING FOR IT ALL
(NEW STUDENTS)


COMPULSORY FEES
Security Deposit
Orientation
Technology Fee
ID Card
Insurance Fee
Student Activity Fee
Total


Bill Calculation:
3 cc
(9 C
Fees $
Tuition (for Bahamians)
Student Development
Total Bill $ 1
Deferred Payment Calculation
Downpayment by Aug.19
Installment due Sept. 30
Oct. 31


$ 100.00
50.00
100,00
25.00
25.00
50.00
I $ 350:00


Refundable on Matriculation, $200 for non-Bahamians
One time fee, non-refundable
Payable each semester
One time fee, $15 to replace
Payable annually
Payable each semester


Lower Level Courses


nurses
redits)
325.00
900.00
*75.00
,300.00


4 courses
(12 Credits)
$ 350.00
1,200.00
75.00
$ 1,625.00

$1,165.00
$255.00
$255.00
$1,675.00


5 courses
(15 Credits)
$ 350.00
1,500.00
75.00
$ 1925.00

$1.345.00
$315.00
$315.00
$1,976.00


Upper Level Courses(Bachelor)


4 courses
(12 Credits)
$ 350.00
1,800.00
$ 2,150.00

$1,480.00
$360.00
$360.00
$2,200.00


5 courses
(15 Credits)
$ 350.00
2,250.00
$ 2,600.00

$1,750.00
$450.00
$450.00
$2,660.00


3 courses
(9 Credits)
$ 325.00
1,350.00
$ 1.675.00


*Note: These are sample billings. Actual bills will differ based on courses selected.


TUITION REFUND POLICY
A Drop/Add form must be completed, approved by an authorized COB official and a $20.00 fee paid if a
student wants to withdraw from class(es)


Withdrawal before August 29, 2005
Withdrawal during week of August 29 September 2,2005
Withdrawal during week of September 5 -9, 2005
Withdrawal after September 9, 2005


Amount Refundable
90% of tuition only
75%/. of tuition only
50% of tuition only
NIL


FRESHMAN WEEK PARKING

The College of The Bahamas wishes to inform the public of
the following arrangements for parking at Oakes Field Campus,
day and evening, on Tuesday, August 16 and Wednesday,
August 17 in relation to Freshman Week Activities.

All those doing business in the Portia M Smith Student
Services Centre, attending Parents' Night or Student
Orientation on the 16th and 17th are asked to enter the
campus through the Tucker Road Gate and park in the car
parks of the 'T' and 'B' Blocks.

Please note that no parking whatsoever will be allowed
in the areas surrounding the Student Services Centre.




Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs : "q t!]!^^^ .:^


THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD -

NOTICE
Payment of Benefits and Assistances for the month of August 2005, will be made in the following
districts, at the following pay stations between the hours stated below:

ADELAIDE DISTRICT:
Thursday, August 18, 2005: 12 noon 12:30p.m., at the Church Hall.

CARMICHAEL DISTRICT:
Thursday, August 18,2005: 9:30a.m. 11:45a.m., at Beacon Hill Church of Nazarene, Carmichael
Road.

GAMBLER DISTRICT:
Thursday, August 18, 2005: 12:45p.m. 1:30p.m., at St. Peter's Church Hall.

FOX HILL DISTRICT:
Thursday, August 18, 2005: 9:30a.m. 3:00p.m., at the National Insurance Board's Fox Hill
Sub-Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may collect them
throughout the month of September 2005, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

WULFF ROAD LOCAL OFFICE:
Thursday, August 18,2005: 9:30a.m. 4:00p.m. at the National Insurance Board's Wulff Road
Local Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may collect them
throughout the month of September 2005, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT:
Thursday, August 18, 2005: Monday, August 22, 2005: 9:30a.m.- 4:00p.m., at The Bahamas
Public Service Union Hall, East Street South.

GRANTS TOWN DISTRICT:
1. Thursday, August 18 Wednesday, August 24, 2005: 9:30a.m. 4:00p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters "A" "L", at the Cat Island United
Association Hall #1, Market and Vesey Streets.

2. Thursday, August 18 Monday, August 22, 2005: 9:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters "M" "Z", at the Salvation Army
Hall, Meadow Street.

3. Tuesday, August 23 Wednesday, August 24, 2005: 9:30a.m. 4:00p.m.
Persons who did not collect their cheques from the respective stations on the days
specified, may collect them at the Cat Island United Association Hall #1, Market and.
Vesey Streets, on the above-mentioned dates.

PLEASE NOTE:

Cheques must be collected from the listed pay stations on the dates and times given. In cases of
emergency, uncollected cheques may be collected from the Pensions Department, at the Jumbey
Village Complex throughout the month of September 2005 between the hours of 9:30a.m. and
4:00p.m.

Claimants and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in order to
collect their cheques. Acceptable forms of identification for claimants collecting their own payments
are:
Their National Insurance Registration Card, together with any one of the following:
1. A Passport;
2. A Voter's Card; or
3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the claimant is sending a representative to collect his/ her cheque, the representative should
provide an Authorization Form completed by the claimant, or a letter authorizing the Board to
pay the representative, together with any of the above-listed items to identify the representative.

All claimants and/or their representatives are advised that should they fail to provide satisfactory
documents to identify themselves as requested above, there may be a delay or denial of payments.


- .. _







PAGE B, WDNESAY, UGUS 17,005USEITIBUN


Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:

Accounts Clerk IV (Northern Bahamas Campus)

The successful candidate will report to the Assistant Vice President, Northern
Bahamas and to the Supervisor, Accounts Receivable, Oakes Field Campus and be
responsible for the following duties:

* Daily collection and daily banking of all monies in accordance with Accounting
Department Procedures.
* Receiving, recording and receipting cash and receivables from tuition, fees,
grants, rents, ancillary enterprises, etc. Issuing official receipts for all income.
* Balancing daily end-of-day batches from revenue collections.
* Analyzing & Reporting all daily revenue and collections by bank account,
mode of payment and receipt category.
* Proper and timely reporting and documenting of all overages and/or shortages
to the supervisor.
* Keying in all transactions into the Management Information System.
* Disbursing petty cash
* Any other related duties as required.

Qualifications/Experience/Personality Traits


An Associate Degree in Accounting or Business.
Minimum of two (2) years experience in a similar position
Experience with automated financial application is an advantage
Trustworthy and of good character
Meticulous and ability to work under pressure


Salary Scale: $16,900 x $500 $25,900

Interested candidates should submit a resume with supporting documents through
their Head of Department by Wednesday, August 31, 2005, to:

The Director
Human Resources Department
Oakes Field Campus
Nassau, Bahamas


IndiGO


N E.T W


O R K S


SIndigo Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in Nassau,
Bahamas. Indigo is in the process of hiring the highly skilled team required to
develop these and future service offerings. Successful candidates will be highly
energized, willing and able to take on the challenges of a fast-paced network
rollout. Indigo Networks offers a comprehensive benefits package. Salary is
commensurate with qualifications.

Position: Telecommunications Specialist

Description
The Network Services team is tasked with the 7/24/365 OA&M of an international
telecommunications network. The principal responsibilities of the Telecommunications
Specialist are:

*Maintaining end-to-end carrier-grade voice telephony over an MMDS
wireless network and an underlying Cisco telephony infrastructure

-Ongoing administration of softsWitch, PSTN gateways and SS7
hardware/software

-Integration of corporate telephony systems, most specifically circuit-switched
Mitel and Nortel PBX, via Cisco access gateways

-Monitoring and troubleshooting inter-carrier switch-to-switch interconnection

*Network and Subscriber Capacity Planning

Qualifications

*Determined and independent, but a team-player and a self-starter, with
7+ years previous telecoms experience in a similar capacity maintaining
an international service provider's network.

*Willing to work hands-on 7/24/365 to resolve network or system problems.

-University degree preferred. Industry certifications necessary:
CCNP/CCSP/CCIE

*Excellent verbal and written communications skills.

-Excellent troubleshooting and analytical skills.

-Deep experience with Cisco routers, switches (LAN and WAN), VolP
gateways, SS7 controllers, and BTS10200 softswitch.

*Knowledge of the fundamentals of NLOS MMDS wireless systems and
wireless backhaul

*Solid understanding of telecommunications circuits from DS-0 through
OC-3

-Broad and extensive knowledge of IP telephony (VolPNoN), soft-switches,
PSTN gateways, SS7, QoS, SIP, H.323, and MGCP, over a range of
broadband mediums

*Fluent with data packet analyzers and expert in IP packet analysis

-Solid PBX (Mitel, Lucent, Nortel) administration, a plus

-Knowledge of carrier class switching systems a necessity (DMS100,
DMS250)

Interested Candidates should submit their resumes in writing to Indigo
Networks RO. Box N-3920 to the attention of the Technical Services Manager.


Bahamas to look to India for


boost in technological base


FROM page one
through upgrading their tech-
nological platform by tapping
into the Indian market.
"You can't advance without
proper information and com-
munications technology. We
have to make sure the way we
communicate internationally
and locally exposes us to the
widest potential to' get our mes-
sage out to the world," Mrs
Wright said. "The idea sums
up everything you need to
receive and give information,
and the resources India brings
to bear are quite substantial."
Mrs Wright attended the First
India-CARICOM Economic
Forum, co-ordinated by the.
Confederation of Indian Indus-
try in collaboration with the
Indian High Commission.
The forum also incorporated
a jnulti-product India/CARI-
COM Trade Exposition, Min-
isterial Dialogue,
workshops/seminars and other
activities. The forum was held
in Trinidad and Tobago earlier
this month.
India's ministerial represen-
tatives told the forum how
important the Caribbean region
was to them, and that they
expected to attain an unprece-


dented 7 per cent economic
growth. The Indian delgation
gave illustrations on how ties
with the region were growing,
pointing to the CARICOM
Centre in Trinidad, which was
fully computerised by an Indian
company, with a second stage
underway that involves sophis-
ticated ICT such as video con-
ferencing.
Ms Wright said the major
objectives of the forum were to
promote and develop relations
in four major areas politics,
health and science, ITC, and
small and medium enterprises.
She added that as CARI-
COM members seemed poised
to build a new regional econo-
my, ICT was generally accepted
as central to this objective.
Looking at the area of small
and medium enterprises, Ms
Wright said this area was of spe-
cial importance because most
of the Chamber's member were
small and medium-sized enter-
prises.
She said that in forging closer
ties, it was conceivable that
India-based companies could
partner with Bahamian compa-
nies to assist with training exer-
cises, improve their ICT plat-
forms and help in making them
more efficient and competitive.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WILLY THOMAS PETIT HOMME OF
LINCOLN BLVD., P.O. BOX 8162, NASSAU, BAHAMA~Epplying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of AUGUST,
2 005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
RO.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.





THE MEDICLINIC CABLE BEACH
Requires: J1) Full Time Registered Nurse
Pa) Part Time Registered Nurses to work
in Primary/Urgent Care Facility
Qualifications:
Current Bahamian licence
Must have at least three (3) years experience in the
field.
Must have current ACLS Certificate
Must demonstrate strong public relations,
communication skills
Must be responsible, dedicated, competent and
independent.
Attractive Benefit Package
Please send resume to:
The Mediclinic
P.O. Box N-4302
Nassau, Bahamas


In recent months, the spot-
light has turned to the small
business sector and ways both
Government and the private
sector can help promote the
start of small businesses, with a
lot of banks readjusting their
focus on businesses and com-
mercial loans, Ms Wright said.
She added, however, that
having funds available was only
part of the equation, with com-
panies looking to build success-
ful enterprises needing to have
the right technology, training,
structure, and even mentorship.
Mrs Wright said India had,.
many large businesses that can
help Bahamian firms better
compete in a global market.
While suggesting that all large
firms take this approach, Mrs
Wright said the focus of small
and medium enterprises was to
have India-based companies
come to the Bahamas and help
them bring their strategic plans
to fruition and also place them-
selves in strategic markets.
They would be able to look at
the whole structure of the com-
pany and, working together,
determine how to make the
enterprise reach where it needs
to be, both on a national,
regional, and global competi-
tive scale.


Shell


disposal

FROM page one
St Kitts/Nevis, St _Yin_ent,_
Grenada ,Bntis Virgin Islands,
Netherlands Antilles and
Dominica.
It runs more than 100 gas sta-
tions across the Caribbean
region, as well as nearly three
dozen distribution depots.
The SOL Group is continuing
to use the Shell name and logo
in its operations under a trade-
mark licence agreement.
Tribune Business revealed the
involvement of Mr Simpson in
the race for Shell (Bahamas)
retail business back in May this
year. Mr Simpson also runs the
General Motors (GM) dealer-
ship on Barbados.
The Bahamas has the high-
est retail margins in the region
for gas, set at $0.44 per gallon. -
As gasoline bhas a price con-
trolled by the Government, run-
ning a gas station is effectively a
volume-driven business.
However, it is still possible
that the Shell (Bahamas) deal
might yet be disrupted by the
Government's review of the
industry pricing structure, which
could lead to margin cuts:.


4jJ Public Utilities Commission





PUBLIC MEETING
on
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited Application to increase its Monthly
Rates/Prices For Telephone Lines

The PUC will hold a PUBLIC MEETING on the Bahamas

Telecommunications Company's application to increase the
monthly rates/prices for telephone lines on Thursday 18 August,
2005 from 6-8 pm in FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA at PRO-
CATHEDRAL OF CHRIST THE KING, East Atlantic Dr., and
Pioneers Way.


The purpose of the public meeting will be to afford
consumers and interested parties the opportunity to ask questions
or make oral comments on the application.


Copies of the Commission's Public consultation document on
BTC's applications can be obtained from the PUC's office-
located in the Agape House, 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
or downloaded from the Commission's website at
www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs.


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


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Double





Bahama


blow for




s boxers


By KELSIE JOHNSON
* Junior Sports Reporter
BAHAMAS received some
disappointing news after the
-weigh-ins at the Common-
wealth Boxing Championships
(CBC) in Glasgow, Scotland.
Lavar Stuart, who was set
to fight in the lightweight divi-
sion on Monday night, failed
to meet the required weight
specified for the division at
the weigh-ins and match draw-
S. ings, so will not.be competing.
The news came as a blow to
the boxing squad and head
coach Andre Seymour, who
. was counting on three gold
medals after adding Carl
Heild to the team.
"This was just an unfortu-
S nate situation with Lavar, part
of which should be blamed on
our late arrival and travel
problems," said Seymour.
. - '"We were supposed to
reach in Scotland on Sunday,
but we never got here (Scot-
land) until Monday morning,


Taureano Johnson is

last CBC competitor


two hours before the weigh-
in.

Weight
"All of this played a factor
in his weight. If we had gotten
here a little earlier there are
some things we could do to
bring his weight down, but our
late arrival didn't give us suf-
ficient time to do so.
"This came as a blow to us,
but we are moving on. We
were expecting big things from
Lavar, he is one of the boxers
that has shown maturity and
one of our medal hopefuls.
"But the other members of
the team our holding on, try-


ing to strengthen each other
as the days go by."
However, a second blow
came for the Bahamas later
on that evening as Heild
fought in his first internation-
al match.
Heild, who is fighting in the
light-welterweight division,
lost a four rounder by judges
decision to Nathan Brough of
Scotland.
The two eligible Bahamian
boxers both received byes,
advancing them through to
the quarterfinals.
Seymour added: "Heild
held his own, we are so proud
of him. He might have lost,
but he has gained the most
important thing, exposure and


experience.
"From the -minute he
stepped into the ring he
became a force to reckon with.
He fought'like a professional
boxer who had a lot of expe-
rience under his belt.
"This is his first interna-
tional fight, but the way he
fought last night one couldn't
tell. It was a close fight that
could have swung either way
with the judges.

Maturity
"We knew adding him to
the team was a great idea. He
has showed maturity at home
and the presence in the ring
is one persons should help."
In amateur boxing four
medals are awarded, two
bronzes, a silver and a gold.
One of the bronze medals
is presented at the quarter
finals.
Winning the bronze medal
will automatically advance the


boxer to the semi-final
rounds.
Taureano Johnson, the last
championship's silver medal-
list, is the .sole boxer left in
the CBC for the Bahamas.
Johnson is set to fight later on
tonight against one of India's
top boxers.
He will be fighting out of
the welterweight division, for
the quarter-finals bronze
medal.
Seymour said: "A lot is
expected from Taureano, he
is in tip-top shape. He is the
silver medallist from last
year's championships.
"He knows that he has to
fight his way into the semi-
finals, but this time around he
doesn't have a lot of fighting
to do.
"At last year's champi-
onships he had to fight from
the first day we got here, at
least he got a bye, a little time
to rest which is good."
Johnson will fight at 8pm
Eastern Standard Time.


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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005, PAGE 7B


TRIBUNE SPORTS







WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005

SECTION


B 4
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


. 01 a


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


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Ace

Minister
prepares for
S island-wide
celebrations
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas has a lot to
celebrate after capturing two
medals at this year's World
Championships, but these
celebrations will have to be
put on hold.
However, a small celebra-
tion commemorating the sig-
nificant feats of all the ath-
letes will take place today..
for the athletic delegation
that is set to arrive at
2.20pm.
According to the Minister
of Youth Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom, this year's
festivities will exceed the
ones held in the past, where
athletes gathered at the Air-
port VIP lounge and took to
the streets.
"Won't it be nice for the
residents of Eleuthera to see
their hometown boy Chris
Brown," Wisdom said. "Or
persons in Grand Bahama
witnessing Andrae Williams
being honored.
"These are the things we
want to put in place as we
celebrate our athlete's great
performances at the World
Championships.
"This year's celebrations
will go down in the books,
the athletes worked hard
and we are going to award
them.
"So many of the younger
Bahamians, who wish to be
professional athletes in the
future, are looking forward
to meeting persons like
Tonique and Chris, we are
going to make this possible."
Team
Although Wisdom didn't
reveal when the celebrations
will take place, he did note
that everything will be.
scheduled when the efitire
I team can celebrate anctbe
presented to the Bahamas as
one.
The Bahamas finished up
13th at the World Champi-
onships, 196 countries par-
ticipated.
The gold and silver medal
finishing by Tonique
Williams-Darling and the
men's 4x400 relay team at
the 10th World Champi-
onships, held in Helsinki,
Finland, sent waves of
cheers throughout the
islands of the Bahamas.
Williams-Darling, who
started the nationwide
rejoicing with a world fastest
time finishing of 49.55 sec-
onds, will move on to Zurich
Switzerland on Friday,
Monaco in September and
then onto Japan before
returning home.
Also attending the Weltk-
lasse, Zurich, Golden
League meet will be silver
medallist and 400m finalist
Chris Brown; 100m finalist,
Chandra Sturrup; and Chris-
tine Amertil.
All the athletes listed
above will also compete in
World Athletics Finals, set
for September 9th-10th. But
several athletes have also
scheduled to continue on in
the IAAF Golden League
series, despite not being eli-
gible for the cash prize.
While Williams and relay
teammate Aaron Cleare
returned to school for the
fall semester, Lavern Eve
and Leevan Sands will be in
Action on Friday.








H iT E* ENTERTAINMENT


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


* BAHAMIAN artist Lillian Blades is pictured in front of one of her 'quilt' assemblage pieces at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.


(Photo: Roland Rose)


Lillian





nieces


8 By ERICA WELLS
WHEN Bahamian artist Lil-
lian Blades walks into a thrift
store or visits a flea market
she sees what most people
don't. Where some see hand-
me-downs, dusty trinkets and
old fashions, she sees a build-
ing block for her art.
And Blades is always look-
ing in the most unexpected
places.
"I am constantly looking for
things," Blades told The Arts,
referring to the intriguing
objects that adorn her vibrant
quilt and assemblage pieces.
"I do a lot of thrifting, look
in a lot of antique stores, flea
markets. When I go into a
thrift store I see a pallet. It's
like my paint."
From this pallet, Blades
enhances little boxes, covered
in bright fabrics, of various
shapes and sizes, with stuff of
all kinds photos, bottles, jew-
ellery, buttons, lace, bird
cages, spools of thread, pic-
ture frames anything that
holds a feminine energy and
honours her ancestors.
"I found it more challeng-
ing and thought provoking to
find items from everyday life
to use as a medium to work
with rather than implying with
paint. The implication and
associations of meaning I feel
are stronger with actual
objects and their juxtaposi-
tions with another. The
process of gathering objects
that carry connotations stim-


)icks up





for her


Artist 'constantly looking' for items

for her 'quilt' assemblage works


ulate my creative process. I
take note of the relationships
that are formed and use it as
the theme of the quilted
assemblage," says Blades in'
an artist's statement.
The quilt pays tributes to
her ancestral mothers, and to
her own mother, a talented
seamstress who died in child-
birth with Blades.

Mothers
"The process of assembling
also celebrates the beauty of
how our mothers used utili-
tarian and decorative objects
throughout the home as
shrines or altars "of everyday
living," says Blades.
The maternal theme has
had a strong presence in her
work throughout Blades'
career as an artist. It stems
from her personal experiences
- a child who never knew her
birth mother and didn't learn
that she had died until the age
of 12 and a serious respect
for the feminine and spiritual.
Blades uses the metaphor
of the "quilt" (but not in its
usual form) as a reference to
her own life; and with a


daughter of her own, makes
work that explores the
"maternal impulse to nurture,
protect and cultivate the
domestic environment".
And although Blades nev-
er met her birth mother,
whom she is named after, the
artist says that her mother is
always with her, "like a
guardian angel" watching over
her.
The colour, she says, reflects
her experiences growing up in
the Bahamas, something that
she began to appreciate at an
early age.
"I remember drawing in my
colouring book," she says. "I
always wanted to press real
hard to get the boldest colour
and do a little more than nor-
mal."
Blades would arrange her
64-pack of crayons in order of
the rainbow, in a circle, and
lie down in the centre with her
colouring books. That order
is still seen in her work today,
in the small stretched canvas-
es and the organisation of her
studio, where the found
objects are neatly organised
and easily at hand.
Blades received her first
paint-by-numbers set in grade


10 and would spend hours
drawing at her family's dining
room table.
By the time she got to high
school, Blades was spending
a lot of time in the Art
Department of St Augustine's
College, including lunch
breaks, and recalls carefully
preparing for her Art GCE,
for which she received an 'A'.
Blades knew early on that
she wanted to be an artist, but
her family had reservations
about her pursuing a full-time
career in art.

Resolve
She took her first semester
in architecture at COB and it
turned out to be a decision
that would strengthen her
resolve to be an artist.
"I just wanted to be creative
and be able to survive," says
Blades who switched to stu-
dio painting for her second
semester at the College of the
Bahamas. "I figured some-
body had to break the cycle
and be an artist, fully."
And for her decision,
Blades received a lot of sup-
port. Not only from her moth-


er (an aunt who raised her),
but from lecturers and local
art collectors. While at COB,
Blades says that she received a
strong foundation that has
allowed her to succeed as an
artist.
When it was time for Blades
to pursue her bachelor's
degree in fine art she was
forced to overcome the finan-
cial challenges faced by so
many young Bahamian stu-
dents.
Noted Bahamian artist
Antonius Roberts, who was
then a lecturer at COB, sug-
gested to Blades that she auc-
tion her work to raise money
to continue her education.
Over the years, Blades
would hold three auctions and
managed to raise the money
needed. She also received a
matching scholarship from the
Savannah College of Art and
Design (SCAD).
While at SCAD she was
also the recipient of a Chris
Blackwell scholarship which
afforded her the opportunity
to study in Europe.
During her three years at
SCAD, Blades worked her
way through school, over sum-
mers at home and in Savan-


the





art


nah, where she held another,
auction which also helped save
a 19th century theatre.
During her last year at
SCAD (1995/6) Blades began
applying to graduate pro-
grammes. She was accepted
by the prestigious Yale Uni-
versity, but like the challenges
she faced when it came time to
finish her undergraduate
degree, she could not afford
to pay the high Ivy League
tuition fees.
But this time around,
Blades was not willing to work
in the way that supported auc-
tioning off her paintings.

Focus
"Not to say that the work
(auctioned earlier to raise
money) was bad, I just felt
that the work had moved
beyond that," she said. "I
wanted to focus on the devel-
opment of the work. It was
good to start off that way, buit
it felt too commercial."
When she applied to Yale
she knew it was a real possi-
bility that she would not be
able to afford the tuition, as
scholarships and financial aid
are not available to interna-
tional students.
"I guess I could have
worked in the (school's) cafe-
teria but that would've meant
taking time away from my
work," says Blades.
SEE page two


E X H I B I TI ONSS


* M US I C










* DETAIL of a 'quilt' assemblage by Lillian Blades.


Lillian picks





up the pieces





for her art


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FROM page one

So she applied to Georgia
State University and during
a tour of the campus, given
by Larry Walker (father of
celebrated African-Ameri-
can artist Kara Walker),
realised that "everything I.
needed" was at Georgia
State.
During her time at
SCAD, Blades says that her
work began to change, in
terms of its development.
No longer was she only
responding to the colour,
but began to think about
the subject matter.

Paintings
In her "Funeral Series", a
series of paintings created
following the death of her
father in 1995, Blades'
development of the content
of her work is obvious. "It
didn't feel right to take a
'decorative' approach. I
wanted to capture more of
the spirit." She has
described that series as her
"most focused" group of
paintings.
Her graduate studies
would mark an important
turning point in Blades'
work.
It was then that she iden-
tified the common theme of
her work mother and child
- a subject that she took on
quite literally, seen in her
earlier paintings which
depict traditional and more
common images associated


with mother and child.
Lecturers and fellow stu-
dents reacted to her work
by suggesting that she not
deal with the subject so lit-
erally.
And Blades responded.
At first using dresses and
then small canvases pieced
together to create a quilt
assemblage, Blades began
to use the found objects and
vibrant fabric to express a
different visual language.
By placing pattern next to
pattern, playing shapes off
one another and attaching
objects that paid respect to
her mother, ancestors and
Bahamian heritage, Blades
has attracted a lot of atten-
tion.
Now 32 and living and
working in Atlanta, Geor-
gia, she is among a select
group of Bahamian artists.
Not only has she made a
name for herself outside of
the country, she has suc-
ceeded in an area dominat-
ed by men.
She was in Nassau last
week to deliver a talk at the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, and was well
received by supporters and
admirers of her work, some
of whom have followed her
career since she was a stu-
dent at COB.
In her latest project,
"Quilted Community",
which she finished just a few
weeks before her talk at the
NAGB, Blades organised
the creative efforts of a
broad range of people -
children to elders of all
backgrounds to create a


mixed-media assemblage
"quilt".
Each participant received
a panel on which to paint
and the collective effort of
hundreds of people in the
community was installed at
the East Atlanta Library.
Blades also created 25
cast concrete tiles, inspired
by the Bargello in Florence,
Italy, for the library's stone
facade. The sculpted pat-
terns echo and introduce
the interior's decorative tex-
tures to the exterior of the
building.

Awards
Although Blades has done
well as an artist (she is the
recipient of numerous
awards and has been
involved in many exhibi-
tions, both in Nassau and
the US) she is not resting
on her laurels.
She is embracing new
ways to express herself,
through technology and dif-
ferent mediums, and is con-
stantly looking for ways to
challenge herself, something
that she has done through-
out her career.
"My mother was a hard
worker, and I always felt
like if she could be a hard
worker I needed to be, too,"
says Blades.
"I don't want to be stuck
in a rut. I want to constant-
ly grow. I have to be aware
of what's going on, and how
other people are using their
visual language to get their
message across."


Lillian Blades


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005








THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ H TRBNAWDEDYAGST1,20,SAE3


World renowned


poet


POETRY is unquestionably the
most popular form of creative writing
in the Bahamas.
A number of local writers have been
published in international journals and
presses over the years.
Poetry has also been a popular part
of the Nassau nightlife since Krissy
Love first started her speak easy years
ago.
Poets Michael Pintard and Obediah
Michael Smith have become house-
hold names and Asha Rahming, Mar-
ion Bethel and Christian Campbell
have received critical acclaim interna-
tionally for their work. Patricia Mei-
cholas and Nicolette Bethel, Lynn
Sweeting, Tania Dixon and Helen
Klonaris are also highly regarded prac-
titioners of "the craft".
School of English Studies and the
Bahamas Association for Cultural
Studies were fully aware of this when
they sought to invite Professor Lorna
Goodison to the Bahamas to conduct a


DEVELOPING Commer-
cial Art Galleries will be the
topic of discussion this Thurs-
day at the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas.
Specially invited presenters
include Gilou Bauer, director
and curator of the Mutual Life
Gallery, Kingston, Jamaica
and, Rosie Gordon-Wallace,
founder and proprietor of the
Diaspora Vibe Gallery, a fine
art gallery in Miami's Design
District specialising in the
work of Caribbean artists.
"This series is designed. to
encourage reflection on0'he
absence of commercial gal-
leries in the Bahamas, by invit-
ing commercial and non-prof-


it gallery owners and opera-
tors from throughout the
Americas to share their expe-
riences with this unique and
exciting business; philosophies
about their work;how they go
about choosing which artists
to represent and or exhibit and
the potential of such enter-
prises in the Bahamas,"accord-
ing to a NAGB press release.
This event will be especially
informative for those interest-
ed in the business of art.It is
free and open to the public.
Secure parking is available
at the gallery.
For more information please
contact the Gallery at
242.328.5800.


the


N ROSIE
GORDON-WALLACE


N%"- dimtrr tor namcd for


J Paul (ctI MuM um



- "Copyrighted Material -

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -


- ~


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Bahamas


Professor Lorna Goodison


to conduct workshop


workshop in poetry and to read her
work.
Goodison was the 1986 winner of
the Commonwealth Prize for Poetry
and has published 10 books of poetry
and two books of short stories.

Writers
This Jamaican poet is considered
one of the best writers in English alive.
When asked why the College's
School of English chose Goodison, Dr
Ian Strachan, chair of the School, said
that he first met Goodison in Miami at


the 1996 Caribbean Writers Workshop
and was very impressed. "She has a
generosity, a humility, a gentleness
which is uncommon among people
who achieve her level of fame and suc-
cess. She was very encouraging at the -
workshop I attended and I knew that if
I ever had the opportunity I would
bring her to the Bahamas. Thankfully ..
she was available and agreed."
According to Dr Strachan, the
Caribbean region has produced some earth. It's not pretentious or superior.
of the finest writers in the world in the The best poetry puts you in touch with
last 60 years and Goodison is among the eternal. I think her work does
the best. that," says Dr Strachan, who hopes
"Her poetry is beautiful and down to that young and experienced writers


alike will use this opportunity
to talk about their work and get
advice.
He expects Professor Goodison's vis-
it to be a shot in the arm for the local
literary community.

Reading
Goodison will give a public reading
of her work on Friday August 26, at
7pm at the Lecture Theatre of the
Bahamas Tourism Training Centre on
Thompson Boulevard.
This event is free and open to the
public. She will also conduct a poetry
workshop on Saturday August 27
from 10am to 1pm at the Lecture The-
atre.
The cost of the workshop is $50 and
those wishing to participate must sign
up with the School of English office
by Wednesday August 24. Interested
persons can call 302-4381 for more
information.


arts brief


LOVE, an exhibition-fea-
turing Bahamian artists Jason
Bennett, John Cox fightht,
Blue Curry, Michael Edwards,
Toby Lunn and Heino Schmid
at Popopstudios and Gallery
on Dunmore Ave in Chip-
pingham, next to Dillet's
Guest House (1/4 mile south
of the Bahamas Humanes
Society).
Call 323-5220 or 322-5850
for more information:
Rhapsody an exhibition
of paintings by Triaidadian
artists Angelica and Marielle
Barrow @ Central Bank of the
Bahamas Art Gallery, Mar-
ket St. This mother-daughter
team has produced |o-
sition of light, colour f r-
gy descriptive of the spirit of
the Caribbean people, their
landscapes and lifescapes. The
exhbition runs until August
29 during bank hours.
The National Collection
@ the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas, an exhibition
that takes the viewer on a
journey through the history of
fine art in the Bahamas.
It features signature pieces
from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions
by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Ben-
jamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to
book tours.
Past, Present and Per-
sonal: The Dawn Davies Col-
lection @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa
Doyle, West and West Hill
Streets.
The exhibition is part of the
NAGB's Collector's Series.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.
The Awakening Land-


scape: the Nassau Water-
colours of Gaspard Le Marc-
hand Tupper, from the
collection- of Orjan and
Amanda Lindroth @ the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas.
The mid-nineteenth century
paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one
of the earliest suites of paint-


ings of Nassau and its
environs.
Tupper was a British mili-
tary officer stationed at Fort
Charlotte in the 1850s.
The works show a pre-mod-
ern Bahamas through the
decidedly British medium of
watercolour.
Call 328-5800 to book
tours.


On-the-spot financing and insurance. 24-month/24,000-mile factory warranty.


visits


National Art Gallery


gets down to business.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005, PAGE 3C


o *


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


in e vm


Rendezvous, a two-day event dubbed the
biggest party of the year, featuring music
by DJs from Jamaica, the Bahamas and
New York. Day 1: Saturday, August 20 @
Club Waterloo. Doors open at 8:30pm.
Admission: $20.
Day 2: Sunday, August 21 at Coco Loco's,
Sandyport. Doors open at 12pm. Admis-
sion: $10

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday
night @ Club Trappers, Nassau's "upscale"
gentleman's club. Featuring a female body
painting extravaganza. Free body painting
@ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admis-
sion: Men free before 10 pm. Females free.
There will be free food and hors d'oeuvres
between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid lounge, this and every
Thursday night. Doors open at 10pim.
Ladies free before lam, $10 after. Guys:
$15 all night. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacar- IT'S being called the biggest event of the
di) Giveaways and door prizes every week. year, and any serious partner can't miss

Saturday-ighLive every Saturday night This kend, Hypermedia Entertainment
@Club Fluid; Bay St. The biggest party of I... ;,redI ie ra..nn...
the week, pumping all your favourite hits tional party tofeature the hottest Jamaintrna-
all night long. Ladies in free before pm. Bahamian and New York DJs.
Strict security enforced. :The party will feature the best in soca,

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz
spinning the best in Old Skool. Admission
$35, all inclusive food and drink. Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight
@ Crystal Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies
Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters free.
Sports Bar. Drink specials all night long,
including karaoke warm-up drink to get TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West
you started. Party from 8pm-until. Bay St and Skyline Drive. Singer/song-
writer Steven Holden performs solo with
Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover special guests on Thursday from 9pm mid-
charge includes a free Guinness and there night.
should be lots of prizes and surprises.
Admission: Ladies $10 and Men $15. The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim
Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm -
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. 10pm @ Hurricane Hole on Paradise Island.
Free appetizers and numerous drink spe-
cials. Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court
Lounge, British Colonial Hilton, Wednes-
The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. day-Thursday 8pm-12am.
Doors open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm.
Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer. Sunday NightInterlude @ Briteley's
Restaunrant & Lounne, Eneas St off Pnin-


Doctors Hospital, the official training cen-
tre of the American Heart Associationr
offers CPR classes certified by the AHA.
The course defines the warning signs of res-
piratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid sudden death syndrome and
the most common serious injuries and
choking that can occur in adults, infants
and children. CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at
302-4732 for more information and learn to
save a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges ineets from
7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUBS B


Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7.30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's
Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss
Road. Club 9477 meets Friday; 7pm @
Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday,
7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton. Club
1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday,'
calypso, Latin, Reggaeand Reggaeton music, 6p @ The J Whitney Pnder Building,
o NthO- iio al ... t.io @ Collins Ave.
amony o themusicalstyles Ba las aIt Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and
ClubWatey 1:" ors U'wopenyatl beh8.30pm.d fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder
Admission: $20. Building, CollinsAve- at 6pm. Club 612315
ADy 2: Sunday, August 21 will be held at meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
col0ctos, ancdyrt astop ns a W N Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets
Coco Loco's, Sandyport. Doors open at 12pm.e
Admissioni $10. F every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Admission: $10. Solomon's Buildin g, East-West Highway
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros. All are wel-
The National Collection @ the National Art come.
Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition that
takes the viewer on a journey through the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi
history of fine art in the Bahamas. It fea- Omega chapter meets every second Tues-
tures signature pieces from the national day, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the
collection, including recent acquisitions by Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.
Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne
Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every
tours. This exhibition closes February 28, first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord's Restaurant,
2006. Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-
4589 for more info.
Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn
Davies Collection @ the National Art Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every
Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House,
and West Hill Streets. The exhibition is IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.
part of the NAGB's Collector's Series. Call
328-5800 to book tours. This exhibition The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Coun-
closes August 31, 2005. cil (NPHC) meets every third Monday of
the month in the Board Room of the -
The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.


Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring
late '80s music in the VIP Lounge, Top of
the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights
and Go Go dancers. Admission: Ladies free
before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour
every Friday 3 for $10 mixed drinks and
$1 shots. Bahamian Night (Free admission)
every Saturday with live music from 8 pm
to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to
midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all
night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo,
Charlotte St kicks off Fridays at 6pm with
deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl'wide
on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandy-
port, from 4pm-until, playing deep, funky
chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge,
every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @ Patio
Grille, British Colonial Hotel.


ciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at
the key board in the After Dark Room
every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine
food and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the
Caribbean Express perform at Traveller's
Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.


THE ARTS


LOVE, an exhibition featuring Bahamian
artists Jason Bennett, John Cox, Blue Cur-
ry, Michael Edwards, Toby Lunn and
Heino Schmid at Popopstudios and Gallery.
The gallery is located on Dunmore Ave in
Chippingham, 1/4 mile south of the
Bahamas Humane Society. Gallery hours:
M-F 4.30pm-7.30pm or call 322-5850 for
appointment.

Da Spot, a weekly comedy show, features
skits and spoofs on Bahamian life, with
improv by a talented young cast. The show
is held Tuesdays @ The Dundas at 8pm.
Admission is $10, and tickets are sold at the
door.


watercolours of taspard Le ivarchand
Tupper, from the collection of Orjan and
Amanda Lindroth @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas. The mid-nine-
teenth century paintings that make up the
exhibition are part of one of the earliest
suites of paintings of Nassau and its envi-
rons. Tupper was a British military officer
stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s.
The works show a pre-modern Bahamas
through the decidely British medium of
watercolour. Call 328-5800 to book tours.
This exhibition closes August 31, 2005.


HEALTH


The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets
at 5.30pm on the second Tuesday of each
month at their Headquarters at East Ter-
race, Centreville. Call 323-4482 for more
info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets
every third Saturday, 2.30pm (except
August and December) @ the Nursing
School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.


Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Mones-
tary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Mones-
tary. For more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administra-
tive Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets
the third Thursday of every month @
Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third
Friday of the month at COB's Tourism
Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 dur-
ing the academic year. The group promotes
the Spanish language and culture in the
community.




Send all your civic and social events to The
Tribune via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
outthere@tribunemedia.net


S


/MBN PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS$
NE & RESTAURANTS N a1ilM

Lifeline: Truth, Music, Life, featuring the
music of Aydee Rolle @ The Buzz on
Wednesday, August 17. Showtime at the
Buzz, located East Bay Street opposite the
marina, upstairs over the old Yahmaha
store, is 10pm; $7 before 9pm, $10 after.


MMNMNkl


W HAT'S ON IN AND AROUND NASSAU















EMAIL OUTTHERE @ TRIBUNEMEDIA.NE T








THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005, PAGE 5C


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PAGE 0, WDNESAY, UGUS 17, 2005HE TIBUN


Hopes and fears of the Bahamas'




16-year-old singing sensation


E By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

SINGING her heart out to
impress a representative from Def
Jam Records and other judges, 16-
year-old Khrisna Virgil walked away
with the Best Singer title at Satur-
day's Bahamian Star Search finals.
Etta James' hit song "At Last",
which praises newfound love, did
the trick. But Khrisna admits that
coming into the competition, she
wasn't all that confident she could
pull off a win.
She decided to join the competi-
tion because it was time to "branch
out". Khrisna has been singing since
age three, and has sang in church, at
school and at various weddings.
And after dropping out of her first
competition last year, because it was
too "disorganised", Khrisna thought
that this competition would be a
better opportunity, since Def Jam
representatives would be in the
house, and it seemed more organ-
ised.
"I just felt that at this point I was
ready to pursue the career I wanted,
that's singing. I feel as if singing is
the only thing I want to do in my
life, in terms of careers, so I thought
why not join. I didn't have anything
to lose," she told Tribune Enter-
tainment.
Though "At Last" did blow away
the judges, it was not Khrisna's first
pick. In fact, it was chosen out of
desperation at 3am on Saturday.
The competition was set for 8pm.
Earlier on, the contestant had
arranged with a pianist to play live
music while she sang her first choice,
Fantasia's breakout hit, "I Believe".
But that morning he informed her
that he couldn't play on Saturday
night. "So that started my search for
something new to sing, because I
really wanted live music. My search
was narrowed down to 'A Moment
Like This' by Kelly Clarkson, and
'At Last' by Etta James. I was just
more comfortable singing 'At Last',"
Khrisna adds.
The sixteen-year old, who will be
entering her senior year at Bahamas
Academy in September, says that
she was a bit intimidated by some of


the singers who went before her.
"They were walking across stage
while they were singing, and really
putting on a show."
Though she was nervous, she
realised that it all came down to,
how bad did she want to win?
Some encouraging words from
her Amen corner mother, father,
best friend, school friends and a
friend from church helped her get
over the hurdle.
"I was nervous because this was
the finals and I wanted to do my
best, and I really wanted this. My
father was right there saying do this
for him, and my mother was saying,
'you know you wanted this, so go
out there and do it'. I was nervous
but I was optimistic at the same
time."
While judges deliberated,
Bahamian singer Blessed, and con-
testants who didn't make the finals,
performed at the Church of God
Auditorium, Joe Farrington Road.
At this point, her nervous feel-
ings peaked. "I didn't think that I
had made it through because these
people were so good. My parents
and my friends were telling me that
I had made it through, but I really
didn't think I did," Khrisna shares.
So when hosts called her name as
one of the three finalists, Khrisna
says that she was thinking, "Y'all
sure?"
While this win is a great accom-
plishment for the young singer, she
says it's only the first step. Her ulti-
mate goal is to create exposure for
local talent.
"My goal is to produce albums
that will go platinum. If I make it big
in the United States, it will bring a
lot of focus to the Bahamas and help
expose some of the talent we have
here, because people don't really
know about it," Khrisna explains.
Since Saturday's win, Khrisna has
been writing songs that she plans to
later record.
A cash award of $1,000, which she
is not quite sure what to do with,
and two free music recordings at
Cross Water Entertainment in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida (the contest
prizes), will surely help make her
goals a reality.


* KHRISNA Virgil performing at the Bahaiman Star Search finals on Saturday


Rapper breaks tradition



to enter competition


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

WHEN Davon Knight start-
ed his rap career as a musical
artist 15 years ago, he never
imagined that he would win a
competition. That's because he
never intended to enter one.
But last Saturday night, the
28-year-old Bahamian who goes
by the stage name, "M Deez",
won the top rapper prize at the
Bahamian Star Search finals, the
first time that he went up against
other artists in any forum.
"Music has always been a
passion for me, but I wasn't into
the competitions. The music was
for the people, to see if they
enjoyed it. That was my com-
petition, to see if people can
enjoy my music and feel what
I'm feeling," Davon says in an
interview with Tribune Enter-
tainment.
"So I didn't enter this com-
petition for the prize money.
The actual goal was to expose
myself to the international labels
that would be there," the artist
adds.
But exposure to overseas
labels is nothing new to Davon,
who has been in talks with Uni-
versal Records, and was even
signed to Warner Brothers
Entertainment at one point in
his career. The artist says that
due to poor management he lost
that record deal.
Hopeful and confident that
he had this competition in the
bag, he showed up to the semi-
finals a week before the final
showcase and recalls saying to


* 28-YEAR-OLD rapper M Deez


the person at the door, "I hope
y'all have my money".
Davon heard about the com-
petition through a call just one
hour.before the semi-finals was
about to start. Thankfully, the
organisers were prepared to
hear new acts. And he was
asked to return the following
week.

Confident

Davon says that because he
has already been exposed to
large crowds performing in
numerous local clubs, at shows
in Washington, at BET's first
Wrap It Up Tour, at Wyclef
Carnival in Florida Saturday's
competition wasn't the least bit
intimidating.
"That crowd was tiny because
I've performed in front of
crowds around 60,000 already,"
he said. (Davon also opened for
Elephant Man at Club Eclipse
on Sunday night.)
Though he won Saturday's
competition that was looking for
the best Bahamian singer and
rapper, Davon says that his
sound is more reggae than any-
thing else.
"Walk This Way", the song
he performed that night, was
written earlier in the year and is
already recorded. It was pro-
duced by Ian Cleare, head of
Nassau's Island Boy Records,
to which the artist is signed.
By the end of next month,
"M Deez", plans to release his
debut album, "The Prescrip-
tion", which is already com-


pleted. The first single, "Walk
This Way" has already been giv-
en to local radio stations, and
should be in rotation by next
week, says the artist.
About his first single, Davon
says: "It's sort of welcoming
people to the musical world of
the Bahamas. It's sort of rep-
pin' the Bahamian Junkanoo
music because the music is all
Junkanoo instruments, the bells
the horns ya know.
"The sound is the new wave
of Junkanoo. I reggae-Junkanoo
fusion."
He can't recall exactly how
the tune came about, but says
that Island Boy Records is
always looking for a new angle,
a new spin, or a new idea. It
was through some sessions of
spontaneous, mixing, that they
came up with the sound, he sus-
pects.
And while he has heard his
music compared to many reg-
gae artists out there, Davon says
that anyone who really knows
his music knows that he is com-
pletely original.
Looking forward to releas-
ing his album, and having won
his first competition, Davon says
that he expects 100 per cent suc-
cess. "And that's with every-
thing I do," he adds.
"You gat your KBs and your
Ira Storrs who are local artists
doing music for the Bahamians.
But I'm looking to bring inter-
national attention to the
Bahamas with reggae music...
"To let everybody know that
M Deez, which stands for the
music doctor, is here."


PAGE 6C, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








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The Tribune presents


Having the right food to






make it through the day


* By JANICE MATHER
SCHOOL isn't just a place to learn academics,
it's also part of the mealtime training ground.
Between classes, students learn and choose the
foods that help form the basis for a diet that's
either healthy, or not. Parents are nowhere in
sight, and even very young children can decide
what goes into their mouths.
But at many schools, standard tuck shop
options are far from nourishing: salty chips, sug-
ary sodas, and an array of candies, cookies, hot
patties and an array of high-fat, low-nutrient















PACKED luncheshold greatpotential to
be much more nutritious and perhaps
cheaper than anything a student can
get at altuck shop, corner store, cafete-
ria or back-trunk vendor. Not sure what
to prepare? Try these fun, tasty ideas:
Cold pizza Children can assemble
the ingredients when lunchtime rolls
around, using:
flour tortilla/English muffin/cooked
mini pizza base
pizza sauce
shredded cheese
Wrap/roll-up In a flour tortilla, wrap
up a combination of;
lean, lowfat meat
lowfat cheese, shredded
shredded lettuce
other vegetables
The Improved sandwich
You can get a quarter of the fat, and,
.four times the fibre into a simple lunch of
a sandwich, side, fruit, sweet snack, and
drink by making a few changes.
A standard lunch beef bologna
sandwich on white bread, with mayon-
naise; chips; fruit cup in syrup; choco-
late sandwich cookies; fruit punch drink
has 980 calories; 48g'fat; 13.5g satu-
rated fat; 125g carbohydrates; 59g sug-
ar; 3g fibre.
Upgrade it to:
Lean turkey sandwich on whole
wheat bread, with lettuce and mustard
carrots and celery with light dressing
fresh grapes
homemade trail mix
skim milk
725 calories; 13.5g fat; 2.5g saturated
fat; 120g carbohydrates; 52g sugar; 13g
fibre.
Source: Kidsheafth.org


foods that provide very little in the way of quali-
ty fuel for active bodies and expanding minds.
That, however, doesn't have to be the case;
whether kids and teens buy or bring their food, it
is possible to have tasty, economical meals that
are healthier, too.
Like their counterparts around Nassau,
Kingsway Academy students can munch on chick-
en, French fries, macaroni and peas and rice at
lunchtime. But with every hot meal, students
are guaranteed a side of corn, carrots, sweet peas
or other vegetables.
"Kids like the fried stuff, but we sneak some
healthy stuff in, too," says cafeteria supervisor
Donald Johnson. Younger children, he reports,
are finicky over their greens, but older children
are more likely to chow down veggies once
they're provided. And whether children eat all
their vegetables or not, at least they have the
option. Other options include five daily salads:
chicken strip, chicken, chef, and tossed, and fruit
salads.
Last year, whole fruits were also added to the
menu.
"They really sell," says Mr Johnson. "The
younger children love the fruit, they're the main
ones who buy the majority of the fruits."
That goes to show that, if nourishing meals
and snacks are available, children can and do.
make healthy choices. And at Kingsway, even if
Mommy isn't there to suggest an orange instead
of Oreos, Mr Johnson has been known to remind
children of what's best.
"I'll tell them, 'this granola bar is much health-
ier for you than the chips and the chocolate bar,
it has whole grains and that willahelp to clear you
out'. Some of them try it and they find,,that they
like it, and continue to buy it," he says.
With the introduction of healthier eats and
drinks, even soda sales have gone down. Instead,
many children at the school are choosing apple,
orange, grape and cranberry juices, Gatorade,
and flavoured waters.
"You have a few kids who are hooked on the
Coke sodas I had to row one girl who drinks,
two, three Cokes a day. I said, 'that's not good for
you! Drink a juice sometimes, that would be
better,' and at times I do break her down. Since
we've introduced the juices and Gatorade, the
soda sales have dropped." But is there any chance
that the school likely to go as far as some Amer-
ican schools, which have taken vending machines
out all together? Probably not.
"Kids complain, and they end up bringing sodas
to school. Some kids, if you don't sell sodas,
they will bring them from home," he explains,
"so I don't think we'll ever get to that place where
they'll eliminate it. All we can do is increase the
juices that are sold," he says.
Even that approach has made a significant
change; he estimates that, once other options
were made available, soda sales have fallen by 40
per cent.
Smart snacks from home,
Not all students have easy access to fruits,
veggies, lean meats and whole grains on their
school campus, and the simplest solution is to
come armed with smart snacks and lunches from
home.
Rather than feeling awkward about brown-
bagging lunch, kids with home-packed food can
become trendsetters, and influence their friends,
who may in turn influence their own parents to
make smarter eating choices, says Shandera
Smith, nutritionist in the Ministry of Health's
Nutrition Unit.
She recommends packing lunches that include
each of the major food groups; that can be simply
done with a sandwich on whole wheat bread, a.


lCo py r ig hted MaterialI

Syndicated Conte nt
Available from Commercial News Providers"


fruit, and fruit, water, or reduced-fat milk. In
place of candy, try raisins or other dried fruit;
instead of cake, a banana or bran muffin.
To make home lunches more fun, Ms Smith
suggests getting children involved in putting
together the meal. :
"When children prepare their own lunch,
they're more apt to actually eating it, and seeing
the benefits of having a healthy diet, as opposed
to one that is not so healthy," the nutritionist
says.
Give young people incentives to eat healthy
Poor childhood diet can be a contributing fac-


tor in contracting diabetes, high blood pressure,
heart problems, and a host of other diseases that
have generally been associated with adulthood.
But words like 'hypertension' may go in one eat
and out through the other; in convincing chil-
dren to eat healthily, give, them reasons that will
pique their interest; for example, a good diet
helps ward off problems like morbid obesity,
being very, very fat.
"They are more interested in getting good
grades, performing in sports, weight control, and
healthy skin good nutrition contributes to all of
SEE page three


Making the right choices abut sexuality
A -


* By JANICE MATHER
IN school, they teach math, English,
history, and all those other subjects.
But many young people learn much
more than how to read and write.
In the 1998 Bahamas Youth Health
Survey (BYHS), which involved 2007
adolescents between 10 and 19 years,
almost a third of 13-15-year-olds had
sex, and 41.4 per cent of teens 16 and
over had been sexually active. Here
are some tips about sexuality as you
prepare for a new school year.
Know what sexuality is
Sexuality isn't just the act of sex it
involves mental and emotional aspects,
gender expectations and identity, and
much more, explains community nurse
Carolyn Russell, who coordinates the
Adolescent Health Centre.
When you think of sexuality, also
think of your personal values, morals,
beliefs and what you want out of life,
long-term and short-term.


"(It involves) the things that make
you who you are," says Nurse Russell.
"A part of that is goal-setting, and
deciding what you want ... We need to
be able to teach our children how to
negotiate sex effectively, and not just
(tell them) 'say no'. Yes, say no, but we
need to teach them how to negotiate
for themselves."
Negotiating skills and making
choices
Negotiating for yourself when it
comes to sex is vital in the BYHS, a
third of young people felt they had
been pressured or forced to have sex.
Nurse Russell points out that young
people can and should think about and
make their own decisions about sex,
and act accordingly.
"In yourself you have to decide what
is safe, and what is not... 'If I choose to
have sex now, this isigonna happen. If
I choose tb wait later, maybe I could
get a career, maybe I could finish
school, I can go off, I can plan for a


future.' It means you have to know
what is safe and what is not, and you
have to decide on what level of risk is
acceptable to you.
"Most people if they actually stop'
and think about the fact that the same
thing you do to have sex gives you
AIDS, gives you teenage pregnancy,,
gives you an unplanned event like an
abortion, they'd take more note of
it."
More about choices
Although many young people are
sexually active, there are also many
who are not. If you decide you don't
want to have sex at this time, you're
not the only one who's made this deci-
sion, regardless of how it may feel.
According to the BYHS, most young
people who haven't had sex made a
conscious decision not to, most com-
monly because they were afraid of
catching a Sexually Transmitted Dis-
ease (75.6 per cent), wanted to wait
for marriage (72.3 per cent), didn't


want to get pregnant (68.7 per cent),
were following their parents' values of
sexual abstinence (67.8 per cent), and
believed that they'd feel guilty (60.9
per cent).
"If you decide not to have sex,
there's nothing wrong with you I tell
adolescents, for all the persons who
have sex all the time, it's a lie most of
them are not. The persons who talk
about it the most are doing it the least,
or may not be doing it at all," says
Nurse Russell.
If you've decided not to have sex,
be sure that you know how to say no
clearly and forcefully.
"Some people say no, but the way
they say no is not the right way, they're
not clear, concise, forceful with their
decision. They have a verbal some-
thing but they have a nonverbal some-
thing that makes you realise, no is not
really no," says Nurse Russell.
Bear in mind, though, that even a
verbal 'no' should be respected by a
potential partner.


Other factors that influence deci-
sions -
Decisions you make and boundaries,
you set sexually may end up getting
tossed out of the window if you ind
yourself using drugs, or drinking.
According to the BYHS, "As the num-
ber of drinks normally consumer at
one time increased, so did the per-
centage of respondents who bad
engaged in sexual intercourse". e
"Once you start drinking or using
drugs, it impairs your judgmefit,"
explains Nurse Russell. "The way bow
you'd react in a sexual situation is&hot
gonna be the same as it would ifYou
did not take a drink."
Consider consequences
Learn that you have rights, choices
and need to take consequences and
ownership for your behaviour. ,
"Not all persons who have sex get a
SEE page two


emd 0 L















Sex education: pointers for parents


* By JANICE MATHER

MOMMY, Daddy: you may not like
to hear it, but young people are sexu-
ally active. Not all of them, of course.
But look at the last Bahamas Youth
Health Survey, which questioned 2007
11 to 19 year olds about their behav-
iour and attitudes: 41.2 per cent of par-
ticipants had "gone all the way". That
included a third of 13 through 15-year-
olds, and 57.4 per cent of those 16 and
older, according 1998 Bahamas Youth
Health Survey.
Short of locking an adolescent in an
underground dungeon and feeding
them through a small slot, there's no
guaranteed method for stopping your
offspring from having sex. The decision
to have sex, or to wait, is essentially
one each young person has to make,
but parents can and should pro-
vide guidance and influence in the
decision.
Teach and talk about sex or some-
one else will Information about sexu-
ality and sex abounds, whether it's on
TV, on the computer, or through peers
and other people. When parents fail to
provide facts, there will be a wealth
of other sources children can draw on,
says Nurse Carolyn Russell, commu-
nity nurse and coordinator of the Ado-
lescent Health Centre.
She encourages parents to discuss
more than just reproductive facts with
their children; include information
about changing feelings and emotions,
the need to make right decisions and
how to make them, and the concept
of choices and consequences.
Assuming that children are just
'good children' won't cut it; neither
will a mindset that 'my child would
never do that!'
"If you fail to teach them, the street
will teach them," says Nurse Russell.
"And it's not gonna be the right way.
You can't sit down and say 'well I
raised my child in the house and I
raised my child in the church, and I
raised my child to be a decent child'
because when your child goes out of
your four walls, that same morally
upright child's personality changes and
it's a different individual. You have to
actually educate your child."
Answer questions frankly and hon-
estly, and don't make a child or teen
feel that any question is a stupid one.
Instead, work to foster an environ-
ment where discussing sexuality is a
straightforward part of life; this is your
chance to defer myths and misinfor-
mation that your offspring may be get-
ting elsewhere.

Be comfortable discussing sexuality
In order to guide your son or daugh-


ter in his or her sexual choices, you
must feel comfortable discussing sex
- which many parents don't.
The first conversation about sexu-
ality may feel uncomfortable and
that's normal.
"The first time doing everything is a
little hard," says Nurse Russell, who
recommends finding a parenting
group, church marriage club, or other
organisation that teaches sexuality and
can help parents feel comfortable dis-
cussing the topic.
For some parents, this can require
being realistic about activities their
children are already involved in.
"You have parents who actually go
through a pregnancy with an adoles-
cent, have a whole child that they're
home raising, and... they tell you that
they don't want you to offer their chil-
dren birth control because they're not
gonna have sex anymore.... you have to
take your head out of the cloud and
say 'she had to have sex to bring this
child, and if she had sex once, chances
are, she's gonna have sex twice. She
didn't ask you the first time, and she's
not gonna ask you the second or third
or fourth."
Other parents still struggle with the
idea that giving children information
means that the youngster will feel
obligated to try that information out.
"There are still people who believe
'if I give my children information about
sex, they're going to go out there and
do it, so if I tell them about contra-
ceptives, I'm telling them to go and
get the pill or go and get condoms',"
says Nurse Russell.
She recommends that parents who
truly feel uncomfortable discussing sex
must know when ito seek help -
resources include the Adolescent
Health Centre, which can help pre-
pare parents for tackling touchy issues,
or talk directly, to teens.

Communicate effectively
In addition to talking specifically
about sexuality, parents need to com-
municate with their children.
Working late? Call home to make
sure that your son or daughter is there.
And if you've set rules, make sure you
enforce them.
"There must be positive and nega-
tive consequences for action.
Sometimes parents say, 'if you do
this, I'm gonna do that', the child does
it, and you do nothing," says Nurse
Russell. "Eventually, you're condoning
a behaviour."
During adolescence, it's normal for
a child to pull away from parents, and
rely more on peers. That's why form-
ing strong bonds early in life is vital; a
child who has always talked openly


^1 Copyrighted MateriaIl

SSyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


and often with her parents will still lescent life, get to know who your son
draw away to an extent, as she gets or daughter is spending time with. Try
older, but is more likely to continue opening up your home to these friends,
to let them know what's going on. so you can observe them for yourself.
That way, if you suspect there's a prob-
Know your children's friends lem, you'll., have tangible evidence to
Since peers play a big role in ado- confront your child with when you sug-


gest that this companion may not be
the best choice.
"All adolescents and this is a fun-
damental fact will reject advice that
is devoid of reason. If you're giving
them advice and you're not telling
them why, they will-reject it," says
Nurse Russell, who notes it's vital to be
able to show your child exactly what is
negative about a problem friend.
Try listening in on conversations
between your child and their friends,
and challenge your teen to think about
what their friends say.
Involved parents may shape behav-
iour
When sexual pressure or temptation
faces your teen, you won't be able to
make a decision for them. However,
parents who have a positive, active
role in their children's lives can shape
behaviour.
In the Bahamas Youth Health Sur-
vey, it was found that girls who felt
neglected by their families were one-
and-a-half times more likely to have
sex than those who felt they received a
lot of attention.
Fathers in particular can play a big
role in the decisions girls make, says
Nurse Russell.
"Some girls were telling me the oth-
er day that some guys were bigging
them up for being involved in some
very lewd behaviours. If they had pos-
itive male role models, you would not
have major problems going on," she
explains.
"Parents are the key, but a lot of
our kids don't have parents that are
there for them," says Nurse Lena
Clarke, clinic supervisor. "If (girls)
don't have a father to tell them in a
nice way, in an innocent way, 'you are
lovely', without any kind of motive or
anything behind it, when guys say that
to them on the street, they aren't used
to hearing this so they just fall into
something.
Girls, too, look for male attention
and if they've been used to getting that
male attention from their father and he
has made her feel 'you are all of that!'
then they don't fall for just any guy
who comes along and tells them 'you
are beautiful'."
The survey found that "for males,
no association was observed between
engaging in sexual intercourse and the
amount of attention paid to the stu-
dents by their families." That doesn't
,mean,,though, that boys should be left
to themselves.
Says Nurse Clarke, "if they don't
see the role of a male in the home,
they'll find a role model somewhere
else.".
See page 5


Considering



everything



about your



sexuality


FROM page one
sexually transmitted infection,
but adolescents have sex at a
younger age, it opens up a big
(can) of worms it exposes
them to so many of the risk
factors, and that goes not only
for teenage pregnancy; your
body's not fully matured to go
through what you're going
through so you can end up
having all kind of cervical
changes and abnormal pap
smears.
"You can have emotional
changes... you cannot deal with
the fact that... this person who
loved you and you're everything
to them, tomorrow is everything
to your best friend.... early sex-
uality leads to early delinquen-
cy, you may not think that your
parents are no longer responsi-
ble for accountable for you
because you're doing the same
thing your parents are doing,"
she says.

Parents, and other positive
resources
Ideally, you should be able
to talk with your parents about
sexuality whether you're
active or not. For sexually
active teens, though, communi-
cation with parents is vital
because without their consent
you won't legally be able to
access condoms to prevent
STDs and pregnancy. If you're
a girl, you won't legally be able
to get birth control, or go to a
clinic to get a Pap smear, an
important test for all girls and
women once they reach 21
years or start having sex (it
detects changes in the cervix,
and is vital in preventing cervi-
cal cancer).
Parents can also be useful in
offering guidance and advice,


and in answering questions -
which you may have, and which
your friends may not be answer-
ing accurately.
"If you don't find a voice at
home, nobody lives in isolation;
there are relatives .. you can
always find another concerned
(person)," says Nurse Russell,
who suggests finding someone
who'll be open to listening to
your problems or concerns.
"Make sure that adult.has pos-
itive values and is able to give
you the information that you
need."
If you're have questions or
problems and you don't know
who to ask, try:
The Adolescent Health
Centre, located on School Lane
(one corner west of The Tri-
bune and 10OJamz). They offer
services ranging from repro-
ductive health, family planning,
antenatal and postnatal care, to
counselling services and the
Adolescent Health Desk (Tues-
days at 4pm), a peer-education
programme that includes dis-
cussions, games, and other
activities. Phone: 328-3248/9.
Email:adolescenthealth_4@hot-
mail.com
The Ministry of Youth also
has an Adolescent Health Desk,
similar to the one offered at the
Adolescent Health Centre.
The Bahamas Crisis Cen-
tre provides services and sup-.
port if you're being sexually (or
otherwise) abused. Contact
them at their 24-hour hotline:
328-0922, or by e-mail through
bahamascrisiscentre@yahoo.co
m.
Their website is www.baham-
ascrisiscentre.org.
Also, try resources like
school guidance counsellors or
church and youth group lead-
ers.


PAGE 2F


THE TRIBUNE













tart the mor ing right The correct
food and the


0 By JANICE MATHER
EVEN before lunchtime rolls
around, breakfast is an opportuni-
ty to start the day well.
Registered dietician Julia Lee, of
Doctors Hospital, says children who
have breakfast do better in school,
which should be incentive enough
for any parent to serve up a bowl of
cereal to their growing offspring.
Mrs Lee, consultant for
Kingsway Academy's cafeteria,
which has been working to provide
students with healthier foods, says
the school began offering break-
fast because of the impact a good
morning meal can have.

Nutrients
"Breakfast is a meal, and an
opportunity to get a third of the
day's nutrients," says Mrs Lee.
"Teachers have seen a difference
- the students are more attentive,
because they are not hungry."
Make sure the day's first food is
high-quality; that means sugary
cereals, and the soda-candy com-
bo that some students regularly
chow down on, are definite no-nos.
"A growing child needs to have
good food in the morning," Mrs
Lee says. "You see some children
stopping for candy and sodas that
is an example of missing an oppor-
tunity for nutritious food."
Some Bahamian breakfasts like
souse and Johnny Cake can also
provide a nourishing start, but
beware of the 99 cent variety, warns
Shandera Smith, nutritionist in the
Ministry of Health's Nutrition Unit.
Tuna, when not laden with may-
onnaise, is a better option than
corned beef, which is both salty and
fatty. For grits, hold up on the butter
-half a teaspoon of butter, if any.
Instead, get moisture and flavouring
from the tuna or corned beef.

Concentration

"It's absolutely vital that every-
one eats breakfast, especially chil-
dren, because when they go to
school, instead of having a hungry,
growly stomach, they can't con-
centrate on the lesson that's being
taught. That breakfast helps them


P9 ,Copyrighted Mate rial

5 Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


- * _* _
4 40-


to concentrate better and focus on
their schoolwork, rather than being
hungry even adults, when you're
hungry you just want to eat some-
thing and satisfy that," says Ms
Smith, who recommends whole
grain cereals, and eggs as great


morning options, along with fruit
and fruit juices.
While hearty carbs provide ener-
gy in the morning, Ms Smith advis-
es against loading up on too much
heavy food, which can leave a child
feeling luggy' and weighed down.


"If they go to school with a real-
ly heavy stomach, they may get
(sleepy) you don't want to laden
them down with a heavy brfak-
fast," she recommends. "Give them
sufficient so they wouldn't feel so
full that they can't concentrate."


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THE TRIBUNE






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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


III


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'PAGE 7F


'










PAGE T8T ESCHRIBUSNEPLEMENT 20051


JOSEPHINE WHYLLY LIZINGA ROLLE LAMECH JOHNSON


Sasha Ferguson is off to the University of
Science and Arts of Oklahoma (USAO) in
Chickasha, Oklahoma this Autumn to pursue a
bachelor's degree in biology. Sasha is the recip-
ient of a full scholarship, awarded by USAO,
and will have all expenses paid to study for the
next four years. During her enrollment there,
she will add her basketball talent to the USAO
"Drovers" women's basketball team. She will
play the position of guard. Sasha was graduat-
ed from Saint Augustine's College with honours
in June 2005 and was the recipient of the Father
Prosper Myer Outstanding Female Athlete
Award. In sports, she has represented the
Bahamas in track and field at the 2003 Carifta
Games held in Port of Spain, Trinidad and won
a gold medal in the women's discus throw. The
following year, Sasha competed in the Junior
Central American and Caribbean (CAC)
Championship Games in Vera-Cruz, Mexico
where she also won a silver medal in the wom-
en's discus throw.
Sasha is a member of the Bahamas Junior
National Female Basketball Team and has con-
tributed in securing a bronze medal for the
Bahamas at the Caribbean Basketball Confed-
erations (CBC) Youth Championships held in
St Augustine, Trinidad in July 2005. Sasha is a


member of The Club Monica Track and Field
Club and has participated in the Governor Gen-
eral's Youth Award Programme. In academics,
as a consistent honour roll student, Sasha was
selected and recognised for her high academic;
achievements by the most outstanding students
in the Bahamas Award Programme for three
consecutive years, 2003-2005. She also success-
fully obtained seven BGCSE's this year. .
: Lizinga S Rolle, 14, was graduated from S
C McPherson Junior High School with special
honours. She served as Head Girl, vice-presi-
dent of the school's newspaper club and acting
NCO in the RBDF Rangers Programme.
* Lizinga has been a member of her school's
softball team, speech and debate club, choir,
dance troupe, band, and volleyball team at dif-
ferent points throughout junior high. She was
also a member of the Wahoo House Social
Studies Competition Team, won various awards
in Spanish, Language Arts and Computer Stud-
ies, maintained perfect attendance and
remained an honour roll student.
In her second year at the school she won the
Holistic Student Award. She earned eight BJCs:
Social Studies, (A); English Language (A):;
Health Science (A); Religious Studies (A);


Mathematics (B); Home Economics (B); Gen-
eral Science (C); and Craft Study (C).
Her ambition is to become a lawyer, special-
ising in the protection and rights of abused chil-
dren and adults.
N Melissa Prescious Fox, 14, was graduated
from S C McPherson Junior High School in
June and is excited about beginning classes at C
V Bethel Senior School come September.
During heryears at S C Mcpherson, Melissa
rose from scoring a less than two point average
in the eighth grade, to a three point average
during her first term in the ninth grade. She
made the principal's list and obtained second
highest GPA overall during her final term at the
school. She achieved all of this while partici-
pating i1 her school's dance club and singing in
the Bahamas National Children's Choir.
Melissa looks forward to joining C V Bethel's
debate team as well as the school's choir. Her
goal is to one day become an attorney and lat-
er a judge. "The sky is your limit and only you
can determine your destiny in your pursuit for
excellence" continues to be her motto.
Josephine Whylly was graduated from S C
McPherson Junior High School in June. She


has received a scholarship to attend Faith Tem-
ple Christian Academy in September. While
at S C McPherson, she served as a school per-
fect and was an honour roll student for six con-
secutive terms (2002-2005). Josephine earned 8
BJCs: English (B); Mathematics (B); Craft
Study (B); Religious Studies (B); Home Eco-
nomics (B); Social Studies (B); General Sci-
ence (C); and Health Science (C).
0 Lamnech Johnson, 13, was graduated from
S C McPherson Junior High School where he
served as Head Boy. He considers himself a
"follower of Christ'" and enjoys reading, par-
ticipating in sporting activities, journalism, and
modern technology. He has been accepted to
Bahamas Acedemy, where three years from
now, he hopes to graduate at the top of his
class.
Afterwards, he hopes to attend a university
abroad and obtain his master's degree in Jour-
nalism. Lamech was an honour roll student
throughout junior high school, following his
performance at Ridgeland Primary School
where he maintained no less than a 3.4 GPA.
His motto has always been, "Good, better best.
I shall never rest until my good is better and my
better is best."


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8F















Teen sexual health: a forgotten issue?


* By JANICE MATHER

WHEN we talk about young peo-
ple, we remember school, violence,
delinquency, and everything they do
wrong. What is often forgotten is what
many young people should be doing
right for their own health but are
hampered by doing so, by law.
A young person in the Bahamas is
legally able to consent to sex at age 16.
Ironically, until they turn 18, they still
need parental consent for any medical
treatment, including sexual health ser-
vices. That means teens can't receive
publicly available birth control, or
access condoms to protect themselves
in those consensual relationships, unless
their mother, father, or other guardian
...hassignda form agreeing to this. Nor
can they be tested for Sexually Trans-
mitted Infections and, for girls, receive
Pap smear tests (recommended at age
21 or as soon as sexual activity begins),
without parental consent.
The Bahamas Youth Health Survey
taken seven years ago found that 41
per cent of adolescents questioned had
been sexually active.
Whether those teenagers are likely
to inform their mother or father that
they're having sex, in order to access
health facilities, is highly questionable.
"I personally feel that until the laws
are changed within the commonwealth
of the Bahamas, sexual health in ado-
lescents really has a long way to go, We
have to actually do something to reduce
the rule that parents need to be (giving
consent), especially in the case of late
adolescents I'm talking about the 16
and 17 year olds... not the little kids,"
says Nurse Carolyn Russell, coordinator
at the Adolescent Health Centre.
"In my opinion, hardly any of them
are accessing services, because of that,"
she says. "I don't care how we glam-
orise it, young people are not coming
to a facility where your parents have to
(sign a consent form). Like a young
lady told me the other day, what?
She'll wait 'til she's 18 because she's
not going through that....they prefer
not to have to go through it because
they feel that it's a breech of their con-
fidentiality. Everybody thinks of ado-
lescents as being bold and brassy but
they respect their privacy as well."
Nurse Russell points out'that, in the
US, condoms are widely available to
the sexually active teen population in
bathroom dispensers, for example.
Their unavailability locally doesn't
mean young people aren't having sex -
even as far back as 1986, 16 per cent of
live births were coming from girls


pyghted ii"--i '"Material


Syndicated Content


Available rom Commercial News rov2d


0-4@010 aan o 0- .bw* *
______ -
4b w ___obm _w-10 10ON amm 4000 O Mqu


between 10 and 19 years (Vital Statis-
tics Reports, Department of Statistics).

Protection

Inability to discreetly access protec-
tion clearly doesn't mean all young
people are opting out of sex. Instead,
says Nurse Lena Clarke, administra-
tor at the centre's clinic, "children are
using baggies, plastic baggies".
"So the adolescents out there are
using baggies, the Saran Wrap baggies
- they're actually using baggies," says
Nurse Russell. "We don't even think
about this when we stand and we talk
about promoting sexual health among
adolescents, we don't think about the
restrictions that exist in our country
that cause persons to think twice


before they do something that's actu-
ally gonna protect their health."
Sexually active teens may also be
turned off from seeking health services
by the fact that a provider is obligated
to call the police if they find a minor
has been involved in sex.
"The laws in the Bahamas need to
be changed because without the laws
being changed, there's a major barrier
to adolescent health services," says
Nurse Russell. "A lady came in recent-
ly and she said she'll wait until next
month, in September, when she'll be
18. But by the time she comes in, she
may be pregnant. There are real issues
when we look at accessibility to ser-
vices foi the adolescent person. We
say that we have accessible and afford-
able services, but we still have barriers
in terms of how these persons can


access reproductive health issues...as
long as our laws don't really address
the issue of the adolescent, we're going
to continue to have major challenges."
Statistics for 2003 recorded 21 STDs
amongst 10 to 19-year-olds that only
reflects the number of cases notified.
At the end of last year, figures from the
Infectious Diseases Division of the
Princess Margaret Hospital and the
Department of Public Health showed
292 cases of non-AIDS HIV Infections
in persons of the same age range, and
16 AIDS cases.
"A lot of persons don't see the ado-
lescents at some point they are a for-
gotten group. They don't vote, most
of our statistics don't break them down,
and (some) parents don't want to be
confronted with the issues," says Nurse
Russell. "Some countries have con-


b o -.


dom machines, in bathrooms. I think
if you ever put a condom machine in
bathrooms in the Bahamas you'd have
a riot... a lot of parents, a lot of school,.
our culture, we prefer to have a blind
eye," she says.
Young people, she says, may turn
up needing sexual healthcare, but
because of legal factors, that often hap-
pens when a situation has become dras-
tic, and not in a proactive manner.
"They usually turn up to us pretty
much when the situation is out of con-
trol either a police has them for run-
ning away," says Nurse Russell. "Oi,
they're caught with somebody or the
orgies we are having some serious
things happening in our society. There
are major negative things that are ha) -
pening that are affecting the adoles-
cent population."


PAGE 9F


THE TRIBUNE














Cadet programme is launched




to boost foreign language study


IN February 2004 the Ministry of
Tourism launched its Foreign Lan-
guage Cadet Programme, designed to
promote the study of foreign languages
among high school students.
The programme, a national plan for
tourism development, seeks to stimu-
late and create an incentive for the
study of foreign languages, inevitably
"laying the ground work for the wide
spread acquisitions of foreign lan-
guages to address the growing needs of
the economy".
It offers 10 positions that allows
eleventh grade students of public and
private schools in New Providence,
who study Spanish and French, to take
part in the interactive three-phase pro-
gramme.
Some 80 students wrote the Quali-
fying Examination for entry into the
programme on November 27, 2004,


producing high results and competi-
tive scores.
The first segment of the programme
takes place every Thursday from Feb-
ruary 10 through March 17, from
4.30pm 6.30pm and exposes partici-
pants to seminars, workshops, field
trips, tours and excursions in Span-
ish/French.
The second phase, the internship
segment, assigns students to work at
the following establishments for five
Saturdays, for six to eight hours during
the month of April Atlantis, RIU
Resort (formerly the Sheraton Grand
on Paradise Island), Dolphin Encoun-
ters, the Hilton British Colonial and
Stuart's Cove Dive Bahamas.
The third phase, known as the Study
Abroad is funded by the Ministry of
Tourism and takes place in July. This
phase of the programme allows stu-


dents to travel to Costa Rica, Spain
and France for a month of immersion.
During the month abroad, students
are enrolled in a Spanish/French course
and are accommodated by families and
language camps. With 24-hour super-
vision students take 3-4 hours of class-
es during the morning, followed by
excursions, sporting and cultural activ-
ities in the afternoon.
This year, language centers include
France-Accord, a French Language
Camp, outside of Paris, and Ecole des
Roches in Normandy, Spain, the
Enforex Summer camp in Madrid and
Costa Rica- CPI- Centro American de
Idiomas in Heredia, a nearby suburb of
capital city San Jose.
Graduates of the entire Foreign Lan-
guage Cadet Programme are awarded
an official Certificate of Completion
during a graduation ceremony, sched-


uled for September 29, 2005.
It is hoped that the interaction of
the programme will help to "generate
an industry in which young profes-
sionals are bilingually equipped to ser-
vice the tourism industry".
Cadet graduates of the 2005 pro-
gramme along with the Ministry of
Tourism's Foreign Language Unit will
launch an inter-high school Foreign
Language Club in October, 2005. The
club will provide a monthly forum for
grade eleven and twelve students to
converse in Spanish and French.
Activities will include culture talks,
movie nights, field trips, games, trea-
sure hunts, cooking demonstrations,
grammar clinics and end of year trips to
a Spanish or French speaking country.
Foreign Language Cadets 2005 are:
Jemellia Anishka Baker of C V
Bethel Senior High School;


Philicia Crystal Ambrister of Doris
Johnson Senior High School;
Leneka Georginn Adams of Gov-
ernment High School;
Rashanda Louise Sands of Jordan
Prince William High School;
Carisma Anderia Tucker of St
Augustine's College;
Omar Jesse Mckenzie of St John's
College;
Claudia Gulce of C I Gibson
Senior High School;
Kerline Octave of C R Walker
Senior High School;
Marla Joy Wood of Queen's Col-
lege and;
Travis Martin Varga of St
Andrew's School.
SEE pages 10-13 for
profiles of the cadets


How important is your child's vision?


M By DR EBBIE SHEARER
JACKSON
VISION is one of the most pre-
cious gifts given to us. It enables us
to view our surroundings, interact,
communicate and socialise with
each other.
When one considers how much
energy is involved in the visual
process, how could we neglect to
take care of our visual health.
Generally speaking, Bahamians
do not pursue preventative health
care measures unless something
happens. This can be attributed to
previous generations who were not
able to practice preventative health-
care and therefore most of us have
continued the tradition.
However, we have developed as a
nation over the years and most of us
can afford to get all the things we
need and desire.
The question is, why do we con-
tinue to neglect our health as a
nation?
Vision care is one of the most


important primary healthcare ser-
vices available in our country today
and there are many individuals who
have never had an eye exam.
Yet, many of these individuals
use computers on a daily, have cell
phones which require them to focus
at small, near objects and many of
the technological gadgets that
require the need of the visual sys-
tem. Technology continues to
impact our visual system on a daily
basis and many individuals are
experiencing visual problems and
do not realise it.
In our school system, many of
our students are failing as a result of
vision problems that are impacting
their learning.
Poor handwriting skills, reading
difficulties, frequent mistakes,
headaches are just some of the
signs/symptoms these students are
experiencing on a regular basis. Yet,
many of these signs go undetected
and these students, continue to
struggle in school on a daily basis.
Many work institutions require'


their employees to use computers
on a regular basis and do not pro-
vide vision care or coverage for
them.
It is important for us as a nation
to recognise the importance of
vision and its effect on us as indi-
viduals. Many complain of
headaches on a regular basis and
are often misdiagnosed for some-
thing else when in fact it could be a
vision problem.
We must see the need to have
our vision checked on a regular
basis and have our children exam-
ined on a regular basis to rule out
any problems that could affect their
learning.
It is beneficial for us as a country
to become more involved in our
health affairs and do whatever is
necessary to promote good eye
health.
Your vision is one of the most
important gifts God has given to
us, ensure that yours is protected.
Contact Dr Ebbie Shearer Jack-
son dt Pahndale Visioi Centre


& Copy--rig hted MaterialI
SyndicatedCo intent

Available from Commercial News Providers"





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PAGE 11F


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B H IP N


OMAR MCKENZIE TRAVIS VARGA RASHANDA SANDS


T


So00

Telephone 24.- 39- 58


IDA LMDALE VISION
CENTRE
...................


BACK








PAGE 12F


THE TRIBUNE


BCTOSCHOLSUPLEEN 20


CARISMA TUCKER


JEMELLIA BAKER PHILLICIA ARMBRISTER


Augustine's College completed four weeks of
immersion at the (CPI) Centro Panamericano
de Idiomas in San Joaquin de Flores, Costa
Rica.
"The first phase of the programme involved
meetings and activities. I was partnered with,
Jemellia Baker and I tied for first place for my
cadet partner profile. The meetings and activ-,
ities were a lot of fun and I particularly enjoyed
the scuba diving
"During the second phase of the programme
I worked in the RIU hotel with Rashanda, we
worked in each of the different sections of the
hotel, (separately of course), and I was able to
practice a little Spanish with the boss. My
favorite section of the hotel to work in was the
pool section because it was fun.
"During thIc third phase of the program I
travelled to Costa Rica with Jemellia. Lene-
ka, and Philicia we studied in Heredia Campus
at CPI. It was quite a unique experience. Jemel-
lia and I had the same host family and they
were very nice. Costa Rica is place with many
hills, mountains, and valleys. To go from school
to the mall would be to change altitude many
different times.
"I was able to communicate in class with my
a-teachers in Spanish and to speak Spanish at
home, on the street and in stores if I needed to


make an inquiry. The food was very different
but it was a very good experience and I am
.glad for it."

M Spanish Cadet Jemellia Baker of C V
Bethel High School completed four weeks of
immersion at CPI Centro Panmericano de
Idiomas in San Joaquin de Flores, Costa Rica.
"During the first phase of the programme
the meetings took on different forms, for exam-
ple, once we had a Spanish Treasure Hunt and
another time we went to Stuart Cove's. These
sessions were great!
"During the second of the programme I
worked in the Sun Lounge at Royal Towers,
Atlantis, Paradise Island. I had the opportuni-
ty to meet some celebrities such as Bow Wow,
Donnie McKlurkin and BeBe Winans.
"The final phase of the programme involved
me venturing for four weeks on an all expense
paid trip to beautiful Costa Rica. One of the
first things that caught my attention was that my
colleagues and I were the only "coloured" folks
on campus at the Centro Panaameicano de
Idiomas, seeing that we were friendly people we
soon made friends.
,"4.4 hoS.-t amily was the Viquez Oviedo.
They were 'iqspitable and accommodating.
'After aty or two I began to feel homesick


Spanish Cadet Phillicia Armbrister of
Doris Johnson Senior High School completed
four weeks of immersion at (CPI) Centro
Panamericano de Idiomas, San Joaquin de Flo-
res, Costa Rica.
"I entered the Ministry of Tourism's For-
eign Language Cadet Programme with great
anticipation and enthusiasm. It was like a dream
that came true. I was finally in the programme
that I craved to be apart of for the last year.
"The programme afforded me many exciting
experiences and opportunities. For example,


NSui Nova Southeastern University


* Bachelor's Programs
Bachelor in Business and Professional Management
-Accounting -Finance
-Human Resource Management -Marketing.
-Management Information Systems -Business Administration


Contact Us


* Master's Programs
-Masters of Business Administration
-MBA Finance
-Master of Science in Human Resource Management
-Master of Science in Education with specilization in Teaching & Learning
-Doctoral and Specialist degrees (TBA)

APPLICATION DEADLINES


Telephone: 364-6766 Fall Term starts: October 7, 2005-Bachelor's programs
Eml ax: 364u October 15, 2005-Master's programs
Email: nsu-bahamas@nsu.nova.edu Submit applications on or before September 16th, 2005


UNDERGRADUATE BUSINES vans
STUDENTS Evans
Farrington
Last Name First Name Init. Ferguson
Adair Camilla M.L. Ferguson
Adderley Deborah Y. Forbs
Adderley Sharon E. S. Forsythe
Allen Charlene M. Frazer
Bailey-Burrows Racquel M. Gabson
Bain Lynette W. Gibson
Bain Valencia P. Griffin
Bastian Deidre M. Hamilton
Beneby Pauline Hepburn
Benjamin Crispin H. Hepburn
Biggs-Russell Angelene A. Jameso
Bonaby Monique V. Johnson
Burrows Dwight R. Johnson
Burrows Vadalia R. Jolly
Butler Dionne V. Knowles
Capron Sherlane K. Knowles
Capron Alissa D. Knowles
Carey Marsha Lynch
Clarke Danika D. Major
Colby Rosita Malrticolm
Conliffe Adrian N. Martinez
Cox Tera L. McKinney
Culmer Archealaus Leonard
Curry David E. Miller
Curtis Natasha K. Moller
Darville Kathleen C Monroe
Davis Janice C. Morley
Dawson Deleta Moss
Dean Latoya N. Moss
Dean Kenyetta T. Moss
Deveaux-Daxor Leketa M. Moss
Dorsett Viviar G.D. Moultrie
Ellis Quinton V. Moxey
Munroe


Mebra
Nikisha
Arnette
Donna
Ulease
Chery
Carol
Jonathan
Sherene
Tiffany
Audrey
Maria
Beatrice
Italia
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Lorraine
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Melisia
Patricia
Michelle
Renay H.
Sherene
Melenia
Christina
Corene
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Denise.
Geannie
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Samantha


1L.
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H.

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Y.H.
A. W.
R.
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L.
C. P.

R.


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Poitier
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Willamson


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Joy
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Sarah
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Philippa
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N'Keba
Denise
Anthia
Shemique


G.
L.
K
Y
M.
L.
M.
N.
P.


P.
A.
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G.
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P.
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M. P.
L,
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0,
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N.


MASTERS IN BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION


Last Name
Braynen
Collie
Cooper
Cox-Ferguson


First Name
Vanessa
Aretha
Tashika
Neville


Init.
C.
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Davis
Durocher
Edden
Ferguson
Ferreira
Higgs
Lockhart
Mackey
March
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McKenzie
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Missick
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MASTER OF SCIENCE
IN HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT


Last Name
Campbell
Charlton
Forbes
Francis
Gomez
Jones
Miller


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Shrine
Sharon
Edward
Roselyn
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on Chakita
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 13F


135 Storr House, Mackey Street
P. O. Box SS-6353
Nassau, Bahamas
k Telephone: 394-6000
heard 394-CHEK
Fax: 393-4377
Email: chekard@batelnet.bs
The Bahamian Courtesy and Convenience Card


Shop safely and conveniently when you use your Chekard at any of these participating Merchants:


APPLIANCES/ELECTRONICS
BEST BUY FURNITURE
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PAGE 14F


THE TRIBUNE


BACKTOSHOLSUPLEEN20


LENEKA ADAMS MARLA-JOY WOOD CLAUDIA GULCE


', France. many great people, cnecKig guests in, taKing amf
my life have them to their rooms and even getting tipped by of n














Pursuing education and taking




proper care of money matters


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
FOR the Bahamian student
who is making the decision to
study abroad, nothing affects
that decision more than
finances.
But if your child is on the
verge of a high school gradua-
tion or at the point where you
have just mailed in your appli-
cation and attachments, it may
already be too late to be think-
ing of how to fund your child's
college education.
Catherine Richards-Dean, a
financial advisor who has two
children in college, knows first
hand the demands of funding a
college education.
Her two daughters both
attend universities in the United
States and may have missed the
opportunity to further their
education abroad had their par-
ents not planned ahead of time.
"I'm talking about way ahead
of time," she says in an inter-
view with The Tribune. "When
they were younger we made
sure that we set aside money
every now and again for their
education.
"But a lot of persons don't
do that, because they are think-
ing that college is so far away.
You don't really realise how
quickly that time creeps up on
you, so it's best to start putting
yourself in the position finan-
cially, before you get to the
point where you cannot help
yourself," she adds.
Mrs Richards-Dean says that
she couldn't imagine how she
would have funded the thou-
sands of dollars spent for an
education at the "historically
black" universities they attend,
especially considering the fact
that fees for international stu-
dents are much steeper.
She explains: "You also have
to realise that a university edu-
cation in a foreign country -is
not the 1,000 odd dollars you


pay in COB, because our stu-
dents are foreigners in those
countries. And foreigners pay
more, a lot more. Sometimes its
double what the residents or cit-
izens in that country are pay-
ing for the same education.
"So saving, putting money
side for their education is what
you want to do. People are
always complaining that the cost
of education in this country is
going up, so what do you think
about the cost of education in
these other countries. It's sky-
rocketing.
"And if you want your child
to get that education, you can't
put all the pressure on them
when the time is already there,
to see if they can get a scholar-
ship."

Scholarships

For most college students, if
not all, a full-tuition scholarship
with no pressure to repay those
who issue it later down in life,
would be ideal to fund their
education. But the reality is that
these scholarships are often
very competitive.
Most colleges and universi-
ties do offer entrance scholar-
ships, but many of these are
very specific, for example, there
may be a partial scholarship
available for only Caribbean
students,
According to the financial
advisor, parents and students
who are thinking about an over-
seas college education should
never "bank" on the hope that
they may receive a scholarship.
Doing this, she says, only puts
the student at a disadvantage
in the event that the scholar-
ship that he/she was so sure of,
doesn't come through. "Then
what will you do? What can you
do?" she asks.
"A scholarship is an asset, but
there's no guarantee in apply-
ing. You have to think about


N SOME forward planing is essential when considering your child's education


these things when your children
are in primary school even
though that's pretty young
because the truth is that not
everyone will get a scholarship."


While everyone will not get a
scholarship, there is a chance
that more students will be eligi-
ble for student loans. Though
organisations that offer student


loans usually have GPA
requirements, they are much
more flexible, Mrs Richards-
Dean believes.
"That's because they are


loans and these groups can
make interest off of you the
same way that the bank would if
you took out a loan for a car or
to mortgage a house."


Poor study habits


Studying with Friends
While fun, sometimes you
may lose out on quality study
time by socialising. Find one
good study-buddy if you like
group studying.
M Too much music
Noise and music can interfere
with the brain's ability to com-
prehend new information. It can
also distract you from focusing
on the material at hand. If you
need music in the background,
find a specific type (usually clas-
sical) that works well for you.
Don't keep changing it around.
When there are no lyrics,
then it is easier to focus on the
words on the paper in your
hand.
Bad environment
A poor study environment
can ruin all quality time. If you
are uncomfortable at a chair,
desk, room, the temperature is
too cold or too hot, you will be
unsuccessful studying.
Test out different sites until
you find the best place for you.
It may be the library, it may be
your room, your bed, your best
friend's backhouse. Who
knows? Find what works best
for you and stick with it.
Cramming
While many people swear by
the cramming method, it is ulti-
mately terrible at long term


knowledge retention and can
cause undue stress. Study for
days up until the test. Or, if you
do prefer cramming, try cram-
ming two nights prior to the
exam so that the final night will
not consist of stress. Rather it
will be a night for review.
Eating
Eating too much food during
studying can disrupt retention
of material. It can also take too
much time away.
You may want to snack light-
ly during studying, but not eat
enormous meals. Keep a small
bag of snacks by your study
area. You won't have to leave
the area just to pick up food
when you get hungry.
Drinking
Drinking is a double-edged
sword. Never drink alcohol
while studying. However, it is
important to stay awake and
hydrated. Have a glass of water
(or soda with caffeine) by your
side. Be very careful not to spill
it onto your books and papers.
Working in your bed
While it may be comfortable,
your bed can also soothe you
to sleep instead of study. Sit at a
desk in your room instead of
on your bed.
Do not study on your bed late
at night, as you will be tempted
to fall asleep.


Multi-tasking
Many people are able to mul-
ti-task, meaning they can do
several different things at once.
This can be good for daily tasks.
When it comes to studying, you
may not retain as much materi-
al as if you were to focus purely
on one task. Before a big exam,
drop everything else for at least
24 hours and focus purely on
the studying. When it is com-
plete, you can return to your
multi-tasking.
Studying during a commute
Many people enjoy reading
on a train, bus or car to w6rk
and school. These environments
are wonderful for light reads,
but not necessarily for intense
studying. Use the commute (if
you have one) for light studying,
such as memorisation, repeti-
tion and review. Do not use this
time to learn new information.
1 Outside stress
It is inevitable to allow out-
side problems into your study
world. They exist and cannot
be turned off light electricity.
There is no perfect way out of
eliminating outside stress to a
study area. The best advice we
can give you is to find a location
that eliminates all superficial
stress enough that will allow you
even a few hours to focus on
writing, studying, reviewing.
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16F


I


Ol<








i ne inrlIuneI presents


Counselling, confidentiality





and preserving a reputation


By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
PROTECTING the student-coun-
sellor relationship can be challenging at
times, seeing that there is a fine line
between what information should actu-
ally be considered confidential and
what information should be handed
over to the authorities.
One local guidance counsellor
believes that though the counselling
systems within Bahamian schools is
not perfect, when it comes to confi-
dentiality it is "far better" than it was
years ago.
"Counselling, for a long time, had a
bad reputation because nothing could
be kept a secret. So it was difficult try-
ing to convince or re-direct children
to realise that what happens within the
office between the counsellor and the
child stays there between the counsel-
lor and the child," says Samantha
Evans, guidance counsellor at the
Garvin Tynes Primary School in Sunset
Park.
Ms Evans has been a counsellor at
the school for two-and-a-half years.
Though she believes that children in
today's school system are more com-
fortable disclosing information to their
counsellors, there still remains many
"challenges" in the form of other per-
sons leaking what a student discloses in
a closed forum, she says.
"When you come in with a student in
these meetings some things are out of
....y6e. ftrolbaegase other persons 'are'
- called in to these meetings aAd insist 'on
being a part of these meetings. Some-
times, they are the persons who take
the student's business out of the


office," Ms Evans claims.
"So you have to talk to the persons
in authority, mainly the administrators
in the school, to let them know that if
they are in a meeting, especially where
delicate situations like child abuse are
discussed, they need to know that this
stays within the office. And it's not to
be taken to your secretary. It's not to
be taken home. It's not to be taken
out of this forum."

Self-esteem

According to Ms Evans, when stu-
dents feel they cannot trust their coun-
sellors, or any school official for that
matter, it helps "deflate" their self-
esteem.
"It is very important to be confiden-
tial because depending on the serious-
ness of the situation, the child is
removed from the home. But they are
not removed from the school. So the
confidentiality needs to be protected
because you need to protect the child's
image since that child still has to live
within his own or her own shell. And so
we need to safeguard that child's self-
esteem," says Ms Evans.
"And we need to ensure as counsel-
lors that we protect them. We don't
have any control over what other agen-.
cies do or what administrators do, but
we took an Oath of Confidentiality
and so we need to ensure that it is
upheld," she adds.
Ms Evans believes that for the most
part, counsellors ~iderstaid eir-rs-"
sion" in the school system but it may be
others who need education on how
vital maintaining confidentiality is.


"Teachers need to know the impor-
tance of protecting that confidentiality
because these are the ones who want to
know information. Many counsellors
are pressed for information, but some
teachers don't realise that you can only
tell them the information that they
need to know. Anything else is the
responsibility of the parents."
The repercussions of not protecting
that child's private discussions can be
far reaching. The student may grow
up with feelings of low self worth and
because persons may ridicule them the
child genuinely believes that anybody
has the right to harm them again," Ms
Evans warns.
"It's because my teacher said I'm no
good and they are talking about me,
and my friends laugh at me because
this happened to me, maybe this is
what is supposed to happen. So they
continue to live a life with that type of
behaviour," she adds.
According to Ms Evans, children
who have been molested or victims of
incest often end up becoming rape vic-
tims or get involved in promiscuous
activities as a "spin off" of what hap-
pened to them earlier in life.
She feels that this is even more like-
ly to occur in cases where the coun-
sellor never effectively followed-up
with the student to ensure that "healing
took place".
Ms Evans' theory seems to be along
the lines of, 'it takes a village to raise a
child'. She feels that parents, teachers,
counsellors, school administrators and
'the 'ider community must world.
together, especially teachers and coun-
sellors, since the child is with the
teacher most of the day.


"Counsellors go into the classroom
for only a short period during the
year," she explains. "So what I do is let
teachers know what to look out for. I
also encourage teachers to get involved
in the students' lives ask them about
their day, ask them if they watched a
certain movie last night because
teaching falls on deaf ears if the child
isn't mentally ready or if something is
on that child's mind."

Vigilance

Ms Evans urges school guidance
counsellors to be "vigilant" because a
parent is "the main source of abuse in
the lives of children". And because
children generally love their parents,
regardless of how that parent treats
them, the counsellor must also build
a trusting relationship with their stu-
dents.
Says Nfs Evans: "Children will be
children, and even if you tell them that
if someone hurts them to talk, some-
times they won't because they are
scared. So you have to make them feel
comfortable with you;,..
"And they might not tell you right
away in the first session. You might
need two or three of four sessions
before they open up to you, but it just
depends on how deep the wound is.
So it's a task and sometimes it gets
really intense, but you have to be real-
ly grounded as a counsellor. Even if
you have to twiytt,tapdturn-it andask-
them a'qustion many times ifor them
to understand that you want the right
answer the truth you have to ask
them and make sure that you do."


When it comes to counselling ses-
sions, Ms Evans says that there is no
such thing as a counsellor becoming
too personal with the questions asked
of a student.
She feels that some things might be
too personal for teachers to ask, but
not counsellors, especially if the coun-
sellor has reason to believe that some-
thing is going on in the home.
"And parents may not understand
that either, but if we suspect that some-
one is being abused, we have that right
to ask them the questions even if the
parents feel like it is inappropriate,"
Ms Evans adds.
Though confidentiality is a major
aspect of guidance counselling, Ms
Evans agrees that some situations do
call for police involvement.
And Garvin Tynes has needed this
assistance on many occasions during
the last school year, she notes.
"If it requires sometimes getting the
police involved then you do that
because they have no tolerance for
abuse in the homes. They take the child
home and tell the parent that the child
was seen by a counsellor today, and if
the child is not in school tomorrow or
comes with bruises, tomorrow they are
coming to pick you (parents) up," says
Ms Evans.
"That is the point it is at now with
parents. Since we can't get them to the
court system we have to use the police
to get done what we need done. When
you are hearing messages from these-
..parents that they arot coming down
to no school to see no guidance coun-
sellor, and they ain't coming until
report card day, you have to get the
message across."


An education in :




the environment


N DR K Sealey, volunteers and Michael Brooks (right) prepare collected corals for transplant.


* MICHAEL Brooks (left), and co-principal investigator, Lester Flowers, lecturer at COB discuss
shoreline plants


THE Earthwatch Institute's
research expedition to Great
Guana Cay, Abaco this sum-
mer was quite an interesting
experience for North Andros
High' School teacher Michael
Brooks.
As part of Team III of the
Coastal Ecology of the
Bahamas data collecting
process, volunteers from around
the globe explored the
nearshore environments of the
coast of Great Guana Cay from
16-26 July.
The main areas of focus for
the principal investigators, staff
and volunteers were Near Shore
Marine Plants Diversity, Near
Shore Fish Surveys, Water
Quality Assessments, Coastal
Plant Diversity as well as
Coastal Mapping and Ranking.
The research seeks to docu-
ment the environment and use


this information to make deci-
sions regarding the health of the
ecosystems surveyed.
Using period field monitor-
ing techniques and satellite
imagery this research seeks to
map the entire country assist
the Bahamas when making
developmental decisions and
the impact these will have on
coastal ecosystems and fishery
habitats.
The programme is headed by
Dr Kathleen Sullivan Sealey,
Dean, Science, Technology and
Allied Health, at the College of
the Bahamas, and Lester Flow-
ers, lecturer in the School of
Science and Technology, COB.
Mr Brooks considers the
expedition's work very impor-
tant, not only to the ecology of
Great Guana Cay and the coun-
try but also to the world.
Information and data


acquired in this longitudinal
study may be applied to other
environments throughout the
Bahamas and provide a deeper
understanding as to the natural
resources and their sustainabil-
ity.
As an ardent supporter of
conservation efforts generally,
Mr Brooks thanked ANCAT
for its assistance and making it
possible for him to participate in
this unique and valuable expe-
rience. He looks forward to
deepening his association with
Andros Conservancy Trust
(ANCAT), the Bahamas
National Trust and other con-
servation organisations dedi-
cated to preserving the pristine
nature of the Bahamas. He also
looks forward to sharing his
experience with his students of
North Andros High School and
the community at large.


* MICHAEL Brooks (left), Mr Lester Flowers along with staff and volunteers of team III set out
for data collection in the waters of Great Guana Cay.















Using the power of reading





to teach life skills to children


N By PETURA BURROWS a
Tribune Feature Writer A Bahamian author and


LOCAL primary school stu-
dents will have the opportunity
to learn positive life skills and
glean tips for developing better
character and integrity with the
addition of a series of books
that will be added to their cur-
riculum come September.
What is interesting about
these books is that they are
. authored by a Bahamian who
is currently in the school sys-
tem and acquainted with the
needs of school-aged children
in this country.
Samantha Evans, who has
been a guidance counsellor at
the Garvin Tynes Primary
School for the past two-and-a-
half years, and who prior to that
worked in child welfare services
within the schools, is the author
of the newest addition to the
curriculum, the "Quiet Reflec-
tion" series.
The Ministry of Education
has extended a challenge to
Bahamians to write more mate-
rial to be used in local schools,
and the school counsellor saw
the need to answer this call.
"And now that I'm able to
contribute in this way to the
education of children in this
country, I'm very happy about
it... It's good that I'm. able to
share my unique way of coun-
selling with other students and
other counsellors too, so that
they can use it in their class-
rooms," she told The Tribune
in an interview.
Realizing that life lessons
have to be taught based on the
grade level of students, Ms
Evans developed her book at
different levels: Level A-1 will
be used by first graders; Level
A-2 by second graders; Level B
by Grades 3 and 4; and Level C
by Grades 5 and 6, ,,.
Levels B and C are currently:,..
available at NassautiStatiopers,
Rosetta Street, and i)eep South
Bookstore, Town Centre Mall.
Levels A-1 and A-2 will be
available at those locations on
August 22, says the author.
(The author plans to develop a
book to be used by kindergart-
ners.)
The series, which Ms Evans
refers to as "self discovery for
beginners", offers a practical
hands-on approach to guidance
counselling, in activity book
form;.
Level C (for Grades 5 and 6)
opens with a guidance prayer,
then delves into topics such as
defining true. friendship, then
into a powerfully positive poem
titled "Who Am I", which was
written to build the readers'
self-esteem.

Reflection

The importance of maintain-
ing good spirits, belief in one-
self, conflict resolution, appre-
ciating cultural diversity, respect
for peers and for authority, and
honesty, are some of the topics
addressed in "Quiet Reflec-
tion".
The books, which were ini-
tially intended to be an anthol-
ogy of motivational poems,
"evolved" into this fun and
interactive book for children,
.says the author.
She made it a point to involve


guidance counsellor has

drawn on her experience

to teach some life lessons


the primary level students who
often have short attention
spans. So each topic in the
books ends with an activity for
the student, and a "Let's Talk"
section where students are
asked to answer questions on
that particular lesson.
"I realised that the book as
it was written is particularly for
students, and in order for stu-
dents to understand and to
grasp what I am trying to get
across, I needed to make it so
that there could be some inter-
action or some activity, some
thing that they could do to
become a part of what it is I am
presenting," says Ms Evans.
"So the book evolved into
this activity, fun, question-and-
answer, role-playing kind of
book."

Aims

While Ms Evans has plans to
complete her series with an
advanced book to be used in
the junior and senior school sys-
tems, she believes that it is more
important to, tackle issues of
self-esteem and self-worth in a
child's formative years, and that
she says would be his/her pri-
mary school years.
Each student will be required
to purchase a copy of the book,
which they will use along with
their guidance counsellors dur-
ing Classroom Guidance peri-
ods.
During these sessions, coun-
sellors go into the classroom for
one or two periods (which is 30
minutes to an hour) within the
school day. Some of these class-
es are weekly, some once a
month, others twice per month,
all depending on the size of the
school, the guidance counsellor
explains.
The objective of these ses-
sions is to provide students with
a positive message. "We want
them to be aware so that when
we talk about self-esteem they
can know what that means.
How do you develop self-
esteem? What does self-esteem
look like to you?
"We want to help them to re-
direct their thinking to make a
situation work for them. How
about being more proactive?
That's what we want to equip


them with. How to take control
of their own lives and not wait-
ing for someone else to do it
for them," Ms Evans says.
But isn't this too weighty a
topic for primary school stu-
dents, who are noticeably more
concerned with lunch and break
times?
This guidance counsellor does
not seem to think so.
Training

In fact, she says that counsel-
lors in the school system often
find that in order for them to
promote prevention and "com-
bat the ills" that exist in the
junior and senior high schools,
they must focus on training chil-
dren in their more impression-
able years.
She explains: "If you wait
until that age (when students
are in junior and high school),
when children have already
formed their own identity and
they already have a more
defined sense of who they are,
its gonna be more difficult for
you to try and teach them these
concepts because they've
already learned the concepts
from somewhere else. And
chances are it could be wrong.
"But they already have a
sense of what they think self-
esteem is, or what type of man-
ners they should have or what
respect means to them. And
they may have learned it from
the wrong place.
"So our purpose now is to
teach the children the right way,
give them the choice so that
when they are faced with these
situations they will have the
tools to make the right deci-
sions. So that this generation of
primary school students, when
they go into junior and high
school, it is our hope that they
would make better choices
because they would have been
properly trained."
The books will be retailed
at Nassau Stationers, Rosetta
Street and Deep South Book-
store, Town Centre Mall at the
following prices: Level A-1 and
Level A-2 books at $15.63; Lev-
el B at $12.50; and Level C at
$14.68 at Nassau Stationers and
Deep South Bookstore.


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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


"Iv-


PAGE 18


THE TRIBUNE


~AZJ









BCTOSCHOOLSUPPEMNT00


Turning COB




from a college




to a university


* COB Bandshell, the hub for college and community activities.


M DURING the past three months workmen have been busy carrying out renovations to the
Boulevard Building to ensure its readiness for the Fall 2005 semester, which begins August 29


RENOVATIONS to COB's
Boulevard Building are ahead
of schedule. The newly acquired
40,000 square foot addition to
the College of the Bahamas'
main Oakes Field Campus com-
plex has undergone a massive
overhaul during the past three
months to ensure it's ready for
the Autumn 2005 semester,
which begins August 29.-
The building will house the
university bookstore, business
centre, a caf6, faculty and
administrative offices, office
space for President Emerita Dr
Keva Bethel, two lecture the-
atre rooms, seven conventional
classrooms, the Schools of Edu-
cation and Social Sciences and
the Department of Graduate.
Studies.
On April 15, the multi-build-


ing complex was purchased
from Boulevard Investments, a
Bahamian company at a price
of $3.2 million. This purchase
was significant because it rep-
resented the first asset which
the College of the Bahamas
holds in its own name. All oth-
er college properties are vest-
ed in the Bahamas treasury.
Renovations, inclusive of fur-
nishings and equipping the
building, are pegged at approx-
imately $4 million and are
expected to be completed by
the end of August, in time for
the Autumn 2005 semester.
Already, work on the exterior
of the Boulevard Building is
nearing completion and bears
the look of the College's main
campus complex.
In May, the College held its


annual Commencement exer-
cises on the newly built Band
shell, which will play host to
many COB and community
events and activities; The com-
pletion of the Band shell and
the renovations of the Boule-
vard Building are the first in a
series of physical expansion for
the College of the Bahamas.
On April 21, ground was bro-
ken for the construction of the
new state-of-the-art Harry C
Moore Library and Information
Centre; phase one, the straight-
ening of Tucker Road, is near-
ing completion. Phase two is
the development of the 260-
space car park.
Additionally, the College of
the Bahamas is engaged in a
substantial beautification pro-
ject of its campus grounds.


THE realignment of Tucker Road continues as workmen move swiftly to complete this phase of
the Harry C Moore Library & Information Centre. Phase two will be the construction of a 260-
space car park.


Busy year for school of English


THE School of English Stud-
ies at the College of the
Bahamas had a busy 2004/05
academic year.
In the past nine months, the
School has launched a number
of initiatives designed to
enhance students' language and
critical thinking skills, increasing
substantially its course and pro-.
gramme offerings and involv-
ing students in cultural and
artistic events.
The pinnacle of the School of
English Studies' many accom-
plishments is the establishment
of its Bachelor of Arts Degree
in English, which will be offered
this Fall semester at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. The cre-
ation of the BA in English
began under the careful stew-
ardship of the former School of
English Studies (SES) Chair
and present Acting Dean of
Liberal and Fine Arts, Dr Ear-
la Carey-Baines. Dr Carey-
Baines and the School of Eng-
lish Studies Bachelor of Arts
Committee worked diligently
to ensure that the BA in Eng-
lish satisfies COB's mission for
undergraduate education as
identified in the Strategic Plan
2002-2007.
Dr Ian Strachan, current
School Chair, proudly stated in
At Random, that the BA in
English degree programme will
in fact be "instrumental" in ful-
filling that mission, offering
courses that require students to
demonstrate critical, reflective
and creative thought. He said
that such courses will expose
students "to the diverse cultur-
al and intellectual traditions of
the peoples of the world, thus
broadening students' exposure
to 'diverse populations".
The BA in English offers a
variety of courses that strength-
en student competency in lan-
guage, and knowledge and
understanding of literature
local, regional and global.
Bahamian literature, Bahami-
an Creole and Studies in
Bahamian Culture, for exam-
ple, provide students with deep-
er knowledge of the Bahamas'
rich literary, linguistic and cul-
tural traditions. Courses in West
Indian and Caribbean literature
offer opportunity for the explo-
ration of Caribbean identity and
heritage, while a multiplicity of
other courses present opportu-
nities for analysis and evalua-
tion of numerous works of art,


including films.
An exciting aspect of the BA
in English is the inclusion of a
course devoted solely to film
studies. The BA programme
exposes students to the joys of
animation as in Finding Nemo;
the ingenuity of the sci-fi/fan-
tasy genre exemplified in the
Star Wars trilogy; and the indi-
vidualistic, thought-provoking
productions of world cinema.


Students, says Randall Pinder,
Head of Department, "are
going to be really stimulated by
this course". From B' Rabbie
and "the Gaulin Wife" to Toni
Morrison's Song of Solomon to
Grace Nichols' I is a long-mem-
oried woman to The Passion of
the Christ, the BA in English
offers students a diversity of
material to explore, ponder and
analyse.


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Working on a sports programme for



a stronger College of the Bahamas


THE College of the Bahamas
introduced a physical education,
health and nutritional compo-
nent to its general education
course outline in August.
This two-credit course is a
requisite for each student
enrolling into the College of
the Bahamas regardless of the
student's bachelor degree pro-
gramme. The new requirement
is a part of the College's com-
mitment to preparing students
to become productive and
thoughtful citizens by offering a
broad liberal arts education.
COB's general education
undergraduate curriculum is
multi-disciplinary in perspec-
tive. It seeks to broaden stu-
dents' knowledge, foster life-
long learning and nurture
reflective and analytic ability
through the examination of
underlying values and contro-
versial issues. Students become
equipped with a range of skills
that are honed through nine
strands, the newest being phys-
ical education, health and nutri-
tion.
According to COB's Physi-
cal Education lecturer Jenny
Isaacs-Dotson, the new general
education course requirement
in physical education, health
and nutritional is not only time-
ly but it will provide COB stu-
dents with an in-depth look at
health and nutritional concerns
from a personal perspective.
"This one is long overdue,"
said Dotson. "I fundamentally
believe that physical education,
health and nutrition is a part of
the holistic approach to student
development. We know how
important academics are but the
physical well being is equally
important to an individual's
future success."
Ms Dotson noted that this







Archie Burrows, 18, is a
full-time student at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and is
pursuing a BA in economics
and finance (double major).
Archie has made the
Dean's List every semester.
His current GPA is 3.35.
Archie was graduated Jor-
dan Prince Williams High
School with a 3.30 in 2003.
He received a "Most Out-
standing Youth Award" for
his achievement, and hon-
ours in the subjects of Eng-
lish, accounts and geography
upon graduation. He earned
nine BGCSEs, all with suc-
cessful passes.


New course for


every student


kind of course requirement is
normal for most universities in
North America and agrees that
the benefits derived from this
course will extend beyond the
classroom setting.
"One of the sporting disci-
plines that will be offered is
swimming," said Dotson. "It's
surprising to know that many
Bahamians cannot swim, and
so this obviously is a lifetime
skill that our students will
acquire. And while students will
have the opportunities to par-
ticipate in a number of the
sporting disciplines, I believe
the health and nutritional com-
ponent will be advantageous to
everyone enrolled in the
course."
This course, in particular the
health and nutritional compo-
nent, will require students to


develop a programme for
healthy lifestyles, inclusive of
fitness and diet. Students will
conduct research, analyze data
and advance recommendations
about health related issues.
To fulfill the general educa-
tion component requirement of
a bachelor degree programme,
students must complete a mini-
mum of 36 credits. Of these 36
credits, students must complete
at least 27 credits at the lower
level and nine at the upper lev-
el; the physical education,
health and nutrition course is
in keeping with the
College/University of the
Bahamas' commitment to pro-
vide students with both disci-
plinary and multi-disciplinary
approaches to the pursuit of
knowledge and solving prob-
lems.


* COB students participate in volleyball and basketball action as a part of the physical activities on
campus.


Plans to enhance the



environmental studies



programme at COB


AS the College of the
Bahamas looks to expand and
improve its academic pro-
grammes in the institution's
march to university status, fac-
ulties will be called upon to be
more innovative and creative
both in administration and the
delivery of instruction.
This summer, Lionel Johnson,
2004/05 chairperson of the
School of Science and Technol-
ogy, participated in an intense
three-day conference, which will
enhance the environmental stud-
ies programme at the College.
The Council of Environmen-
tal Deans and Directors
(CEDD), a professional asso-
ciation of academic leaders of
environmental studies, hosted
its fourth annual summer pro-
gramme conference July 13-15
in San Jose, California. The
conference provided partici-
pants with opportunities for net-
working with fellow environ-
mental programme leaders; to
share challenges and successes,
and learn about opportunities
to improve environment pro-
grammes at their respective col-
leges or universities.
A portion of CEDD's mis-
sion is to promote, encourage,


Science school chairman

attends three-day conference


develop and support efforts to
advance knowledge, learning in
the interdisciplinary environ-
mental sciences and studies
(physical, biological, social sci-
ences, engineering and human-
ities) and to disseminate such
knowledge to the scientific com-
munity and to the public.
This year's conference fea-
tured presentations and discus-
sions, including Creating Inter-
disciplinary Scholars; the Future
of Environmental Programmes;
the Future of Environmental-
ism; Curriculum; Careers and
Programme Administration;
Fundraising and Funding
Opportunities; and Internation-
al Partnerships/Collaboration.
"A number of breakout ses-
sions, some by size and type of
colleges, allowed participants
the opportunity to discuss com-
mon issues and to discover the
ways that different institutions
deal with the same problems,"
noted Mr Johnson. "The chal-


lenges of building, sustaining,
funding and evaluating envi-
ronmental programmes drew
intense discussions as partici-
pants tried to arrive at best
practices for hiring or otherwise
gathering sufficient faculty from
other disciplines to enable the
creation of an interdisciplinary
programme, while at the same
time minimising cost."
As the sole Caribbean repre-
sentative, CEDD president Dr
Brad Smith noted his intent to
encourage the College of the
Bahamas to assume the lead role
in fostering more support from
the region that would underpin
environmental education.
Mr Johnson addressed the
body on environmental pro-
grammes at the College of the
Bahamas. He stressed the need
for the College of the Bahamas
to play a leading role in provid-
ing informed, scholarly opinion
on matters of national develop-
ment.


* LIONEL Johnson, 2004/05 Chairperson, School of Science and Technology, the College of the
Bahamas.
(Photo: Andrew Seymour)


: :


PAGE 20


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, 16TH AUGUST, 2005
6:00 p.m 8:30 p.m .............................................................. Parents Evening

WEDNESDAY, 17TH AUGUST 2005
8:00a.m 2:00 p.m ..........................................................................O rientation
2:00p.m. 8:00 p.m...............School Meetings/Advisement/Registration/Payment

THURSDAY, 18TH AUGUST & FRIDAY, 19TH AUGUST, 2005
9:00a.m. 6:00 p.m....................Advisement/ Registration/Payment Continues

SATURDAY, 20TH AUGUST, 2005
8:00 p.m until............................................ Freshmen Dance COB Auditorium

All events without a venue listing, will be held
at the COB Band Shell, Poinciana Drive


Orientation is mandatory for all new students.


For more information, please call 302-4446 or 302-4342



NE SUDNTRGISRTO


SCHOOL


A13
E12
_Faculty Offices
Faculty Offices
T25
T25
T04
RECORDS


English Studies & Communication & Creative Arts
Education & Social Sciences (Including LLB Programme)
Business (Advisement in Faculty Offices)
Hospitality-&-Tourism Studies
Nursing & Allied Health Professions
Sciences & Technology
Continuing Education (CEES)
Graduate Students


PRINTING
MIS
MIS
RECORDS
RECORDS
T25
T25
T04
RECORDS


LAE EISRAIN OMg SSGMET


SCHOOL


PRINTING


A13 English Studies & Communication & Creative Arts RECORDS
E12 Education and Social Sciences (Including LLB Programme) "
Math Sciences & Technology
T25 School of Nursing & Allied Health Professions
Faculty Offices School of Business "
Faculty Offices School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies "
T04 Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES)
The Business Office Hours will be opening from 8:00am 6:00pm on the following dates
August 18th, 19th, 31st and September 1, 2005.


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Opportunities 2005/2006


What is your career goal?


V PROMOTION


QUALITY SERVICE

V INTERNATIONAL


CERTIFICATION


V SALARY INCREASE


V CAREER CHANGE/ ENHANC


The Professional Development Department can help you achieve your career goal! A wide array
of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can
become a pioneer in setting performance standards in your organization. We have secured
partnerships with leading international institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You
can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas. Success is
at your finger tips. Call us today.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
* Certified Professional Managers Programme, James Madison University
* Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
* A+ Computer Technician Certification Programme
* Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOUS)
* Certificate In Law Programme
* Certified Professional Security- Officers Programme
* Becker Conviser CPA Review (Certified Public Accountant)
* Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
* Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
* Journeyman Plumbing License
* Master Plumbing License
* Certified Security Officer Programme
* Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
* Ethics And Professional Responsibility
* Writing & Research Skills
* Introduction To Computers, Windows & The Internet

2005/2006 Programme Duration is 6 Months 9 Months
External Registration is required for UK and US Institutions.


Professionals holding the Bachelor or Master Degrees may apply for
exemption from specific courses.

FALL 2005 CLASS SCHEDULE


CLASSES BEGIN:


Saturday, 3rd September


For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am 12noon.
International programmes available. No entrance exams required.
Tuition may be paid per term or in full.

Visit The Centre For Continuing Education or Call for an interview today!
(242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0093


f rmi Invite you to

















q jrnownedCari66ean Poet d PWinner of
the Commonweathry WPrize for (Poetry


Lecture: TFriday, 26thAugust 7pm
S yPwace: iBahamas tourism training,
&Centre (BTfic) Lecture Teatre
Cost. Tree
Workshop: Saturday, 27tihAugust
10am- 1pm
Cost: $50.00
RefresAments Included
Deadline to fJgister '4ednesday 24th August

"goodison is among the finest poets writing today"
-WorfdLiterature Today






This is an introductory course covering basic medical terms. Students will be
exposed to terms that will enable them to read and interpret medical reports,
charts, and communications relevant to a variety of health care environments.
Major topics include Word Building Rules, Prefixes, Suffixes, Whole Body
Terminology, Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscles and Joints, Nervous
System, Blood and Lymphatic System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory
System and Digestive System.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Prerequisite:
Tuition:.


Monday, 26th September 2005
6:00am 9:00pm
C.R. Walker Secondary
None
$225.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Coordinatorat Tel: (242) 325-5714 ;1(242) 328-0093/
328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception
of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly
provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right
to change tuition, fees,, course content, course schedule and course materials.








All persons interested in enrolling in Academic Upgrading, Personal Development and/or
Professional Development courses offered by CEES are advised to register two weeks prior
to the starting date of class.
All students registering must provide a copy of the first five pages of their passport.
Persons registering after the starting date of class will be required to pay a late registration
fee of $60.
i). College Preparatory Programme
ii). Basic Upgrading Programme for Traditional Age Students (under 25 years old)


Classes Begin: August 29, 2005
New Student Advisement: August 17 19, 2005
Time: 9:00am 5:00pm
Venue: Room T4
iii). Mature Upgrading (25 years and older) Programme
Classes Begin: August 29, 2005
Advisement and Registration: August 17 19, 2005
Time: 9:00am 5:00pm


Mathematics 046, 047, 048 Mondays & Wednesdays 6:00 7:50 pm
English Language 015, 016, 017 Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00 7:50 pm
Venue: C.C. Sweeting Junior High School.
Tuition: $300.00 per course
iv). Preschool and Day Care Centre Practitioners Certificate
v) Infant/Toddler Day Care Educarers Certificate
Classes Begin: September 2, 2005
Wednesdays 6:00- 7:50 pm & Saturdays 9:00 am -1:30 pm.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
vi) Management and Administration of Infant/Toddler Day Care Centres


Classes Begin: September 3, 2005
Saturdays 9:00- 11:00am.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.


The Psychology Department, School of Social Sciences will offer the following course
the Fall Semester, 2005
PSY 310 Consumer Psychology -01 -Wednesdays 6-9pm
interested persons may contact the School of Social Sciences at 302-4489
Additional fees include one time application fee of $40, Insurance $25 (per annum),
ID Card $25 (one time), Technology Fee $100 (per semester), Student Activity fee $50
(full-time) $25 (part -time) (Fall & Spring Semesters), Drop/Add $20 per application.


-A : L,"...... :::::::::::::i L:: .i ::: !:' : ti \ :?


at www.cob.edu.bs


LAB








F BACKAL TO SCHOOL..SUPPLEMENT 2005


J 0I


,Fit Temple ChJITi1si


B By JANET HANNA


Faith Temple Christian
Academy, formerly
Beth-Phil School, was
founded in September
1985.
Leo Bethel, one of the founders,
saw the need for a true Christian Pre-
school with a foundation and philos-
ophy based on the word of God, and
a standard of education that made
it among the best in the Bahamas.
A member of Faith Temple
Church, Mr Bethel approached three
of his friends and fellow church
members Franklyn Bethel, Philip
Kemp and Philemon Wilson and
shared his dream.
The men approached Pastor Del-
ton Harne, then Pastor of Faith Tem-
ple Church, for permission to use the
church's facility on Prince Charles
Drive as a site for the school.
Permission was granted and the
dream became reality. Beth-Phil
Christian Pre-school was born.
In 1985, the school started with a
student body of 15. Sheila Kemp, the
wife of Pastor Larry Kemp, became
the school's first principal. In 1988,
Sylvia Ramming was appointed the
school's second principal.
The school grew from 60 to 125
and during this time the principal
owners approached Pastor James
Weaver, pastor of Faith Temple,
about the church taking over the
school and making it a part of its
outreach ministries.


The church agreed and the school
was renamed Faith Temple Christian
Academy.
After the death of Mrs Ramming
in 1990, Annabel Dean was appoint-
ed principal, followed by Dr Diane
Major who was offered a contract
for three years to restructure and
reorganise the school. At the end of
her three-year tenure, the student
population was at 49.
In September 1985, Melissa Groff
was appointed principal and under
her tenure the school experienced
its largest growth, from 49 to 852.
In March 2000, Pastor Thomas J
Sands took over as acting principal,
and in October 2000, Rev Daniel 0
Simmons was appointed principal,
effective January 1, 2001.
Today Faith Temple Christian
Academy (FTCA) has a student pop-
ulation of 685 and remains steadfast
in its commitment to provide quality
education which upholds a standard
of scholastic excellence and fosters
vital Christian living in preparation
for responsible citizenship, for stu-
dents of all backgrounds.
The vision of Faith Temple Chris-
tian Academy is to be recognised as
the "school of first choice for stu-
dents who desire a quality education
in a Christian environment".
It is the academy's belief that a
strong foundation in basic education,
in accordance with Christian princi-
ples, lays the groundwork of enabling
a child to become fully developed as
a whole person and to enhance


* PROMISE KEPT Faith Temple Christian Academy (FTCA) has
promised its clients an improved computer programme that would cater to
the needs of all students from pre-school to High School. The promise has
been kept and students now enjoy learning about computers in a spacious
and modern facility. FTCA's Grade Two students gain.the basics of Com-
puters through hands-on-learning approach in an environment that is con-
ducive for learning.


his/her quality of life and contribu-
tion to a compassionate and caring
society.
This past academic year 2004-2005,
the Academy made some inroads in
the overall advancement of educa-
tion through several key areas.
One such area was a state-of-the
art Computer Lab for the Elemen-
tary Division. This computer facility
allows students from Grades 1-6 to
gain hands-on learning experience
in a spacious, air-conditioned envi-
ronment.
Also, in keeping with modern tech-
nology, Faith Temple Christian
Academy computerised its grading
system and generation of report
cards.
FTCA first tested "Smart School"
for generating report cards in
December 2004 and fined tuned the
programme in January 2005. The
"Smart School" programme captures
and stores academic and other stu-
dent records.
According to the administrative
team, homeroom teachers are hap-
py about the system as it relieves
them of the task of calculating final
grades and GPA (Grade Point
Average) as well as overall aver-
ages. The time spent preparing


* FAITH Temple Christian Academy prides itself on providing quality
education while promoting Christian living and responsible citizenship


report cards is greatly reduced.
In a digital world where upgrades
are a constant feature, Faith Tem-
ple Christian Academy will continue
to make the necessary adjustments to
remain current, and the "Smart
School" will make these changes
much easier to be made.
In September 2004, the Academy
saw the need to hire the services of a


full-time Registered Nurse (RN).
Ruth Dixon, a veteran medical prac-
titioner with 18 years of experience
became the Academy's first full-time
Nurse providing medical assistance to
the students.
The Academy is looking forward
to celebrate its 20th Anniversary,
according to principal Daniel Sim-
mons.


~c~I3


Off Johnson Road off
Eastern Road, 3 corners on right
Woodburn Est.


Monday- Friday


7:30 am

7:30 am 6:00 pm


S

324-5672

ctalael datcl& (
dvo~l^'t-16,1/i-. *


NOW REGISTERING
FOR
SEPTEMBER CLASSES


.. ....... ...


GROSVENOR ACADEMY
ITRATIO AL ANGAGERSURE


Rciatrctfwo 4w e sAwoed4


SPANISH
FRENCH
CREOLE
PORTUGUESE
JAPANESE
ITALIAN
GERMAN

English for Foreign Learners

Saturday Spanish for Kids

Small classes
Experienced teachers
Affordable prices


Grosvenor
Academy of
Languages

64 Grosvenor Close
(East of P.M.H.)

Tel: (242) 323-2078


email: ilr@batelnet.bs
Fax: (242) 323-6914


I Ce inoraton(42 3 07


I


I /' V%% I- 1.-


I I I- I I VL-


~3~&~cR


~rk ~$






THEK TRIBUNELSUPPAGEN 223


Eleven-year-old's


accomplishments in


track and field are


'truly impressive'

0 By ANTONIA ROBERTS
rinjassia Johnson may
only be 11 years old but
her passion for and
accomplishments in In a meet in Freeport., Grand
track and field are truly Bahama Printassia once again cap-
impressive, tured first place wins in the 100 and
A graduate of Our Lady's Catholic 200 meter races as well as long jump.
School and present.member of Star There, Printassia anchored in the 15
Trackers Track and Field Club, Print- and under 4 x 100 relay, where she
assia hopes to become the "best ath- once again left victorious.
lete the Bahamas has ever pro- The BayTaf Meet, held in Tampa,
duced". Florida felt Printassia's fierce winds.
While the average "tween" may She won two silver medals and a
be spending their summer vacations bronze medal.
in front of the television, Printassia is
working diligently to obtain "tracker Received
pride", as coached by David Charl-
ton, Rudolph Ferguson and Trevor On July 23 and 24 of this year she
Strachan Jr. took part in the Blunt East Coast
Invitational 2005 in Durham, North
Compete Carolina. There, Printassia placed
first in the heats, semi-finals as well
Printassia has competed on many as the finals. She won two gold
tracks, locally and internationally. medals and received the MVP award
In May 2004 she took part in a for her age group.
track meet held in Tampa, Florida, So far, Printassia has won a total of
where she captured two gold medals 43 first places, 16 second places and
for the 100 and 200 meter races, and one forth place.
a third place finish in long jump. Printassia's love for track and
In July of the same year Printassia determination to succeed is spiritual
travelled to Greensboro, North Car- and physical, she says. "I can do all
olina, winning a silver and bronze things through Jesus Christ who gives
medal. me strength."
In February 2005, she took part in She is grateful for her parents'
various Track Club Meets, sponsored -..._encouragement and her coaches who
by the Bahamas Amateur Athletic Alhelp makee it look so E-A-S-Y".
Association, and brought home PrintaSiawill attend OQeefs Col-
numerous medals. 0 ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD PRINTASSIA JOHNSON "lege in the Fall on a full scholarship.


M.-
A -
1 II I1H


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~1%0loffiTeachinglSupplieslforlTeacherslandllParents Sas
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I OFFER GOOD UNTIL AUGUST 23, 2005
S EXTRA SAVINGS "
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0 Black & White Composition Books 99 each
Art Time Clay 12 OZ $2.29
Exercise Books 70 sheet 10 for $4.99
R Pencil Boxes $1.99


IJ Kids Club Crayons 24ct. $1.99
Sleeping Mats starting at $9.99
Kids First Pencil dozen $4.99
Kids First So Big Crayons 8ct $2.99 .
Kraft Sticks 1,000 $9.99
Construction Paper 9x12/50 sht $2.59

- SNACKSOGALOREINOSTORE -


W M


PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24


AMEER AGENCY OF THE BAHAMAS
AOCXONOF TRAEL AGENCY OWNER-


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