Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00175
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: August 8, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00175
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

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ON FORM
st qua lifies for loom fing


Fears water


wells may be


contaminated


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
AN urgent investigation is
underway to see-if a petrol leak
in East Bay Street, Nassau, has
caused widespread contamina-
Consumers have been
warned to be on their guard as
experts probe the extent of the
leakage, which caused a "strong
odour" in the area. It is feared
that soil could be badly pollut-
ed, causing a hazard to well sup-
plies.
The Department of Environ-
mental Health launched the
investigation after an apparent
leakage of a petroleum product
near the Shell Service Station
on East Bay Street. The leak is
feared to have contaminated
water and soil in the area.
Yesterday, parliamentary sec-
retary at the Ministry of Health
Ron Pinder told The Tribune
that the service station initially
called the Water and Sewerage
Corporation(WSC) last week
because they feared their, sew-
erage lines might be blocked.
While WSC technicians were
investigating that problem, Mr
Pinder explained that they dis-
covered a strong odour of
petroleum." It was then that the
Department of Environmental
Health(DEH) was called to
investigate.
Further investigations, includ-
ing excavation of the area,
revealed that there was
evidence of a petroleum


product in the soil.
Anthony Ryan, senior tech-
nologist at the Environmental
Monitoring and Risk Assess-
ment Department, collected soil
and water samples from the
area to be tested at their labo-
>tatory. "
'He said the test result will
give the department a better
idea -of exactly.what the product
-is and whether it caused conta-
mination and in what amount.
At present, he said there is
no way to tell how much petro-
leum product was released, the
source of the leak or how long
there may have been a leak.
However, he said that if the
ground water is contaminated
it would be a major problem
because it is difficult to contain
the contamination.' He
explained that the soil would
have to be aerated to allow the
petroleum product to evapo-
rate.
While the tests are being
completed, the department
plans to hold a meeting of all
the major stakeholders, includ-
ing the petroleum association,
the utilities companies, Ministry
of Works and the DEH.
Mr Pinder said that it is too
early to determine if persons in
the surrounding areas would
have been affected by contami-
nated ground water supply.
However, he said the ministry
has always urged consumers to
avoid using water wells. He
SEE page 14


* THE parliamentary secretary in the Ministry of Health; Rni Pindeir, Was called In Whlei possible gas leak at the Shell gas station
on East Bay Street was discovered. Samples of the soil were taken and sent off to the laboratory for tests.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


Brakes fail on


minister's plane


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs Minis-
ter Fred Mitchell escaped with
a scare on Friday when an air-
craft experienced a brake fail-
ure.
The minister was travelling
on Chalk's Ocean Airlines
from Bimini to Nassau when
the aircraft's left main wheel
brake reportedly failed short-
ly before take-off, causing the
seaplane to slam into the
ramp.
Although most passengers
were unharmed, Minister
Mitchell and a foreign affairs
officer sustained back injuries.
Government spokesman Al
Dillette said that Mr Mitchell
consulted with doctors in Nas-
sau after the incident. "There
was no residual numbness so
doctors believe it was only a
strain," he said.
Mr Dillette said Mr Mitchell


had been prescribed the pain
reliever Voltaren to help treat
a residual soreness of the
back.
In an interview with ZNS,!
Mr Mitchell explained that the
incident occurred only
moments after Chalk's flight
number 35 had taxied down
the take-off ramp in North
Bimini.
"We were all onboard the
aircraft and were about to
take off, I gather that they lost
control of the brakes and the
plane slipped off the ramp,"
he said.
Mr Mitchell said he and his
ministerial aide sustained back
injuries because they were sit-
ting in the rear of the plane,
the part of the aircraft which
slammed directly into the
ramp.
When asked how the acci-
dent had affected him, Mr
SEE page 14


Accident victim dies

from his injuries


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THREE days after a cata-
strophic car crash on John F
Kennedy highway, 19-year-old
Herby Severe died of his
injuries, bringing the number
of traffic fatalities for the year
up to 37.
Police liaison officer Inspec-
tor Walter Evans yesterday
confirmed that the young man,
after battling for his life for
days, died on Thursday
evening.
Mr Severe was driving a
2003 model Ford Explorer on
JFK Drive last Monday when
he collided head-on with a
1997 Chevrolet Lumina near
Lake Killarney.
According to police, Mr
Severe lost control of his vehi-
cle and crashed into the Lumi-
na driven by Mergurite Fer-
guson Adderley.
Both vehicles were exten-
sively damaged, and the "Jaws
of Life" had to be used to cut


the two drivers out of their
vehicles.
Mr Severe and Mrs.Adder-
ley were both immediately
taken by ambulances for treat-
ment at Princess Margaret
Hospital.
Last week Mr Severe was
said to be in "critical but stable
condition" in the intensive
care unit.
Mrs Adderley, who was said
to be in a stable condition, was
last night 'still recuperating in
hospital.
Mr Severe has now become
the second traffic fatality of
this year's Emancipation Day
weekend.
Family. and friends on Sat-
urday came to together to
mourn the death of 18-year-
old Crystal Cassar. who was
killed in a traffic accident last
Sunday.
The well-attended funeral
service, held at Christ Church
Cathedral, featured tributes
SEE page 14


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PAGE--2,--MONDAY,--AUGUST--8,2005--THE -TR--BUNE


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LOCAL NEWS


Family of Romanda




Curtis vows her




killer 'will not




go unpunished'


Funeral

service for

murder

victim


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE message was clear on
Saturday as the family of mur-
der victim Romanda Curtis
came together for the young
woman's funeral service: The
killer will not go unpunished.
Family members and friends
were overwhelmed with grief
as they bid farewell to Roman-
da, 20, who was found strangled
to death three weeks ago.
Many who were scheduled to
speak at the funeral service,
held at Southland Church of
God, including the deceased's
sisters and friendF, were unable
to do so, as they were overcome
with emotion.
Giving the eulogy, Bishop J J
Stubbs told the mourners that
"although police haven't yet
found the person responsible,
God will."
"It's the eyes of God that will
see, and like the saying goes
'you can run, but you can't


hide'," he said.
To rousing applause from
mourners, Bishop Stubbs said
that if the person or persons
responsible for the murder of
Romanda escape earthly
authorities, then God will dole
out the punishment.
The deceased's aunt, Nurse
Arnette Swain from Birming-
ham, England, read the obitu-
ary and remembered her niece
as someone who had faith in
God.
"God was first in Romanda's
life.
"It was not always smooth,
but she trusted in God and he
brought her through. Roman-
da was filled with the spirit of
God right up to the last days
she spent she never expected
to be taken away so soon," she
said.

Photo
Following the service, the
congregation, many wearing T-
shirts bearing a photo of the
deceased instead of traditional
funeral garb, paid their final
respects as Romanda was laid to
rest at the Southern Cemetery
on Cowpen and Spikenard
Roads.
Romanda's badly decom-
posed body was discovered on
July 14 on Sands Lane behind
Love 97, after she had report-
edly been missing for six days.


Police determined that the
cause of death had been stran-
gulation. -
Romanda's mother Wescola
Rolle-Larrimore and stepfather
Douglas Larrimore said the
autopsy report indicated that
their daughter had died on the
same day that her body was
found, leading them to believe
that she may have been kid-
napped and held for days before
her death.
Police on Friday released a
poster seeking information on
the person or persons responsi-
ble for the death of Romanda.
However, assistant police
commissioner Reginald Fergu-
son told The Tribune last week
that this new appeal is not an
indication that the investigation
has stalled, and that in fact the
investigation was very much
alive.
He explained that police seek
to turn over "every rock," and
rely on "every little bit of infor-
mation to do this."
Ricardo Curtis, Romanda's
husband, reported his wife miss-
ing on the morning of Saturday,.
July 9.
Anyone with information is
asked to contact the Central
Detective Unit at 322-2561/2/3,,
502-9991, 502-9941, 322-3333 or
at 919.
Police assure that all infor-
mation will be held in the
strictest confidence.


* MURDER VICTIM Romanda Curtis


MI


PAGE 2, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


. . . . .....




. . . . . . . . .
. . . .....
................


i














C.. CDR's Fenton Nemore hits
W MINISTER ofrTrade and Industry Leslie Miller


out at government approach





to dealing with oil companies


;69


POLICE are investigat-
ing two armed robberies
which occurred over the
weekend.
At 12.45am on Satur-
day, police on patrol near
the Drop-Off bar on Bay
Street were alerted to an
armed robbery that ha.d
just taken place at the
establishment.

Handgun
Two masked men, one
armed with a silver hand-
gun, held up the bar-
tender and patrons and
demanded cash.
They escaped with an
indeterminate amount of
money.
At the time of the


crime both men were
wearing white T-shirts
and dark pants.
At 12.30pm on Sun-
day, a "tall, dark,
slim" man robbed the
Shalom Store on Village
Road.
"The man purported to
be a customer and came
to the cash register with
two packs of T-shirts,"
press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans
said yesterday.
At the cash register the
man produced a handgun
and demanded money
before fleeing the
store.
Investigations are con-
tinuing.


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE government's
approach in dealing with the
three major oil companies is
"hypocritical," Fenton
Nemore of the Coalition of
Democratic Reform (CDR)
said yesterday.
Criticising Trade and Indus-
try Minister Leslie Miller's
conduct in addressing the
problem of high gas prices, Mr
Nemore said that the govern-
ment should not resort to tak-
ing the approach of attack.
"The present minister is
attacking the oil companies
for the provision of gasoline
and then on the other hand
embracing them for LNG
(Liquefied Natural Gas) to
me this seems hypocritical,"
he said.

Statements
Speaking as a guest on yes-
terday's edition of Parliament
Street on Island FM, Mr
Nemore said that statements
made by Mr Miller in regard
to Esso, Texaco and Shell,
equal accusing the oil compa-
nies of stealing.
"One should not approach
investors in that manner, par-
ticularly when government
controls what their margin is,"
he said.
On Friday, Mr Miller told
The Tribune that the recent
hike in fuel prices at the
pumps will continue to. have
the local oil companies
"laughing all the way to
bank."
Statements such as these, or
the past claim by the minister
that the oil companies must
have gasoline "running
through their veins," said Mr
Nemore yesterday, are detri-
mental to the process of low-
ering the country's high fuel
prices.
"We need to revisit present
price structuring of gasoline,
going around attacking is not
the right approach," he said.
Gas prices went up on
Thursday for the sixth time


Minister's

'conduct'

criticised


this year.
According to Mr Miller, the
prices will average aboutf$3.89
a gallon in New Providence,
$4.33 in the Family Islands,
and $4.06 in Grand Bahama.
Mr Nemore conceded that if
Mr Miller, through the recent-
ly signed PetroCaribe accord,
"can provide a product at our
docks at a lower cost than we
are presently getting, then it is
good."
"We wish the minister suc-
cess in lowering the price for
gasoline, but the manner in
which he approached this, we
felt, was an incorrect manner,"
he added.
Mr Nemore also criticised
the fact that the Bahamas
does not have sufficient legis-
lation in place to address all
the concerns of the petrole-
um industry.
"There are avenues for
improvement in regards to the
provision of energy, but legis-
lation needs to be put in place
to address the provision of
energy.
"The bottom line is that we
do not have in place sufficient
legislation to adA'ess our ser-
vice stations," he said.
Mr Nemore said this meant
government had to resort to
using standards from the
American Environmental Pro-
tection Agency as its policy.
"There is no legislation in
regards to installation, the
materials, or anything. We
don't address air emissions.
The Bahamas has a long way
to go. We are a country that
prides itself on its beauty, but
these are matters that we do
not address. The CDR will
obviously address those," he
said.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 3









PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUT 8, 2005 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A.; LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387


Pindling, elections and the race card


IN A letter to the editor published on this
page today, the writer takes us to task for stat-
ing that Sir Lynden Pindling came to power
on the race card.
"While it is true," he writes, "that race plays
a part in all elections in The Bahamas I think it
is nonsense and an oversimplification of his-
torical facts to conclude that the race card was
the reason Sir Lynden came to power".
We agree that it is an oversimplification to
say that the race card was the reason Sir Lyn-
den came to power, but it is not an over sim-
plification to say that it was the instrument
that Sir Lynden used to come to power.
Just as oil is the fuel with which Hugo Chavez
is greasing his chariot to become the strong
man of the Caribbean, whipping up racial emo-
tions made it easier for Sir Lynden to gain his
prize and in every election it was the method
he used.
Majority rule was inevitable in fact it was
long overdue. Nor was it surprising that it
would leave bitterness in its wake. Many said at
the time that the PLP was the bastard child of
the UBP. We prefer to say that it was the
UBP's legitimate offspring. It was a legitimate
birth hastened by the arrogance of the colony's
rulers who had a haughty disregard for human
dignity and the rights of the majority of
Bahamians, both black and white.
When we think of this period we often reflect
on Edwin Markham's thought-provoking poem,
"The Man with the Hoe".
"How will it be with kingdoms and with kings
"With those who shaped him to the thing
he is -
"When this dumb Terror shall rise to judge
the world,
"After the silence of the centuries?"
The silence of the centuries burst into a roar
in the Bahamas in the mid-fifties, culminating
in the PLP victory in 1967. If Sir Lynden had
been a more enlightened leader, he would have
united Bahamians, instead of dividing them.
If he had concentrated on building bridges of
unity, instead of sowing seeds of suspicion and
discord that only widened the gulf between
the races, today's discussion might not be nec-
essary. Talented white Bahamians who wanted
to be a part of a new Bahamas were sidelined
- black Bahamians were now in charge and, as
they said, they knew what they were doing.
Obviously they did not take their duties as
seriously as did both races of earlier lgenera-
tions. If they had, Senator C B Moss would
not have complained about how embarrassed
his government was at so many'empty seats at
this year's Independence celebrations. He want-
ed to know where all the white Bahamians
were and why they had not participated. What
he failed to realise, and what Mr Norman


Solomon pointed out in a letter to this news-
paper last week, was that all those empty seats
were reserved for today's government leaders
and civil, servants all black Bahamians. It
would seem that Senator Moss was asking the
wrbng question.
According to today's letter writer "it is true
that race plays a part in all elections in the
Bahamas." In Sir Lynden's elections it played
more than a part, it was the election. It was so
bad that there were Bahamians of both races
who no longer felt safe in their own country,
especially when the rock throwing and harass-
ment started.
The best seller, "Roots", which was made
into a movie, became an issue in the 1977 elec-
tion campaign. TV-13 was rushed into exis-
tence so that "Roots" could be a part of that
campaign.
In that year Mrs Janet Bostwick was the
BDP candidate for Pinedale. In a hard-hitting
campaign speech she claimed that Tourism Min-
ister Clement Maynard had admitted to using
racist tactics to cover up real campaign issues.
Sir Lynden's racial card had become such
an issue that it was picked up by The Miami
Herald.
Mrs Bostwick was referring to The Miami
Herald article of the previous day in which Sir
Clement explained: "What 'Roots' would do
would be to remind the youth of slavery and of
the continued dominance by certain elements
even after slavery was abolished."
"Roots" was shown every night on TV-13
during the days leading up to the election. It
became known as the "election film" because it
was used at every subsequent election.
"What they are doing," said Mrs Bostwick,
"is trying to stir up racial hatred in this gener-
al election campaign. I feel the film can create
racial tensions at this time, which, so far, has
been peaceful."
After the election a former PLP MP admit-
ted that ZNS' eight-part showing of "Roots"
was one of the major reasons for the PLP's
landslide election victory that year.
Not only was the film used, but ZNS' morn-
ing radio news was always preceded by hate-
filled racial slogans. Bahamians wakened in
the morning to racial hatred, and went to bed at
night on racial hatred.
Eventually there was a backlash. The morn-
ing radio programmes were eventually stopped
when angry Bahamians of both races threat-
ened to boycott the music shop that was spon-
soring them.
As Mrs Bostwick pointed out "Roots" was a
beautiful film with historical and cultural value
that should have been viewed in that context.
Instead it was used'by a ruthless party as a
vehicle for division and hate just to win an
election.


Problem of




black racism in




the Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune
Thank you, for allowing me
space in your valuable column.
I read with much interest your
editorial dated August 4 titled:
"Can only whites be racists?" I
was even more intrigued with
the argument you put forth
regarding the racism which
exists among black Bahami-
ans.
Madam, being of very dark
complexion was the cause of
much grief for me during my
early childhood. I was called
every name imaginable, like
"tar-baby", "black Haitian",
"shoe-shine", "nugget", and the
list goes on and on.
We were often told that we
were too dark to wear certain
colour clothing or to take a lead
in the school play.
I vividly remember my aunt
who never had children recall-
ing how my mother who had
many, said she could choose
one of her twins to live with her
and her husband. She picked
my brother. She said she did
that because I was too dark.
Well before she died she was
to apologise to me, because my
brother was involved in drugs
and alcohol and was not inter-
ested in education at the time. I,
on the other hand, tried as best


I could to make something of
my life, in spite of my dark com-
plexion.
I also recall stories of my
great grandmother, who would
not "mind" or "baby sit" her
offspring who were considered
too coloured. She encouraged
her daughters to marry "bright"
men. Another cousin did like-
wise with her children and eight
of the nine married "bright"
men. Today most of them are
either separated or living mis-
erably, but the daughter who
married a black man is doing
quite well for herself and her
children.
Madam Editor, the racism
that exists in this area is so bla-
tant that it's hard to miss it. A
friend of mine who works at
one ofthe main banks in Nas-
sau commented how some
branches, especially those in the
downtown area, prefer to hire
tellers who are of a lighter com-
plexion, and the darker ones
are sent to the Over-the-Hill
branches.
They claim that the bank say
people prefer to be served by


people who are "bright" and
beautiful. How ridiculous!
When did intelligence become,
synonymous with the colour of
one's skin? If this was so the
late Martin Luther King would
not have excelled because of
the complexion of his skin, nor
would the late Sir Lynden Pin-
dling.
If we are going to address
the racism issue we as black
people must first look into our
own prejudices against each
other.
Growing up the kids used to
say "if you are white you are
all right, if you are brown, stay
around, if you black go back".
Words like that can destroy
anyone, and they were spoken
by our own black people.
Today there is not much dif-
ference. My sister the other day
told her dark daughter that she
was not to bring her "no black
man" for a son-in-law. How
absurd. It's okay if he is dis-
honest, or a wife-beater; once
his colour is "right", he is okay.
So once again thank you for
your frank and honest dialogue
on a subject that has been taboo
in this country for too long.
TOO BLACK TO COUNT
Nassau
August 4 2005


Please put Sir Stafford


Sands back on note


EDITOR, The Tribune
I should be most grateful if you
would publish the attached open
letter to my Prime Minister.
* *

Mr Perry G Christie,
Prime Minister,
Bahamas.
My dear Prime Minister,
I should be most grateful if you
would issue the necessary instruc-
tions to the right person to have
the photograph of our esteemed
national hero, Stafford Lofthouse
Sands placed back on the Bahami-
an ten dollar note.
Many thanks.


ROBERT "BOB" HALL
Freeport
Grand Bahama
August 5 2005


Sir Lynden was


about more than


the 'race card'


EDITOR, The Tribune
REGARDING the edi-
torial of today, August 4,
2005, your comment that
"Sir Lynden came to power
on the race card," surely
shows why race is still a big
issue in The Bahamas.
While it is true that race
plays a part in all elections
in the Bahamas, I think it
is nonsense and an over-


simplification of historical
facts to conclude that the
race card was the reason Sir
Lynden came to power.
The fact that the editor
of the leading newspaper in
the Bahamas believes this
to be so says it all.


ANDREW
CHAN
Nassau
August 4 2005


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005















Anger over 'lack of authentic
(V_ .E


By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs Minis-
ter Fred Mitchell personally
expressed his condolences to
the Florida community on
the recent suicide death of
former city commissioner
Art Teele.
Mr Mitchell.was speaking
at the official church service
to mark the Bahamas' 32nd
anniversary held at the St
Agnes Episcopal Church in
Overtown Miami yesterday
morning.
.The minister travelled to
Florida to speak to the con-
gregation following a near
catastrophic plane accident
f:,on.Friday.. ,,
Mr Mitcjhell said the,.. .
church event was a double
honour considering that it
not only marked indepen-
dence, but was also a visit
from the Anglican Church of
St Agnes in Nassau.
"We have a goodly her-
itage. St Agnes in Nassau is
celebrating 160 years of
work," he said.
Mr Mitchell said that since
he was in Florida, he thought
it appropriate to personally
express his condolences to
the family and the Florida
community.
"I wish also at this time to
express my personal condo-
lences to the Florida com-
munity and to the widow of
the late Art Teele, a
Bahamian woman, the for-
mer Stephanie Kerr of West
End, Grand Bahama.

Sentiment
"I issued a statement
shortly after his untimely
passing on behalf of the gov-
ernment but I thought that it
was appropriate to say so
personally in the context of
this service this morning. I
repeat the sentiment that I
expressed in the statement
that Art was a friend of The
Bahamas and of Bahamians.
"When I first became min-
ister, Mr Teele was one of
the leaders in this communi-
ty who sought to galtattize
the Bahamians. anditheir 2,
descendants in this area to
assist in the vxork of the min-
istry. He was also instrumen-
tal in making necessary
introductions to our then
new Consul General. We
shall sorely miss him. We
pray for his widow and fami-
ly."
Mr Mitchell also noted
that as the Bahamas pro-
gresses, much of that eco-
nomic progress is shared
with the South Florida area.
"You have only to visit
your airports today and see
the scores of Bahamians lin-
ing up with their packages
'bought from South Florida
business. That is only part of
the story, because the busi-
nessmen in the Bahamas
have many links of long-
standing with Bahamian
businessmen. That is why we
Aust all be committed to
hassle-free travel between
the two countries.".
Mr Mitchell added that
the Florida community
demonstrated their support
ai4fidship-fo he..
^^ ~ihas rifeng thnit'assis-
ai a ithe Bahamas after
Selst'iU6to caused byd






MONDAY'
AUGUST 8
6:30' Bahamas @ Sunrise- Live
7:30 Island Hopping: 52nd Annual
National Family IslandRegatta...
Highlights. -, .. .
9:00 Remembering he Contract'
10:00 'Bahamian Music & Heritage
Festival
11:00 Gillette World
11:30 10th IMAAF World Championships
in Athletics Session V
12noon ZNS News Update Live
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3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
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8:30 Storm Stories
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9:00 Legends From Whence We
Came: Winston "Gus" Cooper


10:00 Sports Life Styles: Isaiah Thomas
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
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ships in Athletics
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
NOE0 N -V 3rsre
th rih. o aelstmnt


products at Straw Market


Locals claim Bahamian


items are being 'replaced'


amid hundreds of imitation
Louis Vuitton and Fendi hand-
bags, purses, belts and wallets.
In addition to this, vendors
were also pushing imported
straw work from the US and T-
Shirts embossed with the pop-
ular Jamaican saying: "Hey,
Mon".
While canvassing the Straw
Market, The Tribune
approached a Bahamian busi-
nesswoman who stood between
two stalls complaining about
the "poor selection of Bahami-
an straw bags," meanwhile
turning down the offer of an
aggressive vendor who was
attempting to sell her a gold
sequins bag that had obviously


been imported.
The businesswoman, who
spoke on the condition of
anonymity, said she frequents
the market to buy straw work,
souvenirs and other Bahamian-
made trinkets for her foreign
clients and business associates
several times a year.

Recent ,

However, in recent years, the
shopper said she had found that
"Straw vendors have been
falling down on their job and
have completely lost touch with
what is authentically Bahami-
an."


"I come here often. I am no
stranger to this place: Many of
these vendors here know me
by name and they will tell you
that every time I, come here, I
complain about all these
imported goods they are bring-
ing into the country and selling
in our native market. It's a dis-
grace," said the shopper.
Another shopper told The
Tribune that on a number of
occasions, visitors had entered
the Straw Market and actually
told vendors that they can buy
some of the imported bags they
have on sale "for little or noth-
ing at home in the US."
"Now isn't that a disgrace?
That our visitors could walk
into our Straw Market and pick
out a bag among our selection
and tell us that they have seen
the same bag at home and they
can buy it there?"
"If these vendors would go
back to making the native straw
work, no one could come here
and tell them they could find
their products anywhere else in
the world," said~the shopper.


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
WHAT most Bahamians
consider to be the historic Nas-
sau Straw Market is now being
dubbed the "Nassau Flea Mar-
ket."
Irate locals believe that the
profound history and unique-
ness associated with the Straw
Market is being abused by the
hundreds of vendors who are
."no longer selling products that
are authentically Bahamian."
Several locals told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the native
Bahamian straw baskets and
crafts that visitors to the island
have admired and have become
accustomed to over the years,
are now being "replaced by
knock-off European hand-bags
imported from the US."
In an effort to investigate the
claims, The Tribune took a trip
to the Straw Market just before
closing time on Sunday, only to
find an insignificant number of
authentic straw bags hanging


LAURIE WILKIE and Paul Farnsworth held a signing of their new book
'Sampling Many Pots', at the Logos bookstore.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Clifton site research


makes good reading


M By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter


SAMPLING Many Pots: An Archaeology
Of Memory And Tradition At a Bahamian
Plantation is a new book by noted anthropol-
ogists Laurie Wilkie and Paul Farnsworth
which traces their experience and findings
during their research at the culturally rich
Clifton site.
The site, home of the Whylly plantation
between 1809-1828, was the focus of a massive
campaign to preserve the remains after devel-
opers wanted to transform the site into a hous-
ing complex.
In fact, during last year's debate in the
SHouse of Assembly to pass legislation to
I: ': ure that the ruins were not touched, MPs
: quoted extensively from the Wilkie
Farnsworth report, which stressed the need
to preserve Clifton.
On Saturday, Ms Wilkie and Mr Farnsworth
chatted with The Tribune as they signed copies
of the books at Logos Bookstore.
According to the authors, they started writ-
ing the book in 2002 and took two years to
complete it. Ultimately, said Ms Wilkie, "we
wanted people to know what we found. That
is a part of doing research, to interpret the
findings."
Ms Wilkie added that their research showed
exactly how diverse the country is. She said
there are records which indicate that Bahami-
ans can trace their roots back to almost every
section of Africa, including Congo, Gambia
and the Gold Coast.
What is interesting, she said, is that the
Whylly plantation was a compilation of the
different cultures and heritages and yet evi-
dence suggests that they all lived together
peacefully.
She described the Clifton site as exciting
and beautifully preserved.


IN i I
FetiitclizeFni cide

Pest Cntrl

H|^^i3ol lnntp


"It has both a great archival record and an
archeological record, which is very rare to
find in one site."
In addition to describing what the archeol-
ogists found, the book serves as a research
tool in that persons can use the appendices to
trace their ancestors all the way back to some
of the slave ships used to transport slaves
through the middle passage, said Mr
Farnsworth.
The book contains extensive details of the
workers at the plantation, their family histories
and records of their lives.
He said writing the book was a learning
process in which he and Ms Wilkie fed off
each other.

Spark
"She would write something and that would
spark my thought process and then we would
go from there."
In addition to their own findings, they relied
heavily on the works of Bahamian historians
such as the late Dr Cleveland Eneas, and Dr
Gail Saunders.
"We used the Bahamian voices to guide
our interpretative process," said Ms Wilkie.
Mr Farnsworth said that Bahamians seem to
have a definite interest in their history. He
said that wherever they go in the country,
when people hear what he and Ms Wilkie do,
they share their own stories from the past.
"He.said the book is best suited for senior
high students, college students and adults.
There are also plans to use it in some intro-
ductory history college courses.
"We hope Bahamians will see it and read it
and that it proves useful."
Sampling Many Pots, which has received
excellent reviews, is now available in local
bookstores.


It has also been an expressed
concern among locals that straw
vendors are now stitching pop-
ular Disney characters and oth-
er animated figures on straw
bags, as opposed to native
scenes of the Bahamas and his-
toric landmarks.

Ministry

Although the Straw Market
and its daily operation do not
fall under his portfolio, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe told
The Tribune yesterday that his
ministry has spent the last ten
years working with more than
90 vendors to promote authen-
tic Bahamian products.
However, Mr Wilchconibe
said the straw vendors and their
failure to deliver a greater num-
ber of Bahamian-made prod-
ucts stems from their "lack of
knowledge and the mere fact
that the issue of mass produc-
tion has never been addressed."
"We\have not been able to
sustain the high demand for our
Bahamian products, so vendors
over the years have had to find
alternative means in which to
make their money," said Mr
Wilchcombe.


Objective
Although his ministry's
objective has always been to
increase visitor spending and
to ensure that an authentically
Bahamian product is available
for visitors to purchase, Mr
Wilchcombe said this is an ini-
tiative that cannot solely rest
on the shoulders of the Min-
istry of Tourism.
"We are'fully aware of the
problems that exist and we are
working to try and change that,
but it will take The Ministry of
Trade.and Industry, as well as
the support of the straw ven-
dors," he said...
While his and:other min-
istries' workAto .achieve a 100
per cent "Bahamianised prod-
uct," Mr Wilchcombe said it is
important that visitors as well
as Bahamians exercise patience
with the straw vendors, who he
said are just trying their best to
meet an overwhelming
demand.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2u,-,, ,










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I it I HlIUNE


I- CARIBBE-ANEWI


Caribbean




court has its




test case with




a poultry




matter


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- 0


SIXTEEN years ago,
allegations that a poultry
farmer was supplying
questionable chickens to
restaurants inspired a flur-
ry of biting calypso songs,
according to Associated
Press.
Memories of the "Bar-
bados chicken controver-
sy" still provoke chuckles
among locals, but the
furor died down and it
never resonated much
outside the Caribbean
island.
That is about to change.
A libel suit stemming
from the scandal has
become the unlikely test
case for the Caribbean
Court of Justice as it
replaces the colonial-era
Privy Council, made up
of members of Britain's
House of Lords in far-
away London, as the final
legal arbiter for most for-
mer British colonies in the
region.
The married couple
who owned the farm,
Ram and Asha Mirchan-
dani, argue the scandal
forced them to close their
business in 1990 even
though the allegations
never were proven.
In 1999, they won a
libel and defamation suit


against Barbados Redif-
fusion, one of the radio
stations that played the
calypsos, though they
were not awarded dam-
ages pending appeals.
In its first hearing Mon-
day, the Trinidad-based
Caribbean court will
decide whether to consid-
er the radio station's final
attempt to have the suit
dismissed. The nine-judge
panel has not disclosed
when it will rule.
The hearing will offer
the first, glimpse into a
system replacing the Privy
Council, which has served
as the top appeal court for
former British Caribbean
colonies since 1833.
Although the
Caribbean court was inau-
gurated in April, only
Barbados and Guyana
have adopted it formally.
Other countries are strug-
gling with legal obstacles
or resistance from oppo-
nents who argue the
regional court could be
vulnerable to political
pressure.
After years of discus-
sion, Caribbean leaders
pushed to create the
court, which they hope
will serve all 16 member
states of the Caribbean


Community, when the
Privy Council began
blocking attempts to
impose the death penalty
in the 1990s.
Trinidad and Tobago
became the first country
in the region to break a
hiatus on the death penal-
ty, hanging 10 convicted
murderers in 1999.
Caribbean residents
clamoured for the right to
execute criminals as they
faced surges in violent
crime as the islands
became transit points for
drug trafficking from
South America to the
United States and
Europe.
But this first case for
the court could have
important implications for
calypsonians' traditional
role as political satirists.
The Afro-Caribbean
music evolved in Trinidad
as a means of spreading
news and denouncing cor-
ruption and other prob-
lems. Calypsonians were
often the target of cen-,
sorship during British
colonial rule.
"They function like
lampoonists," said Gor-
don Rohlehr, author of
the book "Calypso and
Society" and a literature


* --


professor at the Univer-
sity of the West Indies.
"The calypsonians are
regarded as the people
who sniff out the truth
and who tell you what the
man on the street thinks."
The chicken contro-
versy erupted in 1989
during carnival, when
calypsonians traditional-
ly debut their most acidic
lyrics.
Several employees of
the MacDonald Chicken
Farm accused the Mir-
chandanis of processing
and selling chickens that
had died of natural caus-
es.
An explosion of chick-
en calypsos hit the air-
waves, while carnival rev-
elers donned chicken cos-
tumes or T-shirts with
rude slogans about the
farm.
Among the biggest hits


was the Mighty Gabby's
"Chicken and Ram," sung
to the children's jingle
"Old McDonald had a
Farm." With its veiled
lyrics, it was among the
few chicken songs that
radio stations did not
drop when the Mirchan-
danis sued.
"I was concentrating on,
highlighting the way peo-
ple were feeling at the
time," said Mighty Gab-
by, Barbados' most ven-
erated calypsonian. "The
issue was to voice the
people's opinion, not to
hurt."
Attorneys for the Mir-
chandanis and the radio
station declined to discuss
the case.
Calypsonians complain
lawsuits have a chilling
effect on creativity, argu-
ing they should be
allowed the same flexibil-


ity as American comedi-
ans.
"On 'Saturday Night
Live;' in the United
States, their performers
do some things that we
can't even think about
doing here in Barbados,"
said Peter Boyce, a per-
former with the five-
member calypso and com-
edy troupe MADD,
whose "Madd Chicken
Song" was banned. "We
need laws that allow for
more freedom of expres-
sion."
Yet the perpetual
threat of censorship and
lawsuits have inspired the
veiled imagery and dou-
ble-entendre that make
for the best calypsos,
Rohlehr said.
A victory for the Mir-
chandanis might "simply
make for better and more
clever songs," he added.


- N eb M
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Farm Road youth camp finishes


* By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services
THE Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project's summer
youth camp came to a rousing
end Friday with singing, danc-
ing and dramatic perfor-
mances.
More than 400 youngsters
participated in the sessions held
at East Street Gospel Chapel
and Evangelistic Temple where
they were taught arts and craft,
computeronics, drama and
-sports.
"The camp exceeded our
expectations," said ASP
Stephen Dean, officer in
charge and co-ordinator for the
Farm Road Urban Renewal
Programme. "We accom-
plished all our goals.
"We have seen that the part-
nership between the churches
the state and the community
has worked well. This is a part-
nership we want to replicate
throughout all the communi-
ties."
At closing ceremonies
campers showed off skills they
learned during the month-long
programme and showcased
the new and enlarged Farm
Road Youth Marching Band,
SEE page nine


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* THE Farm Road Youth Marching Band performs during closing ceremonies


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* YOUNGSTERS from the East Street Gospel campus perform


* EVANGELISTIC Temple's youngsters perform their poetry


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 9


with youngsters'


FROM last page
directed by Angeline
Forbes.
Eula Pratt, supervisor for
East Street Gospel campus,
said the beginning of camp
was a challenge "but we
were able to take each day
and work with it to make
our camp an enjoyable expe-
rience. Within the short time
much bonding had taken
place. We became a family."
The audience was moved
by little David Aliens' solo,
applauded East Street
Gospel Chapel's girls' per-
formance of 'Don't Turn
Back', admired Evangelistic
Temple's poetry recitation,
and marched with the Farm
Road Band, trained by offi-
cer Theodore Campbell of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band.

Praise

ASP Dean commended
pastors Tom Roberts of East
Street Gospel and Gary Cur-
ry of Evangelistic Temple
for opening the church's
premises as headquarters for
the programme.


celebrations


"We got tremendous
response from the parents,"
said ASP Dean. "They want-
ed their children to be a part
of this. The parents are
indeed buying into the pro-
gramme. We hope to devel-
op a support group for the
parents shortly."
Under the direction of
officer Theodore Campbell,
the band is doing in-service
training in preparation for a
concert at the National Arts
Gallery.
Cedric Seymour, Evange-
listic Temple's sports direc-
tor said the dedication of
parents played a big role in
the success of the camp.
"Now, the children know
about having respect, being
disciplined and having pride
for the country," he said.
"Parents supported the
children and the camp
tremendously. They played a
very important part in the
overall success. The support
of the parents is the number
one factor.
"It all starts at home and
once we get the support of
parents, the children will car-
ry over to being respectful
to adults in the community,"
Mr Campbell said.


* THE wind section of the Farm Road Youth Marching Band perform


* MINISTRY of Youth, Sports and Culture permanent secre-
tary Harrison Thompson is warmly welcomed by campers dur-
ing closing ceremonies for the Farm Road camp Friday.
(BIS photos: Gladstone Thurston)



Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


The family of the late


Holland G. Smi
15 May, 1923 8 August 1973

Former Chamber of Commerce President .
is remembered lovingly by his family for the.
dreams he set in motion. He was born in
Georgetown, Exuma. He moved his mother.
brother and sisters to Nassau. where he taught
high school before going to the U.S. to study
civil engineering. He returned to the Bahamas
with his young family 1958 and started his
own business as a structural engineer and
businessman. He was a member of the
Kiwanis, Guild of graduates of tie University
of the West Indies and co-founder of the once
Commonwealth People's Party. In May of .
1972 he was elected President of The
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce the first
black person to hold that position. Then re-
elected to a second term in May of 1973. He
was a serving member of the Fox Hill branch
of the PLP at the time of his death.
He lives on in the hearts and memory of
wife, Delores; children, hi sisters, brothers
and many other family members and friends.


H~il^HHI^HH^HHHII^HHH^^HIIILOCAL NEW^SZ^I^^I^^^HHIHBIHI^^IBIB










Meeting planners get

into the spirit of Nassau
THE Nassau Paradise Island Development Board hosted a group w
of meeting planners from around the United States in order to
show first hand what the Bahamas has to offer. The guests were
treated to an evening at the British Colonial Hilton Nassau on
Saturday night, where they got the opportunity to take in some
views of Nassau (right).
Clifford Palmer (below), one of the guests hosted by the Nassau..
?aradise Island Development Board, showed off his limbo skills dur-
ng a dinner party held at the British Colonial Hilton..
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Vr;M -e ar
Ad" wosu
ON ateq mWV


"Copyrighted Material-

Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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It is essential and critical to understand that The Kinodom of God was not the
introduction of a reli ion, but a governing system 0-7abljshed in the spirit of
sc ' ,alues, moral an(I behavior.
man and mani -ested it hi character,
"I'liere is no other alternative in history, nor present Trogranis or fLiture pros'pectS
that can completely address today's challenges.. V e invite you to prepare for a
personal transformation that will 6quip you to inTact vour
4amily, community, nation and the wor


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear from people
who are making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are
raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in
the area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.


6~YYYiu~'rw*;~~rirv~~~7~ulmh~cn:~;r~rr


PAGE 10, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






"Your Bahamian Supermwkets"I

SUPER
VALUE
NOW ACCEPTNG
SSUNCARD
GUATY iRIBHTSN A CS PRCES RESERVED


HOT
OFF
THE1
GRILL


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AUG. 8TH AUG, :10TH, 2005
r9p
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PER LB

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CHUCK STEAK
DS OR ROAST
PER LB


FRES2 SWEETDR


School Supplies Curtains Throw Pillow s
Car Mats Shower Curtains Rugs
Feather Beds Decorative Rods Dinnerware Sets
Large Plastics Lamps Wall Pictures
Hot Plates Comforters 4 Slice Toasters
Electric Tea Kettles Sheet Sets Coffee Makers
Chair Coverings Towels Flatware Sets
Loretta Window Toys 25% off
\I*& : *II :


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Less at


Discount MarI


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MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


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WEESSONE


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BEACH TOWELS
PALM SPRINGS TOWELS
FITTED & FLAT SHEETS
MADISON THROW RUGS


PIG

FEET
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I I 1 I. i I 1 1.






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


IN DAYS GONE BY .i......i
.. ..... .. .. ..


CANDIDATES Keith Duncombe (BDP), far left,
and Cecil Wallace-Whitfield (FNM) are interviewed by
Radio Bahamas' Al Dillette after their by-election nomi-
nations in Nassau at St Thomas More School in February,
1978. Standing behind Mr (later Sir) Wallace-Whitfield
are Wideon Pyfrom and Rudy McSweeney, FNM candi-
dates defeated in the general election the previous year.
Photo: Derek Smith


I MEMBERS of the Vanguard Nationalist and Socialist Party are seen here stag-
ing a demonstration during September, 1978, in protest against alleged poor treatment
of fruit, vegetable and fish vendors in Nassau.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"





MONDAY AUGUST 8, 2004, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
IT V ple a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
SJohns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
/ Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


STOR MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
HARBOUR BAY ONLY


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


JBI
GREEN PIGEON
PEAS IN COCONUT
MILK
15 OZ



WINN DIXIE

MAYONNAISE
32 OZ
2Z3^00


ARIEL
DETERGENT
W/ BLEACH
1 2 OZ3
2/$30oo


SUNBELT
CHUNK
STYLE
DOG FOOD
16 LB
\oePED


ZIPLOCK
STORAGE BAGS
ASSORTED
20"'S



MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACARONI
16 OZ
.990


CHARMIN

ULTRA ALOE
12 ROLL



LIBBYS
VIENNA SAUSAGE
REGULAR & CHX.
27, 30, 32, 40
-99a


ROBIN HOOD

GRITS
5 LBS



LIBBYS
GARDEN
PEAS
*16 OZ
.a89


4


WHITE & RED SEEDLESS GRAPE
RED GLOBE GRAPES
SLB
PLUMS RED LARGE,
PEACHES LARGE
I 459
LB
CABBAGE GREEN
EACH
59zo


SPREAD
5 LB
SUNNY DELIGHT
8 PACK (6.70Z 2/990)
P99
8 PACK


CORN ON COB
6 EAR
SOMMERDALE
STRAIGHT CUT POTATOES
5 oz

THRIFTY MAID
CORNED
-BEEF
12 OZ
.99

HUNTS
TOMATO
PASTE
12- OZ



KELLOGS
FRUIT
LOOPS
43 OZ
$799


s CELLOLETTUCEDOLE


BLUE
BERRIES
EACH

POTATOE
BAKING 5.LBS
B* EACH


W/D
SLICED CHEESE
$ 69
16 OZ
BAYS
ENGEL IS H
0 am -16 -. .CT


NIBLET CORN, GREEN
BEANS, SWEET PEAS &
MIXED VEGETABLES
EACH
PRESTIGE
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS
64 OZ
^^64 OZ


ROBIN HOOD


FLOUR
5 LB
o 99g


V8 SPLASH
ASSORTED
FLAVOURS
16 OZ



HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQUEEZE BOTTLE
36 OZ
$219


CITY MARKET


ASSORTED FRUIT
DRINKS a-oz ..........................4/99
LIBBY'S
PEACHES (HALVES)
IN SYRUP 822-GR...........................$2.69
SUNCHY
100% APPLE & FRUIT
PUNCH JUICE 11.s- oz...................2/99
W/D
SNACK PIES ASSORTED 11 -oz..$1.69
LIBBY'S LITE
MIX FRUIT &
DICE PEACHES 4.5s-oz...................$3.59
KELLOGS
NUTRI-GRAIN
ASSTD FLAVOUR BARS os-CT........$4.99
MURRAY
MINTS iooG ...................................2/$1.69
KRAFT
CHEESE-N-CRACKERS 15- oz..........2/99


RICE LAND
REG& PERFECTED
RICE
5 LB



DORITOS
CHIPS
ASSORTED
7 OZ



CHEF BOY ARDEE
PASTAS
ASSORTED
CANNED
15 OZ
S1469


BARBER
CREAM
CRACKERS
200 GR
-990


SURTOX
INSECT
SPRAY
450 ML


KOOL AID
ASSORTED
FLAVOURS
EACH
6/$1 oo


TURKEY

WINGS
LB
.69


MINI

LB
.97f


N.Z
LAMB
SHOULDER
CHOPS


$1


99
LB


PORK LOIN PRESTIGE CHOICE PIGS
END CUT CHOICE FE
CHOPS BONELESS
CHOPS CHUCK ROAST F T
LB LB LB

US FRESH CHICKEN
CHOICE GROUND DRUMSTICK.
PRESTIGE
BEEF T-BONE TURKEY NASSAU ONLY
LB LB
$979 s 29 $ 29-
LB


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COOKED HAM OR ROTISSERIE CHICKEN
TURKEY BREAST $799
,~ a EACH
LB ALL NEW
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ASSORTED FLAVORS STRAWBERRY,
AMERICAN CHEESE COCONUT CREME & CHOCOLATE
$399^ EACH
39LB 59L


BAHAMA
EVAPORATED
MILK
14.5 OZ
5/$ 29


NABISCO
CLUB SOCIAL
BISCUITS & HONEY
BRAN
9.8 OZ
S ol


ISLAND QUEEN
COCNUT
WATER
11.5 OZ
2/$ 49


HUNTS
BBQ SAUCES
ALL FLAVOURS
18 OZ
2/$300


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA(WATER)
8 OZ
2's 1 39


WESSON
OIL REGULAR
VEGETABLE,
CANOLA & CORN
OIL
48 OZ
$289


_ -L __ ,, ~ --Y-a, I - ---- ~I-I I I =








PAGE 1, MONAY, AGUST 200CTHE RIBUN


Minister



investigates



after leak


FROM page one
explained that the water
which comes from city lines is
in a closed system and treated
for contamination.
Mr Pinder added that the
problem of petroleum prod-
uct leakage is a current trend
in the Bahamas. He said there
have been reports in the past
of massive contamination of
water source and soil in a
number of areas in and
around service stations.
"The most prominent one
which comes to mind is the
contamination of the soil and
water in the Cable Beach
area, in particular Ruby
Avenue," he said.
He said it is the govern-
ment's intention to review the
current procedure and create
a more stringent application
process for companies who
want to renovate or open ser-


vice stations.
He said that the applica-
tions must include the use of
equipment made with non-
metallic fibreglass holding
tanks. This is the responsibili-
ty of the Ministry of Works
when they grant the work
approvals, he added.
Mr Pinder also said that the
second requirement would be
a reconciliation report which
would simply indicate the
amount of petroleum product
coming in and the amount
which is spent.
"That would act as a track-
ing tool to determine the
quantity and volume of petro-
leum product," he said.
Third, he said, would be the
implantation of monitoring
wells in and around service
stations which would assist in
the collection of physical evi-
dence of possible leakage of
petroleum product.


m


*


:1
* W .*


"Copyr0ighted Material

O Syndicated Content b

Available from Commercial News Providers"
~- p -?g


mm4-b 04b4a mo- Mw* ma v- U oub a* -


Minister injured after


plane's brakes fail


FROM page one
Mitchell told the TV station that there are
risks involved in flying and that it is simply
"part of your work, what you have to do."
Despite the incident, Mr Mitchell later
that day again boarded a plane to fly to
Miami. where he attended a special church
service in honour of the Bahamas 32nd


anniversary of Independence, Mr Dillette
said.
The minister had visited Bimini to par-
ticipate in the native fishing tournament
festivities.
Chalk's Ocean Airlines, established
1917, is believed to be the world's oldest
continuously operating airline. It has never
had a fatal accident.


Man dies after traffic crash


FROM page one
to the deceased COB student.
Crystal, a second-year law student, was
killed when her Ford Ranger truck over-


turned and slammed into a utility pole on
Prince Charles Drive.
Relatives and fellow students speaking
at the service described Crystal as a "loving
girl" and as someone with a lot of potential.


will rmn I fall dectio l


rtpliae Iakri


- A M -


- ~' -


- -


. - -


* ~ - -
-


Public Utilities Commission






PUBLIC CONSULTATION
on,
An Application by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited to Modify its Monthly Rates/Prices For Telephone Lines

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) invites comments from consumers
and providers of telecommunications services on its consultation document on an
application by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) for
permission to increase its monthly rates/prices for telephone lines.

On June 20, 2005 BTC submitted to the PUC an application to increase its
monthly rates/prices for telephone lines for business and residential customers. The
application is designed to more closely align BTC's prices to the underlying cost of
providing services.
Section 8.5 of the Telecommunications Sector Policy (TSP) stipulates the
key principles of government's tariff policy including the rebalancing of telephone
prices towards cost orientation. Section 6(1 )(h) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999
stipulates that one of the functions of the Commission is to regulate the prices that
may be charged by a licensee who is Dominant in a relevant market in accordance
with the provisions of subsections (6) and (7) of section 9. BTC is the only
telecommunications company in The Bahamas that has been declared dominant.,

Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, requires the Commission to act
in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory manner and consistent
with the objectives of the Telecommunications Act.

The main objective of this consultation is to
(a) inform the public and stakeholders of BTC's
application for approval of increased monthly
rates/prices for telephone lines;
(b) explain the rationale behind the rates; and
(c) invite comments from the public.

Copies of the Public Consultation Document can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House at 4th. Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded
from the Commission's website at www.PUCBahamasgov.bs. Written comments
should be submitted by September 16, 2005 via post, hand delivery, facsimile or
e-mail to:
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P.O. Box N-4860, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: (242) 323-7288
Email: info@pucbahamasgov.bs
The PUC will supplement its standard consultation approach by arranging public
meetings so that consumers and interested parties can ask questions or make oral
comments. The dates of the meetings will be announced in the media by the PUC.


~kcod


'eSS~Ull


PAGE 14, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


ft-.


1m






MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE lb


THE TRIBUNE


Casement Windows


Half Circles, Fans & Ellipticals


Horizontal Rollers
(Rolling Windows)


Single Hung ,
(Push Up Wind-,s)


V4 1


. 1111


3K


2-".


. .., ...- ..


qI


are~


I







PAGE 1, MONAY, AGUST 200CTHE RIBUN


Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club now employs over 60 Bahamians, a few of whom are pictured below. Some of them can be found
in the company's Marsh Harbour office or on site at Baker's Bay, located at the northern tip of Great Guana Cay in the Abacos.


Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club will continue in the tradition of the Discovery Land Company properties
of enhancing the natural character of the Great Guana Cay property and the employee experience.
The company's goal is to become the employer of choice for Bahamians.


Baker's Bay is currently seeking an
Infrastructure Construction Manager
with an engineering degree and substantial management experience.
Contact Doug Shipman, VP Project Development at 242-367-0612.
............. ...


PAGE 16, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 17


World renowned luxury goods purveyor Bally opened its first stand-alone
signature store in the Bahamas last week in the Prince George Plaza on Bay
Si re The store is the most recent addition-to the Solomon's Mines group, which
now bost.s 49 stores throughout the country and employs over 300 people. At the
store opening, a luxurious limited edition handbag the Bally Nature Bag was
,un filed. Only 20 are being sold in the Bahamas, and a portion of the profits from


the sale of the bag will benefit the Brent Malone Artist in Resident Fund aid dili
New York based Rainforest Foundation. And to further promote local aIts-. tw
Bahamas Bally store is hosting a silent auction for the sale of a signature \,od
carving by noted Bahamian artist Antonius Roberts. Proceeds fiom the sale ;:iIl
also be donated to the Artist in Residence Fund, allowing a Bahamian arti-mi l
work in-studio for a year. The sculpture is on display at the Bay St. Bally ston:.


.Ask.-
Niki0 oifSr VP Solm lomo Mes
Gcriry Mlll)lld(yMtentinl Tr-m-- Rtai


I-----~-~.I.-~,.,,,~,.~ '


THE TRIBUNE


I















Children's organisation gives thanks



for member's committed service


BISMARK Coakley, chair-
man of the Crippled Children's
Committee hosted long-serving
CCC member Paul Bower to a
dinner on the occasion of his
retirement from the civic organ-
isation.
Mr Bower served the CCC
for 15 years and was thanked
for his "faithful service" by the
chairman and members of the
committee.
"Paul has given generously
of his time over the years, as he
worked as part of the commit-
tee to assist numerous children
and young persons with crip-
pling or disabling conditions in
the Bahamas.
"Through his efforts as a
member of the public relations
committee, the CCC has been
able to make parents and fami-
lies more knowledge about
options that are available," said
Mr Coakley.
I Mr Bower is also the recipi-
ent of the Paul Harris Rotary
Award, the highest honour giv-
en out by the civic club.
The Crippled Children's
Committee is a Non-Govern-
ment Organisation, founded by
Sir Etienne Dupuch in 1954.


* PAUL Bower is shown accepting a plaque of appreciation from Bismark Coakley


New property executives appointed

ELEUTHERA Properties Limited has
announced the appointment of two new executives.
The company has appointed Thomas Sands Jr
and Wim Steenbakkers to the positions of board
member and managing director respectively.
Eleuthera Properties chairman Franklyn Wilson
said the addition of Mr Sands and Mr Steenbakkers
was "significant for many reasons, including the
fact that it broadens the range of expertise on the
board."
"Mr Steenbakkers has owned or managed many
high-end resorts both in Canada and the United
States, and is particularly suited for the role of
managing director.
Mr Sands is abroker and an appr iser and lives
on South Eleutheri.
"This combination puts him in a unique position to
help ensure that the company's vision is being imple-
mented in a manner that is sensitive to its evolving
role within the community,"' Mr Wilson said.
Mr Sands' appointment also marks the passing of
the baton to a second generation of pioneers. He is-
the son of founding president of Eleuthera Prop-
erties Thomas Albert Sands Sr, who passed away in
E WIM Steenbakkers June. 0 THOMAS Sands Jr


EYOUR


12 Noon 6pnro

August 13th, 2005


TOWN CENTRE MALL

Blue Hil Road & Independence Drive


Resort gives out

employee awards


WEST END, Grand
Bahama Old Bahama
Bay Resort and Yacht Har-
bour has announced the
recipients of the "employee
of the month" and "man-
ager of the quarter" awards.
Fred Moss received the
manager of the quarter
award for "his excellent
leadership as food and bev-
erage director at Old
Bahama Bay."
Mr Moss oversees the
three resort restaurants,
Dockside Restaurant and
Sports Bar, a causal dining
atmosphere serving three
meals a day; Aqua, a fine
dining dinner restaurant,
and The Straw Bar located
on the beach.
"Moss also plays a major
role in the events that .take
place at Old Bahama Bay,
as food is integral part of
every celebration," the
resort said.
"My work during the past
six months at Old Bahama
Bay Resort and Yacht Har-
bour has been at times chal-
lenging yet extremely
rewarding.
"I'm surrounded with a
cadre of talent and very well
trained culinary experts.


"The fact that I work
with a very prominent and
co-operative company
makes it quite easy to
accomplish my goals.
Receiving this award is an
honour," said Mr Moss.
Beach attendant Kenneth
Christie was named
employee of the month.
The resort said he is "a
favorite among resort and
yacht harbour guests".
"He is being recognised
for the many positive com-
ments and for the many
guests who return to Old
Bahama Bay for his ser-
vices."
Mr Christie gratefully
exclaimed, "It's great to
work for an organisation
that values the employees
and recognises us when
we're doing a good job.
"I'm happy to receive this
award for just being myself
and for working hard at a
job that I.love," he said.
Qld Bahama Bay Resort
and Yacht Harbour is situ-
ated on 150 acres of ocean-
fronit property in the his-
toric village of West 'End,
Grand Bahama Island,
about 25 miles west of
Freeport.


* KENNETH Christie


TEXjCO


p I Ib I I


I '


- I


PAGE 18, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


I I a f *


I I I I


THE TRIBUNE


G





THE TRIBNE MONDyINAUGUSA8,2005LPAGEW1


Pope prays for

victims of plane

crash in Sicily

**


o ft- 4OM-b4 Iu -
"Copyrighted Material ---
Chief of Syndicated'ontent ro pu

"aAvailable from' Commercial News Providers'"


Sw


%a 4m --


Starting at $24,619.00
License And Inspection To Birthday, Floor Mats, Full Tank Of Gas,
3 Year Road Side Assistance, First 5 Services To 12,000 Miles Free
3 Year or 36,000 Mile Warranty
See The Full Line Of All Your Favourite Fords At
FRIENDLY MwOTORS LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20. MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


EA N


Officials still


optimistic about


chance of peace


in the S


uda


"*-- "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"

* *
*


-~ m
.~ .~
-. ~ m
~- 0
S


The fine line of General Electric appliances found at Geoffrey Jones cater to today's busy households
and fit every lifestyle. Our wide variety of GE appliances are designed to suite your needs, providing the
ultimate in convenience, performance and style. With the best that technology has to offer, competitive
pricing and a full service department, Geoffrey Jones is your ultimate appliance centre.


Saes&FulSev.ceDearmen Rset


GEOFFREY



JONES & CO


n


S.


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C


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 21






Russian


submarine are rescued


* -

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MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 23


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-MONDAY EVENING


AUGUST 8, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
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* WPBT show FYI l Orchestra perform waltzes, marches and melodies from around the world. (CC)
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The Insider (N) The King of Everybody Two and a Half Two and a Half CSl: Miami The team delves into
3 WFOR n (CC) Queens Hi, Loves Raymond Men /t (CC) Men A" (CC) the personal lives of members of Mi-
School" (CC) "P.T. & A" (CC) ami's judicial community. (CC)
Access Holly- Fear Factor "Favorite Winners" Pre- Miss Teen USA Young women from 50 states and Washington, D.C., vie
B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) vious winners return to compete. t for the crown; Aaron Carter and Kimberly Locke are scheduled to per-
(CC) form. (Live) C (CC)
Deco Drive Renovate My Family A family gets Renovate My Family A family News (CC)
0 WSVN help facilitating their dreams and whose matriarch recently had a
throwing a family reunion. (N) heart attack gets a new home. 11
Jeopardy! (CC) NFL Preseason Football Hall of Fame Game -- Chicago Bears vs. Miami Dolphins. From Canton, Ohio. (Live)
* WPLG n (CC)


(:00) Cold Case
A&E Files (CC)
Hardtalk


BET.com Count-
down
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Street (CC)
Late Night With
Conan O'Brien
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may lurk on Texas Interstate 45. Gotti (Part 1 of 2) Gotti (Part 2 of 2) needy Mexican
(CC) (CC) (CC) villagers. (N)


BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es-
(Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to
computers.
*** SOUTH CENTRAL (1992, Drama) Glenn Plummer, Byron Keith
Minns. Gang members prowl L.A.'s South Central slum.
Track and Field IAAF World Championships. From Helsinki, Finland.
(Taped) (CC)
The Age of Wal-Mart: Inside America's Most Powerful Company The
history and future plans of the retail giant.
Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC)


** TOMMY The Daily Show Reel Comedy Comedy Central South Park
BOY (1995) Chris With Jon Stew- (N) Presents Vic "Hooked on Mon-
Farley. art (CC) Henley. (CC) key Fonics"
Cops Al (CC) Unexpected Heroes (N) Forensic Files North Mission
Road
That's So Raven * DOUBLE TEAMED (2002, Drama) Annie McElwain, Poppi Mon-
"Royal Treat- roe, Chris Olivero. Twin sisters Heather and Heidi Burge make it to the
ment" (CC) WNBA. (CC)
This Old House Weekend Deco- Fresh Coat Scrapbooking Embellish This!
(n (CC) rating Creative covers.
Euromaxx Journal: In Faith Matters Journal: Projekt Zukunft
Depth Tagestema
The Soup The Girls Next The Girls Next Wild on Tara "Greek Isles"
Door Door


Airline Beatles
tribute band can't
fly. (CC)


BBC News Asia Today
(Latenight).
The Parkers A The Parkers C,
(CC) (CC)
The National (CC)
The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
NewsNight With Aaron Brown
(CC)
Blue Collar TV Mind of Mencia
You Might Be a (CC)
Redneck. (CC)
Home of the Brave (N)
Phil of the Fu- Sister, Sister
ture "Double The twins get
Trouble" (CC) separate rooms.
Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty
Melanie Falick.
Journal: In Euromaxx
Depth
Kill Reality Jenna and Steven
bond. (N)


Monday Night MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Milwaukee Brewers. From Miller Park in Milwaukee. (Live) (CC)
Countdown
ATP Tennis US Open Series Rogers Masters -- Day Track and Field IAAF World Cham- Track and Field IAAF World Cham-
1. From Montreal. (Live) (CC) pionships. (CC) pionships. (Taped) (CC)
Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
Lady Saint Dominic.
Caribbean Work- FitTV's Housecalls "Jackie C.; FitNation "Gym Nation" Choosing The Extremists The Extremists
out 1 (CC) Weight-loss"' (CC) the right health club. n (CC) n (CC) /l (CC)
Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
The Sports List World Series of Darts From Pur- Best Damn Sports Show Period The Sports List Best Damn
fleet, England. (Live) (CC) Sports Show
(:31) Golf Channel Academy Live (:43) Golf Fitness Playing Lessons (:08) Champions Tour Learning
Live) Center
Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire n The Amazing Race [I (CC) Ballbreakers (CC)
(CC)
(:00) Attack of Race to G-Pho- Race to G-Pho- Race to G-Pho- Race to G-Pho- Filter "Portable Judgment Day
the Show! (N) ria ria ria ria Games' (N)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Eyes of a Columbo "Any Old Port in a Storm" A wine connoisseur murders his
Texas Ranger Ranger Walker encourages a tal- brother, who is planning to sell the family winery.
"Paradise Trail" ented 16-year-old to sing. (CC)
Holmes on Rooms That Design U Creat- Debbie Travis' Facelift "Elsy's New Holmes on Homes "Drain Disdain"
Homes "Access Rock' Rockin' ing an inviting Home" rl n
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(CC). bach (CC) (CC) day


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KTLA down "Mala Mala Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air One With Joey's censors a gay ro- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
Jong" C Two Sabrinas. C (CC) New Brain" C mance. (CC) Ray gets rolled. ,' (CC)
DELIBERATE INTENT (2000, Drama) Timothy Hutton, CRIMINAL INTENT (2005, Suspense) Linda Pud, Vanessa Angel, Sebas-
LIFE James McDaniel, Ron Rifkin. The author and publisher tian Spence. Premiere. A man becomes the prime suspect in his ex-wife's
of an assassination text are sued. (CC) murder. (CC)


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Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC)
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E-Force Ultimate Play- Survivor "Crack in the Alliance" Cl
ground (CC)
Tuner Transformation Special (N) NASCAR Nation NBS 24-7
Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
Franklin (CC) (CC)
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and Rachel's marries a Canadi- ousy rears as Stewie gets the
neighbor dies., an ice dancer. ugly head. acting bug. (CC)
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Need a Miracle" Injured teenagers.


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fan is (N)
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La Madrastra


Law & Order A former Black Pan-
ther is accused of murdering a Cau-
casian police officer. A
Teen Titans Dragon Ball Z
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D'ici et TV5 Le Journal
d'ailleurs

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S. (:00) Law & Or- ** % LIAR LIAR (1997, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Maura Tierney, Jennifer Monk "Mr. Monk Gets Drunk"
USA der: Special Vic- Tilly. A lawyer is forced to tell the truth for 24 hours. (CC) Crime-filled weekend for Monk. (CC)
i times Unit
f (:00) America's America's Next Top Model "The Anna Nicole's Fabulous Life Of... "Celebrity Reli- The Surreal Life
H1 Next Top Model Girl Who Didn't Hug Goodbye" Most Shocking gion n'A CC (CC)
Home Improve- MLB Baseball Cincinnati Reds at Chicago Cubs. From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Live) A (CC)
WGN ment Al reveals a
secret. (CC)
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WPIX Loves Raymond goes on her first official date. f be better off bypassing her last year Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchlano
l (CC) (CC) of junior high. Cl (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
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win dates. William. cret from Mona.

(:15)** ANACONDAS: THE HUNT FOR THE The Comeback Entourage Vince Six Feet Under "All Alone" Keith
HBO-E BLOOD ORCHID (2004) Johnny Messner. Explorers Cl (CC) reveals his feel- makes an embarrassing self-discov-
encounter monstrous snakes in Borneo. 'PG-13' ings. Cl ery. Cl (CC)
(6:00) *** i Pretty Things Filmmaker Liz Goldwyn explores the *** CITY BY THE SEA (2002, Drama) Robert De
H BO-P DANGEROUS history and art of burlesque with former dancers. Cl Niro, Frances McDormand. A police officer's estranged
LIAISONS 'R', (CC) son commits a murder. C 'R (CC)
(6:00)*** (:15) *x CAMPUS MAN (1987, Comedy) John Dye, Steve Lyon, Kim (:15) ** ANACONDAS: THE
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GOTTA GIVE (2004) Johnny Messner. 'PG-13' -
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HBO-S Christopher Guest. Small-town Missourians prepare an Steve Martin. A doting dad deals with his daughter's HER OF THE
anniversary musical. C 'R' (CC) impending wedding. Cl 'PG' (CC) BRIDE PART II
(6:20)** 50 ** ALIEN VS, PREDATOR (2004, Science Fiction) (:45) MAX on ***A TIME TO KILL(1996,
MAX-E FIRST DATES Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova. Antarctic explorers en- Set: Allen vs. Drama) Sandra Bullock, Samuel L
(2004) 'PG-13' counter deadly extraterrestrials. C 'PG-13' (CC) Predator (N) Cl Jackson. A 'R'
(.00) * SEA OF LOVE (1989, Drama) Al Pacino, ** FACE/OFF (1997, Suspense) John Travolta, Nicolas Cage, Joan
MOMAX Ellen Barkin, John Goodman. A detective becomes in- Allen. An FBI agent and a violent terrorist switch identities. C '' (CC)
volved with a murder suspect. Cl 'R' (CC)
(6:30)** (:05)WEEDS (:25)** THE STEPFORD WIVES (2004, Comedy) Weeds House- Weeds House-
SHOW BEREFT (2004) Added Value Nicole Kidman. iTV. A couple move to a town where all wife's husband wife's husband
Vinessa Shaw. (iTV) women act the same. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) dies suddenly. dies suddenly.
(6:15) ** MAD **% THE FIGHTING TEMPTATIONS (2003, Comedy) Cuba Gooding (:05) *sMARCI X (2003) Lisa
C DOG TIME Jr., Beyoncd Knowles, Melba Moore. Premiere. A man forms a gospel Kudrow. A woman must deal with a
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PAGE 24, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


Discove


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MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


SECTION =am,


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks,


Analysis, Wall Street


K Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


.mo -- _4 *.-1M 0 *

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*n-m


Tourism industry



to continue enjoying



'robust support from



the United States'


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
he Bahamian domestic
economy is expected to
continue to expand over
the remainder of 2005,.
and despite remaining
uncertainty over .when Grand
Bahama's tourism sector will experi-
ence a full recovery, the country's
tourism industry is expected to con-
tinue to enjoy "robust support from
the US" and other external
economies.
Accelerated Bahamian dollar cred-
it expansion during the first six months
of the year, which firmed to $222.4
million from $107.7 million in 2004,
coupled with moderate Bahamian dol-
lar deposit base growth, resulted in
reduced gains in external reserves, a
situation that is likely to continue as
the level of capital goods imports
which are exempted from import tax-
es increase, and a decline in bank liq-
uidity.
The build-up in liquidity was even-
ly paced against 2004, however.
Growth in Bahamian dollar deposits
were said to have slowed to $297.7-
million from $354.2 million in 2004.


In its Monthly Economic and Finan-
cial Developments report June 2005,
Central Bank officials said that
prospects remained strong, however,
for continued growth in external
reserves, although at a slower pace.
Also impacting the tourism sector
are rising household incomes in the
US, along with pricing advantages
from the weak US dollar, and the
expansion in airline seat capacity from
North America and Europe, including
the arrival of Virgin Atlantic and First
Choice out of the UK and a increase
in flights from a number of low-cost
US-based airlines.
Uncertainty
The uncertainty and potential risks
of what is expected to be an active
hurricane season is something the
industry will continue to face, as well
as geopolitical tensions that impact
where and if people travel.
From a fiscal perspective, the gov-
ernment was said to remain in a
stronger position to realise revenue
growth. However, less buoyancy is
expected in the short-term.
With a numb,'r of foreign invest- .
ments ongoing and others coming on


stream, there are expected to be sig-
nificant medium-term benefits to the
construction sector as more tourism
developments. come on stream
throughout the Bahamas, ai. the
more relaxed credit conditions con-
tinue to support local housing devel-
opments.,
Looking at the first six months of
the year, the Bahamian economy con-
tinued to strengthen, with growing for-
eign investment inflows and healthy
domestic housing investments offset-
ting the slowdown in tourism receipts.
Exchange control data on foreign
currency outflows point to increased
domestic expenditures on imports,
which point to the. impact of higher
oil prices.
Firming in domestic expenditures
has been supported by more acceler-
ated credit expansion, which has come
at the cost of moderation in banking
sector deposit growth.
While this slowed the first-half
build-up in external reserves,, which
steadied at $49.8 million, the seasonal
-improvement in bank liquidity con-
tinued at the same pace as in 2004, at

SEE page 8B


Tackling the issue


of a mandatory


pension scheme


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
TACKLING the issue of a
mandatory pension scheme, the.
office of the Registrar of Insur-
ance Companies is expected to
begin a review of the Pensions
Act shortly and look to regu-
larise the.country's private sec-
tor pension schemes.
The legislative review comes
as the Social-Security Reformn
Commission is set to make
public the final version of its
recommendations for the con-
tinued 6peration and develop-
menit of the National Insurance
fund.
Legislative
While it is anticipated that
the Commission's recommen-
dations would speak to the
issue of privately-run pension
schemes in the context of
broader social security mea-
sures and reform, there is cur-
rently no legislative framework
within which these schemes are
managed.
According to Dr Roger
Brown,'registrar of Insurance
Companies, the legislation sim-
ply does not exist at this time
and companies that manage
pension funds do so at their
own discretion.
One of the provisions to be,


Registrar of
Insurance
Companies
expected to
begin review
of Pensions
Act shortly
and look to
regularisell
Bahamas'
priVate sector
pension
schemes

addressed by his office, Dr
Brown said, is whether compa-
nies of a certain size should be
required to offer employees a
pension. Another provision
that will be reviewed is the
question of vesting and how

SEE page 2B


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rAGE 2B, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


Teekay Shipping reports





net income of $104.6m





for the second quarter


eekay Shipping
Corporation
reported net
income of $104.6
million, or $1.23
per share, for the quarter end-
ed June 30, 2005, compared to
net income of $98.5 million, or
$1.13 per share, for the quarter
ended June 30, 2004.
Net income for the six
months ended June 30, 2005,
was $383.6 million, or $4.42 per
share, compared to $287.6 mil-
lion, or $3.32 per share, for the
same period last year. The
results for the six months end-
ed June 30, 2005, included a
number of items that had the
net effect of increasing net
income by $146.5 million, or


$1.69 per share,
Net voyage revenues for the
six months ended June 30,
2005, was $800.7 million com-
pared to $816.5 million in the
same period last year, while
income from vessel operations
increased to $401.4 million
from $330.7 million.

Share
Repurchase
Programme
On April 20, Teekay
announced that its board of
directors authorised a $225 mil-
lion share repurchase, pro-
gramme which followed the


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three million share, or $129
million, repurchase programme
completed in early 2005. As of
July 26, 2005, the company
repurchased around 3.9 million
shares at an average price of
$43.37 per share for a total cost
of about $170 million under the
$225 million repurchase pro-
gramme.
Teekay also announced that
its board authorised a $250 mil-
lion increase to the existing
share repurchase programme
which has a remaining authori-
sation of around $55 million,
for a total current authorisa-
tion of $305 million.
Should the remaining share
repurchase authorisation of
$305 million be completed at


an average price of $45.01 per
share, Teekay's closing share
price on July 26,2005, the com-
pany will have repurchased
over 16 per cent, or about $604
million, of its outstanding
shares since the end of Novem-
ber, 2004, when the first share
repurchase announcement was
made.

Initial Public
Offering of
Teekay LNG
Partners L.P.
Teekay's subsidiary, Teekay
LNG Partners L.P. completed


Swiss Private Bank
is presently seeking application
for an


OPERATION MANAGER

Requirements:

Strong Supervisory and Organization Skills
5 years Minimum Related Experience h a Private
Bank
Knowledge of French
Knowledge of all Aspects of Back Office Operations
Strong Problem Solving and Decision-Making Skills
Knowledge of Olympic Banking Software would be
an asset.

Responsibilities:

Co-ordinate and supervise the day-to-day operation of the
bank and implement new projects as they come along.

Please send resume to be handle confidentially to:
P.O. Box N-7678.


Island Traders Building
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com



BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB' RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


mn n nFinancial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of: lm
05 August 2005

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div S PIE Yield
1.10 0.85 Abaco Markets 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
9.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.00 9.25 0.25 1,000 1.452 0.340 6.4 3.68%
8:48 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.44 6.48 0.04 2,800 0.561 0.330 11,6 5.09%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.70 -0.10 4,900 0.187 0.100 3.7 1.43%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.122 0.000 11.5 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.15 1.15 0.00 700 0.062 0.040 18.5 3.48%
8.66 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.66 8.66 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.7 2.77%
2.20 1.87 Colina Holdings 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.004 0.060 NM 0.00%
9.08 8.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.79 8.79 0.00 4,600 0.673 0.410 12.5 4.66%
2.50 0.62 Doctor's Hospital 2.48 2.48 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.5 0.00%
4.12 3-85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.50 9.19 Finco 10.49 10.49 0.00 0.662 0.500 15.7 4.77%
9.05 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.591 0.,380 13.0 4.20%
8.98 8,31 Focol 8.98 8.98 0,00 0.675 0.500 13.3 5.57%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.526 0,405 18.3 4.20%
8.30 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.30 8.27 -0.03 6,850 0.581 0.550 14.7 6.77%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.03 5.97 -0.06 0.184 0.000 32.8 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.760 5.0 7.60%
S2wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7,25%
10.14 10,00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0,.06 0,000 NM 0,00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 62wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2454 1.1798 Colina Money Market Fund 1.245429*
2.3657 2.0058 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3657 ***
10.4855 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4855""*
2.2636 2.1330 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.263627-*
1.1246 1.0544 Colina Bond Fund 1.124578""*
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19;Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD lasI 12 month dividends divided by closing price
S2wk-Hl Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Collna and Fidelitq
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity)
Previous Close .. Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price .. Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per-share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
A* At JUL. 31, 200561 AS AT JUN 30, 2005
* AS AT JULY 29, 20061 ** AS AT JUNE. 30, 20061 "*** AS AT JUNE. 30. 2006


its initial public offering of 6.9
million common units at a price
of $22 per unit on May 10,
2005, representing an initial
yield of 7.5 per cent based on
targeted minimum annual cash
distributions.
Gross proceeds from the
offering were $151.8 million.
Teekay LNG-'s current fleet
includes seven LNG carriers
and five Suezmax tankers, all of
which are on long-term fixed-
rate charters. Teekay currently
owns a 78 per cent interest in
Teekay LNG, including its two
per cent general partner inter-
est.

Teekay
Awarded Two
Long-Term
LNG Charter
Contracts
Teekay has been awarded


long-term fixed-rate contracts
to charter two liquefied natur-i
al gas (LNG) carriers to the;
Tangguh LNG project in
Indonesia. The carriers will be
chartered for a period of 20
years to The Tangguh Produc-
tion Sharing Contractors, a
consortium led by BP Berau,
a subsidiary of BP plc.
In connection with.t|fls
award, Teekay has exercised
shipbuilding options! with
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.
Ltd. to construct two 155,000
cubic meter LNG carriersbt
preferential prices. conmpa i
to current market valuesilhfi,
are scheduled to delivery l
2008 and early 2009: 0
Teekay is also expected to
enter into these transactions
with an Indonesianlp' r
who has taken a,30 pe"it
interest in the vessel. In a r-
dance with exiting ageem s,
Teekay is required to offer i
ownership interest in these ves-
sels and related charter con-
tracts to Teekay LNG.


FROM page IB


many years an employee needs
to be in a sdieme before the
employer contribution needs
to be vested in the employee.
He said also that "there
should be a provision in the
legislation for persons to carry
their pension with them when
they switch jobs.
Measures
Meanwhile, Dr Brown said
that the working group brought
together to look at the draft
for the new External Insurance
Act and its regulations has cre-
ated measures to bring the sec-
tor into the 21st century.
With the existing Act passed
in 1983, the competitive envi-
ronment has changed drasti-
cally and the new act is expect-
ed to help the Bahamas better
position itself as it looks to
streamline operations.
Industry stakeholders will
also see the introduction of
new aspects of legislation, such


as the allowance for segregated
accounts and the possibility for
variable insurance.
During review of the act,
there was the concern that the
draft regulations for corporate
governance might be too
restrictive for industry players.
Dr Brown said that, initially,
there was an attempt to use the
same regulations that have
been proposed for the domestic
insurance industry, but that had
to be reconsidered.
The registrar said his office is
also working on some neces-
sary regulations to bring the
Domestic Insurance Act into
force.
RegUlations
Both the External Insurance
Act and the regulations for the
Domestic Insurance Act are
expected to go before Parlia-
ment during the next sitting of
the House.


ii


DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF
EDUCATION NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Bahamians for the
position of Deputy Director of Education,
beginning September 2005.

The applicant must have a Masters Degree in
Education from a recognized university, with at
least ten (10) years accumulative administrative
experience. The applicant must also be computer
literate.

Only qualified applicants need apply.

For further details please contact the Anglican
Central Education Authority on Sands Road
at Telephone 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application, submitted with copies of
degree certificates, curriculum vitae, three
references, and three passport sized photographs,
must be addressed to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION
AUTHORITY
P.O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The deadline for Application is Wednesday 17th
August 2005.


i vic i tliultUN_








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, AUGUST 8,


The

"Abaconian

VOL e. MEt ie f aM ee e.fAUL'Vft jtO
VOLUME 13, NUMBBER 13, JUBLY Ist, 2p0o$


Elections Set Local Govt. for Three Years
Only Six Communities Required Elections


Keen interest-













being shown in




The Agbacon ian


already being
shown in The
Abaconian, the
community
newspaper which has been put
up for sale by founders Dave
and Kathy Ralph.
Several inquiries have been
received by the American cou-
ple since news broke in last
week's Tribune Business of
their intention to sell.
Community
The Abaconian, a fortnightly
community newspaper serving


Abaco, was launched by the
Ralphs 12 years ago. It has pro-
gressed from being a 12-page
monthly publication to a 56-
page fortnightly with a 7,000
circulation.
Retire
Mrs Ralph told The Tribune:
"We shall be sad to sell the
paper, but now is the right
time. We are ready to retire."
The couple launched The
Abaconian from their water-
front home in Marsh Harbour
in 1993.
At first, it was intended to


be a goodwill gesture because
the couple had enjoyed their
40 years on the island and
wanted to put something back
into the community.
However, it became a suc-
cessful business, showing
impressive advertising sales
growth over many years.
Progress
Now it is ready to progress to
weekly publication. But the
Ralphs say it's time for some-
one else with energy and vision
to take the paper to the next
level.


Senior




The Central Bank6
individual tofill thep
Department.TheDel
relative to the domes

Job Summary
To assess the operate
change markets in or
and exchange rate p
of these markets.

PmNCIPAL ACCOUNT
* Recommends a
money, governm
* Monitors develop
and capital andf
* Provides guidan
andcapital andf
* Conducts appro
money markets.
* Oversees func
operations.
EDUCATION AND EXI
* A first degree in
second class'hon
* Professional cert
a Aminimum of te
years at a senior
a Previous workin

KEY COMPETENCIES
* Leadership a t
development of
* Communicatio
prepare reports
* Interpersonal I
working relation
* Technological A
Powerpoint, Wor
* Result Orientat
potential problem

The Bank offers
Plan and other b













All ap


r Market Analyst


of Trinidad and Tobago is seeking to recruit a suitably qualified
position ofSenior MarketAnalyst in the Domestic Market Operations
partmentis responsibleforprovidingadvice and implementingpolicy
stic, money and capital and foreign exchange markets


ional efficiencies of the domestic, money and capital and foreign ex-
rder to recommend policy strategy for the implementation of monetary
olicies and to undertake initiatives for stimulating the development


ABILITIES
ad implements improvements in the operational efficiencies of the
nent securities and foreign exchange markets.
)pments and liaises with market participants in the domestic, money
foreign exchange markets; coordinates meetings as required.
nce and coordinates the work of the Analysis in the domestic, money
foreign exchange markets.
priate intervention strategies in the domestic, foreign exchange and

tioning of the primary dealer system and bureau de change

PERIENCE
Economics, Banking, Finance or a related discipline (at least lower
ourss.
tification in a related field will be an asset.
en (10) years working experience in the financial sector with three (3)
level.
g experience in a research environment would be an asset.



rackrecord of success in motivation staff and fostering the learning and
others through encouraging, managing and coaching/ mentoring.
n Skills Excellent presentation/ oral skills and proven ability to
and to convey technical information in a succinct manner.
Effectiveness proven ability to develop and maintain effective
ships and manage diversity in a team environment.
Awareness strong working knowledge of Microsoft Office Excell,
rd and Database Management.
ion Ability to manage and organise work in a manner that minimises
ms in order to exceed targets.

an attractive remuneration package which includes a Group Health
benefits.

Applications should be made in writing to:

Senior Manager
Human Resource and Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
P.O. Box 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad and Tobago

Email: hr@central-bank.org.tt
Fax No. 1-868-624-6528

Closing date for submission: August 10, 2005

applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged.


BUSINESS


SBank of The Bahamas

INT ER NATIONAL


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED

ADVANCED EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Program
of The Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is
pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL Students in
The Loan Program will take place at The Holy Trinity Activities
Center Stapledon Gardens from August 8th, 2005 through August
19th, 2005 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm as follows:-

NEW STUDENTS (FIRST TIME RECIPIENTS)
AND RETURNING STUDENTS

A-B: Monday 8th, August 2005
C-D: Tuesday 9th, August 2005
E-G: Wednesday 10th, August 2005
H-K: Thursday 11th, August 2005
L-M: Friday 12th, August 2005
N-R: Monday 15th, August 2005
S: Tuesday 16th, August 2005
T-Z: Wednesday 17th, August 2005

Time: 9:00 am 3:00 pm

Place: Holy Trinity Activities Centre,
Stapledon Gardens
Returning Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present
and must bring 'relevant Identification (Valid Passport and National Insurance
Card).

ALLACCOUNTS MUST BE CURRENT AS AT JULY 31,2005 BEFORE
CHEQUES CAN BE RELEASED.

New Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present and
bring relevant Identification (Valid Passport, National Insurance Card,
Current Job Letter and a copy of Utility Bill)

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation has been
completed.
NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, ..


THE TRIBUNE


JOB ADVERTISEMENT
DESCRIPTION
Zamar Group Companies Limited is the leading provider of audiovisual equipment rentals, staging
services and related technical support to hotels and organizations in the Bahamas.
We are currently searching for a Human Resources Manager to Join our organization.
POSITION OVERVIEW
Provides analytical and technical human resources support to 40+ employees in multi locations. The
Human Resources Manager will provide support to President, Vice President, Managers and employees
in the areas of recruitment, employee relations, benefits and salary administration and training and
development.
POSITION ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Develop and maintain strong partnerships with President and Vice President
* Responsible for the competency-based recruitment and on boarding of employees
* Coordinates processing of employee information for new hires, promotions terminations, and status
changes
* Identifies and addresses potential employee relations issues
* In conjunction with President and Vice President, monitors employee training programs
* Provides resource to employees in regards to benefit administration
* Uses HRIS system to compile and analyze human resource information for use in key management
decisions.
* Ensures smooth implementation of human resources programs and provide key feedback for process
improvements.
* Communicates policies and procedures to all employees within assigned locations.
PLEASE FORWARD RESUMES TO 363-0040 (FAX) OR ZAMARGROUP@CORAILWAVE.COM
(E-MAIL) FOR IMMEDIATE REVIEW AND CONSIDERATION
We offer a very comprehensive compensation and benefits package, a stimulating work environment
and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our business while expanding your career.
REQUIREMENTS
BA degree, Human Resources major/ emphasis preferred.
* 2-3 years of corporate human resources generalist experience in a multi-location environment
* Ability to thrive in a fast-paced environment which places a premium on flexibility
* Excellent analytical and problem-solving ability
* Strong written and oral communication skills






THE TRIBUNE


PA.:U -L, tIviUNDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


Statistical Advisor


The Central Bankof Tinidad andTobago is seeking to recruit a suitably qualified individual
to fill the position of Statistical Advisior in the Research Department.

Job Summary
-.To advise on and guide the collection, analysis, storage and dissemination of the Central
Bank's economic statistics; to supervise the Statistics Unit of the Research Department.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Maintains and enhances the Bank's statistical information infrastructure e.g. FAME
database and reviews statistical databases with a view to improving processes for
information gathering/compilation. ......
*" Assists in1lhe developmeintdf a ietlibdology for 61ec6tonib storageof statistical1

Coordinates the development of new indicators for assessing the performance of
the financial system (i.e. for pensions and insurance, credit, mutual funds; capital.
and foreign exchange markets) and advises on the development of surveys for the
collection of economic statistics.
Ensures the preparation of relevant statistical infomation for uploading to the Bank's
website.
Manages the distribution of the Bank's statistical publications.
Coordinates data requests from the Bank's external stakeholders and maintains the
Bank's commitments to various data dissemination standards (e.g. GDDS)
Supervises the work and output of the Statistical Unit of the Research Department.
EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE
A universitydegreein Eeonomnics,.Statistics,.Business, Accounting-(at least-Lower
Second Class honours) or a professional designation such as ACCA or CFA.
A post graduate degree in Economics or Statistics would be an asset.
Working knowledge of project management methodologies.
Proficiency in use of Statistical software, Database Management and Microsoft Office
Suite.
10 years experience with at least 5 years at a senior supervisory level.

KEY CO ETENCIES
Analytical Skills/Problem Solving The ablility to analyze issues in a thorough,
systematic manner, to focus on critical details while keeping sight of the big picture;
to make well-reasoned, timely and sound decisions and to develop solutions.
Planning and Organising Manages and organises work in order to meet or exceed
targets.
Results Orientation Drives for closure, results and success; persists when faced
with obstacles and challenges.
Flexibility/Adaptability.- Demonstrates openness and flexibility when faced with
change; copes effectively with challenging situations and adversity.
Teamwork and Cooperation Able to work with others interdependently toward
a common goal and to feel a shared responsibility witthot iiier m embers oia team/
department.
* Communication- Able to communicate effectively in writing and to prepare technical
reports for Senior Management or external publics as required.

The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package which includes a Group Health
Plan and other benefits.


Applications should be made in writing to:

Senior Manager
Human Resource and Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
P Box 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad and Tobago


Email: hr@central-bank.org.tt
Fax No. 1-868-624-6528


Closing date for submission: August 10, 2005


All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged


JOB ADVERTISEMENT
DESCRIPTION
Zamar Group Companies Limited is the leading provider of audiovisual equipment rentals, staging
services and related technical support to hotels and organizations in the Bahamas.
We are currently searching for an Administrator to join our organization at its Our Lucaya location
in Freeport. Grand Bahama.
POSITION ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Communicate with hotel to ensure the proper coordination of all audiovisual and production
activities and services betwen the Resort and Zamar.
* Preparation and submission of client Invoices.
* Work closely with the audiovisual manager pertaining to the coordination of all audiovisual and
production activities at the Resort.
* Work closely with the audiovisual manager concerning the coordination, and supervision of the
daily activities of all audiovisual staff.
* Conduct a monthly inventory of all equipment.
* Cordinate and supervise the movement of all equipment.
PLEASE FORWARD RESUMES TO 363-0040 (FAX)DR AMARGi(.P@CORA.W;AVBPXOM-
(E-MAIL) FOR IMMEDIATE REVIEWAND CONSIDERATION
We offer a very comprehensive compensation and benefits package, a stimulating work environment
and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our business while expanding your career.
REQUIREMENTS
* Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration/ Management or other equivalent relevant
qualifications, along with strong PC skills with emphasis on Microsoft Word and Excel, and a
minimum of 3 5 years experience in a similar role.
* Background and experience in the hospitality indistry is a definite asset
* Must be customer service oriented, intelligent, energetic, and self-motivated.
* Must possess strong organization and communication skills (written and oral)
* Must be able to. work independently, organize time, meet deadlines, and pay very close attention
to details.
* Must be prepared to put in the time necessary to complete assignments, and work on weekends
and holidays.


A SERIES of meetings is to
be held this week to urge
backing -for CARI-O-M'-s--
trade support programme.
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is collaborating
with Trinidad and Tobago's
trade support programme in
hosting the meetings on
August 11-12.
Stakeholders
Stakeholders in the private
and public sectors are being


encouraged to take part in the
programme, under which qual-
...ified-firms- can-apparently
access interest-free loans of
between $US6,000 and
$100,000.
Launched
The CARICOM Trade Sup-
port Programme was launched
in October and November,
2004, in Jamaica and St Lucia.
It was designed to redress
the regional trade imbalance


between Trinidad and Toba-
go and its CARICOM part-
-ners and build trade-capacity.
in those member states.
The primary component of
the programme is a revolving
loan fund of US$16 million.
This fund, focused onr the
private sector, will be dis-
bursed in three annual tranchi-
es between 2005 and 2007'to
qualified firms in CARlICOM
member states in the form of
interest-ffeeiloans!- .
The programmed Wvill ,a1|o
facilitate investment by filirs
from Trinidad and TobagIn
CARICOM member statTs
utilising vehicles such as joiit
ventures and strategic
alliances.
C ....Mi.. -W ,,ilt
Component
SAnother componentt offte
CTS programme will be p .i-
visionof technical inputs fr|mn
Private sector brganisatihns
and member states through
tlihCaribbeaffAsGsociationibf
Industry and Commerce; -
It is intended that the pro-
grammme will contribute ;to
enhanced levels of competi-
tiveness among private sector
firms in CARICOM member
states "and so aid in stimulat-
ing economic growth aind
recovery from the adverse eco-
nomic effects of globalisation
and recent natural disasters."
Trinidad and Tobago com-
panies are excluded from the
loan arrangements.


-~-~-


NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 35(1) of the Lotteries and
Gaming Act, Chapter 351 of the Statute Laws
of The Bahamas, Notice is hereby given that
PNK (EXUMA) LTD., a company incorporated
under the Laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in accordance with provisionsiof
sections 34 of the aforementioned Act, has
made application to the Secretary of the Gaming
Board of The Bahamas for a licence to operate
a casino of approximately 5000 square feet
situate at the Emerald Bay Resort, Exuma, The
Bahamas. Any person or persons having
objection should submit two copies of the
objections to the Secretary of the Gaming Board
at P.O.Box N-4565, Nassau, The Bahamas.,


citigroup"

Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Deputy
Document Control Manager.

FUNCTIONAL/ DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore
trust companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas,
Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Island, New Jersey and
Singapore. Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary
structure.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

Daily management of Imaging Unit
Deputy Manager, Documentation Mgmt & Control Unit (Imaging,
Safe Keeping, Dual Control, Warehouse, Records Management.)
Assist with training and administrative functions for the respective
document control units.
Assist in systems enhancements and process re-design
Assist with implementation of global initiatives regarding document
management and control.
MIS reporting.

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS- REQUIRED

Historic imaging and records management experience andfamiliarity
with Trust and Company documentation.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with various business units on a global basis.
Influencing, organizational and leadership skills.
Initiative and the ability to think strategically
People Management.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Operation Controls Head
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O.Box N-1576
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com


Deadline for application is August 17th, 2005


I I


Series of meetings



set to urge backing



for CARICOM's trade



support programme


omwmmd







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


TUESDAY, 16TH AUGUST, 2005
6:00 p.m 8:30 p.m ...............................................Parents Evening

WEDNESDAY, 17TH AUGUST 2005
8:00a.m. 2:00 p.m ............ ...... ........................Orientation
2:00p.m. 8:00 p.m................School Meetings /Advisement
/Registration/Payment

THURSDAY, 18TH AUGUST & FRIDAY, 19TH AUGUST, 2005
9:00a.m. 6:00 p.m.................Advisement/ Registration/Payment
I Continues

SATURDAY, 20TH AUGUST, 2005
8:00 p.m until.............Freshmen Dance COB Auditorium

SATURDAY, 3RD SEPTEMBER 2005
8:00 p.m..............................................COB Gospel & Cultural Show

All events without a venue listing, will be held
at the COB Band Shell, Poinciana Drive

Orientation is mandatory for all new students.

For more information, please call 302-4446 or 302-4342


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Opportunities 2005/2006


Whqt is your career goal?


[ PROMOTION


V QUALITY SERVICE

V INTERNATIONAL


CERTIFICATION


V SALARY INCREASE


V CAREER CHANGE/ ENHANCEMENT


The Professional Development Department can help you achieve your career
goal! A wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification
and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer in setting performance
standards in your organization. We have secured partnerships with leading
international institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain
your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas. Success
is at your finger tips. Call us today.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
* Certified Professional Managers Programme, James Madison University
* Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
* A+ Computer Technician Certification Programme
* Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOUS)
* Certificate In Law Programme

* Certified Professional Security Officers Programme
* Becker Conviser CPA Review (Certified Public Accountant)
* Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
* Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
* Journeyman Plumbing License
* Master Plumbing License
* Certified Security Officer Programme
* Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
* Ethics And Professional Responsibility
* Writing & Research Skills
* Introduction To Computers, Windows & The Internet

2005/2006 Programme Duration is 6 Months 9 Months

External Registration is required for UK and US Institutions.

Affordable Tuition Per Term
Tuition starts at $250 per course.

Professionals holding the Bachelor'or Master Degrees may
apply for exemption from specific courses.

FALL 2005 CLASS SCHEDULE


CLASSES BEGIN:


Saturday, 3rd September


For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays,
8am 12noon.

International programmes available. No entrance exams required.
Tuition may be paid per term or in full.

Visit The Centre For Continuing Education or Call for an interview today!
(242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0093


Mi^jiJLJj,^ u MU. i, UId o urAIt t 5b



CBENRE FOR CONTINUHG BUCATION

& EXTENSION SERVICES

Fall Offerings

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT


COURSE NO. SECT
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01
ACCA901 01
ACCA902 01
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01
CUST900 01
COMPUTER
COMP901 01
COMP901 02
COMP902 01
COMP903 01
COMP 941 01
COMP953 01
COMP960 01
COMP930 01
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01
COSM804 01
COSM807 01
DECORATING
DEC0800 01
DEC0801 01
FLOR800 01
FLOR801 01
FLOR802 01


ENGLISH
ENG 900
ESL 900
HEALTH AND
FITNESS
MASG900'
MASG901


LANGUAGES
CRE 900
CRE 901
SPA900
SPA 901
FRE 900
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900
MGMT901
MGMT902
MEDICAL
MEDT900
SEWING
SEW 800
SEW 802
SEW 805
SEW 811


COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III


CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECH. I
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
MS POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S

MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAIL ART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORALDESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN III

EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG.


01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II


CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I


HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. I
HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. II
'HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WIS


01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I


BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II
DRAPERY MAKING I
UPHOLSTERY MAKING I


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00OPM
6:00-9:OOPM


DAY START DUR.


Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur


6:00-9:OOPM Tue
930am-4:30pm Thur


6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-7:30PM
930ami4:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM

6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM


Mon
Sat
Thur
Wed
Tue
Tue
Thur
Thur/Fdri

Mon
Tue
Mon/Thur


26 Sep.
26Sep
27 Sep


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


27Sep 8 weeks $225
130ct 1day $170


26 Sep
24 Sep
29 Sep
28 Sep
27 Sep
27 Sep
13Oct
3 Oct

30Oct
26 Sep


12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
6 weeks
12 weeks
1 day
2 days

8 weeks
8 weeks
6 weeks

8 weeks
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


6:00-9:OOPM Tue 4 Oct 8 weeks $225
6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10 weeks $250


6:00-9:OOPM Thur
6:00-9:OOPM Mon


* 6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fn


29 Sep 10 weeks $465
26 Sep 10 weeks $620


29Sep
26 Sep
6 & 7 Oct


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

12 weeks
12 weeks
2 days


6:00-9:OOPM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $225


6:00-9:00PM-
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:OOPM


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All fees are Included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly
provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to changeTuition, Fees, Course Content,
Course Schedule and Course.





:This is an introductory course.cpvering, asiGmegdLcl,,ter.m.s, Students will be exposed to
terms that will enable them to read and interpret medical'reports, charts, and communications
relevant to a variety of health care environments. Major topics include Word Building Rules,
Prefixes, Suffixes, Whole Body Terminology, Integunmentary System, Skeletal System, Muscles
and Joints, Nervous System, Blood and Lymphatic System, Cardiovascular System, Respiratory
System and Digestive Systhem.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Prerequisite:
Tuition:


Monday, 26 September 2005
6:00am 9:00pm
C.R. Walker Secondary
None
$225.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or
email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of
$40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages
of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change tuition, fees, course content, course
schedule and course materials.




All persons interested in enrolling in Academic Upgrading, Personal Development and/or
Professional Development courses offered by CEES are advised to register two weeks prior to
the starting date of class.
All students registering must provide a copy of the first five pages of their passport.
Persons registering after the starting date of class will be required to pay a late registration fee
of $60.
i). College Preparatory Programme
ii). Basic Upgrading Programme for Traditional Age Students (under 25 years old)
Classes Begin: August 29, 2005
New Student Advisement: August 17 19, 2005
Time: 9:00am 5:00pm
Venue: Room T4
iii). Mature Upgrading (25 years and older) Programme
Classes Begin: August 29, 2005
Advisement and Registration: August 17 19, 2005
Time: 9:00am 5:00pm
Mathematics 046, 047, 048 Mondays & Wednesdays 6:00 7:50 pm
English Language 015, 016, 017 Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00 7:50 pm
Venue: C.C. Sweeting Junior High School.
Tuition: $300.00 per course
iv). Preschool and Day Care Centre Practitioners Certificate
v) Infant/Toddler Day Care Educarers Certificate
Classes Begin: September 2,2005
Wednesdays 6:00- 7:50 pm & Saturdays 9:00 am -1:30 pm.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
vi) Management and Administration of Infant/Toddler Day Care Centres
Classes Begin: September 3, 2005
Saturdays 9:00- 11:00am.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
The Psychology Department, School of Social Sciences will offer the following course the
Fall Semester, 2005
PSY 310 Consumer Psychology -01 -Wednesdays 6-9pm
interested persons may contact the School of Social Sciences at 302-4489
Additional fees include one time application fee of $40, Insurance $25 (per annum), ID Card
$25 (one time), Technology Fee $100 (per semester), Student Activity fee $50 (full-time)
$25 (part -time) (Fall & Spring Semesters), Drop/Add $20 per application.


it our


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Large wholesale business is seeking to employ an


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as part of its supervisory team. The Candidate must
be able to:

> Ensure timely and accurate review of all
reconciliation's ahld entiies to the general ledger.
> Supervise a small accounting team.
> Be responsible for the day-to-day operations
of the accounting department.

Requirements:

> 2-3 years supervisory experience in a similar
capacity.
> Bachelor's degree in accounting.
> Knowledge of Accpac accounting software a
plus.
> Proficient in Microsoft office.
> Excellent oral and written communication
skills.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Mail resume by August 5th 2005 to:

The Financial Controller
C/O The Tribune -- .. .
Nassau, Bahamas

Or e-mail to: bferguson@coralwave.com


Economist II


The Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago- is seeking recriuitably qualified
professionals to fill the position of Econonist il in the Research Department.

Job Summary

To assist with the management of relevant research projects, so as to provide timely and
accurate economic analysis to the senior management of the Central Bank.


Principal Accountabilities .

* Assists with the coordination and supervision of research projects on relevant aspects
of macroeconomics, monetary and financial policy.

Assists in coordinating and supervising the production of statistical and routine
reports.

Attends Policy Meetings and responds to queries from the public on macroeconomic
and other research related issues.

Represents the Bank at local and international fora in technical and related issues.


Education and Experience

A B.Sc. Degree in Economics (at least Lower Second Class Honours).

A post-graduate degree in Economics, Business or Finance or equivalent post-
qualification training (minimum five years)


Key Competencies


Analytical Skills/Problem Solving Ability to analyze issues in a .thorough,
systematic-manner -to-focus on critical details while keeping sightof the bigpicture;
to make well-reasoned, timely and sound decisions anid to develop solutions.:

Communication Skills Good oral/presentation skills and ability to prepare
reports and make recommendations on compliance and other regulatory matters
in a clear and concise manner.

Teamwork and Cooperation The ability tow k withothers interdependently
toward a common goal and to feel a shared responsibilitywth othermnenbers of
a team/department.

The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package commensurate with qualifications
and experience which includes agro healtplan d ther benefits


Applications should be made in writing to:


Senior Manager, IHuman Resource & Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
P.O. Box1250
...................... Port of Spain
Trinidad & Tobago

Email: hi@central-bankorg.t
FaxNo.: 1-868-624-6528

Closing date for submission:- August 10, 2005*


All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged


Available from Commercial News
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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SU TPR F.M CORT


1995
No 1146


Equity Side
IN THE MATTER OF B4NCO ANDINO
(NASSAU) LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation under the Supervision of the Court)


!;AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992
NOTICE OF DIVIDEND
TAKE NOTICE that the Liquidator of the above named
Bank has declare a first dividend of $0.08 to be paid to all creditors
who have proved their claims in accordance-with the Windind-
up Rules. Such dividend is to be paid on Wednesday the 10th
August, 2005 or on any subsequent working days until the 30th
day of September, 2005.
NOTICE is further given that any creditor who has not
proven his/her debt by Wednesday the 7th day of September,
2005 will be excluded from this dividend.
DATED the 29th day of July, A.D., 2005
Anthony S. Kikivarakis,
Official Liqidator


c/o DELOITTE
Dehands House
2nd Terrace Centreville
P.O.Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas


Tel: (242) 302-4800
Telefax: (242) 322-3101


Providers"
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Share.

your

news_..
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


JOB ADVERTISEMENT


DESCRIPTION


Zamar Group Companies Limited is the leading provider of audiovisual equipment rentals, staging:
services and related technical support to hotels and organizations in the Bahamas.
We are currently searching for an Administrator to join our organization at its Four Seasons locations.
in Exuma.

POSITION ACCOUNTABILITIES
* * ^ *


* Communicate with hotel to ensure the proper coordination of all audiovisual and production
activities and services betwen the Resort and Zamar.
* Preparation and submission of client Invoices.
* Work closely with the audiovisual manager pertaining to the coordination of all audiovisual and
production activities at the Resort.
* Work closely with the audiovisual manager concerning the coordination, and supervision of the
daily activities of all audiovisual staff.
* Conduct a monthly inventory of all equipment.
* Cordinate and supervise the movement of all equipment.
PLEASE FORWARD RESUMES TO 363-0040 (FAX) OR ZAMARGROQUt@CQRALWAVAWE.OM
(E-MAIL) FOR IMMEDIATE REVIEW AND CONSIDERATION

We offer a very comprehensive compensation and benefits package, a stimulating work environment
and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our business while expanding your career.

REQUIREMENTS

* Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration/ Management or other equivalent relevant
qualifications, along with strong PC skills with emphasis on Microsoft Word and Excel, and a
minimum of 3 5 years experience in a similar role.
* Background and experience in the hospitality industry is a definite asset
* Must be customer service oriented, intelligent, energetic, and self-motivated.
* Must possess strong organization and communication skills (written and oral)
* Must be able to work independently, organize time, meet deadlines, and pay very close attention
to details.
* Must be prepared to put in the time necessary to complete assignments, and work on weekends
and holidays.


. i


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


i


i


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUN MONDY, AGUST8, 205,IPGES7


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RBC

FINCO


NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot on eastern side of
South Ocean Blvd, situated in Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 19,159 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the manager, Royal Bank Collection Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 0684" all offers must be received
by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 12th August, 2005.





F NCO



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 100, in Colony
Village situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas situated
thereon is a Single Family/Residence consisting of (3) Bedrooms, (2)
Bathrooms.
Property Size: 10,053 sq. ft.
Bui ding Size: 2,273 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPbRATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forw irded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the manager, Royal ank of Canada, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked "tnder 1269" all offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 12th August, 2005.


RBC
FINCO



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 13, Blk #30,
Gleniston situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (2) Bedrooms,
(11/2) Bathrooms.

This property'is being sold undef Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the manager, Royal Bank Collection Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Naissau, Bahamas and marked "tender 1102" all offers must be received
by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 12th August, 2005.



RBC
FINCO



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot #'s 22 & 23, Glengariff Gardens
situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single-family residence consisting of three (3) bedrooms and two
(2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 18,310 sq. ft.
Building Size: 3,080 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the manager, Royal Bank Collections, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked "tender 0670" all offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 12th August, 2005.



*RBC
FINCO


NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 1527, Pinewood
Gardens situated in Southern District of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (3) Bedrooms, (2)
Bathrooms.
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,064 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the manager, Royal Bank Collections, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked "tender 1269" all offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 12th August, 2005.


GN-253

GOVERNMENT NOTICE


COMMISSION

VACANCY FOR FISHERIES OFFICER
(CONSERVATION, AQUACULTURE)
DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, MINISTRY
OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND
LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
to fill the position of Fisheries Officer (Conservation
and Aquaculture), Department of Fisheries, Ministry of
Agriculture, Fisheries and Local Government.
Requirements for the post:
Applicants must possess a Bachelors Degree in
a biological science such as Marine Biology,
Marine Ecology, Fisheries Science, Aquaculture
or related field and at least five years relevant
experience.
A Masters degree in a relevant field and three
years relevant experience
Possess the ability to work with minimum
supervision and proper time management skills.
Computer skills and SCUBA Diver Certification
would be an asset.
The successful candidate will:
Be assigned duties relative to the conservation of
marine resources and environments, and the
culture of marine and aquatic resources.
Be required to travel within The Bahamas from
time to time.
The salary of the post is in Scale AF 11 $24,800 x 600
$31,400 peI annum. Starting salary will be
commensurate with (Iualifications and experience.
Serving officers must apply through their Heads of
Departments.
Application forms may be obtained from the Department
of Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Local
Government, East Bay Street or the Public Service
Commission. Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street.
They must be returned compete with original
qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to reach. the Secretary, Public Service
Commission. Poinciana Hill, Meeting Street, not. later
than 29th August, 2005.
Secretary
Pubhi SerVice Commission

VACANCY FOR ASSISTANT FISHERIES
OFFICER (SEAFOOD INSPECTION)
DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, MINISTRY
OF AGRICULTUURE,.FISHERIES AND
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons
to fill theposition of Assistant Fisheries Officer (Seafood
Inspection), Department of Fisheries, Ministry of
Agriculture. Fisheries and Local Government.
Requirements for the pv st:
Applicants must possess ">achelors Degree in a relevant
biological science such as Food Science, Microbiology,
Chemistry, (Marine Biology. Marine Ecology, Fisheries
Science) or related field.
Computer skills would be an asset.
The successful candidate will:

Be posted at the Food Safety and Technology
Laboratories, Gladstone Road, Nassau;
Be required to travel within The Bahamas from
time to time.
Duties of the post include the following:
Inspecting and monitoring seafood and seafood
processing facilities. This will involve the
sampling and physical examination of seafood
products.
Issuing of relevant export documentation.
Reviewing and analyzing processing and all
related practices at seafood processing facilities,
to ensure compliance with standards relative to
food safely, hygiene and quality control.
Assisting with the training of workers in the
seafood indusriv.
The salary of the post is in Scale AFI4 $21,050 x 600
- $26.450 per annumLn. Starting salary will be
commensurate wit ih qualifications and experience.
Serving officers must apply through their Heads of
Departments.
Application forms may be obtained from.the Department
of Fisheries. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Local


Government. Fat 3Bay Street or the Public Service
Commission. Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street.
They. must be returned complete with original
qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to reach the Secretary, Public Service
Commission. Poinciana 1 ill. Meeting Street, not later
than 20th Ai\gustl.2015.

Secretary
P1h4li' Service Commission


MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE B, MNDAYAUGUT 8,205 TESTINESS-


Booked up


Iiw


MAL.


'Cqopyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available fromnCommercial News Providers'


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


ASPHALT VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of August
2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC
Liquidator


FRO pgeIB


$70.9 million.
"External reserves expansion
eased to $104.2 million from
$169.2 million last year.
According to the report: "The
Central Bank's net foreign cur-
rency intake declined by 40.2
per cent to $95.9 million, with
the 37.7 per cent slackening in
net intake from banks to $132.3
million, outweighing a 29.9 per
cent reduction in net sales to
the public sector to $36.5 mil-
lion. "Similarly, commercial
banks, net foreign currency
intake from the private sector
decreased by 35.9 per cent to
$130.1 million, characterised by
an 18.4 per cent rise in total
sales relative to a 10.3 per cent
growth in purchases."
Meanwhile, private sector
credit growth firmed to $160.5


million from $101.8 million,
while mortgages gained
strength at $118.1 million.
Growth in consumer credit was
moderately reduced to $29.6
million, while growth in net
credit to government slowed
to $59.8 million from $72.7 mil-
lion in 2004.
Domestic
The domestic foreign cur-
rency credit growth was said to
have strengthened considerably
to $107.4 million from $22.7
million in 2004. Intensified
lending in the hotel sector
drove private sector credit
expansion to $122.6 million.
Tourism statistics indicate
that, for the fjrst five months
of 2005, the decline in visitor
earnings could be attributed to
a decline in visitor arrivals to
Grand Bahama, where the
Royal Oasis remains closed fol-
lowing the 2004 hurricane sea-
son.
The tourism industry in the
Nassau/Paradise Island and
Family Island destinations reg-
istered more upbeat trends
with gains in the stopover seg-
ment contrasting a mild soft-
ening in cruise traffic.
In the fiscal sector, govern-
ment's revenue growth saw
marginal softening to 4.9 per
cent during the first 11 months
of the fiscal year, 2004/05


through May, as compared to
the same period of the previous
fiscal year. The cumulative
deficit increased to $137.2 mil-
lion, $118 million on an adjust-
ed basis, from $85.9 million in
the previous year as estimated
expenditures rose at a faster
pace of 9.9 per cent, mainly
owing to trends in recurrent
outlays.
The tourism industry, the


level of foreign investments
and residential construction all
continued to support the econ-
omy's medium-term prospects,
with predicted expansion in
each area. According to the
Central Bank's report, this out-
look is supported by the stable
growth forecast for the US
economy and improving con-
ditions in ofher leading
economies.


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


PEPPERCORN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of August
2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


SHANTI VILLAGE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named CompanyJ
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of August
2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O. Box N-)
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC
Liquidator
-
Si


NOTICE OF VACANCY
FOR
BUSINESS MANAGER


The Grand Bahama Development Company Limited (Devco) is a major
Real Estate Developer and is responsible for master planning most of
the land zoned for tourist/ commercial and residential use within the city
of Freeport. Devco undertakes development in its own right as well as
selling land to third party Developers. The company is jointly owned
by The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Hutchison Whampoa
Ltd.

A vacancy exists for a suitably qualified BUSINESS MANAGER who
will report to the CEO of DEVCO

Applicants should have the following:

0 International Business Experience
0 A CPA or hold an MBA or equivalent degree.

The individual will be responsible for

D Research and preparation of feasiblity studies and Business Plans
El General administration and coordination between departmental
heads within Devco and the Port Authority Group of Companies

An attractive package and an interesting and challenging work
environment are available for the right candidate.

R6sumes with supporting documentations should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Development Company Limited
P.O.Box F-42666
Freeport. Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
on or before August 15, 2005


citigroup


COMPLIANCE/INTERNAL CONTROL MANAGER

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited is considering applications from qualified,
persons for a position as a Compliance/Internal Control Manager.

This position supports all Citigroup entities in the Bahamas and the Trust:!
Business in the Cayman Islands. Candidates must possess an extensive
working knowledge of compliance policies and controls and have a ,
complete and detailed understanding of Bahamas legislation knowledgef
of Cayman legislation, the U.S.A. Patriot Act and Sarbanes-Oxley Act
would be an advantage). Candiates must hold a Bachelors Degree with"
a minimum of 5 years Compliance/Audit Experiene. Superior analysis,
oral/written communication skills,experience in the formal documentation
and presentation of reports to senior management is required.Strbng,
project management skills, 'and the ability to work independently on
diverse assignments. An in-depth knowledge of PC applications (Microsoft
Office, Access, Internet) is essential.

This position includes the conduct of audits and risk management analysis
of business monitoring and developing controls and procedues, designing
and implementing training programs, working with internal and external
auditors and regulators.This position also involves active participation
directly with Trust officers, Corporate Business managers,and other-
Citigroup businesses worldwide.

This position reports directly to the Country Compliance Officer. Global
travel may be required.

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Resume should be faxed by August 12, 1005 to:

Human Resources Department
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
Fax No. 302-8732


W-- I-I ,


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


I


v


-


THE TRIBUNE


I







THE TRIBUNE


Are inflation fears





overblown?


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BRAZIL?


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Do you want to grow your
international investment
practice?

How committed is your firm
in supporting your international
business?


INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT ADVISORS

When it comes to~meeting the financial needs of our clients in Latin
America and other international centres, the International Advisory
Group, a division of RBC Financial Group, is second to none. We have
developed a special rapport with our Portuguese and Spanish-speaking
clients. They know our integrity, expertise, and entrepreneurial excellence
ensures would-class service is available every step of the way.

If you have exemplary skills in another language and a portfolio in
International clients, talk to us today. You are a licensed Investment
Advisor driven by the desire to achieve international business success.

You communicate effectively in Spanish, Portuguese, English and/or
another language. As a take-charge over-achiever with a flair for
realizing strategic objectives, you have a strong desire to grow your
international practice and you have a proven track record as a sales
expert.

- You also know no limits!

Diskovera unique international career that will open. up-worlds of
opportunities for you!

Please contact:
Alex Goulden
Tel: (345) 814-8145
'Fax: (345) 949-0092

Opportunities in Cayman and The Bahamas

Please respond by August 31st, 2005.


RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ld.
RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd., is a member company under RBC Investments.
RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd.,,and Royal Bank of Canada are separate
corporate entities which are affiliated. Investment Advisors are employees of RBC
Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd. Member CIPf. Irademark of Royal Bank of
Canada. RBC Investments is a registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used
under licence. Copyright 2003. All rights reserved.


RBC
Investments

Dominion Securities


The Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago is seeking to recruit a suitably qualified individual to
fill the position of Senior Economist in the Research Department.

JOB SUMMARY
To coordinate and oversee research activities in order to provide economic analyses to the Bank's
management, so as to assist in the formulation of effective economic, monetary and financial
policy.


PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Produces routine and non-routine reports on economic, monetary and financial policy issues
for senior management.

* Assists the Manager in ensuring that the macroeconomic data produced is relevant, accurate
and timely.

* Assists the Manager in indentifying critical microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and
where relevant proposing appropriate policy action.

* Represents the Bank at local and international fora in technical and related issues.

* Effectively manages human resource issues of direct reports and ensures that employee
performance-is monitored with ongoing coaching and feedback

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE
* A university degree in Economics, Finance or Statistics (at least lower second class honours
or a G.P.A. of 3).
* Post graduate degree in Economics, Finance, Statistics or equivalent post qualificationtraining
(minimum 5 years).

* Advanced knowledge of econometric and statistical methodologies.

* Considerable work experience across all economic sectors (monetary, fiscal, real sector
etc.).


Effective supervisory and coaching skills.

Strong communication and presentation skills.


Languages: Spanish (optional).


At least 9 12 years experience required.


KEY COMPETENCIES
* Technical Expertise: Advanced knowledge of statistical methodologies, economic models,
quantative methods and working knowledge of the relevant I.T. systems: Advanced training
in Economics, Finance, Statistics or equivalent post qualification training in the relevant
areas of expertise.

* Communication Skills: Excellent presentation/oral skills; proven ability to prepare reports
and to convey technical information in a succinct manner.

* Results Orientation: Manages and organises work in a manner that minimises
potentiall problems in order to exceedtargets. ........................

* Flexibility/Adaptability: Revises priorities readily in order to meet timelines.
Ability to adapt to organisational changes.

* Interpersonal Effectiveness: Proven ability to develop and maintain effective
working relationships in a team environment.
The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package which includes a Group Health Plan and
other benefits.
Applications should be made in writing to:
Senior Manager
Human Resource and Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
SP.O. Box 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad and Tobago
Email: hr@central-bankorg.tt
Fax No. 1-868-624-6528
Closing date for submission: August10, 2005
All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged


4 UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international
trust company, is presently looking for a


Senior Trust Officer

This position is open to candidates with the following
minimum requirements:

Qualifications
Bachelor's degree in a relevant discipline:
Post graduate degree in law and/or a STEP
designation;
Several years experience in an offshore trust
company;
Ability to speak a second language is a plus;
Extensive PC knowledge.

Personal qualities
Good analytical, organisational and
communication skills;
Committed to service excellence;
Able to work on own initiative;
Positive and flexible attitude;
STeam player

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should apply
in writing, enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


I M s C ,..., IJ .-, a


I


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- ..


w







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


* IN ATTENDANCE

HELSINKI, Fin-
land: There's a good
core of Bahamians
attending the 10th
IAAF World Cham-
pionships.
The list is headed
by Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom, his
wife, Manita and son,
Donovan; Deputy
Permanent Secretary
Bruce Walker and
Sports Ambassador
Tommy Robinson.
Also here are
Doyle Burrows, who
assisted the Bahamas
Government in the
preparation of the
Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Sta-
dium for the hosting
of the Colinalmperial
Central American
and Caribbean Cham-
pionships; Grafton
Ifill II, a consultant
in Sports Administra-
tion at the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and
Culture, along with
his family, including
sprinter Grafton Ifill
III.
Olympic bronze
medallist Frank
Rutherford is also
attending the champi-
onships.

MEN'S 100
MISERY

Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom said
he's just as stunned
as everybody else
about the 11.57 sec-
onds that national
champion Derrick
Atkins ran in the
qualifying round of
the men's 100 metre
heats on the first day
of competition at the
10th IAAF World
Championships.
"I just understood
that the young man
was injured, but it's
most unfortunate that
he was injured," Wis-
dom stated. "I hope
he's not discouraged
because I've seen him
run 10.20-point. So
I'm hoping that he
can recover. But it
has to be a major dis-
appointment for
him."


* RAINY
OPENING
CEREMONIES

Although they got
wet when they came
out for the official
opening ceremonies
at the 10th IAAF
World Champi-
onships, the nine
members of the team
that represented the
Bahamas still stuck it
out.
Long/triple jumper
Leevan 'Superman'
Sands carried the
flag. Behind him
were Philippa Arnett-
Willie and Nathaniel
McKinney. They
were followed by
Sevatheda Fynes and
Troy McKinney.
After them were
Debbie Ferguson and
Andrae Williams.
And bringing up the
rear were team man-
ager Ralph McKinney
and assistant coach
Tyrone Burrows.
They all stayed
until the end and
returned to the Ath-
letes Village around
2am.


Luckily, none of
the athletes had to
compete Sunday.
Arnett-Willie and
Fynes are on the
women's 4 x 100 relay.
team, while McIntosh
and Williams are on
the men's 4 x 4 team.
Williams is also
entered in the men's
400. Ferguson is
injured and will not
compete.


Christine storms


into


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

HELSINKI, Finland: Chris-
tine Amertil, matched against
defending champion Ana
Guevara in the first round of
the women's 400 metres, eas-
ily advanced to the semifinal
on day two of the 10th IAAF
World Championships on
Sunday.
Competing in the first of six
heats in lane five, Amertil
clocked 51.35 seconds to finish
in second behind Guevara's Avai
winning time of 51.14 out of
lane eight at the Olympic Sta-
dium.

Controlled

"I wanted to go out there in
the first round and run a nice
controlled race and I did just
that," said Amertil, who was a
silver medallist at the 2003
World Indoor Championships. -
The athletes were out on
the track pretty early and it
took a while before the race
got started, but Amertil said in lane sE
that didn't have any drastic Guevar
effect on her because she stretch.
knew what she had to do. final cur'
When the race got started, way, Gu
she made up the stagger on on the r
Donna Fraser of Great Britain having a


Just the

FROM page

Guevara won he
51.14, the fourth fas
ifying time, just a
Bahamian Christine
who was second in
The first two in ea
heats in the sei
advance to the final
Williams-Darling,
on the world all-tim
a smooth race in h
Competing from la:
she was able to catc
na Prokopek front
before they got off
curve to take contr
race.
As she headed d
back stretch, she mz
her pace, but was cat
moment by Jamaica
ka Williams. Coming


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o M -


even and she chased
a down the back
As they came off the
ve onto the straight-
evara made a check
est of the field and
slight lead, she con-


tinued to surge ahead.
Amertil, the 25-year-old
Colinalmperial Central Amer-
ican and Caribbean Champi-
onships' 200 silver medallist,
attempted to make one last
push for Guevara at the line.


Tonique for Williams-Darling

one final bend, Russian Olesya want to get a good lane foi
Zykina provided a challenge. the final."
at one in But as she headed home, This is Williams-Darling's
test qual- Williams-Darling pulled away first race since winning the
ahead of and wasn't challenged the gold at the Colinalmperia]
Amertil, rest of the way. Central American and
51.Amerti35 "I tried to get out fairly Caribbean Championships at
ch of t51.35. hard because I wanted to set home and she indicated that
mis will up my race so I wouldn't her performance there will
I have to work so hard in the really help her here.
now 10th finish," she insisted. "So I "I had some solid training
e list ran think I did that." afterwards, so I'm feeling
ier heits. Having advanced to the pretty good," she stated. "But
ne seven, semis, Williams-Darling said the rounds there have really
nh Grazy- she expects the competition helped me here."
n Poland to heat up, so she has to be In addition to Guevara,
the first ready to run today. who is listed as the eighth
rol of the "I think in every heat here, best on the world all-time list
they had two solid runners with a personal best of 48.89
down the and so the next round, I and a season's best of 50.05,
aintained expect at least four in each Williams-Darling will also
ughtfor a race," she reflected. "So I have to contend with Ameri-
n Sheric- expect to really get out there can Monique Henderson in
g off tlhe and run hard. You really lane six.


-- -b.. q Mn qm,-

But the Mexican was a deter-
mined to stay ahead.
"I knew she would run hard
because she was in lane eight.
It's a tougher lane to run out
of," said Amertil, who had to
run out that lane in the final of


the Olympic Games last year,
in Athens, Greece when she
finished sixth.
"But I just wanted to get
through the heat in a com-
fortable time so that I can get,
through to the semifinal in a,
good position."
Having qualified with the
fifth fastest time in the pre-
liminaries, Amertil, who has.
run a season's best of 50.65,.
will now run out of lane three
in the second of three rounds
of the semis today.

Rival

Her toughest rival in the
heat should be American
DeeDee Trotter, who posted
the eighth fastest qualifying
time of 51.44 with the winning
time in heat two. Trotter was a
member of the 2004 Olympic
4 x 4 gold medal team and the
2004 US Collegiate champi-
on, representing the Universi-
ty of Tennessee.
"I just want to continue to
do what I've done today,"
Amertil declared.
The first two finishers in the
heat will automatically qualify
for the final plus the fastest
two times in the three heats
combined. The final is set for
Wednesday night.


HELSINKI, Finland: National century champion Derrick Atkins
recorded the slowest time ever at a major international meet when he
hobbled across the finish line in 11.57 seconds for sixth place in heat one
of the men's 100 metres preliminaries at the 10th IAAF World Cham-
pionships.
Atkins, the 21-year-old NAIA double sprint champion from Dick-
inson State University, ran nowhere near his season and personal best
times of 10.21 that earned him a qualifying spot at the Colinalmperial
Central American and Caribbean Championships last month.
"I didn't run as I was supposed to. I can't do anything about it," he
stated. "I made it this far, so I'm happy about-it. I ran through the race
and I'm okay."
Against a field that comprised of two of the favourites to medal in the
final, Atkins was left in the blocks and was never really able to challenge
his rivals as Francis Obikwelu crossed the line in 10.17 and American
Shawn Crawford followed in 10.23.
Out of the eight heats contested, Atkins faded out of a shot at fin-
ishing in the top three in his heat to automatically qualify. He ended up
tied in 52nd spot with Reginaldo Micha Ndong, the eighth place finisher
in heat eight.
A total of 58 competitors participated.

Performance
Atkins didn't appear to be at full strength and his performance
prompted harsh words from team manager Ralph McKinney.
"You can't bring people at this level limping. On paper, with the com-
petitors in his race, we expected him to get to the second round,"
McKinney insisted.
"We figured that he could have definitely ran third, the worse being
fourth if the Canadian beat him, and then moving on to the next
round."
McKinney said they knew coming here that Atkins had a slight
injury, but they didn't think that it was so severe.
The night before the race started, Atkins said he did his usual routine
to get himself prepared and he was feeling alright going into the race.
But he said he just didn't have the energy that everybody else did
down the straight.
Running out of lane seven, Atkins did finish ahead of Harmon Har-
mon from Cook Islands, who did a season's best of 11.84 and Mariuti
Uan of the Republic of Kiribati, who ran a personal best of 11.92.
"Everybody has their day. Coming to this meet, I was prepared,
but then I had a little bump in the road and that kind of slowed me
down," he admitted. "Hopefully, I can regroup and come back for
next year."



Sturrup on form

ahead of finals


FROM page one

lower her national record,
but is confident that she can
and will run faster if the
opportunity presents itself
in the final tonight.
When asked by one of the
international reporters
about the key to her come-
back, Sturrup noted that it's
been her hard work and ded-
ication under the watchful
eyes of her coach Trevor
Graham in North Carolina.
As for her performance in
the first two rounds, Sturrup
noted: "I just tried to get
through them as quickly as I
could.'" However, she said
she's definitely going to be
prepared for the challenge
that lies ahead today.
In her first round heat,


Sturrup, running out of lane
two, got a big jump on the
field and was never chal-
lenged.
Her nearest rival was
Lucimar Apacid de Moura
of Brazil, the 31-year-old
South American 100/200
record holder, who ran 11.40
for second.
And in the quarter-final,
Sturrup once again got out
early and stayed on top of
the field. Muna Lee, the 23-
year-old 2004 Olympic 200
finalist, came close in 11.22,
but Sturrup was just too far
ahead.
"They say my start has
been pretty good, so that's
encouraging," said Sturrup,
about each phase of her
race. "I guess I just have to
continue to work hard right
to the very end."


400m semis


SPORTS


I


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11

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9


4Dm o4 t-o ooml









SPORTSI4..


Jeff Rodgers




with camp i


holds court




-... Jamaica


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
JEFF RODGERS was wel-
comed by more than a 1,000
enthused campers from dif-
ferent parishes in Jamaica
recently.
The annual Jeff Rodgers
Basketball camp, which
attracts hundreds of Bahami-
an athletes, ventured into
Jamaica, takinIg some familiar
faces from the National Bas-
ketball Association (NBA)
with it.
Travelling with Rodgers
were Greg Anthony from
ESPN and 12-year NBA vet-
eran Travis Knight, as well as
Scott Barrell, both of whom
are, free agents.
OjRbR ger~s, hosting the
gairp in Jamaica was an expe-
rience he would not trade.
,, -H said: "The way we were
wivdomed was shocking. We
vwre in one of the most dan-
gerous parishes in Jamaica
gpdley.toppk 'us in like we
wet( t' wn:e.^";',-h.


"Everyone was surprised
about the level of expectancy
by the campers and the com-
munity. We were able to unite
two gangs, persons who would
never talk or associate.
"This is the kind of things
the camp is all about. I admit
at first I was a little scared and
the idea of going into those
areas was frightening, but the
campers were very attentive
and didn't want us to leave."

Welcome
After such a warm welcome
by the campers and citizens of
Jamaica, Rodgers has decid-
ed to host a two week camp,
along with his annual four
week camp which is held here
in the Bahamas.
This is the third time
Rodgers has extended his
camp into other Caribbean
Islands, having done so on two
occasions in the Cayman
Islands and one in the Turks
and Caicos.


"It was truly a blessing, a
lifelong experience," said
Rodgers.
"We have extended the It -
camp to other Caribbean .- i
Islands, but I must admit that
the one held in: Jamaica was
the most memorable.
"When we went down there
we tried to teach them more
than just the game of basket-
ball, we tried to teach them
things they can use throughout
their everyday lives.
"We had at least 500 or 600
campers in both parishes.
"They didn't even want us
to leave. When we travelled
through the areas we were
welcomed, guys asking us to
come out and play with
them." PIT .
,The next camp in Jamaica .
will be held two weeks after
the annual camp in the
Bahamas. ". .-
0 MORE than 1,000
basketballenthusiastsA
flocked to Jeff
Rodgers' camp.




ter makes


World


M iByKElSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
:^**.*^. -.:. "' : .'------*-----
BAHAMAS doubled their medal count on day three at the
Central Americari and Caribbean Swimming Championships
(CCCAN), over the weekend.
After a record breaking performance on day one, Alana Dil-
lete swam her way-.onto the podium again, this time taking a sil-
'ver medal.
Dillete, who competed in the girls' 15-17 long course indi-
vidual medley, swam a time of 2:26.67 seconds. The winner, in
2:25.04 seconds, was Alia Atkinson of Jamaica. Coming in
third was Laura Ro.deriguez of Dominican Republic in 2:28.10.
In the preliminary rounds of the event, Dillete
swam 2:30.33 seconds, the fourth fastest time heading into the
Finals.
The second silver :medal on the day came from Arianna Van-
derpool-Wallace in the girls' 13-14 100 freestyle.
Vanderpool-Walilace swam 1:00.44 seconds for the silver,
with Alexia Benitez of El Salvador taking the gold in 1:00.61 sec-
onds and Jennifer Barajas of Mexico coming in third in 1:01.66
seconds.
Also in the event was Alicia Lightbourne, who finished up
fifth in a time of 1:01.21 seconds.
Ashley Butler made her splash in the girls' 11-12 100m
freestyle.
Butler, who came into the event with the third fastest time,
1:04.05 seconds, swami a time of 1:02.60 seconds for the bronze.

Events
Winning the event was Edilexis Gil of Venezuela in 1:01.52
seconds, Andrea Salas of Mexico was second in 1:02.33 seconds.
Lightbourne took to the pool again, this time in the 50m
breaststroke.
Although she was able to beat her seeded time in the pre-
liminary rounds, she fell short of a medal.
Lightbourne finished up seventh in 36.26 seconds, her pre-
liminary time was 36.36 seconds.
Winning the event was Michelle Divali of Mexico in 32.86 sec-
pnds, with Danielle Beaubrun of St Lucia finishing second in
34.99 seconds.
A seventh place finishing was also recorded by Travano
,McPhee in the boy's 50ma backstroke.
.;McPhee tried to better his preliminary times against a tough
field but fell short, clocking 30.60 seconds.
, .,The winning time of 29.46 a new meet record was swam by
Alvao Fortuny of Guatemala. Marco Gonzalez of Mexico came
ih second with 29.49 seconds.
As day three wrapp.ed-up, John Bradley claimed the
Bahamas' last medal of the night in the boys 13-14, 1500m
Bradley clocked a time of 18:38.83 seconds for the bronze, fin-
sfliS b 1und Rjcardo Lopez, who swam 18:26.77 seconds for the
winkWan'dDiego Castillo's 18:32.04 seconds.
Day two of competition was a slow one for the Bahamas, five
svWIj ni advanced through to the finals, but failed to medal.
Three 'swimmers will take to the pool early today, with Dillete
and Vanderpool-Wallace looking for their third medals at the
*gigJ niesi' \\ ,; i .





for Sulgrave Manor, Cable Beach.

Mature Bahamian preferred. Must be literate,
honest, fit and active. Police certificate and
references required. Main duties, man front desk,
answer incoming calls, assist residents, and
surveillance of grounds and building. Work on
shifts.


Phone Manager 327-7916


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
MARK STERLING was
the sole competitor at the
World Masters Games in
track and field for the
Bahamas in Edmonton,
Canada.
Sterling, who competed in
the men's hammer, weight
pentathlon and weight
throw, won three medals a
silver in the hammer throw,
bronze in the weight throw
and weight pentathlon.
The games, which are held
every four years, saw more
than 3050 athletes take part.
The next games are set to
take place in Australia.
He said: "I was a little
scared during the competi-
tion, but was in awe when I
saw the athletes compete.
The World Masters are like
the Olympic games, but for
older athletes.

Competitors
"I first learned about the
games after searching the
web, when I saw the dis-
tances by the other competi-
tors I felt as though I would
have faired well in the com-
petition so I signed up.
"I will encourage other
athletes to. compete at the
World Games, it felt great
going up on the podium with
the Bahamian flag."
In the hammer throw,
Sterling's distance of 41.76
metres earned him a silver
medal. Winning the event
was Slexet Tsvetikov of Rus-
sia with a throw of 49.35m,
finishing third was Rana
Cheema of Canada in
37.96m.
Competing in the weight
pentathlon, an event that
hosts more than five disci-
plines, Sterling got a bronze.
In other events Sterling
finished up fifth in the shot
putt with a best throw of
9.97m. In discus, Sterling got
seventh with a throw of
27.95m.
Sterling worked-out lightly
after the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associa-
tion's national champi-
onships.
In that event he finished
off third in the discus and
shot putt and first in the
hammer.


SMARKI, STKERLING participated in the World Masters Games 2005 in Edmonton Canada,
winntin a silver medal in the hammer throw, bronze in the weight throw and the weight pentathlon.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


his ma rik at


Masters Games









MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


BROUGHT TO YOU BY

1


Chandpa is on or1







a head o m 10i0 final


* BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IT WAS a decades ago
today in Gothenburg, Sweden
at the Ullevi Stadium that
Troy Kemp and Pauline
Davis-Thompson put the
Bahamas on the map with the
first two medals at the IAAF
World Championships.
Today, sprinter Chandra
Sturrup will get an opportu-
nity to win her second medal
in three years at the 10th
championships when she com-
petes in the women's 100
metres at the Olympic Stadi-
um.
After breezing through the
first two rounds of the pre-
liminaries, Sturrup surged into
today's semifinal with the sec-
ond fastest qualifying time of
11.10 seconds behind Chris-
tine Aaron from France, who
posted a 11.03.
The quarter-final was
almost identical to the first
round in which Sturrup and
Aaron both won in matching
times of 11.15. Aaron, how-


Sturrup breezes

through the rounds


ever, stepped it up a bit in win-
ning the second of four heats
in the quarters, but Sturrup
followed in heat three, saying
all she wanted to do was to
advance.

Excitement
"I felt good. I just wanted
to go out there and run well,"
said Sturrup, who was beam-
ing with excitement as she
looked ahead to improving on
the bronze medal she claimed
at the 2003 World's in Paris,
France.
The 33-year-old, coming off
her gold medal performance
at the Colinalmperial Senior
Central American and
Caribbean Championships,
will be running out of lane six.


Two youngsters are also
expected to be in the hunt for
the four qualifying spots for
the final. They are American
Lauryn Williams, 21-year-old
2004 Olympic Games' silver
medallist in lane three, and
20-year-old Sherone Simpson,
who ran the second leg on the
victorious Jamaican 4 x 100
relay team at the Olympics.
"It's going to be tough,"
said Sturrup, when asked
about the semis. "11.03 in the
round. That means it's going
to be tough."
She was referring to 31-
year-old Aaron, who will lead
the charge in heat one out of
lane five with
27-year-


Kim Gevaert of Belgium in
lane two, 24-year-old Ameri-
can quarter-amiler turned
sprinter Me'Lisa Barber in
three, Jamaican 23-year-old
Veronica. Ca'mpbell, a foutr-
time Olympic medallist, in
four and 24-year-old Aleen
Bailey, also of Jamaica, in sev-
en. Americani Muna Lee is in
six.

Comeback
Sturrup is ;having a remark-
able comeback after sitting
out most of last year due to
surgery in February.
After bouncing back in time
to.help the Bahamas mount a
challenge for another medal
in the 4 x 1 relay at the
Olympics, Sturrup said she's
on a course to regain her
prominence in the women's.
sprints.
She currently holds the
world's fastest time of 10.84,
which enabled her to


STURRUP surged into today's semifinal with the second
fastest qualifying time of 11.10 seconds behind Christine Aaron
from France, who posted a 11.03.
(Photo:.Felp6 Major/Tribune staff)


HELSINKI, Finland: Olympic champion Tonique
Williams-Darling knew that in order for her to be in
contention for the gold medal, she would have to
run consistently well through the rounds at the
10th IAAF World Championships.
In the first round of the women's 400 metre
preliminaries on Sunday at the Olympic Stadi-
um, Williams-Darling did just.that as she cruised
to an easy .victory in the fourth of six heats in a
time of 51.04 seconds.

Happy
"It felt a good, solid qualifier," said Williams-
Darling, a favourite to pull off the gold here on
Wednesday night. "I wanted to be the first qualifier in
my heat because I want a good lane in the semifinal. I did
that today, so I'm happy."
In today's semis, Williams-Darling will run out of lane
four in the last of three heats ahead of her arch-rival last
year, Mexican Ana Guevara, the defending World Cham-
pionships' champion.


I


- ~---~. .=--------sl-----rp- -- ---sa -----~- --- I ------ ---sa- -~l~ll~.~..~~.~..a~~larnlrr~-rr~aae~-~Bu








MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


The stories behind the news


After weeks of speculation and con-
troversy, president of the College of the
Bahamas, Dr Rodney Smith (pictured
at left), officially resigned his post last
week. Immediately after leaving for a
month's vacation last Thursday the
rumour mill at .COB was spinning
about Dr Smith's future at the college,
and last Friday Council chairman
announced at a press conference that
Dr Smith had resigned and the col-
lege was in the process of looking for
a replacement...


Now





a ne


The three major oil companies in
the Bahamas Shell, Esso, and
Texaco are all reportedly looking
into the option of selling their
retail interests in the Bahamas,
The Tribune was told last week.
Talks of Shell's sale have surfaced
recently and numerous retail
owners have reportedly been con-
tacted by bidders offering them
the option to be potential share-
holders in the company buy out...


college


-w


Following "fruitful" meetings with PetroCaribe rep-
resentatives last week, Minister of Trade and Industry
Leslie Miller said yesterday that the Bahamas is posi-
tioned to receive its first supply of fuel from Venezuela
as soon as September. Describing PetroCaribe as an
"enhancement of the Caracas and other accords", Mr
Miller continued to push for the deal that he signed
along with 13 other Caribbean countries with Venezue-
lan president Hugo Chavez on June 29. Mr Miller has
been lobbying for the idea of PetroCaribe for more than
two-and-a-half years, promising that the deal would
bring lower gas prices to Bahamian drivers, and overall
relief in resulting energy costs...


seeks


president Dr
Rodney Smith
wa.s the only
acceptable out-
come of the plagiarism scandal
at the College of the BahamaS,
and the only way the instititu-
tion could maintain its credi-
bility in the face of such a
major embarrassment.
For weeks, an air of uncer-
tainty has hung over the Oakes
Field campus as faculty and
students awaited findings of a
special panel appointed to
investigate th.e crisis. With the
president gone, the tension has
lifted.
Dr Smith's; decision to clear
his desk and leave quietly
offers COB the chance of a
new start when faculty
reassembles next week. It also
silences the' irrational baying
of Dr Smith's supporters, who
misguidedly seemed prepared
to allow sentiment to under-
mine the college's academic
standing. Fortunately, their
views were. not allowed to pre-
vail.
Dr Smith's sudden illness
delayed publication of the
investigating committee's find-
ings following a thorough
appraisal of the affair. But
there wa: no doubt about the
way they: had voted. Once the
president got wind of the com-
mittee' feelings he acted
accordingly, sparing the college
council the unsavoury task of
firing him.
Last week, before Dr Smith's
decision became known, a col-
lege sc urce told INSIGHT:
"There, is a strong impression
that the report's recommenda-
tions are negative as far as Dr
Smith is concerned. The gen-
eral feeling on campus is that
he wi 1 not survive this crisis,
that he will be granted a leave
of absence and then quietly dis-
appegr."
Arid that's almost exactly
how it happened.
There is no doubt that the
college president's confession


As COB's plagiarism nightmare comes to

an end, INSIGHT examines the background

to the affair and looks to the future of the

nation s premier academic institution.


to blatant plagiarism in a con-
vocation speech has shaken
COB to the core. His decision
to lift words by New York Uni-
versity president John Sexton
and present them as his own in
front of a large gathering of his
own faculty and students has
left his admirers utterly bewil-
dered.
The debacle has had a par-
ticularly harsh impact on col-
lege council chairman Franklyn
Wilson, whose fulsome praise
for Dr Smith in advance of his
appointment last year now
hangs like a tattered banner in
the breeze.
Not only does the entire fias-
co leave a huge question-mark
over his judgment, it also rep-
resents a massive dent in his
pride.
"Poor Frankie has more than
egg on his face," said one
observer, "he has a king-sized
omelette smack on top of his
head."
For Dr Smith himself, the
crisis proved traumatic. He
checked into a Florida hospital
reportedly suffering hyperten-
sion, or high blood pressure,
when the report's publication
seemed imminent. As a result,
its findings were withheld,
pending his treatment and
recovery.
Failure to publish the report
was immediately interpreted
as an indication that the com-

SEE page 2C


* FOR weeks, an air of uncertainty has hung over the College of the Bahamas' Oakes Field campus as
faculty and students awaited findings of a special panel appointed to investigate the plagiarism scandal.
With the resignation of president Dr Rodney smith, the tension has lifted.
(The Trtibunearchive photo)


beginning


- -


The Tr-'--ibun e;i














WEEK IN REVIEW


speculation
and controver-
sy, president of
the College of
the Bahamas, Dr Rodney
Smith, officially resigned his
post last week.
Immediately after leaving for
a month's vacation last Thurs-
day the rumour mill at COB
was spinning about Dr Smith's
future at the college, and last
Friday Council chairman
announced at a press confer-
ence that Dr Smith had
resigned and the college was
in the process of looking for a
replacement.
The findings of the special
advisory panel formed to inves-
tigate Dr Smith admission of
plagiarism in May, were not
released.
Dr Smith became embroiled
in a plagiarism scandal in late
May, after he delivered a
speech at the college's honours
convocation ceremony. In his
speech, Dr Smith had included
as his own six paragraphs from
a speech delivered three years
earlier by John Sexton, presi-
dent of New York University.
The academic community was
notified of the plagiarism by a
whistle-blower, who happened
to be a college council member
who had attended Dr Sexton's
presentation at his installation
as president of New York Uni-
versity. When she had con-
firmed the plagiarism, she made
and distributed copies of Dr
Sexton's speech to the council
and Dr Smith.


PUBLIC Health director Dr
Baldwin Carey said last week
that he has launched an inves-
tigation into the claims of an
increase in cancer cases in
Andros.
His department was the sec-
ond government agency to
announce such an inquiry in as
many weeks.
Two weeks ago, an Andros
resident said locals have
noticed a disproportionate
number of cancer cases among
persons who lived near or
worked at the AUTEC base.


The Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company signed a


FROM page 1C


$49.3 million contract last week the Family Islands. Submarine Cable Network provide the residents of these Although the contractor's
that will provide the country The contract, signed last International (BDSNi). islands with access to high-tech cost is $49.3 million, the pro-
with the world's "most signifi- Tuesday by BTC executives The submarine cable, which telecommunication systems, ject's total cost is estimated to
cant" submarine telecommuni- and the US-based Tyco group, is expected to be fully installed including GSA services, DST
nations system and facilitate is for the installment of state- by the end of 2006, will con- Internet and 200 digital televi- SEE pag, 3C
new investment possibilities in of-the-art Bahamas Domestic nect 15 Bahamian islands and sion channels.


mittee's findings were not in
his favour and that dismissal,
or forced resignation, beck-
oned. This again turned out to
be true.
However, Mr Wilson was
saying nothing and urged
everyone else to do the same.
The report and its findings
were placed under wraps until
Dr Smith's recovery was com-
plete. Then came his resigna-
tion, relayed to the faculty via
e-mail. The news was accepted
with regret, even though most
observers saw it as inevitable.
One lecturer said: "However
* you look at it, it's a mess. No-
one has come out of this with
their reputation intact, certain-
ly not the college council,
which did everything wrong."
The saddest aspect of the
whole story is that the Wilson-
Smith regime actually showed
real signs of promise. What had
always appeared an embattled
institution looked like having
a chance of making real
progress under their control.
Dr Smith, a Harvard gradu-
ate, was seen as the harbinger
of a new era a capable acade-
mic with a real sense of mis-
sion. Many lecturers felt he was
making a difference, neutralis-
ing destructive factions and
pushing ahead with plans to
achieve university status by
2007.
Indeed, there was a sizeable
section of the faculty that want-
ed him to carry on, in spite of


what can only be interpreted
as a catastrophic misjudgment.
They felt that even plagiarism
was forgiveable in the interests
of the greater cause.
But wiser heads saw only one
way forward a new president
for the new school year. They
felt that a college president
guilty of plagiarism is like a
police chief guilty of theft.
There were only two realistic
courses open dismissal or res-
ignation.
A COB source said: "It was
considered out of order to say
anything while Dr Smith was
ill. However, faculty reassem-
bles on August 18 and some-
thing needed to be said before
then.
"Last week, college gover-
nors were in conclave mulling
over the issue. My feeling was
that the college council would-
release a statement saying they
would grant him leave of
absence to attend to his illness.
I thought he was going to be
allowed to brazen it out, then
he would go."
Now it seems that executive
vice-president Rhonda Chip-
man-Johnson will take over as
acting president, delaying her
anticipated transfer to a senior
post in a government depart-
ment, with senior colleague
Pandora Johnson holding the
reins temporarily pending her
return.
A lecturer said: "In the past,
Chipman-Johnson been seen


as something of a dragon. But
now she's softened her image
by buying an Indiana Jones
style hat.
"All round, perhaps
Franklyn Wilson himself is the
best man for the job in the


been the appointment of Dr
Rodney Smith. I think his
intentions were good. He want-
ed to create a nice little preppy
school and Dr Smith seemed
to have all the right credentials.
"However, as time went on, I


"There is a strong

impression that the

report's recommendationS

are negative as far as Dr

Smith is concerned. The

general feeling on campus

is that he will not survive

this crisis, that he will be
granted a leave of absence

and then quietly disappear."

College of the Bahamas source


long-term. He has made a
major difference at COB. He
has cleaned up the college's
books, brought a new spirit of
dynamism to the place and
improved the campus.
"His one big mistake has


think the college's sponsors
began to see Dr Smith's
$220,000 pay package as a poor
investment."
Dr Smith's departure ends
what some critics have viewed
as "a comedy of errors" at


COB. It also marks what one
lecturer described as "a major
defeat" for Mr Wilson, who
now faces the task of finding a
long-time successor who can
be guaranteed to deliver the
goods.
It's unlikely, he feels, that
the private sector will ever
again get involved in
bankrolling a senior appoint-
ment of this kind because of
the devastation caused by the
Smith affair.
"It's hard to believe that pri-
vate business will put up mon-
ey for a remuneration package
at this level after this embar-
rassment," he said.
"I think the major challenge
for the government now is how
to deal with a wounded
Frankie Wilson."
Before Dr Smith's arrival,
Mr Wilson had conducted an
intense campaign to have Dr
Leon Higgs removed from the
presidency. He felt the Andros-
born academic was the wrong
man to lead COB to university
status.
He then went out on a limb -
a very thin and precarious limb
as it turned out to trumpet
Dr Smith's credentials, even to
the extent of canvassing busi-
ness support in putting togeth-
er a $220,000-a-year package,
including a $120,000 salary, pri-
vate schooling for his children
and very expensive accommo-
dation on the Eastern Road.
In the process, Mr Wilson


suggested he wars getting the
best, a world-class academic
who was going to pull up trees
at COB and make it the inter-
nationally-recognised institu-
tion he desperately wants it to
be.
What he got, in.fact, was a
man who, faced witih the task of
compiling a convocation speech
on academic integrity, plun-
dered someone else's work in
an attempt to add .gloss to his
own presentation. It's hard to
imagine a more damaging
offence. College chiefs on
$220,000 a year are expected
to have some thoughts of their
own.
Far from walking on water,
as Mr Wilson led everyone to
expect, Dr Smith sank without
trace after his plagiarism was
exposed. Few expected him to
resurface as president of COB,
and their predictions have
proved right.
Only Mr Wilson's most
implacable enemies will find
anything to smile about in this
lamentable tale of false hopes
and broken dreams. Others will
be left to wonder if COB will
ever get its act together and a
lay a sound base for a bright
future.
But, with Dr Smith now offi-
cially out of the picture, at least
the way is clear for the college
to try again.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










TE TRBUENSIGHTMUU eb 2U, .zI I


"We want to (replace the president) as
,soxn as possible but let's recognise if you are
entertaining any candidate not employed in
the institution you have to recognise that
there is a possibilitythat they may not be
available before a certain period of time,"'.
Franklyn Wilson, chairman of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas Council announces
that COB is looking for a new president
after the resignation of Dr Rodney Smith.

"Shell has...decided to review whether
these expressions of interest will add addi-
tional value to the shareholders and to this
effect has entered into a due diligence
process withselectedparties.
"This does not mean that a deal has been


Week

agreed, or a final divestment decision has
been taken."
Shell Bahamas country managerLuis
Curti on the oil company's interest in sell-
ing its interests locally.

"These top executives have indicated that
all they are waiting for is to see what price
Shell will get, then Esso and Texaco will
follow suit.
"The Bahaias is a small market com-
pared to their future overall plans. "
Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie
Miller on speculation that along with Shell
Bahamas, Texaco and Esso are also inter-
ested in selling their interests in the
Bahamas.


FROM page 2C


Quotes of


be almost $60 million, said
Minister of Works and Utili-
ties Bradley Roberts, who
described the venture as "the
most significant domestic
undersea system being con-
structed anywhere in the world
right now".
The submarine cable, which
will be manufactured at Tyco's
New Hampshire plant, will be
constructed throughout the
islands of New Providence,
Andros, Exuma, Long Island,
Acklins, Inagua, Mayaguana,
San Salvador, Crooked Island,
Cat Island, Eleuthera, Abaco,
Rum Cay and Ragged Island.


THE three major oil compa-
nies in the Bahamas Shell,
Esso, and Texaco are all
reportedly looking into the
option of selling their retail
interests in the Bahamas, The
Tribune was told last week.


Talks of Shell's sale have sur-
faced recently and numerous
retail owners have reportedly
been contacted by bidders
offering them the option to be
potential shareholders in the
company buy out.
It is believed that there are
six groups bidding for Shell's
interest in the Bahamas, three
of which.are Bahamian.
Minister of Trade and Indus-
try, Leslie Miller said that he
also received information from
top executives at Esso and Tex-
aco who say that they are now
waiting to see what Shell will
be sold for, and will use that
as a gauge for their possible
sale.


FOLLOWING "fruitful"
meetings with PetroCaribe rep-
resentatives last week, Minister
of Trade and Industry Leslie
Miller said yesterday that the


...


Bahamas is positioned to
receive its first supply of fuel
from Venezuela as soon as
.September.
Describing PetroCaribe as
an "enhancement of the Cara-
cas and other accords", Mr
Miller continued to push for
the deal that he signed along
with 13 other Caribbean coun-
tries with Venezuelan presi-
dent Hugo Chavez on June 29.
Mr Miller has been lobbying
for the idea of PetroCaribe for
more than two-and-a-half
years, promising that the deal
would bring lower gas prices
to Bahamian drivers, and over-
all relief in resulting energy
costs.
However, PetroCaribe has
come under constant fire since
its inception, with some
activists calling the deal a
"bribe" by President Chavez
to win political support for
Venezuela in the Organisation
of American States (OAS).


lilji i;l_ ___


MUONUAY, AUUUS 1 6, 200UU, r t-A 3


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4C, MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2005


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.. ...... = .............. ............................................................................................................................... I .......... .- ............


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


OPTHE IAMI HhAL



OPINION


JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBUSHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


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S A S o9 S & *6 S


EDITORIAL EXCERPTS


On the death of Dr. John Garang


* From The Standard, Nairobi, Kenya

In a cruel irony of fate, the man who fought
for the freedom and justice of southern Sudan
for 20 years, Dr. John Garang, is dead. Garang
died on Saturday in a helicopter crash, only
three weeks after he was sworn in as the Suda-
nese vice president and the president of south-
ern Sudan.
His death is a big blow to the people of
Sudan and to the fragile peace agreement that
came into effect beginning this year.
It is usually the fate of great men that they
sometimes do not live long enough to see the
full realization of what they fought for: Moses


On Saudi Arabia

* From the Daily Telegraph, London

The silky transition of Crown Prince Abdul-
lah to the Saudi throne has been met with grate-
ful relief all around. Nobody expected there to
be any real trouble. But these days you never
know.
So out goes one bearded, berobed friend of
the West, and in comes another. The new man
is confidently expected to continue in the anti-
terror, pro-oil-for-all traditions of his predeces-
sor. He may go even further and do something
serious about bringing a little democracy to the
place.....
The current golden economic glow is illu-
sory and actually reinforces one of the king-
dom's structural problems its dependence
on oil revenues for its prosperity and stability.


did not see Canaan in spite of leading his peo-
ple there and ascending Mount Horeb to take a
glimpse of the country. Garang had the short-
lived benefit of seeing a new Sudan and laying
the framework of a new government. It is on his
efforts that peace is flourishing in Sudan today.
These efforts must not go to waste. While
Sudan and indeed the entire Africa mourns the
death of a great warrior, there is no bigger
honor that Sudan can accord Garang than to
ensure that what he started goes on, that the
Sudan he desired pushes on and that the largest
country in Africa does not degenerate into
chaos again. Africa has surely lost a great war-
rior and leader.


Demands for greater democracy, on the
other hand, are unlikely to,present a major
headache for the new monarch. Reform loses
its appeal in times of prosperity.
It is, anyway, the preoccupation of a small
number of Western-educated sophisticates
who are greatly outnumbered by a conservative
majority whose loyalties are to family and tribe
and to the harsh form of Islam that is the twin
pillar of the state....
The Saudis may not be democrats and are
unlikely to become so any time soon.
We may not like their apparent profligacy
and refusal to endorse modern mores. But
strange times make for'strange friendships.
This is one we would do well to sustain and
nurture.


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