Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00172
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: August 4, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00172
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"CHECK OUT OUR
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----- PARTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.207 THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005 PRICE 500


Bahamasaip cash 'd isappeaPrs


Employee is


suspended


after $65,000


goes missing


* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
A .REASU ,Yemployee
at Bahamasair was suspend-
eda-for-14-days-after $65;000
unexpectedly "disappeared"
from the airline's safe in its.
administrative office on Coral
Harbour road.
The missing money consist-
ed of $20,000 in cash and
$45,000 in cheques, which
were payable to the airline.
: According to Bahamasair's
general manager Paul Major,
the employee said that the
money had been in the air-
line's safe last week Wednes-
day, but was missing when he
went to. make the deposit on
Friday morning:
"That morning (Friday), the
treasurer detected that a
deposit for $65,000 was not in
the safe where he purports to
have left it on Wednesday.
According to him it was there
on Wednesday. He said he
didn't go into the safe on
Thursday," Mr Major said.
Since then, police have
searched the cars and homes
of all the employees who work
in the treasury department at
the airline's administration
building.


"They did that last week
and since then we had no
good leads. But the matter is
still under investigation. Cer-
:tainly' nothing has, happened
'of this magnitude before.'
"Two or three months ago
an overnight deposit of $1,600
allegedly never reached the
Royal Bank. That also is still
under investigation.
"The employee in that
instance was not terminated
from the airline, but in this
case this employee has been
suspended for 14 days while
the investigation is ongoing,"
he said.
Mr Major maintains that the
airline has sufficient security
measures in place, despite the
recent problems. He insisted it
was now merely a matter of
ensuring that they are prop-
erly implemented.to prevent
future losses.
"The measures were always
in place, we now have to do
our best to improve them. The
safe does have a lock, but if
the custodian leaves the key.
in the desk someone can find
it.
"The investigation will
probably lead us to what hap-
pened, but, yes, we will
SEE page 14


BAHAMAS Food
Services workers take their
issue to the steps of the
Churchill Building
(Photo: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)
N By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
EMPLOYEES of
Bahamas Food Services
have been promised a meet-
ing with Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie after dozens of
them stormed in front of the
Churchill Building yester-
day.
Fearful of the company's
future, they tried as a group
to see Mr Christie, but were
stopped by police from
entering the building.
According to group
spokespersons, the employ-
ees believe their jobs may
be in jeopardy if the compa-
ny does indeed close its
doors this December as has
been hinted. Five hundred
employees would be affect-
ed.
Arnold Brown and Jessie
Goldman told The Tribune
that the employees have
been left in the dark about
SEE page 14


Three are found
after going
missing at sea
* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THREE men who were
missing at sea yesterday could
have had assistance earlier if
they had had safety or com-
munications equipment on
board the vessel.
Bancroft Thompson, Ben
Martin and Zhivago Martin
were scheduled to return
home from a fishing trip at
4pm on Tuesday. However,
they did not return.
Chris Lloyd, operations
manager of Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association (BAS-
RA), told The Tribune, that
at 3pm yesterday they
received a radio call from a
private aircraft heading south
from Nassau to the Exumas.
The aircraft located persons
waving in a small boat match-
ing the description of the pre-
viously reported overdue ves-
sel, which reportedly was
going on a fishing trip to
SEE page 14


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
POLICE are appealing for
the family and relatives of a
toddler to have a "con-
science" and come forward
to claim him.
According to police press
SEE page 14


Flight grounded

after man gains

unlawful access
0 By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BAHAMASAIR flight was
held back at Fort Lauderdale
airport yesterday morning after
security personnel detained a
man who had unlawfully gained
access to the aircraft.
According to reports; a for-
mer employee of Bahamasair
was able to pass through US
airport security and board the
airline's Dash 8, which had just
arrived in Fort Lauderdale from
Freeport shortly after 9am.
Speaking with The Tribune,
Bahamasair managing director
Paul Major confirmed that offi-
cers of the Transportation Secu-
rity Administration (TSA) had
taken into custody a former
employee so far identified only
as 'Vince', who had been fired
from the airline for breaching
security protocols.
SEE page 14


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


he BAHAMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION








PA~ ~ I HUSL)A, AUGST 4,005CAHL TNBUN


Granting of pilots' work




permits 'not connected to




agreement over fare dispute'


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

DIRECTOR of Immigra-
tion Vernon Burrows said the
granting of work permits for
four Western Air pilots was in
no way connected to an agree-
ment reached in a fare
dispute between the compa-
ny's owner Rex Rolle and
Immigration Minister Vincent
Peet.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday Mr Burrows said he
wanted to clarify the depart-
ment's position on comments
made by Mr Rolle which


Decision came 'after


investigation into matter'


appeared in Tuesday's Tri-
bune.
In that article, Mr Rolle said
that after he and Mr Peet came
to an agreement, the
pilots' work permits were
approved.
Mr Burrows told The Tri-


bune that the decision to grant
the work permits came after
the department's investigation
into the matter and not
because of an agreement being
reached between Mr Peet and
Mr Rolle.
He said he was not aware of




aFH BB apfB l


the details of any such agree-
ment.
Initially, the permits of six
pilots were denied because the
Department of. Immigration
determined that the pilots were
in the country illegally. The
department said it also felt the


permits should be denied
because the Bahamian talent
pool was sufficient to fill the
position.
Western Air countered that
there were no Bahamians qual-
ified to fly the Fairchild Metro,
which is the only type plane
the Andros-based charter com-
pany owns.
It said the department's deci-
sion crippled the company,
causing management to imme-
diately downsize the operation.

Flights
The owners of the company
also claimed that Minister Peet
owed them more than $95,000
in bills for flights he booked
between New Providence and
his constituency of North
Andros and Berry Islands.
Last week, the Rolle's attor-
ney Desmond Bannister told
The Tribune that an agreement
had been reached between his
clients and Mr Peet's attorney
regarding that bill.
He would not however elab-
orate on the details.
Mr Burrows explained that
after the six permits were ini-
tially denied, the Rolles
re-applied for four of the
pilots.
According to Mr Burrows,
there was' a communication
problem in the first applica-
tion, in that the department
was not aware that there were
no Bahamians qualified to fly
the planes.
At the time of the second
application, he said the depart-
ment was satisfied that the
work permits were essential to
the operation of Western
Air.


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
WHENEVER allega-
tions of brutality arise in
connection with the
Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre, it is a cause of
concern for the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
and the nation, said the
Force's public relations
officer Darren Henfield.
Last week, a Cuban
refugee alleged he was a
victim of brutality perpe-
trated by two Defence
Force officers at the
Detention Centre.
Last week Thursday,
Acting Minister of Labour
and Immigration Obie
Wilchcombe confirmed
that the refugee claimed to
have been beaten, and shot
twice with rubber bullets
by the officers.
The case is not the first
time detainees have
alleged being abuse at the
centre.

Reports
"Anytime in a place like
the Detention Centre
where individuals are
detained and reports of
brutality persist it is a
cause of concern for the
Defence Force and the
nation as a whole for obvi-
ous reasons," said Mr Hen-
field.
Director of immigration
Vernon Burrows said that
law enforcement officers
are often accused of bru-
tality or inappropriate
behaviour, and that an
investigation is always con-
ducted to uncover the
truth.
"Out of the vast majority
of complaints against law
enforcement officers, after
investigation is carried out
officers were cleared of
any wrong doing. Histori-
cally majority of persons
who made the complaints
were found to have exag-
gerated the facts," said Mr
Burrows.
All Defence Force offi-
cers have basic training in
human rights and how to
treat people in their cus-
tody, said Mr Henfield.
He said the Defence
Force did its usual initial
investigation into the latest
allegations and handed the
matter over to the police
for a full and impartial
investigation.


tUQ-a


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IHE TRIBUNE


PAUl- 2, I HUHSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


9 ql Q
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Asbestos l e aio B

'will be ine's t iiated


'will" beivsiate',


N By KARAN MINNIS


ASBESTOS may have been used to build
the first homes in Yellow Elder and may be
putting the lives of residents at risk, claimed
human rights activist and Haitian lawyer Eliez-
er Regnier.
Speaking to the Parliamentary.Secretary in
the Ministry of Environmental Health Ron
Pinder, who was a guest on the Darold Miller
show yesterday, Mr Regnier said that the sit-
uation needs to be investigated.
It is Mr Regnier's belief that the first homes
in the Yellow Elder subdivision have been
constructed with the materials containing
asbestos.

Risk
Asbestos is a harmful mineral fiber that
has been found to cause an increased risk of
the lung cancer mesothelioma.
Responding to the comments made by Mr
Regnier, Mr Pinder said that the allegations
will be investigated.
According to Mr Regnier, he had learned
about the issue from a 1960's Tribune news-
paper advertisement, which announced the
development of the Yellow Elder subdivision
and listed asbestos as one of the building com-.
ponents.
In the past, asbestos, which can be only be
positively identified by a special type of micro-
scope, was added to a variety of products to
strengthen them and to provide heat insulation
and fire resistance.


* By KABIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE 2005 hurricane season may
become the most active season on
record, the National Hurricane
Centre (NHC) in Miami
announced yesterday as it updated
its forecast to include an increased
number of projected storms.
The National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NQAA) in the United States is
warning that the season will be
stormier than previously predicted,
producing up to 21 tropical storms,
11 of which may become hurri-
canes.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Chief Meteorolo-
gy Officer Basil Dean said that
with the increased number of pre-
dicted storms, the probability of




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PARLIAMENTARY Secretary in the
Ministry of Environmental Health Ron Pin-
der said the allegations will be investigated.

Until the 1970s, many types of building
products and insulation materials used in
homes contained asbestos.
Common products that might have con-
tained asbestos include steam pipes, boilers,
furnace ducts, resilient floor tiles, cement
sheets, door gaskets, soundproofing or deco-
rative material, patching and joint compounds
for walls and ceilings, textured paints, cement


the Bahamas being hit by a hurri-
cane also goes up.
"The cyclone development this
year has been unprecedented.
We've already had a record-num-
ber of eight named storms so far,
and only 15 were predicted.
Once we reach the statistically
busy period this year, that num-
ber will easily be eclipsed," he said.
Yesterday afternoon, a tropical
depression south-west of Bermuda
became Tropical Storm Harvey.
Travelling at 60mph, Harvey is
the earliest named eighth storm
.on record. ....
Calling for a 95 to 100 per cent
chance of an above-normal 2005
hurricane season, US forecasters
say that the bulk of the season's
storms are still to come.
NOAA now expects an addi-
tional 11 to 14 tropical storms from
August through November, with
seven to nine becoming hurricanes,
including three to five major hur-
ncanes.

Storms
Gerry Bell, lead meteorologist
on NOAA's Atlantic Hurricane
Seasonal Outlook, said: "Although
we have already seen a record-set-
ting seven tropical storms during
June and July, much of the sea-
son's activity is still to come."
Initially NOAA projected 12 to
15 tropical storms for the season,
with seven to nine becoming hur-
ricanes, of which three to five were
predicted to become major hurri-
canes.
"The tropics are only going to
get busier as we enter the peak of
the season. This may well be one of
the most active Atlantic hurricane
seasons on record, and will be the
ninth above-normal Atlantic hur-
ricane season in the last eleven
years," director of NOAA's
National Weather Service David
L Johnson said yesterday in a press
statement.
For Bahamians, Mr Dean said, it


roofing, shingles, and artificial ashes and
embers.
According to the Department of Environ-
mental Health, most people who are exposed
to small amounts of asbestos do not develop
any related health problems.
"However, if disturbed, asbestos material
may release asbestos fibers, which can be
inhaled into the lungs.
"The fibers can remain there for a long
. time, increasing the risk of disease. Asbestos
material that would crumble easily if handled,
or that has been sawed, scraped, or sanded
into a powder, is more likely to create a health
hazard," said Anthony Ryan, senior labora-
tory technician.
According to the US Environmental Pro-
tection Agency website, the risk of lung can-
cer mesothelioma increases with the number
of fibers inhaled.
The website said that persons who get
asbestosis, "another related lung disease, have
usually been exposed to high levels of asbestos
for a long time.
"The symptoms of these .diseases do not
usually appear until about 20 to 30 years after
the first exposure to asbestos."
The website also stated that once the mate-
rial is in good condition it will not release
asbestos fibers and there is no danger unless
fibers are released and inhaled into the
lungs.
The Department of Environmental Health
recommends having a specialist come in to
check your home if you suspect it may contain
asbestos especially if it is damaged in anyway
way.


is now the time to start 10 named storms, six of which
preparing for the active months become hurricanes.
ahead. However, the atmospheric and
"Although we have been lucky oceanic conditions favouring hur-
so far this year, the sensible thing ricane formation which were pre-
to do is to be prepared. This is the dicted in May are now in place.
time to complete roof and window These conditions, combined
repairs, to ensure that missing shut- with the high levels of activity
ters are replaced. already seen, make an above-nor-
"People should now make their mal season nearly certain, NOAA
properties safe, make sure that it is forecasters say.
free of debris," he said. The most hurricanes in a sea-
An average Atlantic hurricane son was 12 in 1969, and the highest
-"asimt'Vich rufirin i frt nefi if iiir5'V 6eftmilflfuanes was
through November 30, produces eight in 1950.




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0


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


Belt


--~~---








PG 4, THURSDAYiAUG USTT4,200T T I


SIR Stafford Sands cannot remain on the
Bahamas' $10 note because he was a racist
- a UBP racist at that. Apparently, that is the
Gospel according to the PLP.
But just who are racists in the Bahamas,
and can only whites be racists?
Racism is defined as the antagonism
between different races. However, if one
understands the Bahamas' "degrees of colour"
chart, racists can exist within the same racial
group. And so a black man, a white man, a
brown man, a yellow man, or a man of mixed
colour can all be racists in varying degrees. But
racists are also found within the same colour
chart a chart that moves from very dark at
the bottom, and becomes lighter as it moves
up the scale until it is near white at the top.
This determines a person's social desirability.
This yardstick is prevalent throughout the
West Indies. Of course, the lighter the skin
tone the more desirable the person.
We have often heard racial slurs bounced
back and forth within this group. To illustrate,
we recall meeting many years ago a very
attractive, ebony coloured Bahamian woman
who had caught the eye of an equally attrac-
tive, intelligent young man. The young man
had everything going for him. It was obvious
that however he chose to develop his talents,
he would be successful.
One day we broached the subject with the
young lady, suggesting that they would make
a handsome pair. "Oh, no," she retorted, curl-
ing her lips scornfully, "he's much too black for
me!"
In fact he was a shade lighter than she was,
but still that was too dark for her. Obviously
she was out to lighten her race. Years passed.
He left the Bahamas, married an intelligent
young woman of his own race, and together
they built a very successful business. As for the
Bahamian woman, she caught the "bright"
young man of her dreams and when we
say "bright" we are talking of skin tone only,
not intellect, a department in which he was
sadly lacking. They had a brood of children.
That's about all they had. But she probably
believed she had achieved her life's goal- at
least she had acquired for her children a little
"brightness" to lift them from the darkness.
Now they could inch up a little higher on the
colour chart.
There is a lot of racism in the Bahamas -
within all races, within all political parties. No
one can honestly point an accusing finger at
anyone else.
There was white racism during the UBP era.
There was racism in reverse during the PLP
era. It was understandable that after centuries
of being the underdog, years of repressed


resentment would be unleashed when the
dream of majority rule at last became reality.
The racial bitterness encouraged by the PLP
and the victimisation practised by that admin-
istration during that period left deep scars on
the Bahamian psyche. Only time and patience
will heal the emotional wounds.
During the radio talk show last week dis-
cussing Sir Stafford Sand's removal from the
$10 note, a caller pointed out that Sir Stafford
did not leave the Bahamas because he did not
want to live under black rule, rather the
hatred that was erupting in the country at the
time made it impossible for him to stay. He
told how Sir Stafford was harassed during the
period leading up to the 1967 election that
saw the PLP take the government from the
UBP. He said that from the time Sir Stafford
parked his car to walk the short distance to his
office, there was unpleasantness. In other
words Sir Stafford could not have continued to
live in peace in the Bahamas. And so he left --
although he returned home in death and is
buried in the Eastern cemetery.
Many Bahamians felt the same way both
black and white.
Sir Lynden came to power on the race card,
and every election he played that card to the
hilt. White people felt uncomfortable, even
unsafe, in their own country. Many people,
both long time residents and Bahamians left
the Bahamas during this period. Much damage
was done to human relations.
rS IMilo Butler is oilihe Bahamas' $20
noie ~iaot only the first Bahamian, but also
the ffrst black governor-general of the
Bahamas. During the colonial era we sat
through many hours when he was Mr Butler
and a member of the House of Assembly lis-
tening to his booming, threatening voice rever-
berating around the chamber as he shouted
with raised fist about how he was going to see
the white Englishman's blood flowing knee
deep on Bay Street.
Is this a racist? If the answer is "yes", then
how can Sir Milo, who verbally threatened
violence, stay on the Bahamas' $20 note, while
Sir Stafford, labelled a "racist", was taken off
the $10 note? Sir Stafford threatened no one,
instead he created an industry that gave poor
black Bahamians work year round.
It is for this reason that we recommend
that the image of the Queen be returned to
our bank notes. Bahamians are still too emo-
tional, too embittered, too blinded by hate to
decide objectively whose life's work has ben-
efited our people to the extent that it merits
recognition.
Tomorrow: Sir Stafford and Sir Lynden -
who are the racists?


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DULPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


Can only whites be racists?


EDITOR, The Tribune
THANK you for allowing
me space in your valuable col-
umn. Discussions have taken
place in the past concerning
whether Bahamians should be
allowed to gamble either by
way of a national lottery or at
the local casinos, and except
for a news release by the gov-
ernment a few weeks ago
there has not been discussions
on this topic.
The arguments for and
against introducing a national
lottery for Bahamians are
rather interesting; proponents
have proffered convincing
arguments stating, among oth-
er things, that a lottery plainly
supports educational, medical,
sporting and other social insti-
tutions. Whereby opponents
have stated that lottery fund-
ing tends to remain
unchanged as these same insti-
tutions evolve. Accordingly
the opponents believe that
because of this defective
result, the argument of social
funding becomes null and
void.
Regarding the proponents
of a national lottery, at first
glance their views appear to
be logical and more impor-
tantly; truthful. As a matter
of fact, the theory that a
national lottery can support
social funding appears to be
a genuine solution to funding
woes that constantly plague
education and sports pro-
grammes. Concerning sports,
proponents argue that it will
relieve parents, coaches and
athletes of the worries of find-
ing sponsors each year; while
with education it is generally
believed that funding will pro-
vide better facilities, lower
tuition costs and assist with
paying teachers. In the end
how truthful are these asser-
tions?
It is not denied here, and
data has shown that the ini-
tial cash injection does in fact
assist organizations. Howev-
er, what is also true is that
when this rationalisation mask
has been removed, one sees
that gambling does not
improve social funding but
instead if adversely affects the
family income, values and
goals. Further, most of the
studies show that neither the
rich nor the poor are as nega,


tively affected by gambling as
the middle and upper class
families. And it is said that
these are the very two classes
which act as stabilisers in any
country's economy.
It is asserted that the oppo-
nents to a national lottery
have it right. They have con-
cluded that it is futile to imple-
ment a national lottery
because it inevitably fails in
its original objective which is
the supporting of education-
al, medical or sports funding.
Further, the second tier of
opposing a national lottery is
more relevant than that of the
first. In reality, the main aim
of implementing a national
lottery to the Bahamas is not
to support social funding as is
constantly submitted by pro-
ponents but it is more a veiled
attempt to legitimise a repug-
nant act by tying it to a social
good. Whenever there is a
need to justify an act, then the
act itself must be unreason-
able; therefore a social ill such
as gambling need not be legit-
imised.
Whether we agree or nor.
there are foundational truths
that societies are built on.
Whether modern or tribal,
secular or religious, a society
which abides not only by the
legal definition of the rule of
law but by an inherent under-
standing of what is good or
just tends to be a stable soci-
ety.
This is the very same stabil-
ity that prevents anarchy.
Meaning, just because gam-
bling is considered a popular
pastime with Bahamians does
not mean that it is good for
Bahamians. Unfortunately,
whenever an act such as this
happens and no reasonable
resistance is voiced through-
out society then a vacuum is
created. This vacuum is called
a compromise.
No matter how we as
humans force things, there is
no circumventing these foun-
dational truths when trying to
build a stable society. The
ingredients of these truths are
ethics, morals, determination,
focus, mind expansion, study,
hard work, smart work, inno-


vation, inspiration and cre-
ativity. Citizens in any society
who exercise these qualities
have consistently rendered
unnecessary the need to legit-
imize a social ill in the name of
wealth creation or recreation.
Some may argue that par-
liament cannot legislate
morality or that freedom of
choice is what a modern soci-
ety is based upon. These
views, at a cursory glance,
sound very appealing however
they are indeed fallacious in
that the more freedom one
acquires, the more responsi-
ble one is to be held for his or
her actions.
The following are some of
the negative effects of gam-
bling on a society that
researchers have found.
The effects on college stu-
dents, who are of the view that
the lottery can provide a
dream world for them.
The single-parent house-
hold.
Lotto-funded projects
remain flat and do not
increase with inflation and
social expansion, therefore, as
time goes by more schools or
educational institutions to be
constructed, the projected fig-
ures which are set aside for
the fund would not increase
and gain becomes of little or
no effect.
It is deemed to be good
for a one time economic boost
but has never solved a gov-
ernment's fiscal policies.
The households that will
spend more on lotteries, is Said
to be the middle anid slightl,y
upper middle-class family'andi
not the lower income family
because they have to spend
their disposable income on
more immediate needs.
In saying this, we as a nation.
must be determined to set
utopian economics aside. Wei
must be made aware that we
cannot create a nation of mil-
lionaires contrary to basic
foundational truths. Attempt-,
ing to do otherwise is not only:
misleading but it can be dev-
astating on our country's.
social fabric. "Just because
people will do it anyway" is.
not a strong enough reason to
seek legalising gambling.
DWAYNE J HANNA
Nassau
July 15 2005


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST -.


Magistrate 'failed to tell ..
\/ ITIT^T^ *

the Majors their rights'

THE lawyer for Dwight and
SKeva Major continued his sub-
S missions in the couple's habeus
corpus application before
Supreme Court Justice Jon
Isaacs yesterday.
kLawyer Michael Kemp
argued that a magistrate in a
lower court had not treated his
clients' case fairly. yO LM
Mr Kemp told Justice Jon
Isaacs that when dealing with r O
Dwight and Keva Major's extra- The Tribune wants to hear
dition case, Magistrate Linda from people who are
Virgill failed to inform them of making news in their
their rights. neighbourhoods. Perhaps
He said that it is the magis- you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
trate's duty to advise extradi- for improvements in the
tion defendants of their rights in area or have won an
such a case. award.
He said July 30, 2003, the If so, call us on 322-1986
Magistrate had informed them and share your story.
that she was satisfied that a pri-
ma facie case had been estab-
lished and that they would be
extradited in 15 days.
The Majors however had
mounted no defence, he said.
Mr Kemp also argued that
the Magistrate failed to advise
his clients, as a statutory act of
caution, that any statements
they made in court could be
used as evidence against them.
He further said that his
clients were not informed that
they could give evidence in the
case nor that they could call
on witnesses to give testimo-
ny.
The matter resumes in the
E DWIGHT and Keva Major (centre), pictured in 2003 Supreme Court today.

MP thanks police for



festival achievement


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre i
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


RTROPICALA
MERMINATORL
2 5
ETPEST CONTROL
7PHONE: 322_21 R
TS _E
S2-2151
UST




P T
SCHEDULE
CM TL
THURSDAYUL
AUGUST4
0 00


Community Pg./1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean News Update
Immediate Response
Ethnic Health America
Spiritual Impact
Mr. Ballooney B.
Treasure Attic
Bishop Leroy Emmanue
Gilbert Patterson
Rizen
Gospel Grooves
News Update
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Legends From Whence
Came: Tommy Robinsor
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Da' Down Home Show
Black College Talent Hoi
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
*Community Page


N -T1 r v


i


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter


MP for Fox Hill and minister
of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell last night thanked
police for making the Fox Hill
annual festival a success.
He also called for better
camaraderie, prudent planning,
and more support from the Fox
Hill community in making the
area's annual festival a contin-
ued success.
"I know that some of you
were concerned about what
appeared to be a fall off in the
e crowds that attended Junkanoo
on Monday morning.
"Some have suggested that this
was because of the Junkanoo
parade in Grand Bahama.
-"I do not agree but I think it
is important this year, as you
do every year, to conduct a
thorough post-investigation on
what went right and what did
not go right this year.
"When the Junkanoo parade
We was announced in Grand
n Bahama with the distortions as
a result of the huge prize mon-
ey supplied by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, in my
view there was not a sufficient
ur marketing response.
"By that I mean, if you look
at the Fox Hill Festival as an
entertainment product as it is,
and the fact that on this week-
end it competes normally with
excursions to the Family
Islands, the Grand Bahama


experience was new.
"It cannot therefore be
assumed that everyone would
know that Junkanoo continued
in Nassau in Fox Hill. We have'
to get the message out. In oth-
er words, more vigorous mar-
keting and advertising may
have helped. There were many
people who did not know that
there was Junkanoo in Fox
Hill," he said.
Mr Mitchell said that, as all
the major groups patronised the
Grand Bahama event, it might
have been more prudent to
"invest more time and effort" at
working with other groups.
"The fact is that whether or
not there is Junkanoo in
Freeport, Fox Hill's Emanci-
pation Junkanoo will continue,
and there is an audience of Nas-
sauvians who will come to Fox
Hill, if they know, if it is prop-
erly organised which it usually
is and if the activities up here
are considered safe, secure and
clean fun.
"In this connection, I wish to
congratulate the chairman and
his committee for doing just
that, organising a safe, clean
and fun festival where there
were no incidents.
"We also attempt to ensure
that the grounds are kept clean
of garbage, and that there is
sufficient police presence to
ensure that order is kept and if
anything is amiss that it is
brought under control quick-
ly," he said.


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PAG iUHSDAY, AUG 200 ....HETOCLUNE


DJ celebrating




life in Jamaica


, A POPULAR Jamaican DJ
and presenter will mark her
country's independence by per-
forming in the Bahamas.
,,Jamaicans living in the
Bahamas will be joined by vet-
eran broadcaster Dorraine
Samuefs-Binger at a street con-
cert on Saturday to mark the
4,rd anniversary ot Jamaica's
independence.
,- The event is being hosted by
the Bahamian branch of West-
ern Union in the Bahamas,
which hopes to stage a "first-
,qass independence celebration"
.jr Jamaicans living in the coun-
try. The company said the cel-
pbration will take the form of a
,treet party at the Fidelity Bank
Bahamas and Western Union
Location on Frederick Street.
"The parking lot will be con-
yprted into a colourful festive
ste with Jamaican cuisine and
beverage offered from colour-
fully decorated tents," said the
company in a statement.
- The organisers plan to offer


free Red Stripe beer, Appleton
rum, Coca Cola and Dasani
water for the duration of the
event, which will take place
from noon to'9pm.
"Delicious, authentic
Jamaican food will sold to all
in attendance by popular
Jamaican entities such as Orig-
inal Patties, Beverley's Kitchen,
and Premium Patties.
"There will be card and domi-
noes games and lots of give-
aways and treats for all in atten-
dance," the company said.
Dorraine's performance is the
highlight of the event.
There will be a live radio
broadcast on 1OOJamz radio sta-
tion in conjunction with popular
Jamaican radio station RJR.
"Jamaicans here in the
Bahamas will therefore have
the opportunity to send 'live
shout outs' and independence
greetings to family in Jamaica
via this medium," Western
Union explained.
Malvern Bain, vice-president


of Fidelity Bank Bahamas, the
local agents for Western Union,
expressed her gratitude "to the
Jamaican community for their
patronage over the years.
"This is just a small way to
show our appreciation for the
support given to the Western
Union business in the Bahamas
and to wish them a Happy Inde-
pendence," she said.
Dorraine Samuels-Binger has
commanded the Jamaican air-
waves for over 24 years at
Radio Jamaica Limited.
Her initial programme, Sun-
day Magazine was followed by
the Jamaica Today show.
She also co-hosted the suc-
cessful game show Price Tag with
the late Larry Nieman, as well
as several Newsline broadcasts.
Dorraine is a former board
member of Radio Jamaica and
chief union delegate. She was
also on the board of the
Jamaica Foundation for Chil-
dren and works closely with sev-
eral service organisations.


* ALFRED Gray


"Copyrighted Materiall

am-Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Provide


By KARAN MINNIS
AGRICULTURE and Fish-
eries Minister Alfred Gray
.. began a-- four-4ay--v-isit-to-
Havana on Tuesday following
an invitation from the Cuban
government.
According to a report in the
Cuban press, the invitation has
given the minister with the
opportunity to meet with the
agriculture and fishing special-
ists, researchers and officials in
Havana in order to establish
bilateral agreements with Cuba.
The Prensa Latina Press
quoted Mr Gray as saying that
it is important to-work in a co-
ordinated way to promote col-
laboration and exchange to
achieve a stable result in the
region.
According to the Prensa Lati-
na website, Mr Gray said the
BIhattrasrhas-a-populatioir of
almost 300,000 and gets more
than five million tourists a year,
and therefore needs to meet
food demands through efficient
agricultural production.
"I am sure bilateral agree-
ments will allow us to devise a
formula with the support of
Cuban specialists in this area,
to improve our islands' agricul-
tural capacity," Mr Gray is
quoted as saying.
-Aeeordin-g-te-4he-P-rensa.
report, the minister said it was
important to strengthen agri-
,.r culture and tourism links
rs between countries in the region.
The Tribune attempted to
contact Agriculture and Fish-
eries Permanent Secretary
Camille Johnison abouit-the ifin-
istry's position on the visit.
However, Mrs Johnson
declined to comment.
She replied through her office
that when Mr Gray returns, he
*will respond to questions from
the press.


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PUBLIC CONSULTATION
on
An Application by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited to Modify its Monthly Rates/Prices For Telephone Lines

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) invites comments from consumers
and providers of telecommunications services on its consultation document on an
application by The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) for
permission to increase its monthly rates/prices for telephone lines.

On June 20, 2005 BTC submitted to the PUC an application to increase its
monthly rates/prices for telephone lines for business and residential customers. The
application is designed to more closely align BTC's prices to the underlying cost of
providing services.

Section 8.5 of the Telecommunications Sector Policy (TSP) stipulates the
key principles of government's tariff policy including the rebalancing of telephone
prices towards cost orientation. Section 6(1 )(h) of the Telecommunications Act, 1999
stipulates that one, of the functions of the Commission is to regulate the prices that
may be charged by a licensee who is Dominant in a relevant market in accordance
-with the provisions of subsections (6) and (7) of section 9. BTC is the only
telecommunications company in The Bahamas that has been declared dominant.

Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, requires the Commission to act
in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory manner and consistent
with the objectives of the Telecommunications Act.

The main objective of this consultation is to
(a) inform the public and stakeholders of BTC's
application for approval of increased monthly
rates/prices for telephone lines;
(b) explain the rationale behind the rates; and
(c) invite comments from the public.

Copies of the Public Consultation Document can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House at 4th. Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded
from the Commission's website at www.PUCBahamasgov.bs. Written comments
should be submitted by September 16, 2005 viapost, hand delivery, facsimile or
e-mail to:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P.O. Box N-4860, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue -
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: (242) 323-7288
Email: info@pucbahamasgov.bs
The PUC will supplement its standard consultation approach by arranging public
meetings so that consumers and interested parties can-ask questions-or-nake-oraL
comments. The dates of the meetings will be announced in the media by the PUC.


HI l p


PAGE .;, i --HUSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE_-TBIBUNE.


ALIM








THETRBUN TURDAYAAGUS 4E205,PAEI


* MEMBERS of the Public Transit Association came to Rawson Square to witness the signing of a new communication system
designed for the public bus service, this was signed by president Reuben Rahming.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)




PTA signs contract for




communication system


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Public Transit Associa-
tion yesterday signed a contract
with the company Marine Tech
for a state-of-the-art communi-
cation system.
The new system, which
includes radios in all buses that
are connected to a central oper-
ator, is expected to cost almost
$250,000.
Once completed, association
president Reuben Rahming
said, the system will.enable
every driver to be contacted
immediately, allow communi-
cation between buses and
ensure that a central headquar-
ters is aware of the location of
every bus at any given time.


He said this would enable the
association to greatly enhance
the quality of service it provides,
because it would now b.e able
to regulate routes by spacing
out drivers.
For example, Mr Rahming
explained, instead of having two
buses pass an area at the same
time, they could space the bus-
es so that persons do not have
to wait for long periods of time
between buses.
He said this would also
improve the quality of service,
in that drivers would not have
to be overtaking other buses to
make more money.
In addition, if there is a prob-
lem on a particular bus, such as
a flat tyre, the operator would
then be able to call the nearest


bus to take over the route.
The new feature is also
expected to enhance security
for both passengers and drivers,
as drivers would have direct
contact with police in the event
of an emergency.
In order to maintain priva-
cy, Mr'Rahming said that each
bus driver would be outfitted
with a special headset which
would allow him to hear the
activity of the other buses,
without disturbing other pas-
sengers.
Yesterday's signing took
place in Rawson Square. Join-
ing Mr Rahming for the event
was Marine Tech representa-
tive Fred Wilson, whose com-
pany has agreed to supply 300-
350 buses with the radios and


install the equipment for the
central operator.He said the sys-
tem should be in place in four to
six months.


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
TWO American men and a
Bahamian were charged yes-
terday with trying to deposit a
fake cheque worth $57.2 mil-
lion in a local bank last week.
/ The three men appeared
before Magistrate Renee Mck-
ay and pleaded not guilty to
charges of possession of a
forged document, uttering a
'forged document and attempted
fraud.
The defendants, 71-year-old
John H Delph of Ohio, 61-year-
old Michael Gabriel of Florida
and 39-year-old Augustas Pin-
der of Garden Hills in New
Providence, were allegedly
found in possession of a forged
Central Bank of Nigeria cheque
'in the amount of $57.2 million
dollars on Wednesday, July 27.
According to initial reports
by police, the men attempted
to deposit the 57.2 million dollar
cheque, drawn on a Nigerian


Bank account, at the First
Caribbean Bank on Shirley
Street.
Bank officers reportedly
became suspicious when the
men presented the cheque and
immediately notified the police.
The two Americans, who are
being represented by attorneys
Murrio Ducille and Cecil
Hilton, were granted $20,000
cash bail.
The Bahamian, who is not
represented, was also granted
bail in the sum of $20,000 with
two sureties.
The matter was adjourned
October 12.
A 32-year-old Eleuthera
man pleaded not guilty to pos-
session of more than $12,000
worth of cocaine.
It is alleged that Preston
Cooper, of Wemyses Bight
Eleuthera, was found in pos-
session of a quantity of cocaine
which he intended to supply to
another.


According to the prosecution,
the drugs weighed one and a
quarter pounds.
Cooper was granted bail in
the sum of $20,000.
The matter was adjourned to
February 16.


Mitchell calls



for festival's



improvement


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOX Hill MP Fred
Mitchell has called on the
organisers of the area's annu-
al festival to keep the cele-
bration alive and well.
Mr Mitchell said that after
one or two hours, the audi-
ence at the Fox Hill Day fes-
tivities tends to get bored,
and encouraged the organis-
ing committee to think of
more activities to keep peo-
ple engaged.
"We must also seek to
flesh out the week with more
activities. This year there
were some gaps which could
be filled with activities.
"For example, on the day
after the official opening
there was no activity and it
was clear that the village was
expecting some activity.
"Persons turned out in fair-
ly significant numbers that
Saturday evening (July 30)
to honour Roberto McKin-
ney. So there was a market
available.
"So we must spend some
time over the next year fig-
uring out what further enter-
tainment opportunities we
can provide during our major
days Fox Hill Day and
Emancipation Day.
"You must also realise that
you have major competitor
in festival terms with Gam-
bier which now has a more
organised fun event which


being newer, will have
greater cachet. *
"We have to figure otft
how do we keep our audil
ence or our market in the
face of that competition," hlt
said. -,
Mr Mitchell encouraged
the members of the organic .
ing committee to scout oilt
the Gambier event, to s6'e
what could be used to make
the Fox Hill Festival more
entertaining.
"This is called markdi
research. Is it possible ti
,work with Gambier or witfh
Adelaide to develop things
which do not now exist bht
that can help enhance boill
experiences. '
"The more planned arid
organised we are, the greater
the resources we can get. 86
this year, I would wish ft
work with committee chai'
Charles Johnson to set sorile
of these plans in motion. :'
"You know my philoso-
phy; I do not believe that the
MP should be a part of thN,
committee, except in an Jo
officio or informal sense.
"This is to avoid any sut
gestion of partisan politiN
being involved in it. (.f
course, the MP has an intdt-
est because whatever hap"
pens at the festival, people
think that it is the MP whoyi
responsible.
"So I have to ensure thattit
goes well, but I do not hap
to run it," Mr Mitchell saik.


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Office Hours: Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 7
.I














Three things to avoid to





prevent business failure


WE NEED busi-
nesses in the
Bahamas to succeed, be they
foreign or Bahamian owned.
Some 160,000 workers
depend on businesses suc-
ceeding to pay their bills and
.-b.eyond that, to finance their.
dreams. Even many of the
24,000 government workers
would lose their jobs if the
rate of business failure
increases because businesses
generate much of the gov-
ernment revenue used to pay
their salaries.
This writer's definition of
business failure is simple.
When a business does not
generate sufficient profits
over a reasonable period of


time to convince the owner
to continue that business, the
business is failing.
Two things become imme-
diately clear in this definition.
First, it is the expectation of
the owner that matters most.
This is as it should be because
it is the owner who generates
the idea for the business,
invests the capital and must
continue to the bear the risks
of carrying on the business.
Second, success for the
business is not merely a mat-


STRAIGHT UP-TALK

ZH IVAR G LAI NG


ter of incgoMe__excee.diag...
-xpenses but rather it is a
matter of income exceeding
expenses at a level that satis-
fies the owner that he should
continue in that business.
Having consulted with
numerous Bahamian busi-
nesses over the last three
years, there are a number of
things causing many busi-
nesses to fail but three things
in particular stand out.
My projection is that over
the next 15 to 20 years, busi-


'" POOR BUSINESS
PLANNING

Sne, poor business
planning.; 'Ma niy
businesses in the Bahamas,
including large ones, ignore
the importance of planning
in their initial set-up and
ongoing operations. As a con-
sequence, many such busi-
nesses are ill-conceived,
flawed in their product and
service design, undercapi-
talised, inappropriately mar-
keted, poorly staffed, tech-
nologically handicapped,
inadequately lead, overly
insular and have inefficient
processes.
Planning enables a business
to gain insight and:foresight
about its operations' and the
environment in which they
take place. This leads to bet-
ter decision making, raising
profits, cutting costs and
improii6ving prospects:for the
future.

POOR CUSTOMER
SERVICE 7

T wo, poor customer
service. The Min-
istry of Tourism should not
be: surprised' that. so many vis-
itors to the Bahama..s com-
plain about. their' stay here.
The fact is that for too many
years Bahamians have been
complaining about the,treat-
ment they get froni employ-
ees of businesses in this coun-
try.
It is in many instances sim-
ply appalling.


ness failure in The Bahamas
will increase dramatically if
these things are not correct-
ed.
This projection is based on
the fact that businesses oper-
ating in and from within the
Bahamas will face increasing
competition and standards
compliance due to the effects
of globalisation and trade lib-
eralisation.
What are the three most
significant causes of business
failure in the Bahamas?


Far too many employees
treat customers, Bahamians
and foreigners, as if they are
doing those customers a
favour and as if those cus-
tomers have to do business
with them.
I suppose that if enough
businesses in an industry have
poor customer service, the
employees are right to
believe that customers
have no choice in where they
shop.
Be that as it may, poor cus-
tomer service in many
instances is damaging busi-
nesses and will cause their
failure.
What is clear is that the
attitude of many employees
is adopted from home but
perpetuated in the workplace.
Employers assume that their
employees know what good
customer service is.
This is a simply not true.
If those same employers
had an opportunity to
observe their employees
interact with others outside
the workplace, they might
quickly realise that their nor-
mal socialisation is course,
crude and lacking in the
finesse necessary to appeal to
the average customer.
It may not be that the
employee wants to be rude
and offensive but merely that
such behavior is regarded as
normal in their ordinary cir-
cles.
The only way to correct
this is training and lots of it.
Training means providing
opportunities to produce a
required skill on demand.
Seminars, courses-and the
like all help. Expenditure on
training is an investment and
it is a necessary expense.
Look at those businesses
with good customer service
and you will observe that
their investment in training
is commensurate with that'
service.


POOR GROWTH
MANAGEMENT

Three, poor growth
management. Some-
times, success can lead to fail-
ure. Many small Bahamian
enterprises come to enjoy sig-
nificant growth over time but
the owners fail to adjust their
administrative, financial and
technological systems to
accommodate the growth.
The result is that the busi-
ness begins to mishandle cus-
tomers, poorly manage cash,
neglect vendors, overlook its
workers and fall behind to its
competitors.
What results is a meteoric
fall that parallels its meteoric
rise.
In many instances, this fail-
ure to manage growth is
related to the failure to plan
properly because a part of
good planning is considering
an appropriate response to
growth.
We have many smart busi-
nesses in this country that are
doing extremely well; They
are succeeding because they
have a handle on the three
issues that we discussed
above.
Yet, there are many other
businesses in this country that
do not have a handle on these
issues and they are struggling
and struggling badly.
The bad news is that things
for them will only get worse.
The good news is that things
can get better but they must
take action.
My advice is find a busi-
nessperson with proven suc-
cess who may be willing to
help, and get their input.
Otherwise, financial and
business consultants can be
helpful. We need business
success and far more busi-
nesses can enjoy it than are
doing so: e ...
Success, however, is not an


accident, it comes by delib-
erate pursuit.
HOW ABOUT A NEW
BUSINESS POLICY FOR
THE GOVERNMENT?
.Government would be wise
enough to realise that busi-
ness success is the life blood
of the Bahamian economy. If
it recognises this, its policy
toward business should be
success-orientated.
This means, do what isi nec-
essary to help businesses
raise revenue, cut cost, max-
imise profits, reach out to
expanded markets, invest in
technology, avoid over-regu-
lation and focus on competi-
tiveness, local and global.
The tendejncyto mi-cro-
manage businesses for politi-
cal reasons should be avoided
at all cost.
"Let business live and
thrive for the good of the
state," should be the motto
of the government's business
policy.
Of course, when businesses
act illegal, unethically,
immorally, unsafely or in any
other way injurious to the
public interest, the govern-
ment should intervene.
Where none of these things
happen, the, best the govern-
ment can do is to stay out of
the way of business and let it
do what it does best; make
good money for owners and
keep people employed and
paying taxes. When this
works right, all will benefit,
including the worker who
may one day become an
employer.

THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
"When you are grateful,
fear disappears and abun-
dance appears."
Anthony Robbins


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"What is clear is that the
attitude of many employees is
adopted from home but
perpetuated in the workplace.-
Employers assume that their
employees know what good
customer service is Tl-a~
simply not true."


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE,








THETRIBUNETHURSDAYAUGUST42005PAGOCALNEWPAGE


* MARK Lusignan, director of the international services
directorate of Consulting and Audit Canada (CAC); Louis
Vadeboncoeur, acting chief executive officer of CAC; Ruth
Millar, financial secretary in the Bahamas Ministry of Finance;
Rowena Bethel, legal advisor to the Ministry of Finance.
Standing from left are Mr Ram Narayan, principal consultant
froom the international services directorate; Philip Smith,
Bahamian High Commissioner to Canada.

Canada and Bahamas

go to e-government


The governments of the
Bahamas and Canada have
signed an agreement for the
Department of Consulting and
Audit Canada (CAC) to pro-
vide consulting services to equip
the Bahamian public service
with e-government.
- The agreement was signed on
Monday at the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs and Trade in
Ottawa, Canada.
The engagement was recent-
ly approved by the Bahamian
Cabinet to advance the estab-
lishment of a national commu-
nications and information tech-
nology framework.
The project is expected,
among other things, to har-
monise all current e-govern-
ment initiatives, update the gov-
ernment's e-government policy
and assess a strategy for meet-
ing short-term (one year), mid-
term (three year) and long-term
(five to ten year) goals.
Bahamas Financial Secretary
Ruth Millar, who signed on
behalf of the Bahamas,
acknowledged Canada's pre-
eminence in e-government ser-
vices and welcomed the alliance
as one that would greatly assist
the Bahamas in meeting the pri-
mary challenge of ensuring that
users of its government services,
wherever they are located, have
equal opportunities to satisfy
their needs.


The CAC, under the direc-
tion of Mr Ram Narayan, will
lead the project.
The CAC team visited the
Bahamas in May for a prelimi-
nary scoping mission, which
involved dialogue with various
public and private sector stake-
holders.
The department has provided
similar consulting services to
other countries around the
world.
The deal was facilitated by
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
through the offices of Philip
Smith, the Bahamas High Com-
missioner to Canada.
Mr Smith, who attended the
signing ceremony, said Canada
is a natural choice as a provider
of electronic expertise.










-751U0


Hurricane shelters




are looked over


* BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT In preparation of a very
active hurricane season, the Department of
Social Services is busy updating the list of
hurricane shelters .and providing shelter
management training on Grand Bahama.
Lillian Quant-Forbes, assistant director
of social services in Freeport, said a new
shelter has been approved and added to
the list, which now comprises 15 designat-
ed shelters throughout the island.
The Church of God Fairfield on Set-
tler's Way is now a designated shelter,
which can accommodate a maximum of
100 persons.
"We know that there are still a number
of persons who have not yet recovered
from last year's hurricanes and we antici-
pate that with damages still outstanding a
lot more persons will go to shelters," she
said.
"We visit the shelters to see whether
they are suitable and have met all require-
ments. And we are going through and con-
stantly updating the list," she said.
Shelter management was initially the
responsibility of the Red Cross.
Following last year's hurricanes, the
Department of Social Services was man-
dated by government to operate hurricane
shelters throughout the Bahamas.
The department has been given the
responsibility of identifying shelters and
training persons to manage them.
In all, the 15 shelters can accommodate
more than 3,000 Grand Bahamians.
The department is currently hosting a
three-day shelter management workshop at
the administrator's office in Freeport,
where more than 100 persons are being
trained in shelter management. The Roy-
al.Bahamas Defense Force is conducting
the training sessions, which end on Thurs-
day.
Participants are being trained in first
aid, fire prevention and proper shelter
management skills.
Mrs Forbes said that training is very
important and should be done on consis-
tent basis. She noted that of the 110 par-
ticipants, not all would be identified as
shelter managers.
Taking over the management of shel-
ters on Grand Bahama has. been a chal-
lenge for the department. But Mrs Forbes'
j .., ;2 ".


S TRAINING in CPR


said they are reaching out to the commu-
nity for assistance.
This year, it is predicted that a total of 18
to 21 tropical storms will develop, with
nine to 11 becoming hurricanes, including
five to seven major hurricanes.
Mrs Forbes said persons utilising shelters
should remain calm and bring specific
items, such as a blanket, water, food, and
medication.
"We want to them to realise when they
come to the shelters they must bring these
specific things as we will only provide basic


items," she said.
The list of shelters are: First Baptist
Church, St Georges' high school,
Sir Jack Hayward high, Maurice Moore
primary, Living Waters Assembly of God
Church, Calvary Bible Church Hall, Cen-
tral Church of God, Christ the King
Anglican Church Hall, the Church of
Christ, Church of God Fairfield, Bethel
Baptist Church, Eight Mile Rock high
school gymnasium, Martin Town Com-
munity Church and Central Zion Baptist
Church Hall.


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE








L A


Grand Bahama resort


involved


with groups' fundraising efforts


OLD Bahama Bay Resort and Yacht
Harbour is luring local organisations "out
west" to have fun while at the same time
raising money.
The resort has launched a new "fun-rais-
er" programme offering special packages
and prices for fundraising events to be host-
ed at the resort.
Old Bahama Bay offers an alternative
location for events in Grand Bahama such
as receptions, banquets, "fun-raisers" or
other celebrations in one of its three restau-
rants.
,The Dockside restaurant overlooks the
marina and features indoor and outdoor
dining in a casual "charming" atmosphere.
Aqua, Old Bahama Bay's fine dining restau-
rant features an innovative Bahamian fusion
menu that reinterprets the presentation of
classic Bahamian delicacies.
The Straw Bar, located right on the beach
at the ocean's edge, offers cocktails, deli-
cious food and is the main location of most
celebrations. Special rates are also avail-
able to guests who want to stay over night in
a luxury room.
The resort said that persons or groups
can also take part in the many festive cele-
brations held regularly at Old Bahama Bay.
"Croon to the Moon" is a beach party
held each month on the Saturday closest to
the full moon. The party features cocktails
and dinner, a bonfire, karaoke, perfor-
mances by The West End Love Train, crab


*


- -~
- ~.- -


races for children and live karaoke.
The weekly junkanoo festival every
Thursday features a live "rake and scrape"
band, live Junkanoo "rush out" and the
chance to watch the resort chef bake bread
in the sand.
More than 50 representatives from various
local groups were invited to Old Bahama
Bay for lunch and a resort tour when the
,official launch of the "fun-raiser" pro-
gramme was held at the resort in June.
Bob Kramm, the chief operating officer
and Fred Moss, the food and beverage direc-
tor, toured the guests and discussed possible
ideas for "fun-raisers" and other events.
"It was a great opportunity to spend the
day at Old Bahama Bay Resort and Yacht
Harbour with colleagues from so many local
organisations.
"The property is magnificent, the lunch
was delicious and the presentations were
informative and filled with creative ideas
for all sorts of celebrations. The Rotary
Club of Freeport will definitely consider
hosting a future "fun-raiser" at Old Bahama
Bay," said Chris Guthro, president of the
Rotary Club of Freeport.
This first planned "fun-raiser" to be held
at Old Bahama Bay is "the Potcake Ball"
which will take place in August.
Proceeds from the event will benefit the
Grand Bahama Humane Society and the
gala will be held at sunset when guests will
be served dinner on the beach.' ,


Copyrighted Material


- : Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers"


A- - f


Rosetta St. Phone 325 3336


- -


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION
POSITION AVAILABLE FOR
COMMERCIAL MANAGER ELEUTHERA
Applications are invited for suitably qualified and experienced individuals for
the position of Commercial Manager with the Corporation's Eleuthera operations.
This is a Management position.

The duties the Commercial Manager will be expected to perform include but
are-not limited to maintaining collection efficiency standards, monitoring new
connections ensuring that charges are billed, fees are paid, orders generated/
carried out forwarded to the Corporation's Head Office for billing within agreed
time frames. Control cashiering activities in so much as cash draws are closed,
balacing reports prepared and approved, monies deposited, and reports forwarded
to the head office. Documents via work-orders all disconnections, reconnections,
and service requests, inclusive of fees payable. Assist in the administration of
local supplier accounts and handling of petty cash and floats.

Required Qualifications and Experience
Successful candidates must possess a minimum of the following qualifications
and experience:
BSc. Degree in Accounting or other relevant field of Business
Management from an accredited College or University and a minimum
of five (5) years post qualifying management level experience in similar
work with a similar organization.
Demonstration of having obtained average marks in one sitting of the
Certified Public Accountants (CPA) exams of 60% for all subjects OR
successful completion of at least two subjects OR equivalent results in
other comparable professional examinations.

Required Skills:
Good analytical skills
Good human relations skills
Ability to work without supervision.
Good computer skills
Ability to communicate both verbally and in writing
Ability to train support staff
Good accounting and business management skills
Good interpersonal skills

Starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Interested persons may obtain application forms from the Coropration's Human
Resources Division, #87 Thompson Boulevard, P.O.Box N-3905, Nassau
Bahamas or from any of the Corporation's operational office located on the
respective Island. The application form together with a detailed resume must
be returned to the Corporation;s Human Resources Division not later than
August 12 2005. Only qualified applicants need apply.


00


Cheese Bottom






L k:


---


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


Phone : 325 3336


Rosetta St.


*0-












'Tropical Night in White


at the Pelican Bay Resort


* By DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
Services
FREEPORT The Pelican Bay Resort
in Lucaya was the host for this year's
27th annual reunion of African-American
probation, parole and pretrial service
officers. /
*;Ihe resort's Yellow Tails Garden also
hosted the group's family celebration:-
'*tropical Night in White".
fYT.e family reunions are held each year
ifring the last weekend in July and are
describedd as having grown tremendously
tbtmore than 200 participating officers
ad their families and friends.
S!According to the organisers, the idea
Qioginated of the officers coming togeth-
er for family interaction and fellowship inl
Atlanta, Georgia in 1979.
At that time, a handful of dedicated,


pioneer officers who were the first
African-Americans to receive appoint-
ment in their respective courts got
together with the permission of the Chief
US probation officer and held the first
BUSPPOE (Black United States Proba-
tion and Pre-trial Service Employees)
family reunion.
The officers came together then and
now, it was stated, for the purpose of
identifying with other African-American
officers in the system, to bridge gaps,
increase networking, resolve common
concerns, build careers, enjoy family
vacations all over the world and nurturing
life-long friendships.
Bill Higgs Sr, retired deputy chief for
the Eastern District of Virginia, and Fred-
erick Rogers from the Northern District
of GeoTgia;- were--idetifi-a-
having envisioned the family reunion -
concept.


PTA in talks over public





transit management HQ


*-



as 4b- 4m0
00-mb0 f S -
4b * awm
__ ____ .l -


* By ADRIAN GIBSON

'PUBLIC Transit Associa-
tion president Reuben Rah-
ming said his organisation is
in talks with the government
to establish a headquarters for
public transit management.
According to Mr Rahming,
the association hopes to pur-
chase a property on East Hill
Street behind the police head-
quarters, to better coordinate
the transit community and
"benefit transportation in the
country."
He said that while the initial
response from the government
was slow, they met with Min-
-ister. for Transport and Avia-
tion Glenys Hanna-Martin to
discuss the acquisition of the
location yesterday morning.
"She promised us that she
would present it to Cabinet
and speak to us on Monday,"
he said.
According to Rahming, the
association is interested in


Association meets


with minister


establishing an agency through
which the public would have
direct access to the authori-
ties who manage transit.

Location
"This is where the daily
management of the bus sys-
tem will take place. It will
serve as a call up location for
certain routes, a routing and
communication center, a day-
start and day-end point where
all buses will be obligated to
stop in the mornings and in
the evenings."
He said that with the advent
of such a system "no one
would be kicked of off buses


in the evenings when the bus-
ing time is up.
"Because police headquar-
ters have fuel tanks, we can
liaison with them and use this
as a fueling point, that way
buses wouldn't-be making ran-
dom stops at gas stations with
passengers on board," Mr
Rahming added.
He told The Tribune that
the site would also serve as a
central revenue point, where
fares would be collected and
an electronic and revenue sys-
tem implemented.
"We also intend for it to be
a point where buses can be
fixed and serviced and for
fleet parking at the end of the
day," he went on.


It is also hoped that the
agency will be able to expand
local bus services currently, as
the location could serve as a
center for the recruitment,
training and retraining of
employees.
"Employees will be taught
first aid, defensive driving,
stress management and how
to deal with elderly and spe-
cial needs passengers" Mr
Rahming said.
He said that whilst the Pub-
lic Transit Association intends
to hire security guards, secu-
rity guards would only be
placed on buses if there is
public demand.
"Our actions here is to build
morale and perception, and
foster unity among our dri-
vers.
"These people are focused
and if the government does
not want to invest in us the
drivers are willing to invest
in themselves" Rahming
added.


. 0


- "Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content --
Available from Commercial News Providers"




4d


-


0 e -


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2Uuo, ..


40- .


O


6


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 2, THRSDA, AUGST 4,2005THE TIBUN


Exuma students



graduate from



programmes



in nursing


* By KRISTAL KNOWLES
Bahamas Information
Service
GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
- A group of female students
of the LN Coakley high school
in Georgetown, Exuma, grad-
uated on July 27 from the Min-
istry of Health's nursing cadet
summer programme.
The graduating ceremony
was held at St Andrew's Com-
munity Centre in George Town.
Exuma is the first of the Fam-
ily Islands to implement the
nursing cadet programme.
Nursing director Mary John-
son said the programme, ini-
tially established in 1996, tar-
gets students in the 10th though
12th grades.
The Future Nurses of the
Bahamas programme, which
targets students in grades five
through nine, began in 2001.
Mrs Johnson said during the
first few years of the nursing
cadet programme, sessions were
held on Saturday mornings
between 9am and 1pm in order
to avoid interference with
school work on week days. The
programme was later changed
to the summer months.
She said the programmes
serve as feeder for the associate
of science degree in nursing and
also for the certificate in the
trained clinical nurses pro-


Skills are needed for new

mini-hospital soon to open


gramme at the College of the
Bahamas.
The programmes, she added,
provide an opportunity for par-
ticipants to get a "bird's eye
view" of what the nursing pro-
fession is all about.

Glamourised

She noted that television
shows tend to highlight the
glamorous side of nursing,
where nurses work closely with
doctors, while the other side is
not shown.
The programmes, Mrs John-
son said, allow students to inter-
act with others with similar
interests and expose them to
nursing personnel and other
health care professionals who
can assist them in their career
goals.
Mrs Johnson said the nursing
cadet programme over the years
has greatly enhanced the
recruitment efforts of the Min-
istry of Health and generated
interest in other heath care
areas.
The Ministry of Health also


provides sponsorship to future
cadets and nurses in the associ-
ate of science and trained clini-
cal nurse programmes.
"Once participants sign into
the cadet summer nursing pro-
gramme, it is our commitment
to assist them in graduating as
nurses so we handle them care-
fully, coach them as it regards to
study habits, and encourage
them along the way so that they
obtain the necessary subjects
for entry into the nursing pro-
gramme," Mrs Johnson said.
She said the services of the
graduates will be needed in the
not to distant future when the
Ministry of Health opens its
new mini-hospital in Exuma.
Mrs Johnson urged the cadets
and future nurses to continue
to wqrk hard, study and pursue
their dream of becoming a
nurse.
She also called on parents to
continue to support youngsters
in fulfilling their dream as the
Ministry of Health strives to
increase its manpower and
enhance the quality of health
care and services to the people
of the Bahamas.


Protesters win


* CYNTHIA 'Mother' Pratt, speaking outside the Churchill Building, tells the workers of
Bahamas Food Services that she would like to help them, but the situation must be dealt with
rationally
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


* A BIG smile from Miss Bahamas 1967, Elizabeth Knowles, heralds the government's cour-
tesy and efficiency campaign of that year, as tourist figures neared the "one million a year"
mark. Elizabeth is seen at the straw market with examples of work by Nassau vendors. Photo:
Howard Glass, Bahamas News Bureau











THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.
P.O. BOX N-3048 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL. (242) 302-7000


TENDER FOR COURIER SERVICES


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to
invite qualified companies to submit tender for Courier Services.

Interested companies may collect a specification document from
BTC's administration building on John F. Kennedy Drive between
the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender for Couri(
Serviceand delivered to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administrative office on John
F. Kennedy Drive by 5:00pm on Tuesday, August 9, 2005

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


In Days Gone By


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION

POSITION AVAILABLE FOR

OPERATIONS MANAGER ABACO

Applications are invited for suitably qualified and experienced individuals for the
position of Operations Manager for the Corporation's Abaco operation. This is a
Management position.

The principal duties and responsibilities of the position include but are not limited
to the following:

Direct, co-ordinate and supervise the activities of employees engaged
in water production and maintenance of the well-fields, pumping sation
l* operation and maintenance, water treatment, water supply and distribution,
operation and maintenance of sewerage systems, and commercial
operations.
Supervision of the administrative activities of staff of the Abaco operations.
Prepare daily, weekly and monthly reports
Ensure that safety practices and the Corporation's policies and procedure
are adhered to

Required Qualifications
The successful candidate must possess the following qualifications and experience:
A minimum of a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil or Mechanical
Engineering from an accredited College or University and a minimum of five
(5) years post qualifying experience in a similar work with a similar organization
AND
Demonstration of having obtained the Engineering In Training (EIT)
Certificate OR
Professional Engineering Certification with two (2) Years post qualifying
management experience in similar work.

Required Skills:
Good analytical skills
Good supervisory skills
Good project management skills.
Ability to train support staff '
Good time management and human relations skills
Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing
Sound knowledge of business management
Must have good PC skills

Starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. Interested
persons may obtain application forms from the Coropration's Human Resources
Division, #87 Thompson Boulevard, P.O.Box N-3905, Nassau Bahamas. Completed
application form with an attached detailed resume must be returned to the Human
Resources Division not later than August 12 2005. Only qualified applicants need
apply.


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









audience with the Prime Minister


* CYNTHIA Pratt tells the workers of Bahamas Food Services, to "fight the fight in the smart
w "). She invited the spokesman of the group to a meeting with the Prime Minister and herself.


* NEVILLE Wisdom listens to digruntled workers from Bahamas Food Services in front of the
Clhurcjiill Building.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune Staff)


* ONE of the many signs of the Bahamas Food Services workers during a peaceful demonstration
in front of the Churchill Building yesterday.
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune Staff)


RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 13







PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4,2005 THE TRIBUNE'
LOCAL EWS


Police make appeal


tol

FROM page one

liaison Inspector Walter Evans
a toddler, who appears to be
two years old, was found on
Rose Street, opposite the SC
chicken shack, during the Fox
Hill emancipation day celebra-
tions on Monday. The child has
a dark complexion and at the
time he was found wore a red
and grey shirt, plaid trousers
and black sandals.
It is reported that after the


:oddler' s


child was found, police officers
informed the public during the
emancipation day festival by
passing on information around
the parade ground. But no one
came forward to claim him.
Inspector Evans said that
although the little boy is in
"safe keeping" the important
issue is that "the little boy
needs to be nurtured". He said
that "police have done their
part."
Woman police sergeant 1555


Debbie McCartney said that
on Tuesday, police made
efforts to locate the child's rel-
atives. She said that the child
was taken door-to-door in the
community in which he was
found to see if anyone recog-
nized him, but no one did.
Sgt McCartney said that the
boy is not able to say his name
and can barely speak. Howev-
er, she did note that he
"appeared to be healthy, ener-
getic and had clothes like any


BFS employees march on


prime minister's office


FROM page one

the possible closure. They claim that what is
more upsetting is the fact that there may be a
potential buyer, the US based Sysco foods, but
it appears that government has been holding up
the sale.
As they have not received answers from man-
agement, they said they tried on several occasions
to contact Mr Christie in the hopes that he would
intervene on their behalf. But it was in vain.
Desperate to receive some answers, they said
the employees walked off the job to go to the
Cabinet office.
Ms Goodman claims that employees have not
been able to secure bank loans to pay for their
children's education because local banks have
said the uncertainty of the company's future
makes them a credit risk.
In addition, several protesters claimed that
they have not received raises in over three years.
Ms Goodman said she did not understand why
or if the sale should be a problem. She said gov-
ernment has made provision for other US com-
panies to purchase Bahamian businesses. This sit-
uation, she said, should be no exception.
The employees, Mr Brown added, would pre-
fer for a sale to go through rather than staff be
terminated and receive a compensation pack-
age.
"We do not know what the company would
give us as a compensation package and so we
would prefer to have our jobs," he said.


The group of protesters vowed that they would
not leave the front of the Churchill building until
they got answers.
Winston Dean, another spokesman said that
Bahamas Food Services supplied almost every
major hotel and restaurant in Nassau, includ-
ing, Kerzner International (Atlantis). He said if
the employees remained off their jobs, it would
be a tremendous blow to the tourism industry.
"Every hotel and restaurant would cry," he
said.
Although the employees did not get to see
Mr Christie, they were able to talk with Youth
and Sports Minister Neville Wisdom and Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt. Both ministers
tried to assure them that their concerns would be
addressed.
Mr Wisdom told them that he understood
their frustrations, but said the situation needed to
be dealt with rationally and without emotion.
Mrs Pratt told them that she also understood,
their fears. She said she too has been in a situa-
tion where she has wondered how her bills would
be met.
She said she was in politics to help people.
She gave her full assurance that she would
arrange a meeting for them.
Yesterday afternoon, Ms Goodman, said Mrs
Pratt had in fact lived up to her promise and
arranged a meeting with Mr Christie and five
company spokespersons for 10 o'clock this morn-
ing.
Calls to officials at Bahamas Food Service
were not answered.


other young child running
about."
Sgt 45 Theophilus Bonaby
told The Tribune that since the
child was taken into custody,
he has been provided with food
and other necessities, such as
pampers, which he still wears.
Yesterday, The Tribune dis-
covered that the child is cur-
rently in protective custody in
the child protective services at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal.
Visibly disappointed, Inspec-
tor Evans urged the child's
caregivers to "show love and
concern by stepping forward."
"They need to recognize
that he is a human being and
that he should be treated with
love, concern and respect." he
said.
The Inspector questioned the
motives of persons who would
abandon the child. "In a situa-
tion as this, we must allow our
conscience to affect how one
could allow a child to wander-
that's an individual, that's a life,
that's a person! The communi-
ty at large should be concerned
about something like this."
He said that while they
searched areas in Fox Hill to
locate the child's guardians
"people from all over Nassau
came to the emancipation day
festivities as it is open to all
and sundry."
According to police, cases of
this nature are "irregular" in
the Bahamas. They are unusu-
al and infrequent, he said.
Asked whether charges


would be filed against a per-
son or persons who may come
forward to claim the toddler,
Inspector Evans said "once
persons come forward, we will
look at their circumstances and
want to find out exactly why
the little boy went wandering
and why it was not reported."
The public is urged to supply
police with any information
regarding the identity and
parentage of this child at 919 or
the Fox Hill police station at
324-2030.



Airline

money
FROM page one

improve security as best as
we can. The cheques are
recoverable as they are
payable only to Bahama-
sair and anyone trying to
cash them would only
implicate themselves if
they tried to do anything,"
he said.
Reginald Ferguson,
assistant police commis-
sioner with responsibility
for crime, said that the case
is being expeditiously
looked into.
No arrests have been
made as yet.


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family


Flight grounded

after man gains

unlawful access

FROM pag"

However, a ,cco
a Tribune siou.icefi
man, is a Jamaicat .
Mr Major sauil4the,fi
was able to pass throttg
the TSA security che~k
point and then enter th
waiting lounge near the]
Bahamasair gate.
"Reports suggest that
he was able to go
through security by
sing an old boarding
pass, dated July 8 I
believe, and some form
of identification, maylig
a drivers licence,",he
said.
Mr Major explained,
that the man then pro'
ceeded to "mingle.witd
passengers that ha'& jnsS
deplaned from the'
Freeport flight.
"He mingled with
those deplaning and
because he was an ex-
employee, he was some-
how able to go behind :i
wall near the gate and
hide himself," he said.
By hiding behind the
wall, Mr Major said, the
former employee was
able to circumvent per-
sonnel at the gate.
The man then left
through the gate onto
the tarmac, where he
boarded the Bahamasair
plane.
"There is security in
place onboard the air-
craft who ensure that the
people deplane and the
right set of passengers
board. It was these secu-
rity officers who detect-
ed the young man and
challenged him as. to why
he was onboard the ,
plane," Mr Major said.
Mr Major said that the
officers quickly discov-
ered that the man did
not possess a valid
boarding pass. They
detained him.
"Apparently he told
TSA that he boarded the.
plane in order to meet a
flight attendant, but
beyond that, we do not -
have any further infor-
mation as yet," he said:
Mr Major could not
give a last name for the
man in question, but said
that it is his understand-
ing that the man was
fired from Bahamasair
several months ago.
"He was terminated
for a series of security
breaches, and now here
he is once again respon-
sible for a security.,
breach," he said.


Three are found
FROM page one

northern Exuma.
The private aircraft provided BASRA with the exact location,
which was 10 miles south off Yamacraw.
The Royal Bahamas Defence Force was contacted and
patrol craft P 43, which was in the area was diverted to assist.
A US Coast Guard boat assigned to Operation Bahamas
Turks and Caicos (OPBAT), which had previously done a
search of the northern Exumas yesterday morning, again pro-
vided assistance by relocating the vessel and staying on the
scene until the Defence Force vessel arrived.
Mr Lloyd said the men appeared to be in good condition.
"They were swimming with the boat towards Nassau. It was
good cooperation with all agencies involved," said Mr Lloyd.
"Unfortunately it lasted as long as it did due to the vessel hav-
ing no safety or communications equipment. If they had com-
munications on board they could have indicated that they need-
ed assistance much earlier," he said.
The men rescued were travelling on a 16 foot open boat
with a 55 horse power engine.
The men were scheduled to arrive at the Defence Force base
yesterday at 6pm.
It is not yet known what difficulty they were having with
their boat.









Staff are trained in fire safety


* SUNTEE employee learning to use a fire extinguisher


SUN TEE employes who participated in a fire training session conducted by the Royal Bahama
Police Force Fire Services Division pose outside the Shirley Street establishment.


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


'4


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THE TIBUNETHURDAY, UGUST4,205,LPAEE17


Anthropologists



reveal secret of



slave population


TWO distinguished anthropologists
have just published the definitive study
about the enslaved population of the
Clifton area.
From the pre-Columbian aborigi-
nal Lucayan Taino tribes who lived
there before European colonisation, to
the hard life of pre-Loyalist days, to
the plantation aristocracy who fled*
there following the American Revo-
lution, to the post-Emancipation for-
mer slaves eking an existence from
the hard, rocky soil; they all trod the
land at Clifton and their stories are
buried there.
From 1996 to 2000, the husband and
wife team of Laurie Wilkie, associate
professor of anthropology at the Uni-
versity of California, Berkeley, .and
Paul Farnsworth, associate professor of
anthropology at Louisiana State Uni-
versity, along with their teams of stu-
dents, spent their summers unearthing
evidence so these stories could be told.
For at least 700 years, Clifton has
been the site of human habitation, the
evidence of which Wilkie and
Farnsworth set about to painstakingly
uncover and interpret.
Authors of countless articles and


several books, the pair has now com-
pleted their study of the enslaved pop-
ulation that lived at William Wylly's
plantation from 1812 to 1833.
Their new book, Sampling Many
Pots: An Archaeology of Memory and
Tradition at a Bahamian Plantation,
explores the diverse ways that the mul-
ti-ethnic African community at Clifton
navigated the circumstances of enslave-
ment and negotiated the construction
of New World identities within their
families and with their neighbours.
Focusing on household and com-
munity levels of social integration at
Clifton, Sampling Many Pots employs
a variety of evidence to reconstruct
not only the structures and artifacts
of the plantation but the identities and
lives of those who used them.
Drawing upon archaeological evi-
dence from a tightly controlled exca-
vation of the site, historical data on
the plantation, its owner and the
enslaved and free Africans and
African-Americans living there, as
well as ethnographic information from
West Africa, the Caribbean and North
America, the authors provide the
reader with a picture of the liv6s of


those who lived on that plantation two
centuries ago.
Interweaving the comprehensive
information derived from their exca-
vations and their study with lively and
vivid narration, Wilkie and
Farnsworth are able to trace changes
in the culture and identities of the
individual residents of Clifton over
the two decades this plantation exist-
ed, drawing the reader inexorably into
that world so long ago and making
the lives of those enslaved people as
relevant to the story of the Bahamas
-as someone who lived yesterday.
Featuring more than 50 illustrations,
a dozen maps, an actual listing of the
names of those who lived at Clifton
and a detailed chain of title for, the
property, Sampling Many Pots is a
must-read for everyone who has been
fascinated with the story of this very
special and historic Bahamian land.
The book will be released in the
Bahamas on Saturday, August 6 at
Logos Book Store in the Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre with a special book
signing by both authors, who will be
available from 11am to .1pm at the
store-. .


New courses


available at


fitness centre


10


YOUR


August 13th, 2005


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MANAGEMENT and staff
of Bally Total Fitness have
trained in the Bally signature
classes of powerflex and kwando.
Professional master trainers
from Bally USA came to the
Bahamas to give expert train-
ing to the Bally Bahamas fit-
ness instructors.
A master trainer is someone
that has surpassed the level of
trainer and has mastered the
class to the extent where they
are able to teach others how to
instruct an entire class.
Roslyn Roberson, a master
trainer in powerflex and kkwan-
do, came to the Bahamas from
Washington DC to instruct the
Bally Bahamas fitness staff.
On the first day of training,
,the Bally staff were taught how
to instruct a powerflex class.
Powerflex incorporates resis-
tance training through the use
of a variable weight barbell.
During the weekend of train-
ing, the Bally Bahamas staff
also gained knowledge on how
to instruct a kwando class.
Kwando is an intense cardio-
vascular and strength condi-
tioning class. The kwando work-
out consists of basic punches,
kicks, and transition moves.
Powerflex classes are avail-
able at Bally Total Fitness
Bahamas, located in the Sandy-
port Plaza, every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday.
Kwando class is currently
being offered to Bally members
every Thursday afternoon.


Meet the authors on August 6 at
Logos Bookstore, Harbour Bay Shopping Centre,
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for a book signing!


-I I I I


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 17:


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 18 THURSAY, AUUSTR4,205OTHETRIBUN


Is opyri ghtedlMaterial,
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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


- Ab. - -


o












Greenpeace shuts down illegal



logging road in Brazil rainforest


Greenpeace shuts illegal log-
ging road in Brazilian rainforest
BRAZIL
Rio de Janeiro
Activists from the environ-
mental group Greenpeace gated
shut an illegal logging road cut
into an Amazon rainforest
reserve and protested the lack


of government safeguards, the
group said yesterday.
Activists built a gate and
locked it on Tuesday on a log-
ging road that runs 135 kilome-
ters (85 miles) into the Altami-
ra National Forest, some 1,250
miles (2,000 kilometers) north
of Rio de Janeiro.


After posting signs that read
"Amazon: Save it or destroy
it?" and "Area awaiting pro-
tection," the activists chained
the gate shut and delivered the
key to officials from Ibama,
Brazil's environmental protec-
tion agency.
"What happens at the


Altamira National Forest is an
example of what occurs with
other conservation areas, which
face serious threats because of
the precarious state of the pub-
lic agencies charged with pro-
tecting the Amazon's environ-
mental riches," said Nilo D'Av-
ila, who heads Greenpeace's


campaign to protect the area
around the BR-163 interstate
highway through the rainforest.
Today, much of the BR-163
remains little more than a dirt
road running through dense
jungle. But environmentalists
are alarmed at plans to pave it
to allow soybean farmers in
Brazil's midwest to ship their
crops from the Amazon River
port of Santarem.
Other paved highways in the
Amazon have attracted loggers
and ranchers who clear th6 for-
est for about 30 miles (50 kilo-
meters) on either side of the
road.
Federal environmental offi-
cials have pledged to enforce
logging regulations to reduce


the impact along BR-163.
But Greenpeace says the
existence of illegal logging iri
the Altamira national forest
show that the jungle must bes
protected before the road isg
paved.
"If without paving, the nat-
ural resources around BR-163
are being totally devastated'
imagine what will happen with,
access over paved roads,"v
D'Avila said.
Brazil's rainforest sprawl
over 1.6 million square miles
(4.1 million square kilometers),
the size of western Europe
Experts say as much as 20 per-!
cent of the forest has been
destroyed by development, log-
ging and farming.


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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNETHUSAYUT


Fourteen


marines


dlled in roadside



bombing in Iraq


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-b 4ba


* -


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE






INTERATIOALNWI


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crash


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I I


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 23


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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 25


AUGUST 4, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- Dennis DeYoung: A Soundstage Special A perform- Get Down Tonight: The Disco Explosion n (CC)
WPBT show "Hayward's ance by Dennis DeYoung, former lead singer of Styx.
Heath" (Live)
The Insider (N) Big Brother 6 Head of household. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "Lone Star" n
S WFOR n (CC) (Live) n (CC) The CSIs probe the deaths of a (CC)
model, a boy and a bodybuilder.
Access Holly- Joey Joey inter- Will & Grace The Law Firm A dispute between (9:59) ER A young gir wounded by
B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) views personal "The Fabulous former friends; a lawsuit filed by a a car bomb in Iraq, is sent to Count
assistants. (CC) Baker Boy" f dominatrix. (N) A (CC) for treatment [ (CC)
Deco Drive That '70s Show That '70s Show The O.C. "The O.Sea" Filmmaker News (CC)
S WSVN Take It or Leave "Street Fighting George Lucas expresses interest in
It" )Man" n Seth's graphic novel. n (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) Extreme Makeover Best friends Hooking Up Amy is ambivalent Primetime Behind the scenes at a
S WPLG from Florida get new looks., (CC) about one suitors philandering juvenile detention center. (N) (CC)
ways. (N) n (Part 4 of 5) (CC)
(00) American Cold Case Files "Death Before I Do; Hollywood Homicide; The DNA Link; The First 48 "Roadside Buming;
A&E Justice (CC) The Secret Slide" A killer's girlfriend calls police; actress murdered. (CC) Blood Ties" A Dallas motorist discov-
ers a body. (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET BET Style The Parkers n The Parkers n Blowin' Up; Fat- Girlfriends Soul Food n (CC)
(CC) (CC) ty Koo (CC)
CB(:00) Distinct Hiroshima: The First Weapon of Mass Destruction (CC) The National (CC)
CBC ocs (N) (CC)
Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien
N (:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) -ewsNight With AaronBrown.
C N Cooper 360 (CC)
Reno 911! Jones The Daily Show Weekends at the Comedy Central South Park Chappelle's Reno911! John-
COM considers quit- With Jon Stew- D.L.(CC) Presents "Tom "Summer Sucks" Show Memorable son tries to mar-
ting.(CC) art(CC) Shillue" (CC) moments. ry. (CC)
COURT Cops n (CC) The Investigators "A Deadly Forensic Files Body ofEvi- Military Secrets (N)
Game" (N) "Memories" dence
That's So Raven * BRINK! (1998, Adventure) Erik von Detten, Christina Vidal, Patrick American Drag- Sister, Sister
DISN "Boyz'N Commo- Levis. An in-line skater deserts his pals to join a rival team. (CC) on: Jake Long "Slime Party" '
tion" (CC) (CC)
DThis Old House Weekend Wood Works Home 10 Contractor: Va- DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
DIY ( (CC) Handyman (N) cation Homes cue cue
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth Tagestema Depth
Love Is in the Kill Reality Egos clash over peo- Kill Reality Fight for Fame Actors compete for
Heir ple's roles. a commercial.
ESPN treetball (N) City Slam (N) X Games From Los Angeles. (Live) (CC)
ESPNI ESPNPerfiles Racing World ATP Tennis Tenis Con Clerc RPMSemanal Simplemente Fitbol (N)
lMI (N) Weekly (N) (N) (N)
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Back Stage The Holy Rosary Theology of the The Church and
VM Lady Body the Poor
IT V 00) Total Body FitNation "Gym Nation" Choosing Ultimate Goals A woman strives to The Extremists The Extremists
FT TV Sculpt Plus 1 the right health club. 11(CC) get her life back on track. (CC) ,F.( CC). n (CC)
FOFox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
F F Marlins on Deck MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (Subject to Blackout)
FSNFL (Live) (Live)
GOLF International Highlights Ernie Els. Questfor the 19th Hole Golf U.S. Women's Amateur Championship- Second
Card IIRound. From Atlanta.
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A The Amazing Race 1 (CC) Dog Eat Dog n (CC)
____ (CC)
Tech :00) Attack of X-Play Cheat Batman Icons "Tim Schafer" Game pro- Icons Cinematech
Tec the Showl (N) tips. grammer Tim Schafer.
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger An escaped ** PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE MUSICAL MURDER (1989,
HALL exas Ranger convict wants to kill the judge who Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, Alexandra Paul. A stage manager
"War Cry"(CC) sentenced him. (CC) is accused of killing a harsh director. (CC)
Dream House Holmes on Homes "Semi Dilemma" RealRenos "Hog The Ultimate Do- The Block After two weeks, the
HGTV Construction de- n(CC) Town" (CC) Up Break in Ro- stress levels run high. n (CC)
lays persist. torua. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Assemblies of
(CC)4_ .. -(CC) day God
Xiaolin Show- Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends Phoebe Will & Grace Everybody Everybody
KTLA down A(CC) Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air tries to prevent a Grace dates Loves Raymon Rmon
Life is a circus. (CC) suicide. (CC) Will's therapist. (CC) "Young Gid" n
LOVE IS STRANGE (1999, Drama) Kate Nelligan, Ron ** A STRANGER TO LOVE (1996, Drama) Beau Bridges, Tess Harper,
LIFE Silver, Julie Harris. A cancer diagnosis brings a di- Pam Dawber. A resurfacing past disrupts an amnesia victim's new life.
vorced couple together again. (CC) (CC) (DVS)
:00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Situation With Tucker Carl- Scarborough Country
MSNBC cC mann son
IJimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Ned's Declassi- Full House F, Full House F Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of
NICK Boy Genius SquarePats I Ified School (CC) (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air
NTV Will & Grace n Big Brother 6 Head of household. Still Standing Yes Dear ( News A (CC) News
S(CC) (Live)/ ((CC) ____ (CC) (CC
OLN (:00 Survivor E-Force The World of The World of Buckmasters Survior "Old and New Bonds" /
OLNM n CC) Beretta Beretta (CC)
SPEED NASCAR Be- American Mus- Car Crazy Barrett-Jackson 2005: The Auc- NASCAR Nation NASCARBe-
SP E yond the Wheel cle Car tions (N) yond the Wheel
Praise the Lord Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
(:00) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Cincinnati Reds. From Great American Ball Park in. * TIN CUP (1996) Kevin Cost-
TBS Cincinnati. (Live)(CC) ner An undisciplined golfer attempts
to reach the U.S. Open.
:00) In a Fix Sex, Dice & Vegas "Law and Or- U.S. Marshals: The Real Story Overhaulin' "Mad Kidney Donor'
TLC Stage, Right?" def Meeting defenders of justice in Marshals help Washington state offi- Thanking a kidney donor. (CC)
Garage project. Las Vegas.(CC) cials catch a murder suspect.
:00) Law & Or- *** THE NEGOTIATOR (1998, Action) Samuel L. Jackson, Kevin Spacey, David Morse. Atop police nego-
TNT der "Menace" n tiator is accused of committing murder. (CC) (DVS)
(CC) (DVS)
TOON Grim Adven- Pokdmon Camp Lazlo CampLazlo Yu-Gi-Oh! A Teen Titans "Be- Dragon Ball Z
T ON tures (CC) "Parasitic Pal" (CC) trayal"
TV5 Passe-moi les jumelles Les Grands duels du sport Les Enquites d'Eloise Rome TV5 Le Journal
TW600) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC M Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
UNIV 0) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Aquiy Ahora
UNIV ti
(:00) The 4400 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit TORNADO! (1996, Drama) Bruce Campbell, Ernie Hudson, Shannon
USA 'Rebirth" (CC) "Escape" Detective Benson hunts a Sturges. Storm chasers race a twister to test scientific equipment. (CC)
fugitive pedophile. (CC)
VH1 (:00) Kept n Kept A Kept (Season Finale) (N) A Hogan Knows Kept n
______________ Best Ft
Home Improve- America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine ,C (CC)
WGN ment n(cC) n (CC) n (CC)
Everybody Smallville A strange glowing stone Everwood "The Reflex" Ephram WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond causes Clark and Lionel to switch and Amy decide to take their rela- Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Young Girl" ,t bodies. (CC) lionship to the next level. F (CC) & Mr, G (CC)
W SBK Jeopardy! (CC) WWE SmackDown! (N) (CC) Dr. Phil
WSBK -

(6:00) * Real Sports ,T (CC) * i' TAKING LIVES (2004, Suspense) Angelina Jolie, Ethan Hawke,
HBO-E THE ASSOCI- Kiefer Sutherland. An FBI profiler helps detectives search for a killer. n
ATE (1996) 'R' (CC)
(5:45) ** * PAPARAZZI (2004, Suspense) Cole Hauser, ** THE EDGE (1997, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins,
HBO-P RUNAWAY JURY Robin Tunney, Dennis Farina. An actor takes revenge Alec Baldwin. A plane crash strands two rivals in the
(2003) Fn on intrusive photographers. F 'PG-13' (CC) Alaskan wilderness. F 'R' (CC)


(:00) *** THE LARAMIE PRO- (:45) The Making ** THE ASSOCIATE (1996, Comedy) Whoopi Goldberg, Dianne
HBO-W JECT (2002, Drama) Dylan Baker, Of: Spider-Man Wiest, Eli Wallach. Premiere. A female financial analyst invents a male
Stephen Belber. Ft (CC) 2 Ft (CC) partner. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) * THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE CRADLE * IN THE CUT (2003, Suspense) Meg Ryan, Mark Ruffalo, Jennifer
H BO-S (1992) Annabella Sciorra. A woman vows to destroy a Jason Leigh. An English teacher suspects her lover of murder. 'R'
amily she blames for her woes. 'R' (CC)
(6:15) ** * SCREAM (1996, Horror) Neve Campbell, David Arguette, ALONG CAME POLLY (2004,
MAX-E LOVE DON'T Courteney Cox. Premiere. A psychopath stalks the teens of a sleepy Cali- Romance-Comedy) Ben Stiller, Jen-
COST A THING fornia town. F 'R' (CC) "niferAniston. *PG-13' (CC)
(6:45) ** THE PEACEMAKER (1997, Suspense) **1' I, ROBOT (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan,
MOMAX George Clooney, Nicole Kidman. A scientist and a sol- Bruce Greenwood. A homicide detective tracks a dangerous robot in
dier seek stolen nuclear weapons. F 'R'(CC) 2035. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:15)*** ** THE CORE (2003, Science Fiction) Aaron Eckhart, Hilary Swank, (:15) *** BARBERSHOP 2:
SHOW THE OPPOSITE Delroy Lindo. iTV. Earth's dead core must spin again or humanity will per- BACK IN BUSINESS (2004) Ice
OF SEX (1998) ish. 'PG-13' (CC) Cube. iTV. ( 'PG-13' (CC)
LEGALLY i EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH (2004, Comedy) (:45) *x MARCI X (2003, Comedy) Lisa Kudrow, Da-
TMC BLONDE 2 Matt Dillon, Christina Applegate. Premiere. A distraught mon Wayans, Richard Benjamin. A woman must deal
__ man loses his job and fiancee. ,( 'R' (CC) with a controversial rapper. Ft 'R' (CC)


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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


Meet the FirstCaribbean tear


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E t A e__ IH0E y i e iin u E




IHUHbUAY, AUUUSI 4, 2UU,, t-AU~( /


THE TRIBUNE


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IN


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LOCATIONS


n of Home Finance Specialists


eleBanking
Banking


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


3L) Business oaiionst ;d.
* Digital B&W Copiers
* Digital Colour Copies
* Digital Colour Printers Xerox /
Tektronix Brands
* Duplicators
* Copier Supplies
* All products can be networked
or stand alone
* Authorized dealers for Xerox and Riso


Paper


U


for


sale


* By JOHN MARQUIS
An American
couple who
launched a
newspaper off
their kitchen
table 12 years ago are ready to
sell what has become one of
Abaco's most inspiring busi-
ness success stories.
The Abaconian, a twice-
monthly, two-section commu-
nity paper, is up for sale to
anyone who has the energy
and vision to take it to even
greater heights.
Valuable
Selling up will sadden
founders Dave and Kathy
Ralph, but they feel the time is
right to dispose of a valuable
business asset they created
from nothing.
They want to "ease up"
-after -a lifeti m6of 'work 'and
believe The Abaconian needs
to find a new owner now
ready for its next stage of
development.
"The business is doing so
well that it's now time to make
it a weekly," Mrs Ralph told
The Tribune from her water-
front home in Marsh Harbour.
. "However, Dave and I want
to retire and don't feel we
want to take that next step.
The paper needs someone
with the energy and ambition
to carry on the success. It's
truly a great opportunity for
the right person."
The Abaconian began as a
modest dream in 1993, when


the Ralphs launched it as a 12-
page monthly with no experi-
ence of newspapers or jour-
nalism. They felt the island
needed a community newspa-
per and launched it from their
own home.
Consistent
Since then, it has shown
consistent growth, generating
ever-increasing advertising
revenue without the help of a
sales staff. Since becoming a
fortnightly publication, it has
made impressive progress.
From that low-key 12-page
launch edition, The Abaconian
has grown into a 56-pager
packed with adverts and com-
munity news.
It has built up a sound rep-
utation for local coverage and
as .an advertising medium.
Most Abaconian businesses of
note now promote themselves
"through its pages, benefiting"
from its guaranteed free dis-
tribution of around 7,000
copies.
Community
Mrs Ralph said: "It needs
someone who really wants to
become part of the communi-
ty. You can't sit back and live
a leisurely life when you run a
newspaper. But it's a growing
business and has some influ-
ence in the area."
She believes The Abacon-
ian can still be run as a mom-

See PAPER, 3B


The


Abaconian


V dOsE13 NME41 3sUei ste Newpa20 e'
VOLUME 13, NUMBER 13, JULY 1st, 2005


Elections Set Local Govt. for Three Years

Only Six Communities Required Elections *


SThe studerns of thr Eve C^hil CUrits Schooil enyoaed a di ffim at the.Abac C (luf WWiMtdng B&ay. They rt. guess of Mr.
Petr de St &wrv ennise-amt fhorseblknid.edThe highCifas tF 'the day a nagiec show pia en Afr. FdfWnt "Caliguta' id*tr4IaonfWA m
Nasatr. The day irtrfe a del&iodo hmh T he group is how. rre.ong ith Mr. H 'ain, general manger at thelateo
aubi d orgad ir Mr. d' Sawty h, ss. and MC.. Lyn Major. fboozerr of iECCnd prihopat. o hoise ack, tM. TTani*
twatbe. dlubt seera., with srutdes frm thise Sdt oft. See .rcy o pao 14.
Immigrants Completes Ho

Health Program
By aMin twaa hwa;hiter enviraonmen
Aftheew monta o' social and edafm TA prol. beaskdby Dr Zeo s7XMIt.
ti rc.sipcnksbl athe fo r am i s Pta Zgoing ,batk to w ixtb." ai i.roieot


rFS. ra'Iney w hrsfrastedaW: m. atekwoio'U Sbiinse 'a k R iwwe WfJne il ,4s
aidg us t'T sdents maBn&i i. lgBaftm o P wfr iors tha tiem our th 0cwifhubfr 0se i Tamhsw an Raentlrw I and er4wro lthe Awkareaaecrm Fd wr
Sigwltiiiiil Afin!Mof te~teve awA^ rfl^oAvtAiN Wv/i $ips


* THE Abaconian (pictured) is up for sale to anyone who has the energy and vision to take it to even greater heights.


McWeeney: Our


members have


slowed process


to introduce an


ACH system


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
CHAIRMAN of the Clear-
ing Banks Association Paul
McWeeney revealed yester-
day that association members
have slowed the process to
introduce an Automated
Clearing House (ACH) sys-
tem in an effort to better edu-
cate members about the
potential costs and other
impacts of the system.
It will also allow them to
make decisions on the various
parameters of the system and
provide adequate time for
each bank's internal check
processing system to be
aligned with the new system.
Mr McWeeney said a re-
measurement exercise is being
undertaken to ensure that the
,expectation of all clearing
bank members are being ade-
quately addressed. He said
'during this period, they would
look to inform members of the
facilities they are getting,
when those systems would be


put in place and how it would
benefit the public.
A final report is expected
to be completed by next week
to be distributed to members,
Mr McWeeney said; adding ..
that he expects the ACH to
be up and running by the end
of the year.
"We have to look around
us at other territories and gain
from their experiences. Some
banks are at different levels
of automation so we have to
make sure that all the banks
are adequately aligned as they
moved through the system."
He added: "Events emerge
that need to be given ade-
quate attention and we need
to make sure it's working in
the best interest of the finan-
cial community. There is no
.question of our commitment
to it."
Calling it a mammoth exer-
cise that will introduce direct
debiting, credits and imaging
facilities to the Bahamian
financial services landscape,

See SYSTEM, 9B


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Living with


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power and magic in it.
Begin it now.

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe -

www.bahamaswebawards.com
Enter Your Website Now! I


KINGSWAY

ACADEMY



OPERATIONS MANAGER
FOR KINGSWAY ACADEMY

has an immediate vacancy for an
Operations Manager.

The successful candidate will be mainly
responsible for the supervision of the
Security Staff, supervising the maintenance
projects on the site, along with other duties.

Interested persons should submit a resume
along with three references that will include
one from the candidates Church Pastor to:

Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy
Business Office
Bernard Road

Telephone contact:
324-6887, 324-6269; Fax 393-6917

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS -
FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 2005




SAccounting records in bad shape?
* Need financial statements for the bank?
* Need a business plan and financing proposal
prepared?
* Need business licence prepared/certified?
CALL US WE CAN HELP
* Business Start-Up Assistance/Consultations
* Compliance Commission Examinations
* Easy Bookkeeping Records Fits every business
* Small Business Packages and Systems
* Computerized-quickbooks Setup Training
* Small Business Accounting Handbooks ..$25
* Samnie R Buiness Plans (NAw/Fxistinn RI usine ses


SEMINARS & WORKSHOP Registration: $25
(Materials and Refreshments)

Analyzing Financial Statements
August 27 10am
Businesss Loan Proposals Special
Preparation/Financing Referrals
TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 FAX: 323-3700

Small Business Consultants


Pricing Information As Of:
03 August 2005


the


explosion
x]P og


If you are like most
businesses, e-mail has
quickly become the
primary means by
which you communi-
cate both internally and exter-
nally with customers, partners
and vendors.
It is no surprise therefore
that e-mail usage is exploding
in businesses of all sizes
around the world.
In a recent article by CIO
Magazine (Message Therapy,
January 15, 2005), IDC, the
international research firm,
forecasts that the average
number of e-mails sent world-
wide on a daily basis is likely
to hit 36.2 billion in 2006, and
according to Gartner, this
staggering number is expected
to grow by 25 per cent to
30per cent per year through
2009.
What is even more amazing
is that Gartner's figures do not
include spam, which currently
account for three-fourths of
all inbound messages.
More significant than the
exploding volume of messages
your organisation is likely to
send and receive are the find-
ing, of ,the Enterprise Strate-
gy Group (ESG) who estimate
that 75 per cent of most com-
panies' intellectual property
is contained in the messages
and attachments they send
through their e-mail systems.
The implications for busi-
ness leaders and their IT
departments (or IT providers)
are clear your e-mail system
just may be your most valu-
able asset, both as a commu-
nication platform and as a
repository of critical business
information.




For Sle byOwne

2.4 ce

$75900


Te:1-1-6004


SColina
Financial Advisors Ltd.


!By Ian liesn


Growing
Challenges
The sheer volume of e-mails
your organisation is likely to
send, receive and save over
the next few years presents
challenges that most e-mail
systems were never intended
to deal with.
Microsoft Exchange and
Lotus Notes, for example, the
two most prominent e-mail
platforms used today, were
designed primarily on the
assumption that e-mails would
be deleted once read. This is
no longer the case. In fact, the
Bahamas is likely, to follow
countries like the United
States where organizations in
key industries are required to
keep and be able to reproduce
e-mail messages for up to sev-
en years.
Clearly, most organisation's
current reliance on tape back-
up solutions for archiving and
retrieving e-mail messages is
not going to cut it. Not only is
it inefficient and slow, but
most tape back-up solutions
do a very poor job of finding
and restoring individual mes-
sages. They are primarily
intended to restore all mes-
sages after a major disaster.





I-SI T

Fo.te toie
behndth nws


Beyond the archival and
retrieval challenges, organisa-
tions are faced with yet anoth-
er challenge. How do you
ensure that the companies'
intellectual property, sitting in
an individual user's mailbox, is
safeguarded and not acciden-
tally or deliberately deleted
by that user?

Better
Management
The challenges outlined
above demand that organisa-
tions adopt new and better
ways of managing the entire
e-mail process.
The key lies in several new
technologies which allow e-
mails to be archived to disk
rather than tape and indexed
for rapid retrieval based on
advance search capabilities.
In this approach, a copy of
every e-mail entering an
organisation is automatically
sent to the e-mail archive for
indexing and safekeeping.
Users continue to send and
receive e-mails as before.
However, a master copy of all
e-mails is now available for
searching by authorised users.
If a vendor, for example,


claims to have sent an e-mail
or an employee claims not to
have received an e-mail, the
archive can be searched quick-
ly to determine what really did
happen. This provides organ-
isations with a level of visibil-
ity currently not available in
even the leading e-mail solu-
tions.
In addition to advance
search and retrieval capabili-
ties, disk-based archival solu-
tions allow organisations to
define and enforce e-mail
retention, deletion and alert-
ing policies currently not pos-
sible in today's email solu-
tions.
Based on the IDC and
Gartner figures, your organi-
sation is likely to find e-mail
management more and more
of a challenge, if it does not
already.
The good news, however, is
that dramatically cheaper disk
storage, coupled with more
affordable archival and index-
ing software, brings better
management well within the
reach of most organisations.
The key, however, is in real-
ising that your e-mail reposi-
tory just may be your most
valuable asset.
To provide feedback on this
column, please email makin-
glTwork@providencetg. corn
About the Author:
Ian Hepburn is the founder
and Managing Director of
Providence Technology
Group, one of the leading IT
firms in the Bahamas. Prov-
idence Technology Group spe-
cializes in Networking Solu-
tions, Consulting & Advisory
Services and Software Solu-
tions.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, JOAN PATRICIA
MISSICK, of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas, intend to change my name to JOAN
PATRICIA ROLLE. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, RAMAJRDO EARL JAMES
Golden Gates #2, P.O. Box N-9947, Nassau, Bahamaas,
intend to change my name to RAMAJRDO EARL BANNISTER.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.:


I) Ili TY I


2wk-HI S2wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
1,10 0.89 Abaco Markets 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%"
9.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 9.00 9.00 0.00 1.452 0.340 6.2 3.78q%
6.44 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.44 6.44 0.00 0.561 0.330 11.5 5.12%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.187 0.100 4.3 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.122 0.000 11.5 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.15 1,15 0.00 0.062 0.040 18.5 3.48%
8.65 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.00 8.00 0.00 0,589 0.240 13.6 3.00%
2.20 1.87 Colina Holdings 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.004 0.060 NM 0.00%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.79 8.79 0.00 0.673 0.,410 12.5 4.66%
2.50 0.62 Doctor's Hospital 2.48 2.48 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.5 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9,6 5.83%
10.50 9.19 Finco 10,49 10.49 0.00 0.662 0.500 15.7 4.77%
9.05 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.591 0.380 13.0 4.20%
8.98 8.31 Focol 8.98 8.98 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.3 5.57%
1.99 1,27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.3 4.20%
8.25 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.30 8.30 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.8 6.75%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.12 6.09 -0.03 0,184 0,000 33.3 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 1000 00 2.010 0760 5,0 7.60%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid S Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Dv $ PIE YIeld
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0 066 0.000 NM 0 00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0,60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 054 0,35 -0.103 0.000 NIM 0.00%
S2wk-HI SZwk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %1
1.2442 1.1786 Colina Money Market Fund 1.244212*
2 3657 2.0058 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3657 **
10.4330 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4330""**
2.2528 2.1164 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.252768"
1.1246 1.0544 Colina Bond Fund 1.124578""*
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
82wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest dosing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM -.. Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by Ithe last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
- AS AT JUN. 30, 200651" AS AT JUN 30, 2005
* AS AT JULY 8, 2005/** AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/ **** AS AT JUNE. 30. 2005
^^^^^^^^^^^- g.|| |4~g~l^(gg~l j) gE f ~.


e-mail


Empty Liquid Nitrogen Aluminum
Cylinder.


Almost new, weight 1031bs, capacity
600 liters. Suitable for Medical Office,
Factory, Hospitals, ect.



4, 000.000 or nearest offer


Phone: 322-1666 Colims Avenue


I -~ -- ~- -- -~--~~~~-


ITORSALE


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE

















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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
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Paper, from Page 1B


and-pop operation, but only
if those involved are ready to
work hard. "It's the sort of
business that enables you to
get out and about in the com-
munity," she said.
"We had no newspaper
background at all, but The
Abaconian has grown as the
island has grown. We have
benefited from Abaco's suc-
cess. We don't have any ad
salesmen, yet the business
comes through the door. The
paper's growth has been phe-
nomenal."
Successful
Whoever buys The Aba-
conian will become a key play-
er in one of the Bahamas'
most successful island
economies.
With the Winding Bay,
Baker's Bay and Bahama


Beach Club projects all in the
pipeline, Abaco is enjoying a
construction and real estate
boom.
Expanding
House sales are buoyant
and an expanding business
community looks like provid-
ing The Abaconian with a firm


base for the future.
Family
The Ralphs arrived in Aba-
co in the late 1950s and raised
their family there. "It has been
our life and this island is our
home," said Mrs Ralph.
"However, we both now
feel that we need a rest. The


time has come to sell The
Abaconian."


Economist II


The Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago is seeking to recruit suitably qualified
professionals to fill the position of Economist II in the Research Department,

Job Summary
To assist with the management of relevant research projects, so as to provide timely and
accurate economic analysis to the senior management of the Central Bank.


Principal Accountabilities

Assists with the coordination and supervision of research projects on relevant
aspects of macroeconomics, monetary and financial policy.
Assists in coordinating and supervising the production of statistical and routine
reports.
Attends Policy Meetings and responds to queries from the public on macroeconomic
and other research related issues.
Represents the Bank at local and international fora in technical and related
issues.


Education and Experience


A B.Sc. Degree in Economics (at least Lower Second Class Honours).
A post-graduate degree in Economics, Business or Finance or equivalent post-
qualification training (minimum five years).


Key Competencies


Analytical Skills/Problem Solving Ability to analyze issues in a thorouI
systematic manner; to focus on critical details while keeping sight of the big pictui
to make well-reasoned, timely and sound decisions and to develop solutions.
Communication Skills Good oral/presentation skills and ability to preps
reports and make recommendations on compliance and other regulatory matte
in a clear and concise manner.
Teamwork and Cooperation The ability to work with others interdependent
toward a common goal and to feel a shared responsibility with other members
a team/department.

The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package commensurate with qualifications
and experience which includes a group health plan and other benefits.


Applications should be made in writing to:

Senior Manager, Human Resource & Comnmunications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
P.O. Box 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad & Tobago

Email: hiocentral-bank.org.tt
Fax No.: 1-868-624-6528

Closing date for submission:- August 10, 2005

All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence
All applications will be acknowledged


- Q.


-


NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 35(1) of the Lotteries and
Gaming Act, Chapter 351 of the Statute Laws
of The Bahamas, Notice is hereby given that
PNK (EXUMA) LTD., a company incorporated
under the Laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in accordance with provisions of
sections 34 of the aforementioned Act, has
made application to the Secretary of the Gaming
Board of The Bahamas for a licence to operate
a casino of approximately 5000 square feet
situate at the Emerald Bay Resort, Exuma, The
Bahamas. Any person or persons having
objection should submit two copies of the
objections to the Secretary of the Gaming Board
at P.O.Box N-4565, Nassau, The Bahamas.


Learn to drive in Ft. Lauderdale
just five easy classes
Learn to find:
Walmart, Brandsmart, Flea Market,
Home Depot and many more!

Call: 565-6077


Bank of The Bahamas
INT E R N A:T IO N A.L


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED

ADVANCED EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Program
of The Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is
pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL Students in
The Loan Program will take place at The Holy Trinity Activities
Center Stapledon Gardens from August 8th, 2005 through August
19th, 2005 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm as follows:-

NEW STUDENTS (FIRST TIME RECIPIENTS)
AND RETURNING STUDENTS
A-B: Monday 8th, August 2005
C-D: Tuesday 9th, August 2005
E-G: Wednesday 10th, August 2005
H-K: Thursday 11th, August 2005
L-M: Friday 12th, August 2005
N-R: Monday 15th, August 2005
S: Tuesday 16th, August 2005
T-Z: Wednesday 17th, August 2005

Time: 9:00 am 3:00 pm

Place: Holy Trinity Activities Centre,
Stapledon Gardens
Returning Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present
and must bring relevant Identification (Valid Passport and National Insurance
Card).

ALL ACCOUNTS MUST BE CURRENT AS AT JULY 31, 2005 BEFORE
CHEQUES CAN BE RELEASED.

New Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present and
bring relevant Identification (Valid Passport, National Insurance Card,
Current Job Letter and a copy of Utility Bill)

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation has been
completed.
NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 200b, t,- 3


THE TRIBUNE


I
































































WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT"
& CRYSTAL PALACE CASINO

CAREER OPPORTUNITY


Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino seeks to hire an Internal Auditor Casino
Complimentaries. The successful candidate will conduct ongoing audits of casino complimentary
charges, verifying approvals to ensure compliance with established ptcies an cedures,
prepares monthly summary reports for resort and casino management. Minimum requirements
for the position are an undergraduate degree in Accounts (prerred but not necessary), with
7 10 years experience, excellent communication skills and a proven capacity to work
effectively with individuals at all levels is essential.

Please forward curriculum vitae with salary requirements via e-mail to hr@cabldeachresorts.com
or via private fax to (242) 327-5897 by no later than August 15, 2005. All responses will
be held in the strictest confidence


1 m Q
............ --..---------------------------------------------------------------.........


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Cable Beach Resorts seeks dynamic and resourceful individuals for the following positions:

Director Food & Beverage Cost Control

Successful candidate will manage the resorts' Food & Beverage Cost Control Department
which Will impleinti-and maintain food and beverage cost controls for all Baha Mar owned
and operated entities. Candidate will provide food and beverage cost control policies and
procedures training to operational personnel as necessary to achieve operating controlsand
target cost performance, coordinate all day-to-day food and beverage cost control record
keeping and issuance of daily food and beverage management reports. A Certified Public
Accountant or Chartered Accountant is preferred with a minimum of 10 years experience.
Familiarity with standard concepts, practices and procedures, exceptional communication
skills, outstanding management capabilities, and proven capacity to work effectively with
individuals at all levels are essential.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a cover letter and curriculum
vitae under confidential cover to hr@cablebeachresorts.com or via private fax to (242) 327-
5897 no later than August 15, 2005. All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


CABLE BEACH & GOLF RESORT
ASSA- SAHAMASU


NASSAU
BEACH
"Hotel


0
WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT"
& CRYSTAL PALACE CASINO


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THETFRIBUNE-


ANSBACHER
ANSBAC HER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED


COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE

Ansbacher Bahamas Limited is pleased to announce the availability of commercial
space in downtown Nassau. This space is located on the 3rd floor, One Bank Lane,
Ansbacher House and was formerly occupied by the British High Commissioner.
This is vell-maintained and appointed office space available for occupancy from
July 1, 2005. The building is maintained in first class condition and indicative terms
and conditions are set out below. Actual terms and conditions are subject to a final
lease.

Available Space 3,860 sq/feet

US $30 sq/ft per annum, payable quarterly in advance

Utilities are charged on a pro-rated basis, based of the occupied area. This
space represents 14.2% of the total sq/ft of the building. Amounts are
payable quarterly in arrears. (Last two quarters charges were in the US
$6,500 to US $8,000 per quarter) This covers, Electricity, Air-conditioning
Water, Sewer, Property Tax, Security and Maintenance of the building
common areas and washrooms.

We would be looking for.an initial-term-of-3years, withaWd optirtliot
renew

The following parking spaces are also available for rent:
Covered Parking- 3 spaces @ US $120/per month
Uncovered Parking 2 spaces @ US $80/ per month

Contact:

Robert Davidowski (502-3679)
Bryan Pennerman (502-3701)

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7768
Bank Lane
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone + 1-242-322-1161
Fax +1-242-325-0524


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loans


qbw-*w- 4110 a.
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Progressive Industry Seeks to hire an Occupational Health Nurse.

The successful candidate will direct nursing service activities, develops and conducts training programmes to promote employee safety
in the workplace, conducts regular inspections of facilities and equipment to identify any health and safety hazards, maintains records,
investigates accidents and injuries, prepares appropriate reports for management. Candidate must be a graduate of an accredited nursing
program or a college graduate with an undergraduate degree in Nursing with a minimum of five (5) seven (7) years direct experience.
Familiarity with a variety of the field's concepts, practices and procedures, relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and
accomplish goals, performs a variety of tasks and must demonstrate proven ability to work with others at all levels.

Please forward curriculum vitae to:

DA14431
C/O The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


-MINION
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4







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY,


AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 5B


MILLARS HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
Sbje pop (Nassau)
Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old, single story triplex with
floor area of 2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist of 2 bed,
1 bath, living, dining area and kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq.
ft. 75 X 100.


Appraisal: $268,411.00
Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West Ave., on the
southside immediately after Topps Laundermat. Take first right
which is Wimpole St, go around curve on left which is London
Ave., travelsouth on London Ave., property is 2nd to last building on the right before T, Junction (High street) L shape
triplex, painted green, trimmed white.
No. 8 BELL SNOW CLOSE
BEL-AIR ESTATES SUB.
....(Nassau)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 6,000
sq. ft. (60 x 100) designated as lot No. 348 of Bel-Air
Subdivision, situated on Turtle Drivve on Bel Snow Close,
being the fourth lot east of Turtle Drive, on the south side of
the road. The subject property is on flat terrain with grass
lawn and paved driveway in front, the grounds are competley
SV enclosed and fairly maintained. This property consist of a 6
year old single story, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom, livingroom,
diningroom, familyroom and kitchen single family residence
with floor area of 1,711 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $193,200.00
Driving west on Carmichael Road until you reach Turtle Drive, turn left onto Turtle Drive and Bel Snow Close is the first
corner on the left after the Fedder Road that runs parallel to Charmichael Road. The house is the 4th on the right painted
white trimmed pink with wall in front.


et propertyTROPICAL GARDENS
Sbj prot. (Nassau)

< Lot #3 a four year old single story house with floor area
of 1,340 sq. ft., and consisting of 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, living room,, dining room, tv room and
kitchen. Lot size is 7,200 sq. ft., wide in front, and 98
ft wide at the back, 84 ft long at the north and 80 ft
long at the south.

Appraisal: $189.963.90
Traveling west on John F Kennedy drive, pass the
second entrance into the airport, the first right after
Esso's Division Office which is Tropical Gardens Road,
then first right which is Kiskadee Drive, then first corner
on the left, property is third house through on the right.



JOHNSON ROAD
(Nassau)
All that lot of land having an area of 5,520 sq. ft., (60 x 92)
situated on the corner of Johnson Road and Step Streeet.
This property is rectangular and comprised of a 12 year old
single storey house that consist of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
living, dining room and kitchen. Also an efficiency apartment
attached. The subject property is slightly above the level of
the abutting roadways with minimal landscaping. The property
is open with chain link fencing along its western boundries.
Appraisal: $139,868.40

opposite St Augustine's College Drive all the way to the curve
heading west the subject house is first house on the right all
'-'.. :Zi4 i,. white trimmed yellow.


MCKINNEY DRIVE
(Nassau)

Lot #H2 a five-year old single storey house with floor area
of 1,751 sq. ft. and consisting of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms,
living room, dining room, laundry room, foyer, and kitchen.
Lot size 11,816 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $183,750.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road, after passing the
Community Clinic, turn north onto McKinney Drive. Continuing
north, the subject property will be the house behind the
second house on the right hand side of the road white trimmed
blue.


CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)

All that lot of land numbering as "H" being one of several lots
: in Cyclops Gardens located off the northern side of Cowpen
Road one corner west of Faith Avenue Junction. This property
comprise of a two and a half year old single storey duples
with a gross floor area of 1,512.42 sq. ft., each unit consisting
of 2 bedrooms all wth wall airconditioning units, 1 bathroom,
living, dining and kitchen building is effectively new.
. ,Appraisal: $219,450.00
Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road
make a right then first right again. The subject property is the
4th on the right tan trimmed brown.





WEST RIDGE ESTATES
(Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 34,089
sq. ft., being lot #152, of West Ridge Estates Subdivision,
zoining is single family residential with all utilities available.
The subject property is on hilly terrain at the top of a ridge
that offers a lovely view to the northeast. The grounds are
: attractively landscaped with a grass lawn, ornamental shrubs
and flowering plants. Other improvements include chain link
fencing along the sides and rear.boundaries, with a concrete
block wall at the front with asphalt paved driveway.
Appraisal: $1,049,788.90

There are two buildings located on this property. The main
2 storey house is located at the highest point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate gross floor area of 4,8000
sq. ft., upstairs consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each with a full bathroom), inicuding a master bedroom suite, an office
with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living room, formal dining area, casual dining area,
powder room and spacious kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)
YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES
(NASSAU)
Lot #63, house #19, Cat Island Avenue,a 6 year old single
story house with three bedrooms, one bathroom, living room,
dining room, kitchen and laundry room. Property is 70x100
single family residential. This property is on flat terrain and
fairly level with road way. Living area 1,574 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $173,000.00
Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass the Prison
Compound, turn left onto Yamacraw then 1st right, follow
the road to 1st left, then first right. The road curves to your
left, the house is #19 Cat Island Avenue, painted white. The
grounds are attractively landscape and well-kept access
into the subject property is provided by a concrete paved
drive way along with the walkways of concrete flagstones.


BOILING HOLE
(Eleuthera)
Lot #7, Boiling Hole Subdivision, Govemor's Harbour, Eleuthera,
contains a single structure duplex, lot size 80x125, 10,000
sq. ft. building size 55 x 27 sq. ft., apartment building consists
of two units, two bedrooms, one bath, kitchen, dinning and
living room.


Appraisal: $113,338.57


MURPHY TOWN
(Abaco)
Lot #78, crown allotment, single story concrete building which
serves as a duplex apartment complex 2 unit, each with 2
bedrooms, bathroom, living, dining room and kitchen areas.
The building has a total floor area of approximately 1,800
sq. ft., land size 11,232 sq. ft.,



Appraisal: $187,257.42


DUNDAS TOWN
(Abaco)
2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre lot no. 25, living room,
dining room, family room, kitchen downstairs, upstairs there
are 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms.Age is 16 years, color is
yellow trimmed with white, upperlevel 1,080 sq. ft., lower
level, 1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft., covered verahandahs
390 sq. ft., the land is portion W of one of the Dundas Town
Crown Allotment parcels situated near Forest Drive being
just under half acre in size. Located on the southern side of
a ridge being 12 feet plus above sea level with little likelihood
of flooding grounds well kept with above average landscaping
including grass cover with palms and citrus trees. Enclosed
on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the
fron. 30 ft., by 36 ft., roof garage now used as a nursery
school. At the upper level on the eastern side is covered
wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior walls concrete, ceiling
of sheet rock and floor of ceremic tiles.
Appraisal: $267,987.91


ALICE TOWN
(Eleuthera)

All that piece parcel of land and improvements containing by
admeasurements 5,500 sq. ft., being lot no. 115 in the
settlement of Alice Town on the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas.
This house is approximately 16yrs old and consists of 3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, fronroom, dining room, sittingroom,
with kitchen and utility room in one, floor area 1,645,42 sq.
ft. this house is is in very poor condition
Appraisal: $75,352.00


ELIZABETH ESTATES
(Nassau)
All that piece, parcel of land having an area of 5,000 sq. ft., being lot no. 46 of the said subdivision situated in the eastern district of New Providence, between Prince Charles and
Yamacraw Road, approximately 2,200 ft east of Fox Hill. This property consist of a 21yr old single storey house which was expanded from 700 sq ft within the last 11yrs, to having a
gross floor area of 1,460 sq ft quality of construction is good and maintenance is average. The effective age of the building is 5 years, the house is comprised of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
living, dining area kitchen and laundry room. The property is sufficiently elevated and yard is open and the grounds are neatly maintained with minimal landscaping in place.
Appraisal: $162,750.00
Heading east along Prince Charles, drive passing the intersection of Fox Hill, take first corner right (Trinidad Ave), corner right before Government Clinic, then first right again, (Tobago
,Cresent) the subject house is second house on the curve right, just after BEC Power Plant. Painted all white.


YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES
(Nassau)
All that piece, parcel of land having an area of 7,912 sq. ft., being lot No. 259 of the subdivision known as Yamacraw Beach Estates, situtated in the Eastern District of New Providence,
Bahamas. This property consists of two building a 19 yr old 11/2 storey residence and a newly built unfinished single storey 1 bedroom apartment at the back of the residence.
RESIDENCE Climate control is by wall air-conditioning unit downstairs and a ductless central air-conditioning unit upstairs with living area of 2,939 sq. ft. the residence is comprised
of a master bedroom upstairs and 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom living and.dining area, family (TV) room, kitchen, Laundry room, Carport and 2 covered patios and 2 attached efficency
apartments downstairs. Construction is good and maintenance is average. Effective age is 4yrs. APARTMENT BUILDING -This building is about 65% finished with 1 bed, 1 bath, living,
dinining and kitchen area. This land is flat but appear to be elevated the grounds are well kept and neatly maintained lawn with flowering plants and fruit beainng trees. This yard is
enclosed by chainlink fencing at the sides and back. The front is partly enclosed by concrete block wall fitted with metal railing and single size metal gate. The walls fo the section of
the front fence is yet to be installed.
Appraisal: $380,827.65
Heading east along Prince Charles Drive to the intersection of Fox Hill, make a right on Fox Hill Road traveling south past Joe Farrington Road Take the 4th corner on the left then first
right house is the 8th house on the right, painted white trimmed red.


Fo cniton-f ae.andoter infrmationcontac


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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY



MUST SELL


MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES








PAGE B, THRSDA, AUGST 4,2005THEITIBUN


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


1995
No. 1146


IN THE MATTER OF BANCO ANDINO
(NASSAU) LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation under the Supervision of the Court)
AND
IN'THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992
NOTICE OF DIVIDEND
TAKE NOTICE that the Liquidator of the above named
Bank has declare a first dividend of $0.08 to be paid to all creditors
who have proved their claims in accordance with the Windind-
up Rules. Such dividend is to be paid on Wednesday the 10th
-August, 2005 or on any subsequent working days until the 30th
day of September, 2005.
NOTICE is further given that any creditor who has not
proven his/her debt by Wednesday the 7th day of September,
2005 will be excluded from this dividend.
DATED the 29th day of July, A.D., 2005
Anthony S. Kikivarakis
Official Liqidator


c/o DELOITTE
Dehands House
2nd Terrace Centreville
P.O.Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas


Tel: (242) 302-4800
Telefax: (242) 322-3101


"Copyrig ted Material


Syndicated Content

Available rom Commercial News Providers".


Senior Economist

The Central Bank of Trinidad anid Tobago is seeking to recruit a suitably qualified individual to
fill the position of Senior Economist in the Research Department.

JOB SUMMARY
To coordinate and oversee research activities ii order to provide economic analyses to the Bank's
management, so as to assist in the formulation of effective economic, monetary and financial
policy.


PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Produces routine and non-routine reports on economic, monetary and financial policy issues
for senior management.

* Assists the Manager in ensuring that the macroeconomic data produced is relevawit; a ieiirate
and timely.

* Assists the Manager in indentifying critical microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and
where relevant proposing appropriate policy action.

* Represents the Bank at local and international fora in technical and related issues.

* Effectively manages human resource issues of direct reports and ensures that employee
performance is monitored with ongoing coaching and feedback.


EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE
* A university degree in Economics, Finance or Statistics (at least lower second class honours
ora G.P.A. of 3).

* Post graduate degree in Economics, Finance, Statistics or equivalent post qualification training
(minimum 5 years).

Advanced knowledgLof econometric and statistical methodologies.

* Considerable work experience across all economic sectors (monetary, fiscal, real sector
etc.).

* Effective supervisory and coaching skills.

* Strong communication and presentation skills.

* Languages: Spanish (optional).

* At least 9 12 years experience required.


KEY COMPETENCIES
* Technical Expertise: Advanced knowledge of statistical methodologies, economic models,
quantative methods and working knowledge of the relevant I.T. systems. Advanced training
in Economics, Finance, Statistics or equivalent post qualification training in the relevant
areas of expertise.

* Communication Skills: Excellent presentation/oralskills; proven ability to prepare reports
and to convey technical information in a succinct manner.

* Results Orientation: Manages and organises work in a manner that minimises
potential problems in order to exceed targets.

* Flexibility/Adaptability: Revises-priorities.readily in order to meet timelines.
Ability to adapt to organisational changes.

' Interpersonal Effectiveness: Proven ability to develop and maintain effective
working relationships in a team environment.
The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package which includes a Group Health Plan and
other benefits.

Applications should be made in writing to:
Senior Manager
Human Resource and Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
P.O. Box 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad and Tobago
Email: hr@central-bankorg.tt
Fax No. 1-868-624-6528
Closing date for submission: August 10,2005
All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants .to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Transatlant
Queen Mary 2
New York-Southampto
14 Sep. 08 Oct. 20 Oct,
Southampton-New Yo:
08 Sep.-20 Sep.-14 Oct.- Oct. 2


Rates per person, double occupancy and subject to change. Gratuities and air: Additional








Reservations and sales through your local travel agent


NOTICE OF SALE


Caves Point Management Limited (hereafter "the Company") invites offers for the
purchase of ALL THAT Unit Number 7F of "Caves Point Phase IV"
Condominium situate on West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island 'of
New Providence being a three (3) bedroom / three (3) bath apartment unit together
with ALL THAT 1.25234% share in the common property of the Condominiums.
The Company makes no representations or warranties with respect to, the state of
repair of the building situate thereon.
The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in a Declaration of
Condominium dated the 3rd day of November, A.D., 1999 which is recorded in
Volume 77 at pages 299 to 428.
TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the time of contract and
the balance upon completion within Thirty (30) days of contract.
This sale is subject to a reserve price. The Company reserves the right to reject any
or all offers.
Any enquiries can be addressed to the Caves Point Property Manager (Tel: 327 4122
or Fax: 327 4125). Interested persons must submit written offers addressed to The
Directors, Caves Point Management Ltd., Caves Point, West Bay Street, P.O. Box
N-65, Nassau, Bahamas to be received no later than the close of business on Friday
the 12t, day.of August A.D., 2005.


_ _I -..-j


I


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 7B


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Syndicated Content -:. -"

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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To advertise in The Tribune

r il I I ITRC1 lI ~call 322-1986


Large wholesale business is seeking to employ an




as part of its supervisory team. The Candidate must
be able to:

> Ensure timely and accurate review of all
reconciliation's and entries to the general ledger.
> Supervise a small accounting team.
> Be responsible for the clay-to-day operations


of the accounting department.

Requirements:

> 2-3 years supervisory experience in a similar
capacity.
> Bachelor's degree in accounting.
> Knowledge of Accpac accounting software a
plus.
> Proficient in Microsoft office.
> Excellent oral and written communication
skills.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Mail resume by August 5th 2005 to:

The Financial Controller
C/O The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas

Or e-mail to: bferguson@coralwcave.com


Computer Technician
Micronet Ltd., a leading business technology supplier requires
a computer technician. Must be self-motivated, responsible and
willing to learn.
Great career Opportunity
Professional Cerifications a plus (A+; MCSE, etc:)
Hardware and software experience a plus
Must have your own transportation
No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
(subject line: Computer Tech.) or fax to:
Computer Tech
c/o Manager
Micronet Ltd.
P.O.Box SS-6270 Email:jobs@micronet.bs
Nassau, Bahamas Fax: 328-3043

TOSHINBA icronet
COPY= FAX*PRINT BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY


Career Opportunity

Cable Beach Resorts seeks vibrant and ingenious individuals for
the following positions:


P.C./NT Systems Administrator,

Successful candidate will assume overall responsibility for specific systems related to their
area of specialization. Candidate will implement major projects or initiatives related to
the overall NT Network and server infrastructure for Cable Beach Resorts, work closely
with the IT operational technical team to facilitate the successful implementation of NT
related projects. Minimum requirements for the position are an undergraduate degree in
Computer Science or related field, three (3) years of progressive experience and direct
knowledge of Windows NT, Windows 2000/2003, Enterprise Server and XP, Compaq
Server Management Tools, Exchange 2000/2003, Veritas Backup Solutions and TCP/IP
Based Communications.

Network Supervisor

Successful candidate will assume responsibility for the configuration and maintenance of
Cable Beach Resorts' LAN/WAN environment, implement, configure, coordinate, control,
troubleshoot and develop specialized procedures related to the use of the LAN/WAN within
the enterprise, ensures that the core LAN/WAN system is arranged for optimal performance
and availability, all devices in the field are functional, oversees direct management of unit's
personnel. Minimum requirements for the position are a high school diploma with two (2)
years of accelerated studies in IT related courses, technical knowledge of the following
areas are preferred: Cisco CCNA or CCIE, Bridges, Hubs, Routers, Ether Switches,
Terminal Servers, Modems, FDDI, Ethernet, DOS, Windows 2000/2003 Server, Windows
XP Operating Systems, UTP, Single Mode, Multi Mode Fibre Cabling Systems. Proven
ability to work with others at all levels is essential.

Systems Analyst/Project Manager

Successful candidate will assume responsibility for all systems and facilities related to their
area of specialization. Candidate will work closely with users in various locations particularly
in the area of core business solutions related problems, data integrity and potential application
enhancements. Minimum requirements for the position are an undergraduate degree in
Computer Science or related field, at least three (3) years of progressive experience, direct
knowledge of procurement, ERP applications, human resources and financial packages,
previous consulting and project management experience is essential.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a cover letter and curriculum
vitae with salary requirements via e-mail to hr@cablebeachresorts.com by no later than
August 15, 2005. All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


NASSAU
EACH
notel


CABLE BEACH & GOLF ESORT
NAISWAII -* A11AMARA


0
WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT'
& CRYSTAL PALACE CASINO


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NOTICE OF VACANCY

FOR

BUSINESS MANAGER


The Grand Bahama Development Company Limited (Devco) is a major
Real Estate Developer and is responsible for master planning most of
the land zoned for tourist/ commercial and residential use within the city
of Freeport. Devco undertakes development in its own right as well as
selling land to third party Developers. The company is jointly owned
by The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited and Hutchison Whampoa
Ltd.


A vacancy exists for a suitably qualified BUSINESS MANAGER who
will report to the CEO of DEVCO


Applicants should have the following:


o International Business Experience
E A CPA or hold an MBA or equivalent degree.


The individual will be responsible for


D Research and preparation of feasiblity studies and Business Plans
D General administration and coordination between departmental
heads within Devco and the Port Authoriiy Group of Companies


An attractive package and an interesting and challenging work
environment are available for the right candidate.


R6sumes with supporting documentation should be submitted to:


The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Development Company Limited
P.O.Box F-42666
Freeport. Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
on or before August 15, 2005


--- "








PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE OF SALE


Caves Point Management Limited (hereafter "the Company")
invites offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Unit Number 7F
of "Caves Point Phase IV" Condominium situated on West
Bay Street in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence being a three (3) bedroom/ three (3) bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.25234% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in a
declaration of Condominium dated the 3rd day of November,
A.D., 1999 which is recorded in Volume 77 at pages 299 to
428.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at
the time of contract and the balance upon completion
within Thirty (30) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves
the right to reject any or all offers.

Any enquiries can be addressed to the Caves Point Property
manager (Tel: 327 4122 or Fax: 327 4125). Interested persons
must submit written offers addressed to The Directors, Caves
Point Management Ltd., Caves Point, West Bay Street, P.O.
Box N-65, Nassau, Bahamas to be received no later than the
close of business on Wednesday the 10th day of August A.D.,
2005.


* g
40-


"Copyrighted Material :


Syndicated Content:- -

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Statistical Advisor

The Central BankofTrinidad and Tobago isseekingto recruit a suitably qualified individual
to fill the position of StatisticalAdvisior in the Research Department.

Job Summary
To advise on and guide the collection, analysis, storage and dissemination of the Central
Bank's economic statistics; to supervise the Statistics Unit of the Research Department.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Maintains and enhances the Bank's statistical information infrastructure e.g. FAME
database and reviews statistical databases with a view to improving processes for
. ,information gathering/compilation.
* Assists in the development of a methodology for electronic storage of statistical
data.
Coordinates the development of new indicators for assessing the performance of
the financial system (i.e. for pensions and insurance, credit, mutual funds, capital
and foreign.exchange markets) and advises on the development of surveys for the
collection of economic statistics.
Ensures the preparation of relevant statistical infomation for sploading to the Bank's
website.
Manages the distribution of the Bank's statistical publications.
Coordinates data requests from the Bank's external stakeholders and maintains the
Bank's commitments to various data dissemination standards (e.g. GDDS) i
Supervises the work and output of the Statistical Unit of the Research Department.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE
A university degree in Economics, Statistics, Business, Accounting (at least Lower
Second Class honours) or a professional designation such as ACCA or CFA.
A post graduate degree in Economics or Statistics would be an asset.
Working knowledge of project management methodologies.
Proficiency in use of Statistical software, Database Management and Microsoft Office
Suite.
10 years experience with at least 5 years at a senior supervisory level.


KEY COMPETENCIES
Analytical Skills/Problem Solving The ablility to analyze issues in a thorough,'
systematic manner; to focus on critical details while keeping sight of the big picture;
to make well-reasoned, timely and sound decisions and to develop solutions.
Planning and Organising Manages and organises work in order to meet or exceed
targets.
Results Orientation- Drives for closure, results and success; persists when faced
with obstacles and challenges.
Flexibility/Adaptability Demonstrates openness and flexibility when faced with
change; copes effectively with challenging situations and adversity.
Teamwork and Cooperation Able to work with others interdependently toward
a common goal and to feel a shared responsibility with other members of a team/
department.
Communication Able to communicate effectively in writing and to prepare technical
reports for Senior Management or external publics as required.


The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package which includes a Group Health
Plan and other benefits.

Applications should be made in writing to:

Senior Manager
Human Resource and Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad & Tobago
P.O. Box 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad and Tobago

Email: hr@central-bankorg.tt
Fax No. 1-868-624-6528

Closing date for submission: August 10, 2005

All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged.


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iHabla usted ESPANOL?

Voc6 fala a lingua do

BRAZIL?


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Do you want to grow your
international investment
practice?

How committed is your firm
in supporting your international
business?


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INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT ADVISORS

When it comes to meeting the financial needs of our clients in Latin
America and other international centres, the International Advisory
Group, a division of RBC Financial Group, is second to none. We have
developed a special rapport with our Portuguese and Spanish-speaking
clients. They know our integrity, expertise, and entrepreneurial excellence
ensures would-class service is available every step of the way.

If you have exemplary skills in another language and a portfolio in
International clients, talk to us today. You are a licensed Investment
Advisor driven by the desire to achieve international business success.

You communicate effectively in Spanish, Portuguese, English and/or
another language. As a take-charge over-achiever with a flair for
realizing strategic objectives, you have a strong desire to grow your
international .practice and you have a proven track record as a sales
expert.

You also know no limits!

Discover a unique international career that will open up worlds of
opportunities for you!

Please contact:
Alex Goulden
Tel: (242) 814-8145
Fax: (242) 949-0092

Opportunities in Cayman and The Bahamas

Please respond by August 31st, 2005.



RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd.
RBC Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd., is a member company under RBC Investments.
RBC Dominion Securifies (Global) Ltd., and Royal Bank of Canada are separate ntsBC
corporate entities which are affiliated. Investment Advisors are employees of RBC 1 n stm ertt
Dominion Securities (Global) Ltd. Member CIPF. Irademark of Royal Bank of
Canada. RBC Investments is a registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used Dominion Securities
under licence. Copyright 2003. All rights reserved.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


BUSINESS Ix


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6







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 9B


System, from Page 1B


MEL"CopyrighteclMatenaIj
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FTP
CORPORATE
SERVICES
LTD.
(A Licensed Financial & Corporate Service Provider) 4 W
presents a -
Breakfast Empowerment Seminar -
On


Essentials of Estate Planning - -
(Wills, Inheritance Act, and Trusts)
Speaker: Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald
Saturday, August 6th, 2005
British Colonial Hilton
Rum Cay Room
West Bay St.
9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
Cost: $50.00 (Seminar Materials and Continental Breakfast included)
Contact: Ms. Porsha Rolle (327-3347/327-4170)
Space is limited. Please register early.


Mr McWeeney said the ACH,
which will be introduced
through the Central Bank of
the Bahamas, i.s expected
begin with a check processing
instrument before expanding
to involve several different
phases.
While the complete automa-
tion of the banking system is a
possibility, the extent of the
automation and the timeframe
for each system to be imple-
mented is also being consid-
ered during the re-measure-
ment exercise.
Meanwhile, Mr McWeeney
confirmed that- there were
three bidders involved in the
process, although no software
provider has been identified
at this point. He said also
that what has not been
finalised is the actual design
of the company that will own
the equipment. Whether the
association will own the equip-.
ment outright, outsource it or
arrive at some other agree-
ment, is still to be determined.
A source close to the
process has revealed that one
of the bidders asking to man-
age the system currently man-
ages a similar system in Bar-
bados. It is believed that this
software provider is jointly
owned by ScotiaBank
(Bahamas), Royal Bank of
Canada and FirstCaribbean
International Bank. It is also
understood that a Bahamian


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firm is participating in the
process. Earlier this year, the
Real Time Gross Settlement
(RTGS) system, which;
involves the movement of
high value transactions by


banks and is utilised by the
clearing banks and also sug-
gested for customers moving
$50,00 or more, was intro-
duced into the banking com-
unitiiy.


Swiss Private Bank
is presently seeking application
for an


OPERATION MANAGER

Requirements:

Strong Supervisory and Organization Skills
5 years Minimum Related Experience in a Private
Bank
Knowledge of French
Knowledge of all Aspects of Back Office Operations
Strong Problem Solving and Decision-Making Skills
Knowledge of Olympic Banking Software would be
an asset. /.;-i

Responsibilities:
Co-ordinate and supervise the day-to-day operation of the
bank and implement new projects as they.come, along.

Please send resume to be handle confidentially to:
P.O. Box N-7678.


Senior Market Analyst




The -Central Bankf-T -d Tobago is seeking tec-uita qualify
individual to fill the position ofSenior'MarketAnalysti theomescMarketOperations
Department. The Department is responsibleforprovidngadviceandmplementigpolicy
relative to the domestic, money and capital and foreign exchange markets

Job Summary
To assess the operational efficiencies ofthe domestic, money adcapitaland foreign ex-
change markets in order to recommend policystrategy for the implementationof monetary
and exchangetratepblicies and to undetake initiatives forstimulatingthdevelopment
:oftfhiesemiif rkets ..i ,'" .. ...' . .. -::, '

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES
* Recommends and implements improvements in the operational efficiencies of the
money, governmentsecuritiesand foreign exchangemarkets.
Monitors developments and liaises with market participants the domestic, money,
and capital and foreign exchange markets; coordinates meetings as required.
Provides guidance and coordinatesthe workoftheAnalysisi thedomestimoney
and capital and foreign exchange markets.
Conducts appropriate intervention strategies in thedomestic, foreign exchange and
money markets.
Oversees functioning of the primary dealer system and bureau de change
operations.
EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE .:
SA first degree in Economics,Banking,Finace or a relateddisipline (at least lower
second class honours).
* Professional certification in a related field will be an asset.
* Aminimum often (10) years working experiencein the financialsector with three (3)
years at a senior level.
* Previous working experience in a researchenvironment wouldbea asset.

KEY COMPETENCIES
* Leadership-atrackrecordofuccessinmotivationstaffandfosterinthe
development of others through encouraging, managing and oachingmentor ig.
* Communication Skills Excelent presentation oral skills and proven ability to
prepare reports and to convey technical informationina s nt m ner.
* Interpersonal Effectiveness proven ability to develop and maintain effective
working relationships and manage diversity in a team environment.
* Technological Awareness strong working kiiowledge of MicrosftOffice Exeell,
Powerpoint, Word and Database Management.
* Result Orientation -Ability to manage an orgaise work i aanner that minimises
potential problems in order to exceed targets.


The Bank offers an attractive remuneration package whichincludes a Group Health
Plan and other benefits.

Applications should be made in writing to:

Senior Manager
Human Resource and Communications
Central Bank of Trinidad &Ibbago
P.O. Bx 1250
Port of Spain
Trinidad and Tobago

Email: hr@central-bahkorg.tt
Fax No. 1-868-624-6528

Closing date for submission: August 10, 2005

All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.
All applications will be acknowledged


citigroup

Cititiruist (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup,-a leading financial,
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Deputy
Document Control Manager.

FUNCTIONAL/ DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore,
--trust companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas,
Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Island, New Jersey and
Singapore. Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary
.structure.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

/ Daily management of Imaging Unit
Deputy Manager, Documentation Mgmt & Control Unit (Imaging,
Safe Keeping, Dual Control, Warehouse, Records Management.)
-* 'Assist with training and administrative functions for the respective
Document control units.
Assist in systems enhancements and process re-design
Assist with implementation of global initiatives regarding document
management and control.
MIS reporting.

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Historic imaging and records management experience and familiarity
with Trust and Company documentation.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with various business units on a global basis.
Influencing, organizational and leadership skills.
Initiative and the ability to think strategically
People Management.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Operation Controls Head
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O.Box N-1576
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

Email: gieselle.campbell @citigroujip.comri

Deadline for application is August 17th, 2005.















World Championship





hopes for Bahamas team


BY THE time you
would have read this
column, I should be in Helsin-
ki, Finland for the 10th Inter-
national Amateur Athletic
Federation's World Champi-
onships in Athletics.
The championships are
scheduled to get underway on
Saturday and will run through
Sunday, August 14.
By now, you are probably
aware that we will have a vet-
eran team of 18 athletes rep-
resenting us in the same
venues that we have
participated in for the past
decade.
It's a team that I expect will
do very well.
I anticipate that we will def-
initely surpass the three bronze
medals we attained at the last
championships in Saint-Denis,
Paris France.
Two of our women seem to
be in contention to lead the
medal table for us again this
year.
Tonique Williams-Darling is
a sure bet to wearing a medal
around her neck just as she did
at the Olympic Games last
year in Athens, Greece.
It's just a matter of what
colour.
Having had former world
champion Ana Guevara's
number, both in Mexico and
in Europe, Williams-Darling
now has another challenge to
contend with.

It's Jamaican-born Amer-
ican Sanya Richards,
who has posted the world's
fastest time of 49.28, just ahead
of Williams-Darling's 49.69.
Add Christine Amertil into
the mix and the Bahamas
could again have a legitimate
Shot at a pair of medals. That's
if Amertil can run fast enough
through the.rounds to secure a
good lane in the final.
Chandra Sturrup is definite-
ly back and, if she's anywhere
near the form that she was in
before her injury-prone sea-
son last year, she should be
back on the medal podium.
Only this time I anticipate
that she will move up from
bronze to possibly gold.
She has the world's fastest
time of 10.84 and from what
we've seen so far, she's just
getting to run even faster with
more competition on the. side
of her.
The men's 4 x 400 relay
team is back, with the excep-
tion of Dennis Darling.
Instead, Avard Moncur,
Nathaniel McKinney and Chris


STUBBS


OPINION


Brown will have Andrae
Williams, Aaron Cleare and
Troy McIntosh to rely on.
It's a good mixture of youth
and experience and although
the United States, who got dis-
qualified in Paris, along with
Jamaica are the favourites, the
Bahamas team is just as hun-
gry for a medal.
Cleare, Williams, McKinney
and Brown ran 3:01.08 in win-
ning the Colinalmperial Senior
Central American and
Caribbean Championships for
the fourth best time so far this
year.

Time
But the only country that
has ran faster is Great Britain,
which has the best time of
3:00.51. The other teams came
from the collegiate ranks.
That speaks volumes, but it
doesn't rule out arch-rivals
United States and Jamaica,
which haven't ran too many
relay teams this year.
The Bahamas' other relay
team, the women's 4 x 1, didn't
contend for a medal in Paris.
The team of Timicka Clarke,
Sevatheda Fynes, Debbie Fer-
guson and Shandria Brown just
missed making the final eight
in Paris.
But without Ferguson in this
year's line-up, I still feel that
our team of Sturrup, Fynes,
Clarke, Philippa Arnett-Willie
and Shandria Brown are a
threat to be in the medal hunt


this time around.
At the CAC Championships,
the combo of Clarke, Arnett-
Willie, Fynes and Sturrup ran
43.48 for the 14th fastest time
this year, but the fifth for a
nation. With a little more
work, they could be right up
there.
It's just a pity that we
haven't been able to field a
women's 4 x 4 or the men's 4 x
1 relay teams, especially after
they both gave a gallant effort
in trying to qualify at the CAC
Championships.
If there are any athletes who
can emerge as upsets at these
championships, they could be
Leevan 'Superman' Sands and
Lavern Eve.

ands will have a more
difficult task as he's
torn between two events this
year. He's trying to go for the
double in the long and triple
jump. If one doesn't come
through, at least he has the
other to fall back on.
Eve was an eighth place fin-
isher in Paris. But she's been.
so consistent since then, mak-
ing it to her final in the
Olympics last year, that she
should be motivated to really
put the finishing touches on
her long and illustrious career.

Achieved
She goes into the champi-
onships having achieved the
13th best throw with her sea-
son's best at the CAC Cham-
pionships. She will have her
hands full with the Cubans.
The outside chance for a
medal will have to be with the
two male quarter-milers, Chris
Brown and Andrae Williams.
The duo are neck-and-neck
in the standings at 44.89 and
44.90 respectively. But in order
to be a medal contender, they
will have to at least break
Moncur's national record of
44.45.
The field of entries who
have ran faster or close to that
time is just too deep.
The other three Bahamians
competing, Dereck Atkins in
the men's 100, Dominic
Demeritte in the men's 200
and Jackie Edwards in the
women's long jump, should be
hard pressed to make the final.
But in track and field, any-
thing could happen.
So let's not count anybody
out just yet. It just makes the
trip to this year's champi-
onships that much more
intriguing.


eO py r ig htfed Mate ria I

Sy nd icated Conte nt

Available from Commercial News Providers"'


The wei





for Baha


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter Nation
POWERLIFTERS throughout
the Bahamas have begun prepara- /-fl
tion for the sport's most illustrious / ,11 LS l
showdown of the year.
The Bahamas Powerlifting Fed-
eration will host its 24th Annual
National Championships on Sep-. up to the challenge.
tember 24th at a venue yet to be "The seasoned lifters
announced. form their best when
This year's championships will come out and perform
feature over 50 competitors from said. "It forces them t
islands all across the Bahamas com- game up and creates an
peting in over 15 categories, ter show for the public
There will be nine open cate- Burnside added that
gories for men, five open categories juniors this year is the
for women, and three categories aggressive recruitment
for junior powerlifters. implemented by the fed
Federation president Rex Burn- "We have really becc
side said the Nationals will be an on setting the junior
exciting event due to a cross-sec- motion," he said. "We
tion of junior lifters and seasoned. sued and successfully
veterans, number of young junior
"We expect this to be a great suc- will one day replace 1
cess," he said. "Sixty per cent of lifters of today."
the lifters in the competition will He said the recruiting
be juniors so the public will defi- led by Jay Hennfield h
nitely treated to a show." leaps and bounds over t
Burnside said the veteran lifters months.
will undoubtedly be ready to step "The progress we hav
many of the young lifte


ght is nearly





'mas powerlil


Championships,

.mber 24th


always per-
the juniors
n well," he
o step their
overall bet-
the influx, of
result of an
nt program
deration.
>me focused
program in
e have pur-
recruited a
r lifters who
the veteran
ng program
as grown in
the past few
'e seen from
ers has been


excellent and, if they continue
working with Jay Hennfield, the
best is yet to come," he said. "We
expect many of these juniors to
compete successfully alongside the
veteran lifters at nationals."
Juniors, defined by the BPF's
standards, are lifters under the age
of 23.
The federation will use the
Nationals as a qualifier for teams
for the upcoming Pan Am Cham-
pionships and World Champi-
onships.
Both events will be running con-
currently November 14-17 in Mia-
mi, Florida.
Burnside said the Bahamas
expects to field one if its largest
teams, due to the close proximity of
the event and the progress of the
lifters.
"We have a lot of prospects and
we have seen a lot of development


as far as the young lifters are con-
cerned," he said. "This will not only
be one of the biggest national teams
ever assembled, but also one of the
best."
Burnside said fans should expect
to see the most prominent names in


H
pret
lifted
case
ber
man


powerlifting on stage competing at
the event, including Bob Brown,
Michael Johnson, Borilin Darling,
Leslie White, who burst onto the
national scene last year shattering a
number of records a junior, and
Leany Diaz, who is amongst the
top women in the sport in the coun-
try. She won a silver medal at the
North American Powerlifting
Championships in June.


yea
Pov
five
said
erai
tion
con
of
hav
grain
som


over





fters


[e said, with over a month to
pare, the country's best power-
ers appear determined to show-
e their skills.
There are high hopes for a num-
of lifters to produce perfor-
nces similar to Leslie White last

a great
it of the lifters
ill be juniors
initely treated


resident Rex Burnside
r and who are going to take
verlifting forward for the next
to 10 years in this country," he
i. "There are always a few vet-
n lifters who decline competi-
or retire, but that is why we
tinue to stress the importance
getting involved and why we
e this ongoing recruiting pro-
mme. You will definitely see
ie upsets."


"We expect this to b
success. Sixty per cer
in the competition w
so the public will def
to a show."

Federation p


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE 11B


.TRIBUNE SPORTS









THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


-~~ EB[ UtiStic


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Bahamas team ready for Caribbean clash


THE Bahamas under 15 boys
national soccer team are going for
goal in the Caribbean Football
Union championships in Trinidad
and Tobago today.
The tournament, which has
attracted several big teams from
throughout the Caribbean, is being
used as preparation for the team in
their bid to qualify for major events
next year.


The friendly tournament will be
played at the Hasely Crawford Sta-
dium between host country Trinidad
and Tobago, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, Anguilla, St Kitts and
Nevis, Jamaica, British Virgin
Islands and the Bahamas.

Preparing
The 18-member team has been
preparing for their first warm-up
tournament this year since early
July, playing trial matches against


Kick-off
Bahamas will kick-off the tour-
nament against the British Virgin
Islands before taking on Jamaica on
Friday. On Sunday the team will
play St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
The tournament is set to wrap-up
on immediately following the game,
with the team returning home on
Monday.


Freshnel Fleurizard
Dominique Bannister
CJ Smith
Michael Bethel
Ambry Moss
Justin Sealey
Junior Veius
Duran Mitchell
Nolan Cancino
Ehren Hanna
Jared Higgs
Shem Moss
Lequardo Newbold


Ramon Strachan
Raymius Johnson
Chris Larson
Sydney Watkins
Franz Taylor
* TECHNICAL STAFF
Wilson Bain National Coach
Ian Hutchinson -
Assistant Coach
Kilroy Farrington -
Equipment Manager
Gary White -
Technical Director


W D01avis ym is set







for VOolleb all action


"Copyrighted Materia
Syndicated Content I
Available from Commercial News Pi


Ai r nId a%4


N By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
AFTER a week of post-
ponement, volleyball is
roviders" back in action at the DW
Davis Gymnasium.
The New Providence
Volleyball Association
(NPVA) opened up their
2005 premier. league on
July 24th, but, due to the
tight booking of the high
school gym, play had to be
postponed for a week.
The postponement will
force the NPVA to push
the regular season back,
especially after the league's
expansion.


Squad
This year, the NPVA
welcomed three new men's
teams and a ladies squad
to the competition. Last
year the league had seven
men's and six women's
teams.
The national gym, Sir
Kendal Isaacs, has also
bee.n provided to the
NPVA, for times when the
DW Davis gym is not avail-
able.
Association president


Friday August 5, 2005
(D. W. Davis)
WOMEN'S MATCH
7:00pm Da Basement
Lady's vs. Lady Techs
MEN'S MATCH
8:00pm Star Mart vs. Gold
Sunday August 7, 2005
(D. W. Davis)
MEN'S MATCH
3:00pm Police vs. Pass6


Paul Farquharson said:
"We are grateful for the
other gym. But games will
only be played at Sir
Kendal Isaacs when DW
Davis isn't available to us.
"Our original home is at
DW Davis, but there are so
many activities being held
at the school now making it
difficult for us to schedule
games.
"One week we have
access to the gym, another
we are locked out because
of the other sports.
"Volleyball needs a
home to ensure that the
status of the sport remains
at a high level. Right now
we can't invite the public
out because the 'iffy'


WOMEN'S MATCH
4:00pm Diggers Lady's vs.
Scottsdale Cougars

Monday August 8,2005
(D. W. Davis)
WOMEN'S MATCH
7:00pm Scottsdale Vixens
vs. RBDF Stingrays
MEN'S MATCH
8:00pm Intruders vs. Da
Basement


schedule."
Other leagues playing in
the gym are the Bahamas
Football Association's Fut-
sal league, the New Provi-
dence Women's Basketball-
Association and the Gov-
ernment Basketball
League.

Opening
Since the opening of the
league, only two games
have been played, despite
eight games on schedule.
Scheduling two games for
this Friday and two more
for Sunday, Farquharson
believes that the constant
play will improve the inter-
est and skill levels of play-


ers and fans.
He added: "We are try-
ing to have at least three
days of continuous play,
games being on Sunday,
Monday and Wednesday's.
Fridays if necessary.

Fan
"The more play we have
the better the league will
get. Our fan base will
expand along with the
interest of persons return-
ing to play.
"More play will also
mean new players coming
into the league."
Friday's match-ups will
be between the league's
defending women champi-
ons, Da Basement, against
the Lady Technicians. This
will be followed by Star
Mart and the Kalik Gold.
On Sunday, Police will
take on Passe, one of the
newer squads, at 3pm, with
the lady's match-up
between First Caribbean
Bank Diggers and Scotts-
dale Cougars.
Although the NPVA's
junior did not get off the
ground, the association will
divide their premier league
into two seasons.


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


The Tribune


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
.... Page 2C,


crowned


Miss


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
W hile most Bahami-
ans were in the
middle of enjoying
their emancipation
holiday on Sunday,
July 31, nine Christian young women
were busy representing themselves as
"daughters of the kingdom" in the
10th annual Miss Gospel Bahamas
pageant.
The pageant, the vision of Great
Commission Ministries International,
attracted hundreds to the Rainforest
Theatre of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort in support of Willissa Saun-
ders, Miss Wilsu Plumbing; Louna
Pierre, Ms Youth in Action; Candera
Gilbert, Miss Good News Baptist
Church; Rokell Major, Miss Zion
Baptist Church; Lakia Williamson,
Miss Fellowship Baptist Church; Moi-
ka Rolle, Miss Greater Chippingham
Church of God; Alexia Virgil, Miss
Garfi Designs; Krysta Williams, Miss
Bethel Baptist Church; and Saman-
tha Burrows, Miss Shield of Faith
Ministries.
And while all of these young
women could be considered "daugh-
ters of the kingdom" the theme for
the pageant only one would be
:rowned.
At the end of the night, Moika
Rolle,19, would take the title of Miss
Gospel Bahamas 2005.
Ms Rolle's decision to enter the
pageant came in April, when her pas-
tor, Bishop Carl Lafrenier, called her
into his office on a Thursday after
church to ask if she was interested.
Based on his recommendation, and
the support of other church members,
Ms Rolle decided to give it a try.
It would be a "learning experience"
that she would never forget.
The most meaningful aspect of this


* NINETEEN-year-old Moika Rolle, Miss Gospel Bahamas 2005
(Photo courtesy ofjunkanoobeat.com)


experience, she says, was not so much
the pageant itself, but the pre-pageant
activities. It was in these exercises that
she received "all-around-training" in
being a "queen".
Weeks leading up to the big night,
each contestant was involved in vari-
ous activities geared to "groom" them
into young women.
A retreat, where the contestants
were trained in Christian living, eti-
quette, a courtesy call on the Gover-
nor General, and how-to make-up ses-
sions were only some-of the activities
the contestants were exposed to.
But apart from participating in pre-
pageant activities, organisers advised
the contestants to spend time in per-
sonal prayer and meditation before
God. They were instructed to read
the book of Esther, and be inspired by
her story; being transformed from an
ordinary woman to the position of
queen.
It was a suggestion that Ms Rolle
took rather seriously, reading Esther's
story daily.
"So every day I would read a chap-
ter of Esther. I would read the book
over and over and over because
Esther only has about eight chapters
or so. So I constantly read it to try
and make the story a part of my life
and get it into my spirit," she told Tri-
bune Religion. :
Despite her desire to be a part of all
pageant activities, she ended up miss-
ing the float parade (just two weeks
before the big night) as a result of an
car accident. It was '" "iihrdle" that
left Ms Rolle with no broken bones
but pain throughout her body.
"I didn't attend.the float parade and
that was a struggle right there," she
said. "You know, just coming out of
an accident your body doesn't feel

See PAGEANT, 2C


St Matthew's Anglican Church choirs


host annual Summer Extravaganza


* By CECILIA STRACHAN
THE choirs of St Matthew's Anglican
Church, under the direction of Vivienne
Francis, hosted its annual Summer Extrav-
aganza with a wonderful blend of sacred
and cultural music, both classical and mod-
ern.
The concert featured performances by
the church's senior choir, the newly formed
Sunrise Choir made up of members who
attend the 7.15am service and duets by
Ena Stubbs and Stephanie Francis, and
Vylana Davis and .Salome Francis-Charles.
Performing solo were Dorsey McPhee,
Catherine Archer, Cher Strachan and
Matthew Arnett on percussion.
This year's extravaganza, held on Fri-
day, July 29, was also part of celebrations
marking St Matthew's 203 years of dedi-
cation to Christian witness (July 18).
Choir director Vivienne Francis became
the organist titular and director of St
Matthew's Choir 20 years ago. In Septem-
ber, Mrs Francis will be celebrating her
20th anniversary with the choir. A special


* MEMBERS of St Matthew's Church choir
sing and fill the community with joyous songs
at the church's annual Sumnier Extravaganza.
The choir is conducted by church organist,
Vivian Francis.


church service is scheduled to mark the
occasion, with guest performances by
choirs from other Anglican churches.


Members who have been ministering in
the choir for 20 years or more will also be
recognised during the special service.


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Gosp el Bahamas








PAGE 20, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4,2005THE TRIBUNE


BI~RLGOI S B


* REVEREND Walter Hanchell, pastor of Great Commission Ministries International,
presents Moika Rolle with her bouquet of flowers and trophy


(Photos courtesy ofjunkanoobeat.com)


Pageant, from Page 1C


like doing much work but you
have to persevere in spite of
it."
Her private Bible studies and
periods of fasting and prayer
before God renewed her
strength, in a sense, and made
her as confident as any other
queen come pageant night, she
said.

Contestant

But like any other pageant
contestant, she remembers
being nervous at points
throughout the pageant, espe-


cially at the talent segment.
Playing the trumpet in her
church's band and singing in
the youth choir for a number of
years should have made her
comfortable enough. But a
church crowd is different from
the pageant scenario, gospel-
themed or not.
Calling for one of the auxil-
iary team members to pray for
and with her, Ms Rolle was
ready to go on stage and min-
ister.
"Fortunately, the prayer just
came through and I went out
there and did my talent. I sang


and played 'That Name' by
Yolanda Adams," she recalls.
As a "daughter of the king-
dom", Ms Rolle wants to live
her life in holiness and humili-
ty. That was her response to
the final question on pageant
night what are two qualities
that a "daughter of the king-
dom" should possess?

Holiness

Said Ms Rolle: "I believe
holiness is the number one
thing because God is a holy
God. So if I proclaim to be a


'daughter of the kingdom' or
if anybody proclaims to be a
'daughter of the kingdom' they
should be living a life of holi-
ness because they represent
God who is holy.
"And humility, because as
being a 'daughter of the king-
dom' your number one goal
should be to reach lost souls.
And you can't reach lost souls
if you are full of pride, if you
are, so to speak, stuck-up, you
have to know how to come
down to their level and know
how to reach out to them in
order to help to bring them to


Jesus Christ."
Now that the torch has been'
passed on to her, Ms Rolle says
that her overall goal will be to
improve the lives of young per-
sons.
She has taken a fresh
approach to her platform and
has given it a catchy name -
Operation Destination.

Programme

The new Miss Gospel
Bahamas hopes that this com-
munity-based programme will
involve park rallies, talent


explosions, youth workshops
and seminars, and will be a col-
laborative effort between her-
self and various youth organi-
sations in the country.
"We want to bring young
persons from where they are
to where they ought to be. And
with this platform I would like
to' get as many of the youth
groups in the Bahamas and in
my denomination.involved in
this, because I know that I am
only one person. And there is
strength in unity," said Ms
Rolle.


Church Iio


AGAPE
FULL
GOSPEL
BAPTIST
CHURCH

THE church at Golden Palm
Estates and Malcolm Road, off
Kennedy Subdivision, is sched-
uled to hold the following ser-
vices:
Sunday, 7 am Morning
Glory Service, 10 am Divine
Worship Service
, Monday, 7 pm Refueling
Station
s Wednesday, 7 pm Bible
4tudy (Deep Sea Diving)
r Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
i ig
Saturday, 1 pm Children's
~Iinistry
For further information, call
328-6937 (P 0 Box: EE16151)
Fax: 323-3328


ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
August 7,7 am Sung Mass,
10 am Sunday School and
Adult Bible Classes, 11 am -
Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class


Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday


School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting


PARISH[
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledlon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist,, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:
www.holytrinilybahamas.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank.
Parking is available imme-


diately behind the Kirk. Visit
us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com


FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD

THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service


Correction

IN a Tribune Religion article published last week under the headline "Knowledge is key to fight against HIV/AIDS", the following
statistics were mentioned as achievements in the fight against HIV/AIDS: a three-quarter upscale in anti-viral medicine, 25 per cent
decline in bed occupancy, three per cent adult prevalence and a two per cent decrease in maternal transmission.
This information is incorrect.
The achievements outlined by Minister of Health Dr Marcus Bethel included "a reduction in new reported HIV infections, a 50
per cent reduction in the bed occupancy rate for HIV on the infectious disease wards of the public hospitals, an empty pediatric aids
unit, a more than four-fold increase in the number of persons on anti-retroviral medications, dramatic disease in the number of death
from HIV/AIDS and a growing focus on youth HIV/AIDS and a growing focus on youth IHV prevention program."
Dr Bethel also noted that there has been a reduction of mother to child infections from 30 per cent to less than two per cent.


- -


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













* *b *Age old




2aspromises

0 By REV ANGELA C posture of prayer, Scripture
BOSFIELD MEDITATION .reading, singing praises to
PALACIOUS God? Are we exercising
our freedom to worship
DURING this time of with a grateful heart and
aEmancipation celebration, steadfast faith?
our thoughts remind us to ,


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
C elebrating 25
years as a
Catholic priest,
Monsignor John
T Johnson of
Eleuthera, looking back on
the happiest years of his life, is
thankful to God.
"I am grateful to Almighty
God for all the goodness He
has bestowed on me," he said
as he talked in anticipation of
Monday's celebrations.
"These past 25 years have
been the happiest of my life
thus far. There have been
some trials and tribulations,
but through all of them God
has been good. There have
been some mountains I had
to climb. Through the grace
of God I did. There have been
some sadness in my life, but
through the consolation of
God I survived."
On Sunday, August 7,
Msgr. Johnson will celebrate
Mass with his three parishes
on Eleuthera St. Gregory's
at 8 am, St. Catherine's in
Hatchet Bay at 10 am and St.
Paul's in Governor's Harbour
at noon.
Asked how he plans to cel-
ebrate, he replied:
"I have no major plans, I
-am just thankful for the jour-
ney that I am on; that is serv-
ing the Lord."
"The parishioners are using
this opportunity to thank
him," said Mr. Mark Kemp,
parish council president at St.
Catherine's in Hatchet Bay.
"The celebration will begin


with a mass on Sunday, and
we will have activities for the
next four months, which will
culminate in a banquet to be
held the last Friday in Novem-
ber in Hatchet Bay during our
annual bazaar."
Msgr. Johnson is well loved
at Eleuthera, by Catholics and
non-Catholics alike. He is
loved by his students at North
Eleuthera High School, said



"I am
grateful to
Almighty
God for all
the goodness
He has
bestowed
on me."
Monsignor John T
Johnson


Mrs. Maryann Farrington.
"Msgr. Johnson is a humble
man of God, one who is down
to earth," she said.
"I remember his ordination
like it was yesterday. I had
travelled to Nassau to have
my third child when labour
pains started .on the 8th of
August. I prayed that the Lord
would not have me deliver my
child until after his ordination.


My prayer was answered and
a few hours afterward, the
pains started and I said, 'Now
Lord your servant can depart
for my eyes have seen the sal-
vation'," she said as she quot-
ed Zachariah, the high priest.
"If no one else appreciates
him we love him on Eleuthera
for he is our home and own
boy."
Msgr. Johnson was born in
the farming community of
Gregory Tow,n to the late
Prince Edward and Ida John-
son. He was ordained on
August 8, 1980 at St. Francis
Xavier Cathedral in Nassau
by the late Archbishop
Samuel Carter of Kingston,
Jamaica, in an emotional ser-
vice.
He began his priesthood
formation and studies at St.
John Vianney Seminary in
Tunapuna, Trinidad. He holds
a Master's degree in Religious
Education from St. John's
University, Minnesota. He is
the pastor of St. Gregory's
Catholic Church, Gregory
Town, Eleuthera, which
includes the parishes of St.
Catherine's in Hatchet Bay
and St. Paul's in Governor's
Harbour. He formerly served
at Our Lady of the Holy Souls
and the Church of the Resur-
rection in Nassau.
In addition to his priestly
responsibilities, he is the Fam-
ily Life teacher at North
Eleuthera High School.
"To God be the glory great
things He has done and will
continue to do in my life," said
the monsignor.


'Chosen to be blessed'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
BETHEL Baptist Church is celebrating its
215th birthday this year, under the theme "Cho-
sen to be blessed".
Pastor Timothy Stewart and members of
Bethel Baptist, referred to as the "Mother
Church", are proud to have reached this mile-
stone in their development.
According to the church's archives: "Ten score
and 15 years ago, the hand of God providen-
tially guided to the shore of Nassau, Bahamas a
small band of men marginalised by society, who
would be instrumental in laying the foundation
for the Baptist denomination."
Architects
Records suggest that Prince Williams and
Sambo Scriven were the architects for what is
now Bethel Baptist Church. The men are
believed to have purchased lots 20 and 21 in
Delancy Town, upon which they built a wooden
chapel. They called it "Bethel Meeting House".
The chapel was probably constructed by
Prince Williams who was listed on the deed as
carpenter.
Ground breaking ceremonies for Bethel's
Meeting House were held on Monday, August 1,
.1790. It was the first church in the vicinity and
the first building ever built in the underdevel-
oped area.
Prince Williams served as the pastor of Bethel
Baptist church for 44 years. In 1833 he left Bethel
Baptist and started St John's Native Baptist
Society.
Bethel Baptist's present pastor, Rev Stewart,
was ordained in August 1977 at Mt Zion Baptist
Church.
He received his bachelor's degree from the
American Baptist Theological Seminary and
attended Southern Baptist Theological Semi-
nary in Louisville, Kentucky. Rev Stewart was
elected pastor of Bethel Baptist Church on
November 3, 1982, and was installed on Novem-
ber 26, 1982.
Under the leadership of Pastor Stewart, Bethel
Baptist Church is continuing to make an out-
standing contribution to the spiritual develop-
ment of the congregation, the community and
the country.
Administrative
The church employs four full-time associate
ministers who help Pastor Stewart minister to the
congregation's needs. A team for the church
office is also employed to carry out the admin-
istrative work of the church.
Bethel Baptist continues to expand because of
the role it plays in the community. The church
has undergone extensive renovations, adminis-
trative offices have been built and properties
have been acquired to meet the growing
demands of the church.
Recently, the challenge has been undertaken
to evangelise and minister to the needs of the.
community where the church is located.


The church's involvement in the community is
clear through the establishment, of:
Bethel Baptist Cooperative Credit Union;
Bethel's Soup Kitchen, which serves 1,000
meals weekly to the sick, shut-in and needy per-
sons in the community and/or church twice dai-
ly;
Clothing drive programme where clothing is
distributed once per week to persons in need;
Senior Saints Ministry that meets once per
week to minister to the needs of the elderly in
the church and community;
Outreach Ministry to the schools where two
full-time persons minister to the needs of the
youth and children in the schools;
A Computer Lab and After-School pro-
gramme to target the young people and assist
those who may need help academically;
An evangelistic programme that involves
the whole church going into the community on
Sunday mornings (as well as Good Friday) for
home and street ministry;
A successful follow-up programme in the
surrounding area of the church;
A vibrant Youth and Children's Ministry
that caters to the needs of young people in the
church and the community at large;
Bethel's Marching Band, Liturgical Dance
Ministry and Hand Bell Ringers Group and;
Music Ministry which employs full-time
musicians.
Strengthen
Pastor Stewart, moderator for the Bethel Bap-
tist Association, has embarked on a new pro-
gramme to strengthen member churches.
throughout the Family Islands.
Pastor Stewart is also 2nd Moderator for the
Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Edu-
cational Convention, and internationally, he was
appointed International President of the Pro-
gressive National Baptist Convention, with
responsibility for 3,000 churches in Africa,
Europe, Haiti and Cuba. As a result of this rela-
tionship with the progressive National Baptist
Convention, he was able to host the first Nation-
al Baptist Convention Winter Board Meeting
in the Bahamas, in 1991. This was the first time
the convention was held outside the US.
The church is now preparing to deal with the
difficult challenges that confront the family, the
community and the country.
These objectives are to be met through the
pastoral care ministry, the preaching of the
gospel, the. teaching ministry of the church, and
the necessary expansion of the church's facilities.
Special anniversary celebration services will be
held this Sunday at 10am and 4pm.


INTERNATIONAL


AUGUST 14- 8, 2005

CARMICHAEL RD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS


THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005, PAGE.3C


THE TRIBUNE


'M`.MMMAV M-Mg


It is essential and critical to understand that-The Kingdom of God was notmth6



t thaintroduction of a religion, but a governing systen-i established in the spirit of
n'ian and manifested in his charact6r, values, n-ioral and behavior.
There is no other alternative in history, nor present programs or future prospects
hat can completely address today's challenges We invite ),'OLI to prepare
personal fransforn-iation that,vill equip you to iin )act vour
family, community, nation and the wor for a
)sit Ott 11*Ict,





: TH


PAGE 4C. THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


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\


I







PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


REIGO


There is no need for them to go away; you
give them something to eat!


(Matt. 14:16).


* By FATHER JAMES MOULTRIE
Jesus fed 5,000 people one day in the desert. Everyone
got as much as they wanted, and still there were 12 bas-
kets of food left over. It was a dramatic display of com-
passion and generosity on His part. But Jesus probably
would not have done if it were not for the generosity of
the young boy with the five loaves and two fish, who was willing
to share his lunch with the others.
Sometimes a small deed takes on importance far beyond its
actual value. After the boy voluntarily gave up his lunch, Jesus
blessed it and gave it to the apostle to be distributed to the peo-
ple.
When the apostles said, "All we have is five loaves and two fish.
What is that among so many?" Jesus could have said, "That's no
good, forget the whole thing. Send the people home." But He said
no such thing. Instead, He took the loaves and fish, and with
them fed the people. Jesus takes the little we have and uses it to
do great things.
There is a tendency these days to go for the big and dramatic,
and neglect the small. We may be tempted to think that because
our contribution is small, it will make no difference. But every lit-
tle helps. Besides, our example of generosity may encourage oth-
ers to be generous, and before you know it, there is enough for all.
Some us may believe that we cannot feed all the hungry people of
the world, or even of the neighbourhood. But this miracle tells us
that if we do what we can, God will do the rest.
People are still hungry today, and Jesus depends on us to feed


* FATHER JAMES MOULTRIE


them. Feeding the hungry is one of the greatest acts of mercy we
can show. We do a good job of feeding the hungry as a parish with
our soup kitchen, but not every member gives to that effort. We
have a food barrel at the back of the church, with the intention that
every member brings a non-perishable food item every Sunday,
and from that barrel we could more effectively feed the poor. But
few people remember to bring something. I hope that we will
begin to do something about that. When you do your grocery
shopping, purchase one can item for the food barrel and help us
feed the hungry. Be like the lad in the miracle: give of what you
have, even if it is only a smalltamount. God will multiply it.
Feeding the hungry is something we can do. But there is food
which only God can give. Jesus was concerned about those who
were hungry. But He did not just feed people's bodies; He also
nourished their minds, their souls, and their spirits. The people
Jesus fed that day in the desert left filled in body, mind, and spir-
it. The miracle involved much more than giving food to hungry
people. It was an expression of the love and care of God for His
people. The food is but a symbol of the generosity of life God
wants us to lead.
The feeding is also an anticipation of the Eucharist where Jesus
feeds the spiritually hungry. In the Eucharist we taste the love of
God. The proof that we have experienced the love of God as
expressed in the Eucharist will be our willingness to love and
help others. The real miracle was not Jesus' ability to multiply
loaves and fish, but the ability to get people to share what little
food they had. What will you do now?
As I write this meditation, I am actually in Israel, on the spot
where the story unfolded.
Rev James Moultrie is the Rector of St Matthew's Anglican
Parish.


Anglican



Church



Men in



monthly



worship



service

THE Anglican Church Men
Council visited St George's
Anglican Church on Sunday;
for its monthly corporate wor-
ship service.
The ACM Council has des-
ignated one Sunday of the;
month as its corporate service,
at which time various church-
es in the diocese will be visit-!
ed. St George's was the venue
for July.
The Sons of Thunder, the;
council's male chorus, per-'
formed at the service under;
the direction of Adrian!
Archer and Father Shaz Turn-
quest, founder.


PICTURED are mem-
bers of the ACM Council
along with members of the:
Sons of Thunder and Rev Dr
Roland Hamilton, assistant
priest at St George's.


Young honourees in annual Bayfest spotlight


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
YOUNG people were celebrated
at the annual Bayfest in Hatchet
Bay, Eleuthera during a special ser-
vice held at St Stephen's Baptist
Church.
Honourees young people liv-
ing in Eleuthera and those specifi-
cally from Hatchet Bay who are
working in other parts of the coun-
try were divided into two cate-
gories, students who excelled in
their final year of high school and
those who are excelling in their cho-
sen profession.
Students recognised for high
school achievement included
Shereece Miller, McNeil Newbold,
Claudette Calixte and Glenique
Scavella, all of whom were gradu-
ated from the Central Eleuthera
High School with a grade point
average of three points and above.
All are expected to attend colleges
locally and abroad this Fall.
Honoured for excelling in their
fields were Elder Reginald Saun-
ders in religion; Corporal Stephen
Carey; Nurse Tamazina Farrington;
Dr Odia Stubbs; and lawyer, Robin
Scavella.
The church was filled to capacity


with family, friends and well-wish-
ers during Sunday's service.
The honourees were commended
and challenged by Rev Lambert
Farrington, who said that if the
Bahamas had a "few more like
them", older people could rest
assured that the community and
country would be in good hands.
He said that today's youth are
living in extremely challenging
times. "We should not let any
opportunity pass without recognis-
ing and celebrating their success in
academics, sports and specialised
careers.
"In spite of how the situation
might appear, I assure you that all is
definitely not lost because of the
contribution of young people whom
we honour this evening, and indeed
this entire weekend. And these are
only a few of the wonderful young
role models of Hatchet Bay origins.
They must hear from us, we must
let them know that the entire com-
munity is depending on them to
make a difference in their commu-
nity and indeed the Bahamas."
During his sermon, Rev Farring-
ton cited three young biblical char-
acters who made a great impact on
their societies.


David, found in Samuel 17:32-
37;47, was a courageous young man,
said Rev Farrington who acknowl-
edged that today's young people
are facing many Goliaths drugs,
peer pressure and sexual abuse,



"We should not let

any opportunity pass
without recognising
and celebrating their
success in academics,
sports and specialised
careers. "
Rev Lambert Farrington



among others.
"However, they must be told that
they can overcome the giants in
their lives by trusting Jesus Christ,
who will empower them with
courage to stand boldly against


these giants or hindrances and
defeat them," said the reverend.
The second character cited was
Joseph Genesis 41:38-44 a
young man of integrity. "Integrity
does have its rewards, so as we cel-
ebrate our youth let us encourage
them to never ever sell themselves
short but to hold on to integrity,
which can also be defined as moral-
ity, honesty, decency and clean liv-
ing," said Rev Farrington.
He encouraged young people in
the congregation to always main-
tain their integrity and not to com-
prise their principles by looking the
other way or give in to situations
laced with wrong doing, but strive
to be like Joseph. "If you have to
run, run for your life, but hold on to
your integrity because in the end
you will be greatly rewarded."
Esther was the third and final
biblical character he used as an
example of a positive young role
model.
Esther was a young woman of
determination, said Rev Farring-
ton. "Just like in Esther's day there
are many 'Hamans' in our commu-
nities people who want our youth
to bow down to them or engage in
negative activities. They will


instruct you to say and do this or
that, and if you do not conform they
will try and destroy you."
A young Jewish girl whose iden-
tity was not previously known to
the king or the people around her,
Esther was determined not to bow
to the wishes of the wicked
"Hamans".
"And because of her quiet but
firm determination she was able to
save the lives of her people from
being destroyed," said Rev Far-
rington.
He challenged all young people
to be courageous like David, "stand
against the evil and destructive
forces that may rise up against
you".
And hold on to their integrity
and character like Joseph, even
when others do not agree.
He urged them to be an Esther,
to set and reach the positive goals
that lay ahead.
In closing he left the congregation
with a verse from Proverbs 3:5&6:
Trust in the Lord with all your
heart and lean not on your own
understanding; in all your ways
acknowledge Him, and He will
direct your paths.


- I s I


-~a 1 111~-- 11 II ,r II I








THE TRIBUNE


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