Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00167
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: July 28, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00167
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.202 THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005 .PRICE 500


E


Explosion leaves nephew


in critical condition


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
AN explosion rocked Salt Pond, Long Island
yesterday afternoon, killing a "great" boat
builder and seriously injuring his nephew.
Mack Elijah Knowles, in his late fifties, of the
well-known Mangrove Bush boat building fam-
ily, was in the hold of his vessel, m/v Summer
Crab II, when the explosion occurred around
noon Wednesday. The boat was docked in the
Salt Pond harbour. His nephew, Jessie
Knowles, 24, was seriously injured. He was
clinging to his life last night.
".'ITlt'ry ugiylpiicture," Nicolas Zervos,
Mr Knowles' brother-in-law told The Tribune
yesterday.
According to a family member, Mr Knowles,
an electrician, and his nephew were trying to
repair a loose fixture on the boat's freezer in
preparation for crawfish season when it is
believed a leak.in the (freon) gas line sparked
the explosion when Mr Knowles lit a blow
torch.
The force of the explosion threw Mr Knowles
back off his feet. He was burnt so badly that


"his skin was loose from the bones", said Col-
in Cartwright, a sailor.
A crew member on the upper deck felt the
violent impact of the blast below and when he
tried to pull the men from the flames he
received minor burns, said Mr Cartwright.
It is reported that Mr Knowles walked out of
the hold before collapsing in the front cab of a
pick-up truck.
Jessie, who was shielded by his uncle in the
explosion, jumped overboard to escape the
intense heat of the blast and was taken to the
clinic on the back of the truck.
Mr Knowles reportedly died in the settle-
ment of Gray's on his way to the clinic in Dead-
man's Cay.
The death marked another serious blow to
the Knowles family, which buried Mr Knowles'
son two years ago following a car accident.
Two emergency flights were dispatched to
Long Island, one with a doctor, nurse and para-
medic to treat Jessie; and the other to transfer
Mr Knowles' body to New Providence.
SEE page 14


* RICK Bodge, senior vice-president of Kerzner
International, shakes the hand of Richard Wilson, CEO
of Cavalier Construction Company, after the signing of a
millionn contract yesterday to provide a conference
centre at Atlantis. See page three for the story.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


Bahamas 'could lose

4.5 million tourists'


* By KRISTINA McNEIL
OVER the next 10 years the
Bahamas could lose 4.5 million
tourists due to poor visitor sat-
isfaction, said Frank Comito,
Bahamas Hotel Association's
executive director.
Nearly half a million tourists
in 2003 reported that they
would not recommend the
Bahamas as a vacation destina-
tion, according to visitor statis-
tics presented at the Bahamas
Hotel Caterers and Allied


Workers Union shop stewards
meeting held yesterday morn-
ing.
According to Mr Comito out
of the five million visitors to the
Bahamas in 2003, 450,000 or
nine per cent said they would
not recommend the Bahamas.
"Over 10 years that would be
4.5 million people. Can we sus-
tain an industry with that?"
asked Mr Comito.
Mr Comito, who was on the
SEE page 14


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are now satisfied
bery was the motive in the m
two Austrian visitors to Bimin
On Tuesday police arreste
for questioning in connection
murders of businessman Bern]
Bolzano, .34, and therapeutic
sional Barbara Frelin von Pe
over the weekend.
"We have arrested a man, he
ing us in our investigation. An
now at the point in the invest
that we can safely say that rob]
the motive," Assistant Comm
of Police Reginald Ferguson, i
of crime, said yesterday.
Mr Ferguson said that polic
believe that the suspect had an
plice.
"Right now we only have o
we are only dealing with one
ual," he said.
A local source told.The Trib
SEE page 14


US launching

1 investigation

into human

trafficking

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
that rob- THE US Coast Guard and the US Depart-
urder of ment of Homeland Security have teamed up to
Ii. investigate what they call an ingenious under-
d a man ground human trafficking operation in the
with the Bahamas.
hard von Outlining an operation that could have far-
; profes- reaching repercussions for local and foreign
rfall, 32, immigration departments, officials from the
US Coast Guard said that it is almost impossi-
is assist- ble to estimate the size of the smuggling ring.
d we are Allegedly these persons are not only being
stigation smuggled into the US for economic reasons, but
bery was some are being sold into "slavery" and sex
nissioner shops, The Tribune was told.
n charge Illegal immigrants from as far as Peru are
being smuggled into the Bahamas, reportedly
e do not by air transport, through to Grand Bahama,
n accom- and then finally into the Florida area.
Yesterday's Tribune reported that the US
ne man, Department of Homeland Security was inves-
individ- tigating a recent offloading of 17 immigrants in
the Miami area.
'une that It was claimed that the boat captains were
being paid up to $10,000 per person to take


SEE page 14


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Man found

floating off

Potters Cay

* By ADRIAN GIBSON
THE body of 51-year-old Edward
"Pints" Brown was found floating in
waters at the Eastern end of Potters
Cay dock yesterday.
Assistant Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune
that officers arrived at the scene around
7.10am after a caller notified them
about the body.
Mr Brown's daughter, Crystal
Brown, said that when she heard about
his death, she was so shocked she could
not speak.
Ms Brown told The Tribune that her
father had seven children.
"It was so sudden that I don't know
what to say," she cried. "I just called
him yesterday. I still don't think that
he's gone. I really loved him, he was a
good friend and a cool, supportive
dad."
Kenneth Brown, one of five brothers
of the deceased, said his "brother used
to go fishing by the dockside every
night for fun and sometimes in the
evening. He liked it."
"He is a super guy, he stayed close to
his mother and always looked over his
SEE page 14


i







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Bahamas receives $665,000 for




security training at airports


*- INDEX


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Ministry of Transport and Avia-
tion has received more than $600,000 in
financial assistance from the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank (IDB) to con-
duct airport security training in the
Bahamas.
According to project co-ordinator Jerry
Hutchinson the ministry has received a
grant of $665,000 from the Multilateral
Investment Fund (MIF), which is adminis-
trated by the IBD.
Mr Hutchinson said the project has three
components: regulatory strengthening,
implementation of new administrative ser-
vices and training.
It will include training of more than one
thousand persons in public relations and
the implementation of new ID passes for all
airport workers.
"We want to increase the level of exper-


tise and pool of trained aviation personnel
in the country," said Mr Hutchinson.
He explained that the project has been in
the works for quite some time and was the
brainchild of Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin.

Standards

Mr Hutchinson said the Bahamas has
maintained the security standards neces-
sary in a post-September 11 world.
Mr Hutchinson noted that the Bahamas
has always been a model of good security
practices in the Caribbean.
The ministry is currently advertising for
firms to carryout the training of:
350 persons from the Nassau Airport
Authority (NAA), Civil Aviation Depart-
ment (CAD), Police Force, Defence
Force and Customs Department in basic
aviation and security and emergency


management procedures.
20 aviation security officers in air cargo
and mail security systems.
15 persons from the CAD, NAA, Min-
istry of.Transport and Aviation and other
related government agencies in bombs iden-
tification.
10 CAD officers in the development
implementation and monitoring of the air-
port security programme.
20 select employees in hostage negoti-
ation.
600 persons in security awareness, pub-
lic relations and customer service,
The Bahamas has 28 airports, 16 of which
are international.
Mr Hutchinson said the project will focus
on seven airports: NIA, three airports in
Eleuthera, two in Abaco, one in Exuma
and one in San Salvador.
The training will begin next month.
Bahamian companies are encouraged to
apply.


Smith: Sir Stafford

should stay on note


OPPOSITION leader Alvin
Smith has condemned the
removal of Sir Stafford Sands'
image from the new Bahamian
$10 note.
Sir Stafford, who is known as
the architect of the Bahamas'
financial services and tourism
sectors, was branded a racist
when he left the Bahamas and
vowed never to return after a
black majority government
came into power in 1967. He
died in London on January 25
1972.
Speaking to The Tribune yes-
terday Mr Smith said, "I would
have thought that one would
have simply accepted the valu-
able contribution that Sir
Stafford has made to the
Bahamas and move on, howev-
er this may not have hap-
pened," said Mr Smith.
Sir Stafford's picture will be


replaced with that of Queen
Elizabeth II. The replacement
will begin on August 3 and the
old note will be phased out over
a six to eight year period.
"Everyone has their short-
comings," Mr Smith said.
"However, the FNM had decid-
ed that despite this Sir
Stafford's contributions should
still be honored and appreciat-
ed."
He added: "The PLP has
been opposed to having Sir
Stafford Sand's image on the
note from the beginning," he
said.
Mr Smith said that both he
and the FMN government are
waiting for a statement to be
released on the issue.
The Tribune attempted to
contact Wendy Craig, the gov-
ernor of Central Bank, yester-
day, but she was ur available.


Third man charged


with 2003 shooting


* By NATARIO
McKENZIE
A THIRD man has been
charged with the 2003 shoot-
ing death ofjunkanoo enthu-
siast Eric "Cardico" Rolle.
. Rolle, who was 53 years
old at the time of his death,
was gunned down outside his
home in Black Village on
August 20 2003.
Initial reports stated that
while sitting outside his
triplex apartment building,
Rolle was approached by.
two gunmen who shot him
in the chest.
Lavardo Simmons, 23, of
Miami Street was yesterday
charged with murdering
Rolle in connection with oth-
ers.
Simmons was also
charged with conspiracy to


commit armed robbery.
He who appeared before
Magistrate Roger Gomez and
was not required to enter a plea
to the charges.
Due to the nature of the
charges, Simmons was granted
no bail and was remanded to
Fox Hill Prison until Septem-
ber 20, when a preliminary
inquiry will take place.
Earlier this month, a Haitian-
Bahamian, also of Miami Street,
was charged with Rolle's mur-
der. He was the second man to
be charged in connection with
the incident.


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* r US navy: no reports of

I e1Awri-d- or


By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A SETTLEMENT has been
reached between Western Air
owners Rex and Shandrice
Rolle and Labour and Immi-
gration Minister Vincent Peet.
The Rolle's had claimed that
the minister owed them in
excess of $95,000 in bills for
travel between New Provi-
dence and his constituency,
North Andros and the Berry
Islands.
Yesterday, attorney for the
Rolles Desmond Bannister
told The Tribune that he and
Mr Peet's attorneys had
reached an "amicable settle-
ment" in the matter.
However, he said he was
unable to comment on the
specifics.
Western Air made headlines
last month after it was forced
to downsize when the Depart-
ment of Immigration refused
to grant work permits for six
pilots.
Mrs Rolle said the decision
crippled the company as there
were no Bahamians qualified
to fly the company's Fairchild
Metro Aircraft.
Western Air is the only air-
line in the Bahamas which flies
this type of aircraft.
Labour and Immigration
Minister Vincent Peet defend-
ed the Department's action
saying that the pilots had been
working in the country with-
out a licence.
He said officials were only
acting in accordance with the
law.
However, the Rolles main-
tained that the pilots had been
employed with the company
for several months with valid
permits.



Psychiatric

evaluation

ordered for

girl accused

of stabbing


,TE-5ear-old girl accused
V1 ipgntantffigirl at the
1,iae PrattCntre for Girls
aywas ordered to
psychiatric evaluation
etrning to court..
i-g i i c ha rge d. w i t h
iondllycausing harm o.
iher-ye'ar-6ld..
accus"edappeared before
agistrate Roger Gomez at the
bveaile court yesterday.
e .S-i was. not required to plea
:t11he charge, as she was not
accompanied by relatives yes-
.terday; but is to return to court
,oio August17.
She' was remanded to the
adolescent 'ward of the Sandi-
lands Rehabilitation Centre
*whe're- Ahe is to receive psychi-
atric evaluation.
A. 29-year-old Elizabeth
E/ates man appeared in the
$agistrate's Court yesterday.
io face burglary and stealing
chrges.
It is alleged that some time
between 11.30pm on Wednes-
day, May 21 and 6.30am on
Thursday, May 22, Deon Brice
:broke into the home of Naomi
Mcpzhee situated at Malawi
Street in Elizabeth Estates.
IThere he allegedly stole
$1,430 in electronics and other
items belonging to Mcphee.
Brice was not required to
plea to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000 with one surety.
The matter was adjourned to
October 6.
A 33-year-old Golden Gates
man pleaded not guilty to steal-
ing $4,000 in cash by reason of
service.
It.is alleged that between
Tuesday, May 24 and Tuesday,
June 21 Walden Mitchell stole
$4,000 from Clement Saunders
by reason of service.
Brice who is currently on
$4,000 police bail will return to
court tomorrow.


illness caused by


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
THE US navy has denied
claims that its AUTEC base on
Andros contributed to cancer cas-
es among locals.
In an official statement issued
on behalf of the US Navy, Lieu-
tenant William Marks of the Pen-
tagon in Washington said: "Our
research indicates that the
AUTEC range is a safe and
healthy work environment for
both US and Bahamian citizens.
There have been no reports of
illnesses caused by the AUTEC
range. The navy was always com-
mitted to providing a safe and
healthy work place for our work-
ers, our neighbors and the envi-
ronment".
Lieutenant Marks said the
Navy "looked everywhere and
used everything we had, but we
couldn't find anything" suggesting
that AUTEC operations might
have caused cancer cases among
locals who worked or lived near
the base.
Last week, reports of an
increase in cancer cases near
AUTEC and a base in Eleuthera
closed since the 1980s have
attracted media attention.
Some locals on both islands say
they have noticed a dispropor-
tionate number of cancer cases
among Bahamians who lived near
or worked at the bases.
Environmental Health parlia-
mentary secretary Ron Pinder
said. last week that he had spo-
ken to Ambassador for the Envi-
ronment Koed Smith about the
matter.
Mr Pinder told The Tribune
that he and Mr Smith decided to


Official statement issued


launch a full investigation into
the claims.
He said that if they proved to
be true, government would
attempt to discover what caused
the cancer cases.


Appearing on the ZNS talk
show Immediate Response yes-
terday, Eleuthera lawyer Lloyd
Johnson spoke about the con-
cerns surrounding the old naval
base at Governors Harbour.


* By KARAN MINNIS

POLICE are investigating a kidnapping and shooting incident
that occurred early yesterday morning.
Although the victim claims he was kidnapped on Milton
Street, police have ruled out the possibility of a connection
between the incident and the homicide that occurred there on
Monday night.
It is alleged that around 2am, Antwom Betnicourt was walk-
ing along Milton Street when he was abducted by two men
driving a red jeep.
He is said to have been taken to a secluded area on Barcadi
Road, where he was released.
According to police reports, shots were then fired, and Mr
Betnicourt was grazed by a bullet on the side of his head.
He was taken to the hospital where his condition is not listed
as critical.
There are currently no suspects in the matter.
Around 3am yesterday morning, a Milton street man was
arrested in connection with the murder of Philip Minnis that
occurred late Monday night.
The suspect was found in a hotel in the downtown area and
is being held in police custody for questioning.
Mr Minnis, 28, was shot six times in various parts of his body
while talking to a group of friends outside his home on Milton
Street.
The incident occurred shortly after 9pm.


He said that many persons who
worked at the facility subse-
quently contracted cancer.
Last week, Koed Smith said
that concerns about cancer have
been raised in Andros since
AUTEC was established. "It does
concern me and particularly the
government," he said.
Last week Tuesday Mr Smith.


said that the Bahamas Environ-
ment, Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission is currently
in discussions with AUTEC
through the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs about researching the cas-
es.
Mr Smith is scheduled to
appear on Immediate Response
on Friday.


N RICK BODGE (left), senior VP of Kerzner International signed a $55million dollar contract with l
Cavalier Construction Company Limited yesterday. Cavalier CEO Richard Wilson (second left)
looks on. ,


(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff

$55m conference centre for PI


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
KERZNER International has
announced the construction of a
$55 million conference centre on
Paradise Island.
Yesterday,. Kerzner officials
signed a contract with Cavalier
Construction Company Limited
for the construction of the new
facility.
The 250,000 square-foot con-
ference centre is expected to be



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It will include a 100,000 square-
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al ballrooms, the largest of which
will measure 50,000 square-feet.
Cavalier CEO Richard Wilson
'said his company is "very
pleased" to have been selected
for the project.
'Kerzner chief operation offi-
cer' Nan Palmer said the centre
will enhance the company's abil-
ity to cater to group visitors.
"We are extremely excited


.11 III Ix

i,': ,


about having more capacity for
our group guests, and that is what
our restriction is right now as we
do not have enough group cus-
tomer meeting space," she said.
"With the addition of the con-
vention centre we will be dou-
bling our group rooms, which
gives us the ability to attract more
incentive corporate groups and
association markets.
"That is going to expand our
ability to appeal more to that
group," she added.


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THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUL 28, 2005 THE TRIBON


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-


I


Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387


White Bahamians' absence felt


ONE by one the lonely chickens are at last
coming home to roost.
Why, asked Senator C B Moss at the close
of the recent Independence celebrations, have
white Bahamians neglected to participate in
events of national importance?
After living long enough to see the fall-out
from the hatred sown so many years ago, we
admit the tragedy, but also ask the question:
Why should white Bahamians participate?
And why should Senator Moss turn the
spotlight only on white Bahamians? Where
were all the black parliamentarians who one
would have expected to set an example, but
were nowhere in sight?
Wasn't it made clear to white Bahamians
when the PLP, under Sir Lynden Pindling,
came to power in 1967 that their faces were
too white to be shown in public? Everything
that went wrong was the fault of the white
man. Some PLPs even bemoaned the fact that
only black youth went to prison. What was
wrong with white youth that they didn't have
the good sense to join in the proceeds of crime
and share a jail cell?
Come election time white Bahamians were
criticised for voting and financially supporting
FNM candidates, most of them black. The
irony of this was that because the FNM, com-
posed mainly of black Bahamians, were sup-
ported by white Bahamians, the PLP magic
wand suddenly turned the FNM into a "white
party". And, in the words of Paul Adderley,
who in 1982 was the PLP government's exter-
nal affairs minister, because the FNM were
indebted to the "white minority" they "could
never represent the black people of this coun-
try."
In other words, here was one group of black
Bahamians who could not represent another
group of black Bahamians, because of their
friendship with white Bahamians!
Of course, if white Bahamians had bowed
their heads and supported the PLP there
would have been no problems. It was just a
case of jealousy and sour grapes on the part of
the PLP government.
In his analysis of the election at that time,
Mr Adderley attributed the victory of black
FNM candidates in what he called "white
block" areas solely to white voters. He failed
to appreciate that in many of those areas there
was a sizeable black vote that also went to
the FNM.
By this reasoning, one would have expected
- as did Mr Adderley that predominant-
ly black areas of the population would give a
landslide vote to black PLP candidates. Not so.
For example, Mr Adderley could not
explain why in the Carmichael polling divi-
sion, a black stronghold, which, although he


won, he did so by a very narrow margin cer-
tainly not by a margin that he and his party
had hoped for. So it showed that even in black
areas there was a strong vote for the so-called
"white FNM".
Here are some of the headlines of those
years, which should answer Senator Moss'
naive question and help him understand that
people do not usually go where they are not
wanted:
Adderley hits out at FNM sellout to "white
minority"; "White racist UBP" used FNM "to
try to get their country back" claims Adderley;
Adderley blames "lack of confidence" in
Bahamas on "white racists"; Rahming raises
race issue in the Senate; Says white Bahamians
"hogged up" the land Elliston Rahming;
and Sir Lynden spells out "beginning of end"
for Bay Street: These headings were selected
at random, but this page could be filled with
many more like them.
Paul Adderley, whose illogical "logic" has
always intrigued us, had a real racist run in
1982. So much so that Sir Etienne Dupuch, the
late editor of this newspaper, wrote an edito-
rial under the heading: "Adderley blinded by
racism."
"The PLP is a racist government. In every-
thing they say and do they make it clear that
the whites ... both Bahamian and foreign.. .in
these islands have no rights. They are merely
tolerated by the government," was the open-
ing paragraph-of Sir Etienne's editorial of
June 26, 1982.
He said the racist attitudes of the govern-
ment had "driven tourists and white investors
to other places, such as the Cayman islands,
which are booming with investment".
He said that because of Mr Adderley's back-
ground one would have expected "some mea-
sure of understanding of the fact that the
Bahamas is entirely dependent on white
tourists and white investors.to survive."
Eventually tired of the insults, tired of being
sidelined and told their expertise was not
needed; tired of only being acknowledged
when someone wanted to get their hands into
their pockets for a hand-out, many white
Bahamians melted into the shadows, minded
their own affairs and built their businesses.
And now, almost 40 years later their
absence is being felt. And a PLP senator ha's
had the nerve to ask white Bahamians to
explain why they have "for so long" neglected
to involve themselves in events of national
importance.
What would Senator Moss have done if the
door had been slammed in his face and he
had been told to get out? Maybe, Senator
Moss, that is the question that should be
answered first.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
FOR the record, I am per-
haps too white to be black and
too black to be white. The
important thing is that I am
Bahamian by birth.
The colour black holds a
prominent place on our most
recognisable national symbol,
the Bahamian National Flag. In
this regard I dare to ask the
unthinkable question. Could
this have been a secret and
malicious attempt to send the
message that there would be no
substantive place in the
Bahamas for white Bahamians
in a post UBP era?
How ironic could this possibly


be for a Mark Knowles, or the
like? I wonder what emotions
come to the fore as the Bahami-
an flag proudly flutters in the
wind at the celebration of a vic-
tory.
Yes I dare to ask with regard
to another prominent white
Bahamian and former Olympic
gold medal winner, whether it is
he whom we embrace or is it
his accomplishments and gen-
erosity?
The true test of the legitima-


cy of "one Bahamas" cannot be
measured by how readily black
Bahamians accept their out-
standing white counterparts but
rather in the way we relate to
the poor and middle class white
Bahamians.
I suspect that the political
powers in this country have no
genuine desire to disturb the
status quo. After all, it may pro-
vide them with a needed trump
card in a ftiture election.
If the problem is to be solved,
you and I must do it. If not you
and I, who? If not now, when?
MICHAEL E NOTTAGE
Nassau
July 22 2005


Attendance not based on race


EDITOR, The Tribune
SENATOR Dr Rev C.B.
Moss' comments concerning the
attendance at the eve of Inde-
pendence celebrations at Clif-
ford Park basically and funda-
mentally meant nothing except
that whoever is in charge for
invitations I presume the usual
protocol that there is an RSVP
required, did not do their job.
Based on respondents then
the protocol people set up
reserved chairs.
It is noteworthy that even
nowadays at church functions,
pews are reserved and persons
who ordinarily attend some of
these places of worship are


excluded simply because the
VIP-dignitary did not do what is
required, send in their RSVP.
The adage: In God's house
there are no reserved seats, is a
good one for the churches to
follow anyway.
The perceived patriotism of
the minority non-Afro-Ameri-
can Bahamian anyone who
has a conscious understanding
of real Bahamian history will
know and acknowledge that as
much as the Afro-Bahamian
had a rough time they had as
rough a time over the years.
Sort of tongue in cheek, may
I suggest that the Bahamian
whites have a lot of'control -
what colour is the pole the flag


is. hoisted on? What colour is
the rope? What colour is the
material through which the
rope passes to hoist the flag
proudly?
I never liked or supported the
One Bahama Day as it per-
ceived that there was no one
Bahamas. When you induce this
concept I run. The facts are sim-
ple between 1993-2000 the
government was more interest-
ed in celebrating One Bahamas
not Independence, July 10.
Let's leave this all alone, Edi-
tor it is so unhealthy.
F DEVEAUX
Nassau
July 22 2005


Unfair on our women


EDITOR, The Tribune
WITH the CSME debate sort
of pushed back to the Bahamas
Trade Commission I was think-
ing, and in conversation with a
friend, whose daughter is mar-
ried to a foreigner, raised the
following I am very annoyed,
seemingly we were willing to
give all the rights to set up busi-
nesses in the Bahamas to those
folks from The Caribbean
whilst denying basic fundamen-
tal rights to men married to our
own women!
I was really taken aback and
argued that I thought a husband
married and living with his
Bahamian wife, had almost every
right, except to vote. Not so.
I checked around and discov-
ered that foreign spouses mar-


ried to Bahamian women are
second if not third class people
- they need Central Bank
approval to buy a house for
their family, even if all the funds
are his or he generates to ser-
vice a mortgage he needs Cen-
tral Bank approval to own the
roof over their head they need
Cabinet approval to own a busi-
ness and without that they must
give 60 per cent to their wife or
a Bahamian.
Mr Mitchell and those sup-
porting CSME were quick as
lightning willing to legally allow
any citizen of a CSME country
to set up shop seemingly with
none of these restrictions -
restrictions on a partnership
where one is a Bahamian.
The majority of these foreign
spouses have Permanent Resi-


dence, with the right to work,
but that seems to be restricted
to working for someone else
and only omits the require-
ments to have a work permit.
In 2005 do we need to treat
our women this way? It is cer-
tainly time we gave equal rights
to these foreign spouses up to
not being able to vote unless
they become a citizen. It is so
degrading to our Bahamian
women who simply fall in love!
Can't government take
immediate steps to exclude all
these ugly provisions with a sim-
ple amendment to Exchange
Control Regulations and Busi-
ness Licence Act?
J JOHNSON
Nassau
June 23 2005


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Country is





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than colour


THE TRIBUNE
E.\


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JULY 2.


CTH NEMCAonW
V GrandnBahama. i L A a 3


Minister surprised at gas price hike


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller
yesterday expressed his astonishment at the astro-
nomical hike in gas prices on Moore's Island.
Locals have claimed that gas prices are now as
high as $6 on the tiny cay near Abaco, which is
home to small a fishing community.
"I would be surprised if fuel hit $6, but once
again it is based on the circumstances," Mr Miller
said. "I understand the gasoline is delivered in 55
gallon drums and apparently it is difficult to get it
from one point to the next."
The minister said Bahamians need to fully
appreciate "the negative effects of the spiraling
prices of oil is having on the economy. It effects all
our lives directly and indirectly, in the gas prices
and our electricity bills from BEC," he said.
Recently, The Tribune revealed that the price of
fuel on the island had risen from $5 to $5.50 a
gallon, and that other fuel products such as
kerosene were also being sold at very high prices.
Mr Miller said that he will be taking a team of


officers from his ministry to Moore's Island tomor-
row to investigate the matter and hopefully bring
some relief to the residents there.
"It pains me. You try your best... the two and
a half years that I have been trying and now these
same 'sooth-sayers' are saying that we should not
have signed on to PetroCaribe and that we should-
n't get it.
"The ones. who are supposed to be educated
among us are singing this song to the detriment of
all of us.
"I pay my fuel and electricity bill like every-
one else. These prices are hurting all of us. If we
ever need to find a cheaper source of fuel we need
it now. If we ever need to cut the margins on fuel
it is now.
"The government needs to seriously look at
reducing the cost of fuel and the time is now. This
is causing some serious problems and it is only
going to get worse before it gets better," Mr Miller
said.
The minister he is confident that the Petro-
Caribe project will be up and running by Septem-
ber.


Children get 'wake-up call' at prison


' By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM *
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GROUP of children who
were given a tour of Fox Hill
Prison say they are determined to
never end up behind bars in the
Bahamas.
They experienced first-hand the
heat in prison, which inmates say
is almost unbearable.
They also had a chance to hear
prisoners tell how they ended up
behind bars.
The children 20 boys and one
girl are participating in the Farm
Road Urban Renewal Project's
summer youth camp hosted by
the East Street Gospel Chapel.



THURSDAY
JULY 28


Community Pg./1540
Immediate Response
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Immediate Response
Ethnic Health America
Spiritual Impact
Mr. Ballooney B.
Treasure Attic
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
Gilbert Patterson
Video Gospel
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News Update
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Legends From Whence We
Came: Boston Blackie Miller
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Native Stew
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15th Conference of Com-
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Sergeants Samuel Duvalier and
George Bodie toured the students
around the prison after giving the
children an orientation.
One of the first things Sgt
Duvalier told the children is that
criminal behaviour can begin in
"simple ways".
"If you don't want to listen to
your teachers, parents or elders,
you're on your way here. That's
how it starts. There are laws that
govern this land and you must
abide by them," he said.
The first prisoner the children
met gave them a real wake-up call.
Tina Pinder spoke to them
from her top bunk in the female
prison.
She is petite and pretty, her hair
immaculately kept.
Listening to her speak, the chil-
dren found it hard to believe she is
a 21-year-old murder convict who
has been at the prison since she
was 16.
"I was doing everything in the
book. I was selling drugs on the
blocks when they picked me up.
Anything you do, the man could
pick you up," she said.
"No one is above the law. You
can go to jail as young as 11 and
12. So you have to know now that
for every wrong you do, there's a
consequence."
Next, the children were taken
to the tailor shop, where Stephen
Edgecombe shared his story.
"I am spending a 15-year sen-
tence for manslaughter. For me,
it's when someone run you hot,
and you pick up a piece of wood
and lick them twice, but you didn't
mean to kill them. Kids, you don't
want to come here. I've made
friends here, but they all come
and go. I have a long time to
spend here."
As the imposing maximum
security gate shut behind them,


Fetlie, ugiie
PetCoto


E OE:ZST-1.esre
therihttomak lstmiut


the children jumped and were
apprehensive about continuing.
"As they headed into the build-
ing, an inmate shouted: "You
came here for a visit; don't come
back here. Get your education
and stay on the road!"
When the children complained
about the heat, one inmate told
them that on some days, it is ten
times as hot.
At the end of the tour, each of
the children were asked to com-
ment on his or her experience.
"Keeping bad company and
fighting could cause me to go to
jail," one child said. "Prison is a
hard place to live," commented
another.
"Jail is easy to get in, but hard
to get out," said a third child.


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE chairman of the Grand
Bahama YMCA has said that the
organisation did apply to govern-
ment for help with repairs after
last year's hurricanes- despite
Housing Minister Shane Gibson's
claims to the contrary.
While Mr Gibson asserted that
YMCA officials never
approached the ministry of Hous-
ing for hurricane restoration assis-
tance, Daniel Williams, chairman
of the YMCA's board of direc-
tors, said that the organisation
sent a letter to the National
Emergency Management Agency
(NEMA) on January 17, 2005,
but NEMA, neither acknowl-
edged nor replied to that letter.
The letter was the result of a
meeting held on January 14 with
Mr Canard L Bethell, Undersec-
retary in the Prime Minister's
Office in Freeport.
Earlier this month Mr Gibson
announced that government
would contribute funds for the
restoration of the YMCA.
This follows concerns raised by
Sir Jack Hayward that the
YMCA was not receiving funds
from a $1 million donation made
by himself and the late Edward St
George to NEMA.
On its own the YMCA raised
$100,000 through fundraisers and
donations from the private sec-
tor. It is estimated that another
$400,000 is needed to restore the
building.
Mr Williams hopes that by
October the YMCA will be fully
functional.
Currently none of the YMCA's
activities is in operation in the
building.
"The building and pool are still
down. We have people working
on the building and have repaired
one portion of the roof that was
damaged," said Mr Williams.
He said the YMCA had peti-
tioned NEMA for $25,000 to
assist with the first phase of the
repairs, but the assistance never
came.
"Shane Gibson was here about
two weeks ago and made a com-
mitment to step forward to assist
with the repairs to the YMCA,
but said that assistance would
have arrived sooner if YMCA
officials had approached,govern-
ment sooner. The thing is we did,
but we did not get a response
from NEMA after writing them
for assistance," he said.


The YMCA says it wrote a let-
ter to Mr Canard Bethel,
NEMA's representative in Grand
Bahama on January 17, but it was
never answered.
The letter resulted from a
meeting with Mr Bethell as
Undersecretary in the Prime Min-
ister's Office in Freeport.
"The YMCA," said the letter
to Mr Bethell, "suffered severe
structural damage resulting in
the facility being effectively
closed. Currently the soccer pro-
gramme is the only activity that is
still up and running. The swim-


ming programme and the fitness
centre are closed. The children of
the swim club are suffering from
the loss of the pool. The fitness
centre, the largest fund generating
programme of the Y also needs to
get back up and running. Restora-
tion of these programmes will
result in bringing life back to the
YMCA in the shortest time pos-
sible."
The letter then itemised in
detail what was needed to restore
the Y. It also gave the cost of each
area in need of restoration.


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Causeway project

awaits the go-ahead

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

DESIGNS for a new causeway to connect North and South
Eleuthera have been completed and the project now awaits the go-
ahead from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).
In an interview with The Tribune, Minister of Works and Utili-
ties Bradley Roberts yesterday said that the $8.5 million effort to
replace the Glass Window Bridge with a causeway is now awaiting
the IDB's final approval the Bahamas' economic study on the
matter.

Contract

"Once the IDB decides that the economic study is to its liking,
and they give us the go-ahead, then we will be able to proceed. We
will then be able to let construction companies bid on the contract,"
Mr Roberts said.
Earlier this year, the IDB granted a loan for the construction of
the causeway as part of the bank's assistance to infrastructure
rehabilitation following Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in 2004.
Mr Roberts said there have been several unsuccessful attempts
to replace the bridge with a causeway on "the calm side" of the
island, near the Eleuthera Bight.
"Because of seriousness of the currents and the sea surges it was
decided to build a causeway instead of just replacing the bridge,"
he said.
The Glass Window Bridge, which has been in a poor state of
repair for years, connects North and South Eleuthera at the island's
narrowest point.


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~'A~i. .. ~.iiDAYULY282LOCTHE TIBUN


Report completed




into National



Insurance system


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
BY next week, government
will be able to say when a report
on the future sustainability of
the National Insurance pro-
gramme will be made public.
National Insurance Board
(NIB) chairman and Cat Island
MP Phillip Davis yesterday con-
firmed that the report has been
completed.
Mr Davis said the document
"is now in the process of being
reviewed by the country's hier-
archy."
While he anticipates that the
report will be public informa-
tion in the very near future, Mr
Davis said he preferred not to
pre-empt its release by dis-
cussing its contents.
During his contribution to the


Budget debate in June, Mr
Davis said that there is a need
for overseas investment to max-
imise returns for the National
Insurance fund.
He said the Social Security
Reform Commission has
reviewed both the current and
future financial state of the
NIB, "while ensuring that NIB
benefits are relevant to cur-
rent socio-economic condi-
tions."
Mr Davis estimated that the
National Insurance fund will be
exhausted in less than 25 years.
He explained that the com-
mission has held extensive dis-
cussions with stakeholders
throughout the Bahamas and
that its many recommendations
deal with "expanding the scope
of NIB to include new benefits,
ensuring that NIB coverage and


benefits remain relevant to the
cost of living and wages
increase, improving NIB's oper-
ational performance and of
course, improving long-term
sustainability."
Once the commission's report
is finalised and made public, Mr
Davis said he expects several
amendments to be made to the
National Insurance Act and to
current regulations within the
next year.
In addition to the commis-
sion's report, Mr Davis also
confirmed yesterday that the
annual National Insurance
report "has been sent to the
printers."
He said this report will be laid
on the table of the House of
Assembly by Minister of Hous-
ing and National Insurance
Shane Gibson soon.


* NATIONAL Insurace Board chairman Phillip Davis


Resort developer to fund



new high school on Bimini


*. By KARAN MINNIS
A NEW high school is to be
built on Bimini as part of a deal
between the government and
the developer of Bimini' Bay
Resort.
Geraldo Capo has also
agreed to upgrade the South
Bimini Airport, Bradley
Roberts has announced.
The Minister of Works and
Utilities made the announce-
ment at the official contract
signing for the dredging of the
Bimini channel inlet.
Mr Roberts said that the
planned upgrade will bring the


airport up to the standards set
out by the International Civil
Aviation Organisation (ICAO).
He added: "The current all-
age school will be refurbished
and will house the primary
school. As we speak my min-
istry is busily designing the new
high school."
Construction is scheduled to
begin before the end of the
year.
Speaking to The Tribune yes-
terday, Mr Roberts said that
new high school will be built on
an area of land near the current
all age school.
"For years, families in Bimini


have been sending their chil-
dren to the US or to Nassau for
education, however with this
new development I expect that
will change," he said. "Most
important, this development
will change the way children in
Bimini are educated."
According to director of edu-
cation Iris Pinder, the current
secondary school in Bimini is
too small to offer the wide vari-
ety of courses th'at most
Bahamian or international
schools offer.
"We are already provided
with a secondary school in
Bimini, however there is limited


space available to offer all of
the programmes that. are
offered elsewhere in the
Bahamas," she said. -"Withthe
new faculty we will be'able.'to
offer more technical pr'd-
grammes that are related 'io
business, tourism, and technol-
ogy".
She added that teachers will
be supplied upon thb'comple-
tion of the school.
With about 206 studenits'dti--
rently enrolled at'thet all-age
school, Mrs Pinder anticipates
that students will return hoiiie
to coiiplete their secoiidary
education at the thew 'h i5l.


Mr Smith goes to Washington

MINISTER of State Finance held the post since 1988. and several primary ancd se'c-
James Smith has been in Wash- Mr Smith is expected back in ondary education projectsM
ington DC attending a meeting Nassau today. The bank has also funded
to name a new president of the Since 1979, the IDB has had a health-related projects and post-
Inter-American Development strong presence in the Bahamas hurricane rehabilitation efforts.
Bank (IDB). and has funded projects worth The New Providence road
The meeting of the IDB about $365 million in total. transportation programme and
board of governors will elect a Recent initiatives funded by solid waste management pro-
new president to replace the IDB include a potable water gramme were also funded by
Enrique V Iglesias, who has project for the Family Islands the IDB.












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^-AL.E ;, ;.u ni iDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


i
1
]
]
1
]













$5.26m road contract signed


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A $5.26 mil-
lion contract has been signed
for major road works project in
East Grand Bahama.
The contract, which is being
carried out by Basil Neymour
Construction Company,
involves the reconstruction of
11 miles of road and repairs to
seven more miles of road
between Gold Rock Creek and
McCleans Town.
The existing roads in East
Grand Bahama, which have
been in place for 20 years, are
eroded along the edges and
consistently develop deep pot-
holes.
In addition to repairing roads,
the government will also carry
out major drainage work in East
Grand Bahama to alleviate
severe flooding in low-lying
areas.
Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts revealed that 10 new
culvert crossings would be
installed and four to five drain-
ing ditch outlets, each about 800
to 1,000 feet long, will be exca-
vated to direct flood waters out
to sea.


The contract signing was held
at the Administrator's Office in
High Rock.
Mr Roberts told residents
that the road and drainage
works would be completed over
the next 18 months.

Damage

Last year, roads and seawalls
of East Grand Bahama sus-
tained extensive damage dur-
ing hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne.
After a complete evaluation
of infrastructural damage, Mr
Roberts said government decid-
ed to undertake work in three
phases.
He said the first phase would
address the roads in East Grand
Bahama, the second would
address the restoration of sea
walls along the shoreline roads,
and the third would address
roadwork in West Grand
Bahama.
Mr Roberts announced that
government has implemented
a new policy for all Family
island works.
The ministry will now station
an engineer on the site of all
future road projects for the


duration of the contract to
ensure that the contractors do
not deviate from drawings and
materials specifications.
"This concept was utilised
during the reconstruction of
, Harrold Road and I am satis-
fied that it has worked very
well," he said.
Mr Roberts assured residents
of East Grand Bahama that
government will provide addi-
tional lighting, guardrails, and
signs at two dangerous curves
16 miles east of Gold Rock
Creek.
He also noted that, problem
of access by boat frorh Sweet-
ing's Cay would be addressed
by constructing a cutting
through an adjacent Cay to the
west, which will provide shel-
tered canal passage between
waterways at each end. Mr
Roberts said work would be
done in two stages beginning in
early 2007 at the cost of $ 2 mil-
lion.
"Perry Christie's PLP gov-
ernment has demonstrated since
coming to office that it will gov-
ern on behalf of all the Bahami-
an people. The signing of road
improvement contract is a reaf-
firmation of that pledge," he
said.


* BRADLEY Roberts signs the contract, watched by Marcus Bethel


(Photo: Denise Maycock)


US Embassy issues statement


reminder to Bahamian students


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIANS applying for US student
visas are being reminded to submit bank
statements showing proof of financial sup-
port or stability.
US Embassy chief consular officer Abdul-
nor Zaiback told The Tribune that Bahami-
an students regularly fail to meet this major
requirement.
Applicants, he said, "are all bringing their
passports, 1-20 forms, completed visa appli-
cations, and other documentation, but the
one critical document that they neglect to
bring is the bank statement that we require."
Mr Zaiback said many applicants are mis-
understanding the need for the three-month
bank statement, and instead are present-


ing the embassy with bank letters.
The bank statements, he said, "are so
critical, because they show proof of the
amount of cash on the bank accounts of
the student or his/her sponsor and speci-
fies when the cash was deposited there."
Although interview agents at the embassy
are allowed to use prudence in issuing ,a
student visa, Mr Zaiback said the bank
statements are trusted and can ensure flaw-
less processing.
So far this week, Mr Zaiback said the
Embassy has issued more than 900 visas,
and promises to create additional time for
student applicants if necessary.
In addition to providing bank statements,
Mr Zaiback also reminded the public that
first-time students, or students pursuing, a.
new degree must pay a $100 SEVIS fee in


addition to the $100 visa application fee.
The SEVIS fee, he said, must be paid
prior to the application interview at the
Embassy.
There are three acceptable methods of
payment for the SEVIS fee: payment
through the institution at which the appli-
cant will study, credit card payments over
the internet at www.fmjfee.com, or Western
Union's Quick Pay service.
Students must come to the embassy in
person during regular visa hours to present
their application and be interviewed.
Regular visa hours are Monday through
Thursday 8.00 to 11.00am. Applicants are
seen on a first-come, first-served basis.
Visa forms can be picked up at the
embassy, or completed online at
www.evisaforms.state.gov.


Staff complaints at state


of government building


* By KRISTINA McNEIL
EMPLOYEES and visitors
of the Rodney Bain building on
Shirley Street say they are
appalled by the deplorable state
of the structure.
According to one employee,
no routine maintenance is car-
ried out on the building, which
houses the office of the Regis-
trar General and the Coroner's
Court, and work crews only
come if called to fix a problem.
"The building is in a bad state
of disrepair," said another
employee. "This is a govern-
ment building, it should be in
Better condition."
The Tribune viewed one of


the women's restrooms at the
building yesterday. While. the
toilets were functional, the rest-
room was very untidy and
showed no evidence of regular
maintenance.
Anyone attempting to dry
their hands after washing them
with the only available soap -
dish washing liquid, would find
paper towels scarce.
The windows were open and
were not equipped with screens,
which grants easy access to the
pigeons that frequent the build-
ing.
Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts told The Tribune yes-
terday that as far as he knows,
there were no arrangements


planned for the refurbishment
of the building.
Construction had begun on a
building on Market Street to
house some Registrar offices,
but the government decided to
discontinue work after dis-
agreements over how many
storeys the new building should
have, said Mr Roberts.
"The decision is really up to
the Minister of Financial Services
to relocate the people and
whether or not the building will
be raised or refurbished," he said.
The Tribune was unable to
contact Minister of Financial
Services and Investments
Allyson Maynard-Gibson for
comment.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2003, r-AUit- /














Diversification of the


Bahamian


economy


T HESE days I regularly
provide staff training,
motivational speaking and busi-
ness consulting services to
scores of organisations. Each
opportunity to do so is both
rewarding and enlightening.
One thing that intrigues me
during such occasions is how
often Bahamians express the
desire that the government
"diversify" the Bahamian econ-
omy. Bahamians appreciate the
benefits they gain from tourism
and financial services, the two
dominant sectors of the econo-
my, but they seem to want an
economy that is more broad
based and less vulnerable to
outside shocks like a downturn
in the US economy or the
events of September 11, 2001.
Often, diversification of the
economy for Bahamians means
more focus by the government
on agriculture, fisheries and
manufacturing, which today
account collectively for about
10 per cent of GDP.
WE NEED BUSINESS
VISIONARIES IN
GOVERNMENT

D iversifying the
income and job-cre-
ating sectors of our economy is
a good objective and one worth
genuine focus. However, to
look for this diversification from
the government is futile for a
number of reasons.
First, unlike in times past, we
lack business visionaries in gov-
ernment. Sir Stafford Sands, a
successful attorney, was a busi-
nessman first, a lawyer profiting
from commerce second and a
.politician third. It was the busi-
S..nessman, Sir Stafford Sands,
who seized upon the opportu-
: nity that rested in promoting
tourism as a mass, year-round
industry for the Bahamas and
financial services as a natural
outgrowth of that tourism. He
laid the foundations of the mod-
ern Bahamian economy. If Sir
Stafford was not a businessman
and purely a politician, it is
quite likely that he would have
stuck with the economic status
quo rather than seek to engi-
neer a new economy through
tourism and financial services.
Most political figures today are
first politicians, second politi-
cians and third politicians. Most
lack entrepreneurial zeal and
many of those who have it, have
it for themselves and not the
country. To increase our
chances of diversifying our
economy, we need people in.
politics who understand busi-
ness and can envision national
possibilities in it.
THE PRIVATE SECTOR
FOCUSES ON BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT

S econd, economic growth
and development is
principally the business of the
private sector. Enabling that
economic growth and develop-
ment is principally the business
of government. New economic
activities and better ways of
doing existing ones most often
emerge from businesspeople,
not politicians. Look around
you, how many hotel, restau-
rant, construction, wholesale,
retail or real estate businesses
do you see that have emerged
purely as an exercise of political
will. Yes, some politicians may
have gotten a piece of the pie by
greasing the bureaucratic
wheels to get the business start-
ed but the business itself was
most likely the brainchild and
effort of some businessperson.
Government officials are pre-
occupied, the politicians with
winning elections and civil ser-
vants with the routine business
of running the public service.
Few government officials have
the sense of urgency, creativity,
innovation, dedication and per-
sistence that drive business-
people to look for new and bet-
ter ways of making a profit
through meeting the demands
of consumers. A politician's
consumers are voters and voters
have such diverse demands that
most politicians are too preoc-
cupied by the confusion of
those demands to focus on any-


STRAIGHT UP TALK


Z H IVA R G 0


thing as magnificent as diversi-
fying the economy. It will take
the private sector to explore
and develop new industries for
the Bahamian .economy.and
when in doing so they meet
with an obstacle that the gov-
ernment can remove, then the
government will have a role to
play but not before.
GOVERNMENT IS TOO
COMFORTABLE WITH
THE STATUS QUO

Third, there is such
momentum built up in
the economic status quo of this
country that it takes great
courage to attempt to provide
new momentum. What we have
in this country, that is tourism
and financial services, have
worked for us for decades and
still work for us. As long as the
government can make people
believe that it is responsible for
bringing millions of tourists to
the country and billions of dol-
lars in foreign investments, cre-
ating jobs, it will have little
interest in changing the formu-
la that supports its pretense. As
long as the government believes
that the current economic mod-
el can raise its revenue and
keep enough people'enployed
to secure sufficient votes to win
the next general election, it has
little motivation to seek a new
or improved model.
On the other hand, entrepre-
neurs always believe that they
are on the verge of extinction.
They are always on the look-
out for predators, the competi-
tion, so they have a mind
toward change and innovation.
It is this competitive streak and
sense of imminent demise that
lead them to not only seek to
increase momentum in business
but at times to cLange that
momentum altogether. The dis-
satisfaction that so many
Bahamians express about the
uncertainty of our current eco-
nomic model must translate
into to action on their own part
to change the model to make it
work better for them.
GOVERNMENT TENDS
TO BE REACTIVE

ourth, diversifying the
Bahamian economy is
a proactive measure; more


co
*0-
L

1"


Sa
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00






S4-


4"

t-
0


i
O

0)


LAIN


often than not, the government
is reactive. Only when some-
thing threatens our existing
cash-cows of tourism and finan-
cial services has the government
tended to concentrate its efforts
to do something and that some-
thing is often protecting and
preserving the status quo in
these areas. Seldom does the
government look beyond these
sectors to explore opportuni-
ties in others.
It is not the practice of polit-
ical leaders to spend any rea-
sonable amount of time pon-
dering new opportunities for
developing the Bahamian econ-
omy.
Just look at the nation's leg-
islative and policy agendas, they
do not focus on new business
development. Rather, they
focus on maintaining what exist.
For all the talk about e-com-
merce, we have yet to make any
significant strides in this sector.
Why? Because most of the talk
comes from the government
and not the private sector,
which has the real skills to make
e-commerce work as an indus-
try in the country."

THE PRIVATE SECTOR
MUST LOOK OUTWARD

iFEifth, many new eco-
Jinomic opportunities lay
outside the boundaries of our
nation. By reaching out to for-
eign consumers and business
partner riand soi r'ing inputs
and technology fr"oiacross the-
.g]pbe, Bahamians will have the
opportunity to develop a
diverse set of businesses and
industries.
This reaching out will not be
done by the government, for
politicians in developing coun-
tries in particular reach out to
the international community
principally to beg for aid and
engage in philosophical discus-
sions about the happenings in
the world.
Seldom are their discussions
'aimed at business and econom-
ic development.
It is the Bahamian private
sector that must look outward
and see the globe as a place of
opportunity and seize upon
those opportunities to spur
the diversification of our econ-
omy.


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NEW SECTORS
TO LOOK TOWARD


We can diversify our
economy. We can
add to tourism and financial ser-
vices new sectors that give us
greater vitality and durability.
What are some such sectors?
One is research and develop-
ment. There is a genuine busi-
ness opportunity for the
Bahamas presenting itself to the
scientific and academic com-
munity as a research and devel-
opment centre for, among oth-
er things, marine science, solar
energy, electric cars, informa-
tion technology, small island
states development, etc.
Another possible industry is
organic farming.
This high-end farming can be
profitably conducted on an
island like Andros, which has
an abundance of good water
supply.
Yet another industry is inter-
national diplomacy. As one of
the world's most civil societies
and one with friendly relations
with all states, the Bahamas can
as a matter of strategic intent
better position itself as a centre
for conducting international
peace promotion and dispute
settlement. Still yet, there is the
solar energy industry. This area
of energy development holds
great promise, though the tech-
nology still has a ways to go.
As a tropical climate looking
to preserve its environment, the
Bahamas has a vested interest
in participating in the develop-
ment of this clean energy form,
Add to this the alternative med-
icine and wellness industry. The
Bahamas can win big in this
area by promoting itself as a
.centre for the development,
practice and promotion of alter-:;


native medicines.
These are just a few exam-
ples of what is possible. Do not
expect them to emerge through
the efforts of today's typical
politician. But let a business-
man see the vision and be sure
he or she will run with it. That is
how we will diversify our econ-
omy.
(This article reprinted as a
result of public demand).

THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
"The greatest tragedy is to
have eyes but lack vision."
Dr Myles Munroe
zhivargolaing@hotmail.com


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


'6;rmy~


THE TRIBUNE







THE TIBUN THURDAYJULY28, 205, AGE


New fraternity


president is


installed


Shane Albury has been
installed as the 17th president of
the Iota Epsilon Lambda Chap-
ter of Alpha Phi Alpha Frater-
nity.
The ceremony was held at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
and was and was attended by
more than 50 Brothers of the
Fraternity.
Prior to the official installa-
tion, Terrance Fountain, 16th
chapter president; gave an
address outlining his accom-
plishments and challenges dur-
ing the past two years as leader
of the chapter. He also thanked
the brotherhood for their sup-
port.
"Our membership is indeed


honoured to have President
Albury and his officers led the
local chapter into the centenni-
al activities of the fraternity
which will begin on January 1
2006. The chapter will be
enriched by his leadership expe-
riences, his energy, wisdom and
commitment," said Ricardo
Deveaux, Bahamas area direc-
tor for the fraternity.
Mr Albury will lead the chap-
ter's delegation consisting of
Terrance Fountain, immediate
past president and Ricardo
Deveaux, Bahamas area direc-
tor to the fraternity's 99th
anniversary international con-
vention to be held in Houston,
Texas from August 4-8.


Copyrig htedMaterial

*-. Syndicated Content -

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BTC launches repair



system on internet


IN what is being described
as a "major step" in telecom-
munications services, BTC
customers now have the
option of registering repair
requests online.
Yesterdy BTC officials
announced the launch of
the new Repair Services
Request service on the com-
pany's website, www.btcba-
hamas.com.
"Allowing subscribers to
log repair request via this
new medium is considered a
major step towards ultimate-
ly improving the way we do
business," said BTC senior
vice-president and chief
operations officer Leon
Williams.
Customers using the online
repair service from the main
menu should select "Contact
Us". a prompt is then dis-
played that asks the customer
whether telephone repair is
required.
Once the prompt is select-
ed, the following instructions
should be followed:
Supply telephone number
of line needing repairs.
Select a general problem
from a drop down menu


Enter a telephone num-
ber to be reached at
Provide an address and
directions to the home or
business.
Submit the form.
The request forms are
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repair services department
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The customer then receives
an e-mail message acknowl-
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and advised on the repair sta-
tus.
BTC will also soon be offer-
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customers in the form of cred-
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allow subscribers to manage
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THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULYn28, 2005BTHE TRIBUNEW


* BEECHAM Brennen performs Oh Look Misery at a performance during the National Youth
Choir tour of New York




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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005










National Youth Choir wows the


crowds during tour of New York


THE Bahamas National Youth Choir
has just returned from a tour of New
York, Philidelphia and Connecticut.
The choir and band totalling more
than 50 people entertained audiences
with renditions of Bahamian folk music,
classical pieces and Negro spirituals.
They also performed at the ainited
Nations, appeared lives on CBS and
entertained youngsters at the Manhat-
tan Children's Hospital.
The choir goes on tour every year.
Last year's trip saw the choir represent-
ing the country in the People's Relu'blic
of China


S(Photos: Donald Knowles)
0 THE choir performs
Miss Lucy outside the
United Nations building in
New York


* THIchoir performs at the riverside Church where Luther
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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 200!,


101,





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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Scholarships awarded to

36 students for college


* NAKERA Simms, a former Bahamas Supermarkets Foundation scholarship recipient,
addressed nearly 150 people last week at the 37th annual Bahamas Supermarkets Scholarship
Awards ceremony. Now employed as project co-ordinator for Phase m of Atlantis, Simms told
students who were just beginning their college careers to "enjoy your college experience, but stay
focused on the task at hand and remain true to your values and life goals." This year's awards
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


I
















Artist's vision of yesteryear


* By C E HUGGINS
TRADITIONALLY, people
who use pigment on canvas to
create images have been known
as artists. Artisans are persons
who may be as skilled as any
brush wielder but primarily
because their expertise is in an
applied art they may not appro-
priate or have not been allowed
to appropriate the title artist.
The fact is not every brush
wielder or painter is an artist
even if known as such. Many
are painters of pretty pictures.
For the artist, no matter the
medium, applied or otherwise,
is the person who both trans-
forms and transcends the mun-
dane making it memorable.
And where there is a spark
the memorable is recognised.


Primarily artists, whatever their
medium, use known experience
and bring us to a place that
helps us to transcend the way
we see. They bring the tran-
scendent within the mundane
to our attention; the hidden in
plain sight open.
Perhaps more than any medi-
um, photography is about cap-
turing the transcendent
moment. Few photographers
ever master the medium to be
considered artists. Names like
Beaton Capra, Parks, Steiglitz,
come readily to mind.
Without the marvels and
magic of today's technology,
which allows any tyro to literal-
ly make a silk purse of a sow's
ear, these men created art. They
saw and captured that moment
enough times to create a body
of work that demonstrated that
here was no ordinary seer.
At the Central Bank is a body
of work on display by one such


artist. The work, which spans
decades, is in black grey and
white (interestingly enough they
are not considered colour) and
colour.
From a quizzical frog staring
back knowingly at the lens and
an elegant butterfly in black
white Stripes atop a flaming
bougainvillea bract to a handful
of incredible cloudscapes -
Threatening, Summer Cloud-
burst and Cyan to a trio of
women listening to a story
caught as the story teller pauses
to remove her pipe The Pipe #
1.
Or the composed and made
pieces -Seven, Fruit and Nut
Festival show the same acute
awareness of capturing the
moment even in the managed
and composed.
The black and grey and white
works are from an earlier time
of Bahamian history; they pre-
date the notion of nation. It was


a- time of self-sufficiency we
are no longer able to find home-
grown papaya in abundance in
the market place or the sense
of plenty that a forest of masts
evokes.
That other Bahamas was
every bit as commercial, but
outside the ambit of the flour-
ishing Bay Street of big deals
and closed markets. The jostling
sail boats intriguingly titled
Slaughterhouse waiting to
make their next trip back to the
islands with their supplies and
their farmers/vendors or the
young boys awaiting their next
dive for coins Coin Divers as
they perfected their skills for a
life of spear fishing and diving
conch; for truth be known, few
if any were destined for "higher
things".
Flowers, plants and insects
that are right there in front of us
as to be hidden and unseen are
seen anew and for the first time


in the memorable combinations
in nature's endless dialogues -
Moth, Shower and the already
mentioned Stripes.
The artist is Roland Rose. He
has spent a life away from his
native country of more norther-
ly latitudes. In fact he has
adopted this country of islands
as his own and has made us all
the richer for his adoption.
He knew and knows a
Bahamas then and a Bahamas


now. The difference is instruc-
tive and memorable. -
Hopefully, one day Mr Rose
will create a book so the thou-
sands who would not have seen
this-exhibition could at least go
to the library and take out a
copy, or better still buy it from
the book stores and give it as a
gift on birthdays, at confirma-
tions, at christenings, at wed-
dings. Yes, the work is that
good.


Seaman completes course


Able Seaman Roberto
Adderley of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force
recently returned home after
completing the journeyman-
networking core course at the
Corry Station Center for Infor-
mation Dominance in Pen-
sacola Florida.
The 18-month syllabus was
compressed into a 6 week
course which ran from June 6th
to July 19th 2005. Its main
focus included administrating
a Windows 2000 server Net-
work, which was divided into
five subject areas Cisco
Routers and Switches
(CCNA), Networking, Active
Directory, Windows 2000 Serv-
er and Windows 2000
Exchange Server.
Able Seaman Adderley
joined the Defence Force on
October 26, 1998 and is cur-
rently serving as a computer
technician in the computer and
information systems depart-
ment.


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your story.


'THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE








C J!J 28,200OCTHENT IBUN


Boat builder dies


FROM page one
The son of the legendary
boat builder Rupert Knowles,
was described last night as "a
great boat builder". He was
the owner of the famous 'A'
class regatta boat "Rupert's
Legend", named after his
father.
"You have to have a lot of
nerve to go and see (Mr
Knowles)," said Mark
Knowles, Mr Knowles' cousin.
"I didn't have the nerve to go
and see him. All his clothes
were burnt. His body is unrec-
ognizable the explosion
took off all his skin. He was
white, man."
Immediately after the explo-
sion, frantic family members
called The Tribune asking for
help to find a doctor who
would fly to Long Island to


treat Jessie for smoke inhala-
tion. Initially the emergency
flight was delayed because a
doctor was not immediately
available, according to Mr
Zervos.
Mr Zervos said that they
were told that because Jessie
had breathing difficulties due
to the pressure and smoke in
his lungs, the plane could
not leave without a doctor to
stabilize him as flying would
put a lot of pressure on his
lungs.
"We are afraid that he
would be like the man in
North Andros who died
before he could make it to
Nassau we don't want him
to die on the spot," said Mr
Zervos.
Said Mr Cartwright: "We
were going to the Cat Island
Regatta, but that won't hap-


pen anymore because we lost a
great boat builder. You should
let all the sailors know that
this was a great loss, because
he was one of the best."
Mr Knowles' body was tak-
en from the Deadman's Cay
clinic to the airport to be flown
to Nassau on a police aircraft
because of the nature of the
accident.
Larry Philips, proprietor of
Philips Sailmakers, was said to
have narrowly escaped the
explosion. It is understood that
Mr Philips was asked to look
at the gas line but could not
do so as he had a scheduled
return flight to Nassau.
According to Assistant
Police Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson the police on Long
Island, in conjunction with
Nassau, are investigating the
incident.


Man questioned by police as investigation

into Austrian tourists' death continues


FROM page oe
the man being questioned is a
native of the island with a crim-
inal record.
"Yama Bahama", profes-
sional athlete and owner of the
popular Bimini Breeze Restau-
rant and Bar, yesterday claimed
that the man has served prison
time for violent crimes.
The rumour on Bimini, said
the bar owner, is that there is
significant forensic evidence in,
the case to'determine the iden-
tity of thd killer.
Bimini residents and visitors
were sliocked by the murders,
he said, but are comforted by
the ificreased police presence
on the island.
Following the double shoot-
ing death on the weekend,


police sent teams of officers
from Nassau and Grand
Bahama to Bimini.
The bodies of Mr von
Bolzano and Ms von Perfall,
both members of old Salzburg
families, were discovered
around 12.36pm on Friday in
room number six at the Blue
Water Resort and Marina in
Alice Town, Bimini.
Ms von Perfall was found
lying in one of the room's two
beds with a gunshot wound to
the stomach. Mr von Bolzano
was face down on the floor
bound and gagged. He had been
shot in the middle of his back.
The engaged couple were vis-
iting Bimini for a few days to
swim with. the dolphins.
"Everybody was shocked and
disgusted that such a nasty


atrocity could happen on a
Family Island like Bimini. We
are very glad that the police are
here and doing their best. This
is not like in Aruba where
they're unable to find `he cul-
prit. The Bahamian police
already have someone in cus-
tody," he said.
Yama Bahama said that his
business, and the island's
tourism industry on a whole,
has not suffered from the crime.
"I've had calls from all over,
from New York, Chicago, and
Tallahassee all them asking
me what is going on down here
in Bimini. But once I explain
the situation to them, they
understand and tell me that this
kind of thing happens all over
the world these days and can't
be helped," he said.


US authorities look into human trafficking


FROM page one
their human cargo from
Freeport or West End area into
Miami. However it is not known
what the costs of the other legs
of the journey could be.
And, according to US Coast
Guard press liaison Lt Com-
mander Terry Johns, the recent
good weather has resulted in an
increase in this illicit activity.
"I can't tell you for sure what
the frequency is, but it probably
occurs like three times a
month," Lt Cdmr Johns said.
"Our interdiction rate is more
like one to two a month. So
does it occur more? I'm sure it
does. We are probably not
catching them all."
Using Lt Cdmr John's calcu-


lations, the boat captain and his
two helpers in that instance
would have made $170,000 for
that single run.
"So if you get a number of
immigrants together a smuggler
can get a good bit of money that
way. But now is it worth the
trade off that is the main thing.
The smugglers are looking for
easy money. To them it's worth
the risk, it's worth the trade off.
"We do our best to protect
our borders in the US, but cer-
tainly we can't catch every single
one of them. We can only try to
look at where they are leaving
from and who is putting this
information together," he said.
Noting that because of the
size of Grand Bahama, and the
large number of undeveloped


areas that could be used by the
smugglers, Lt Cmdr Johns said
they enlisted specialized groups
to target the perpetrators.
"We have groups like JASU,
who try to target the people
who are organising these smug-
gling events. We are not sure
how long this has beei\ going
on, but this smuggling has
picked up over the past coupled
of months because of the good
weather and the infrastructure
improvement over in Grand
Bahama.
"This is definitely riot a 'mom
and pop shop' orggnisatiqn,
especially when you have miftil
national immigrants involved
The big question mark is hovi
are these people getting into th4
Bahamas?" he asked.


Man's body found flti


FROM page one
siblings," said his brother.
Mr Brown said his brother
went fishing as usual Tuesday
night at Potters Cay dock. He
had been doing this for many
years. He said that his brother
had such a knack for fishing that
"even when Potters Cay wasn't
a dock, he fished off the rocks."
"Two nights ago m6iother told
hini to give up the dock and
stop fishing in the night time,"
he sobbed.
According to Kenneth
Brown, his brother was always


happy, never with problems and
always generous. "There was
no greater love you could find
- he cooked and he never
said no to no one, if ever you
asked for something he would
find it to give."
He believed he saw a sign of
his brother's death when "we
went to a funeral on Saturday
and the man say I wan' pray for'
people. Ed walked to the man
and gave his hand and prayed.
Strange things happen ya know,
you see people doing strange
things and now know why."
Ed Brown, a resident of


Mackey, Street, was described
by his family as a "jokester"
who enjoyed cooking.
"I can't believe it ya know;
it's just amazing how things is
and I miss him," said his broth-
er, Kenneth.
Assistant Commissioner Fer-
guson said Mr Brown's bodi
was identified by his niece yes-
terday.
Mr Ferguson said there iS
nothing to indicate foul play in
Mr Brown's death. "The body is'
currently being examined by the
authorities and we await the
outcome," he said.


Danger to tourism
tourIs


FROM page one
panel at the meeting, said the
top five reasons for not recom-
mending the Bahamas are high
prices, poor attitude, poor .ser-
vice, hotel dissatisfaction and
poor value for dollars. All of
those factors, including high
prices, are within our control,
he added.
"Our problems are those of
consistency it only takes one
bad apple to spoil the barrel,
only one bad experience, one


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encounter," said Mr Comito.
Minister of Tourism Obie'
Wilchcombe said that Bahami-
an leadership is something that
must demand more and be
demonstrated at all times.
"True pride must come from
inside, not from the colour of
one's skin. We need to accept
the true words of our national
anthem; pledge to excel through
love and unity. Pressing onward',
march together, to a common
loftier goal," said Mr Wilch-
combe.
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P/....... THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005









LOCALNW


Important lessons






about crawfish


THE PLACE TO


AUGUST 1 marks the tradi-
tional opening of the crawfish
season.
The spiny lobster or Bahami-
an :crawfish isone,of the most
important commercial fisheries
in the Bahamas. In 2003 the
Bahamas landed a total of 7.5
million pounds of crawfish.
In order to ensure that our
crawfish populations continue,
regulations exist which specify
such things as approved and ille-
gal fishing methods, open and
closed seasons and legal and
undersized measurements.
All aspects of these regula-
tions relate specifically to the
life cycle of the crawfish. Sizes
and seasons were determined
carefully ~nd,' are extremely
important to overall manage-
ment efforts.
Mature spiny lobsters live on
coral reefs and rocky areas of
the;ocean floor. They eat her-
mit crabs, conchs, chitons, sea
urchins and starfish and are
themselves fbod for large
grpupers, loggerhead turtles,
octopus, sharks and man. Adult
crawfish may reach a weight of
20; pounds or more, but five
pqunders are rare today.
Depending on their size
female crawfish produce eggs
twice during the reproductive
season. Most spawning takes
place in the spring and summer
fr minApril to August. Egg-
beaiung females usually stay on
the,'deep edges of a reef and
wlfn the eggs hatch the larvae
arf released on the open sea.
hhe newly hatched larvae are
called hyllosomes. For six to
nilie months the phyllosomes
are part of ocean plankton,
floating and swimming in the
ocean's surface layers with the
larval stages of many other
marine' organisms. They may
drift away in currents or be lost
or spend their early life caught
in; local eddys before they settle
on our shallow banks.
'Some of the phyllosomes lost
from the Bahamas find them-
selves in Bermuda, having been
swept by Gulf Stream Currents.
Inr similar fashion, Bahamian
stocks are replenished by lar-
vae hatched in Cuba, Mexico,
Haiti, Belize or elsewhere in the
Caribbean. For these reasons
co-operative agreements
between Caribbean countries
and regional enforcement of
protective legislation are essen-
tial.
At approximately nine
months the phyllosomes under-
go a complete body change
called metamorphosis. They
settle to the bottom and as a
young crawfish live in shallow
bays and'seagrass beds. As
juveniles spiny lobsters are
gregarious. They band togeth-
er in large numbers to help
each other ward off predators.
In many cases crawfish
"hotjs"ire comprised of these
large numbers of young under-
sized juveniles seeking protec-,
tion in sheer numbers. They,;
gqo. rapidly during/this stage -


for a crustacean, that is.
It takes about three or four
years before they will weigh in
at one pound!
After this initial growing peri-
od the juvenile crawfish leave
their shallow nursery and
migrate to deeper reefs. Adult
crawfish tend to stay near cer-
tain areas of a particular reef
for several years. They move
off to, deeper water in the fall
and winter, but return to the
same shallow patch reef the fol-
lowing spring and summer. The
seasonal movements are related
to the temperature of the sea
and length of the day.
To successfully manage any
commercial resource two major
considerations must be made.
There must be a continued and
healthy production of young to
sustain the harvest and the
yield annually should be maxi-
mized without adversely affect-
ing the stability of the species.
In other words, for crawfish to
produce enough larvae to meet
the yearly market demand they
must be allowed to grow large
enough to mature sexually and
allowed to produce undisturbed.

Catches

The minimum catch size for
crawfish tails in the Bahamas is -
5 ? inches. Crawfish smaller
than the legal catch size have
not reached sexual maturity
and have not reproduced. To
harvest undersized crawfish
deliberately threatens the future
survival of this marine resource.
It is necessary to protect
crawfish while they are under-
sized. If female crawfish are
allowed to reproduce once our
crawfish needs and those of
future generations'of Bahami-
ans, will be guaranteed. If
.'female crawfish are not allowed
to reproduce our demands on
our crawfish populations will
soon exceed the capacity of
these populations to replenish
themselves and the species as
we know it in the Bahamas will
collapse.
The closed season on craw-
fishing in the Bahamas runs
from 1st April through 31st
July. It is one of the most
important aspects of our pro-
tective measures for crawfish.
A female crawfish may produce
between 500,000 and 2,000,000
eggs during the reproductive
season.
In the best of circumstances
less than 10 will survive to
become reproducing adults
themselves. If the female is dis-
turbed or suffers stress while
spawning the numbers get even
smaller. The closed season
gives females the opportunity
to spawn or produce eggs, in an
undisturbed environment.
It is for this reason that the
stability of our crawfish popu-
lations is determined to a large
degree on our compliance with
no crawfishing during the closed
season. Crawfishing out of sea-


son threatens the future survival
of this precious marine resource
in the same as harvesting under-
sized crawfish.
Preservation of crawfish habi-
tat is an important part of any
management plan. The meth-
ods of harvest are crucial td the
success, and ultimate survival
of the crawfish industry. They
must be methods that leave the
natural ecosystems intact and
capable of producing high
growth rates and sustaining
large numbers of crawfish in
concentrations that can be eco-
nomically harvested. -Harvest
methods must also leave juve-
nile or undersized crawfish
undisturbed.
The Bahamas lNational Trust
is committed to supporting sus-
tainable fisheries resources in
The Bahamas.
The Exuma Cays Land & Sea
Park was established in 1959 as
the first national park in the
Bahamas. It is also recognized
as one of the first land and sea
national parks under a single
jurisdiction.


DAYS: Sunday, Monday,Wednesday & Friday


Providenciales to Nassau
Flight # RU401 departs I 0:00am
Arrives in Kaessac, I I .0I-,


Nassau to Providenciales
Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
A r*i/oz in P ,i,4nr;in.fia ') .rh00m.,


t U i m1 T a1 i au i i: va i i rr o vi ienciai .es U I : l pm



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departure taxes Included
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


CIO




clothing
every department
men o women girls' boys



"i !


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUN THURDAYJULY 8,O205, PGEW1


Anniversary:



Bimini hosts



a fishy tale


* AN early start for this
boat at last year's Native
Fishing Tournament in
August 2004. This year the
Bimini Native Fishing
Tournament celebrates its
55th anniversary July 30-
August 6th with a week of
activities designed to re-
establish the excitement of
this historic fishing tourney.


* THIRD place winner in the Children's Division along with the
Weigh Master holding her catch during the 2004 Bimini Native
Fishing Tournament. This year's tournament kicks off July 30
with the Miss and Little Miss Bimini Native Fishing Pageant.


BIMINI The famous
Bimini Native Fishing Tour-
nament will celebrate its 55th
anniversary from July 30 to
August 6,2005.
The tournament was found-
ed in 1950 by the Bimini Pro-
gressive Sporting Club. As
the fishing tournaments for
tourists ended in July, the
organisers planned a week
long tournament for Biminites
to celebrate the end of the
season.
The first year there were
only 12 boats. They would
fish by day, and then gather
by night to tell the tall tales
of the "ones that got away".
The word spread quickly on
all the enjoyment the natives
were having, so visitors were
fascinated to join in; there-
fore, the Bimini Native tour-
nament became the largest in
The Bahamas. However over
the years the tournament has
since loss its luster.


This year's event will kick
off on July 30th with the Miss
and Little Miss Bimini Native
Fishing Pageant. Then July
31 is the tournament registra-
tion.
The coast is $150.00 per
angler that includes a t-shirt,
entry into all of the cocktail
parties and a chance to win
the cash prize of $1,000.00.
The week-long events will
include fishing, picnics, a scav-
enger hunt, a hot dog and
mango eating contest, a soft-
ball game, the 38 Annual
Glenda Road Race, a float
parade, an auction and craft
show.
The celebration. ends on
Saturday August 6 with a
seafood festival including a
Junkanoo parade and perfor-
mance by a popular Bahamian
artist, Elon Moxey.
Proceeds from the tourna-
ment will benefit the Bimini
Scholarship Fund.


Real estate firm


opens offices


in Hopetown


ABACO TWO new full-
service real estate offices now
carry the HG Christie banner
in Green Turtle Cay and
Hopetown, Abaco
HG Christie's newest loca-
tions are authentic Abaco pine
houses built in the 1800's, faith-
fully restored and now housing
fully modern offices with the
latest in technology and equip-
ment.
On Thursday June 23 the offi-
cial opening of the Green Turtle
Cay office drew a community
crowd of well-wishers, as well
as special visitors from
Freeport, Nassau, Eleuthera
and Toronto, Canada.
The.new office is a faithful
restoration of a home located
on the site since 1854.
Located beside Green Turtle
Cay's historic Memorial Sculp-
ture Garden, the restoration
was managed by Abaco assis-
tant district manager Christo-
pher Plummer, Green Turtle
Cay resident and grandson of
Frank Holmes Christie, who
along with his brother Sir
Harold George Christie, found-
ed HG Christie in 1922.
HG Christie's second new
Abaco location, the Hopetown/
Elbow Cay office was officially
launched on Friday June 24.
The office overlooks
Hopetown Harbour and is
located in the heart of
Hopetown beside the Wyannie
Malone Museum.
HG Christie Abaco district
manager Derek Lee said that
"Elbow Cay has been the star of
the Abaco real estate market.
We are very pleased to have
found this location."
"In Abaco, we are getting a
strong core group of people
who want to preserve their tra-
dition and heritage, not only in
buildings but in boats and by
paying respect to the values of
the old lifestyle. It's really great
to see."
By restoring some of the
Family island vintage buildings
that are among the oldest in
their communities and repur-


HOME MOTOR e LIABILITY

CASUALTY 0 CONTRACT WORKS

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 0 MARINE


posing them as offices, HG
Christie says it hopes to do its
part in preserving the rich her-
itage of the islands and in sup-
porting the community.
"Over one thousand dollars
was raised at the Hopetown
opening toward the Hopetown
softball field. At the Green Tur-'
tle Cay opening, funds were also
raised for the local Community
Clinic for treatment of patients
in need of medical attention,"
said a statement from the com-
pany.


Its All About



he luyls, Bikes a Cars

Town Centre Mall, 12 Noon 6pm, July 23rd, 2005


3t)WN CNTRE MAL 4


Deplay of Produmtn &
Ele~troni Just For Men


-


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 17












Hilton KIDS


makes donation


CONTINUING its support for
local community projects, the
British Colonial Hilton has donat-
ed a stove and refrigerator to the
Fort Charlotte Community Cen-
tre.
The donation was made on
Thursday July 14, to the centre's
administrator Deborah Basden
and Minister of Education Alfred
Sears, who is the member of par-
liament for the area.
The Hilton KIDS (kindness in
donations and services) Fund is a
special programme that focuses
and targets assisting children
within the local communities.
According to the British Colo-
nial, the fund was established in
2001 and primarily seeks "to gen-
erate funds to civically assist the
youth of the nation wherever pos-
sible and also exists in all the
Caribbean countries in which


Hilton operates."
"Throughout the year the
British Colonial sponsors several
fund raising activities including
the Bilney Lane Home, Chil-
dren's Emergency Hostel and the
Elizabeth Estates Children's
home and also spear heads visits
to interact with the children of
these homes.
"In addition, the hotel very reg-
ularly sponsor and offers assis-
tance to numerous children's
charities and outreach pro-
grammes, and also recently
donated a machine to the chil-
dren's ward of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital," said a statement
from the hotel.
The public can seek further
information on the KIDS pro-
gramme by contacting Opal Gib-
son, the British Colonial Hilton'
director of sales and marketing.


* MEMBERS of the KIDS charity committee, Minister Alfred Sears, staff and children of the Fort Charlotte Community Center.


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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


1 ti TRIBUNE













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celebrating the launch of a pro-
ject that not only marks a mile-
stone for the company, but rep-
resents a leap forward in
Bahamian health care.
The Bahamas-based web
development company com-
pleted its 100th project since
1997 with the launch of a web-
site for the Public Hospitals
Authority (PHA).
"This milestone site encom-
passes all of the skills that have
made Thyme Online a market
leader efficiency enhancing
functionality and industry spe-
cific tools to improve the cus-
tomer relationship," said a
statement by the company.
It said that as regards the
PHA website, "this translates
to online customer support
management, dynamic tender
publication, delivery of digital
annual reports, training calen-
dar and an integrated library
for professional and educa-
tional research all combined
with award winning graphic
design and usability standards."

Challenges
PHA president Hanna Gray
said: "The challenges of design-
ing and building a site to apt-
ly/adequately represent the
complex entities of the PHA
as a cohesive unit was no small
task. Through the professional
expertise of Thyme Online in
both business development and
technical proficiency, this site
promotes public awareness of
who we are and what we do
while further advancing the
core values, principles and
goals of our organisation.
"We thank Thyme Online
for assisting us in achieving a
successful website product and
look forward to capitalising on
their fine ideas and support as
we progress our site through
all of its planned stages of
future development."
In the last seven years,


New project marks

a 'milestone'


Thyme Online has grown to
include a client list that spans
the globe, from the Bahamas,
Montserrat and Anguilla in the
Caribbean to the United
States, andas far away as Swe-
den.
According to the company,
its work ranges from "simple
but effective marketing-driven


websites, to highly interactive
and complex enterprise-level
business applications powering
some of the largest names in
the region."
"Its client base extends from
small family-run businesses to
multi-national corporations,
covering nearly every sector of
industry."


to Worn.Out Bathtubs

Bathtub Liners are designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
*Wall Surrounds to cover existing bath walls: In simulated Tile and Marble
Shower Base Liners to go over existing Shower bases
Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks
Great Shower Door selection
Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities




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"Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler"


Telephone
IOAO\ QQ_.QrA4


|lr cU v "Authorized Dealer"
Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street


THE FURNITURE GALLERY

NASSAU

CORNER OF SHIRLEY STREET & KEMP ROAD
10-6 MONDAY SATURDAY (AMPLE PARKING)
PHONE: 242-394-7704


At last our new stock has arrived fmm Europe Drop by to see our
exclusive& elegant designs Sofas armcnair coffee tables side tables
cosole tables dmres bendches acubion rugs chairs lamp, glass
asionm rugns china, garden urns& much mome


The Tropical Trading Co., also has brand new stock as shown above at
30 Airport Industrial Road
Phone: 327-3448 or 556-8053


:


r--------- -------------------------------------- -- ---- ------ ----.p I


~hpr =II_ L_ -I


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE







SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over.
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VIENNA &
CHICKEN
SAUSAGE
21$,00


KOOL AID
ASSORTED
FLAVOURS
E DEAL



THRIFTY MAID
AVI
SHORTENING
42- OZ
sis^^s


SUNCHY

MALTA
12-O0
3/$s S9


DISTINCTION
CONDENSED
MILK (SWEET)
395 OR
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CHARMIN
ULTRA
ALOE
S12 ROLL



CAMIPBELLS


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ARIEL
DETERGENT
W/ BLEACH

2/$300


NIAGRA
SPRAY STARCH
HEAVY & LEMON
22 coz


.me,


PLUMS RED LARGE, PEACHE
LARGE
LB

GREEN
PEPPERS
s I LB9 '? :.'
MIX-N-MATCH
WHITE & RED SEEDLESS GRAPE
RED GLOBE GRAPES
LB
S1l 99


SPREAD ASS
9 LB,
WINN-DIXIE
SLICED CHEESE
$S69
V^ 16 -0Z

WINN-DIXIE
CORN ON COB
2/ .4 & 6 EAR
W/D
CUT GREEN BEANS, SWEET PEAS, SWEET
CORN, MIX VEGETABLE, CUT OKRA& I
BROCCOLI
48 OZ


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TD REFRIGERATED BAGELS
27790





SUMMERDALEN
STRAIGHT CUT POTATOES
S3 5-LB
W/D
ICE CREAM ALL
FLAVOURS
$349
64 -OZ


SNACK PACK
PUDDING 4.5- oz $1.75
KELLOGS
NUTRI-GRAIN ASSTD
FLAVOUR BAR -cr......................$4.99
WD
COCONUT BAR
COOKIES s oz .........................$2.39
CHECK
SODAS ALL FLAVOUR 2-LTR...2/$3.00
WD
SNACK PIES ASSORTED ii -oz.......$1.69
BEACH
TOYS ASSORTED EACH .................$2.99
LIBBY'S
LITE MIX FRUIT &
DICE PEACHES 4.5 oz ..................$3.59
CRACKING
GOOD SALTINES 16- oz ............,.......$1.39


CHOPS
L 9


TURKEY
WINGS OR
DRUMSTICKS
LB
-99

PORK RIBS
LB
-97


PORK LOIN PIGS DL LEE
END CUT F WHOLE
CHOPS EET SMOKE
CHOPS PICNIC HAM
LBLB
LB

USDA PRESTIGE CHOICE PRESTIGE
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IN-N.Y. STRIP
SIRLOIN IP ROAST STEAKS OXTAILFRSH
LB LB
1$399 s899 $399


HORMEL HOT
COOKED HAM CHICKEN WINGS |
LB 8/EA30
ALL NEW
WHITE & YELLOW CREAM PIES BAKERS CH I El
AMERICAN CHEESE ASSORTED FLAVORS T
B COCONUT CRIME & CHOOOT
$3 LB 15-o


HUNTS
BBQ SAUCES
ALL FLAVOURS
18 OZ
2/$300


WESSON
OIL REGULAR:
VEGETABLE, CANO
& CORN OIL
48 OZ



MAHATMA
RICE LONG GRAIN
& PARBOILED
5- LBS


THRIFTY MAID
CORNED
BEEF
12- ,OZ



DASANI
WATER

20 OZ



HELLMANNS
MAYONNAISE
REGULAR
32 OZ
a ee ^*


KELLOGS
FRUIT
LOOPS
43 OZ



DEL MONTE
GREEN
PIGEON PEAS
15 -OZ
$^1 19


KRAFT
SALAD
DRESSING
ASSORTED
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2/$3oo


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA (WATER)
6 OZ



BAHAMA
EVAPORATED
"MILK
14.5 OZ
2/$ 25


ENSURE

SUPPLIMENTS
S- oz
$ 19


HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQEEZE BOTTLE
36 OZ



CHEF BOY ARDEE
SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALLS
15 OZ
$129


MCVITIES
DIGESTIVE
BISCUITS
500 GR
14 89


HUNTS
TOMATO
PASTE
12 -OZ
$1 2S
I.


WELCH'S
ASST'D&:
JUICES
11.5 OZ
2/$ 44


ifi K t1l


REAL DEALS


1IC(t~ek~e~iio~b~r I I r ~L


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THETR





THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 21
;b ;,:,


TM

RICE
20 LBS

KRAFT
SALAD DRESSINGS
ASSORTED
* 8 OZ
2/$ 00
ISLAND QUEEN
COCONUT
WATER
11.5 OZ

WD 1


(PRINGLES ~(UPER INSECTOX)


CRISPS
ASSORTED
14 OZ


INSECT
SPRAY
32 OZ


2/$300 $449
HUNTS MULLERS
BBQ SAUCE READY


ASSORTED
18 OZ
3/$300
TM
JUMBO HAND
TOWELS
1- ROLL


CUT
16 OZ
99!
CHEK
SODAS ASSORTED
*CASEl$775
6 PAK


!99$1 99J
WD WD
FOAM FOAM CUPS


PLATES
50 CT
$289
CHAMPION
PIGEON
PEAS
120 CT
$699
BARBER
CREAM
CRACKERS
200 GR
L-99E'
LANDER'S

IP IPII


20CT
16 OZ
$S 49
DORITOS
CHIPS
ASSORTED
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PIG

FEET
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ALL
VARIETY
PUDDING
CAKES


BOX EACH
s599 $439
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wins.wt
say ng on th ese
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WD
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CORN-ONI
THE-COB
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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


EMERGENCY
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Telephone: 394-4823 or 394-7926
Fax: 394-1826
P.O. Box N-9180, Nassau, The
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email: lawnboy@batelnet.bs


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Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30 pm JJ
Sat 8am 12 noon
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E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Salespersons: Pam Palacious,
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_ __


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Defence official



claims Cuba and



Venezuela are



targeting Bolivia



"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content UI L'W
Available from Commercial News Providers"
* l


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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY EVENING JULY 28, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 i1 10:30

Antiques Road- Live From Lincoln Center "A Concert at Mozart's New Florida nt *** WHALE RIDER (2002, Dra-
U WPBT show "Kettering" House" Maestro Louis Langree leads a concert featur- ma) Keisha Castle-Hughes, Rawiri
,_:_' ing soprano Renee Fleming. (N) Paratene, Vicky Haughton.
13 R The Insider (N) Big Brother 6 Head of household. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "Nickel and .. .
0 WFOR n (CC) (Live) (f (CC) "Weeping Willows' ft (CC) (DVS) Dimed" Samantha goes under cover
............ o lure a drug trafficker.
Access Holly- Joey Joey gets Will & Grace The Law Firm Contestants are di- (9:59) ER "Fear" The staff treats two
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) one extra ticket to Grace's date with vided into teams and try two cases, small children who fell from a third-
his premiere. Nick. (CC) (N) (CC) story window. n (CC)
Deco Drive That '70s Show That '70s Show The O.C. The Showdown" ,1 (CC) News (CC)
WSVN Eric needs to fi- Incriminating evi-
nance college. dence. ,1
Jeopardy! "Kids Extreme Makeover Jenny Mc- Hooking Up (N) A (Part 3 of 5) Primetime (CC)
I WPLG Week"(CC) Carthy surprises her mother with a (CC)
mini-makeover. t (CC)

American Jus- Cold Case Files "Hitchhike to Murder; Never Forgotten; The Green River The First 48 Authorities probing a
A&E tice "Dealing Killer" Murder of a young hitchhiker. (CC) savage shotgun murder track des-
With the Devil" perate lovers on the lam, (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET BET Style The Parkers nf College Hill College Hill Blowin' Up: Fat- 25 Hottest Movies
BET((CC) ty Koo
CBC Aquatics World * RUPERT'S LAND (1998, Comedy-Drama) Samuel West, lan The National (CC)
B_ Championships Tracey. Two estranged half brothers reunite after a family death. (CC)
Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien
,NN '(00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
I Cooper 360 (CC)
Reno 911! (CC) The Daily Show Comedy Central Comedy Central South Park (CC) Chappelle's Reno 911! Jones
COM With Jon Stew- Presents (CC) Presents (CC) Show Wyclef considers quit-
art (CC) Jean. (CC) ting. (CC)
COURT Cops "Coast to Cops.Prostitution Cops "Coast to Forensic Files Body of Evi- Uniform Justice 'Burning Secret"
UCoast" f (CC) sting. (CC) Coast" 1) (CC) "House Call" dence (N)
That's So Raven LIFE IS RUFF (2005, Comedy) Kyle Massey, Calvin Wheeler, Kay American Drag- Sister, Sister
DISN "Mismatch Mak- Panabaker. A teenage slacker adopts a stray dog. 'NR' (CC) on: Jake Long "Cafeteria Lady"
er" "Ski Trip" n (CC)
DIY This Old House Weekend Wood Works Li- Home IQ Contractor: Va- DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
Dl, (CC) Handyman (N) brary desk. cation Homes cue cue
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx
D, ___ Depth Tagestema Depth
E" Love Is in the THS Investigates: The Real Life Kill Reality Egos clash over peo- Fight for Fame "Horror" Scene in a
E*; Heir CSI pie's roles. haunted mansion,
ESPN 2005 Hot Dog 2005 U.S. Open of Competitive City Slam Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
,rN Eating Contest Eating (N) _____.
ESPNI RPM Semanal Soccer Chelsea at D.C. United. (Live) SportsCenter -- International Edi-
,N (N) tion (Live),'
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Back Stage The Holy Rosary Theology of the The Church and
V Lady Body ithe Poor
FIT TV :00) Total Body Chasing Lance n FitNation "Buying Beauty" Non-sur- Ultimate Goals An aspiring actor.
I Tiv Sculpt Plus n gical beauty procedures. (N) (f (CC)
FOX-NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
rA'_- ,Shepard Smith _____Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL (:00 MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field in Best Damn Sports Show Period
,N,,i_,-_ St. Petersburg, Fla. (Subject to lackout) (Live) (Live) (CC)
GOLF World Club Championship Highlights Tiger's 1997 Masters Highlights PGA Seniors
Masters Championship
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire n The Amazing Race ft (CC) Dog Eat Dog ,f (CC)
N (CC) .
,,G4Tech (:00) Attack of X.Play "Auto As- Cheat Requests. Icons G4TV.com Icons Frank Cinematech (N)
G4TeC (the Show! sault" I Miller.
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker and LOVE'S ENDURING PROMISE (2004, Romance) Katherine Heigl, Dale
HALL Texas Ranger Trent defend a woman from her Midkiff, January Jones, A mysterious traveler woos a pioneer couple's.
."Undercover" abusive husband. ft (CC) daughter. (CC)
Dream House Holmes on Homes "Honeymoon Real Renos The Ultimate Do- The Block Walls come crashing
,HGTV Construction de- Ensuite" ft (CC) Jim's tradesmen Up "After the Del- down in the boys apartment. ft
lays. (CC) .... are baffled. (CC) uge" (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- AOG
IN Pr ,.(CC) (CC) day
Xiaolin Show- Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends n (CC) Will & Grace Everybody Everybody
KTLA down f (CC) Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air Jack hides the Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
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EYE OF THE STALKER: A MOMENT OF TRUTH BROKEN SILENCE (1998, Drama) Ariana Richards, Susan Blakely,
LIFE MOVIE (1995, Drama) Joanna Cassidy. A judge's William Bumiller. A young track runner is brutally raped by her coach.
daughter is stalked by a college instructor. (CC) (CC) (DVS)
:00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Situation With Tucker Carl- Scarborough Country
iVhN; (C OMmann, son
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TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Thanks- Friends The New * AUSTIN POWERS: THE SPY WHO SHAGGED ME (1999, Com-
TBS Loves Raymond giving dinner with Year's Eve party edy) Mike Myers, Heather Graham, Michael York. Dr. Evil plots to elimi-
"Who's Next" friends. promise. nate Austin by stealing his mojo. (CC) (DVS)
(:00) In a Fix Sports Disasters "Out of Control" Jump Britain French free-runners Overhaulin' (CC)
TLC The Water Fea- (CC) leap from British landmarks.
ture" (CC) .
(:00) Law & Or- * s THE FUGITIVE (1993, Drama) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones, Sela Ward. An in- *,** THE
TNT der "Bad Girl" n nocent man must evade the law as he pursues a killer. (CC) FUGITIVE (1993)
(CC) (DVS) ____(CC)
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I l t ures enlists help. ft (CC) .
TV5 Passe-moi les jumelles Les Grands duels du sport Les Enquites d'Eloise Rome TV5 Le Journal
TW ,6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
ITW PM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC) _

UNIV .00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Aqui y Ahora

... :00) The 4400 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit HALF PAST DEAD (2002, Action) Steven Seagal, Morris Chestnut, Ja
USA 'Carrier" (CC) Detectives search for a suspect with Rule. An undercover agent battles gold-hungry invaders in prison. (CC)
.an ax to'grind. f (CC)
VH1 (:00)40 Awesomely Bad Breakup Songs A Kept f Hogan Knows Kept f
v..___Best ft
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WV GN ment "A Frozen James Woods. A woman asks a bomb expert to eliminate three gang-
Moment" (CC) sters. f (CC)
WP.I X. Everybody MLB Baseball New York Mets at Houston Astros. From Minute Maid Park in Houston. (Live)
WPIX Loves Raymond
"Italy" (CC)
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WSBK Week (cC)

M antle Profile of the life and career ** a THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW (2004, Adventure) Dennis Quad, :45 The Island:
HBOU-E of professional baseball player Mick- Jake Gyllenhaal, lan Holm. Global warming leads to worldwide natural HB First Look
ey Mantle. f (CC) disasters. f 'PG-13' (CC) (CC)


6:00) THE * ANACONDAS: THE HUNT FOR THE BLOOD (:45) AMERICAN SPLENDOR (2003, Biogra-
HBO-P GOONIES (1985) ORCHID (2004) Johnny Messner. Explorers encounterhy)Pau Giamatti, Harvey Pekar. Comic-book wrter
'PG' (CC) monstrous snakes in Borneo. 'PG-13 (CC) arvey Pekar tells his story. n 'R' (CC)
O 6:00) *** s EMPIRE RECORDS (1995, Comedy-Drama) An- Real Sports A (CC) Mantle f (CC)
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(2003) 'PG-13' record store he manages, f 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) **a s THE EDGE (1997, Suspense) Anthony ** CITY BY THE SEA (2002, Drama) Robert De Niro, Frances Mc-
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(2003) 'PG'(CC) an all-gay cruise. 'R (CC) seeks revenge for his family's murder. 'R' (CC)
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(2003) 'PG-13' shy guy a new outlook on life. f 'R' with a young stripper. 'R' (CC)


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 23
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WOOD OV OU.
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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


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THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahamas
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Attorney hopes



for Guana Cay



appeal hearing



by this October


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
T he attorney for
the Save Gua-
na Cay Reef
Association is
hoping the
appeal against the Supreme
Court's decision to dismiss
its application for a Judicial
Review of the $175 million
Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean
Club Heads of Agreement
will be heard in October, as
protesters prepare to take
their campaign to the devel-
opers' home town of San
Francisco.
Fred Smith, who is repre-
senting the protesters, said
he would go before the
Court of Appeal today for
the "hearing of the settle-
ment of the record", which
will decide what papers and
documents will go before the
court when the substantive
issues are heard.
"Hopefully, once the
record has been settled, we
will have the Appeal hear-
ing by October," Mr Smith
told The Tribune.
He added that opponents
of the Baker's Bay develop-
ment were planning to take
their campaign to San Fran-
cisco, which is where lead
developer Discovery Land
Company is based.
Some six placard-wielding
demonstrators had previ-
ously picketed the Buck-
head, Atlanta, offices of one
of Discovery Land Compa-
ny's lead partners, real estate
firm Bullock Mannelly Part-


ners.
Mr Smith acknowledged
that "the wind was taken out
of the sails" of many Great
Guana Cay residents and
Association members when
the Supreme Court threw
out both their bid to gain an
injunction for interlocutory
relief, preventing the devel-
opers from going ahead with
construction work, and the
Judicial Review application.
"It was quite a shock to
have the Judicial Review
application struck out like
that, but we haven't given
up," Mr Smith said.
Protest
"We are continuing to
protest on the island with
signs and newspaper adver-
tisements in the Abaconian
and on the web, and to the
extent that anyone comes to
the island to look at the pro-
ject, we are reminding them
that the people of Guana
Cay don't want this project
as planned."
Mr Smith said the Associ-
ation had met with. Dr Liv-
ingston Marshall, Baker's
Bay's senior vice-president
of community and environ-
mental affairs, to see
whether the developers were
prepared to change their
plans.
They were especially con-
cerned about the size of the
marina, which has already
been reduced from 240 slips
to 180, preserving the wet-
lands and not dredging into
the mangroves, and about
the possible building of jet-


ties out into the sea.
Mr Smith said the Associ-
ation was still waiting for Dr
Marshall to come back to
them with a response.
The developers behind the
$175 million Baker's Bay
Ocean & Golf Club on
Great Guana Cay have pre-
dicted the project will have a
$1 billion "direct effect" on
the Abaco and Bahamian
economies, describing the
project as a "model for eco-
nomic development in the
Bahamas" that cannot be
bettered.
Steve Adelson, a partner
in San Francisco-based Dis-
covery Land Company and
vice-president of develop-
ment for the Baker's Bay
project, said: "I don't know a
better model for economic
development in the
Bahamas than what we're
bringing. It's appropriately
sized.*.. we're creating
administrative jobs, staff jobs
andentrepreneurial jobs.
We're bringing in all this for-
eign investment, adding to
the pot and not taking away
from it.
"The reason I say this is a
a model development and
economic gain for the
Bahamas is that it is clean
and environmentally sound.
It contains economic gains
for the people of the
Bahamas through the taxes
created from real estate
sales, and jobs created for
Bahamians.
"It's a model for the future
economic development of
the Bahamas as long as peo-
ple follow these guidelines."


$12m taken out




of Colina firm




since 2003 start


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
MORE than $12 million has
flowed out of BISX-listed Col-
ina Holdings (Bahamas) in the
form of dividends and service
fees to related parties over the
past two-and-a-half years,
informed sources have told The
Tribune.
Colina Holdings is the hold-
ing company for Colinalmper-
`ial Insurance, the life and health
insurer, and using its 2004
financial statements as their fac-
tual basis, observers have
worked out the cash flows that
took place between the com-
pany and its affiliates, chiefly
the parent, Colina Financial
Group (CFG), and Colina
Financial Advisors between the
beginning of 2003 and mid-


2005.
Given CFG's 67 per cent
stake in Colina Holdings, and
total dividend payments of
$1.484 million and $989,185 in
2004 and 2003 respectively,
CFG received $994,130 and
$662,754 in dividend payments
in those two years. This makes
a total of almost $1.657 million
that was received by CFG in
those two years.
CFG, up until recently, was
owned by Colina Holdings'
chairman, Emanuel Alexiou,
the latter's president, James
Campbell, and fellow Colina
principal Anthony.Ferguson.
Mr Alexiou and Mr Campbell
both owned 45 per cent of
CFG, with Mr Ferguson hold-
ing the remaining 10 per cent.
Around 50 per cent of the
cash flows to Colina Holdings'


related parties between 2003 to
mid-2005 went to CFG close
to $7 million. By contrast,
minority shareholders who hold
a 33 per cent stake in Colina
Holdings have received
$816,077 in dividends for 2003
and 2004 combined.
Mr Ferguson did not return
The Tribune's phone message
seeking comment last night,
and there is nothing to suggest
that Colina Holdings, CFG, the
other entities and their staff,
and the three principals have
done anything wrong.
However, the amount of
money that has been taken out
of the publicly-quoted insurer is
likely to provide further ammu-
nition to Colina's rivals and

See COLINA, 3B


Bank to expand on Grand Bahama

1 By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
PAUL McWeeney, managing
director-of Bank of the Bahamas
International, yesterday said the
bank was in the process of
expanding its Grand Bahama
operations to increase its total
business revenue and grow mar-
ket share.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr McWeeney, who also
serves as chairman of the Clear-
ing Banks Association, said
Bank of the Bahamas' Grand
Bahama operations currently
account for about one third of
the bank's total business. With
an overall Bahamas market
share of some 7 per cent, Mr

See BANK, 4B


Council



'bypassed'


on Guana Cay


development


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE former Hope Town
District Council complained to
Government that it was being
"bypassed" in the process of
giving approvals and permits
to developers of the contro-
versial $175 million Guana Cay
project, saying "there are so
many unknowns" preventing it
from reaching decisions on the
development.
Suffered
Walter Sweeting, the former
chief councillor, in a letter
addressed to Captain Antho-
ny Aliens at the Port Authori-
ty, also complained that the
council had suffered "great
embarrassment" and been
made to "feel totally ineffec-
tual" when a fax sent by Mr
Aliens' agency approving
construction of the Temporary
Dock at the $175 million Bak-
er's Bay Golf & Ocean Club,
arrived in the middle of a coun-
cil meeting that was discussing
whether to give the go-ahead to
the same project.
Mr Sweeting's letter, which
was copied to the Prime Min-
ister and other government


ministers, said the District
Council meeting on May 19,
2005, was discussing approval
of the Temporary Dock with
the Baker's Bay developers,
Discovery Land Company,
when the fax arrived from Mr
Aliens' office.
Approval
The fax said "approval had
also been granted by the Min-
ister of Transport and Avia-
tion, and that Passerine (the
developers) should now pro-
ceed to get a building permit
for the project".
Mr Sweeting wrote on May
23: "All Council members at
our meeting were appalled that
such a letter should appear
with no prior notice to our
Council........
"Even with your letter, the
Council, in all good conscience,
was unable to grant a permit.
As you are well aware, this pro-
ject is a very controversial one
here on Abaco. For us to grant
a permit simply upon your
direction would cause endless
difficulties for both Council
members and all Abaco local

See COUNCIL, 6B


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Chikera A. Cooper was successful in passing her final part of the Uniform
Certified Public Accountant Examination within the April June 2005 testing window.
Upon completion of her secondary education at the Abaco Central High School, Ms.
Cooper went on to obtain an Associate of Arts Degree in Accounting from The College
of The Bahamas. She continued her studies at the University of Tampa, Tampa Florida
and graduated with' a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting in May 2002. Ms.
Cooper immediately went on to obtain a Masters of Business Administration Degree
with a concentration in Advanced Finance and Government & Business from the
University of South Florida (USF), Tampa Florida, where she graduated in May 2004.
While at USF, she became a member of and was actively involved in Beta Alpha Psi,
the Accounting Honors Fraternity. Ms. Cooper began her career with
PricewaterhouseCoopers in July 1999 ,where she was employed for one year as an
Accountant Assistant. After being awarded a partial scholarship by the Firm to finish
her education abroad, she rejoined PricewaterhouseCoopers in September 2004 and
currently holds the position of Associate in the Assurance and Business Advisory
Services (ABAS) group.


A special thank you is also extended to Ms. Jean Bowes and.the Lecturers of COB for For her accomplishment, Ms. Cooper would first like to give thanks to God for always
their assistance and guidance, being faithful. She would also like to thank her parents, Cephas and Laverne Cooper,
her brother Chevano, and other close family and friends for their continued love,
support, prayers, and words of encouragement. Finally, she would like to thank the
Firm.
With offices in Nassau and Freeport, PricewaterhouseCoopers Bahamas is a member firm ofPricewaterhouseCoopers, which is the world's largest professional
services organization. Drawing on the knowledge and skills of more than 125,000 people in 142 countries, we build relationships by providing services based
on quality and integrity "PricewaterhouseCoopers" refers to the network of member firms of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each of Which
is a separate and independent legal entity.








THE TIBUNETHURSAYUSJLYE28



HALSBLI RY
CHAMBERS


Invites applications for the position of:

SBlW i-Commercial Attorney

Applicants must have at least three (3) to five
S(5) years commercial law experience.
e w N a sa u oMust possess excellent communication skills,
both written and oral.


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
S olomon's Mines, a leading
retailer of luxury goods in the
Bahamas, has opened the first
standalone Bally store in the
country, located at the Prince
George Plaza on Bay Street.
Bally, a Swiss-based designer of luxury
leather goods, footwear and apparel, has a,
dedicated following of both locals and
tourist patrons who were anxious to see the
line expanded in the Bahamas.
Flagship
Gordett Farrington, Bally buyer for
Solomon's Mines, said the store had car-
ried the line for a number of years, but it
was only sold at the Bay Street flagship
store and just a small number of items


Colina, from Page 1B


opponents, who have already
declared 'open season' on the
financial services group.
They are using the 2004
financial audit, which was heav-
ily qualified by external audi-
tors PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC), on the grounds that
they "were not able to satisfy"
themselves that all related-par-
ty transactions had been dis-
closed and accounted, to
strengthen their previous claims
that large sums of money are
being taken out of Colina Hold-
ings to the detriment of minor-
ity shareholders and policy-
holders. There are also claims
that the company was being run
as if it were still a private entity,
and not subject to the require-
ments of.a public company. ,
Colina is known to dispute
all this, and be arguing that it is
engaged in an "aggressive" one-
time clean-up of its balance
sheet following the acquisitions
of Canada Life and Imperial
Life, plus the 'bloody' depar-
ture of Mr Campbell.
It is also too soon to pass
judgement on whether Colina
Holdings' series of acquisitions
has been a success or failure,
as it normally takes 18 months
to two years to complete the
integration process and exam-


I -YoR C'Y

$ 750000






mmTel: 1718-30-054


were available.
Over the years, she said, store officials
found they were getting a lot of requests to
expand the line and a decision was made to
look into the feasibility of expanding its
presence
Negotiations
After year-long negotiations, Bally can
now be found in the Prince George Plaza
boutique and Solomon's locations in the
Mall at Marathon and the Caves Village.
The new store covers a space of 877 square
metres, and was officially opened during a
cocktail reception and dinner earlier this
week.
"It's a beautiful line. They make the best
shoes you can find for women and men, in
both classic and trendy styles. For men,
they have work loafers and they have clas-
sic pairs for women.


ine whether cost savings,
economies of scale and share-
holder value has been deliv-
ered.
Once the dust and excite-
ment settles, and the company
moves on with the integration
process, its size and scale are
likely to generate synergies and
efficiency savings that will result
in improved profitability and a
better bottom line for fiscal
2005.
However, since 2003, CFG
has received $2.33 million in
management fees from Colina
Holdings under the terms of a
'Services Agreement' struck in
July 2002, where the parent is
paid for the provision of tech-
nical, supervisory and admin-
istrative services.
Some $941,500 of those man-
agement fees have to be
approved by regulators, though,
following the imposition of the


21 conditions on Colina in.
return for approving its Imper-
ial Life acquisition.
A further $921,000 in bro-
kerage fees was paid to CFG
and its three shareholders in
return for negotiating the Impe-
rial Life and Canada Life pur-
chases, and the parent has also
billed Colina Holdings for a fur-
ther $440,450 in relation to the
Imperial Life deal. In addition,
CFG has received advances of
$1.648 million from the life and
health insurance subsidiary.
Some $1.073 million and
$144,000 were paid out in legal
fees and property management
fees to parties related to Colina
Holdings in 2003 and 2004.
These have not been identified.
Investment management fees
totalling $963,405 were also
paid by Colina Holdings to Col-
ina Financial Advisors, while
some $737,137 was loaned to


LEADING LAW FIRM

invites applications for attorneys for our Nassau office.

Applicants must have a minimum of 6-8 years experience
and be specialized in the area of Commercial, Banking
and Securities Law, demonstrate an ability to work
independently and possess a thorough working knowledge
and technical competence in the areas mentioned.

Successful applicants can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits.

Apply in confidence to:

Vacancy
P.O.Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas


"The line is unbelievable from key
chains to wallets, belts and travel pieces,
briefcases, laptop bags and other leather
goods," said Ms Farrington.
While Bally's does make clothing, the
Solomon Mines stores will not be carrying
them at this time. Ms Farrington said that
for the moment, the retailer will work with
the items they do carry and see how the
various lines sell for both local and tourist
traffic.
Marketing
According to Rochelle Walker, a mar-
keting officials for Solomon's Mines, dur-
ing this week all of the Bally locations will
offer a 5 per cent discount on purchases.
Profits from these purchases will be donat-
ed on behalf of Bally and artist Antonius
Roberts to the Brent Malone Artist in
Residency programme.


the management of Interna-
tional Reinsurance Manage-
ment to help them finance their
purchase of a 40 per cent stake
in the firm, after Colina Hold-
ings had previously acquired
the entire 100 per cent share
capital.
Some $1.464 million in
repricing fees paid to an affili-
ate is also thought to have been
sent to International Reinsur-
ance Management.
It is likely that the estimates
head by The Tribune may be
lower than the actual amount
taken out, beacuse they do riot
appear to include $1.4 million
paid to an unnamed party to
increase Colina Holdings stake
in Goodman's Bay Develop-
ment Corporation from 56.95
per cent to 67.19 per cent.


Applications should be sent to:
Commercial Practice Group
Halsbury Chambers
P.O. Box N-4589



Large wholesale business is seeking to employ an




as part of its supervisory team. The Candidate must
be able to:

> Ensure timely and accurate review of all
reconciliation's and entries to the general ledger.
> Supervise a small accounting team.
> Be responsible for the day-to-day operations
of the accounting department.

Requirements:

> 2-3 years supervisory experience in a similar
capacity.
> Bachelor's degree in accounting.
> Knowledge of Accpac accounting software a
plus.
> Proficient in Microsoft office.
> Excellent oral and written communication
skills.

Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Mail resume by August 5th 2005 to:

The Financial Controller
C/O The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas

Or e-mail to: bferguson@coralwave.com


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CAREER OPPORTUNITY


Baha Mar Devdopment Company Ltd seeks to hire a Financial Controller with
expertise in Construction Management. The successful candidate will control
and report on all expenditure as it relates to the company's planning and development
efforts. This includes construction, critical engineering systems and other capital
expenditure and operating expenses.

The successful candidate should be a Certified Public Accountant with ten (10) -
fifteen (15) years experience. Familiarity with a variety of concepts, practices and
procedures are essential. Exceptional communication skills, outstanding management
capabilities and a proven capacity to work effectively with individuals at all levds
is essential. Please forward curriculum vitae with salary requirements via e-mail to
hr@cablebeachresorts.com or via private fax to (242) 327-5897 by no later than
August 8, 2005. All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JULY 28, ,




















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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BRAMPTON INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 26th day of July,
2005. The Liquidators is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.,




ARGOSA CORP.INC.
............. .. ..Liquidator .. .


Pricing Information As Of:
27 July 2005


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JULY 28,.2005 :


THE TRIBUNE


BUIESa


1.

c

o
0
c.
li
E
g
c
a
tc

rc
B

si
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in
ti
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a
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ii
CE


Bank, from Page 1B.
tcWeeney said the' bank was allgrowth of Banik of. the' engaged ii providing support
cooking to improve its position in Bahamas,' he added.' under the hurricane relief pro-
3rand Bahama. Meanwhile,. Mr McWeeney gramme, and had provided a
It is currently in the process admitted that thespecial lending number of loans to persons in .:
f growing the business platform' facilities that were put in place .ineed.
f its new Freeport corporate- after the'devastating hurricane In many instances, govern-.
redit centre, and new product' season last year had mnade an.; ;iittype transactioif tend to
launches involving American- impact on the bank's Grand. be bureaucratic, so if you can
express and other lending pro-- 'Bahama operations, but not to better achieve the sate end with
rammes will be rolled out con- .the extenti that would warrant yout own products then yo6u ate
urrently with the Nassau oper-. major concern." '; *:..likely to follow- that route. We -
tions. The bank is also expected He said that.based on asset have done some work with the
o expand its physical business quality, which is a measureimenit:.g6vernrent lending pro-
pace and will engage in a major of non-performing loans to total granmmes already, so we have
ovation project of its Grand loans, this remained within rea- 'people dedicated to that type of
3ahama retail.branch. sqnable parameters. For the project lending and it is not as
Mr McWeeney said that as a entire operation, however, the diffilt for us' as other banks,"
ignificant contributor to the special lending facilities are not. Mr McWeeniey said. : -
ank's overall success, .the prod- having a real negative impact on "We stepped up to the plate.
ct expansion and renovations the bottom line. Each bank contributed $100,000.
n Grand Bahama would give Relative to hurricane relief each to the hurricane relief pro-
he operation the necessary matters in Grand Bahama, Bank gramnie. [Bank of the Bahamas]
sources appropriate to aid in of the Bahamas International : also had.lencding programmes in
n expansion that will accom- has given about 150 different support of customers. Not only
nodate the business at hand. loans for a total value of over did we give help in Grand
"What we intend to do is $6 million. .Bahama, but we went to Cat.
improve our market share so it : MrMcWeeney said Bank of '- Island and .some very remote' _
an be consistent with the over- the Baha'mas was stiillactively' settlements."
Looking at the current hurri-.
,_ __',. ._. *.._. cane season, Mr McWeeney said
he wias certain that the neces-'
SPosition available ::sari achiery was already 'in
place, in the event that another
i hurricane negatively impactedd
Junior Accountimg Clerk (Male) the Bahathias.
P ident f the Grand
Computer skills must include Microsoft Excel and amb


Microsoft Word.: .

. Excellent oral and written :o6munication skills.

* Ability to work on own initiative.

* Interpersonal skills.

* Ability to work with cash:. '

Please hand deliver or mail resume t d:

Confidence Insurance Brokers & Brokers Aent Ltd.
Shirley Street (Standard Services Building)
SP.O. Box SS-62,
..... .- Nassau, Bah...amas


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE .. ..


GALLAWAY INVESTMENTS LTD
(In Voluntary Liquidatin)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 26th day of July,-
2005. The Liquidators is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP.INC.
Liquidator


i Colina
Financial Advisors Ltd.


52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change.. Dey Vol. E $ :IV $ PiP Y~tid
1.10 0.89 .Abaco Markets 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0. 208 0.000 N/M. 0.00%
9.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund, 8.70 9.00 030. 1 000. 1.452 0.340 .5 2, 3.78
6.44 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.44 6.44 0.00 0 : 6, 1 0.330' t1.5 ,' 5.12%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 .O : .. 0:100.: 43 -: -
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 6.00 .1 000 11 6. 429%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.15 .1.15 . 0.00 0'.0 .62 0Q '18.5 4.35%
8.65 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.4 '2.82%
2.20 1.87 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 -0.005 0.:069 NM, 273%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.80 8.80 0.00 ' d'.63 :041 12.: .'66
2.50 0.62 Doctor's Hospital 2.26 2.26 0.00 : 4'." .:.052 .0 '5:0 -.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0. 00- 0.42 : 40 'as'-. 3%
10.50 9.12 Finco 10.49 10.49 0 00'.... . ". ".62' 050i .' 1 .::' 4.77%
9.05 7.00 FirstCaribbean 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.591 .0.380 13.0' 4;20%
8.98 8.31 Focol 8.98 8.98 0.00 0.708 0.500. 12.7 5.57%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 :0.022 0.000 .52,3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 .'-:0526' 640 Os' i8S'.:.," -4:26%
8.25 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.30 8.30 0.00 0.561 0.550 14:.8 75
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.01 6.00 -0.01 0.184 0.000 327 .00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.760 7.60%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ .PIE Yield .
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1486 Q.960 9 1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM '7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.066 0,000 NM 0:.00
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00', 43.00 .41.00 2.;220 0.000::1". 4 00
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.10 0.810. 146 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 '.00 N/M .00%
52wk-Hl 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% La 12 Mont a Dlv $ Yield %
1.2402 1.1741 Colina Money Market Fund 1.240183"
2.3657 2.0018 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3657" ... .. . .
10.4330 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4330. -
2.2528 2.1164 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.252768"
1.1200 1.0510 Colina Bond Fund 1.120044 ...

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 nMonth dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Coliia and Fidellti
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful. .
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity B'1hwmas 'Stock nllex~ Mau ir '1I"ar 94 =
" AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/1 AS AT MAY. 31, 2005
- AS AT JULY 1, 20051** AS AT JUNE. 30, 20051 *- AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005
7' "... ' .. ..


merce, Dr Doswell Coakley, said
Grand Bahama-based banks
have been working with their
clients following the devastation
that occurred following the hur-
ricanes.,
-He said that generally, Grand
Bahama had rebounded,'but the
ongoing closure of the Crowne
Plaza Golf Resort & Casino at
the Royal Oasis continued to
have a significant impact on the*
island's economy.
Dr Coakley said he wanted to
re-emphasise the fact that while
Grand Bahama suffered as a
result of hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne, the island's economy has
rebounded to some extent.
He admitted, however, that a
majority of the businesses were
experiencing a lull as a result of
the soft economy, and were
struggling to keep their head
above water.
Dr Coakley said: "I also feel a
sense of optimism in .regard to
the embryonic planning activi-
ties we see. The only concern I
see is when those projects come
on stream, whether we will have
the ability to fill the labour pool.
The Government has to address
these needs from a training per-
spective and prepare th coin-
munity for the opportunities
coming ahead."


Stht 0.4*4; 7tT. f".. MAY.".$'

TEACHI G VACANCY


Invites applications from experienced qualified Christiaai
candidates for the'following position for the 2005 2006
school year.

Dean of Students

APplicanits must:

A. i 'e a praIcticing born-again Christian who is willing to
-subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian

S* aveBachelor's Degree or higher from a recognized
College or University in the area of specialization.
C :. ;Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
.: Have at least five years teaching experience, three of
S which iustbe at the high school level
. Po sesse'xcellenftorganizational, inter-personap .
communicative skills.
.. 'Be, abfebt assist with all asgec'tfthe' Adfiiniltiffii6i.
G. e able to discipline, counsel students.
H. Have high moral standards.

Applicationmust be picked upat the High School office on
Shirley Street and be returned by Augtst 5th, 2005 a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph, church
affiliation, pastor's name and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
S" emple Christian High School
SP.O. Box N-17537
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is August 5th, 2005


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


BERNHARD INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of BERNHARD INC., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE


INFOGRAMES HOLDINGS INC.


Notice,,is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, : the dissolution of INFOGRAMES
;HOLDNGS INC., has been completed; a Certificate
.of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off'the.Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liqui:dator


LEGAL NOTICE

.:- ;' NOTICE


VALLEYDALE PLACE LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) ofthe International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of VALLEYDALE PLACE
LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck offthe:Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
'-.v'.... Liquidator


`~'"-' : ~~"":'"' '-;'''j- :,;-


I


4







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JULY 28,2005, PAGE SB


Baker's Bay



hires on-site



manager for



Venviro rHIei.


THE $175 million Baker's
Bay Golf & Ocean Club has
hired Bahamian Shenique
Albury as its onsite environ-
mental manager, with respon-
sibility for ensuring all
employees and contractors
conform to the Environmental
Management Plan and Envi-
ronmental Impact Assessment
(EIA).
Dr Livingstone Marshall,
Baker's Bay's senior vice-pres-
ident of community and envi-
ronmental affairs, said:
"Shenique is a perfect fit, well
qualified and comes with quite
a bit of experience for this
position.
"What we wanted was
someone who would be on-
site at the project, who will be
our eyes and ears and who will
oversee our compliance with
the stated Environmental
Management Plan (EMP) and
Emergency Response Plans.
Interacts
"Now, we're able to call Ms
Albury on a daily basis and
she reports on what's happen-
ing and interacts with our
Environmental Management
team, particularly persons out
of the University of Miami."
Ms Albury has a Bachelors
degree in Biology and Envi-
ronmental Studies, and gained
experience at the Bahamas
Reef Environmental Educa-
tion Foundation and the
Bahamas National Trust,
working with environmental
education relative to the
ma tine. environment ,angei",,,
*ra4 conseryatpon issii the,
"^ *'f^'^''?'-^'''''^''7''


Reservations and sales only through your local travel agent
International Sales Agents Princess and C-unard for the Caribbean market, viajes.dumbo@vei.zon.net.do


Bahamas.
Ms Albury said: "Three to
four years from now when
people come to visit Baker's
Bay, they'll see a lot of the
measures that we're taking
now really paying off in terms
of environmental protection
and preservation."
Interacts
The 585-acre golf and mari-
na Baker's Bay's community
will offer 244 custom home-
sites, 115 luxury single family
developer residences and a
marina village.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EDLIN LOUIS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as'
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



REAL ESTATE RESORT
DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
Seeking applications for
FINANCIAL CONTROLLER
Responsibilities include: Preparing monthly & quarterly
financial statements, cash management, management of
accounts payables and receivables, managing office staff,
internal controls & regulatory reporting.
Experience: CPA or equivalent with 5 years minimum
experience with a sound knowledge of construction accounting.
Applicants must be proficient in Excel and QuickBooks Pro.
Salary and benefits would be commensurate
with experience.
Please fax your cover letter and resume to the attention of
"The Financial Controller" at 327-1569
Deadline: Wednesday, August 3, 2005


2005 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMME

KPMG is currently accepting applications for its 2005 scholarship programme.
This programme provides financial support to students attending Bahamian and
North American colleges with the career goal of becoming Certified Public
Accountants.
The,scholarship will be awarded to a deserving Bahamian student with outstanding
scholastic achievement. Interested candidates should submit a cover letter,
resume, school transcripts and at least two recommendations to KPMG, Human
Resources Manager, P.O. Box N 123, Nassau, Bahamas.


AUDIT 'TAX ADVISORY
(0 2006., KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.


M SHENIQUE ALBURY


Computer Technician
Micronet Ltd., a leading business technology supplier requires
a computer technician. Must be self-motivated, responsible and
willing to learn.
Great career Opportunity
Professional Cerifications a plus (A+, MCSE, etc.)
Hardware and software experience a plus
Must have your own transportation
No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
(subject line: Computer Tech.) or fax to:
Computer Tech
c/o Manager
Micronet Ltd.
P.O.Box SS-6270 Email:jobs@micronet.bs
Nassau, Bahamas Fax: 328-3043

TOSHIBA Micronet
OPY FAX PRINT BUSIES TECHNOLOGY


Invitation for Bid

The U.S. Embassy is seeking professional
construction companies to submit bids/proposals
on the following construction projects:

1. Removal and provision of custom-made PGT
Windows Wingard Single Hung Windows and
Aluminum Jalousie Windows.
2. Renovations to include the enclosure of porches,
tiling and installation of PGT Windows
3. Construction of out-door garbage housing unit
4. Provision and installation of electronic gate
operators
5. Construction of car wash facility
6. Interior and exterior painting of residence
7. Construction of Staff Caf6, and walk-ways
8. Installation of galvanized chain-linked fencing
9. Removal and replacement of air-conditioning
ducts throughout residence
10. Provision and installation of aluminum rails and
gate around swimming pool.

A full Solicitation Package may be picked up from
the Lobby of the Embassy, located at 42 Queen Street
during the period of Tuesday, August 02 Tuesday,
August 09, 2005 between the hours of 9:00 am and
4:00 pm weekdays.


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE












Council, from Page 1B


government personnel."
Mr Sweeting's letter is likely
to reignite debate about how
much central government
should involve local govern-
ment and consult with local
people when assessing large-
scale investment projects.
Fred Smith, attorney for the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associ-
ation which is opposing the
Baker's Bay project, yesterday
told The Tribune that apart
from the Port Authority, no
other government ministry was
providing information on how
the developers were getting
their approvals.
He said this was defeating
the Association's "intent" to
challenge all permits and
approvals given to the Discov-
ery Land Company.in court.
However, there is nothing to
suggest that Discovery Land.
Company has done anything


wrong with regard to the
approvals process.
Steve Adelson, a partner in
Discovery Land Company and
vice-president of development
*. .


for Baker's Bay, previously
told The Tribune: "Every per-
mit we have obtained has gone
through the. proper channels,:
whether that is central govern-


NOTICE l
NOTICE is hereby given that NALINI MOHAN OF P.O, BOX
N-9841, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and .Citizenship, for.
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21TH day of JULY, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


PUBLIC NOTICE,
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, JOAN PATRICIA
MISSICK. of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas, intend to change my name to JOAN
PATRICIA ROLLE. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, KIRK JONES, of
Ruby Ave, P.O.Box EE-15014, Nassau, Bahamas, intend
to change my name to KIRK DXON. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport, Officer,..
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOUBERT JEAN BAPTISTE, ALLEN
DRIVE, P.O.BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


WEp m L
xEIMN Wi


ment or whether that is local
government.
"We've studied the process-
es, and had all our Bahamian
attorneys look at it to make


sure we are following them....."
In his letter to Captain
Allens, Mr Sweeting said that
when dealing with investment
projects, local government had


previously been asked to
accept the developers' plans,
study whether the project was
right for the area and then
make recommendations. Their
recommendations would be
sent to the Port Authority,
which would "pass final judg-
ment", and permits would then
be issued by the council when
they received a favourable
response.
"In this case, this local coun-
cil seemed to have been
bypassed in the initial presen-
tation of this project. Was this
the result of an administrative
error, a directive from some
central government agency, or
a change in general proce-
dure?" Mr Sweeting wrote.
And in a follow-up letter sent
on May 24 to Abaco's chief
administrator, Revis Rolle, Mr
Sweeting said that because
"there are so many unknowns


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, DEEGENERA JONES,
of Ruby Ave, RO.Box EE-15014, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to DEEGENERA DIXON. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.




NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot on the northern side
of Sandilands Village road'situated in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas. Situated is Triplex Apartment consisting each of
(2) bedroom, (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 10,320 sq. ft.
Building: 2,700 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 2261"
All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pni,
Friday 29th, July 2005.



NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

IRBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
.purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot #6, Block #6,
Ridgeland Park in situated in Central District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom.

Property Size: 4,200 sq. ft.
Building Size: 966.68 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 2308"
All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July 2005.


Shirley Street
For more Information
contact L. Maycock at 322-8571-9


* 2467.60 sq. ft. of office space available
* Idyllically located on the in the heart ofdowntown
* Parking space available
* Fully automated security system
* Office build-out included.
* Available 1 January, 2006


involving this project, we find
ourselves unable to make
sound decisions simply because
of a lack of information".
He added that most residents
of Great Guana Cay were
"vehemently against" the Bak-
er's Bay project and did not
want a golf course or marina.
of the size proposed by the'
developers.
"In our experience with this
project, all major decisions
seem to have been made and
are still being made by our rep-


resentatives of central govern-
ment with absolutely no knowl-
edge or consultation with our
council," Mr Sweeting wrote.
"The letter from the Port
Authority made it very clear
to all council members at our
last meeting that all decisions
regarding this project have
already been made elsewhere,
and any involvement with our
Council is purely an unsatis-
factory attempt to pacify dissi-
dents."


NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot No. 16 A, Sandilands
Allotment situated in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of 4
bedrooms,2 bathrooms with ai Duplex Apartment consisting of
1 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1 2 bedrooms, I bathroom.
Property Size:-32,670 sq. ft. Tot. .l Lnd
Building Size: 2,375 sq. ft. Dwelling
Apartment Size: 1,949 Duplex
This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the, Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Bo N-: 549,' Nassau Bahamas and marked "tender 0881"
All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July 2005.




NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot #140, Coral Vista
Subdivision situated in the Western District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 7,200 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale in a Mortgage
FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked lenderr 2563"
All offers must be received by the closed of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July 2005.


FTP
CORPORATE
SERVICES
LTD.

(A Licensed Financial & Corporate Service Provider)
presents a
Breakfast Empowerment Seminar
On
Essentials of Estate Planning
(Wills, Inheritance Act, and Trusts)
Speaker: Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald
Saturday,August 6th,2005
BritishColonial Hilton
,RumnCay Room
West Bay St.
s:9:00 a.m.- 1:00,p.m.
Cost: $50.00 (Seminar Materials and Continental Breakfast included '
Contact: Iis. Porsha Rolle (327-3347/327-4170)
.Space is limited. Please register early.


NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel of land being Lot north of Farrington
Road, situated in Western Discrict of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 4,505 sq. ft.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed to
the Manager, Royal Bank Collection Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 0341". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 29th Jully, 2005.


WANTED. .

sc l t s. ....ar.
Dishwashers
Housemen
Room Attendants
SpaceCleaners
Caripeters'
Pool/Beach Attendants
Bartenders
Food & Beverage Waiters
Beverage Waitresses
Greenskeepers
Lifeguards
Gardeners
Busboys/Barboys
Applicantsshould apply byfaxing resumto the attentik of.
The Director of Human Resources
Fax # 362-6245
Lyford Cay Club
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 7B


A PE*S- -


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot'is on a hill
Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of
downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom one
bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is
a wooden porch approximately 8 6 feet wide
on the upper level secured with a wooden
handrail. The garage area has been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom.
Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The
efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft.,
6,900 sq. ft., .10 ft,4abovesea level but below
road level and would flood in a severe hurricane
the duplex hIas,4dirensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with
one section virtually finished and occupied with
blocks up to window level and floor ready to
-.be poured. The roof Is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and
the floor of, ceramic tiles. The finished work is
average/below, 2 bedrooms,, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the
structure is .not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00

HAMILTON'S (LONG ISLAND)
Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft.,
dwelling house of solid concrete floors,
foundation column and belt course with finished
plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is
1,237 sq. ft., utilities available are electricity,
water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00


EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early settlers Drive, North Eleuthera
Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains
incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room,
dining room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)
Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four
plex with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two
storey section consist of a master bedroom,
bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two
bedrooms, one bath, living, dining, family room
and kitchen downstairs. The single storey
consist of one two bedroom, one bath
apartment and two efficency apartments, land
size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning on flat
land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one
hundred feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road,
turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first
right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second
building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas
!. 18bs wih-a ara fo an smalleshophAe d1a
Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from
I Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under
a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A
concrete block strudture, with asphalt shingle
roof and L-shape in design with a total length
of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the
interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is
sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old
single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom,
living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main
entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left,
then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st
right, house is second on your right with garage.


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)
,CronAAlloatment #709singe storey wood and
concrete pommrnicial building approximately
758 scq.ft,; about 20years old.


Appraisal: $71,946.00


NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated
in the southern district of New Providence
being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville
of Malcolm Road west. This property is
spacious and can probably another house
at the rear. This property is spacious and
can probably accomodate another house
at the rear. It is lanscaped and enclosed by
a wall in front with fence on the side. The
property consist of a single story, 3
bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room and dining rooms, combined, family room and
kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof covered front proah (indented) with floor area of
1,374 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $123,000.00 "

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the
right, the house is the 4th -on the left painted white trimmried green with wall in front.


LOT #127 WINTON MEDOWS
(NASSAU)

All that Lot of Land Having an area of 8,000
sq. ft. being lot #127 Knollwood Drive of the
Subdivision known as Winton Meadows,
situated in the eastern district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 7
yr old single family residence consisting of
approximately 2,149 sq. ft., of enclosed living
S. space with 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms,
living, dining room and kitchen. There is 619
sq. ft. dirveway and a 125 sq. ft. patio at the
rear and an enclosed 2 car garage also
included. The land is on a grade and level and
appear to be sufficiently elevated to dissallow
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept with fairly maintained
lawn and low shrubs. Yard is not enclosed.

Appraisal: $275,747.43

Traveling east along Prince Charles, take the corner on the right just before Winton Super Value
(Jasmin Drive), then 2nd corner right (Knollwood Road) drive all the way around the curve the
subject property is the 4th property left green trimmed white.


of Periwinkle Lane, about 100 ft east of tl


LOT #17237 BAHAMA
SOUND NO. 18
(EXUMA)

All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq.
ft. being lot #17237 of Bahama Sound of Exuma
no. 18 said subdivision is situated on the southern
side of Queen's Highway about 2 miles northwest
of Georgetown. This property comprises of a 25
year old single storey single family residence.

Appraisal: $110,250.00

This property is located on the southeast side
he junction of Periwinkle and Zareba Circle.


LOT #15 BLOCK #2
WINTON HEIGHTS
(NASSAU)


All that lot of land haivng an approximate area
Sd of 18,647 sq. ft. being lot #15, block #2. The
lot is a corner lot and is odd shaped and is
I situated at the southeast corner of Culbert's
i Hill and Spencer's Close, this property is
Comprised of a 2 storey residence with ground
Floor consisting of foyer, living room, dining
room, a guest sutie, family room (equipped
island cook top and walk in pantry), breakfast
nook, laundry room, storage room and a 2 car
garage and back pation. The upper floor
consists of the master suite that includes a
bathroom and a walk-in closet. The floor throughout are ceramic tiled except the bedrooms,
This house equipped with central air and burglar bars the house is well laid out and tastefully
decoroated. Also numerous cracks were observed in the southern walls of the bedrooms upstairs.

Appraisal: $502,236.73


Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive to corner on the left just before Winton Super Value
(Culbert Hill), travel north on Culbert Hill to the 4th corner right, (Spencer's Close), said house
is #55 on the corner beige trim pink.

BAHAMA PALM SHORES
(ABACO)

SLot #27, Block #26, 80 x 125 being section 4, at Bahama Palm Shore, 6 miles, southwest of Cherokee Sound and 18 miles south of the
township of Marsh Harbour. The land is situated on Ocean View Drive. It is one of the better elevated lots in the subdivision having an excess
of 30ft above sea level, but have no view of the sea, but is about 1,800 feet from the public beach. This property is comprised of a single
storey residence with Bermuda Style Roof containing a large living and dining area split level, with kitchen in the corner. Three bedrooms and
two bathrooms, this building is approximately 7 years old.
Appraisal: $233,000.00

n* n o e a o- e i -o a 9nc o








PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side


1995
No. 1146


IN THE MATTER OF BANCO ANDINO (NASSAU) LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation under the Supervision of the Court)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO DECLARE DIVIDEND
TAKE NOTICE that the Liquidator of the above named
Bank, intend to declare a first dividend of $0.08 to be paid to all
creditors who have proven their claims, in accordance with the
Windind-up Rules, on or before Friday the 29th July, 2005 and
that such dividend is intended to be paid on Wednesday the 10th
August, 2005 or on any subsequent working days until the 30th
September, 2005.
NOTICE is further given that any creditor who has not
proven his/her debt by Wednesday the 7th day of September,
2005 will be excluded from this dividend.
DATED the 27th day of July, A.D., 2005
Anthony S. Kikivarakis
Official Liqidator


c/o DELOITTE
Dehands House
2nd Terrace Centreville
P.O.Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas


Tel: (242) 302-4800
Telefax: (242) 322-3101


AIBT pledges 'ongoing


help' for financial sector


T-


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Cable Badh Resorts saks dynamic and resouraful
individuals for the follong positions.



Telecommunications Manager

Successful candidate will manage the installation, operation,
and maintenance of multiple switching systems and networks
for campus-wide telecommunications. The ability to plan and
manage the design and implementation of construction projects
related to telecommunications infrastructure, systems and
services campus-wide are essential. Minimum requirements for
the post are Bachelor's Degree with five (5) years experience in
the telecommunications field or related area. A varied and
strong technical background would be advantageous. Specific.
understanding of industry trends and standards required.'
Exceptional communication skills, outstanding management
capabilities, and proven capacity to work effectively with
individuals at all levels are essential.


Director of Training

The successful candidate will direct the designing, planning
and implementation of corporate training programmes, policies
and procedures, approves new training techniques and suggests
enhancements to existing training programmes. The ability to
oversee relationships with vendors to ensure appropriate
employee participation in outside training programmes is'
necessary. Minimum requirements for the position are an
undergraduate degree with seven (7) ten (10) years experience
in the field of hospitality. Familiarity with a variety of the
field's concepts, practices and procedures. Exceptional
communication skills, outstanding management capabilities,
and proven capacity to work effectively with individuals at all
levels are essential.


Director of Food & Beverage

The successful candidate will direct and oversee all aspects of
food service, menu planning and dining hall management for
the resort. Responsibilities also include managing work
schedules, planning and coordinating specialty theme events.
The requirements include an undergraduate degree with at least
ten (10) years of experience in a related area, familiarity with
the field's concepts, practices and procedures are essential,
exceptional communication skills, outstanding management
capabilities and a proven capacity to work effectively with
individuals at all levels.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should
submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae under confidential
cover to hr@cablebeachresorts.com or via private fax to (242)
327-5897 no later than August 8, 2005. All responses will be
held in the strictest confidence.



'a 0
WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT"
& CRYSTAL PALACE CASINO
CABLE BEACH & GOLF RESORT NASSAU, BAHAMAS


NASSAU BAHAMAS


NASSAU
BEACH
Hotel


THE Association of Inter-
national Banks & Trust Com-
panies (AIBT) has pledged its
"ongoing assistance" to the
Government to help it grow
the Bahamian financial services


industry.
AIBT's chairman, Robert
Lotmore, told the organisa-
tion's 27th annual general
meeting that it would contin-
ue to actively serve its mem-


PICTURED are: Front Row)
ohn Erskine, BSI Overseas
Bahamas); Christian Coquoz, Lomn
ird Odier Darier Hentsch Private
ank & Trust Bahamas; Robert Lot'
more, Butterfield Bank (Bahamas)
helia Carey, permanent secretary,
ministry of Financial Services &
vestments; Allyson Maynard-Gibr
on, Minister of Financial Services 4
vestments; Wendy Craigg, Gov
rnor of the Central Bank of the
ahamas; Anastacia Johnson,
IBT; Michael Foot, Inspector of
anks, Central Bank of the
ahamas; Hillary Deveaux, Assis'r
nt chairman of the Securities Comr
fission of the Bahamas. Back Rom:
)ominique Leferve, SG Hambroo
ank & Trust (Bahamas); Jan
[ezulanik, Pictet Bank & Trust;
ndrew D. Law, past chairman of
IBT; Jose Gonzalez de Castejou,
antander Bank & Trust; and Martin
hitter, Credit Suisse (Bahamas). '
(Photo: Tim Aylen)
bers through dialogue with th6
Central Bank of the Bahamas,
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services,
also addressed AIBT members
on issues concerning the indus'-
try and thanked the organisaL
tion for its ongoing contribute
tions.
Newly-elected AIBT direcL
tors are:
Christian Coquoz, Lombard
Odier Darier Hentsch Private
Bank & Trust; Martin Sutter,
Credit Suisse (Bahamas)i;
Bruno Roberts, The Private
Trust Corporation; M.F. Ben
Gillooly, CIBC Trust Company
(Bahamas);
Continuing Directors are: ,
Robert Lotmore, chairman-,
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) ;
Jan Mezulanik, deputy chairs
man, Pictet Bank & Trust;
Lindsey Cancino, treasurer,
Oceanic Bank & Trust; John
Erskine, BSI Overseas
(Bahamas); Jose Gonzalez de
Castejon, Santander Bank &
Trust; Dominique Lefevre, SG
Hambros Bank & Trusi
(Bahamas); Dr Attila Molnai,
UBS (Bahamas); David Susst-
man, Franklin Templeton Fidu-
ciary Bank & Trust.


Deadline for application is August 17th, 2005


REAL ESTATE RESORT
DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

Seeking applications for
MACHINE OPERATOR

Responsible, mature individual with the ability to drive and
operate concrete truck, Bobcat, backhoe etc.

Must be willing to relocate to EXUMA

Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Please fax your cover letter and resume to
the attention of
"Machine Operator" at 327-1569
Deadline: Wednesday, August 3, 2005


citigroupi

Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Deputy
Document Control Manager.

FUNCTIONAL/I DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore
trust companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas,
Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Island, New Jersey and
Singapore. Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary
structure.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Daily management of Imaging Unit
* Deputy Manager, Documentation Mgmt & Control Unit (Imaging,
Safe Keeping, Dual Control, Warehouse, Records Management.)
Assist with training and administrative functions f6r the respective
document control units.
Assist in systems enhancements and process re-design
Assist with implementation of global initiatives regarding document
management and control.
MIS reporting.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

Historic imaging and records management experience and familiarity
with Trust and Company documentation.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with various business units on a global basis.
Influencing, organizational and leadership skills.
Initiative and the ability to think strategically
People Management.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Operation Controls Head
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O.Box N-1576
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com


L


I


I I


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


p a








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


I


NAME
Adderley, Patrick
Albury, Wycliffe
Alleyne, Louis
Anderson, Berkley
Antoine, Guy Charles
Archer, Leonard
Archer, Leonard Gerard
Barnett Sr., Paul
Barnett Jr., Paul
Bartlett, Clarence
Bethel, Marcus
Bodie, Meteor
Bostwick, Kermit
Bowe, Donald
Bowleg, Nicholas
Brennen Sr., Samuel
Brennen Jr., Samuel
Bullard, William
Burrows, Lester
Campbell, Ishmael
Campbell, Stanley Sr.
Cartwright, Clyde
Collie, Stephen M.
Cooper, Phillip
Curling, Kendrick
Curling, Ricardo
Edgecombe, Felton
Evans, Samuel K.
Ferguson, Andrew
Fox, Livingston
Galanis, Clifford N.
Gardiner, Oswald
Gibson, Arthur
Gibson, Rudolph
' .. . Hart, Kenneth
Heastie, Eugene
'-.. Hepbum, Paul.::
Hepburn, Shahtell
Hudson, Lewis..
Johnston,. William
Johnson, George
Johnson, Tracey
King, Garnet
King; Kendal
*. Knowles, Kenuth
Laing, Kenneth
Lockhart, Alva C.
Mabon, lan i
abonf, Thoma
Martinboroug Timothy
Mclntosh, El.io
McIntosh,:Peter
Mcintosh, S.dne
McPhee, Gire
S-Miller, Lot n n
Moss, DeO
O'Brien, h h
Pintard,-J'n A.
Pratt, in
RahmitDi rexe
Rolle, Le 1.
Russel J.erny
Sands, Gregory
Storr, Henry
Storr, iStphen
StuartMarvin
Symonee, ~Christopw
Thurston, Petlce
Turnqua.t, Rydell
Sullivan,Wilfred
MalloryK Alfred
Hepburr lte e
Audley, Aerle..


LISENCE
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Three Ph
Threh e


BUSINESS NAME
Patrick's Electric
Nu-Way Elecric Comp

Lil Bert Electric

Taylor industries Limite
Taylor Industiies imfitf


Bartlett Electric :.
Marco A/C & Refrigera
Channel Electric Servi
Flameless Electrie : -
Freeport Elec. Circuits



Service Electric Limite
L.E.B Electrical Sevic
Campbei',s Electric Co
Campbell's Electric Co
Carc's Electrical ServiC
Colco Electric Compar
Philco Electric

Lil Carder Electric


Etd. ADDRESS -
PDO. Box N-.7487
any Ltd' RO. Box N-1877
SP..BoxF-40854
:.O.. Box GT-2021
Box : N-853
S P.O.. Box N-4806
d .P.O. Box N-4806
PO. Box SS-5085
P.O. -Box SS-5085
P.O. Box F-41026
tion Limited : P.O. Box AB-20192
ce & Repairs P.O. Box GT-2021 -
P.O. Box EE-1712 -
& nd. Cont. P.O. Box lF-44160
l.Q. Box GT-2717
P.O. Box N-7935:
P.O. Box N-7935
d P.O. Box N-8430
e .::: P.O. Box SB-50082
mpaiy iLtd. P.O. Box SS-5087
rmpany Ltd.. P.O: Box SS-5087
ces P.O. Box N-3428
ny Limited P.O. Box CB-13684:
P.O. Box SS-6905
P.O. Box EE-15419
P.O.' BoxN-9073
*". ::"'-: :".",. ... ': :.. '"la'ni Rnv FH-IiA iQ l


CITY/ISLAND
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
.Freeport, GraindBah,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas.
Freeport, Grand Bah.
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas.
Nassau, Bahamas .
'Nassau, Bahamas.
Nassau, Bahamas .
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas-
Nassau, Bahamas -
t Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas.
ssau, Bahamas
Bahamas
mt- ias
ss. as


.TELEPHONE
324-0641
-393-3558
646-4984
357-8883
341-0086
322-8941
322-8941
323-4132
- 323-4132
375-0687
367-3186
323-5478
457-4155
646-7333
477-6525
323-6706
323-6706
361-4106
424-0430
393-6203
393-6203
341-5515
.393-4323
361-2975
324-8695
357-9055
324-2423
477-0218
392-1938
.328-1986
327-6681
361-3857
393-8192
325-0741
341-4937
357-7385
364-2104
356-7239
328-0850
373-6610
67-5145
278..
l n.


NAME
Albury, Deno
Andrews, Anthor I
Bain, Ryan
Barrow, Neil
Bethel, Samuel
Brown, Anthon
Brown, Teaco
Bowe, Brackston
Butler, Yorick
Cambridge, Kevin -
Clarke, Jermaine
Cleare, Willard'
Davis, Osborne
Deleveaux, Raphael
Ferguson, Andrew
Ferguson, Otis B.
Forbes, Clinton
Fox, George
Gilbert, Michael
Greenslade, Alvin
Hall, Dwight
Johnson, Anderson
Johnson, Philip
Johnson, Wilton
Jones, Robert
Key, Herbert
Knowles, Edward
Mabon, Allan
McQueen, Darvin
Moree, Bruce
Morley, Carlos
Moss, Gladstone
Munroe, Derek
Nixon, Samuel
Roberts, Richard P. -
Rolle, Bernard
Rolle, Selvyn
Rolle, Wilfred
Russell, Nero
Sands, Gary
Storr, Terrance
Strachan, Terrance
Stuart, Carlington
Taylor, Marlvin
Wells, Stephen



NAME
Albury, Morral
Bullard, James
Carey, Timothy
Cates, Mertland
Evans, Robert
Fox, William
Hanna, Ralph
Johnson, Cedric
Lightbourne, Enoch
Pinder, Rev. Leonard
Roberts, William
Rolle, Ken
Rolle, Samuel P.O. Box c/o N-1605
Swaihn, Salathiel
Sweeting, Edward


Single
Single Pha
Single Phas
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
.Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase,
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase
Single Phase


ADDRESS
P.O. Box
General Delivery
P.O. Box 26045
P.O. Box 34
P.O. Box 23002
P.O. Box F-41344
General Delivery
General Delivery
General Delivery
P.O. Box F-43266
P.O. Box F-41199
P.O. Box MT-509


S. : .. ... ..Nassau, Banamas
DL E P.O 50 ,:.Nassau, Bahamas
Precisioh Electric Nassauw Bahamas
Guaranty Engineering & Technic Box N-3370 Nassau, Bahamas
J's ectrical ContracoIt P.O. Box S-6189 assau, Bahamas
Geoffrey Jones & ComrOny Ltd. PRb. Box N-793 Nassau, Bahamas
Dove Plaza ,RO' Box AB-20458 Marsh Harbour, AB
Flameless Electrical Cont. Ltd. P.O. Box .SS-594. Nassau, Bahamas
Taylor lndu ties Lim itd P.O. Box N-4806Nassau, Bahamas
.;, G"eneralliiery San Andros Andros
B.A.M. Electrical Services P.O Box .SS-S36' Nassau, Bahamas
P.A Box EE-17976 Nassau, Bahamas
: Stone Construction Box CR-5B85 Nassau, Bahamas
: 3-: Electrical S vices P.O.Box: C-1 i.994 Nassau,.Bahamas
Sam.'sElectric Comny Ltd.. P.O. BoxMT59 Matthew Town,' IN
Roberts electrical &Plumbing P.O. Bx AB-22990 Man-O-.ar Cay, AB
Rolled's Electrical I 1intal. & Repair i PO.Box B-3866 Nassau, Bahamas
P... OLEC P.O. Box N-750 Nassau', Bahamas-
Willy's Electric PO. Box E E-16770 NasSau, Bahamas
P.O. Box SS-19546 Nassau' Bahamas
P.O. Box EL-26066 .: .iPalmietto Point, EL
SB ox :EE17934 .. -Nassau, Bahamas
P.O. Box F-40791 ." Freeport, Grand Bahalm
P.O. Box AB-20053 Dundas Town, Abaco
. Mailvin's Electrical ,,P.O. BoxN-10898 Nassau, Bahamas
New Blrth Eltctrica : : ; P.O. B:ox N-10494" Nassau, Bahamas

RESTRICTED JOURNEYMEN


CITY/ISLAND
Cherokee Sound, Abaco
Coopers Town,. At(aco
Eleuthera, 9dhamas .
Rock Sound, Eleuthera
Nicholl's Townr,Andros
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bailey TOwn, birmlnni .' :
STarpum Bay, Efeuthera 77 7
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Freeport, Grand Bahanma
Matthew Town, Ingaua


Freeport, Grand Bahama
P.O. Box 20546 Murpy Town, Abaco
P.O. Box c/o N-323 Gregory Town, Eleuthera


-1736
7-7046
57-8963
325-5792
392-4062
341-5971
525-7514
357-2179
394-2336
' 328-1956 '
392-8026
341-2854
457-1930
364-8567
357-7350
395-6571
322-2188
367-2600
338-8787
:322-8941
329-4316
359-2973
5570221
.424-0509
361-0870
339-1471.
'r365-6016
S 364-0241
341-8104
361-8152
395-4662
: 332-1832
394-9385

375-8050
525-0193
326-8293


TELEPHONE
366-2047
36.. 5-053 .

334-2260,
329-2662
352-8505
3* 347-2414
Si334-4178 7 7
348-3242
373-1610
352-6611
339-1300
352-6611
359-6191
341-4642


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 9B


' '- ~ ~~- ~ `~- -~~ ~-- -- - "i i'


LIST OF AUTHORIZED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 2006


THREE PHAGE ELECTRICIANS








'A~lBTHRDASULO8,205TRBUE POT


Fond memories of


Roberto


THE Fox Hill Com-
munity lost a role
model. The basketball fra-
ternity lost a gem of a coach.
I know I have lost an indi-
vidual whose friendship I will
cherish forever.
The sudden death of
Roberto 'Robbie' McKinney
on Friday has sent shock-
waves through the island
because all who came in con-
tact had nothing but praise
for this talented, unselfish
individual.
At age 33, McKinney
touched the lives of so many
people. He will leave behind
an indelible mark and it will
be hard for anyone to fill his
shoes..
Condolences have poured
in from so many people, who
were affected by his coach-
ing. I know he has had a pro-
found effect on my life
because of the manner in
which he executed his duties.
There was never a time
when you came out to watch


STUBBS
' S


OPINION

him coach his team and he
blamed a loss on the offici-


McKinney


ating. In an interviews con-
ducted, he always felt that it
was something that he or his
players didn't do right.
And you could rest assured
that, after that he game, he
would take his players to
practice and they worked
tirelessly on correcting the
mistakes.
It was obvious from the
way they played on the court.

Opportunity
I also had the opportunity
to coach against him as
recently as April when we
hooked up in the Baptist
Sports Council. He coached
Pilgrim and I coached Mace-
donia.
It was like the good old
days when we played togeth-
er and against each other on
the basketball court at Free-
dom Park.
Even on the opposite side
of the court, I could see his
intensity. In his usual cool,


calm and collective manner,
McKinney went about his
duties.
McKinney was a chip of
the old block. He took over
from his father, the legendary
Harry McKinney, who
coached the Fox Hill
Bombers for many years.
While he was considered a
"coach-from the old school,"
McKinney, at the same
token, developed his own
niche. He did it his way.
He will be remembered as
a jolly fellow, who always had
a smile on his face, regard-
less of the outcome of the
game he coached or played
in.
To his wife, Gail, his chil-
dren and the rest of his fam-
ily, I wish to offer my deepest
sympathy.
May his soul rest in peace.
While we mourn the lost
of one of our fallen heroes,
we want to wish God speed
on one of our Golden Girls,
Pauline Davis-Thompson.
The former national 400


metre record holder turned
coach, suffered a miscarriage
due to complications during
her pregnancy.
She was resting at Piedman
Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia
where she resides with her
husband, Mark Anthony
Thompson.

Illustrious
During the final stages of
her long and illustrious
career, Davis-Thompson had
talked about retiring and
starting her family. She
longed so much to have this
child.
We can only wish Davis-
Thompson a speedy recov-
ery.
She's currently coaching a
cadre of athletes, including
Bahamian sprinter Jamial
Rolle and quarter-miler
Christine Amertil.
They will certainly need
her continued assistance as
they prepare for the future.


Champis eASet'Md to defend gIolf t itle


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WAYDE Bethel and Jeff King are
expected to be back this weekend to
defend their title at the 10th annual
SuperClub Breezes Golf Tournament.
The two-day event is scheduled for
Friday and Saturday, starting at 8am at
the Cable Beach Golf Course.
It's a two-person team, using a com-
bined handicap.
Southern Divisional chairman Glen
Archer said this is their way to continue
to host the monthly tournaments to keep
their members sharp.
"Day one of the tournament, we will
call it a shamble, which means that every
team will choice of the tee shot from
both players and thereafter, eachplayer


must play his ball out for their score,"
Archer disclosed.
"Day two is what we call a 6,6,6 event.
That is six holes scramble, six holes best
ball and six holes alternate shots. Except
for the best ball portion of that event
during the day, there will be choices of tee
shots and for the other two shots."

.Awarded
Prizes will be awarded to the first and
second gross, first and third net, longest
drives from each nine hole sides and clos-
est to the pin on the par threes and most
accurate drive on hole number two.
SuperClub Breezes is also expected to
present prizes to the winners during'the
tournament presentation luncheon at the
end of the competition. ,


"We want maximum participation.
Hopefully we can get at least 30 teams to
come out," Archer projected, "and be a
part of this event."
Archer expressed the Southern Divi-
sion's gratitude to the Cable Beach Golf
Course for their continued support of
the sport and he insists that the adult golf
programme will continue to move into
further heights with the support from the
Baha Mar Group.
"Those golfing tournaments are major
financial resources for the Bahamas Golf
Federation," Archer noted. "Those funds
that we do generate will support the
junior golf programme and our national
teams, which we are committed to putting
in place annually."
With the SuperClubs tournament as
the next event on the agenda, Archer


said they have extended the registration
deadline to Thursday.
And they are encouraging. the
club directors to have more members
register.
The current fee for members is $185
per team, but Archer said, to encourage
a greater participation of their members,
teams of three or more per club
registering, will receive a discount of
$25.
Non BGF members will be charged
$215 per team and juniors will only have
to play $100 per team.
Immediately following the SuperClub
Tournament, the John Bull Tournament
will be held in August.
Archer said more details will be
revealed after the completion of the
SuperClub Breezes tourney.


"^Copyrighted Material

j Syndicated Content '.

Available from Commercial News Providers"
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*----) prr^TT &w~rki A ir-


-


4 x 400m

team to begin

taking shape
By RENALDO DORSET'
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas' mens
4x400m relay team for the
2005 World Championships
should begin to take shape at
the end of the week.
The Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations con-
ducted a fitness test on Tues-
day afternoon for Dennis Dar-
ling and Troy McIntosh to
determine who will be added
to the roster for the team
headed for World Champi-
onships in Helsinki, Finland.
McIntosh crossed the finish
line first, with Darling coming
in just behind in second.
Veteran quartermiler Tim
Munnings ran alongside McIn-
tosh and Darling to give them
a push and ensure they run
the best times possible.
National record holder and
former world champion
Avard Moncur is also eligible
for the team but was unable to
attend the run-off due to a pri-
or engagement at a meet in
Europe over the weekend.
Moncur and Darling report-
ed they had injuries, while
McIntosh had not competed,
in over five weeks.
Team mahaggrfor the&20
World Championship tei
Ralph McKinney said the runi
off didnot bring the BAAA's
search for another team mem-
ber to an end.
"The results from the run
of were okay," he said. "But
we still have to wait until
Avard runs on Friday before
we can make a final decision
and determine who will be
added to the team."
He said the run-off was a
way to weed-out injured ath-
letes who would not be able to
perform at a high level in
Helsinki.'
"We don't want to name
somebody to the team and
have them wind up not being
able to run because of injury,"
he said.
Quartermilers already
added to the team include
Aaron Cleare, Andre
Williams, Nathaniel McKin-
ney and Chris Brown, the
members of the 4x400m team
that competed at the 2005
Central American and
Caribbeanii Track and Field
Championships.


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THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


The iu3iie


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Tank gets set







for title shot


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter
A BAHAMIAN heavy-
weight is preparing to grasp
championship gold on the inter-
national scene and strengthen
his bid locally for a shot at the
Bahamian Heavyweight title.
Sherman "Tank" Williams is
currently training for a Sep-
tember 30 bout against Nigerian
Friday "the 13th" Ahunanya for
the vacant British Common-
wealth title,
The bout will take place in
Lagos, Nigeria at the Abuja
International Conference Cen-
tre, undoubtedly pitting Ahu-
nanya as the favourite.
The title was vacated when
former champion Matt Skelton
of England won the WBU
Heavyweight title.
Under the Rules of the Com-
monwealth Boxing Council, the
Heavyweight Championship
automatically became vacant
once Skelton won the title.
Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion Secretary General Fred
Sturrup was recently named a
Director of the Commonwealth
Boxing Council and immedi-
ately made a positive impact for
Bahamian boxers.


Boxer takes on


Nigerian fighter


He lobbied heavily for
Williams and Freeman "the
Natural" Barr to receive shots
at the British Commonwealth
title in their respective weight
classes.

Requests
Apparently, his requests did
not fall on deaf ears as
Williams' title fight was
scheduled just a few months lat-
er.
Williams is pursuing the same
road to championship gold that
Ray. Minus Jr. took during the
1908s.
Minus captured the British
Commonwealth lightweight
title, which propelled him
amongst the rankings of vari-
ous boxing organizations and
led to three world title bouts.
Williams has a record of 25


Copyrig hted Mate rial
Syndicatedcontent
Available fromnCommercial News Providers".


wins, 10 losses, and 2 draws with
15 knockouts.
Ahunanya has a record of 20
wins, 3 losses, and 2 draws with
11 knockouts.
Standing at 6 feet tall, Ahu-
nanya has a slight height and
reach advantage over the 5 feet
11 inch Williams.'
The fight is being promoted,
by Sports United Ltd. from
London, England.
Williams has had a highly
publicised saga with Renaldo
"Terminator" Minus with for a
chance to gain the Bahamian
Heavyweight title.
Williams said he will continue
to pursue the title until Minis
grants him his title shot.
Winning the British Com-
monwealth title will certainly
place the pressure on Minus to
finally resolve the issue of who
is the Bahamas' best heavy-
weight.


Bahamas junior baseball




stars are a hit in Cuba


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter
THE country's best junior baseball players
gave local baseball fans a glimpse into the
future with a very successful showing against
first-rate competition in the region.
The Bahamas Baseball Federation conduct-
ed a Baseball Exchange Trip with the Cuban
Baseball Federation in Havana, Cuba, July 18-
23.
The team, made up primarily of collegiate
and high school players from schools at home
and throughout the United States, played
against an all-star team from the Cuban Junior
National Baseball Program and Bantu
Province, an A Level Team from the Cuban
Amateur League.
The program was initiated by the CBF to
determine the development of the Bahamas'
junior baseball program.
The BBF was so impressed by the team's
performances, they named the members to the
Bahamas' A squad and B squad of the Nation-
al Team Program.
The team was managed by former Major
League Baseball player Ed Armbrister.
Armbrister captured two World Series rings
as a member of the 1975 and 1976 Cincinnati
Reds.
The team played a total of three games, with
one win, one loss and one draw.
Game one against the Cuban Junior Nation-
al Program All Star team was a heartbreaker
for team Bahamas as they were unable to pull


Team impresses on


Havana exchange trip


it out in the ninth inning, losing 6-5.
Calvin Fowler picked up the loss, he gave
up just one hit and four earned runs.
Offensively, Brett Sands was 2-4, including a
solo home run and scored one run.
Albert Cartwright was 1-3, scored two runs
and stole two bases.
Game two against the Bantu Province A lev-
el team resulted in a 3-3 tie after the 9th as
the game did not go into extra innings.

Pitched
For the Bahamas, Gandi Williams pitched
seven complete innings he picked up four
strikeouts, gave up just four hits and three
earned runs.
In his relief, Anthony Fox pitched two com-
plete scoreless innings.
Williams also helped out his own cause by
going 1-3 at the plate with 2 RBI.
Albert Cartwright was 1-3 with three stolen
bases.
There were just over 300 fans in attendance


for each game and the Bahamas' defensive dis-
play intrigued the crowd.
Playing against older and more experienced
players, Bret Sands and Geron Sands stood
out as the top defensive players on the team.
The team played better with each game and
the week-long program culminated in a 7-6
win against the Cuban Junior National Team
Program.
Eugene Bain started, but did not get the
decision. He pitched four complete innings
giving up two hits and two earned runs.
Albert Cartwright got the win pitching five
complete scorless innings.
Cartwright also performed well at the plate
going 2-3 with one RBI and four stolen bases.
Herbie Brown was 1-3 with 2 RBI.
BBF Secretary General Theodore Sweeting
said the team performed extremely well,
beyond most expectations.
"The trip was a great success and we are
extremely satisfied: Our players made The
Bahamas proud," he said. "The Cuban Base-
ball Federation was very impressed and sur-
prised with our high level of play."


He said the element of surprise and stifling
defense ledt the Bahamas to the 1-1-1-1 record.
"They did not know exactly what to expect
out of our program but I think we surpassed
their expectations," he said.
Despite being much younger than their com-
petition, Sweeting said the team showed a lot of
heart and skill performing in front of a large
crowd in another country.

Experience
"Most of our players are playing in college
and there were even a few that are still in high
school," he said. "They were competing against
players whohave much more experience rang-
ing from ages 20-35 years old.
Sweeting said the exchange program proved
the Bahamas juniors are capable of'competing
against any level of competition.
"We feel as if our junior program can com-
pete with any country on any level," he sdid.
"We hope to go to more international contests
to give these players more experience and fur-
ther develop our national team program."
, He said the team's performance in Cuba is a
result of years of diligent work by the players
and the federation.
"Baseball has been alive under the BBF for
quite some time now, this was the result of a
five year system we have implemented," bhe
said. "The country should be excited
about our junior program. They perfornied
well for the game of baseball and for the
Bahamas.


* a


----------- -








The Tribune


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


'Knowledge is


key to


fight against HIV/AIDS'


* By ANTONIA ROBERTS
S Knowledge is key to
the fight against
HIV/AIDS" was the
message delivered
to Caribbean pas-


tors and church ministers. ing a faith-based response to
attending a workshop in Nas- HIV/AIDS".
sau. The workshop also provid-
The Caribbean Council of ed church leaders, clergy, mem-
Churches workshop, held Mon- bers of the Bahamas Christian
day, July 25 at the British Colo- Council and persons affected
nial Hilton, emphasised "build- by HIV/AIDS with the oppor-


tunity to discuss "statistics,
challenges, personal perspec-
tives and best practices",
according to seminar chairman,
Rev Emily Demeritte.
The seminar, a joint effort of
the CCC and the Bahamas


Christian Council was funded
by the Canadian government
through the Canadian Interna-
tional Development Agency.
Achievements in the fight
against HIV/AIDS, outlined by
Minister of Health Dr Marcus
Bethel, included a three-quar-
ters upscale in anti-viral medi-
cine, 50 per cent decline in
death rate, 25 per cent decline
in bed occupancy, three per
cent adult prevalence and a two
per cent decrease in maternal
transmission.
Dr Bethel said that the
Caribbean's world rating as
having the second highest
HIV/AIDS rate per capita -
second to Sub-Sahara Africa -
"can be rolled back with new
prevention and treatment ini-
tiatives".
He emphasised that the suc-
cesses achieved so far must be
maintained, adding that efforts
of insurance agencies, govern-
ment, the political directorate
and the AIDS.Secretariat are
important in the fight against
HIV/AIDS.
Dr Bethel noted that $6-7
million is required annually to
run the AIDS programme, and
thanked the churches and
Samaritan ministries for their
efforts. Time was also taken to
recognise the late Rev Dr
Glenroy Nottage, who operat-
ed an HIV/AIDS hospice for
those living with the deadly dis-
ease and their families.
Dr Bethel highlighted the
"Know your Status" media
campaign which educates and
encourages and enables the
general public to find out their
HIV status.
And Rosemae Bain, pro-


gramme officer of the work-
shop addressed the Bahamas'
response to HIV/AIDS, noting
causes of transmission, chal-
lenges, achievements and
future plans in combating the
disease.
"What do we do when one of
our own has HIV/AIDS is an
important question each church

"What do we
do when one
of our own
has HIV/AIDS
is an important
question each
church must
ask."

Rosemae Bain
must ask," said Ms Bain.
Recommendations to step up
efforts in the church commu-
nity included bi-annual semi-
nars and workshops, incorpo-
ration of healthy sexuality with-
in church teachings, fundrais-
ing, training, social assistance
and spiritual and emotional
support.
The one-day workshop,
which aimed to "dispel igno-
rance and fear and instill
knowledge and hope", encour-
aged workshop participants to
"prevent, understand and
know" about HIV/AIDS.


Bible Shop


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PAGE 20, THURSDAYB JULY 28, 2005|HHEITRLBUNE


AGAPE FULL
GOSPEL
BAPTIST
CHURCH
THE church at Golden Palm
Estates and Malcolm Road, off
Kennedy Subdivision, is sched-
uled to hold the following ser-
vices:
Sunday, 7 am Morning
Glory Service, 10 am Divine
Worship Service
Monday, 7 pm Refueling
Station
Wednesday, 7 pm Bible
Study (Deep Sea Diving)
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
Saturday, 1 pm Children's
Ministry
For further information, call
328-6937 (P 0 Box: EE16151)
Fax: 323-3328


Church Notes


SAINT
AGNES
PARISH
THE church at Blue Hill
Road and Cockburn Street is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
July 29, 6:40 am Matins, 7
am Mass, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Mass
July 30,7:30 am Mass
July 31, 7 am Solemn Sung
Mass and Sermon, 10:30 am -
Solemn Sung Mass and Ser-
mon
NB: There will be no Even-
song at St Agnes on July 31.
The combined service for
churches in the West Central
Archdeaconry is set for 7:30
pm at St Barnabas Parish, Blue
Hil and Wulff Roads.


For further information, call
325-2640 (P 0 Box: N-1221)
Fax: 322-4748

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
July 31, 7 am Sung Mass, 10
am Sunday School and Adult
Bible Classes, 11 am Praise
and Worship, Sung Mass, 7 pm
- Solemn Evensong and Bene-,
diction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-


tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm. -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions


EAST ST
GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) .- Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday,.6 pm Hand Bells


Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, StapledQn Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, l:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible

See NOTES, 6C


Pope takes a break


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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'With Sincere


Gratitude


'iomasiljfert Sands, O. L2, P.


Bom: Septemxer 24/, 1941


Did fuenel17, 2005






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PAGE 2C, THURSDAY,'JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













Studying

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Drama group stirs up


laughs in


Funeral'


St Matthew's Players put on production to


celebrate church's 203 years of dedication


L aughter could be heard
throughout the Pond area at the
weekend when members of the
St Matthew's Players drama
group put on a production to celebrate the
church's 203 years of dedication.
Characters
"Da Funeral" revolved around the death
of a "major star" and depicted scenes that
can only be found in a Bahamian church. It
included characters like the Town Gos-
sipers (played by Laurena Finlayson and
Carla Smith), third and fourth generation


cousins of the star, Pastor Bouncer, (played
by Suzette Pratt) and guest star Pattie
Label (played by Abby Smith).
Deceased
Norma Ashe played thee straw vendor
who sold her wares to the now deceased,
star; Faye Johnson played the inconsolable
number one fan; and Carlen Darling was
Ben Tinker, a childhood friend of the star.
St Matthew's Anglican church moved
into celebration mode on July 18 and cel-
ebrations continue this Friday with a gospel
concert by the St Matthew's Church Choir


on the basketball court of the A C Johnson
building.
The choir is also celebrating its 20th
anniversary.
y Debut
*A second morning choir, The Sunrise
Choir, has since been added to the church
for the 7.15am mass, and a praise and wor-
ship team to the 10.30am service. The
church's youth choir is currently in practice
and is expected to make its debut in early
September.


TheYea o


,~supraua


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
GOAT skin drums were
beating, cowbells knocking and
whistles blowing in praise' at
Calvary Deliverance Church's
23rd annual convention.
The convention kicked off
on Sunday, July 24 under the
theme, "The Year of Super-
natural Increase".
Speakers at this year's con-
vention range from renowned
Bahamian men and women of
God like Pastor Dorothy
Stubbs, Pastor James Newry,
Pastor Dean Wells and Dr Ivan
Butler. The international
speakers include Bishop
Alexander Williams of (Abun-
dant Life Ministries Interna-
tional Turks & Caicos) and
Evangelists Harold Woodson
and Pastor Rodney Parsley
(World Harvest Church,
Columbus, Ohio).
In a written message to the
officers and members of Cal-
vary Deliverance, Governor
General Dame Ivy Dumont
said: "As the church strives to
meet the spiritual needs of its
congregation it is also very
mindful of the importance of
meeting the needs of the whole
man body, mind, soul and
spirit. This is an awesome task
as these needs are varied, com-
plex and challenging. However,
under the direction of the Holy
Spirit and Bishop Clarke, the
dedicated members of Calvary


Deliverance can count on mak-
ing a positive difference, not
only in the church but also in
the wider community."
On Tuesday night Bishop C
Alexander Williams of Abun-
dant Life Ministries Interna-
tional addressed convention
delegates. Bishop Williams
spoke on the topic: "With God
all things are possible". The
praise team was led by Sister
Merlyn Clarke.
Host Bishop V G Clarke
welcomed the guests, which
included the Leader'of the
Opposition in the House of
Assembly, Alvin Smith.
Milestone
Mr Smith congratulated the
Bishop and his members on
attaining such a momentous
milestone of 23 years, and said
that over that time they have
"truly spread the good news of
our Lord and Saviour Jesus
Christ".
"Bishop Clarke you are
doing a wonderful job, and may
you and your church go from
strength to strength. I trust that
your agenda will continue to
include problems and chal-
lenges facing our Bahama-
land," said Mr Smith.
Bishop Clarke's wife, Bev-
erley, reminded the congrega-
tion of the church's humble
beginnings during her offertory
appeal.


She said that when the
church was formed 23 years
ago at E P Roberts Primary
School, they did not consider
themselves scrap, but people
with a vision and mission.
In 1982 the founding Pastor
of the Church Mother Stubbs,
"sowed a seed that has blos-
somed". She encouraged the
members to sow their seeds so
that the work of God would go
on.
The Voices of Praise, led by
Edison Summer, performed a
"spirit filled" "Jesus something
happens when I call on your
name". And the Calvary Praise
Team brought the house down
with the Caribbean Medley,
accompanied by goat skin
drums, cowbells and whistles.
The Convention will end on
Friday, July 29. The guest
preacher will b; TV Evan-
gelist Pastor Rod L Parsley,
founder of World Harvest
Church in Ohio.
In 1977 Pastor Parsley start-
ed his church with only 17
members, today his church
includes a 5,200 seat sanctuary,
the breakthrough Worldwide
Ministry Centre, Children's and
Youth Ministries, Family Life,
Ministry Resources centres, a
bookstore and administrative
office. Rev Parsley is also the
author of more than 70 books
and study guides, including his
newest release Ancient Wells -
Living Water.


Lamb ofG d
Text:Luke Chapter 2:8-20
Jesus Christ lived in Israel, indeed, and was sentenced to crucifixion
by Pontius Pilate; according to the recorded writings of the Apostles,
known worldwide among scholars, as the Synoptic Gospels. This truth
is confirmed by the Roman Historian Tacitus; who commented about
the Christians of Nero's time in 64 A.D., "Christ from Whom they took
their name had been put to death as a punishment during the reign of
Tiberius [Caesar] at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilate,
and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment,
again broke out not only in Judea, the first source of the evil, but even
Pastor Ben Bailey in Rome."
Program Organizer
The Prophetic Voice The Birth of Jesus: The Christ: The text reports, "Shepherds were
Nassau, Bahamas living out in the fields, keeping watch over their flock by night." The
question arises, why were these shepherds out in the fields, watching
their flocks by night? We surmised first of all, that since God operates
according to the dictates of the Laws He instituted; and the Laws of Nature was one of them; we
further surmised, since the 'Lamb of God' was about to be born; then, this must be that time of the
year when sheep gave birth, and accounts for the shepherds being out at night watching their flocks.
Bryan E. Coates, University of Sheffield, England in an article appearing in Encyclopedia International
concerning the reproduction of sheep, wrote, "Sheep are seasonably polyestrous, that is, they manifest
the disposition to mate only during a part of the year; late summer, fall, and early winter." He concluded,
"The period of gestation is 147 days. Hence ewes bred in the fall will lamb in the spring. This period
of lambing, according to the natural breeding activity, can extend from January to as late as May."
The shepherds were awaiting the birth of their own lambs; imagine their exceeding great joy, when
it was revealed to these lowly shepherds, that the Messiah [Lamb] whom all Israel awaited was born
nearby. James S. Stewart observed in his Book titled Life and Teaching, "Is there not a world of
meaning in the fact that it was very ordinary people, busy about very ordinary tasks, whose eyes first
saw the Glory of the coming of the Lord? It means, first, that the place of duty, however humble, is
the place of vision. And it means, second, that it is the men who have kept to the deep, simple pieties
of life and have not lost the child heart to whom the gates of the Kingdom most readily open."
Jesus was born in Bethlehem, whose name signifies the house of bread; a proper birth place for 'The
Bread of Life.' It was also the city where David, the Shepherd King was bom, and raised as a shepherd.
Therefore, Jesus, the Son of David, the Rod out of the Stem of Jesse, would also be born in Bethlehem
according to the prophetic word of Micah, and destined to rule as King. He was initially born 'The
Lamb of God,' to eventually become 'The Good Shepherd.' Caesar's census requiring everyone to
be registered in their place of birth; also served the useful purpose of determining with exactness,
the number and strength of its citizens with lineage to the Royal Family of King David. As a result,
Jesus was born under the law; He was enrolled together with his father and mother and became a
subject of the Roman Empire as soon as he was born, and "made himself of no reputation", literally,
taking upon him the form of a servant. According to Isaiah 49:7, "He became a servant of rulers.
The Death of Jesus: The Christ: The Paschal Lamb of God: Exodus 12:21: Christ our Paschal
Lamb was killed in the prime of His Life and Ministry; full of strength and sufficiency, to bear the burden
of us all, which was laid upon Him. The blood was to be sprinkled on the doorposts and lintel, but not
upon the threshold. It is precious blood and we are cautioned not to trample it underfoot, as it represents
the blood of the Covenant. The blood applied made provision to all those who were obedient to escape
the destroying angel. Isaiah 53:7-12: We simply highlight one verse concerning the Lamb of God. He
was led as a Lamb to the slaughter; and as a Sheep before its shearers is silent, so He opened not
His Mouth.
George Buttrick was prompted to write concerning the impact of Jesus' Life, "All the armies that ever
marched, all the navies that were ever built, all the parliaments that ever sat and all the kings that
ever reigned, put together, have not affected the life of man upon this earth as powerfully as has that
one solitary life."


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


THE TRIBU


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PAGE 60, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


SThe Tbune
-: n r


r- I I


ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 latest Breakfast Serials story is
and printing every week day, just like a best-selling book, but
Monday to Friday, The Tribune published one chapter at a time
will publish 'The Valley of No every week day. It's great writ-
Return' the second in our ing and illustrating by celebrat-
summer reading series. ed authors and artists, and read-
The Tribune is convinced that ers can't wait for the next day's
reading helps young people to installment.
focus on constructive choices The chapters are short engag-


through exposure to worlds
beyond their immediate envi-
ronment.
Sponsored by Kellogg's, this


ing and compelling so that
the reader keeps coming back
for more.
Read. Learn. Enjoy.


CHAPTER 1 STARTS ON AUGUST 2


The Valley of


No Return


By John Tomerlin
Illustrated by Michael Lacapa


H AVASU CANYON, an Arizona branch of the
Grand Canyon, is famed for its natural beauty.
However, it is less well-known that floods occasionally
rampage through the valley on their way to the Colorado
River.
Two young people set out one afternoon in the autumn
of 1909 to visit "Dead Man's Falls," north of the Supai Vil-
lage. A prank played on them by a young member of the
Havasupais Indian tribe becomes potentially lethal when a
flash flood cuts off their return.
For the next several days the pair must endure cold and
hunger while attempting to make their way to safety; the
situation grows yet more deadly when they discover they
are being stalked by a hungry mountain lion.
This is a story of two young people from diverse back-
grounds one, the son of a mining engineer, the other, a
daughter of the tribal chief whose people are threatened
with exile from their ancestral land, and of the lessons
learned as they struggle for survival.


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
Wednesday,
July 21 was
one of the
longest days
in memory
for a young married couple,
Navado and Cleo Farrington. It
was the day that Cleo gave
birth to a little girl, Clarissa,
who was still born.
The day before, she was sent
from Eleuthera by the resident
Nurse when it was realised that
the baby's heart beat was very
faint.
Induced
Labour was induced and
around 2pm and four hours lat-
er a beautiful baby girl was
born, but she was dead.
The grief-stricken face of the
father and aunts as they gazed
at the angelic looking child left
an indelible impression upon
me that will be with me for the
rest of my life.
The tears shed by this couple
and their family members were
painful to witness. I was moved
by the faith of this family.
Instead of falling apart they
turned to the Lord.
According to Navado's sis-
ter, Gilda Farrington, her
brother and his wife were
extremely excited about the
birth of their child. It was not
their first, she said, but the first
one since their marriage and
the construction of their new


home.
"My brother and his wife
travelled to Miami and
shopped for this child, the nurs-
ery was completely furnished,
for you see they had planned
for this child, and now this."
Nurse Tamazina Farrington
assured her brother and his
wife that "God does everything
well and what he does is well
done". She said that because
Cleo was still young and
healthy they could have more
children.
Maybe there was something
wrong with the child and God
in his wisdom knew that it
would be difficult for them to
deal with all of the medical
attention the child might have
needed, she said.
What was so amazing was
the strength of the mother.
When the question was asked
what was to be done with the
child's body, Cleo said that she
wanted to take her baby home
and ensure that she was given a
proper Christian burial.
Coping
Asked how she was coping
she said that it was only
through the mercies of God
that she was standing. "Words
cannot express how I am feel-
ing. Thank God for family and
friends. I am sure that my
Angel is with the Lord."
She added that the reading at
her baby's funeral service on
Saturday in. Hatchet Bay,


Eleuthera would be appropri-
ate for children.
The baby's grandfather, Rev
Lambert Farrington, said that
the death of a child at any age
is difficult and painful. "Once a
mother carries a child for a few
months and goes through
labour pains, there is an attach-
ment formed, so if the child is
born dead or lives for a few
minutes there is separation that
only she can experience," he
said. "We know the Lord and
he is a righteous and just God,
who takes nothing but his
own."
Saddened
Rev Farrington's wife,
Maryann, said: "I am saddened
by the death of Angel Clarissa,
because I know how her par-
ents were preparing for her
arrival. It only goes to show
you that man proposes, but
God disposes, he is the one
who gives life and takes it
away. The death of anyone
should only draw us closer to
God. I am puzzled by the num-
ber of babies dying these days.
Earlier this year my cousin lost
twins, that too was painful. For
a mother to lose a child is a
devastating thing. All we can
do is pray and depend on Jesus
to carry us through, because
we know we are not alone.
There are many other mothers
and families out there suffer-
ing from the loss of a new born
baby."


'The God who



created us will not



leave nor forsake us'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
WHILE waiting for a traffic light to
change from red to green on Farrington
Road, a number of vehicles behind me
started to honk their horns. I found this a
little annoying because it could not have
been more than a few seconds before the
light changed.
This took me back to the funeral of a
friend's father, which I attended on Satur-
day, July 16 at Rhodes Memorial Methodist
Church. The sermon was delivered by Rev
Emily A Demeritte.
In her sermon, Rev Demeritte referred
to Bahamians as being "much too impa-
tient".
"Do you ever notice that as we drive
along the streets people are so impatient
that they honk at you as soon as the street
light turns green, even before you are able
to press the gas peddle? When it is time to
queue up stand in line no one wants to
wait. We live in such a hurry that we even
resort to warming up pre-cooked food
rather than wait for a meal to be prepared
carefully. And we would pay any amount of
money not to wait in line."
Kingdom
She told the congregation at the funeral
that God's kingdom cannot be entered
through a "quick fix". "We must go God's
way. He has designed us to come through
His son."
St Paul teaches Christians that the fruits
of the spirit are kindness, goodness, faith-
fulness, gentleness; however, according to
Rev Demeritte, "we seem to be attracted to
course, brutal, harsh and 'biggity' (behav-


iour). No one wants gentle anymore.
"One indigenous song often played on
the local (radio) stations says that even the
young ladies nowadays want 'thugz' instead
of gentlemen," said Rev. Demeritte.
She emphasised the need for self-control
as outlined by the apostle Paul. "The God
who created us will not leave nor forsake
us."
Rev Demeritte also observed that
Bahamians "are just too fickle".
Concern
"(We) concern ourselves with many
things that have no value. Friends, it does
not matter what kind of casket Brother
Ingraham has or what his children are wear-
ing at this funeral service. Yes, it is not
important to host a repast this afternoon
and eat and drink and be merry at Mr (Ben-
nett) Ingraham's passing, as has become
the custom. What is important today is that
his death has meaning for us in our own
lives, to search ourselves, to become famil-
iar again with God's word and to turn our
lives around and live as God wants us to."
A few months ago The Tribune published
a story that addressed the perception that
Bahamians seem more concerned about
the fanfare of the funeral rather than the
spiritual state of the deceased person. The
article quoted a theologian from Trinidad
who had visited the Bahamas a few times,
and after seeing how extravagant funerals
were in this country the number of lim-
ousines, matching outfits worn by family
members and the lavish parties that fol-
lowed he commented that "Bahamians
have an unhealthy obsession with death
and funerals".


I *, frm ag 2


Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our web-
site:
'www.holytrinitybahamas.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK
YOU are invited to worship


with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the


corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank.
Parking is available immedi-
ately behind the Kirk. Visit us
also at:
www.standrewskirk.com


RESIGION



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PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2005


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