Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00160
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: July 20, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00160
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text




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Tribune


Volume: 101 No.195


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


PRICE 500


BEST investigates

US Navy operation


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
THE Bahamas Environment
Science and Technology Com-
mission is inquiring into whether
the US Navy's operations in
Andros may be causing increased
numbers of cancer cases.
According to Koed Smith,
Ambassador for the Environ-
ment and Chairman of the
BEST Commission, concerns of
ah increase in cancer cases have
existed since the establishment
of the US Navy's Atlantic
Undersea Testing and Evalua-
tion Centre (AUTEC). "It does
concern me and particularly the
government," he said.
Mr Smith said that the BEST
Commission was currently in dis-
cussions with AUTEC through
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
about researching these cases.
An Androsian raised concerns
about the incidence of cancer in
his family.
He said that his grandfather,
his uncle, a cousin and several
other family members and island
folk who lived near AUTEC's
base have contracted, and in the
instance of his grandfather, have
died from cancer.
"I would not want to take my
children down there," he said.
He also expressed concerns
that AUTEC's operations are
causing dolphins to beach.
He expressed his concern
about a recent sighting of three
dolphins lying dead on a Cargill
Creek beach, which he believes
is due to naval sonar testing.
He also felt that what some say
is a decrease in fisheries near the
shoreline could be because "sonar.
operations drove them away".
In the past, deaths of a variety
of marine mammals have been
linked to US naval sonar activity.
During the past few years dol-


yol

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OV
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phins and whales have washed
up on the shores of Eleuthera,
south Long Island, Grand
Bahama, Abaco and in shallow
areas of the New Providence
channel.
Veterinarian Dr Alan Bater,
who conducted autopsies on
dead whales and heads the
Bahamas Marine Mammals Con-
servation Institute (BMMCI),
testified before the US Congress
that naval sonar activity in
Andros have killed numerous
species of whales and dolphins.
Previously, environmentalists
have claimed that sonar testing
has had profound effects on
marine life and causes the marine
mammals to venture into shal-
low waters and become stranded.
They have also claimed that
sonar interferes with the sensory
system of marine mammals.
In 2000, mass beachings.of
marine mammals were recorded'
in the Bahamas. And in 2001,
the Marine Mammal Survey
wrote a government report say-
ing that 16 marine mammals
were stranded on the same day.
Recently, zoologists writing in
the journal Nature said that
whales and dolphins that have
washed up on beaches could be
suffering from the "bends"- bub-
bles in the animals' tissue brought
on by sonar signals.
"We are currently taking steps
to investigate these claims to
ensure that the US Navy's
actions comply with the law on
environmental protection," Mr
Smith said.
This is the first time it has been
made public that cancer cases are
being examined and that sugges-
tions have been made that the
cases could possibly be associated
with activities at AUTEC.
No one was available at
AUTEC for comment.


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* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
HENRY Hugh Smith was acquitted
of two charges of murder yesterday.
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall instruct-
ed the three-man, nine-woman jury to
deliver a not guilty verdict, finding that
the prosecution, having closed its case,
did not provide sufficient evidence to
convict Smith.
Terah Bethel, 28, and Larry Fernander,
52, were living together when they were
shot to death at their home in the Garden
of Eden, Love Beach, on July 21, 2000.
Smith, a former police officer, was
extradited from Atlanta, Georgia and
brought to Nassau on March 21, 2001.
This is the third time that Smith has
stood trial for these crimes, but it is the
first time that the case was followed
through .to conclusion. It is reported that
two judges had previously excused them-
selves from the case.
Chief Justice Hall told the jury that it is
a question of law for the judge to decide
SEE page 10


Pilots claim

fee increase

will cripple

business

* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIAN pilots are up in arms over a
proposed increase in pilot fees, which they
claim if enforced would cripple their business
and open the door for hackers in unsafe
planes.
According to one pilot, the Ministry of
Transport is planning to increase landing fees,
licences and renewals by as much as 500 per
cent.
The source claimed that the ministry is try-
ing to keep the increase, "under the lid."
The proposed new fees would include an
increase in landing fees from $8 to $18, licence
renewal fees from $200 to $1,250 and permits
from $500 to $1,200, he said.
The source said that the increases would
SEE page 10


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
LOCAL department stores were
unaware that they were selling or had
ordered baby strollers recalled in the
US because of safety concerns.
Graco Children's Products Incor-
porated ordered a recall of more than
one million of its Duo Tandem and
MetroLite model strollers on July 7.
However when The Tribune con-
tacted several department stores in
New Providence which stock the Gra-
co products, they said they had not
been informed of the action.
One store said it currently sells the
MetroLite stroller, and another that
it has both models on order.
Graco says it pulled the models after
reports indicated that 264 injuries and
529 unexpected collapses resulted
SEE page 10


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Tributes paid to




Charles Carey Jr* 'm 1 i


DESCRIBING him as a
"humble and simple person",
family and friends of the late
Charles Carey Jr. reflected on
the life of the local business
and family man, who died of a
massive heart attack in the
early hours of July 18.
Charles Carey Jr, 75, was
described by family, friends
and employees as generous
and hard working. According
to his elder son, Charles, he
had taken his parents to Mia-
mi that weekend for their
medical checkups. His father
was in the best of spirits. "We
had a wonderful time," he
said.
But that Sunday night after
they had returned home, Mrs
Carey complained of not feel-
ing well. Her husband got up


Local businessman


dies at the age of


to sit with her. Towards
morning, he was found
slumped over in his chair. He
was dead.

Shock
It was a shock to the family,
because although he had suf-
fered from a heart condition
for a number of years, his
health had improved and he
had received a good medical


75


report.
According to his younger
son, Chris, who now manages
the family business, Charles
E Carey and Son on
Dowdeswell Street, was start-
ed in the early forties by his
grandfather, Charles Carey,
Sr. The millwork business,
then known as Bahamas
Woodcraft, opened on Bay
Street near Symonette Ship-
yards.
However, when Charles Jr


turned 21 in 1951, Charles Sr
changed the name of the busi-
ness from Bahamas Wood-
craft to Charles E Carey and
Son. In the 1960s the business
was extended to include hard-
ware.
According to his family, Mr
Carey Jr often reminded them
that "what you see here didn't
just happen overnight."
Mr Carey was a skilled car-
penter who passed his knowl-
edge on to others in the trade.
He was also an active mem-
ber in his church as a Sunday
school teacher in Trinity
Methodist Church and as a
leader of Trinity Church's Cub
Scouts. In later years he joiried
Calvary Bible Church, Collins
Avenue, where he was also
very active.


According to Angela Moss,
an employee for 25 years, Mr
Carey was an "honest gentle-
man and a family man who
was always very understand-
ing."
Charles Carey Jr is survived
by his wife, Joan Carey, sons
Charles and Chris, daughters
Mrs Elaine Cates and Mrs


Loree Stephens of Peterbor-
ough, Ontario, and seven
grandchildren.
Funeral services, conducted
by Pastor Allan Lee, will be
held at 5pm on Monday, July
25, at Calvary Bible Church.
Interment will follow in
Ebenezer Methodist ceme-
tery.


Zip's disappearance raises




alarm over dog theft problem


TIME is running out for a
pedigree dog which was stolen
at the weekend and will die
without urgent mediation.
Zip, a male Dog de Bor-
deaux, or French Mastiff, was
taken in the night from the
premises of the Bahamas
Humane Society.
The society has now raised
the alarm about the growing
problem of dog theft, saying it
has become increasingly


le


French Mastiff taken from Bahamas Humane Society


aware in recent months of dog
thieves striking in the night
around New Providence.
"While many stories are
anecdotal, the Bahamas
Humane Society have, sadly,
had first hand experience of
these unscrupulous gangs,"


said the society's executive
director Kevin Degenhard.
"On one occasion at least
three young men were seen
breaking in to the Bahamas
Humane Society premises and
when one of our inspectors
discovered them they threw a


U -


I.

Availab-




Availabl


shower of rocks at him and
stole a puppy."
According to the society, it
would have required "a num-
ber of people" to manhandle
Zip off the premises.
"This story is tragic as Zip
needs the medication that he,,


has been receiving, otherwise
he will die. The perpetrators
of this cruel and thoughtless
selfish deed will probably
bring about Zip's demise," Mr
Degenhard said
Zip is a very large dog and is
reddish brown in colour.
The society said his coat is
normally short by nature but
he is currently suffering hair
loss.
"He requires specialist
attention and is unlikely to
receive it at the hands of these
callous people," Mr Degen-
hard said, adding that the staff
"are very fond of him and he
is sadly missed."
"This is a rare breed and
there are very few, if any, oth-
ers on New Providence. For
those who are not familiar
with the breed one appeared
in the famous film 'Turner and
Hooch'.
"A police report has been


filed and we will continue
looking for him.
If anyone passes us infor-
mation resulting in his return
and/or the conviction of the
thieves, a reward will be giv-
en," the executive director
said. ..
Members of the public who
have any knowledge about the
incident or the whereabouts
of Zip are asked to call the
Humane Society on 356-2659
in strict confidence.
"Ensure your dogs are safe-
ly secured on your premises
at all times and report suspi-
cious behaviour to the police,"
the society said.


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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


" I
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THE TRBUNE EDNESAY, JLY 20C2005NEWS


Nurses to receive



payments after



more than a year


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
GRADUATES from the
clinical nurses training pro-
gramme arp set to receive pay-
ments due to them after more
than a year's delay.
A group of 16 nurses who
graduated from the programme
in April 2004 have not received
their full salaries for the past 15
months.
Now the Ministry of Health
says it hopes to remunerate the
nurses fully before the end of
the week.
One of the programme's
graduates, currently a nurse at
Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre, said that she has been strug-
gling financially and as a last
resort has even written to Prime
Minister Perry Christie to
appeal her case.
The nurse, who wished to
remain anonymous, said that
because of the delay she has not
been able to pay her rent or
provide properly for her chil-
dren.
"I'm afraid that they are
going to evict me from my
apartment because I haven't
paid the rent. And then there's


been the high gas prices and we
have to pay for our own uni-
forms. It's really been a strug-
gle," she said.

Regrets

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Permanent Secretary
in the Ministry of Health Elma
Garraway said that the "ministry
very much regrets" the delay.
"But the good news is that
we are now preparing their (the
nurses) appointment letters, and
we hope to pay them by the end
of this week," she said.
Mrs Garraway explained that
the payments were.held up
because of "several administer-
ial difficulties," but said she
could not go into detail.
"We highly value all those in
the nursing profession and we
truly regret that because of
these administerial problems
the nurses were unable to
receive early remuneration,"
she said.
The Sandilands nurse said
that she hopes to receive the
money that is due to her before
the 'back-to-school' period
begins.


"My children are going to
need all kinds of things when
they go back to school. Books,
uniforms, and many other
things. Without the money I
won't be able to pay for it," she
said.
The nurse explained that she
had entered into the clinical
nurses programme in hopes of
finding a better career to sup-
port her family.
"And for the past 15 months
I've still been making the same
salary I did when I was in
housekeeping at the Depart-
ment of Public Health," she
said.
Mrs Garraway explained that
the clinical nurses programme is
only one of the many initiatives
by the Ministry of Health to
battle the shortage of nurses in
the country.
"It's a world-wide problem,
less people are going into the
nursing profession, then you
have people leaving or going
into the private sector," she
added.
. Mrs Garraway said that
Bahamas has been "quite suc-
cessful in closing the gap of 300
to 400 nurses missing from pub-
lic health in 2002."


Fired security officers


demand a retraction


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE officers terminated
from Wemco Security and
Credit Collections Limited are
demanding a retraction of the
company's statement that they
were fired because of "low per-
formance and poor service."
During an interview with The
Tribune, a decorated employ-
ee who had been with Wemco
for over five years said that she
is already feeling the adverse
affects of being "wrongfully
labeled" on her future employ-
ment. %
On Friday, 20 security offi-
cers from the company were
unexpectedly laid off.
Later that day, Wemco issued


a statement saying it was forced
to make the employees redun-
dant as a result of losing a por-
tion of one of its large contracts.
The former employee who'
spoke with The Tribune said:
"I went to a place for employ-
ment yesterday and the guy
asked me where I worked previ-
ously and I was ashamed to say
so," said Lenamae Cleare. "But
while I was thinking, he said:
'You ain't one of those Wemco
set eh?' I was too embarrassed."
"These kind of statements are
threatening new opportunities
and that is wrong. I have no
problem with losing the job,
that's fine, but let me have my
dignity.
"At least give me credit for
the work I have done. I have


all kinds of accolades and cer-
tificates proving my service:So
I can't just accept that state-
ment," she said.
Mrs Cleare said she and
some of other officers who have
been terminated would, if they
had to, hire an attorney to have
the statement by Wemco gen-
eral manager Paul Thompson
retracted.
"I don't want no couple dol-
lars from them, I only want my
name cleared. What he has said
has been in all the papers and
on the news. They can keep
their job... but just let us keep
our dignity," Mrs Cleare said.
Up to press time yesterday,
attempts to contact Mr Thomp-
son at Wemco were unsuccess-
ful.


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Ten-finger scan will



soon be compulsory


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIANS will soon have to submit to a
ten-finger scan when applying for a US visa.
This new initiative is part of the US-VISIT
programme which is designed to boost securi-
ty efforts to prevent potential terrorist attacks.
Michael Taylor, Chief Political, Economic
and Public Relations officer at the US Embassy
in Nassau explained that instead of submit-
ting two index fingers, persons applying for
visas will in future have to have all ten fingers
scanned.
The plan was announced by Homeland Secu-
rity secretary Michael Che'rtoff last week.
Mr Taylor said before the new scan system
can be implemented, however, new machin-
ery and software has to first be put in place.
He added that'the Embassy does not foresee
the additional scanning leading to an increase
in the visa processing time.
, .The main objective with the ten-fingerprint
scan is to enhance accuracy. With scanning
two index fingers we achieve 96 per cent accu-
racy, with the scanning of the ten fingers we are


approaching 100 per cent," he said.
Mr Taylor pointed out that the enhanced
accuracy will benefit the traveller, as there
now will be less incidents where people are
held up at airports and borders because their
identities cannot be immediately verified.
US officials say the ten-finger scan will only
have to be undergone once, after which visitors
will be subject to the two-print verification
upon visa renewal.
Persons travelling on a police record con-
tinue to have the choice not to enroll in the US-
VISIT programme.
In his announcement last week, Mr Chertoff
said that the move is part of the US' six-point
agenda "to ensure the highest levels of accu-
racy in identifying people entering and exiting
our country."
"Our department must drive improvement
with a sense of urgency. Our enemy constant-
ly changes and adapts, so we as a department
must be nimble and decisive," the Homeland
Security secretary said.
No date has been given for the changes, but
Mr Taylor said that the plan will most likely be
implemented "sooner rather than later."


New VoIP provider in Bahamas


A company specialising in
voice-over Internet protocol
(VoIP) products and services
announced today that it has
signed a new partnership that
will allow it to service the
Bahamas.
Viper Networks Incorpo-
rated announced its newest
distribution partner, operat-
ing under the name Viper
Systems Networks of the
Bahamas.
Elwood Rolle will be the
principal managing partner
of the company, according to
the company's website.
A statement by the compa-
ny said that that Mr Rolle and
his team "have built a formi-
dable launch programme con-
sisting of print advertising and
other marketing campaigns to
penetrate the Bahamas and
Eastern Caribbean markets
and bring Viper Networks
products and services to the
region."


Viper Networks Incorporated
provides VoIP products and
services through distributors
and retailers around the world.

Service

According to the company, the
network of VoIP gateways con-
trolled by Viper includes more
than 350 countries and regions.
Unlike most competing VoIP
providers, Viper Networks
offers its service on a pre-pay
basis. It charges only for min-
utes used and does not require


any monthly fees.
Viper has been pioneering
VoIP service and technology
for more than five years.
Viper Networks CEO Ron
Weaver said his company and
its partners "believe that a com-
bination of domestic and inter-
national sales is essential to suc-
ceed in the industry."
According to the statement,
Viper Systems Networks of the
Bahamas is establishing a web-
site for product ordering and
customer service, which should
be available for worldwide
access within two weeks.


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I


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005, .1t 3


. 0








THE TRIBUNE


PAL vc-LUNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


E I U STITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURAREINVERB-AMAGISTRi
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


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Zimbabwe


EDITOR, The Tribune
The following is a reply to the
article entitled: "Zimbabwe:
Need for intervention", which
was written in The Tribune on
June 20 by Sir Ronald Sanders.
Dear Sir Ronald:
I believe that all the groups
that you mention have been set
up with rules, regulations and
criteria for the benefit of people
and nations. The cleverness of
Mugabe is that he is fully aware
of what you have written, par-
ticularly in respect of why gov-
ernment and the UN are unable
to intervene in the internal run-
.._nng-of-a--country,-and- has-
strategised accordingly.
The criteria were set-up and
decided upon with good inten-
tions and were not drawn up to
cover rogue activities of a leader
who has skilfully manipulated
and orchestrated actions that


although inhumane and intol-
erable fall within the laid down
criteria of what determines
internal governance.
The issue is not why he has
done this but what action
should immediately be taken to
rewrite the rules of intervention
by say the UN, as the leader of
this country has cocked a snook
at all authority and humanitar-
ian organisations after having
bagged a considerable amount
of aid over the first 20 years of
.independence. There hMs been
no quid pro quo.
The essence here is not to
work within the rules that have
been laid down but to think out-
side the box.
One major mistake was for
all powers to conveniently


ignore Gukurahundi in Mata-
beleland in the 1980s as there
was no desire to criticise a
newly independent African
nation despite the slaughter
that occurred by the fifth
brigade.
Another major mistake is to
allow Mbeki to continue to
declare the use of quiet diplo-
macy, as action through South
Africa, possibly determined by
other G8 nations, is I believe
the only logical solution.
Unfortunately I do not see
positive and concrete action
coming from the AU (Afican
Union) as generally speaking
there has been seen a certain
degree of dishonesty from that
organisation whether it be by
commission or omission with
few exceptions.
ALASTAIR SMITH
Harare, Zimbabwe
June 2005


EDITOR, The Tribune
I WRITE to you as a PLP
and one who believes that Obie
Wilchcombe is doing a great
job, as the Minister of Tourism;
in facfTW6oiild iiot liesitafeto
support him if he did indeed
throw his hat into the ring for
the next leader ofthe Progres-
sive Liberal Party.
His acts of bravery speak vol-
umes of his commitment dur-
ing the last hurricane in which


he stayed with his people in
West End. However, lately I
have noticed that the Punch has
been campaigning hard for Mr
Wilchcombe as the next leader
of the party and even though I
have nothing against the hon-
ourable minister running for
this post (at the appropriate
time), the Progressive Liberal
Party does have a sitting leader
now in the person of Perry G
Christie and it is a great disre-
spect to be allowing the Punch


to run on with such nonsense.
Let's not be like the FNM. I
therefore ask the minister to set
the Punch straight, and wait for
the right time, to launch his
campaign, if this is his intention.
If the mminister is not behind
this, then he should speak up.
Let's give our Prime Minister
that much respect.
MR BURROWS
Nassau
July 19 2005


The love I feel for the


country of the Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune
I can see my country smiling,
At her children gathered here,
How she beams with pride and pleasure,
Enveloping all in love and care.
Children from her islands scattered,
Male and female, old and young,
Black and White and Brown together,
United in her National song.
I can feel my country loving,


All of you and all of me, *
Hug me brother, kiss me sister,
In this sweet Democracy.
She feels our pain, she bears our struggles,
Glories in triumphs and in progress,
O. h my Islands, One Bahamas,
Under God a country blessed.
ALGERNON SPB ALLEN
Nassau
July 8 2005


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* -









LOALNES


Experts warn of dangers


as temperatures soar


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
IN THE midst of a particularly hot summer sea-
son, experts are warning of the dangers high
temperatures can pose to both humans and
animals.
In the early afternoon yesterday, the temperature"
in New Providence was 92 degrees Fahrenheit.
While such temperatures can create a problem to
everyone, a local doctor said particular at-risk
groups include diabetics on insulin and those who
suffer from hypertension.
Dr Gloria Ageeb, a general practitioner for 33
years, told The Tribune that at higher tempera-
tures, the human body absorbs insulin at a faster
rate.
This can cause an individual's blood sugar level
to drop, and induce a condition known as hypo-
glycemia.

Exposed
"If they know they are going to be exposed to the
heat, they should be sure that they have their glu-
cometer, which checks their blood sugar level, if
they do not feel well," said Dr Ageeb.
She also noted that the majority of hyperten-
sion patients take water tablets, which causes them
to release large amounts of urine. This, she said,
means they can become dehydrated more quickly
than other persons.
Dr Ageeb said that persons in this situation
should drink plenty of water, and should not wait to
do so until they feel thirsty.
According to the US Navy Safety Center's web-
site, the three most common types of heat-related
illnesses are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat
cramps, the first being the most severe.
The symptoms of heat stroke, it said, include a
temperature as high as 105 degrees and hot, red,
and dry skin.
Persons suffering from heat stroke can also expe-


MP questions government's




hurricane restoration figures

* By DElI IlSE MAYCOCK money to have spent on labour detailed breakdown on who was He indicated that the account-
Tribunre Freeport Reporter cost. The least he could do for paid this money, from where and ing firm of Deloitte and Touche is
the Bahamian public whose mon- when." conducting an audit of the funds
FREEPORT A Grand ey was spent and for the many Mr Gibson had reported that that have been spent so far.
Bahama .IP is questioning the persons who would have made $6 or $7 million was donated by The minister said an audit
amount if money government contributions to the relief fund is the private sector for hurricane report is expected to be complete
says it h, s spent on labour for to give an explanation or a restoration. iq the,next few months.
t- __,:-.__(___.___-'__ -,A


nurrican restoration and repairs
on the isl nd.
On Tu day, Lucaya MP Neko
Grant sail he is concerned about
the $7.8 ni illion figure quoted by
Housing vlinister Shane Gibson
last week in Grand Bahama.
"Of th,; $7.8 million spent so
far on res oration work on Grand
Bahama, :he minister said that $7
million a counts for labour cost
which me mt a mere $800,000 was
spend or materials. Those two
figures ju t don't compute," said
Mr Gran
Minists r Gibson and Tourism
Minister Dbie Wilchcombe, the
MP for West End, were in
Freeport ast Wednesday to view
the progr ;ss of restoration works
on Grand Bahama, particularly
at West I nd.
In add tion to the $7.8 million
already s] ent on Grand Bahama,
he report d that another $4 mil-
lion was t ing earmarked to com-
plete restorations here on the
island.
"I wish to on behalf of the peo-
ple of G .and Bahama and the
Bahamas a complete breakdown
to whom ,was it paid, to what was
it paid, aaid the areas of Grand
Bahama that workmen carried
out this v ork," said Mr Grant.
"Seven' million dollars is a lot of


WI DNESDAY
JULY 20
2:00am I'ommunity Pg. 1540AM
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11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
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1:30 pommuhitPa.1540AM


I


E By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The fact that YMCA officials nev-
er approached the Ministry of Housing for hurri-
cane restoration assistance is a "flimsy excuse" for the
government failing to offer any, Lucaya MP Neko
Grant said.
Mr Grant said that Youth, Sports and Culture
Minister Neville Wisdom was well aware of the dev-
astation at the youth sporting facility on Grand
Bahama.
"I find it laughable for them to say they were nev-
er approached," he said.
"If they were never approached they were cer-
tainly aware of the conditions because the minister
personally visited the facility in Grand Bahama. So,
that is a flimsy excuse."
Sir Jack Hayward initially raised concerns over the
condition of the YMCA, which was left in a severe
state of disrepair following last year's hurricanes.
The facility, which comprises a gymnasium, a fit-
ness area and a recreational centre, caters to the
island's youth.
Sir Jack felt that funds from a $1 million donation
made by himself and the late Edward St George
should have been used to assist in restoring the
YMCA.
While in Grand Bahama last week, Housing Min-
ister Shane Gibson announced that government
would be contributing funds for the restoration of the
YMCA.
"I am sure if we were approached earlier by the
YMCA we would have rendered some kind of assis-
tance," said Mr Gibson, who had explained that the
YMCA never approached his ministry.
YMCA officials have raised $100,000 through
fundraisers and donations by the private sector. They


say $400,000 is still needed to restore the building.
Mr Grant said it appears that Minister Wisdom
may have been "showboating" when he was pic-
tured in the newspapers touring the damaged facili-
ty in Freeport.
"He was standing in front of the YMCA and
reviewing the damage. And certainly, unless he was
just showboating, he should have reported to Cabi-
net what he found when he visited Grand Bahama,"
Mr Grant said.
He said Grand Bahama residents are tired of gov-
ernment ministers taking and releasing "pretty pic-
tures" while they continue to suffer.

Layoff
"It has to stop because people in Grand Bahama
are suffering," he said, adding that the layoff of 45
workers at the Isle of Capri was most unfortunate.
"To put 45 more people on the street at this time
is just disastrous with 1,500 from Royal Oasis and the
many others from the International Bazaar."
"The government simply is not paying attention as
I have warned them of this in parliament. I have
read many number of reports worldwide and local-
ly that they were not making the kind of money
needed to achieve a profit, but the minister of tourism
painted a different picture and those in parliament
that sing about Isle of Capri earnings.
"Well we now know that that couldn't be possible
if these people are saying that they had to lay off 45.
I hope that is the end of it, but I believe that it is not
and that they would perhaps have to lay off more
according to their mode of .operation," Mr Grant
said.
"The people of Grand Bahama simply cannot
take anymore and we are demanding action on the
part of this do-nothing government," he said.


i


rience a rapid, weak pulse and rapid shallow breath-
ing, according to thewebsite.
When an individual is experiencing a heat stroke,
the naval safety centre advised: "Wrap damp sheets
around the victim and start fanning them.
"Wrap cold packs in a cloth and place them on
the victim's wrists and ankles, in the armpits and on
the neck."
The centre said that in order to avoid heat ill-
nesses, individuals should wear lightweight and
light-coloured clothing, drink plenty of water, take
regular breaks and eat small meals.
Animals can also be affected by the summer
weather.
Executive Director of the Bahamas Humane
Society Kevin Degenhard said the heat can have
such an adverse affect on horses that it is illegal for
surrey drivers to take them out between the hours
of 1pm and 3pm during the summer.
"Most surrey drivers comply with this, however
we do see some of them driving tourists around
back-streets during these hours," said Mr Degen-
hard.
He said the society will report any illegal activi-
ty by surrey drivers to the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.
Mr Degenhard also advised that dogs should
never be left in parked vehicles, even if the windows
are down.
The inside of a car, he said, can get "as hot as an
oven," and a dog can die very quickly during the
summer.
Additionally, persons should provide shade for
their pets and provide water 24 hours a day.
Another big concern for the Humane Society
said Mr Degenhard, is that pet shops are selling pet
fish, particularly Siamese fighting fish, in very small
containers.
He explained that water loses oxygen very
quickly when the weather is hot, causing fish to
suffocate.
"The Humane Society do not approve of the
sale of these fish, who live alone, in tiny containers
on people's desk." he said.


Prominent cardiologists

give defibrillator assurance

By CARA BRENNEN the name of Metrotronic. He
Tribune Staff Reporter said the situation with
Guidant is a major misfor-
TWO prominent Bahami- tune.
an cardiologists said they Dr Forbes added that only
have not fitted any Bahami- two of his patients ever
ans with Guidant heart needed to have their pace-
defibrillators, which have makers replaced for varying
recently been named in at reasons and emphasised that
least one wrongful death the pacemakers used were
suit. not made by Guidant.
Dr Conville Brown at the
Bahamas Heart Centre in Reports
Nassau and Dr Winston
Forbes at Grand Bahama
Cardiovascular Centre in According to media
Freeport both said that their reports, a wrongful death
patients got their pacemak- acton was brought against
ers from other manufactur- the company in Jacksonville,
ers Florida by the family of a
75-year-old man, Robert
Earl Smith who died when
ContrOVerSy his defibrillator allegedly
failed to shock his heart back
The US company has into normal rhythm after he
been at the centre of con- collapsed.
troversy after it was forced In March, a 21-year-old
to recall more than a 100,000 college student, Joshua
defibrillators. Oukrop, who required a
Guidant said it has identi- defibrillator because he suf-
fied 69 pacemaker failures.., fered from a genetic heart
The models, recalled disease, died while on a
include the Pulsar Max, Pul- spring break bicycling
sar, Discovery, Meridian, trip.
Pulsar Max II, Discovery II, These events prompted an
Virtus Plus II, Intelis II and investigation by the FDA.
the Contak TR. It is believed that the com-
Dr Br6wn said that hospi- pany will face one or more
tals in the Bahamas have federal or state class actions
been able to install pace- on behalf of the 24,000 peo-
makers since 1996, but said ple who are living with one
that they use a company by 'of the devices.




LA CASITA


The Art of Island Living'






















41()0/0 I


Grant hlits out over YMCA~


-I


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005 PAGE 5'


. I


T


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005
GN 245
OFFICE OF DEPUTY PRIME
MINISTER & MINISTRY OF
NATIONAL SECURITY
RE: Traffic Press Release Notice
Full Millitary Funeral Service for
The Late Police Constable 2747 Henry Curry
INFORMATION:
Full Military Funeral Service for the late Police
Constable 2747 Henry Curry will be held on Thursday,
21 July 2005 at 11:00am at Saint Barnabas Anglican
Church, Wulff Road and Blue Hill Road.
Interment will follow in Saint Barnabas Cemetery, Moore
Avenue.
ROUTE:
The Funeral Procession will leave the Church
after the service and travel the following route:
From Saint Barnabas Anglican Church. Wullf
Road and Blue Hill Road the Mourning Party will form
into a Procession and travel east on Wulff Road to Palm
Beach Street, south on Palm Beach Street to Moore
Avenue, east on Moore Avenue to Saint Barnabas
Cemetery.
ROAD CLOSURE:
From 1:00pm until after the Procession passes, the
following Street willn be closed to vehicular traffic:-
(a) Wulff Road between Blue Hill Road and
Collins Avenue
TRAFFIC DIVERSION:
At the commencement of the Funeral Procession, vehicular
traffic not connected therewith will be diverted through
side streets.
From 10:00am until after the Funeral Service, no vehicle
will be permitted to park on the following streets.-
(a) Wulff Road between Blue Hill Road and Collins
Avenue Both Sides
(b) Palm Beach Street between Wulff Road and Homestead
Street Both Sides
(c) Moore Avenue between Palm Beach Street and Lincon
Blvd. Both Sides
PARKING:
Limited Parking will be permitted in Saint Barnabas
Anglican Curch Parking Lot
Paul H. Farquharson, Q.P.M.
Commissioner of Police.


THE TRIBUNE




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Eleuthera set for


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
TOPICAL issues facing
both church and the com-
munity will be addressed
during Calvary Deliver-
ance's Church annual con-
vention.
In a press conference
yesterday the church's pas-
tor Bishop VG Clarke said
issues such as citizenship,
juvenile crime prevention,
substance abuse and
women in ministry will be
raised.
"As a pastor I see some
of the problems everyday.
You go around the court,
visit the prison, you walk
the streets and you see
things that are invading the
homes and the lives of our
people, young and old.
"I personally feel that
the church is here to bridge
the gap. We are not afraid
to deal with tough issues
and we are prepared to
deal with them," said Bish-
op Clarke.
This year's convention is
being held under the
theme: "All things are pos-
sible" and will be held
from July 24 to July 29.
Convention participants
will be addressed by vari-
ous ministers from the
Turks and Caicos Islands,
the United States and the
Bahamas.
They include Pastor Rod
Parsley of World Harvest
Church in Columbus,
Ohio.


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trst National Park


* By KARAN MINNIS

ELEUTHERA Bahamas
National Trust (BNT) plans
to establish the first National
Park in Eleuthera at Cotton
Bay Estates and Villas.
Eleuthera Properties chair-
man Franklyn Wilson made
the announcement last Friday
at the Clubhouse ground
breaking ceremony for Cot-
ton Bay Estates and Villas in
Eleuthera.
Cotton Bay is a 1,500-acre
development comprised of 114
beachfront and ocean view


Announcement made


at ground breaking


estate lots, a 69-room
luxury boutique hotel, a
clubhouse with full amenities
and two sec, lu.ded
beaches.
According to Mr Wilson,
the development intends to
build on the concept of the
first Cotton Bay Club, which
was once regarded as one of-


the worlds finest resort desti-
nations.
Speaking about the future
national park, Mr Wilson
explained that it Will be an,
educational area arid a source
of information on native veg-
etation.
Speaking to The Tribune
yesterday, BNT director of


parks Eric Carey explained
that it will be the 26th Nation-
al Park in the Bahamas.

Pleased

"We are very pleased that
the Cotton Bay Development
Company has recognised the
importance of conservation
and has committed themselves
to setting aside a parcel of
land for such development,
and we hope that .others will
follow in this trend."
Mr Carey explained that the
BNT is currently in discussion


with the principals of
Eleuthera Properties and that
the total amount of land that
will be donated has not yet
been decided upon.
The BNT, which was estab-
lished in 1959 by Act of par-
liament, is a non-governmen-
tal, self-funded, statutory
body, dedicated to the devel-
opment and management of
the National Park system in
the Bahamas.
It makes vital contributions
to local fisheries and wildlife
management, environmental
protection, and historic preser-
vation.


Bond fans hail

Cafe Martinique

recreation

KERZNER International's new Marina Village has caught the
attention of James Bond fans for resurrecting a 007 dining classic.
The newly opened development was yesterday featured in an arti-
cle on the James Bond website www.mi6.co.uk, which applauded
Chef Jean-George Vongerichten recreation of the "legendary Caf6
Martinique originally made famous by its appearance in the 1965
James Bond classic, Thunderball."
Bond enthusiasts say they expect the new restaurant to "recreate
some old James Bond magic."
"The restaurant features a delectable menu of French gourmet fare
for which Chef Vongerichten is known.
"Redesigning the legendary Caf6 Martinique in a more contem-
porary style is acclaimed New York designer Adam Tihany, who has
achieved worldwide acclaim for his spectacular hotel and restaurant
designs including Jean Georges in New York, the article.
It noted that the new would feature certain "iconic elements"
including "a wrought-iron birdcage elevator, a dramatic mahogany
staircase and elegantly etched glass windows help to rekindle its
much celebrated ambiance.
Caf6 Martinique is slated to open on July 29.
Marina Village, a 65,000 square foot development skirting the
Atlantis marina, was designed to resemble "a quaint Bahamian set-
tlement" according to Kerzner.
It opened on July 15; however some of its 21 retail outlets and resta-
raunts, including Caf6 Martinique, have been scheduled to open lat-
er this month.


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Bai lywoj


S1THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

NOTICE
Payment of Benefits and Assistances for the month of July 2005, will be made in the following
districts, at the following pay stations between the hours stated below:

ADELAIDE DISTRICT:
Thursday, July 21, 2005:12 noon 12:30p.m., at the Church Hall.

CARMICHAEL DISTRICT
Thursday, July 21,2005: 9:30a.m. 11:45a.m., at Beacon Hill Church of Nazarene, Carmichael
Road.

GAMBLER DISTRICT:
Thursday, July 21, 2005:12:45p.m. 1:30p.m., at St. Peter's Church Hall.

FOX HILL DISTRICT:
Thursday, July 21, 2005:9:30a.m. 3:00p.m., at the National Insurance Board's Fox Hill Sub-
Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may collect them throughout
the month of August 2005, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

WULFF ROAD LOCAL OFFICE:
Thursday, July 21, 2005: 9:30a.m. 4:00p.m. at the National Insurance Board's Wulff Road Local
Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may collect them throughout
the month of August 2005, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT:
Thursday, July 21, Monday, July 25,2005: 9:30a.m.- 4:00p.m., at The Bahamas Public Service
Union Hall, East Street South.

GRANTS TOWN DISTRICT:
1. Thursday, July 21 Wednesday, July 27, 2005: 9:30a.m. 4:00p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters "A" "L", at the Cat Island United
Association Hall #1, Market and Vesey Streets.

2. Thursday, July 21 Monday, July 25, 2005:9:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters "M" "Z", at the Salvation Army
Hall, Meadow Street.

3. Tuesday, July 26 Wednesday, July 27, 2005: 9:30a.m. 4:00p.m.
Persons who did not collect their cheques from the respective stations on the days
specified, may collect them at the Cat Island United Association Hall #1, Market and
Vesey Streets, on the above-mentioned dates.

PLEASE NOTE:

Cheques must be collected from the listed pay stations on the dates and times given. In cases of
emergency, uncollected cheques may be collected from the Pensions Department, at the Jumbey
Village Complex throughout the month of August 2005 between the hours of 9:30a.m. and 4:00p.m.

Claimants and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in order to
collect their cheques. Acceptable forms of identification for claimants collecting their own payments
are:
Their National Insurance Registration Card, together with any one of the following:
1. A Passport;
2. A Voter's Card; or
3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the claimant is sending a representative to collect his/ her cheque, the representative should
provide an Authorization Form completed by the claimant, or a letter authorizing the Board to pay
the representative, together with any of the above-listed items to identify the representative.

All claimants and/or their representatives are advised that should they fail to provide satisfactory
documents to identify themselves as requested above, there may be a delay or denial of payments.


k,


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005 PAGE 7


o o


0


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THE TRIBUNE















Consultants make important choice




for the future of New Providence


A FTER Canadian reg-
A ulators panned a
union pension fund for making
"imprudent" investments in
Bahamian hotels during the
1990s, a team of development
consultants is deciding the
future of two landmark prop-
erties on New Providence.
The Ontario Financial Ser-
vices Commission recently cited
poor investment decisions and
potential conflicts of interest by
the Canadian Commercial
Workers Industry Pension Plan
one of the largest private-
sector funds in Canada.
The CCWIPP manages a bil-
lion dollars in assets on behalf
of more than 180,000 members
of the United Food and Com-
mercial Workers Union. And
after regulators urged the fund
to conduct a "complete, inde-
pendent due diligence review"
of its Bahamian interests, big
changes are in the works,
sources say.
Neither the British Colonial
Hilton nor the South Ocean
Beach Resort has so far earned
a return on investment for the
beleaguered Canadian pension
fund which assumed full lia-
bility for the properties after
the owner defaulted five years
ago. But a Coral Gables con-
sulting firm called Allen and Co
has reportedly been working on
an "exit strategy" for the fund.

The Sins of the Father

The fund's Bahamian
investments were part
of a multi-million-dollar lend-
ing spree to a former priest
named Ronald Hubert Kelly,
who had remade himself into
one of Canada's top real estate
tycoons in only a few short
years.
Kelly is an interesting story
in' his own right. As a small-
town parish priest, 'he pleaded
guilty in 1979 to indecently
assaulting five boys, was par-


doned a few years later and
went on to become a top aide to
Toronto's Cardinal, Emmett
Carter. But he left the priest-
hood abruptly in 1990.
He then launched a meteoric
career as a real estate develop-
er. Risking his life savings to
pull together enough financing
to buy a bankrupt Toronto
hotel, he went on to buy more
properties and eventually began
rubbing shoulders with
Canada's business and political
elite.
Kelly's company, RHK Cap-
ital, acquired malls, hotels and
office buildings across Canada
and became the pension fund's
biggest investment partner.
According to the Toronto Star,
the CCWIPP bankrolled Kel-
ly's early hotel acquisitions and
the union got new members in
return. By the time they parted
ways a few years ago, the fund
had invested over $200 million
in Kelly's projects.
High on the list was the $90
million acquisition and rede-
velopment of the landmark
British Colonial Hotel in Nas-
sau, which Kelly bought in 1997.
The following year he borrowed
more pension fund money to


buy the bankrupt S
Beach Resort for $
Former finance
William Allen rec
government was p
contact was first ma
ly on the British C
ject: "At the time w
to get foreign inve
the BC was seen a
catalyst for the red
of the city, whicl
more depressing th
today...But it seeme
the critical mass rec
South Ocean proje
contemplated by"
tal."
According to a:
banker, "The BC p
very positive imj
Bahamas. There ar
sons why it was n'
success, but most r
country and the wa)
developers in doil


Neither the British Colo
Hilton nor the South Ocea
Beach Resort has so far ea
a return on investment fo
beleaguered Canadian pei
fund which assumed ful
liability for the properties
the owner defaulted five y
ago
1'


South Ocean
$18 million.
minister Sir
alls that the
leased when
ade with Kel-


Kelly actually made a contribu-
tion and did not benefit per-
sonally."
The 'New' Colonial Hotel


colonial pro-
ie were keen he British Colonial was
estment and built in 1922 by the
is a possible Munson Steamship Line, with
development the help of a government loan.
h was even For years it was the centre of
ien than it is Nassau's social life, and was
ed to me that owned by the Oakes family for
uired by the more than half a century. But
ct was never by the mid-1990s it was almost
RHK Capi- derelict, giving rise to fears of
demolition. The main building
former local had been mothballed for years
?roject had a while the newer wing where
pact on the BISX is today was operated as
re many rea- a Best Western motel.
ot a roaring RHK Capital took over in
relate to the 1997, planning to invest $40 mil-
y it frustrates lion to fix the hotel and build
ng business, adjacent condos and a marina.
It took two years of painstaking
work to restore the BC to its
former glory.
And in early December, 1999
nial Ron Kelly hosted government
leaders and VIP's (including his
Lin former boss, the Cardinal of
Toronto) to a lavish opening
irned party. It was a glittering affair,
made even more so by the
r the knowledge that the restoration
1had ended up costing over $90
nsion million.
"The resurgence of the
I British Colonial symbolises the
after resurgence of the Bahamas,"
after Mr Kelly told the assembled
ear high and mighty at the opening
rears event. "The BC is the heart and
soul of this country...and the
whole concept was to preserve
the history andintegrity 4b qt.
building. It is one of tli' big
names in the global hotel mar-
ket."
But even before the restora-
tion ended, Kelly had run into
financial problems. When he
defaulted on his loan in July,
2000, the CCWIPP through a
subsidiary stepped in to take
over. It has since met all oblig-
ations and maintained the hotel
at a high standard, despite not
receiving "a single dollar" from
the business over five years.

A ccording to a recent
report, the pension
fund "maintains a long-term
view of its investments (and)
has not abandoned its vision
(for) the British' Colonial site,
which still stands as an intended,
although very lonely, catalyst
to downtown development and
renewal."
Michael Hooper, the Hilton-


So it seems that EP Taylor's
original vision may finally
come to pass albeit 40 years
behind schedule and all will
live happily ever after.


appointed general manager,
confirmed that the hotel was
trading well this year, with 88
per cent average occupancy:
"But I can't speak for the own-
ers."
Nor could the owners them-
selves. So Allen and Co spoke
for them. According to Chris
Allen, the BC's performance
over the past five years was dis-
appointing: "This year Hilton
has done well, but the owners
have not received a single dollar
in fees since the hotel reopened.
The contract still has a ways to
go, but they will have to per-
form. The offices have good
tenants and are doing excep-
tionally well."
He told Tough Call that the
fund's restructuring of its invest-
ments includes an agreement
with a "two billion dollar New
York company" to build an
international yacht club and
marina complex plus condos on
land to the west of the hotel -
as had originally been planned
by RHK Capital.
"We should be able to apply
to the government for a heads
of agreement on this $f50 mil-
lion project within 30 days," he
said. "Davis & Davis are the
lawyers."
New Providence's
SeCond City

In the late 1960s, another
Canadian investor.- E.
P. Taylor, the man who built
Lyford Cay began planning a
"second city" on the largely.
uninhabited southwest coast of
New Providence. In 1972 his
South Ocean Golf Club opened
for play, followed soon after-
wards by the 120-room South
Ocean Beach Hotel, all for an
investment of just under $6 mil-
lion.
Over the years Taylor's
company New Providence
Development had assembled
some 5,000 acres in the area,
much of it carved out of the old
Clifton estate. He envisaged an
entire community with shop-
ping centres, schools, churches,
industrial parks and even an
inland port, as well as more golf
courses and hotels.
"It is our objective to build a


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AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER Salespersons: Pam Palacious
Parts and service guaranteed Terrol Cash Barry Pinder


well-balanced, integrated com-z
munity," he told The Tribune,
in 1972. "There is a shortage. ofi
housing for Bahamians and we,
hope to have homes at popular;!
prices. We have confidence. in
the future and have spent ove,
$10 million on land since 1967
and as yet we have received 0io,
return on our money -s.
And he never did see ,,
return. The project oupderxI,
and New Providence. Develq'-
ment eventually tired of sup7.
porting it, selling the resort to.
Divi Hotels in 1986. When Divi
went belly up in 1990 the prop-
erty was picked up by. Rlg'ad
which flipped it to a C anadian.
company called, i:i re five'
years later. .,

n fact, the South Oceaan,
.Beach Hotel has never'
made money. Analysts say it,
needs a huge investment like'
Atlantis to achieve critical mass.
The pension fund lost $20 mil-
lion at South Ocean between
1998 and 2003 alone, and final--
ly closed the hotel last summer,
putting 85 people out of work.
The plan was to upgrade the
golf course and renovate the
hotel for a winter re-opening
this year, but there were justifi-
able fears that the owners wetr
Abandoning the'investment. :s
Not yet, it seems. Consultant
Chris Allen says a joint venture
has been arranged with one of
the world's biggest real estate
firms to redevelop the 200-acre
hotel and golf course property.
Greg Norman Golf Design has
already started work on th@-
links, and a top Canadian con-
tractor has been lined up to
build a new 500-room 4-star
hotel with casino, spa and maria ,
na. An open residential coml,
munity is also planned. ;
"The golf course and mannA.
are expected to open in early.
2007 and the hotel should be
ready for the 2007 winter sear-
son," Mr Allen told Tougo.
Call. "This property has great.
potential and the Bahamas il
red hot right now. The govern-
ment is being very supportive.
and the pension fund will retain.
a stake in the developments,
*which we think will be very,.
successful."

A Happy Meeting in Heaven I,

eanwhile, New Prov-
idence Development
- now controlled by another.
Lyford Cay bigwig named Joe,,
Lewis is planning a billion-,
dollar golf and residential com-.
munity nearby dubbed the,
Albany Project. ..
And NPD is also working,
with the government to create a
new port at Clifton, between
the power plant and the brew-
ery, with a new road corridor
into the city. -
The port will remove the
shipping terminals from down-
town Nassau a prerequisite.
for any redevelopment of the
city itself. A public/private p~it-
nership has already been
formed to spearhead this multi+J
million-dollar project, which if
expected to transformthte;;
downtown area, as well as.the.
shoreline from Montagu to
Cable Beach. .
So it seems that EP Taylor k-
original vision may finally come
to pass albeit 40 years behind
schedule and. all will live hap-
pily ever after. I ,:
New Providence Develop-4
ment will achieve its long-held,;
dreams. Ron Kelly now said
to be in Panama will no doubt, '
breathe a sigh of relief. Thq,:
fund managers who backed him
will be able to look their subi
scribers in the eye again. And;
Bahamians will have a brand!
new capital city and port. 1,
Sounds like, it's time for a
general election. ,.


What do you think?
Send comments to:
larry@tribunemedia.net


I


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005 ,. 0


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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


VII




Lawyer for Guantanamo detainee says



conv'cbpyrijhted Materialy trial


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- W _


- - U
* ~..- -


'Not


verdict in double murder case


FROM page 10
if enough evidence was provid-
ed. He ruled that there was
"not enough" for them to "go
on."
The prosecution, he said,
called 26 witnesses in the case.
He said neighbours, Phillip
and Ellamae Davis, and
William Wong, were only able
to give a general description of
the car they saw leaving the
area of Fernander's home.
The three testified that they
saw a red hatchback after hear-
ing what they thought were gun-
shots, but Mr Wong agreed that
the neighbour did have a similar
vehicle.
Letisha Colebrooke told the
court that she loaned her red-
Hyundai Accent hatchback to
Smith the day before the mur-
ders. She told the court that
when the car was returned to
her the doors were open and
the keys were under the mat,
which she thought was unusual.
Smith's daughter, Paige, told
the court that about a year.
before her mother was killed,
she directed her father to the
Love Beach home.
A police officer, who told the
court he had worked with Smith-
"off and on for a few years",


testified that Smith appeared
nervous and jittery as he stood
in line at the International
Departures Section at Nassau
International Airport on July
21, 2000.
Dennis Fernander was in the
Love Beach home at the time of
the murders. He described the
man he saw as "not much taller
than Terah, light skinned, with
bushy eyebrows and a scar on
his forehead." The killer, he
said, got into an argument with
Mr Fernander before shooting
him. The young boy said the
gunman then turned and said,
"Terah, I love you", before gun-
ning her down.
Smith left the country for the
United States and a public bul-
letin had to be put out as he
was wanted for questioning
about the murders.
It was because of this that
Dennis, now 15, was not allowed
to identify Smith in court.
Prosecutors Albertha Bartlett
and Jacqueline Forbes-Foster
explained that as Smith was not
in the country, an identification
parade could not be conducted
without prejudice in light of the
bulletin.
"The burden of proof rested
entirely with us from the very
beginning," said attorney


Bartlett. "The fact that the jury
was directed by the judge to
return a verdict of not guilty
was on a point of law: That does
not mean that the accused did
not commit the offence as
charged."
Smith's attorney, Murrio
Ducille said: "Every person
charged before the court is pre-
sumed innocent. As one great
juror said, 'It is better that 99
guilty men go free than for one
innocent man to be imprisoned'.
Although Henry Hugh Smith
was acquitted of the crimes, he
remains in prison where he is
serving a term for the attempt-
ed murder of a 12-year-old girl.
Angela Hinsey was playing
hopscotch in front of her home
on Crooked Island Street when
a car passed by and the occu-
pants opened fire. It is believed
that the bullet was not intended
for the little girl, who was a stu-
dent at CC Sweeting Secondary
High School.
She was shot in the neck,
chest, back, and twice in the leg,
but miraculously survived.
After yesterday's decision, he
will be a free man once he com-
pletes his present sentence.
Heriy Smith was married to
Terah Bethel in 1991. The vic-
tim's mother, Sandra Bethel,


p


said the relationship started out
well, but Smith became abusive
to the point where her daughter
decided to file for divorce. Ms
Bethel said she felt Smith did
not like the fact that Terah was
successfully moving on with her
life.
The couple had two children,
Letika, 13, and Paige, 12. Smith
also has a six-year-old daugh-


ter, Kenya.
Larry Fernander operated
Bahamas Extermination and
Sanitation Services (BESS) for
many years.
Both Terah and Mr Fernan-
der were married to other peo-
ple, but were separated from
their spouses.
She was working as a croupi-
er at Atlantis. Both left their


jobs around 3am and went,
home together. About an hour
later, neighbours heard "rapid,
gunfire".
Smith was free on $50,000i
bail at the time of the murders.;
However, he jumped bail and.
went to the US, where he was-
eventually held by authorities
there, and returned to the;
Bahamas for trial.


Stores unaware of recall


FROM page one
from faulty latches on both
style strollers.
Graco said that of the one
million Duo Tandem strollers
manufactured between 1994
and 1999, 230 injuries have
been reported and 306 col-
lapses.
And of the approximate
143,000 MetroLite strollers
manufactured in 2000 and
2001, there were a reported 223
collapses, causing 34 injuries.
The baby department at
Kelly's Home Centre Limited
yesterday confirmed that they
are carrying the Graco Metro
MetroLite Stroller, and a sim-
ilar style stroller to the Graco
Duo Tandem.
Latoya Smith, manager of
the Baby Department, told
The Tribune yesterday that
Kelly's will "take back any of
the strollers from consumers
who may have had problems
with them and can show proof
that they purchased it from
Kelly's."
Although not carrying the
identical recalled models, a
salesperson in the baby depart-
ment at Multi Discount Furni-


ture told The Tribune that the
Graco Duro Glider stroller,
similar to that of the Duo Tan-
dem is on stock in addition to a
large selection of other Graco
brand strollers.
A store manager at Multi
Discount also confirmed yes-
terday that the Duo Tandem
had previously been on stock,
but is now sold out.
Similar to Kelly's policy, the
manager said if the store had
any of the recalled strollers on
stock, "they would most cer-
tainly be taken off the floor."
A salesperson at the Cost
Right discount mart located at
the Town Centre Mall told The
Tribune that the store has both
the Duo Tandem and Metro
MetroLite strollers on order.
Although Cost Right could
not confirm what the sale price
of the strollers would be, the
salesperson said the order
should arrive within two to
three weeks.
Solomon's Super Centre
and smaller stores like the Tiny
Shop said yesterday that they
do carry baby strollers, but not
of the Graco brand.
Model numbers for the
recalled Duo Tandem strollers


that consumers are being
urged to look for are: 7950,
7955, 7960, 7965, 7970 and
7980, with serial numbers
between 01011994 and
12311999, or model number
7990 with serial numbers
between 10111996 and
10311998.
Model numbers for the
recalled MetroLite strollers
are: 6110DW, 6110F3,
6111FKB, 6114HAV,
6114JAM, 6114NGS,
7410CON, 7413CML and
6413MRN."
The Tribune contacted the
head offices of Graco in Exton,
Pennsylvania for comment yes-
terday.
The company said that it is
the responsibility of the US
Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) to inform
buyers and consumers in the
US about issues pertaining to
the recall of any product.
However, Graco claims it is
"not certain" about the policy
of the CPSC as it relates to
notifying international buyers
and consumers.
The Tribune made several
unsuccessful attempts to con-
tact the CPSC yesterday.


Rise in pilots' fees 'could


not come at a worse time'


FROM page one
create a tremendous burden on
airline charter companies,
already feeling a blow by exor-
bitant and still rising fuel costs.
"This could not come at a
worse time," said the pilot, who
did not wished to be named.
The pilot said that what exac-
erbates the situation is the fact
that to date, no one from Civil
Aviation or the Ministry has
engaged in any form of consul-
tation with the pilots.
"This will definitely hurt us, I
am sure that some pilots would
not be able to survive, the mon-
ey just is not there," he said.
According to the pilot, if he
charters a family island flight at
$600, half of that profit is
absorbed by fuel. He said that
while the gross may be high, the
profit margin for the flights are


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low because of the high main-
tenance costs for the planes.
In fact, he claimed that pilots
"scrape by" until there is a hol-
iday weekend and they can turn
a profit due to extra flights.
"Every operator lives for hol-
idays," he said.
The pilot said that on aver-
age he makes up to ten land-
ings a day, which if the fees are
changed would mean that he
would be forced to spend $100
more per day, an increase from
$80 to $180.
To get a full picture of what a
pilot would be forced to pay,
per year, he added that the
average pilot spends about
$5,000 per year in fees.
However, with the proposed
increases that bill would amount
to more than $12,000 annually.
The pilot said that word of
the proposed increase has cre-


ated a stir among pilots who say'
they might be forced not to.
renew their licences because of'
the high fees.
He said prices for flights
would definitely have to.f
increase which he warned
would open the floodgates for
hackers to offer lower rates.."
However the safety of those
planes cannot be guaranteed.
The Tribune tried to speak to
several charter company per-
sonnel, who either said they had
not heard of the proposed.
increases or if they had heard,,'
no one was there who was
authorised to speak with the
press.
Yesterday, Archie Nairn, Per-
manent Secretary at the Min-'"
istry of Transport said that Min- ,
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin had
announced the change in air.
navigational fees during her
contribution to the 2005/2006
budget debate and that they
were included in the appropria-:
tions bill which was laid on the ,
table of the House of Assem-1
bly.
While he was not aware of
what the increases would be, he
noted that the Bahamas enjoys
the lowest fees in the region.
According to Mr Nairn, the
fee increases are to come into
effect on October 1. f
He said that there will be
ample time to consult with the
pilots as the ministry plans to
work in collaboration with the
Ministry of Tourism and the air-
line companies to make a
smooth transition.
He added that Aviation
Director Cyril Saunders would
be in a better position to dis-
cuss the technical terms of the
fees. However, Mr Saunders
was not available for comment.


* *


TwoStoeyBuldn

4,700sq. eet goundfloo


4ow 4b 6 -








THE TIBUNEWEDNSDAYJULY 0, 205, PGE 1


US personnel




awarded Grand




Bahama stav


* Front Row: Sheila Glinton, director of special projects, Time Travel Flamingo Bay; Ann Castro,
mayor of the city of Dania Beach, Florida; Laura Lightbourne, marketing director, Taino Beach,
Resort and Clubs; Ana Lockhart, Time Travel Flamingo Bay corporate officer. Back Row:
Members of staff of the city of Dania Beach, Florida; US military personnel


* Sheila Glinton, director of special projects, Time Travel Flamingo Bay; Ann Castro, mayor of
Dania Beach, Florida; Junior Telfort, US military; Laura Lightbourne, marketing director, Taino
Beach Resort and Clubs; Ana Lockhart, Time Travel Flamingo Bay corporate officer.


TIME Travel Flamingo Bay, the US branch of
the Bahamian company Taino Beach Resort and
Clubs (TBRC) Grand Bahama, presented a three-
day and two-night island stay at their hotel to
seven US military personnel.
A spokesperson for TBRC said the company
"wanted to show its long-standing US members
and patrons that we care by supporting the things
that matter to them."
The presentation was made on July 15 at Dania
Beach City Hall, as part of the "Salute to our
Heroes" July 4 celebration, which was spear-
headed by Ann Castro Mayor of the city of Dania
Beach, Florida.
"For more than 20 years Americans have


accounted for almost ninety per cent of our clien-
tele. They have accepted our culture and desti-
nation as an important part of their lives and
their vacations.
"Our patrons deserve our support in the mat-
ters that concern them. We saw an opportunity to
show this by offering these well deserved men
and women a small token of our admiration for
their bravery," said Laura Lightbourne, market-
ing director of TBRC.
"This is just the beginning of our commitment
to further consummate our relationship with our
patrons iand to cement the good relations that
the people of the Bahamas and the United States
have always enjoyed," she added.


* MONIQUE Major of Aifco SA; Tanya Stubbs, administrative assistant, Kerzn-
er International sales and marketing department; Ted Adderley, Kerzner Inter-
national's director of sales and marketing; Melonie Inniss of Royal Bank of
Canada Trust Company Bahamas Limited; Karen Cargill, Kerzner International
sales and marketing manager; Marcia Beneby of Wendy's administrative office;
and Kathleen Wood, Elmira College intern with Kerzner International.



Kerzner rewards



its top producers


Inagua

National

Park sets

up office

in museum

THE Inagua National Park has
established an office in the Morton
Museum in Matthew Town,
Inagua.
The park's site support group
wanted to 'landscape the outside
of the building as part of the
Matthew Town Improvement pro-
gramme.
Fox Hill Nursery responded to
the request for plants and also sup-
plied soil and fertiliser to ensure
that the plants got off to a good
start.
Fox Hill Nursery also supports
the Trust by participating in its
membership incentive programme,
offering BNT members a discount
when they purchase plants and
supplies at the nursery.
Pictured is Henry Nixon, war-
den of the Inagua National Park
receiving the plants from Nicholas
Peterson of Fox Hill Nursery.
The Inagua National Park is one
of 25 parks and protected areas
managed by the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust.


KERZNER International's
Priority Club recently honoured
its top producers for the months
of January through June by
hosting the winners to a lunch at
the exquisite Ocean Club's Golf
Course Club House.
The group was also given a
tour of the much-anticipated
Marina Village development by
Ted Adderley, director of sales
and marketing for Atlantis, Par-
adise Island.
The Priority Club is a corpo-
rate service club administered
by Kerzner International's sales
and marketing department.
Members of the Priority Club
book rooms as well as food and
beverage events with Atlantis
and One and Only. Ocean Club
in exchange for points, which
can be redeemed for accommo-
dations along with food and
beverage privileges at any
of K'erzner International's
Bahamian properties.
Karen Cargill, sales and mar-
keting manager with Kerzner
International said, "Every
month we recognise a top pro-
ducer from a particular compa-
ny for producing the most room
nights at Atlantis.
'What we did this time
around, is bring together our
six top producers for the
months of January through
June. We 'wanted to really
thank them in a big way. So we
had a limousine collect the win-
ners from their place of employ-
ment and bring them over to
Atlantis for a special day."
Cargill was pleased to,
announce that Wendy's, a new-
comer to the Priority Club,
emerged as the top producer
for the months of March and
June.
"We are very happy that we
have more organisations that
are booking accommodations


Recognition

for corporate

service


with us, so that we can recog-
nise new companies."
Marcia Beneby, of Wendy's
administrative office said, "It is
just wonderful to know that
Atlantis is doing this... I am
enjoying this and I am confi-
dent that all of our guests and
associates which we book at
Atlantis will also have a special
time."
Monique Major, an executive
assistant with Aifco SA was
selected as the top producer for
January. Aifco SA has been a
member of the Priority Club for
five years. Major said that being
a member of the Priority Club
has its advantages, in that she
can always call a member of the
resort's team and have her
requests met right away. "Every
year we book at the One and
Only Ocean Club and... they
(Aifco SA associates) have nev-
er once asked to change or find
a different hotel, so I know they
are very pleased with the ser-
vice," she said.
Melonie Inniss, of Royal
Bank of Canada Trust Compa-
ny Bahamas Limited, noted that
she is very pleased to be a mem-
ber of the Priority Club and is
most impressed with the level
of service provided to the club's
members.
Other top producers of the
Priority Club included Alsaida
Wilmore of Ernst and Young
for the month of February and
Gina Wilson of CitiGroup for
May.


The Guys, Bikes & Cars


mmum wamJwm


_/


Outktt WMl~fJ~t *OW4 bit 6\ owntf I .^
ilteffi~lii^i^|i-14w^


-;.~-sn~PRI~R~~~;~B~CS~ I e~mP~m~m~I :rll


- -WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE









PAG 1, EDESDYJUYL0,200ETESRIUN


Carmine's opens its


doors to the public


* THE cavernous inside of Carmine's in Marina Village at Atlantis


CARMINE'S last night became the sec-
ond restaurant to open its doors in the new
Marina Village on Paradise Island'.
The restaurant, at the south end of the
development, is the first international
branch of a popular New York eatery,
which is known for its traditional Italian
cooking and abundant portions, served in a
family atmosphere.
For the past week the restaurant has
been holding a series of special evening


for the families and friends of staff at the
restaurant.
They have been able to sample
Carmine's authentic delicacies such as
spiedini alla romana, baked clams, veal
parmigiana, chicken scarpariello and
tiramisu.
One diner said: "The quality of the food
and the service were both excellent espe-
cially when you consider that the place
seats about 300 people."


* LOCAL youngsters enrolled in Atlantis' Discovery Channel Science Camp watch Zeus, Atlantis' new
manta ray in the Ruins Lagoon.
(Photo: Tim Aylen)



Local youngsters get



up close with Zeus


SCORES of local youngsters
enrolled in Atlantis' Discovery
Channel Science Camp watched in
amazement as the resort's new
prized manta ray, Zeus, gracefully
glided through waters in the Ruins
Lagoon on Tuesday.
Zeus, adapting well to his new
home, is prominently displayed in
the Ruins Lagoon at Atlantis. The
256-pound manta, which is seven
feet and seven and a half inches
long, was discovered off the coast of
Rose Island almost a week ago.
As if sensing the exciting crowd
of children, Zeus glided from one
end of the exhibit to the other, as
the children attempted to get up
close and personal with this mag-
nificent creature.
Nan Palmer, chief operating offi-


cer for Kerzner International
Bahamas, said: "The marine habitat
at Atlantis was built to educate and
entertain guests big and small.
Sol Kerzner, chairman of Kerzner
International, wanted to 'bring the
ocean in', and that is exactly what
he did with Atlantis. The lagoons
were built to be natural environ-
ments for the animals including the
flora and fauna that surround
them."
Palmer continued, "We are for-
tunate to be able to expose
Bahamian school children, many
of who would not normally be able
to have such an encounter, with
marine life through a number of
different venues.
"Whether it's via our touch tank
exhibits with sea urchins, horseshoe


crabs and star fish or through our
science camp and special field trips,
the goal is to teach school children
to act knowledgeably about the
oceans and responsibly toward ani-
mals."
Twelve year-old, Courtney
Bethel said her encounter with the
manta was a learning experience.
"It is really fun because we get to
learn stuff about fishes and you get
to do all sorts of exciting activities,"
she said.
The Discovery Channel Science
Camp exposes local children
between the ages of four to 13 years
to various fun-filled science pro-
grammes including Ecological and
Historical Expeditions;. Dolphin,
Shark and Sea Life Adventures and
much nihre.


Distributed by
Lowe s Wholesale
Soldier Road 393-7111


~__1~--_~-------111~---~^-^-


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1999


* a


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


PM works to save



$2.5bn investment


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has been working dili-
gently behind the scenes to sal-
vage a $2.5 billion investment
proposed for Grand Bahama,
having met with the Ginn Cor-
poration's president and chief
executive last Wednesday.
The Prime Minister has been
attempting to woo Bobby Ginn
and his real estate development
project, which involves a hotel,
two 18-hole golf courses, single
family lots, second homes, three
marinas and the re-opening of
the West End Airport as a pri-
vate non-commercial airport,
back to the table in the hope of
rescuing Grand Bahama's mori-
bund economy.
A source close to the project,
who spoke on condition of
anonymity, confirmed to The
Tribune that Mr Ginn and Mr
Christie had met last Wednes-
day to discuss the $2.5 billion
investment, which is earmarked
for 2,500 acres of land on the,
old Sammons Estate. Govern-
ment officials have estimated


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie


that more than 1,000 direct jobs
could be created if the Ginn
project is approved, in addition
to a number of spin-off jobs and
entrepreneurial ventures.
The source said: "It appears
there is some movement. We're
hopeful, but the timeframe has
been pushed back so far."
Another Tribune source said


the Prime Minister had asked
Mr Ginn to "rework" parts of
the planned project and come
back with a "changed propos-
al", although this could not be
confirmed.
The Tribune revealed in
May how the fate of the Ginn
SEE page 6B


a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A FREEPORT attorney
yesterday estimated the cur-
rent unemployment rate on
Grand Bahama to be "at least"
14-17 per cent, and said the
island's economy would sbe-
come "catatonic" if things
became any slower in the,
tourism industry.
Fred Smith, an attorney with
Callenders and Co, described
the recent layoffs by the Isle
of Capri as reflecting "a con-


tinuing downward trend" for
Freeport's economy.
He added: "We are
approaching the slow point of
the tourism season in Freeport,
and if things get any slower
than they have been it will
become catatonic.
"The [International] Bazaar
is continuing to die. Despite
the best efforts of the retail
association and the tour com-
panies, the people aren't there.
"You aren't going to attract
the. people if they don't exist.
The Bazaar depends for its


lifeblood-on the thousands of
people wholgo through the
Royal Oasis and they simply
aren't there."
Another source described
Freeport and Grand Bahama's
economy as a "sick, sick cow"
and being in a "bad, bad way".
On the International Bazaar,
they said: "A lot of life savings
are going down the tubes."
Mr Smith said Grand
Bahama's economy did well
whenever Freeport "booms",
SEE page 3B


Two extra non-stop flights


to raise tourism's Spirit


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SPIRIT, the low-cost airline,
is to expand its non-stop ser-
vices to Nassau later this year
by adding two flights from New
York's La Guardia airport and.


Orlando respectively.
In an announcement issued
yesterday, the carrier, which
described itself as the "leading
low cost carrier in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean", said that
once its November 2005 sched-
ule was introduced with extra


flights to Jamaica and Cancun,
24 per cent of its flights would
serve the region.
Spirit said: "Spirit began ser-
vice to Nassau, Bahamas, with
non-stop flights from Fort
SEE page 2B


Electricity prices

increase 11.84%


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AN 11.84 per cent increase
in electricity prices on Grand
Bahama helped increase the
consumer price index by 0.15
per cent in June.
According to the Department
of Statistics Consumer Price
Index report for June 2005, the
higher electricity rates saw
prices in the. Housing Index
increase by 0.236 per cent.


The report said: "Increased
prices for physicians' services,
medical and pharmaceutical
products and other professional
services were chiefly responsible
for the rise in the medical care
and health index." This
increased by 0.58 per cent.
The food and beverage cate-
gory saw prices for limes, grape-
fruits, tomatoes, lamb, seasonings,
olive, vinegar and relish, grapes,
other meats, fresh fruits, cheese
and cucumbers all increase.


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Performance through June 30, 2005


18.18%* 33.19% 5.49%
12 months to June 2005 Cummulative Since Inception Average Annual Return
(February 1999) 6 years


William Wong & Associates Realty
PH: 327-4271/2



EXECUTIVE STYLE HOME WESTRIDGE NORTH












Property Description: Lovely executive home in Westridge with views of the ocean and
surrounding areas. 4 bedrooms 3 1/2 baths. This home is beautifully designed with a
custom kitchen and appliances. Hand made stairs, cabana, pool deck and porches are
great for lounging or entertaining. Private guest suite with kitchenette. Grounds have
a 2 bed cottage, great for visitors or rental.
Offered for lease at $1,250,000.00.
For viewing information please contact William Wong at
William Wong & Associates Realty Ph: 327-4271/2
William Wong & Associates Realty
Ph: 327-4271/2
Fax: 327-4273


IuI!LTYI.


I





Current unemployment

rate in Freeport is 'at least'

a r ound 14-, 7 percent:,
















Company's foundation to hand out




36 more education scholarships


THE Bahamas Supermarkets
Foundation, which has awarded
some $7.5 million in scholar-
ships since its inception, is set to
hand out a further 36 this year..
More than 100 persons are
expected to attend the Bahamas
Supermarkets Foundation
annual scholarship awards ban-
quet this Thursday at the British
Colonial Hilton.
The event will honour this
year's recipients of the coveted
scholarships, 36 students and
their families.


Special dinner to honour recipents


The awards, first presented
by the Foundation in 1968 as
part of its commitment to youth
development, have helped fund
higher education for 1,599 stu-
dents at colleges and technical
institutions abroad and locally.
Many of those recipients,
including former director-gen-
eral of tourism, Vincent Van-


derpool-Wallace, have gone on
to become national civic and
business leaders.
One of those recipients, for-
mer Miss Bahamas Nakera
Simms, will give the keynote
address at this year's event.
Simms, who received her pri-
mary and secondary education
at St Anne's in Nassau, used


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New Providence
242-356-1697 thru 9


Toll-free Family Islands
242-300-6600
Toll-free from thp U.S.
1-800-472-4648


Life. Money. Balance both.


* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used inder license and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia


her scholarship to study at
Bethune-Cookman College
where she graduated with a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Hospitality Management with
Magna Cum Laude Honours in
April, 2000.
Later that year she was
crowned Miss Bahamas, win-
ning the Miss Congeniality
Award at the Miss Universe
Pageant in Puerto Rico in 2001.
Immediate past president of the
Toastmasters Club 1718, Simms
is project coordinator at
Atlantis for Phase III develop-
ment.
Bahamas Supermarkets,
which operates nine City Mar-
ket stores in New Providence
and three Winn-Dixie stores in
Grand Bahama, has awarded
some $7.5 million in scholar-
ships since the Foundation's
inception.


* VINCENT Vanderpool-Wallace, a past scholarshi[ recipient
and former director-general of tourism


Oceanic employee




passes the Series 7


AN accounts supervisor at
Oceanic Bank & Trust has
passed the Series 7 examination
administered by the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) and
the National Association of


Securities Dealers (NASD).
Carolyn Alcime trained for
the exam with the Nassau-based
National Association of Secu-
rities Training and Compliance
(Nastac Group). She is pictured


above with the company's man-
aging director, Reece Chipman.
The Series 7 is the profession-
al qualification required to
become a broker/dealer or
investment adviser on the NYSE.


Spirit due to expand



its flights to Nassau


COlillR
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of: iFA it-

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
1.10 0.89 Abaco Markets 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.208 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.70 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.70 8.70 0.00 1.452 0.340 6.0 3.91%
6.44 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.44 6.44 0.00 0.561 0.330 11.5 5.12%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.187 0.100 4.3 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.122 0.000 11.5 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.062 0.050 18.5 4.35%
8.65 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.00 8.55 0.55 1,000 0.589 0.240 13.6 3.00%
2.20 1.80 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.80 8.80 0.00 2,050 0.67.3 0.410 12.5 4.66%
2.50 0.62 Doctor's Hospital 2.26 2.26 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.0 0.00%
4.12 3.85 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.50 9.12 Finco 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.662 0.500 15.7 4.76%
8.75 7.00 FirstCaribbean 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.591 0.380 12.6 4.34%
8.98 8.31 Focol 8.98 8.98 0.00 0.708 0.500 12.7 5.57%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
8.25 8.20 J.S. Johnson 8.30 8.30 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.8 6.75%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.77 5.74 -0.03 0.184 0.000 31.4 0.00%
10.00. 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.565 5.0 5.65%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.066 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 4100 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months DIv $ Yield %
1.2402 1.1741 Colina Money Market Fund 1.240183*
2.3657 2.0018 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3657***
10.4330 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.4330*****
2.2528 2.1164 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.252768**
1.1200 1.0510 Colina Bond Fund 1.120044**

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit)
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT JUNE. 30., 2005/ **** AS AT MAY. 31, 2005
* AS AT JULY 1, 20051 *** AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005/**** AS AT JUNE. 30, 2005
y ^


FROM page one
Lauderdale. Spirit will
expand this service in Novem-
ber when it adds non-stop
flights to Nassau from both New
York/La Guardia and Orlando,
Florida."
The addition of two more
non-stop flights by Spirit high-
lights both the attractiveness of
the Bahamas as a destination
for low-cost airlines, and the
success of the Ministry of
Tourism and Kerzner Interna-
tional in attracting them.
Consistently high load factors
because of Nassau's reputation
as a leading tourist destination
in the US market are key for
the low-cost carriers, while their
relatively low fares and
increased routes have made the
Bahamas more accessible and
increased tourist spending in
this nation.
Kerzner International had
pressed long and hard for the


Please reply to:


low-cost carriers, which also
include JetBlue and Song, to
begin service to the Bahamas.
Other hoteliers and tourism
operators have also felt the ben-
efits from the increased airlift,:
which will also boost the $1.2;
billion Baha Mar project at,
Cable Beach and other invest-
ments when they come on
stream.
The downside of the low-cost
carrier arrival has been felt a
Bahamasair, which has seen it:
revenues and margins eroded?
by the likes of Spirit. Some
observers have even suggested
that their entrance into the
Bahamian airlift market has
effectively taken away Bahama-
sair's rationale for existing.
And the increased airlift,
and resulting rise in tourist
numbers, has also caused prob-
lems for the hotel industry, as
the Bahamas does not yet have
sufficient room inventory to
cope.


The Tribune Limited
DA 3864
P.O. Box N 3207
Nassau, Bahamas


for 24 apartment condominium on Cable Beach.
References and business experience essential.


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE~UINS TRIN ENSAJL 0 05


Bank is targeting



business people



for greater use of



American Express


BANK of the Bahamas
International is seeking to
increase use of American
Express products and services
among Bahamian businesses,
as its staff undergo intensive
training for expanded full-ser-
vice representation of the com-
pany.
"We are very pleased to
announce that our partner-
ship with American Express,
which began over 10 years ago,
has once again been strength-
ened and Bank of the Bahamas
International has now been
appointed official agents for the
American Express Card," said
Tanya Wright, manager for
Bank of The Bahamas Trust,
with responsibility for the
bank's overall business devel-
opment.
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national customers will now be


able to apply for American
Express Cards Personal, Gold
or Corporate at bank branch-
es and online.

Payments

Existing card members will
be able to make payments at
bank branches where they may
also re-apply to convert their
card to international dollar
cards, and staff members will
be able to assist with other ser-
vices, including American
Express Travellers Cheque's.
Cardmembers who have
accounts at Bank of the
Bahamas International may
apply for Travellers Cheques
online.
In December, American
Express and Bank of the
Bahamas International


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


OCTOBER HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

TAKE NOTICE that an Extraordinary General Meeting of the
Shareholders of the Company was held at the office of 3rd Floor,
Bolam House, King & George Streets, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau,
The Bahamas on the 30th June, 2004 for the purpose of having the
Liquidators' final account laid before the members and hearing any
explanation that may be given thereon by the Liquidators or their
agents.

Dated the July 19, 2005


ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR




S NOTICE OF SUSPENSION
LEANENHALL BANK & TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

It is hereby notified that the Governor of the Central
Bank of The Bahamas is of the opinion that the banking and
trust licence granted on 17th August 1998 to Leadenhall Bank
& Trust Company Limited should be revoked on the ground
that the licensee is carrying on its business in a manner
detrimentl to the public interest and to the interests of its
depositors and other creditors.
It is further notified that the Governor, pursuant to
Section 18(2) and 18(4) of The Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000, hereby suspends the said banking and
trust licence of Leadenhall Bank & Trust Company Limited
with effect from the 18th, July 2005 for a period of ninety
days or such shorter period as may be determined.

Given at Nassau this 18th day of July, A.D., 2005.


Wendy M. Craigg
GOVERNOR
The Central Bank of The Bahamas




NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES
TENDERS
RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase
of the following
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #34, Block
#1, Faith Gardens in situated in Western District of the Island
of New Providence one of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is Vacant Land.
Property Size: 6,200 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgageto FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 2355".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July, 2005.


announced it had reached an
agreement making the bank the
exclusive agent for the Platinum
Card, a membership card avail-
able by invitation only to per-
sons of a certain income.

Services

The bank has also been serv-
ing its merchant clients with a
variety of credit card services,
including American Express.
One of its goals is to increase
American Express usage among
business clients.
While numbers show Ameri-
can Express cardmembers
spend more on luxury retail
than those using any other
major card, there are still key
businesses catering to Bahami-
ans that could benefit by accept-
ing the card.


* PICTURED back row: Bank of the Bahamas Trust manager Tanya Wright; Julie Reckley; John :
Sands; Samantha Neely; Thea Munroe; Aniska Seymour; Felton Beneby; Carolyn Oliver; Beverley'
Ferguson,; Suzette Russell; and Ignacio Plata, American Express strategic alliances sales executive.'
Front row: Antoinette Major-McKenzie; Anya Penn; Clarice Evans; Sheena Bowe.
(Photo: Tim Aylen);


Attorney's fear of 'catatonic' economy


FROM page one
but despite "many pro-
nouncements by the Gov-
ernment, nothing has broken
ground in Freeport since
2002".
Although the $76 million
Gold Rock Creek film stu-
dios were now up and run-
ning in eastern Grand
Bahama, Mr Smith said "ter-
rible delays" in sorting out
the lease for the developer
last year and during the early


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act, 2000, PREVAL TRADING
LIMITED, is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was July 19, 2005.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. of No.2 Commercial
Centre Square, Alofi, Niue Islands is the Liquidator of PREVAL
TRADING LIMITED.




Al B. Foster
For: Continental Liquidators, Ine.
Liquidator




NOTICE
OF
APPOINTMENT OF A RECEIVER

Take notice that the Governor of the Central Bank of
The Bahamas, pursuant to Section 18(1)(f) of The Banks and
Trust Companies Regulation Act, 2000, appointed Mr. Craig
A. Gomez as Receiver of Leadenhall Bank & Trust Company
Limited on the 18th day of July A.D., 2005 to assume control
of the license's affairs in the interest of its creditors and other
depositors.
Further take notice that Mr. Craig A. Gomez has all
the powers of a Receiver under the Companies Act, 1992.

Given at Nassau this 18th day of July, A.D., 2005.




Wendy M. Craigg
GOVERNOR
The Central Bank of The Bahamas




NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES
TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase
of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or Lot Hospital Lane& Dillet Street
situated in the Southern District of the Island of NewProvidence
one of the islands of the Commonweamlth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (6)
Bedrooms, (3) Bathrooms.
Property Size: 2,215 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,164 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Po er of Sale contained in
a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 9999".
All offers must be received by the dose of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July, 2005.


part of 2005 had prevented Dis-
ney from filming the first part
of its Pirates of the Caribbean II
and III sequels in Grand
Bahama in July as scheduled.
The attorney, who also heads
the Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association, said that if
the July filming had gone ahead
as planned, "millions of dollars"
would have been injected into
the economy during the slow
point of the tourism season.
Mr Smith urged the central
government to stop interfering
with the way business was done
in Freeport, and allow the


Grand Bahama Port Authority
to get on with facilitating busi-
ness under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement.
"So many business have come
and gone through Freeport in
frustration at government inter-
ference. Freeport is the golden
goose that lays the eggs, but
we've been crushing them before
they hatch," Mr Smith said.
"Freeport is dying. The ener-
gy, the lifeblood has been
sucked from Freeport by the
central government. It really is
very discouraging to try to eke
out a living in Freeport."


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that 1, SASHA MIQUEL SMITH,
of Elizabeth Estate, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to SASHA MIQUEL MAJOR. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KEISHA NAIRN OF JAMAICAN,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of JULY, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE

RBC/IROYAL BANK OF.CANADA INVITES
TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase
of the following
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #187,
Millenium Gardens, situated in the Eastern District on the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
Family Residencec consisting of (4) Bedroom, (2) Bathrooms.
Property Size: 5,850 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,136 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 2255".
All offers must be received by the dose of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 29th, July, 2005.





NOTICE

RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES
TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase
of the following
"ALL THAT piece parcel or Lot of Land being No. 861,
Pinewood Gardens situated in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (3) Bedrooms (2) Bathrooms.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 900 sq. ft.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collection Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 0325".
All offers must be received by the dose of business 4:00 pm,
Wednesday 22ndJuly, 2005.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005 F,


THE TRIBUNE








PALE~&, EDEBUSIJLY20N205THSTIBN


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Seeks the following professionals to join our team. Must be self motivated and
willing to be flexible and work various assigned work shifts and have good
communication skills. In our employees, we look for a passion to anticipate and
meet our guests needs and an insatiable desire to attain the highest levels of quality
and guest service. All applicants in the first instant are asked to forward their
application letter with resume, photo and two previous employment references to:
privatedestinations@yahoo.com or mail to: Private Destinations, P.O. Box
CR54697
CLOSING DATE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS: July 24th 2005
GARDNER
Must possess a very good knowledge of the science of growing and maintaining
flowers, plants, shrubs, trees and lawns. Minimum three-years experience and /or
training in related field. Good understanding of landscape planning. Ability to read
and interpret English. Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out
written or oral instructions. Responsibilities including watering, planting and
maintaining plants, flowers, shrubs, trees and lawns. A knowledge of the use of
chemicals and pesticides would be an advantage.
HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR
Responsible for the maids and houseman assigned to Housekeeping and Laundry
duties. Works closely with the Resort manager to coordinate all Housekeeping and
Laundry cleaning tasks and assignments. This includes but is not limited to:
-Purchasing of eleaning.and-Laundry, materials,-monitoring-all-inventories; cleanlitfnes
of all interior and public spaces, setting up appropriate task lists, inspecting guest
rooms and provide on the Job training where and whenever needed..This is a very
hand's on position. Minimum of 1-year hotel experience in a similar position and
excellent communication skills.
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
Reporting to the Property Manager we seek a general maintenance individual who
will check and makes repairs to heating, ventilation and air condition systems as
needed. Checks and makes repairs to heating, ventilation and air conditioning
systems as needed. Checks and makes repairs to plumbing systems and fixtures
such as pipe lines, toilets and sinks, kitchen and laundry equipment. Checks and
-n.makes repairs to electrical systems such as lighting systems, television sets and
kitchen efquiTpent; Perfonrms'repiisffi to building, fliiiftue, bathrooms, guest rooms
etc., as needed; may perform painting tasks. Ensures that all equipment is functioning
properly and that preventive maintenance measures are performed to preserve the
resort and keep product quality to standard.
MESSAGE THERAPIST
Young professional required. Must have proven experience and certification. Must
be willing to work a very flexible schedule.
SPECIAL EVENT COORDINATOR/ADMINISTRATOR
Assist in coordinating special events on site. This will involve event planning and
program design, communication with guests and preparation of all communication
associated with events. You will also be expected to be on-site on the day of each
event and coordinate throughout the duration of the event to ensure that the program
runs smoothly from beginning to end. Superior written communication and
interpersonal skills required. Promptly prepare responses to incoming requests.
Must be proficient in MS Office. Capable of coordinating several projects and
responsibilities with ease. Must have good typing skills: able-to type at-least 45
w.p.m. accurately. Able to work well independently and as part of a team. Must
be well organized and detail-oriented. Experience in general office duties such as
filling, correspondence, mail, faxing, etc.
NIGHT DUTY SUPERVISOR
Duties include but not limited to: Monitor and execute evening entertainment,
security of the property and closing procedures. Should possess basic knowledge
of audio and home theatre systems and proven experience within the hospitality
industry. This is a hand's on multi task position.
GENERAL WORKERS
Required to undertake a multitude of tasks to maintain and upkeep all exterior
areas of the resort.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR/RECEPTION
Superior written and oral communication and interpersonal skills required. Excellent
telephone etiquette required. Promptly prepare responses to incoming requests.
Must be proficient in MS Office. Capable of coordinating several projects and
responsibilities with ease. Must have good typing skills: able to type at least 45
, w.p.m. accurately. Able to work well independently and as part of a team. Must
be well organized and detail-oriented. Experience in general office duties such as
filing, correspondence, mail, faxing, etc.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELIETTE NERELUS, OF PODOLEO
STREET, P.O. BOX N-10326, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citi'en of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JULY,
.2005 to the Minister responsible:foIlatio0ality and Cit:zenship,
-P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, MAXO JONASSAINT,
of, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to MAX
LORFILS. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.


LEGAL NOTICE



GOLDEN HILLS & VALLEY LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
--Section 137(8) of the-Internatiotial Biisiies Co6mpanies Act,,
2000, the dissolution of GOLDEN HILLS & VALLEY
LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the. Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


PILKON INVESTMENT LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of
2000, PILKON INVESTMENT LIMITED, has been
dissolved and struck off the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 14th day of July, 2005.

Ms Ong Beng Hui Patricia,
c/o 101 Thomson Road #33-00
United Square Singapore 307591
Liquidator


Prime lot in exclusive gated community On the water
One of the largest properties in the nautical enclave of
..- Prestigious Port New Providence
Priced below market for quick sale

$399,000
Phone 242-424-3641 or 242-357-3535
...... BREA Realtos welcome, please add fee




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RONALD NAPOLEON OF #62
BLUE HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE



INFOGRAMES HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 31st
day of May, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator

".. ',, "1


"Copyrighted Material


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


AJIM LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of
2000, AJM LTD., has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 14th day of July, 2005.


Roger Frick
Aeulestrasse 5,
P.O. Box 83, 9490
Vaduz, Liechtenstein
Liquidator


PAGE 4"B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


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THE TRIBUNE






- ~


GN-243













SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00271.
Whereas ANTHONY A. FRANCIS of Flamingo Gardens,
in the Western District of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful
Widower has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and
personal Estate of ANGELA FERGUSON-FRANCIS late
of Flamingo Gardens in the Western District of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.


Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00332
Whereas CLARENCE DARREN PINDER of Hatchet Bay
on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful widower has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal estate
of KAREN DIANNE PINDER late of Hatchet Bay on the
Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00337
In the estate of MILTON M. FISHER, late of 190 E. 72nd
St. Manhattan, New York, New York, one of the States of
the United States of America, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate
Side by JAN W. BORGHARDT, of Gambier Heights,
Western District, on the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas,
for the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the
above estate granted to IRVING W. BALLEN, the
Administrator by the Surrogate's Court of the County of
New York, U.S.A., on the 27th day of August, 1984.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00338
Whereas PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS of Edgewater
Drive, Lyford Cay and ANTHONY NOMIKOS KLONARIS
of Old Fort Bay, Western District of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, The
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for MAUREEN
PATRICIA MURLINE, the sole Executor and Trustee has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the
real and personal estate of GERALD MULRINE late of 183
Sandyport Drive, Sandyport, Western District of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00345
In the estate of JAROSLAV CHARLES PILAR a.k.a


CHARLES PILER, late of The Town of Markham in the
Province of Ontario, Canada, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate
Side by LOUREY C. SMITH, of #4 George Street in the
City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the
Resealed Grant of Certificate of Appointment with the Will
in the above estate granted to VIVIAN AVIVA HARRIS, the
Executrix and Trustee by the Supreme Court of Justice of
Ontario, Canada, on the 5th day of February, 2005.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00346
Whereas VIRGINIA BURROWS of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, the Lawful Widow has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
of the real and personal Estate of ANDY GLENN
BURROWS late of Matthew Town, on the Island of Inagua,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00348
Whereas JOSEPHENE ROLLE of Golden Gates
Subdivision No. 2, Carmichael Road, Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, The Lawful Widow has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal Estate of
FREDERICK J. ROLLE late of Golden Gates Subdivision
No. 2, Carmichael Road, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00349
In the estate of LASZLO NEMETH, late of 1831 S.W. 9th
Avenue in the City of Fort Lauderdale in the State of Florida,
U.S.A., deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application'will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate
Side by KEVIN MARTIN RUSSELL, of #14 Doubloon Drive
in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one the Island of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to JEAN ELIZABETH NEMETH, the Executrix by
the Circuit Court for Broward County, Probate Division in
the State of Florida, U.S.A., on the 26th day of January,
2005.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RPO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21,2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00350
In the estate of EVEYLYN STEINHARD a.k.a. EVELYN
TEPPER STEINHARD, late of 18081 Biscayne Boulevard,
#401 in the City of Aventura, in the County of Miami Dade
in the State of Florida, U.S.A., deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate


Side by KEVIN MARTIN RUSSELL, of #14 Doubloon Drive
in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Amended Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to BEN NATHAN TEPPER, the Personal
Representative by the Circuit Court for Miami Dade County
in the State of Florida, U.S.A., on the 24th day of June
2004.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00351
Whereas HELEN I. THOMPSON of Castor Street East,
Highland Park, Western District of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, The
Lawful Widow has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the real
and personal Estate of THOMAS ALVIN THOMPSON late
of Castor Street East, Highland Park, Western District of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00353
Whereas REV. KIRKLEY CALEB SANDS of 135 Yorkshire
Street, Westward Villas, Western District of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
the Lawful Widow has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the
real and personal Estate of CONSTANCE MURIEL SANDS
late of 135 Yorkshire Street, Westward Villas, Western
District of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00355
In the estate of SOLON C. BEXLEY, JR., a.k.a. S.C.
BEXLEY JR., a.k.a. SOLON COUSINS BEXLEY, JR., late
of 6332 Wisteria Loop, Land 0' Lakes, Pasco, Florida,
U.S.A., deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate
Side by DOLLY P. YOUNG, of Nassau East North in the
Eastern District, New Providence, one the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above, estate
granted to CRAIG L BEXLEY, the Personal Representative
by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court for Pasco
County in the State of Florida, U.S.A., on the 28th day of
October, 2004.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
PO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00356
In the estate of MICHAEL DOUGLAS SUTCLIFFE HOOD,
late of Tithe House, The Street, Walberton, West Sussex,
United Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate
Side by DOLLY P. YOUNG, of Nassau East North in the
Eastern District, New Providence, one the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to LEIGH
SUTCLIFFE HOOD, the Executor by the High Court of
Justice, the District Probate Registry at Winchester, United
Kingdom on the 14th day of November, 1997.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RPO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005

2005/PRO/NPR/00358

In the estate of PATRICIA JOAN PIRRIE HOOD, late of
Tithe House, The Street, Walberton, West Sussex, United
Kingdom, deceased.


NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate
Side by DOLLY P. YOUNG, of Nassau East North in the
Eastern District, New Providence, one the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to CAROL
DIANE WEBB, the Executrix by the High Court of Justice,
the District Probate Registry at Brighton, United Kingdom
on the 19th day of November, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


JULY 18, 19, 20


IYaul~iausl~-~r~f~;e:~R;s~If3~7.


- 1 11~1~ -11


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GN-243 Cont'd
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005
2005/PRO/npr/00360

Whereas JOHN BRAYNEN of Holiday Drive, South
Beach, Southern District of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, The
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for RALPH
MADILL, the sole Executor has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration with the Will Annexed of the real and
personal Estate of MARION MADILL late of No. 8 Breezy
Hill off Village Road, Eastern District of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION
JULY 21, 2005
2005/PRO/npr/00361

Whereas GLADSTONE BURROWS of Sun Shine Park,
Southern District of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, The brother, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
Estate of JONATHAN BURROWS late of West End
Avenue, Coconut Grove, Southern District of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005
2005/PRO/NPR/00362

In the estate of DENISE TRAMONTANA, late of 14
Ormond Drive, in the County of Albany, in the State of
New York, one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that .after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its,
Probate Side by ARTHUR SELIGMAN, of the Western
District, on the Island of New Providence, one the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the
Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above
estate granted to AVIS MULHOLLAND, the Executrix
by Albany County Surrogate's Court of the State of New
York, U.S.A., on the 13th day of November, 2003.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
PO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21, 2005
2005/PRO/NPR/00363

In the estate of LIVIAN POWELL HARDING, late of
Harris County, in the State of Texas, one of the States of
the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its
Probate Side by PHILIP ALEXANDER LUNDY, of the
Priderock Corporate Centre, Suite 200, Bay & East Street,
Nassau, New Providence, one the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted
to BETTY HARDING BERNSTEIN, the Indepedent
Executrix by the Probate Court of Harris County in the
State of Texas, U.S.A., on the 16th day of March, 1988.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JULY 21,2005
2005/PRO/NPR/00365


In the estate of GEORGE WILLIAM HARDING, late of
Palm Beach County, in the State of Florida, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen (14) days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its
Probate Side by PHILIP ALEXANDER LUNDY, of the
Priderock Corporate Centre, Suite 200, Bay & East Street,
Nassau, New Providence, one the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to BETTY HARDING BERNSTEIN, the Executrix
by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Palm
Beach, Florida, U.S.A., on the 11th day of April, 1988.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


P ,SD JY 5E


Christie tries to s



Grand Bahama o


FROM page one
Corporation's proposed investment hung
on a knife's edge. The timing of the Prime
Minister's mild stroke is believed to have
hindered progress, as the developer thought
an agreement had been reached, only to
see government officials start to back away
from what had been agreed "with a hand-
shake" and verbally. .
The fact that Mr Ginn has not totally
walked away from the Grand Bahama pro-
ject, and is talking to the Prime Minister, is
likely to revive hopes that he may still pro-
ceed and revitalise an economy still strug-
gling to recover from the September 2004
hurricanes.
Mr Gifn was said to have previously "tak-
en his.marbles and moved on to Mexico",
with one source telling this newspaper:
"Ginn has walked away. About two weeks
ago they conveyed to the Government that:
'We thought we had a deal, we made certain
commitments to you and you made certain
commitments to us over a year ago'.
"They are selling their equipment, pack-
ing up. They got rid of the house they were
using and they are gone. They have taken
the funds that would have be used on the
Bahamas project and are investing in Mex-
ico."
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, minister of
financial services and investments, during
the 2005-2006 Budget debate indicated that


the lengthy negotiations over the Ginn Cor-
poration project were due to the fact that
the investors were asking for incentives
never previously granted.
But a source told The Tribune: "They
never asked for real property tax exemp-
tions, not even on the hotel property. We're
hoping for a stamp tax exemption for seven
years and will be paying real property tax on
everything. It's a billion dollar project and
we're asking for $200 million back, but
that's wealth that [we] created."

Foundation

The Ginn Corporation has proposed the
creation of a $10 million foundation for the
redevelopment of the West End settlement
in Grand Bahama as part of its Heads of
Agreement with the Government.
It has also included a provision for the
revitalisation of the West End community
that will begin with a $3 million donation to
the foundation.
The proposal further stipulates that the
foundation will continue to be funded by
part of the proceeds from the sale of each
residential lot, with Ginn earmarking $2,000
on the occasion of each sale. The foundation
is expected to total some $10 million with-
in its first five years.
Along with establishing a foundation for
the redevelopment of a community devas-


tated by two hurricanes in 2004, the Gini
Corporation has also proposed to install
sewerage and water lines to points at 'it
property line, allowing connections to th(
West End settlement. ,
It will also provide, on an annual basis,; a
agreed level of water and sewerage services
to the settlement. ., I
These provisions were said to have bee*
initially included in the Heads of Agree-
ment in March this year. I
Earlier this year, one Grand Bahainm
source spoke to The Tribune on the impli-L
cations for the island's economy if the prop
ject did not go ahead.
"This is absolutely devastating to us. 1
the last three years Fast Ferries was killed;
it took a year, almost two, to allow the casi-
no to operate in Port Lucaya; Harcbur
pulled out [of buying the Royal Oasis];
Tractebel, which spent over $20 million ii
preparation to come to Freeport, had ai
agreement in principle from the previous
administration and had been issued
licence by the Port Authority, was killed.
This is an issue of credibility for the Gov-
ernment," the source said.
If the West End project does not g
ahead, the Ginn Corporation is also uinlik-
ly to proceed with a $200 million luxury
second home project within th& ~lanl
Bahama Port Authority area as part of 4
joint venture with the latter's real estate
development arm, DEVCO.


Meeting is scheduled with



Leadenhall shareholders


FROM page one
they have not done so, preferring instead to
seek a buyer.
Industry sources last night said they are
still unlikely to increase their investment
in Leadenhall, and the falling out with their
former Axxess/FirstFinancial partners has
also split the shareholders. This is because
some Leadenhall shareholders were also
investors in Axxess International.
Leadenhall was among the small Bahami-
an-owned financial institutions that were
pressed by the Central Bank in 2001 to find
an equity partner from an Organisation for
Economic Co-Operation and Development
(OECD) country that would take at least a
25 per cent stake in the business.
The Central Bank backed away from that
initiative, but if Leadenhall fails to recover
from its licence suspension and goes into
eventual liquidation, it will further dilute the
already minimal Bahamian ownership in
the sector.
The only remaining Bahamian-owned
financial institutions will be the Private
Trust Corporation; Sentinel Bank & Trust,
which is part of the Colina Financial
Group (CFG); and Fidelity Bank and


Trust International.
Apart from the legal dispute over the
MasterCard deposits, Leadenhall has
attracted its fair share of negative publicity
in recent years. After its MasterCard issuing
licence was withdrawn on July 29,2003, the
US Internal Revenue Service (IRS) peti-
tioned the US courts for permission to gain
access to, transaction records involving
Leadcnhall cards issued to at least 10 US
citizens.

Petition

The IRS petition resulted from the sus-
picion that debit and credit cards issued by
offshore banks such as Leadenhall were
being used to evade US income taxes.
Several US citizens were also convicted in
the Manhattan District Court for using
Leadenhall's MasterCards to evade taxes
and for money laundering, the amounts
involved often more than $500,000.
And Leadenhall is also understood to
have "dodged a bullet" after a US court-
appointed receiver decided not to initiate
legal action against the bank in the Bahami-
an courts over the role it was alleged to


have played in a $135 million 'Ponzi'
scheme.
Phillip Stenger, the Cash 4 Titles liq-
uidator, and his Cayman counterpart have
decided not to pursue Leadenhall likely
due to the costs involved and uncertainty of
success, which would affect the recovery
benefits for investors after the lawsuit
they took pout against the, Bahamian insti-
tution in the Northern Illinois District was
thrown out on jurisdictional grounds.
Cash 4 Titles involved the sale of sup-
posedly high-interest bearing securities to
investors, purporting to pay 36 per cent per
annum, the proceeds from which would be
used to finance Cash 4 Titles, an Atlanta
company that made high-interest loans to
poor African-Americans secured by car
titles that were pledged as collateral. Pawn-
ing car titles was given favourable tax treat-
ment in Georgia.
However, the principals behind Cash A4
Titles used old investor money to pay off
new entrants in a classic 'Ponzi' scheme.
Leadenhall denied all allegations against
it, but it is uncertain whether it still facesia
class-action lawsuit taken out against it in
the Florida courts by investors in Cash '4
Titles.


SBL'


Tyiece is a four year,

old in need of I

medical treatment

at Miami Children's

Hospital for surgery


pair her bladder


bowels,


Please assist her in having a normal childhood.

Send donations to account #05135-7021785 at The Royal Bank of Canada
Account Name, Octavier Thurston I
For further information call 327-6746, Cell: 426-2972


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005







,HE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY EVENING JULY 20, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
New Florida n Bob Hope: The Road to Laughter American Masters Actor Bob Inside the Marx Brothers
S WPBT (CC) Newhart began his career doing lo- .
cal radio sketches. (N) I (CC) ~
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WFOR n (CC) ants divide into teams to style two Queens Dugan (N) /A (CC) 'waRefisloundcoveredin-bleod-..
New York punk rock bands. Groupie" (CC) next to a woman's body. / (CC)
Access Holly. The Most Outrageous Moments Law & Order "The Brotherhood" Law & Order "Tombstone" A
B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) on Live TV 1, (CC) Fontana and Green probe the death promiscuous lawyer is found bludg-
of a prison gang member. eoned in her office., (CC)
Deco Drive So You Think You Can Dance (Series Premiere) Dancers audition for a News (CC)
WSVN chance to compete in Hollywood. (N) A (CC)
Jeopardy (N) Supernanny Jo Frost returns to Brat Camp Isaiah runs off, prompt- Lost Jack and Sayid try to convince
i WPLG (CC) England to help a couple with their ing the staff to recruit tough new Sawyer to share the life-saving
four unruly children. (CC) field instructors. (N) medicine he is hoarding.

(:00) Cold Case Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty Inked "Change of Inked "Pull It To- Criss Angel Criss Angel
A&E Files "The Bait- Hunter (CC) Hunter (CC) Hart" (N) (CC) gether, Dizzle" Mindfreak Criss Mindfreak "Levi
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Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Fast Track BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET Music Special The Parkers A, The Parkers n Girlfriends / Girlfriends (I Classic ComicView
(CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)
C Aquatics World Coronation Coronation The Canadian Antiques Road- The National (CC)
CBC Championships Street (CC) Street (CC) show (Part 2 of 2) (CC) _
C Late Night With The Restaurant A (CC) Mad Money'The Main Event" Eliot The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CN BC Conan O'Brien Spitzer.
N (:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
NN Cooper 360 (CC)
Reno 911! Ju- The Daily Show Comedy Central Mind of Mencia South Park A South Park "Up Mind of Mencia
COM nior's accidental With Jon Stew- Presents Jeff "Desperate Gar- monster threat- the Down "Outs the Bean-
S __ marriage. (CC) art (CC) Dunham. deners". ens the world. Steroid" (CC) ee". (N) (CC)
COURT Cops C( (CC) Anatomy of Crime "Sex for Sale" Forensic Files Under Investiga- Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec-
..... ..____ (N) - lion ives.- ..... tives...
That's So Raven LIFE IS RUFF (2005, Comedy) Kyle Massey, Calvin :35) Phil of the The Suite Life of Sister, Sister
CISN orey shoplifts. Wheeler, Kay Panabaker. A teenage slacker adopts a uture Phil alters Zack & Cody The twins witness
r I. (. (CC) stray dog.'NR'(CC) thefuture. (CC ---- romance ....
I .. ... This Old House Weekend Re- Ed the Plumber Rock Solid Home Transfor- Kitchen Renova- Bathroom Reno-
U1 T (CC) modeling mations tions vations
SDW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Made in Ger- Journal: In Euromaxx
Depth Tagestema many Depth
El Dr. 90210 Jenna Jameson: The E! True Hollywood Story Adult film star attains Party at the Child Stars
mainstream success. / (CC) Palms Gone Bad
ESPN :00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Texas Rangers. From Ameriquest Field in Arling- Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
CoN__ t on, Texas. (Live) (CC)
ESPNI (:00) MLB Baseball Teams to Be Announced. (Live) SportsCenter -- International Edi-
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EWTN Daily Mass: Our EWTN Live Religious Cata- The Holy Rosary Fr. Apostoli Swear to God
Lady logue I '
IT TV l Shape "Lo Im- Blaine's Low Blaine's Low FitTV's Housecalls Trainers help a The Extremists. The Extremists
FIT TV pact; Pilates" Carb Kitchen Carb Kitchen diabetic man lose weight. (CC) (I (CC) (I (CC)
OXNC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX NC Shepard Smith :. Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL The Sports List Poker Superstars Invitational The Sports List Marlins on Deck MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at
Tournament (Live) Arizona Diamondbacks. (Live)
GOLPGA Golf Evian Masters-- First Round. From Evian-les-Bains, France. 19th Hole 10th Anniver- Greater Milwau-
GOLF (Same-day Tape) sary Special I kee Open High
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A The Amazing Race Cl (CC) Dog Eat Dog A (CC)
G4Tech 0t(:00) Attack of X-Play Cheat "God of Icons "Ralph Judgment Day Cinematech (N) Cinematech (N)
Gi4. ec. the Show! (N) War." Baer"
L:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Last of a **H HANG 'EM HIGH (1968, Western) Clint Eastwood, Inger Stevens,
HALL Texas Ranger Breed" Hayes Cooper goes after Kil- Ed Begley. A rancher swears revenge on the men who tried to lynch him.
J'' U (CC) gore and the rest of his band.
G Real Renos "The Designed to Sell House Hunters Bu Me Hot Property Sellin Houses Ground Force
SHGM TV 'Weather's Killing Cluttered home. San Francisco "Yolande: Burb "Rochester" 3 "Ilkleyn (CC) "Stamford" C
Us" (CC) A ICC) home Mearch.- Appeal" CA (CG)- (CC) -- -.--2: :- -.: (CC.. :...,- .
INSP Morris Cerullo... Breakthrough Zola Levitt Pre- This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Old Time Gospel
(CC) sents (CC)- () ...... ..... ...... day Hour (CC)
MegaMan: NT Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends The One Will & Grace C Everybody Every0od .
KTLA Warrior "Anetta's Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air With Rachel's (CC) Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
;Revenge" Hip-hop diva. C (CC) Book"(CC) Early retirement. C, (CC)
S* THE DEADLY LOOK OF LOVE (2000, Sus- MURDER IN THE HAMPTONS (2005, Docudrama) Poppy Montgomery,
3 LIFE pense) Jordan Ladd, Vincent Spano. A woman's ob- David Sutcliffe, Shawn Christian. Multimillionaire Ted Ammon is found
session with romance novels goes too far. (CC) dead at his estate. (CC)
MSNBC I 00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Situation With Tucker Carl- Scarborough Country
M NB CCmann son
I K Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Unfabulous "The Full House D.J. Full House C Roseanne n Roseanne"Of
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants Cl 66th Day" skips school. (CC) (CC) s Mice and Dan"
00TV Big Brother * VIOLET 2000, Comedy) Mary Walsh, Peter MacNeill, Andrew News Cl (CC) News
n Bg() Younghusband. A woman dreads the approach of her 55th birthday.
OL M Outdoor Investi- Cycling Tour de France -- Stage 17. Stage 17, from Pau to Revel, France. (Same-day Tape)
S OLN gations
SPEED Street Tuner NOPI Tunervi- Pinks! (N) Unique Whips NASCAR Nation Street Tuner
SP E Challenge (N) sion (N) Cl Challenge
S (:00).Billy Gra- Behind the Hal Lindsey Taking Authority Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN ham Classic Scenes (CC) (CC) Presents (CC)
Crusades
Everybody Everybody Everybody Seinfeld Elaine Seinfeld Jerry Sex and the City Sex and the City
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond takes on a new finds an anatomi- Invitations to a Cl (CC)
Cl (CC) l (CC) 1l (CC) business. (CC) cal interest, wedding.
(:00) In a Fix A While You Were Out Basement Miami Ink "Five Friends" Friends Biker Build-Off "Arlen Ness v.
TLC couple lives in a transformation. (N) open a shop. Roland Sands" Roland Sands; Arlen
fixer-upper.. Ness.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Damaged Goods" *x BLUE STREAK (1999, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Luke Wilson, Pe-
TNT der "Legacy" C Detectives Briscoe and Curtis take ter Greene. A thief poses as a cop to retrieve a hidden diamond. (CC)
(CC) (DVS) on a double shooting case. (DVS)
TOON Grim Adven- Pok6mon C Life & Times of Totally Spies Mucha Lucha Teen Titans Dragon Ball Z
-T ON tures (CC) Juniper Lee "S.P.I. n (CC)
TV5 Therapies algdriennes Compl ment d'enquete Les hipitaux et la semaine (:15) istoires TVS Le Journal-
Vde35heures. de chateauxTy.
S 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC) --..-. ...
TWC ion C) (CC) (Cc) .......
(:00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Don Francisco Presenta Los
UNIV Ti Horoscopos de Durango; Frankie J;
Cepellin; Martha Llamas.
*'A BELLY OF Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA THE BEAST Detectives hunt for the sadist who Benson and Stabler are put on the Detectives hunt for the fiend who
(2003) (CC) tortured an old woman, trail of a pedophile. (CC) raped a coma patient. (CC)
H1m 100 Greatest Kid 100 Greatest Kid Stars "Hour 5" The Surreal Life C (CC) The Surreal Life Wacky Baby
Stars Cl ln (CC) Names
Home Improve- ** AMERICAN GIGOLO (1980, Drama) Richard Gere, Lauren Hutton, WGN News at Nine C (CC)
"WGN ment Tim blows Nina Van Pallandt. A hired companion for wealthy women is framed for
up a building, murder.
Everybody One Tree Hill Although Nathan is Smallville "Pariah" Lana and Jason WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
ViX, ; Loves Raymond already married, Tim throws him a are attacked, and the evidence Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
S'C (CC) bachelor party. C (CC) seems to point to Alicia. C & Mr, G (CC)
Jeo pardy! (N) Eve "Friend or Eve J.T. and Veronica Mars Veronica and Keith Dr, Phil
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...- .. -.. -....- date others. C, harassment suit. Cl (CC)...

(o6: ..15) *** THE CHRONICLES OF RIDDICK (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Entourage 'The The Comeback
HBO-E [ THEGIRL.IN Diesel, Colm Feore, Thandie Newton. A fugitive fights an invading ruler Sundance Kids" Valerie tries to
THE CAFE'NR' and his army. l 'PG-13' (CC) C | (CC) boost morale.
H B P (6:00) *, The Wire "Back Burners" Here dis- s I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER (1997) (:45)** JOHN-
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GAMES (1992) (CC) chopath in a fisherman's coat. A 'R' (CC) (20031 C


*t* JOHNSON FAMILY VACATION (2004, Comed ) (:15) *** THE GIRL IN THE CAFE (2005, Romance) Bill Nighy, Kelly
H BO-W Cedric the Entertainer. A man takes his family on a is- Macdonald, Ken Stott. A chance encounter leads to romance for a lonely
astrous road trip. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) bureaucrat, C 'NR' (CC)
(:15) ** a GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING (2003, *, SILENT FALL (1994, Suspense) Richard Drey- :45)The Making
HBO-S Biography) Colin Firth. Artist Johannes Vermeer paints fuss, John Lithgow. An autistic youth is the only wit- Of: Runaway
a portrait of his maid. 'PG-13'(CC)...... iess to a double murder. 'R'(G) -- Jury (CC)
A (630) *FA- -(:15) *** MEN IN BLACK (1997, Science Fiction) Tommy Lee Jones, *** GARDEN STATE (2004 -
A THERS DAY Will-Smith, Linda Fiorentin., Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial activity Comedy-Drama) Zach Braff, lan
(1997)'PG-13' on Earth. n'PG-13'(CC) ---- -Holm, Jronl.eibinah.:. 'R (CC)
:00) * THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE CRADLE ** ~ SPARTAN (2004, Suspense) Val Kilmer, Derek Luke, William H.
MOMAX 1992) Annabella Sciorra. A woman vows to destroy a Macy. Special-operations agents investigate slave traders, C 'R' (CC)
amily she blames for her woes.'R'
(6:00) **', IT * GODSEND (2004, Suspense) Greg Kinnear, Re- (:45) *** FAHRENHEIT 9/11 (2004, Documentary)
SHOW IUNS IN THE becca Romijn-Stamos. iTV. Scientist clones a cou- iTV. Filmmaker Michael Moore examines George W.
FAMILY (2003) pie's dead son. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) Bush. C 'R' (CC)
T(6:15) ** ** DICKIE ROBERTS: FORMER CHILD STAR (:45) NATIONAL LAMPOON'S DORM DAZE
TMC GIRL (1998, Dra- (2003, Comedy) David Spade. A man stays with a fam- (2003, Comedy) Tatyana Ali. Two women turn heads at
ma) Cl 'R' ily to prepare for a film role. C 'PG-13' (CC) a coed dormitory. Cl 'R' (CC)


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005, PAGE 7B




YOUR OWN ISLAND

Just the way. you. want it


L OOT -LESS


Certified Member


Tel: 9 6 6 3


325. WOOD

,46 Madeira Street


-I


I


,al








RAGE WENESDY, JLY 20 200 TRIUNEOPORT


Volleyball profildes


THE Bahamas Volleyball Federation's junior girls team are
participating in the Caribbean Volleyball Championships in Trinidad & Tobago
this weekend. Here is a closer look at the players taking part:


EBy KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
HOPING to better the
skills of young volleyball
players in the Bahamas,
the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation (BVF) will
host the first annual
Jackie Conyers Back-to-
Basic Volleyball Clinic.
The clinic will get
underway Monday, July
25th-29th at the DW
Davis gymnasium and
will feature college
coaches, hoping to award
scholarships to recent
high school players.
Conyers, a veteran
player at national level,
represented the Bahamas
from the age of 18 years,
wrapping up her last
tournament in Barbados
last year.
According to Conyers,
the level of play has
declined drastically
because of the decreasing
number of youth partici-
pating in the sports.

Ranked
Reflecting on the days
when she played, Cony-
ers admitted that volley-
ball was considered one
of the premier sports in
the Bahamas, with the
national teams ranked
highly throughout the
Caribbean.
She further stated that
the growth in the sport
has declined since the
hosting of the 1994 senior
Caribbean Volleyball
Championships, a tour-
nament which the
Bahamas fared very well
in both divisions.
"I remember when the
gyms used to be
crammed, you couldn't
find a seat," said Cony-
ers.
"This was when the
sport was being played at
a very high level. We
were regarded through-
out the Caribbean and
feared where ever we
went.
"The only way we were
able to achieve this high
level of play was because
of the dedication and.
hand work of the players.
"The training started at
a young age. Coming out
of high school we had
developed the basic skills
that were able to
help us secure scholar-
ships.
"Nowadays, we have
high school students
graduating, who've
played the game for their
schools, but don't posses
the necessary skills."
The level of play is
Conyers' biggest concern
a:; she continues to play
in the local association,
witnessing the proficien-
cy level of junior players.
As a result of this, the
clinic will focus mainly
on developing the play-
ers' proficiency levels,
while fine tuning those of
the more season players.
The week-long clinic
will be divided into two
segments, junior and
senior and will run
between the hours of
9am-4pm.
Eight coaches will be
in town for the clinic,
including: Venessa Hen-
ry, Penny Lucas, head
coach of Air Force Acad-
emy and Verna Jultan,
assistant coach of Air
Force Academy.


Name: Tamaz Thompson
Age: 17 years.
Height: 5-foot-6.
Position play: Middle. Off-set.
School: St. Anne's School.
Years experience: First year.
Expectations: To perform to the best of our abilities
and hopefully medal.


Name: Camilla Miller. -
Age: 16 years.
Height: 5-4.
Position play: Setter/off-setter/power.
School: St. Augustine's College.
Years experience: Third years.
Expectations: To achieve gold in Trinidad.


Name: Aniska Rolle.
Age: 18 years.
Height: 5-foot-7.
Position play: Libero.
School: Benedict College, South Carolina.
Years experience: Second year on Jr. CVC team.
Expectations: To be able to come home with the
gold.


Name: Shatia Seymour.
Age: 19 years.
Height: 5-foot-4.
Position play: Setter/off-setter.
School: Bahamas Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute.
Years experience: Third year.
Expectations: I am expecting our team to win a
gold medal.


Name: Theandra Thompson.
Age: 17 years.
Height: 5-foot-8.
Position play: Middle/power.
School: St. Augustine's College.
Years experience: Third year.
Expectations: Play hard and do our best while
working towards a medal, preferably gold.


Name: Whitney Armbrister.
Age: 19 years.
Height: 5-foot-7.
Position play: Middle/off-set.
School: Livingston College.
Years experience: Third years.
Expectations: To become a better player in the
process and support my team in medalling.


Name: Tia Charlow.
Age: 18 years.
Height: 5-foot-10.
Position play: Middle/off-set.
School: CR Walker.
Years experience: Fifth year.
Expectations: I expect this team to be great and I
expect us to come back with the gold.

Name: Jonean Saunders.
Age: 17 years.
Height: 5-foot-9 1/2.
Position play: Power.
School: CR Walker.
Years experience: Second year.
Expectations: Not available.


Name: Terese Clarke.
Age: 16 years.
Height: 5-3.
Position play: Libero.
School: St. Augustine's College.
Years experience: First year.
Expectations: To do well in the tournament.


Name: Cheryse Rolle.
Age: 18 years.
Height: 5-foot-8.
Position play: Power.
School: Benedict College.
Years experience: Third year on Jr. CVC team.
Expectations: Gold, but at least the bronze.


Name: Jewel Smith.
Age: 18 years.
Height: 5-foot-9.
Position play: Setter/off-setter/middle.
School: St. Augustine's College.
Years experience: Third year.
Expectations: I expect us to come back with a
medal, if not the gold, nothing less than the bronze.

Name: Bianca Ferguson.
Age: 16 years.
Height: 5-foot-8.
Position play: Power.
School: Sir Jack Hayward, Grand Bahama.
Years experience: First year.
Expectations: Not available.


%r% Indci fite Pakiuan in


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... Copyrighted Material..

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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


jakkie
Conyers


,'clmlc gets

derway










TRBUE POTSWDNSDYJUYT0S205 PGE9


CALVIN MURPHY, NBA Hall of Famer (with basketball), poses with excited campers at the 18th Annual Jeff Rodgers Basketball Camp. On his right is Jeff Rodgers, Camp Director.





NBA star Calvin Murphy





holds court at camp


* By RENALDO
DORSETT
Junior Sports
Reporter
THE country's premiere
basketball camp continues
to set the benchmark with
its pageantry, skill devel-
opment and ability to teach
young ballplayers to play
the game the right way.
The 18th annual Jeff
Rodgers summer basket-
ball camp is underway at
its usual location, the
Bahamas Academy Gym-
nasium.
Camp Director Jeff
Rodgers said the camp still
follows the same philoso-
phy it began with almost
two decades ago.
."One of our main focuss-
es has been character
building," he said. "Teach-
ing campers how to listen
and in turn we listen to the
campers."
Rodgers said this years'
camp was special for a
number of reasons.
"This was probably one
of the better years we have
had in the camp," he said.
"It's getting more exciting
because now we under-
stand the young people
better, we understand how
to'work with them and how
to get them to be disci-
plined."

Treat
The campers received a
treat yesterday when they
were visited by a number
of American college and
high school coaches and
former National Basketball
Association superstars,
including Scott Burrell and
Calvin Murphy.
Murphy, a Hall of Famer
and former Houston Rock-
et great, spent time with
the campers, becoming
actively involved and par-
ticipated in drills, display-
ing the exuberant person-
ality which makes him one
of the NBA's most colour-
ful characters.
Rodgers said the young-
sters were thrilled to spend
the day learning from one
of the NBA's greatest.
"The kids were really
excited to getting involved
because Calvin interacted
with them on every level,
teaching them and just hav-
ing a good time," he said.


Jeff Rodgers hails


special event


"It was one of the most
exciting moments of the
camp."
He added that Murphy,
who has a rich history of
working with young play-
ers in his native Houston,
Texas, was as excited to
work with the kids, as they
were to work with him.
"He has his own basket-
ball academy in Houston,
so he was excited and very
enthusiastic about working
with the kids," he said.
"The kids were blessed and


fortunate to hear from one
of the best to ever play the
game of basketball."
While the NBA stars are
brought in to teach
campers and advise them
on how to use basketball
to better their lives,
Rodgers said the players
often leave the camp learn-
ing something new them-
selves.
"A number of the NBA
players have camps in
America and they take
back things from our camp


that they use in their camps
back home," he said. "A
lot of them have told me
they have never seen
another camp do the sort
of things we do so it gives
them an idea of what its
like to help motivate and
encourage these young
people."
The camp's annual fun
night, which is scheduled
for tonight and gives
campers the opportunity to
exhibit their new skills for
parents, coaches and fans.
Fun night also features
the NBA stars in an exhi-
bition game to give
campers an opportunity to
watch their favourite ath-
letes perform.
"It's going to be very
colourful, the kids have


some new drills and exer-
cises they're eager to show
fans and parents," he
said.
"That is what the camp
is really all about, to let the
kids know that whatever
you are going through in
life, you can have a good
time.with sports."

Sponsors
The camp has a number
of corporate sponsors
including Vita Malt, Coli-
nalmperial, Royal Bank of
Canada, CIBC Trust, and
others who are essential to
the camp's success year
after year.
Without these many
sponsors Rodgers said it
would be impossible for


the camp to become what it
is today.
"What motivates me a lot
is the support we get
from people, including
sponsors and parents," he
said. "Without them, there
is.no way possible we can
run a camp for four weeks
and do all the things we are
capable of doing."
Rodgers said the camp is
continuing to grow and
change with each passing
year.
"The camp is just getting
better, every year we learn
from our mistakes and
from our experiences," he
said.
"Each year we learn
something we can do better
than we did the year
before."


NBA HALL of Famer Calvin Murphy, performs jumping jacks with campers at the 18th Annual Jeff Rodgers Basketball Camp.

IJ:> i


TRIBUNE SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005, PAGE 9B









INg


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


ikia and ChPis are


the0


E By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
NIKIA Deveaux and Chris
Vythoulkas will be the only
two swimmers carrying the
Bahamian flag at the XI
FINA World Championships
in Montreal, Canada.
The 15-day championships
is currently underway in
Montreal, Canada with div-
ing, synchronized swimming
and water polo, but the swim-
ming segment will run from
July 24-31.
It will be the first appear-
ance in the championships
for Deveaux and Vythoulkas
as they will now complete the
cycle of competing in every
major international meet.
The junior from the Uni-
versity of Kentucky will be
entered in the women's 50
metre freestyle. As usual, she
will have to wait until the
final day of competition on
Sunday, July 31 to compete.

Training
"Training has been a little
shaky over the past few
weeks because I've been
sick," said Deveaux, who has
been home training at the
Betty Kelly Kenning Aquat-
ic Centre under the supervi-
sion of Ken McKinnon in the
Barracuda Swim Club.
"I've not been training as
well as I would like to, so if I
don't swim as well as I would
like to, I hope to come close
to that time and even swim
better than I did at the
nationals."
At the Bahamas Swimming
Federation's Royal Bank of
Canada National Swimming
Championships last month at
the national aquatic centre,
Deveaux swam 27.4 seconds
to win her specialty.
The 19-year-old graduate
of Queen's College, admit-
ted that her performances
have not been up to par this
year, particularly as she's still
recuperating from the shoul-
der surgery she underwent in


S


tha. am so fit. Yes it can be intimidating
at times, but I have a goal so that is my
main focus right now.
"Every day I am approached by young
children asking me how I go that way and
saying how impressed they are. But my
biggest compliment came from Debbie
Ferguson.
"When she saw me she was like 'wow,
you're in great form and shape'."


Using the national championships as a
stepping stone to the Central American
and Caribbean bodybuilding show, Mack-
ey is confident that her routine
will help her qualify for the World
Games.
According to Mackey, perfecting a rou-
tine will take her at least a week. All of her
routines are designed by Steven Coakley,
national coach.


in


im for Bahamas


* NIKIA DEVEAUX is all smiles as she talks about her chances at the FINA World Championships next week in Montreal, Canada.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


September after competing
in the Olympic Games in
Athens, Greece in August.
"But I swam really well at
my conference meet, so I
should swim really well," she
projected. "My shoulder still


hurts every now and again
and I have to ease up on cer-
tain things in practice. But
it's much better than it was
before I had the surgery."
With two more years left,
in college, the journalist


ShoS!w of tregth romGiU


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter


FINE tuning her .body for the biggest
bodybuilding show to hit the Bahamas this
year is Gina Mackey.
Mackey is making last minute prepara-
tions for the annual Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Nationals, hosted by the Bahamas
BodyBuilding Federation (BBF), July,
29th-30th.
This will be Mackey's seventh appear-
ance at the national show, she has been
competing in the sport since 1997.
Mackey said: "I am looking forward to
the show, making last minute preparations
each day. There's a lot of work you have to
in order to pull of a show of this magni-
tude, so I am still working hard at it.
"It is a lot of work, but I am still holding
on through God's grace. Some days I want
to give up, but I love competing. I love
going out on the stage, entertaining the
crowd."
Mackey will be competing for her fifth
heavyweight title, first starting out in the
sport as a middle weight.
Although she has a ;n-, ckcc.
schedule that runs every weekda n.nd
sometimes on the weekend, Mackey stat-
ed that she will never trade the sport in.
Mackey's day starts at 4.30am with a
light jog for miles, followed by cardiovas-
cular workouts.
Working at the Henry Crawford Nation-
al gymnasium has helped Mackey with her
training.
She said: "I love my job, I love the fact


major has indicated that she
will train through the 2008
Olympic Games in Beijing,
China and, after that, she will
contemplate on retiring.
"That's all I'm looking for-
ward to right now and then I


will see what happens after
that," said Deveaux, who has
appeared in more interna-
tional meets than any other
Bahamian female swimmer.
McKinnon, who will travel
as the manager/coach of the
team, said McKinney is com-
ing into the form she was in
when she participated in the
Olympics last year.

Fast
"She looks as good, she's
as fast, she's as strong and
she's more experienced,"
McKinnon said. "So I expect
that she will come within the
26.75 to 26.69 area, if she hits
her start right. When she hits
her start right, it's a great
improvement."
But if she gets it right,
McKinnon said Deveaux will
have a fantastic meet in
Canada.
McKinnon, who has stayed
in touch with Vythoulkas'
coach about his progress, said
he likes what he's heard
about him training and is
confident that he too will
ha a great meet.
for travelling ith
Vytht.",lkas, Deveaux feels
that they should have a good
trip.
"Me and Chris got along
very well in Athens and so I
think, although it's just the
two of us, we will make the
best out of it," she stated.
"I'm sure we'll get a lot clos-
er together after this trip."
Vythoulkas, a 21-year-old
entering his senior year at
Florida State University, said
he's also looking forward to
travelling with Deveaux.


"It's always good to have
a team. The more the merri-
er, but Nikia and I get along
very well and she should do
very well," reflected
Vythoulkas, who has been
training in Fort Lauderdale
in preparation for the cham-
pionships.
"I've never really done bad
at these meets, no matter
what shape I'm in. It would
have been fun if Jeremy
(Knowles) was there to, but
he just got married, so that's
understandable that he can't
be there."
While he travels to Mon-
treal on Friday, he won't
compete in the 100 back-
stroke until Monday, July 25.
He was also entered in both
the 50 fly and 50 back, but
he pulled out of those two
events to concentrate on the
100 back where he has a per-
sonal best of 58.31.

Competed
"I had a pretty lopsided
training this summer, so I
know I'm not going to be at
my best, but I will still go
there and make it a worth-
while meet," said
Vythoulkas, who competed
for St. Andrew's School
before he headed to high
school in Florida.
"I'm still focussed because
I want it to be a really good
meet.
"This summer has been up
and down. We had a lot of
meets and I had some prob-
lems with my coach, so I will
still try and pull something
off, but I don't know what to
expect."


* GINA MACKEY goes through a light workout session as she prepares for the
Bahamas Bodybuilding & Fitness Federation's National Championships.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


_ __ I


--A








EXHIBITIONS MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT


WEDNESDAY, JULY


20,2005


"BAHAMA Mama", an installation at the National Art Gallery under the Playground Project
programme, invites you to think about artistic expression and cultural criticism.
(Photos: Tim Aylen)



Viewers will




be floored by




'Bahama Mama'


* By ERICA WELLS
MOST people don't think
twice about the floor. But a new
installation at the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas is forc-
ing viewers to look down and
think again in more ways than
one.
"Bahama Mama", a striking
arrangement of 800 Aunt Jemi-
ma-like salt and pepper shak-
ers installed beneath 32 square
feet of Plexiglas serves as a
bridge between two galleries,
and stops the viewer in their
tracks with its scale and mes-
sage.
"It invites you to walk across
her and bridge the gap between
artistic expression and cultural
criticism," says John Cox, edu-
cation officer at the NAGB who
facilitated the project created
by six participants.
The installation, inspired by
Korean artist Du Ho Suh's
"Floor" piece, works oh many
different levels.


Presence


It engages the viewer with its
presence, taking the traditional
eye-level gaze away from the
wall and down to the floor; and
is a social commentary on the
Bahamas' tourism industry.
And how our dependence on it
can sometime come at the
expense of our cultural integri-
ty. The central element is the
"happy smiling native" doll- a
racist stereo-type image that
many people would rather for-
get.
"The physical nature of the


8 0 figures serve


a bridge between


two galleries


structure of the piece suggests a
kind of support that reminds us
of both the reduced but popular
symbolism of the 'Bahama
Mama' in contrast to the cru-
cial reality of the real 'Bahami-
an Mother', which in many ways
symbolises the pillars that hold
the society together," says Cox.
The piece itself is unusual
because it's on the floor, and it
has a "Fun House" quality
about it.
"You have to walk on it, it
forces you to see it in a lot of
different ways," says Cox.
You have to walk on
"Bahama Mama" to get from
one gallery to the other. From
one angle, the doll's red ban-
dana looks like hundreds of
cherries placed neatly in rows;
and from another it has very
military presence, the dolls in
black face lined up like soldiers
ready for battle, their rolling
pins as weapons.
The "Bahama Mama" salt
arid pepper shakers are an obvi-
ous take on the Aunt Jemima
image the distinctive apron-
clad cook with a large girth and


bandana tied around her head.
The figure has become the
clearly identified "mammy" in
American history "the sub-
servient Black woman com-
pletely dedicated to the white
family".

Image
The image is offensive to
many, and for Cox and the stu-
dents who worked on the pro-
ject, it was ideal to illustrate a
very real paradox in the coun-
try's tourist industry.
"This popular sel'Pr symbol-
ises a paradox in c -ourist
industry. We are supp... -d by
selling-endorsing a derogatory
image of ourselves and justify
it as a means of su, val," says
Cox.
Six students Genele Delan-
cy, Jonathan Murray, Mark and
Tina Sterling, Nicholas Symon-
ette and Natasha Turnquest -
worked for three consecutive
Saturdays on the installation
SEE page two


Y7


'w~; ,


__


~~~ai


II







PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


TEARTS


Harry has Bahamian





readers fully booked


- - a
w


THE sixth volume of the Har-
ry Potter series sold close to nine
million copies in its first 24 hours
on sale, becoming the fastest-
selling book in history on both
sides of the Atlantic.
Logos Bookstore in the Har-
bour Bay Shopping Centre
joined bookstores across the
world in a carefully orchestrated
opening that saw young and old
readers pour into stores at one
minute past midnight on Satur-
day to snap up the much-antici-
pated "Harry Potter and the
Half-Blood Prince".

Outselling
By Monday morning, Logos
had sold about 350 copies of the
book (150 of them were pre-
ordered) since it was released on
Saturday, far outselling other
books in its genre, says Rose-
marie Johnson-Clarke, who has
been coordinating children's
books and programmes for
Logos Bookstore for about five
years.
"There is nothing that com-
pares to Harry Potter," says Mrs
Clarke.
Starting from 9pm last Friday,
Harry Potter enthusiasts began
to gather at Logos Bookstore for
a night of activities, including a
trivia contest and treasure hunt,
leading up to sale time. And by
the end of the evening, about 110
people had passed through,
including a visitor staying at


LINDA Gil-Aranha, Harry 6 Team, shows the first copy of "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood
Prince" to excited customers at the launch for Logos Bookstore on Saturday.
(Photo: Tim Aylen)


Atlantis on Paradise Island, who
made a special trip to the store
by taxi-cab to make sure she got
one of the first copies.
First thing Monday morning, a
customer showed up at Logos to
buy another copy of the "Prince"
because she had sold the one she
had purchased the Saturday
before to an eager reader for


$200. She was already on page
400 when the sale was made over
the weekend and couldn't wait
to buy another copy, for $29.99.
The adventures of Harry Pot-
ter and his friends at Hogwarts
School of Wizardry and Witch-
craft have won over a new gen-
eration of young readers and
been adapted into a movie series.


Eighteen-year-old Ahlya
Fountain, who has already fin-
ished reading the latest instal-
ment, was among one of the first
Bahamians to buy the book ear-
ly Saturday morning.
She has read, re-read and re-
read the five previous books in
the series. And said "Harry Pot-
ter and Half-Blood Prince" was


definitely worth staying up for,
even if it was a little "darker"
than the others.
"I read my first Harry Potter
book when I was 11 and I've
been hooked ever since," said
Ahlya who will most certainly
re-read the book before too long.
The series is enjoyed by chil-
dren and adults alike, but the
reason seems hard to pin down
for many.

Masterful
"I don't know what it is (that
makes the book so popular),"
says Mrs Clarke. "(Rowling) is
just a masterful storyteller. She is
able to take kids to another
world, a world that they love."
Logos originally ordered 700
books to ensure they wouldn't
run out, and the remaining
copies are moving fast, says Mrs
Clarke.
J K-Rowling, who first came
up with the idea in 1990, started
writing Harry Potter when she
'went to Portugal to teach Eng-
lish.
After the first book in the
series was turned down by sev-
eral publishers, Bloomsbury
finally offered to print it. The
five previous books have sold
around 275 million copies world-
wide. The series has also make
Rowling the wealthiest woman
in the United Kingdom. Her per-
sonal fortune in 2004 was an esti-
mated $1 billion.


- -


w


- a S -


.5 -


~.- ~..


- S


Viewers will be floored by 'Bahama Mama'


--- a
.0 ~ S -
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FROM page one

(and several other days), which
is part of the Gallery's Play-
ground Project, and its efforts to
find new ways to include the
local art community in ways
designed to both stimulate artis-
tic growth and enhance the
environment.
The idea behind the Play-
ground Project, developed by
Cox, involves NAGB staff
members collaborating with stu-
dents and members of the pub-
lic to make site specific installa-
tions for display at the Gallery
over an indefinite period of
time.
"(The Gallery) wants to
engage people. We want them
to feel like the gallery is for
them, another way for people
to understand and create art at
a high level," says Cox.
"Bahama Mama" is the first
in the series, and sets a high
mark for future projects under
the programme.

Project

While Cox came up with the
idea to base the project on a Do
Ho Suh piece, the group
worked together to come up
with how the installation would
work in a Bahamian context.
In Do Ho Suh's "Floor"
installation, the artist creates a
glass floor suspended in a
gallery by thousands of individ-
ually cast figures. The piece
addresses the notion of individ-
ual versus the collective roles
in society, and the figures rep-
resent and speak to the efforts
that everyday people make in
society that go unnoticed, but
in fact are the very reason that
the communities stay function-
ing, explains Cox. "With our
piece 'Bahama Mama', we bor-
row the artist's idea but re-visit
the concept within a Bahamian
context."
To achieve this, the group


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


- ~ .-.. ~


.5 -

a b.. a.o -


* ft


spent the first Saturday coming
up with ideas and brainstorm-
ing. Once it was decided that
tourism would be the focus, Cox
and the students visited the
-straw market.

Stalls

It was there that. they saw the
"Bahama Mama", a hot seller at
almost every one of the 600-plus.
stalls at the straw market.
Once they figured out that
they would need 800 (400 pairs)
of the salt and pepper shakers to


cover the 4' x 8' space, they con-
tacted the wholesaler and
ordered the half-inch Plexiglas
that would be supported by the
dolls. The group had to make
sure the floor was structurally
sound and could hold a signifi-
cant amount of weight. Ramps
also had to be built to complete
the installation that also serves
as a bridge between galleries
three and four, where works
from the National Collection
hang.
Jonathan Murray, an Art
major at COB who worked on
the project, says he was excited


to work on something concep-
tual for a change.
"It was a lot different from
what I usually do. There was
more thinking involved, we had
to collaborate ideas and work
together, which was sometimes
difficult," he says.
Murray says that while the.
piece is not perfect, it's an inter-
esting contrast to what's hang-
ing in'the two galleries that it
connects.
He said that the most chal-
lenging aspect of the project was
deciding on the idea and mak-
ing sure it held up..
Another reason for basing the
installation on Do Ho Suh's
work, says Cox, had to do with
the medium.

Strength

"I think his work is very inter-
esting. It works, and the
strength of it is, it's on the edge,
it's a cutting medium," he says.
"Conceptual art is the new
language, and a lot of art in that
context .falls short. The mes-
sages are too vague, but his (Do
Ho Suh) work is accessible. I
was interested in something that
would make an impact and have
an architectural presence."
Cox says that he also wanted
to use the project as an oppor-
tunity to move away from the
conventional teacher-student
relationship, based on individual
assessment.
"This project involved a lot
more talking, discussion and
criticism," says Cox. "This is not
a John Cox piece with assis-


tants, it's a collaboration."
He says that one of his first
goals was to introduce and
expose students to a certain way
of thinking, about material and
the symbolism and message. To
work together, conceptualise
and heighten and sharpen con-
ceptual skills.

Process

Admittedly, the process was
quite different (and at times
frustrating) compared to how
one would approach a more tra-
ditional piece, says Cox. "It's
not just about going to the store
and buying paint and then mak-
ing a painting. It involves
research, you have to look in
different places, you're using a
different palette.
But perhaps the most impor-
tant aspect of "Bahama Mama"
is the simple truth in its mes-
sage.
"I thought most people would
be able to identify with the cen-
tral theme of the piece," says
Cox. "It's physically large and
engaging, but each piece has its
own symbolism. When it is mul-
tiplied it begins to take on a dif-
ferent meaning."


Bahama Mama can be
seen at the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, West
and West Hill Sts. Gallery
hours: Tue, We, Fr, Sa -
10am-4pm; Th lOam-6pm.
Call 328-5800 for more infor-
mation.


-S


- ..~ a -


*


=


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Knight stars





with spoken





word works


* By JANICE MATHER

FOR lovers of lyrics and fans
of thoughtful rhythms, a life
supreme proved to be the most
satisfying poetry event of the
season. Visiting artist Larry
Knight, and his smooth spoken
word works, many of which
came from his CD, also entitled
a life supreme, lived up to every
bit of promise the album had
suggested.
Mr. Knight's delivery con-
fident, impassioned and power-
ful was flawless, from the first
note of The Myth of Tomorrow
to the final poem, which evoked
an encouraging message of
spreading wings preparing to
take powerful flight. Mirrors
Beauty Salon, where the show
was held Sunday night, may
seem like an unlikely venue for
the summer's first solid show.
But, with a commanding voice
that needed no microphone,
and words that demanded and
received complete silence
from listeners, Mr Knight trans-
formed an ordinary room into
the wide crossroads of an old


poetry review


Southern road, painting word-
pictures of a piano-playing,
soul-singing queen and of
hose and dog-controlled civil
rights uprisings, and lynched
black boys "slung from south-
ern trees/rhythmically swing-
ing/like macabre metronomes."

Stage

Before Mr Knight took to the
stage on Sunday evening, home-
grown poets set the pace in an
open-mic segment with a level
of quality that would have sug-
gested that performers had
been scheduled. Bodine John-
son, a comedian-style poet, got
the audience grinning with
rhymes about a hypocritical
church deacon whose sins find
him out, while Nadine Thomas-
Brown bent genre boundaries,
straddling poetry and reggae
with rhythmic chat. Carlton
Watson mused on the shoddy


The Nassau Amateur Operatic Society in
conjunction with the Freeport Players Guild
present "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now
Change!" Coming to the Dundas Theatre,
July 21, 22 & 23, 8pm.
Off-Broadway's Longest-running Musical
Comedy celebrates the modern-day mating
game and explores the joys of dating,
romance, marriage, lovers, husbands, wives
and in-laws.
Tickets are $20 and $25 and can be pur-
chased at Fox Hill Nursery on Bernard
Road.
Proceeds will be going towards repairs to
the Regency Theatre in Freeport due to Hur-
ricane damage, and the Bahamas Heart Asso-
ciation.

Wide Angle at the National Art Gallery
features Tough Guise on Thursday, July 21 at
7.45pm. Tough Guise analyzes masculinity as
a social contruction, a performance, or role, in
short, a tough guise.
Disscuants following the screening include
Marie Mills and Dr Ian Strachan of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. This documentary is
brought to you by the NAGB in collaboration
with the School of English Studies at COB. It
is not suitable for children. Admission is free.
Refreshments will be on sale.

Alternate Photography @ the National
Art Gallery: a course designed to engage
interested students in the visual and aesthet-
ic possibilities of photography as an art, and
alternative photography as an accessible
medium.
Students will be introduced to the history of
photography. They will learn how to build
cameras, principles of photographic compo-
sition, correct darkroom procedures and film
development and alternative photography
techniques that allow images to be developed


state of "black love", then
spanned the globe with world-
commentary poetry that ques-
tioned why Rwanda's genocide
has been largely forgotten while
9/11 remains pre-eminent in
many minds.
Then the lights dipped, and,
from the back of the room, a
sonorous song reminiscent of
old spirituals began Mr Knight's
performance.
Taking listeners whirling
through the American South,
Mr Knight used words to pay
homage to musical greats Nina
Simone and Miles Davis and to
evoke painful pictures of
activism and Civil Rights strug-
gles.
Interspersing spoken lyrics
with bouts of song, he tackled
the haunting lines of Strange
Fruit, which bitterly describes
lynching, then later teased lis-
teners with just a few lines of
Eyes on the Prize.


on all types of surfaces and objects, and pro-
duces images with very particular charecter-
istics.
The workshop will be held at NAGB, West
and West Hills Sts, and runs from July 18-
.30, 9.30am 2pm (some days are full work
days and will run from 9am-5pm). Age group:
12 years and older. Cost: $60 members/$80
non-members. All participants must be reg-
istered for this workshop. Walk-ins will not be
accepted. Space is limited. To register call
328-5800.
The National Collection @ the National
Art Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhibition
that takes the viewer on a journey through the
history of fine art in the Bahamas.
It features signature pieces from the nation-
al collection, including recent acquisitions by
Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne
Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The Dawn
Davies Collection @ the National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas, Villa Doyle, West and West
Hill Streets.
The exhibition is part of the NAGB's Col-
lector's Series. Call 328-5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau
Watercolours of Gaspard Le Marchand Tup-
per, from the collection of Orjan and Aman-
da Lindroth @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas.
The mid-nineteenth century paintings that
make up the exhibition are part of one of the
earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its
environs;
Tupper was a British military officer sta-
tioned at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The
works show a pre-modern Bahamas through
the decidedly British medium of watercolour.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.


SAMERICAN ARTIST LARRY KNIGHT


Between power-packed spo-
ken and sung word spat out
with a fervour often only seen in
the Sunday morning perfor-
mances of many a Baptist
preacher, Mr Knight also spoke
of love, and of growing up in
Louisiana, assuring audiences
that while his work is strongly
grounded in the US South, his
themes are no stranger to the
Bahamian shores, or to any-
where.
Speaking about on being
black in America, he told the
audience "The title could be
erased and it could be applica-
ble in the Bahamas... 'Cause
I've been here for two weeks
and I've seen a lot of stuff."
Mr Knight, who said in an
earlier interview that he expect-
ed his material. to be applicable
to Bahamian audiences despite
its very Black-American con-
tent, wove local references into
chaos in e minor, a powerful
rant that contrasts classics like
John Coltrane and Nina Simone
with the contemporary "roar of
an audience as they sit/ waiting,


with guts churning, hearts rac-
ing, palms sweating/ for
announcer to sing 'ladies and
gentlemen, we proudly present
for your listening enjoyment
this evening, the one, the only/
Brittany Spears'."

Original
The original version then
describes a young, undiscovered
black girl, in contrast, singing
somewhere in a house in Jack-
sonville; for the Nassau audi-
ence, it was aptly and suc-
cessfully adapted to "a young
girl in Fox Hill stands in a bath-
room and sings heavenly into a
hairbrush". As well as describ-
ing classic Black American
musicians, Mr Knight broke out
with a recollection of "Ray
Munnings making Nassau a lit-
tle bit funkier, singing 'Nassau's
got rhythm, Nassau's got soul!'"
"I know the fourth verse
too," Mr Knight laughed, to
approving whoops and claps
from the audience.
"(I wanted) just to connect


with the audience and to let
them know that no.matter
where the piece was written, it's
still applicable wherever it's
being performed," explained
Mr Knight, after the show.
"It was just to give the audi-
ence the opportunity connect,
and establish that link."
Even without tangibly reach-
ing out to Bahamians with
familiar names, his content, and
strong delivery guaranteed that
the audience would relate. If
the applause was anything to
judge by, the audience was
pleased with the power-packed
performance that combined
fury at the past, passion for pos-
itive fights, Miles Davis-style
ear play, lyrical storytime, and
old-style spirituals with new-
time commentary. Only one
question remained after the
show: when next?
That remains to be seen. But,
says Mr Knight "Definitely, I
will be back." And, if word
spreads, it's:likely that next time
will be another well-attended
treattfor ears, heart,.and mind.


HIUREAUIENCE^'ONfLY N OE NDR 8 DITTED


WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2u,' , .


THE TRIBUNE









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WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2005, PAGE 5C


HE TRIBUNE


WHATS ON IN AND AROUND N A S S A U

















EM A I L 0 U T T H E R E @ T R I B U N E M E D IA NET


(Free admission) every Saturday with live music from photographer Roland Rose at the Central Bank of
8 pm to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to mid- the Bahamas Art Gallery. This exhibition is being
night, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long. held on the occasion of the 32nd Anniversay of inde-
pendence of the Bahamas.


I~llm PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Sunshine Auto Sales's Boat Cruise & Auto Show
After Party, Thursday, July 21 @ Club Fluid. Doors
open @ 9pm Admission: $10 (ladies). $15 (gents, until
12pm). First 50 ladies receive free glass of wine. Free
hors doeuvres until 11:30pm. Special guest DJs: The
Mighty Pencil & One Dwight.

All Cat Island Boat Cruise, on board the Sea Link, Sat-
urday, July 23. Special guests: Lady Saw and Elephant
Man. Featuring a $1,500 giveaway, and music by The
Mighty Pencil, Da Butler and DJ One Dwight. Board-
ing time: 8pm. Boat leaves Potters Cay Dock at 9pm
sharp. Tickets @ $15 can be purchased at Star Track
Meat, Carmichael Road (Tel: 341-6030). Or $20 at
the boat.

Goin' Back to da Island Boat Cruise Part H (an Ack-
lins Regatta event), on board the Island Link, Saturday,
July 23. Door prizes include: 2 Round trips on Bahama-
sair; Gift certificates from John Bull, The Polo Com-
pany, City Markets, Jaffies Clothing Store and Subway;
dinner for 2 at Cassurina's; his and her watches from'
Colombian Emeralds; and Galleria movie tickets. Fea-
turing music by Marvin A, Gigolo Jeff and Links.
Boarding time: 7:30pm. Sailing time: 8pm. Boat leaves
east of the police station, Potters Cay Dock. Tickets:
$15 (food included), available at the Juke Box, V B
Travel, and Hanna's Hardware. Security provided by
C & M Security Firm.

Nelson Cooper Peace on da Streets Basketball Classic
@ Sir Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, Saturdays, July 23 at
9am. Featuring: a Three-Point Shootout and the Jimel
Slam Dunk Contest. Admission: $1 (children under
12), $2 (adults) before 5pm. After 5pm all entrants
pay $5. For more information call 356-6549 or 326-
7269.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club
Trappers, Nassau's "upscale" gentleman's club. Fea-
turing a female body painting extravaganza. Free body
Painting @;8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission:
Men free before 10pm. Females free. There will be free
food and hors d'oeuvres between 9 and 10 pm. Open
until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid lounge, this and every Thursday
night. Doors open at 10pm. Ladies free before lam, $10
after. Guys: $15 all night. Drink special- 3 @ $10 (Bac-
ardi) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts with 3
for $10 drink specials. Admission: $10 before mid-
night and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning
the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive
food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
every Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight.
First 50 women get free champagne. First 50 men get
a free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reser-
vations call 356-4612.

Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge and
Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday old
school reggae and rockers downstairs, and golden
oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open 9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar.
Drink specials all night long, including karaoke warm-
up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and Men
S$15.

SHlmipi Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The ulti-
mate Ladies Night. Join Nassau's and Miami Beach's
finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with free chainm-
jpagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with $20 cover.


Da Spot, a weekly comedy show, features skits and
spoofs on Bahamian life, with improv by a talented
young cast. The show is held Tuesdays @ The Dundas
at 8pm. Admission is $10, and tickets are sold at the
door.

Bold, an exhibition of paintings by JeRome Harris
Miller at Azure Spa, British Colonial Hilton, runs
through July 30. Spa hours Monday-Saturday, 9am-
6pm and Sunday, 10am-6pin. A second opening recep-
tion will be held on Friday, July 15, from 6pm-9pm.

n Wide Angle at the National Art Gallery features
Tough Guise on Thursday, July 21 at 7:45pm. Tough
Guise analyzes masculinity as a social contruction, a
performance, or role, in short, a tough guise.
Disscuants following the screening include Marie
Mills and Dr Ian Strachan of the College of the
Bahamas. This documentary is brought to you by the
NAGB in collaboration with the School of English
Studies at COB. It is not suitable for children. Admis-
sion is free. Refreshments will be on sale.
Alternate Photography @ the National Art Gallery:
a course designed to engage interested students in the
visual and aesthetic possibilities of photography as an
art, and alternative photography as an accessible medi-
um.
Students will be introduced to the history of pho-
tography. They will learn how to build cameras, prin-
ciples of photographic composition, correct darkroom
procedures and film development and alternative pho-
tography techniques that allow images to be devel-
oped on all types of surfaces and objects, and pro-,
duces images with very particular charecteristics.
The workshop will be held at NAGB, West and
West Hills Sts, and runs from July 18-30, 9.30am -
2pm (some days ate full work days and will run from
9am-5pm). Age group: 12 years and older. Cost: $60
members/$80 non-members. To register call 328-5800.

The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas, an exhibition that takes the viewer on a
journey through the history of fine art in the Bahamas.
It features signature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to
book tours. This exhibition closes February 28,2006.


modem Bahamas through the decidely British medium
of watercolour. Call 328-5800 to book tours. This exhi-
bition closes August 31,2005.


HEALTH

Doctors Hospital Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr
Willard Thompson will talk about sports medicine -
ipjury, prevention/teatment, drug use/abuse, and more
- on Thursday, July 21, 6pm in the conference room.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323-4482
for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes certi-
fied by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strate-
gies to avoid, sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that can occur in
adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid class-
es are offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community
Training Representative at 302-4732 for more infor-
mation and leam to save a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets from 7pm 9pm the sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the
BEC building, Blue Hill Road.


'f CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C
Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, college
Avenue off Moss Road. Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm
@ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm A19,
Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pmi @ British
Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @
The J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave. Club
2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednes-
day at the J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at
6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham
Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every
Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-
West Highway. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tues-
day night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros. All are welcome.
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
7pm @ Gaylord's Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please
call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tues-
day, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor
meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm
@ St Augustine's Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday
of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St
Augustine's Monestary. For more info call 325-1947
after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach,
6pm.


Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte
St kicks off Fridays at 6pm with deep house to hard
house music, featuring CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and
Sworl'wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandyport, from
4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill moods with world
beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday,
4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal
Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.

Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night of
Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all audi-
ences. Latin Flair in the VIP Lounge; Old School Reg-
gae and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in free before
llpm. $10 after 11pm. Men, $15 cover charge.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and
Skyline Drive. Singer/songwriter Steven Holden per-
forms solo with special guests on Thursday from 9pm
- midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal and
Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, andthe Caribbean
Express perform at Traveller's Rest, West Bay St,
every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.

MEN i THE ARTS 1[7 -
The Nassau Amateur Operatic Society in con-
junction with the Freeport Players Guild present "I
Love You, You're Perfect, Now Changel" Coming to
the Dundas Theatre, July 21, 22 & 23, 8pm.
Off-Broadway's Longest-running Musical Comedy
celebrates the modem-day mating game and explores
the joys of dating, romance, marriage, lovers, hus-
bands, wives and in-laws.
Tickets are $20 and $25 and can be purchased
at Fox Hill Nursery on Bernard Road.
Proceeds will be going towards repairs to the
Regency Theatre in Freeport due to Hurricane dam-
age and the Bahamas Heart Association.









PAGE 0, WENESDY, JUY 20,2005THE TIBUN


Singaton starts his gospel





comeback on the right note


* By PETURA
BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

USUALLY a person chroni-
cles his life story in an autobiog-
raphy or biography book form,
but a come-back gospel singer is
sharing his story through the
release of his album, The Rebirth
of Singaton.
The album isn't due for release
until the end of December but
listeners are already getting their
ears re-acquainted with Singa-
ton's sound with the first single
from the project, "Blind Follow
the Blind', which is receiving air
play on Joy 101.9FM.
No stranger to music, Singa-
ton (Clement Chea) had been
on the gospel scene for a number
of years, until he "fell into a
backslidden position" and lost
interest in singing for God but
only temporarily.
Amazing

The life of this 32-year old has
been amazing. Born on January
28, 1973 in West Palm Beach,
Florida to Hazel and Alton
Chea, and "growing up" in the
church, life soon took a dramat-
ic turn into crime and gang
violence early on in his adoles-
cence.
Clement became a member of
the Raiders gahg, and at 16 years
old was. charged with murder.
He was sentenced to five years
but only served 14 months
after receiving a government par-
don.
In 1995, at a Peace on the
*Streets Outreach Mission by
Youth Alive Ministries at
Bahamas Faith Ministries,
Clement found God. He began
singing on the Christian circuit
as Singaton, a.name that he
earned at an impromptu song
competition after he outsang all
the contestants.
Singaton ministered at various
schools and churches along with
other delinquent young men who
had become Christians. They


* COMEBACK gospel singer Siiigaton (Clement Chea)


spread the message of non-vio-
lence and choosing Christ.
But his walk with God would
take a shift. The artist recalls
"loosing (his) way" with God,
but somehow he never forgot his
promise to serve Him.
"I was spiritually weak, so it
leaves space for Satan to pene-
trate and make himself a part of
it... So he made his way to me
through certain ways and
means," he adds.
Singaton stayed in that condi-
tion for seven years. He was a
"henchman" for a popular drug
dealer (now deceased). He trav-


elled "back and forth" to
Jamaica transporting drugs, until
an "encounter" brought him
back to God.
Though his stint away from
God could be considered a waste
of time and energy, Singaton
chooses to look at it in a different
way, as something divine.
He explains: "See, God's num-
ber of perfection, his number of
completion, is really seven, so I
don't really look at it like I wast-
ed seven years in the world.
That's seven years of testimony,
trials and tribulations. I could
have been dead, within those sev-


en years I done get stabbed, been
in the hospital for weeks, lungs
collapsed, done get buss with a
gun buss with dope, been locked
up for $25,000 at the airport, you
know I had all kind of different
things going on, so I have testi-
mony upon testimony. So each
incident has taught me now to
value life more and even appre-
ciate why God has kept me here
for so long. So this album is my
gift."
It's been one year since his re-
dedication that Singaton started
singing again publicly. Realising
that his mistake in 1995 was plac-


ing too much emphasis on the
music and not enough of the
word of God, Singaton wanted to
first get deeper into his studies.
"I'm a person who is just com-
ing into his purpose, so that's
why when I first came back into
the.faith I was like, I ain't going
into that music, that's what
caused me the last time. I was
weak and I didn't even try to get
strong," he shares.
The song, "Blind Follow the
Blind", was written by fellow
gospel artist, Landlord, about 10
years ago, but Singaton added
two verses to it when he went to
the studio in March of this year.
And though he is not the original
author, there were still some
"personal convictions" when it
came to the song.

Biblical
"Following the blind was what
I was doing all my life," he tells
Tribune Entertainment. "I was
following people who were blind
spiritually but they knew the
word of God. And you can prove
it in any bar room, any blocks
where guys smoking and carryin'
on, you will find more biblical
and spiritual conversations going
on there whether its a conver-
sation or debate.- but they ain't
saved, so basically they trying
lead arid they are blind.
And people like me were fol-
lowing their outlook on every-
thing."
The Rebirth of Singaton is a
multi-single release scheduled to
hit the shelves in December. The
five-track multi-single will fea-
ture "Temptation", a collabora-
tion between the singer and
gospel artist Peter Runks; "Nev-
er Give Up", a newly written
song; and a treat for the children,
an old-school cover of the song,
"Father Abraham", among oth-
ers.
But in the meantime, Singa-
ton is receiving much love from
those who remember his voice,
as well as gaining the respect of
new listeners.


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Just a Lil Bit 50 Cent Interscope


Grind With Me
Let Me Hold You
Pimpin' All Over/World
Dreams
Give Me That


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SUM


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Get it Poppin'
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Back Then


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Lonely
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How We Do
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USA: United State of Atlanta Ying Yang Twins TVT


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Soulife
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Boyz N Da Hood
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Amazing Graze
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Who's Report
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Bebe Winans
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