Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00147
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: July 4, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00147
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text








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SUN AND
,: CLOUDS


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.183


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


PRICE 500


Andrew Alleh's
UA
'''Pe. active
W tspe
........... . . . . . . .
442
HAV m craty.
BAKER'S BU T E $2 urse of de od'


Three injured


as fireworks


cache ignites


A MASSIVE explosion
rocked Nassau last night as a
cache of fireworks went off
unexpectedly at Atlantis on Par-
adise Island.
The blast, which shook'bultd?
ings and rattled windows over a
wide area, sent- a huge plume
of black smoke into the air and
set a storeful of carpets ablaze.
Miraculously, only three peo-
ple received minor injuries.
Atlantis discounted reports
that the fireworks were for
today's July 4 celebrations and
said inquiries were still being
made as to how they got there.
.,The explosion occurred short-
ly after 6pm near the Club Med
site where Atlantis' Phase Three
Development will be built.
The fireworks were in a con-
tainer in a secure area well away
from hotel guests.
Atlantis spokesman Ed'
Fields told The Tribune: "No
tourists were in danger, and nor
was the hotel building. This
happened in an open area
which is patrolled by security
men. The public is not allowed
in there."
Two fire engines and two
ambulances rushed to the scene,
where firemen were able to get
the flames under control, even
though witnesses claimed they
had difficulty locating hydrants.
One bystander said: "There
was an enormous explosion
which left huge billowing clouds
,over Paradise Island.
"There was one huge blast


followed by several smaller
explosions. It was an alarming
sight and quite deafening.
"Fortunately, it was well away
from public areas, otherwise it
. could have been catastrophic."
Police threw a security cor-
don round the area and tried to
keep media representatives
away from the scene.
It is understood the fireworks
were in a container near anoth-
er container in which the car-
pets were stored. Several trail-
ers containing furniture were
also set alight.
One photographer said:
"They were determined to keep
us away and employees had
apparently been told to say
nothing."
At 6.40pm, firemen were still
fighting the fire as hundreds of
tourists, hotel employees and
passers-by looked on. By
7.30pm, however, crews were
dampening down the debris.
Mr Fields said: "We are still
conducting investigations to find
out exactly what happened. We
tried to keep people away from
the area for their own safety."
At The Tribune, more than a
mile away, staff felt the first big
explosion, then heard a succes-
sion of small blasts.
"It sounded like a full-scale
fireworks display, only more
intense," said one employee. "It
was like the whole display hap-
pened at once."
SEE page 14


* THE billowing cloud of black smoke which filled the air after the explosion


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A FISHING trip by two friends ended
tragically over the weekend when one
drowned in the eastern part of Nassau
Harbour.
While on routine patrol on Saturday, a
Defence Force vessel discovered the body
of David Pinder of Kemp Road who,
according to preliminary investigations,
drowned on Saturday afternoon while
attempting to repair his boat near Porgy
Rock.
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna said Mr Pin-
der, with his friend Cleotus Reckley, had
set out on a fishing trip at 9am on Satur-
day.
At around 3pm the two men began
experiencing engine trouble. Anchoring
the boat, Mr Pinder dove underneath the
boat to investigate the problem.
"Apparently he was attempting to clear
some rope which had become entangled in
the propeller the boat also began tak-
ing in water," said Mr Hanna.
SEE page 14


Airport security to


increase after arson
.


E By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
TIGHTER security at all Bahamas air-
ports looks certain following the weekend
arson attack at San Andros.
The government is considering placing
all airports under the control of the Min-
istry of National Security, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt said yesterday.
The attack, which destroyed the
airport's terminal building, was
described by Mrs Pratt as "downright


senseless and malicious."
She said the incident showed how
great a challenge the Bahamas faced in
securing all of its 16 airports.
"Currently, security of ports and air-
ports falls under (the Ministry of) Trans-
port. However, after 9/11 and because
we are also an archipelagic nation, there
is much more pressure placed on us,
because the demands are greater," she
said.
SEE page 14


JOSEPH Benjamin Pratt, 66, husband breath., "He has a history of diabetes,"
of Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt, she said. "Doctors are now running vari-
was admitted to the intensive care unit of ous tests to decide where they go from
the Princess Margaret Hospital Saturday here."
evening. Mr Pratt is under the care of a team of
Mrs Pratt said that her husband com- doctors headed by Dr Conville Brown
plained of dizziness and shortness of and Dr Adrian Sawyer.


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rAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


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Fifteen arrested in




raid on Potter's Cay


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* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE arrested 15 ven-
dors during a raid on Pot-
ter's Cay dock as part of a
sustained effort to stop the
illegal sale of liquor.
In the second raid on the
dock this year, police on Fri-
day arrested vendors found
to be selling alcohol without
a licence.
Commending officers,


Bid to stop the

illegal sale of liquor


Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
said police monitoring will
continue as part of an effort
to stop all illegal sales of
alcohol on the dock.


"Police went in there and
arrested those persons found
in breach of the law, openly
displaying and selling
alcohol although they have
no licence.to do so," he
said.
Income
Vendors at Potter's Cay
have in the past protested
that the sale of alcohol is
their main source of income
and that government is not
willing to give them licences
to sell alcohol legally.
"Granting licences is the
job of another department,
the police are simply there
to ensure that the law is not
broken.
Discretion
"It is not something at the
discretion of the police," he
explained.
Mr Hanna said it had been
the experience of the police
"that persons who have no
problem infracting the law,
sometimes also go to other
extremes.
"In a situation like this, the
police cannot appear impo-
tent," he said.


TROICA

M(ER IAIR


0


Do YOU KNOW YOUR RIGHTS?


I J Yi RSE%'I UINi


AT


The

htNATIONAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

TOWN MEETING

TOPIC:
"The National & International Legal Obligations of
Education to Teachers & Students"

Panelists:
Dr. Perry Gomez, Ministry of Health
Melanie Zonicle, Director of Social Services
Marilyn Zonicle, Under-Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Kingsley Black, President, Bahamas Union of Teachers
Kayla Green, Attorney, Office of the Attorney General

Date: Tuesday, July 5th, 2005 from 8 10pm

Venue: Wyndham Nassau Resort & Crystal Palace Casino












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I *N] E


I


OFFICIALLY opening.
the 18th national education
conference, the first one in
six years, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt yes-
terday appealed to teachers
to help equip young
Bahamians with the skills.
needed for the future.
The five-day conference,
which is being held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort'
and Crystal Palace Casino6
under the theme "Trans-!
forming Education for the:
21st century," is expected-
to offer stakeholders a.bm-
mon understanding of the-
philosophy of the existing
education system.
Mrs Pratt called on teach-
ers to prepare the Bahami-
ans people "for the jour-
ney to the 21st century."
She said it is necessary for
future Bahamians to com-
pete successfully in the
international arena "for a
bigger share of the tourism
pie."
This included "expanding
the financial services sector
of the Bahamas and suc-
cessfully challenging
Bermuda, Barbados and
Cayman for primacy in the
captive insurance industry,"
she said.
"For national success in
the 21th century, we must
get better at integrative
thinking. The school must
develop minds capable of
seeing the big picture, of
being able to think through
and appreciate the conse-
quences of every proposed
plan on the level of govern-
ment ministries, on the lev-
el of community, on the
national, regional and inter-
national levels," she said.
Topics to be discussed
during the conference
include a status report on
the Bahamian education
system, education and
national development, the
impact of 21st century glob-
al realities on education,
and the national and ipter-
natiiona legal obligatiorfisf:
education to teachers 'and
students.


HANAMASNLD
TH R FECLLN EEt17







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 3


Peet: residents are


:remely


concerned' by arson attack


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

VINCENT Peet, MP for North
Andros and the Berry Islands, said resi-
dents are "extremely concerned, disap-
pointed and embarrassed" by the arson
attack on San Andros airport.
Police confirmed yesterday that the
airport's terminal was deliberately set
ablaze.
Mr Peet told The Tribune that, with
San Andros airport being the gateway to
north Andros, the fire is having a "dra-
matic" and "negative" impact on the
economy.
"If the gateway is closed'then clearly it
follows that it would have a devastating
impact. It makes it very difficult, if not
expensive and costly, for local residents to
travel. They now have to drive 20 to 40
miles to the next airport in Fresh Creek
for transportation to New Providence or
elsewhere," said Mr Peet.
He said the fire had caused a very neg-
ative image to be cast over residents of
north Andros, because of the circum-


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
PLACING more ,than 30 gun
and knife-carrying, angry, and drug-
using boys who have pledged their
allegiance to gangs in the same
room for six months seems like a
recipe for disaster.
But the Ministry of Youth's
National Youth Service, in con-
junction with the YEAST empow-
erment programme, did just that
and, according to those boys,
they did so successfully.
After six months living together
in the wilderness in Andros, the 16
to 19-year-olds who were graduat-
ed from the pilot programme this
weekend, agree that their lives have
been transformed for the better.
"I'm here because of gang vio-
lence. When I go back home, I will
now try to be a positive influence
on my boys," 17-year-old Julian
Seymour said.
He admitted that there were
many conflicts and challenges when
the group first came together. After
all, how would "my boys feel if they
knew I saw this one or that one
from a rival gang and I didn't do
anything about it?"

Guidance
These youths were taken far
away from city life. Under the guid-
ance of officers of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, they
woke up at 5 o'clock every morn-
ing; they learned to farm, scuba
dive, and drive; they learned plumb-
ing, carpentry and auto mechanics;
and they learned how to communi-
cate, co-operate and motivate.
Enrique Rolle, who gave reflec-
tions at the closing ceremony, was
known among the group as "the
motivator".
Counsellor Andrew Albury told
the crowd that this particular young
man probably had the most chal-
lenges to overcome because he was
a troubled youth who couldn't read
past the first-grade level.
Reading a spirit-stirring address,
Enrique testified to his co-gradu-
ates: "Jesus is alive! I know
because he is alive in me. I had not
spoken to my mother in over a
year. I had no father.
"It has not been easy these past
six months. Trust me, these fellows
are not easy to live with. We had
fighting, stealing, and a lot of rough
days. We had kitchen and bath-
room duties three times a day.
There was all for one and one for
all punishment.
"But then we had a lot of good
days. We had lots of good food to
eat, we got new clothes, and I made
lots of friends. There are beautiful
people here in Andros...and the
girls wow!
"Today, we are in better physical
shape. We know who we are, we


Airport fire having 'negative


impact' on economy


stances surrounding the fire.
"It sends a very bad message to both
domestic and foreign investors about the
mentality of some folk in Andros. Clear-
ly it is not positive," Mr Peet added.
Western Air's office was one of the
units destroyed in the inferno.
Rex Rolle, president of Western Air,
said the fire had "destroyed" their busi-
ness, which was based in the terminal.
"The San Andros airport is currently
closed to aircraft traffic, therefore we
have zero business out of San Andros,"
said Mr Rolle.
Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
said the incident had an affect on so many
families "the vendors, the janitors, the
entire airport staff, the people who take


care of the baggage."
She said the next nearest airport is in
Central Andros. "To take a taxi there
would cost $100, that is a lot of money for
the poor people just to pay for a taxi," she
added.
No decision has yet been made on
whether government will erect tempo-
rary facilities or shut down the airport
altogether.
She said although the airport's run-
way is intact, it cannot be used because
there are no customs and immigration
services.
Rebuilding, she said, would "again cost
taxpayers' money money that was not
planned for (in the budget)."


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER residents of the
Cheshire Home are appeal-
ing to government to have
"compassion" and allow them
to reoccupy the home's facil-
ities, said attorney Paul Moss.
A signed document was
given to Mr Moss by the for-
mer residents outlining why
they deem their present
apartment not disabled
friendly.
The document pointed out
inadequacies in the bath-
room, kitchen, bedrooms,
hallway and yard of the
Sandilands Allotment premis-
es where they now live.
The residents said there is
no grab-bar in the bathroom,
which is needed to assist para-
plegic residents.
"Two of the disabled resi-
dents are confined to wheel-
chairs because of their dis-
ability, which is cerebral pal-
sy.
"Consequently, they can-
not get in and out of the bath-
tub safely or comfortably
without the aid of that grab-
bar. One of the wheelchair
disabled, Kenneth Storr, has
already fallen, due to the
absence of the grab-bar," the
document read.
Additionally, persons in
wheelchairs cannot exit
through the kitchen door
because there is no. ramp. It
was revealed that there is a
make-shift, temporary, and
wooden ramp, at the front
door. However, it is said to
be a safety hazard to wheel-
chair residents, in that it is
somewhat steep.


The document explained
that there are no independent
light switches on bedroom
walls, only on ceiling fans,
allowing only non-paraplegic
residents to control them.
They said the hallway
between the bedrooms is not
wide enough for wheelchair
residents to easily turn
around.
The residents are asking
there be alert devices to assist
deaf and blind residents.
They also want a doorbell,
lighting and sound system so
blind and deaf occupants
know when someone is at the
door.

Residential
"The residential facility,
formally known as Cheshire
Home, is disabled friendly,
having virtually all of these
disabled friendly attributes in
place. This is because it was
purposely built to function as
such," the residents stated.
However, it was said that
at the former Cheshire
Home, there was no lighting
system in place to alert the
deaf resident.
"It is to be noted that in
regards to the building code
of the Bahamas, as it relates
to features that make
dwellings accessible and func-
tional for disabled persons,
virtually no apartment com-
plex in the Bahamas was built
as a disabled friendly build-
ing,
"This includes the one that
is occupied by the four
former residents of
Cheshire Home," said the
residents.


are more aware of life's challenges,
and we are walking closer with
God."
According to co-ordinator Dea-
con Jeff Lloyd, the programme was
not designed to be "curative" but
rather was intended to intervene in
the lives of the boys and help to
break a destructive chain before
they go out into society.
It's like a wake-up call to teach
the young men about self-worth,
self-reliance and respect.
However, Deacon Lloyd said
without strong support from par-
ents, all the success of the pro-
gramme would go to waste.
He said when the 23 boys from
Nassau, four from Andros, and two
from Grand Bahama go home, they
will be invited to join monthly
workshops with their parents.
Some-will go on to the Fresh
Start programme, started by the
Catholic church group SERVOL,
which will help to place them in
productive jobs and reinforce self-
empowerment skills.
"This programme was good,"
said Shakatori Thompson. "I was
trained in so many areas. I devel-
oped mentally and physically. I
passed all obstacles and I think this
camp would be a great help to
youth."
His mother, Colleen Carter,
beamed as he kneeled in the centre
of a complex military drill forma-
tion performed by the boys.
They were undisturbed by the
downpour of rain that threatened to
interrupt the ceremony. They
marched like.true soldiers and gave
a symmetrical and disciplined pre-
sentation.
According to Gabrielle Frasier,
of the Ministry of Youth, the trans-
formation of the group is remark-
able. She reflected on the first few
weeks of the programme, and
recalled that one of the greatest
challenges was to detoxify the boys,
who were avid drug-users.


In light of this, Social Services
Minister Melanie Griffin sang an
inspirational song for the boys and
encouraged them to continue to
put God first in their lives.

Present
Also present was US Ambas-
sador John Rood, MP for North
Andros Vincent Peet, Archbishop
Patrick Pinder and Father Gerry
Pantin, representatives of the Inter--
national Monetary Fund, and other
dignitaries, parents, family and
friends.
Youth Minister Neville Wis-
dom gave the keynote address,
telling those gathered that the pilot
project is symbolic of the kind of
transformation the government
wished to see emulated through-
out the entire Bahamas.


MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture Neville
Wisdom gave the keynote
address.

"A transformation that teaches
that we all have the capacity to be
individuals of strong moral charac-
ter," he said.
"Now that the boys have com-
pleted this pilot, people will be
watching them closely. Everyone
will be expecting them to direct
their lives according to a higher
standard than the kind of behav-
iour that got them here in the first
place. Along with that, there is an
accountability that will remind them
that they are indeed responsible for
their own actions. Please give these
young men a chance."
Among those looking for a sec-
ond chance are Marco Lord and
Owen Cox, who grew up in Bain
Town. They have traded guns,
knives and drugs for a new lease
on life.
"It changed us into better peo-
ple. It made us smarter, and it
makes me feel good," said Marco.
Owen added: "I learnt that you
can make an honest living rather
than the fast, easy life of selling
drugs. You don't have to worry
about cops on our backs. In the
end, working hard will pay off. I
want to be a civil engineer."
The graduates even learnt how
to save lives. They took CPR and
lifeguard courses, giving them a
variety of careers to choose from.
They sat school examinations and
almost every graduate got at least
one "A".
And for those interviewed by
The Tribune, parents and their sons
gave the programme the same
pleasing grade.


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Young gang members get a 'wake-up


call' through National Youth Service


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Cheshire Home's former

residents appealing to

government for 'compassion
.1


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'Y\GF 1 MONDAY, JUL 4,R2005 THE TRIBUN
I *7* S *


The Tribune Limited
Ui I!US ADDICTUSJURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. '--485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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A need to look





at child issues


EDITOR, The Tribune
MICHAEL Jackson's credi-
bility has no doubt been forev-
er tarnished by some of the evi-
dence presented during the
course of his trial. His eccen-
tricities provided much fuel to
the already raging controversy
over his character. And while
he may make for an easy tar-
get for shake-down artists, the
discomfort will long remain
over the habit of a wealthy,
adult, African-American male
having children who are not his
relatives frequently sleeping in
his bed.'
This case has pushed into the
spotlight several issues that have
international relevance. The
vulnerability of children to pae-
dophiles should not be under-
estimated. Over the past few
years, the reports have
increased of children being tar-
geted by internet-savvy per-
verts; and of children being kid-
napped or lured away from


their homes to be used in all
kinds of nefarious activities.
Parents and guardians are often
in denial over charges made by
children, but those who have
specific responsibility in the rais-
ing of their wards should not
take these reports lightly. They
may have substance to them.
Michael Jackson's interna-
tional celebrity status helped to
propel some of these concerns
into the domain of public dis-
course and would have caused
more serious examination of
some of the related issues of child
care and parental responsibility.
It is my strong view that con-
sideration ought to be given to
enacting legislation that will dis-
courage parents and guardian
from arbitrarily dismissing with-
out a thorough investigation,


charges of abuse made by
minors.
There are other questions to
consider as much for the United
States as for the Bahamas: How
far can the justice system be
relied on to provide a fair trial if
an accused does not have the
wherewithal to hire a compe-
tent team of defence lawyers?
An inadequately paid or inex-
perienced defence team might
not be able to investigate prop-
erly the persons bringing
charges against their clients.
We need to ensure that here
in the Bahamas, we do not add
to the number of victims we
may already have. We must
ensure that facilities are in place
to allow children to report cas-
es of sexual and physical abuse,
and that there are proper sys-
tems to do follow-ups investi-
gations.
JERRY ROKER
Nassau
June 16 2005


Pride at Powell win


EDITOR, The Tribune
I WAS surprised, but elated
when Jamaican Asafa Powell
broke the 100 metres record
and in so doing earned the right
to be called not only the fastest
man on earth but the fastest
man in history.
I chalked up my elation to
regional pride.
We must congratulate our fel-
low West Indian who almost
from the very start of his inter-
national career indicated that
he was going to be something
special, whatever his own dis-
appointment at what he and his
handlers may well have consid-
ered his disappointing showing
at the last Olympics held in
Athens.
Such was his confidence, born
not so much out of the normal
sprinter's hubris but actual self-
knowledge, that he actually
served notice that he was going
to take aim sooner rather than
later at what is track and field's
most coveted record.
Powell's feat, then, is the cap-
stone of a fine athletic run by a
Jamaica in particular and the
Caribbean in general, with
Cuba, Trinidad and Tobago and
last but certainly not least the
Bahamas having surprised many
by their ability to match strides
with the world's best given the
relative poverty of the islands
and the consequential make-do
facilities with which their would-
be world beaters had to contend
with, at least in their early years
before their demonstrated abil-
ity won them scholarships to the
training wonderland that is the
United States.


We do not expect that the
United States will ever close its
doors to Caribbean competitors
as Britain so effectively did with
West Indian cricketers, but even
an athletic icon such as the great
Carl Lewis has been heard to
mutter complainingly about the
easy access that non-Americans
have to American facilities on
their way to competing against
and beating Americans.
A word to the wise, then,
would be that we in the
Caribbean should be seeking to
continually raise the level of our
own facilities, if not so much to
prepare for an American block-
ade but to invest in one of the


things we have demonstrated
over decades that we do best.
We can understand West Indian
governments, considering the
demands of, say, national secu-
rity, education and health, not
perceiving sports as a high pri-
ority.
But some way, some how we
must rise to the challenge and
find the requisite funds to pro-
vide our athletes of all disci-
plines with state-of-the training
facilities here at home. We real-
ly have no choice.
JERRY ROKER
Nassau
June 30 2005


The problem



with jetskis


EDITOR, The Tribune
I READ that your Minis-
ter of Transport is about to
introduce new, badly needed
legislation to control the oper-
ation of jetskis in the
Bahamas
I can vouch for how badly
and dangerously they are
operated here. Several days
ago, one driven by a boy rent-
ing the machines on the beach
- twice drove over the pro-
tective buoys in front of our
hotel and came within inches
of hitting swimmers.
We tried to get the number,
but it was (we believe pur-
posely) printed so small, that
it was impossible to read
unless you were within a few
feet of it.


On our lake in Upper New
York State the requirement
for jetskis is that the identifi-
cation numbers/letters be at
least 10 inches tall and
short/simple so they can be
read at a distance. For
instance, 3P67, 7TU3, P9D.
Amazingly, with the intro-
duction of this identification
system on our lake the opera-
tors of jetskis "cleaned up
their act" and, we believe,
hired more responsible youths
to run them.
Your Ministry of Transport
might consider incorporating
this jetski identification
method in the new legislation
she is proposing.
L BASIL COOKE
June 21 2005


LA CASITA
The Art of Island Living


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A-:'AGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


' 1
I


* ; 4 IV % Awn
















Lively politics the curse of





all developing countries


There is an old Chinese
saying that goes "may
you live in interesting times".
Unfortunately for many devel-
oping countries, politicians sel-
dom seem to take this saying
the way it was intended by the
Chinese as a curse!
And so we have, from Latin
America to Africa and South
East Asia, the repeated specta-
cle of developing countries
(especially those with an exec-
utive-presidency form of gov-
ernment) falling prey to their
own taste for political theatre.
Ironically, it has been coun-

The idea that
weak, constantly
changing
government has
been anything
other than a
brake on the pace
of development
in developing
countries is
further belied by
the experience
of those few
developing
countries that
have actually
developed.

tries which have maximised
constraints on executive power
(using presidential term limits
and strengthened multiparty
institutions) that have fared


PERSPECTIVES


ANDREW
worse, especially in Latin
America.
In Ecuador, the term limit-
induced game of political musi-
cal chairs has moved into high
gear in recent years. With last
April's dubious removal of
Lucio Gutierrez (the seventh
president in eight years) mat-
ters now seem set to get worse
before they get better. Mr
Gutierrez' main transgression
(apart from pardoning a virtu-
ally admittedly insane succes-
sor by the nickname of El Loco)
was to offend elements of the
country's political elite by actu-
ally doing what he said he
would once elected to office.
In the end, his.removal was
so fishily well-orchestrated that
few doubted its support among
the same First World govern-
ments that sold the country the
notoriously adversarial, unsta-
ble system of government it
possesses.

All over Latin America
the story repeats
itself. The adoption of an ideal
borrowed from developed soci-
eties (severely adversarial poli-
tics and a tightly time-con-
strained executive branch) has
clearly hindered, rather than
assisted, the development
process.
No sooner is a potentially
successful development pro-
gramme commenced before it
is either abandoned by a pop-
ulist successor (as in Peru, fol-
lowing Fujimori) or violently
overthrown by foreign interests
assisted by opposition elements
(as in Guatemala, following


ALLEN


Arbenz in 1954).
And, as the two foregoing
examples demonstrate, this phe-
nomenon of lively, populist
electoral politics is a threat to
development agendas of both
left and right.

T he idea that weak, con-
stantly changing gov-
ernment has been anything oth-
er than a brake on the pace of
development in developing
countries is further belied by
the experience of those few
developing, countries that have
actually developed.
In every single one of these
there has been one party that
has remained in power for an
entire generation, presiding
over the birth of a new eco-
nomic culture.
Thus, the PAP in Singapore,
the LDP in Japan and the KMT
in Taiwan have all managed
(despite undoubted problems
of corruption, nepotism and
unaccountability) to construct
successful models of economic
development for the benefit of
their people.
In Africa (which is so often
cited as an example of the per-
ils of straying from western
political conventions), the situ-
ation is, of course, complicated
by a tribalism that has under-
mined governments of every
imported nomenclature, from
the socialist, Mengistu Mariam
in Ethiopia, to the Islamist thugs
in the Sudan.
But even in the context of


that troubled continent, the
impulse to mimic the political
environment of the west can be
taken too far. Zambia is per-
haps the best example. That
country awoke some years ago
from a long, torpid sleep under
the dead-hand leadership of
Kenneth Kaunda just in time to
catch the 90s spirit of tri-
umphalist multi-partyism.
His successor, the corrupt,
incompetent Frederick Chilu-


The impulse to
mimic the
political
environment of
the west can be
taken too far

ba, left office a few years ago
under the same circumstances
as did Mr Kaunda facing a
politically motivated but possi-
bly justified legal investigation
by his replacement.

D uring all the tumul-
tuous last decade and
a half, Zambia has barely
budged ahead on any front oth-
er than that of providing rivet-
ing politics.
Mr Chiluba's successor is
now himself facing allegations
of corruption from, among oth-
ers, Mr Kaunda.
By contrast, President Yoweri
Museveni of Uganda, in office
since 1986, has proved to be one
of the African continent's most
successful leaders of recent times.
He has spent the last 19 years
creating a unique, homegrown


I


and remarkably effective pro-
gramme of administrative dis-
cipline and nation-building,
achieving an average growth
rate in excess of six per cent
over the course of his tenure in
office.
Incidentally, it was also Mr
Museveni, together with the
Tutsi leader Paul Kagame, who
was most instrumental in bring-
ing to an end the Rwandan
genocide of 1994.

C oming to office after
the successive back-
ward tyrannies of Idi Amin and
Milton Obote (and after many
years spent fighting in the bush
against both those regimes), Mr
Museveni immediately set about
creating a body politic capable
of resisting the tribal-based Idep-
tocracy into which post-colonial
African democracy has almost
always degenerated.
To achieve this, as one of his
first moves, he banished politi-
cal parties altogether, while


allowing democratic contests for
many positions, including his
own.
Predictably, President
Museveni, despite the endorse-
ment of the World Bank and
western donor community for
his good economic manage-
ment, has offended some in the
west, whose lack of exposure
leads them to push their own
brand of democracy, universal-
ly, and without regard to con-
siderations of culture and his-
tory.
There is no way that the
transformation of Ugandan pol-
itics and society that has taken
place under Mr Museveni could
have been possible had he been
subject to a term limit, together
with all of the other traditional
features of a western-patterned
constitution.
It is to be hoped that his sup-
porters in parliament carry out
their promise and remove the
silly constitutional impediment
to his leading Uganda well into
the foreseeable future.


S. ............We Keep You Talking
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MONDAY
JULY 4
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
7:30 Island Hopping: 52nd Annual
National Family Island Regatta
Highlights
9:00 National Education Conference
10:30 Morning Joy
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Mirror Mirror: Family Origins
1:30 A Cultural Corner
2:00 Legends From Whence We
Came: Sir Arthur Foulkes
3:00 Atlanta 1996: "Getting It Done"
4:00 Da Down Home Show
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Island Spotlight: Inagua
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 A Woman of Substance: Hon.
Cynthia Pratt
10:00 The National Arts Gallery of The
Bahamas
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, P/Ar'" "


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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


k ft


c


*o






THE. TBCAJL4EWS


Grad s of



straw course



in cele ation


* AGRICULTURAL and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) board member, representing
the Ministry of Finance, Mrs Janeen McCartney looking at a handbag created by
13-year-old Savannah Sound resident Kahshann Munningsduring the Eleuthera
Handicraft Straw TrainingProgram Graduation Ceremony, held at the Ministry of
Education Resource Centre in Savannah Sound, Eleuthera. Kahshann was the youngest
participant and one of only three males who took part in the workshop. His mother,
Emily, was also a participant.
(BIS photo: Eric Rose)


* GOVERNOR'S Harbour resident Mark Palmer showing his sons Johnny (left) and
Daniel some of the work produced by graduates, during the Eleuthera ceremony.


* PERMANENT
Secretary at the
Ministry of Trade and
Industry Helen Ebong
speaking at the
ceremony, which took
place last Friday. The
Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial
Corporation (BAIC)
organized the 10-day
course, which was
designed to encourage
and train persons to
become self-employed
in the art of producing
Bahamian-made
handicraft products.


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MUNIUAY, JULY 4, ZUUb, I-wAc. /





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expect nothing less than the highest
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- Glen Ritchie
Vice President of Operations



t C olinaImperial
Insurance Ltd.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


A






THE RIBUE MODAYJULY4,205,OPGEL


qfw


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THE TRIBUNE


i'L.-.-7"K: 1wi- 1 ) .2 : ..'.'I::[










Tropical depression prompts



warnings for parts of Mexico


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its international submarine fiber optic cable system
linking the Bahamas with the continental United
States. The successful candidate must possess a
Bachelors degree in telecommunications or
engineering equivalent with extensive
telecommunications experience, highly specialized
and well-honed technical skills, and knowledge of
Digital Transport Hierarchy. Candidates must have
direct working experience with (OC) transport products
and experience in the design of OC-192 DWDM
SONET rings including FDP, EDSX DCS power and
synchronization. In addition, the successful candidate
must have strong reasoning abilities for analysis
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and strong written and verbal communication skills for
corporate executive level presentations. It is further
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successful candidate will be expected to provide
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Resumes are to be submitted by hand or e-mail by
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Robinson Road @ Marathon
P.O. Box CB 13050
Nassau, Bahamas


rbadderley@cablebahamas.com


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Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


L --s


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


---


* ft








~HE RIBNE ONDY, ULY4,205,PAG Wr


Sons of Thunder make their debut


Children, homes



and boomerangs

THERE is an interesting
trend developing in single-fam-
ily homes: the kids are not leav-
ing.
In the US, Census Bureau
statistics show a 14 per cent
increase in the number of fam-
ilies with grown children living
at home.
Rising tuition, a sluggish job-1IS
market and the high cost of rent
are the major reasons that adult
children are moving back or
staying at home. In Nassau, it is
common for rent for a one-bed-
room apartment to exceed $700
a month!
Instead of sharing a place Listing #CR1890 Listing #CR1891
with ten roommates, kids are 5,170 sq. ft. retail/office space Attractive Executive office space
opting to stay with their folks Centrally located Ready for immediate occupancy
and save money for down pay- Customer parking & on duty security Reception area & conference room
m d Ideal for a Bank & ATM machine Spectacular Harbour views
ments on their own home. This Close to Paradise Island Bridge Easy access, ample parking
presents a wonderful opportu- Negotiable Rental Rate Negotiable Rental Rate
nity for parents to foster their
children's financial security and
responsibility.
Parents, if they are able,
might consider buying a prop- OIOUSE
erty where their child attends
college or university, building':
equity until graduation.
Then you have some choic-
es. Keep it and gain income
'from renting it (although you'll
probably have to hire a mainte-
nance person). Or sell it, likely. iI
at a profit. Listing #H1986 Swimming pool&covered sundeck
Or maybe your son or daugh- Large 5 Bedroom, 4 bath home Lush & tranquil gardens
ter will want to stay. Do not for- Bright, airy oversized kitchen Large children's playground
glIncludes all major appliances Roll down shutters & alarm system
get that Central Bank approval Central A/C, tiled throughout Two car garage and many extras
is required for any foreign pur- Separate laundry room Fnriendly, family oriented community
chases! Maids quarters with bath Price upon request
If you are looking at new
houses and anticipating an adult
child living'at home, look for
amenities like ample parking,
guest suites (remember when
they were "granny suites"?), or
a guesthouse.
Today's real estate market Tracey Barone
offers many options to accom- s R te _- -_
modate this recent trend toward Caves illage, Suite 3, Building 5
"boomerang" kids. P.O. Box N 18414, Nassau


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MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 2, MODAY, ULY 4 2005THE NEWSN


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PUBLIC NOTICE


The
Ltd.
the


Bid for safer streets


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
THE Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation officially
re-launched the National
Road Safety Committee on
Thursday, June 23, at the
Ministry's headquarters on
East Bay Street.
The National Road Safety
Committee, headed by Mr
Jack Thompson, Controller
of the Road Traffic Depart-
ment, seeks to provide a
safer environment on the
streets of the Bahamas,
using education, enforce-
ment and engineering to
enable all to travel in confi-


* MR MICHAEL HUDSON, National Road Safety Committee Co-ordinator (right), speaking a -
the official re-launch of the National Road Safety Committee on Thursday, June 23, at the Ministry's!:
headquarters, East Bay Street. Also from left are Superintendent Burkie. Wright, officer-in-charge of
the Police Traffic Division and committee member; Glenys Hanna-Martin, Minister of Transport and
Aviation; and Mr Jack Thompson, Road Traffic Controller.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen).1


Bahamas Telecommunications Company
(BTC) is pleased to invite Tenders to provide
Company with General Insurance.


Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender
Specification from BTC's security 4desk1ocated
in its Administrative building on John F. Kennedy
Drive, between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm
Monday through Friday.

Tenders should be sealed and marked "TENDER
FOR GENERAL INSURANCE" and should
be delivered to the attention of:

Mr Michael J. Symonette
President and CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.


Tenders should reach the
administrative office by 5:00pm
Monday, July 18, 2005.


BTC reserves the right to


company's
on or before


reject any or all Tenders.


I. . I


dence, free from fear of
death or injury.
The objectives of the
National Road Safety Com-


mittee are to save lives,
reduce serious conse-
quences of injury and facil-
itate recovery, formulate


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49hours Unit 2 years Old


200AMP Automatic Transfer

Weatherproof Enclosure





Tel. 356-0372 days

424-2173 nig hts


strategies aimed at reduce d
ing road-related fatalities
and to promote best prac-
tices by road users.
Additionally, the commit,
tee will make recommenda-'
tions to the Permanent Sece-
retary in the Ministry of4
Transport and Aviation!
regarding laws, regulations,
policies and other measures
deemed necessary for.
implementation by the Gov-,
ernment of the Bahamas.

Collaboration'
Mr Michael Hudson, thai
National Road Safety Cd-J
ordinator, will work in col-
laboration with Mr Thomp-
son, and the National Road
Safety Committee in the.
implementation of pro.-.
grammes, policies and-
strategies for a safer envi
ronment on the roads of the
Bahamas.
As co-ordinator, Mr Hucd
son is responsible for re&-J
establishing the Police Roac4
Crash data base and co,-
ordinate road safety pro-
grammes, policies and ini-
tiatives in conjunction with.
the private sector and gov,-
ernment agencies, and for
determining the most effeo-
tive mechanism for. .thq
implementation and admin-
istration of the Road Safety,
Action Programmes.
Statistics by the National
Road Safety Committee.
showing traffic fatalities
over the past five years
reveal the following:
In New Providence, there;
were 49 traffic fatalities in
2000; 33 in 2001; 35 in 200Q;
19 in 2003; 26 in 2004 and
19 in 2005.
In Grand Bahama, there
were 14 traffic fatalities ihI.
2000; 12 in 2001; 10 in 2002;
11 in 2003; eight in 2004;
and seven in 2005.
Other Family Islands,
there were 13 traffic faftali-
ties in 2000 and 2001 respec-
tively; nine in 2002; five in
2003; 16 in 2004; and two in
2005.
Statistics also revealed
that more males than
females were killed in traffic
accidents.
Members of the National
Road Safety Committee are[
Mr Thompson, Mr Hudson,-
Mr Errol McPhee, coordi-
nator, Transport Policy and
Planning Unit, Road Traf-,
fic Department: Mr Robiri
Hardy, representatives
Bahamas General Insurance
Association; Mr Eric Rose,,
representative, Bahamas,
Information Services; Mr,
Barry Griffin, youth reprde-
sentative, Texaco Youth
Spokesperson; Mr Howard'
Newbold, representative,
Ministry of Education; Mei
Robert Garraway, repre-
sentative, Ministry of Public
Works; Supt Burkie Wright;
representative, Royal
Bahamas Police Force; Pas-,
tor Charles Lewis, acting
representative, Bahamas;
Christian council; Ms Sher-
inette Bodie, representative,
Ministry of Health; Ms
Stephanie Rahming,:8
representative, Grand.
Bahama District; Mr Victor,.
Brow n, representative,'
Department of Publiti
Health; and Sgt David"
Lockhart, Royal Bahamas
Police Force.


I.-= I


BUSINESS DIRECTORY IN PRINT & ONLINE

Bahamas Golden Pages invites
suitably qualified and experienced
persons to apply for the position of
Sales Executives
Interested persons should hand deliver
the application to:
Bahamas Golden Pages
A & K Mini Plaza,
Upstairs, Village Rd

Tel: ww.bhamasgp.co394-7988

Tel: 394-7988


THE TRIBUNEa


PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005







THE TIBUNEMONDA, JUL 4,O205, PGEW1


in the Bahamas


MINISTER of Transport and Aviation Glenys Hanna-Martin at the official re-launch of the
National Road Safety Committee on Thursday, June 23, at the Ministry's headquarters, East Bay Street.
At left is Superintendent Burkie Wright, officer-in-charge of the Police Traffic Division and member
of the committee.
(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)


GLENYS Hannma-Martin, Minister of Transport and Aviation (seated second from right), with
members of the National Road Safety Committee on Thursday, June 23, at the Ministry's headquarters,
East Bay Street. Also seated from left are Mrs Lorraine Armbrister, Undersecretary, Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation; Mr Jack Thompson, Road Traffic Controller; and Ms Stephanie Rahming, Assis-
tant Controller, Road Traffic Department, Grand Bahama. Standing from left are Mr Errol McPhee,
Coordinator of Transport Policy and Planning Unit, Road Traffic Department; Mr Howard Newbold,
representative, Ministry of Education; Mr Robert Garraway, representative, Ministry of Public
Works; Mr Robin Hardy, representative, Bahamas General Insurance Association; Mr Michael R Hud-
son, Coordinator of the National Road Safety Committee; Mr Barry Griffin, youth representative, Tex-
aco Youth Spokesperson; Superintendent Burkie Wright, officer-in-charge, Police Traffic Division;
Mr Victor Brown, representative, Department of Public Health; and Sergeant David Lockhart,
Police Traffic Division.
(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)


"When my life work is ended, and I cross the swelling tide,
When the bright and glorious morning I shall see,
I shall know my Redeemer when I reach the other side,
And His smile will be the first to welcome me."


Today Mama would have celebrated her 90th birthday here on earth, but God took her to
her heavenly home. She is now with the Lord experiencing untold joy, and that glad reunion
with all of her loved ones who have gone before.
We, the family of the late Olga Viola McCartney, wish to express our sincere thanks and
appreciation to all for their many expressions of sympathy on the sudden passing of our
dear mother, grand-mother, and great grand-mother.
It is most difficult to find words to adequately express our thanks to our numerous families,
friends, and neighbors for the acts of kindness during our time of bereavement. Your display
of caring and kindness through your prayers, cards, visits, telephone calls, meals, floral
arrangements, encouraging words of comfort, just by "being there", and whatever you did
to console our hearts will always be remembered.
Special thanks and appreciation are extended to Senior Pastor Tom Roberts, Pastors William
McCartney, Errol Jackson, Dr. James Shearer, Edwin Dorset, Bradley King, George Berry,
nd Deacona of East Street Gospel Chapel, Pastor Doctor Edward Allen, Abundant Life
Chapel,Evangelist Frank Perry, Spanish Wells Gospel Chapel, Nurse Ruth Braynen, Dr.
Artn Sawyer, Dr. Conville Brown, family and friends from the United States of America,
Gaind Bahama, Eleuthera, and'Long IslandThe East Street Gospel Chapel Family, and
QA-] L2,--tk- z n.l:::. ::, :,/:.. :.:: :: .. ...... .. ... ... .:.Y,...


PRICEWATERHOUsECOOPERS U

POSITION AVAILABLE FOR

SENIOR ASSOCIATES

PricewaterhoueCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose qualifications
make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.
Prospective candidates should have at least three (3) years accounting and auditing
experience and be computer literate.
The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and other areas
of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different levels of
experience and skills, is designed to reward high performance. In addition, the firm
provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund benefits. Also, as a team
member of PricewaterhouseCoopers there are opportunities to work in another country
where PricewaterhouseCoopers has an office.
Please submit your application with Curriculum Vitae to:
Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas


I U


TENDER FOR

PLUMBING SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecbmmunications Company Ltd is
pleased to invite qualified companies to apply for tender
for Plumbing Services.

Interested companies may collect a specification
document from BTC's Administrative Building, 21 John
F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00am to
5:00pm Monday to Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender
for Plumbing Services" and delivered to the attention
of: -

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administrative office
by 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 6th, 2005.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid
opening on Thursday, July 7th, 2005 at 3:00 P.M. at
BTC's Perpall Tract location.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4, MODAY, ULY 4 2005THE TIBUN


Cache of fireworks go off


FROM page one
Late last night, fire director
Jeffery Deleveaux said three
people had been slightly hurt
in the incident.
He said 18 trailers were
damaged in the blaze, some
containing furniture, others
roofing materials.
He said six trailers contained
fireworks. "It was extremely


difficult to contain the fire. We
cooled the containers until
they burned out."
Mr Deleveaux said he
understood the fireworks were
for the July 4 American Inde-
pendence celebrations.
Tribune reporter Tiffany
Grant said: "There was thick
black smoke and fireworks
seemed to be going off at one
point."


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Security concern




after airport fire


FROM page one
Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin will
address the public this week on
airport security and changes
that need to be made, she said.
"We have already spent mil-
lions to improve security at our
Family Island airports, but now
we also have to depend on the
help of the people of these
islands. i
"Together with the govern-
ment they can help ensure the


safety at the airports," she said.
Mrs Pratt expressed dismay
that the San Andros airport fire
was set despite constant police
presence.
"The police station is right at
the airport, police are there 24/7,
and since the terminal is such a
small building, police should be
able to man it," she said.
However, press liaison
officer Chief Supt Hulan
Hanna said the arsonist
would have had easy access
to the airport compound, as it


is "very public and open."
Mrs Pratt believed the arson-
ist must have been a local or
"in cahoots with the locals."
Meanwhile, investigations
continue, and although there
have not been any "significant
breakthroughs" yet, police are
following several leads, said Mr
Hanna.
"The police will carry on
their investigations and do what
they have to do. They will not
rest until they get to the bot-
tom of this," said Mrs Pratt.


-1m


Man dies after trying



to repair his boat


FROM page one
American tourists passing by
on a boat pulled up alongside
the small fishing vessel and
offered assistance.
. While help was being ren-
dered, the Defence Force dis-
covered the body of Mr Pinder
floating face down near the fish-
ing boat.
The body was retrieved and
brought to Nassau, where an


autopsy will be performed.
Police, however, do not sus-
pect foul play.
Control Officer with the
Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA) Court-
ney Curtis said that normally
there should be no danger in
diving under a boat while the
engine is turned off.
"If you are an experienced
swimmer, which most fishermen
are, and you are familiar with


your vessel and the weather
conditions are good, then there
shouldn't be a problem," he
said.
Mr Curtis, however, pointed
out that if the boat moves
while a person is underneath
it, due to winds or water cur-
rents, "then that person could
easily be hit by any part of the
vessel, and be knocked uncon-
scious," drowning as a conse-
quence.


S -


-I
*S


I -

rlaI


*s Syndicated Contenti .

Available from Commercial News Providers"


S-. -
"~ "8.


-. '.
.-- .
- '- *- -


Providence Technology Group
Providence Technology Group is one of the leading providers of business critical IT solutions in The
Bahamas. Our core values define how we view our clients, our work and our interaction with each other:
1. There is no greater privilege than serving our clients
2. Excellence is the only standard by which we measure our work
3. Enjoyment and laughter are at the centre of all we do

The Role
As Business Manager, you will be responsible for managing all aspects of the day to day operations of
Providence Technology Group. The focus of your role will be on developing a highly productive and high
performing Operations Division. As such, this is not a role for a "maintenance" focused Business Manager.
You must be driven to improve processes and procedures and to deliver a high level of service to internal
and external clients.

You will be part of a small team and, as such, you will be expected to be flexible in your approach and
assist with completing all activities of the Division as required.


Specific Responsibilities Include:
Accounting:


Administration & Reception:


Facilities Management:

Human Resources:
Support & Service:

Processes & Procedures Improvement:


" Management of Accounts Payable & Payroll
* Management of Client Billings & Accounts Receivable
* Bank Reconciliations
" Reception Management
* Procurement Management
* Recruitment & Management of Operations staff
* Lease & Insurances
* Repairs & Maintenance
" Manage Employee Administration & Benefits
* Ensure that the Operations Division provides a high
level of proactive support to the Providence team
* Develop and implement enhanced processes and
procedures to ensure an efficient, effective and
client-focused Operations Division


Minimum Requirements
* Minimum 5 years administration management experience
* Minimum 5 years experience preparing accounts using QuickBooks or similar package
* Demonstrated experience in improving policies and procedures
* Demonstrated experience in delivering a high level of client service
* Bachelors Degree, ideally with an accounting or business management focus

How to Apply
Please eMail resumes no later than Friday 15 July 2005 to: jobs@providenceTG.com

One Montague Place I Level 2 I East Bay Street I P.O. Box N-1081 I Nassau, The Bahamas
T 242.393.8002 F 242.393.8003 I info@providenceTG.com I www.providenceTG.com
NETWORKING SOLUTIONS I CONSULTING & ADVISORY SERVICES I SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS


Providence Technology Group
Providence Technology Group is one of the leading providers of business critical IT solutions in The
Bahamas. Our core values define how we view our clients, our work and our interaction with each other:
1. There is no greater privilege than serving our clients
2. Excellence is the only standard by which we measure our work
3. Enjoyment and laughter are at the centre of all we do

The Role
As Project Manager, you will be responsible for providing a high level of service to 'our clients through
effective project management. You will be required to simultaneously manage multiple projects from end-
to-end and you will be responsible for delivering 100% of projects on time and in budget. This will include:


* Project Planning
* Coordination of Project Teams
* Scope Management


* Risk Management
* Issue Identification & Resolution
* Project Reporting


To be successful in this role, you must have a strong focus on developing and maintaining excellent client
relationships. Your performance will be assessed on the level of client satisfaction that you achieve on
each project and, as such, management of clients' expectations throughout the project lifecycle is an
integral part of the role.

In addition, your role will include assisting with Business Analysis functions as required. Activities will
include developing Functional Specifications and User/Training Guides.

The Opportunity
This is an excellent opportunity to work in a challenging and rewarding environment which
encourages professional development. In addition, Providence offers excellent benefits such as health
and pension plans.


Minimum Requirements
3 years experience in managing multiple IT projects simultaneously using structured project
management processes; ideally both infrastructure and software development projects
Excellent negotiation, contract and scope management skills
Demonstrated experience in establishing and maintaining successful client relationships
Strong attention to detail and excellent organizational skills
Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Bachelor's Degree with an IT or Business Management major

How to Apply
Please eMail resumes no later than Friday 15 July 2005 to: jobs@providenceTG.com





One Montague Place I Level 2 I East Bay Street I P.O. Box N-1081 I Nassau, The Bahamas
T 242.393.8002 F 242.393.8003 I info@providenceTG.com I www.providenceTG.com
NETWORKING SOLUTIONS I CONSULTING & ADVISORY SERVICES I SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS


BUSINESS DIRECTORY IN PRINT & ONLINE

Bahamas Golden Pages invites
suitably qualified and experienced
persons to apply for the position of
Sales Executives
Interested persons should hand deliver
the application to:
Bahamas Golden Pages
A & K Mini Plaza,
Upstairs, Village Rd



Tel: 394-7988 ILA


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.


~DP-i~--------


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


*











Students pay a E



visit to Dame Ivy


* STUDENTS of Tarpum Bay Primary School, Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, paid a courtesy call on Dame Ivy Dumont, Gov-
ernor-General (front centre), at Government House recently. Teachers and parents accompanied the students. The stu-
dents were briefed on the duties of the Governor-General and given a tour of Government House.
(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)


SI *t PRIMARY school students of the Amy Roberts All-age School, Green Turtle Cay, Abaco, recently paid a courtesy 4
" call on Dame Ivy Dumont, Governor-General, at Government House. The students were accompanied by Mrs Maria
Schrack, a teacher, and parents Mrs Mandy Roberts and Mrs Trinia Cooper. The Governor-General is pictured seated LV
with the children. Standing from left are Mrs Roberts, Mrs Schrack and Mrs Cooper. I
(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel) 1 a |


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


.16


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL market using a fixed form


asea on
emaonal
4*'.







PAGE 6, MODAY, ULY 4 2005THE TIBUN


Explosion rocks


4


Cortizone 10. The best
and fastest relief against
insect bites and itches
caused by skin


R o R T S

Congratulates
DELLARESE FRAZIER
Caribbean Hotel Employee of the Year 2005
Cacique Award winner
Cable Beach Resorts family member
aAN Cable Beach Resort employee


At the 2005session of the Caribbean Hotel Industry
Association Bhab n Dellarese Frazier was named Carib-
bean Hotel Employee of the Year. This award honours out-
staning achievement in the regional Hospitality Industry
and now. coupled wiTh her local Cacique Award win, ratifies
her as one of the Stars of the Caribbean",

The management and staff of Cable Beach Resorts.
inrJluing the Radisson family, are pleased to congratulate
ODe lorese onher achievement on this grand stage, and
cebateher as a wod-class success story.


Nassau


PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


:


iSB-*^







iVkL k '1 r It, 0.-U L I.. -i"C, ".I, JL i A.. -. A


LOCALNW


Civil servants




and schools to




use mapping




program


THE government is moving
to meet the demands in the
workplace by training civil ser-
vants in the use of Geographic
Information Systems (GIS), a
computer mapping program.
: Carmen Gomez, under-sec-
retary in the Office of the Prime
Minister, announced the plan
at the launch of the GIS pro-
gramme at the Sadie Curtis Pri-
mary School by the Bahamas
National Geographic Informa-
tion Systems (BNGIS).
I 'As the government advances
its efforts to modernize the civ-
il service, we must ensure that
the Bahamas has a trained
workforce to meet future
demands brought on by increas-
ing use of GIS,' said Mrs
Gomez on June 23.
The BNGIS hosted a field
trip to launch the GIS's youth
club for Sadie Curtis Primary
School.
"Indeed, this event under-
scores the centre's mission to
promote, educate, coordinate
and advance the practical and
efficient use of GIS technology
in the Bahamas," said Mrs
Gomez.
: GIS is a computer-mapping
program that will help teach-
ers and students alike to dis-
cover the geography of the
-world and of-thea.Bahamas at..
the touch of a button. GIS is
'used all over the world as a tool
to conduct research and plan-
ning analysis.
GIS is also an information
system designed for the man-
agement, analysis and display
of spatial data such as coast-
lines, buildings, streets, schools
and much more.
'As the government
advances its efforts to modern-
ize the civil service, we must
ensure that the Bahamas has a
trained workforce to meet
future demands brought on by
increasing use of GIS. This
begins in the school system
where GIS can be integrated
into school curriculum," said
Mrs Gomez.

Expansion

Carol Albury, director of
BNGIS, said eight more schools
will become involved in the pro-
gramme, which will be expand-
ed to schools on the Family
Islands.
GIS can be useful to the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force in
detecting crime; and the Fire
Department in locating fires.
Sadie Curtis Primary School
was the winner of the centre's
GIS quiz that was a part of the
Ministry of Education's Science
and Technology Exhibition held
in March of this year.
As a part of the prize, the stu-
dents won a field trip to the cen-
tre, and Sadie Curtis was also
chosen to initiate the Centre's
GIS youth cclub programme in
2005 with computer systems
donated by James Blake Jr,
president of Destinations.
The computers, along with
GIS software and data provided
by ESRI, Redlands California,
are expected to go a long way in
grooming the next generation
of GIS experts in The Bahamas.
The full implementation of
GIS youth clubs is scheduled to
start in October, with clubs
being established in other
schools in New Providence and
in the Family Islands.

Banner

Mrs Gomez unveiled the cen-
tre's national banner that fea-
tured a small group of students
from Sadie Curtis Primary, who
were photographed during the
Centre's GIS Day Celebrations
in 2001.
"This photograph was select-
ed as the perfect centrepiece for
the banner, exhibiting a unique
moment in time which captures
the essence and thrust of our
efforts to promote geography


and GIS technology, particu-
larly in the academic arena and
among our youth," she said.
Mrs Gomez urged the prin-
cipal, teachers and students of
Sadie Curtis Primary School to


continue their drive for GIS
knowledge and to work closely
with the centre.
Mrs Gomez also thanked Mr
Blake for his contribution to the
staff of the centre.


Rotary visit to Governor General

* KEN Morgan, director of Rotary International (second from right), and his wife, Winnie
Morgan (right), recently paid a courtesy call on Her Excellency Dame Ivy Dumont, Governor
General, at Government House. The Morgans were accompanied by Richard McCombe, acting
district governor (left) and Barry Rassin, past district governor of Rotary International in the
Bahamas. The Governor General (centre) is shown receiving a gift from Mrs Morgan.
(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)


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et Comforters
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EXTRA SAVINGS
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Sunchy Malta ............ 2/$1.25
Rainbow Corned Beef 12 oz .............. 99#
Blue Bird Juice Asst. 11.5fl oz ........... 2/$1.25
Sunchy Apple & Fruit Punch Juice ... 2/.99#


Table Cloths
Place Mats
itchen Curtains
Bed Ruffles
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Chair Covering
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MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


=l -


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q~s


?)





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20. MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
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11 OZ


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


CADBURY

BOURNVITA
400 0




WINN DIXIE
PLAIN &
IODIZED SALT
26- OZ

2/.990


MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACCARONI
16 oz
.990


WD
ULTRA SUPREME
DIAPERS
27, a30, 32, 40


PLANTAINS RIPE CANTALOUPES
& YELLOW CT
EACH 92
2/.99


LIMES 175CT
2.LB
S/. 99
WATERMELON
(WHOLE. 59 PER LB
LB
.69


SPREAD BOWL CH
$ 9ITAL
5 5-LB
LENDER'S
PLAIN, RAISIN & ION BAGELS
3$279
.LB

GREEN GIANT
CORN ON THE COB
4 12 COUNT
GREEN GIANTS
CORN NIBLITS, GREEN BEABS
SWEET PEAS, & MIX VEGETABLES
1 1-OZ


ROMAINE
HEARTS
EACH

POTATOES
BAKING 5.LBS
EACH
is1l 99


SARGENTO
IEESE, MOZZERELLA, MEXICAN,
IAN, CHEDDAR BLENDS AND LITE
a oz
SUNNY DELIGHT
FLORIDA
CITRUS PUNCH


CAVANDASH
STRAIGHT CUT POTATOES
32-OZ
PRESTIGE
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS
$649
164 OZ


CHEK


SOADAS ALL
FLAVOURS 2-LTR ...................2/$3.00
THRIFTY MAID
CORNED BEEF 12- OZ ......................... 99
THRIFTY MAID
WHOLE KERNEL K CORN ioe-oz.....$5.89
THRIFTY MAID
SPAGHETTI & SPAGHETTI RINGS
W/MEATBALLS s1- oz.....................99
THRIFTY MAID
LONG GRAIN RICE 20o-LB..............$9.89
W/D
PINE DISINFECTANT 28- oz...........$2.39
WD
CHUNK DOG FOOD 35 -LBS ...........$19.48
WINN DIXIE
MAYONNAISE 32-oz..................3/$3.00


PORK LOIN TYSON HICKORY
END CUT TWIN PACK GLEN MEAT
CHOPS GAME HENS FRANKS
LB PER PACK EACH
$J T9 $799 $399


PRESTIGE WHITE & YELLOW
REGULAR MEAT BOLOGNA AMERICAN CHEESE
Il a3L99
LB


HUNTS
BBQ SAUCES
ALL
FLAVOURS
18 OZ
2/$300


POST
CEREALS
ASSORTED
13.5 OZ .
$399

BISSELL
SPRAY STARCH
PROMO
22 OZ
S S99


BAHAMA
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ



CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA WATER
66 OZ
$649


REYNOLDS
STANDARD
FOIL
25 FT
$1 49


GLADE
AIR
FRESHNERS
9-OZ
2/$300


PASTA RONI


4.6 OZ
9 59

WESSON
OIL REGULAR
VEGETABLE &
CORN OIL
48 OZ
$289


ROBIN HOOD

GRITS
5 LBS



PILLSBURY
CAKE
MIXES &
FROSTINGS
16/18 OZ
S$ 69


JBI
COCONUT
WATER
17 OZ
.99


HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQUEEZE BOTTLE
36 OZ
$219


GATORADE
ALL
FLAVOURS
20 OZ



ROBIN HOOD

FLOUR
5 LB
*100 **


RUFFLES
ASSORTED
FLAVOURS
(NASSAU
ONLY)
6.5 OZ



MCCORMICK
GRILLE MATES
SPICES
3.1 OZ
$299

RICE LAND
REG &
PERFECTED RICE
5 LB
$239


I










Albanians vote in test of transition


-








"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Contentr
Available from Commercial News Providers"


0 -


& (Trematorium
Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas


MR. PINDER
will be held on
A-I Tuesday, July 5th,
2005 at 3:00 p.m.
at Christian Life
Church, Seabreeze
; Lane. Officiating will
I be Pastor Jay
Simms. Cremation
will follow.
Mr. Pinder is survived by his wife; Betty;
two (2) sons; David and Gregory Pinder;
one (1) daughter; Michelle Lightbourn; one
(1) stepson; Rico Brown; one (1) brother;
Hilbert Pinder; one (1) sister; Agnes
Knowles; four (4) grandchildren; Raquel,
Amanda, Christy and Dylan; father-in-law;
Valbon Brown; daughter-in-law; Germaine
Pinder and other relatives and friends
including; Alphonsa and Sarah Smith, Stella
Capron, Bernice and Joanna Brown and
especially Cecil and Annie Flowers.
Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers'
Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest
and York Streets on Monday from 10:00
a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Tuesday from
9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. and from 2:00
p.m. until service time at the church.


$^ 99
12 OZ,,


s3 49
12-OZ


With an additional $1500.00 Customer Cash Back
2 year or 30000 Mile Warranty


License And Inspection To Birthday, Floor Mats, Full Tank Of Gas,
2 Year Road Side Assistance, First 5 Services To 12,000 Miles Free
See The Full Line Of All Your Favourite Fords At


FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


o








PAGE 22, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


MONDAY EVENING JULY 4, 2005 1
7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- A Capitol Fourth Barry Bostwick hosts the 25th an- A Capitol Fourth Barry Bostwick hosts the 25th an-
WPBT show FYI Baiti- niversary show, featuring Gloria Estefan, the Beach niversary show, featuring Gloria Estefan, the Beach
more quilt. (N) Boys, the O'Jays and Ronan Tynan. Boys, the O'Jays and Ronan Tynan. [n
The Insider (N) Everybody Two and a Half CSI: Miami The CSIs investigate Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacu-l
0 WFOR n (CC) Loves Raymond Men f (CC) the possible murder of Jake Sulli- lar 2005 (Live) n (CC)
"Ally's F (CC) van, a video-game tester. (CC)
SAccess Holly- Fear Factor A swing across gym- Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Medium "Lucky" Allison realizes that
i WTVJ wood (N) (CC) nastic rings, suspended below a hel- Spectacular: The Light of Free- her brother shares her abilities. ,n
___ icopter hovering over water. dom (Live) Cl (CC) (CC)
Deco Drive Nanny 911 A nanny is sent to aid an Nanny 911 "Dunleavy Family" C News (CC)
O WSVN exhausted couple with seven girls, (CC)
all under the age of 8. (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Nick & Jessica's Tour of Duty (CC) An American Celebration at
SWPLG (CC ) Ford's Theatre: A Salute to the
Troops (N) A (CC)

(:00) Cold Case * WINDTALKERS (2002, Action) Nicolas Cage, Adam Beach, Peter Stormare. A troubled Marine must pro-
A&E Files (CC) tect a Navajo code talker. (CC)
Hardtalk BBC World World Business BBC World Click Online BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News Reportews News
BET 106 & Park: Red BET Awards '05 Honoring outstanding achievements in music, sports and entertainment, at the Kodak Theatre
BET Carpet in Los Angeles.
CBC Coronation DUCT TAPE FOREVER (2002, Comedy) Steve Smith, Patrick McKen- The National (CC)
Street (CC) na. Red Green and friends enter a contest in Minnesota. (CC)
C Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien,,L
CNN (:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
C N Cooper 360 (CC)
S *', BLUE COLLAR COMEDY THE ORIGINAL LATIN KINGS OF COMEDY (2002, Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV
COM TOUR RIDES AGAIN (2004, Docu- Comedy) Paul Rodriguez and other comics perform in Law" ) (CC) "Gadgets" I
mentary) (CC) concert. (CC) (CC)
COURT Power, Privilege Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
UR l & Justice & Justice "Woodward" & Justice & Justice
That's So Raven INSPECTOR GADGET (1999, Adventure) Matthew Broderick, Rupert Phil of the Fu- Sister, Sister Tia
DISN A child irritates Everett, Joely Fisher. A security guard is transformed into a cyborg crime- ture Caveman becomes tongue-
Raven. fighter.'PG' (CC) causes trouble. tied. (
I This Old House Weekend Deco- Fresh Coat Scrapbooking Embellish This! Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty
DIY N(CC) rating ________
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx
vv Depth Tagestema Depth
101-Bigger Cel- 101 Even Bigger Celebrity Oops! 101 Even Bigger Celebrity Oops! 101 Even Bigger Celebrity Oops!
E! _,ebrity Oops!
OESPN 00) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. (Live) Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
ESPNI o00) Beisbol MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at Colorado Rockies. From Coors Field in Denver. (Live)
,E rNI Esta Noche .
WTN Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
r... 'Lady _I_
S(TV :00) FitNation Chasing Lance t (CC) FitNation "All Stressed Out Manag- The Extremists The Extremists
FIT TV ning stress. AC (CC) ( (CC)
FO NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
F N Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL (:00)MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Chicago White Sox. From U.S. Cellular Field Best Damn Sports Show Period
r NFL in Chicago. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC)
GOLF :31Golf Channel Academy Live (:43) Golf Channel Academy Playing Lessons 08) Champions Tour Learning
OvLr Jim cLean. (Live) IICenter
G N Who Wants to Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (I Who Wants to Be a Millionaire Who Wants to Be a Millionaire n
GSN Be a Millionaire (CC) (CC) (CC)
G4Tech Street Fury Street Fury Street Fury Street Fury Street Fury Filter Nextfest Judgment Day
,4- ecn I12005. (N) (N)
STRAIGHT FROM THE HEART (2003) Ter Polo, An- THICKER THAN WATER (2005, Drama) Melissa Gilbert, Lindsay Wagn-
HALL drew McCarthy. Romance grows between a photogra- er, Bian Wimmer. A woman sets out to find her late father's former wife.
_____ pher and a Wyoming rancher. (CC) (CC)
Holmes on Rooms That Design U Trans- Debbie Travis' Facelift "Suzanne's Holmes on Homes "Bar None" ,C
HGTV Homes'Ramp Rock Rec room forming a livin Kitchen" n (CC) (CC)
Revamp" (CC) makeover. l ,room. ) (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W. Scham- This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Love a Child
IN, .r(CC) bach (CC) (CC) day
Xiaolin Show- Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends Imagin- Will & Grace "A Everybody Everybody
KTLA down (CC) Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air ing what might Chorus Lie" C Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
ISabrna erased. I (CC) have been. CC) (CC) A (CC) The Toaster
DEADLY ENCOUNTER (2004, Suspense) Laura A FRIEND OF THE FAMILY (2005, Suspense) Kim Coates, Laura Harris,
LIFE Leighton, Al Goulem, Daniel Magder. A stalker terror- Eric Johnson. Premiere. A woman suspects her husband's business part-
izes a woman and her young son. (CC) ner is a killer. (CC)
MSNBC 00) Coming MSNBC Investigates: Fireworks: The Long War (N) Scarborough Country
Mv,,, BC ,Home ,Fast Burn ,
NI K Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Drake & Josh Full House Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of The Cosby
I K Boy Genius SquarePants C "Smart Girl" (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show C (CC)
NTV Still Standing Fear Factor "Co-ed Models" C House "Cursed" A (CC) News C (CC) News
=NVl "Still Single" l (CC)
OLN E-Force Cycling Tour de France -- Stage 3. Stage 3, from La ChAftaigneraie to Tours, France. (Same-day Tape)
SPEED NBS 24-7 (N) Inside Nextel Cup (N) Pinks! Texas Hardtails NASCAR Nation NBS 24-7
SPEEDI_________ ________"Pilot"
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
S :00) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. From Tumer Field in Atlanta. (Live) Everybody Everybody
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
"No Roll" (CC) Frank is jealous.
(:00) Untold Sto- Untold Stories of the E.R, "Red Untold Stories of the E.R. A baby BTK Killer Next Door? Friends and
TLC ries of the E.R. Blanket" A patientpasses out for no is losing consciousness for no ap- neighbors discuss the man charged
(CC) apparent reason. (CC)parent reason. (N) (CC) in the BTK serial killings.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Patient Zero" Detec- The Closer "Show Yourself Brenda Law & Order The beating death of
TNT der Who Let the tives probe a deadly carjacking in- vestigates sniper-style murders, a youth hockey coach points toward
Dogs Ou" volving SARS. (CC)(DVS) N) a forceful team player. C
TOON Grim Adven- Home for Imagi- Scooby-Doo and the Monster of Mexico Teen Titans Dragon Ball Z
TO N= tures nary Friends
TV5 (:00) Thalassa Elephas maximus Les 16ephants et D'ici et TV5 Le Journal
v ,_leeshommes. (Partie 1 de 3) d'ailleurs
TW (6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC lPM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC),_
U NIV :00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Cristina Miss Cirugia Pldstica.

00) Monk Monk "Mr. Monk and the Kid" A tod- Monk "Mr. Monk Meets the Candidate" An obsessive-compulsive detec-
USA Someone tries to dler finds a finger in a park. (CC) tive probes an assassination attempt on a mayoral candidate. (CC) (DVS)
kill Natalie.
VH1 The Surreal Life The Surreal Life The Surreal Life The Surreal Life n (CC) The Surreal Life "Season 4 Re-
(CC). L(CC) (CC) union" C (CC)
WG (:00 MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. (Live) WGN News at Nine n (CC)

Everybody 7th Heaven Annie is upset to leam Summerland Ava is disappointed to WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond that Matt and Sarah will not be learn that Johnny and Mona have Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"The Toasfer" home for Thanksgiving. (CC) moved in together. Cl (CC) & M(r. G (CC)
...Jeopardy! (N) One on One Flex AII of Us Robert Girlfriends Joan Half & Half n Dr.Phil
WSBK (CC) getsa new part- watches liadur- needs a date for (CC)
___ner. Cl (CC) ing her date. the party. C
(6:15) ** THE Sex and the City Sex and the City Six Feet Under "Eat a Peach" Ruth The Comeback Entourage Eric
HBO-E N-LAWS (2003) "Catch-38" l "Out of the Frying finds a new way to unwind. (N) n Valerie goes to regrets the past.
__PG-13'(CC (CC) Pan" (CC) NewYork.(CC) (CC) n (CC)
O-.. (5:45) ** ** STUCK ON YOU (2003, Comedy) Matt Damon, Greg Kinnear, Eva ** ALEX & EMMA (2003) Kate
HBO-P WHITE SQUALL Mendes. Conjoined twins star on a TV show with Cher. C, PG-13' (CC) Hudson. A struggling writer falls for
(1996)'PG-13' his stenographer. l 'PG-13'


*** CURLY SUE (1991, Comedy) James Belushi, (:15) ** THE IN-LAWS (2003, Comedy) Michael Douglas, Albert
H BO-W Alisan Porter, Kelly Lynch. A girl and her mentor con Brooks, Robin Tunney. A CIA agent wreaks havoc on his future in-law. t,
their way into a lawyer's heart. Cl 'PG' (CC) 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:45) * RUNAWAY JURY (2003, Suspense) * THE WITCHES OF EASTWICK (1987, Comedy) Jack Nicholson,
H BO-S John Cusack, Gene Hackman. A man tries to manipu- Cher, Susan Sarandon. Three divorcees try to conjure up their "dream
late an explosive trial. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) man." C 'R' (CC)
M.AX E i(600) *O ** RESIDENT EVIL: APOCALYPSE (2004, Horror) (:45) ** THE ** THE PEACEMAKER (1997,
MAX-EI SEA OF LOVE E Milla Jovovich, Sienna Guillory. Survivors of a deadly QUALITY OF Suspense) George Clooney, Nicole
(1989) 'R' (CC) virus battle zombies. 'R' (CC) MERCY (1976) Kidman. Cl 'R' (CC)
(6:30) ** z MAN ON FIRE (2004, Crime Drama) *** THE SALTON SEA (2002, Drama) Val Kilmer, :45) Passion
MUOMAX Denzel Washington, Dakota Fanning. A bodyguard Vincent D'Onofrio. A musician descends into the world Cove "Ten Years
takes revenge on a girl's kidnappers. n 'R 'CC) of meth addicts. A 'R' (CC) Later" l
(6:15) BOAT ** TIMELINE (2003, Fantasy) Paul Walker, Frances O'Connor, Gerard Penn & Teller: Penn & Teller:
SHOW TRIP (2003)'R' Butler. iTV Premiere. Adventurers travel back to 1300s wartime France. Bulls...! "Signs Bulls...! (iTV) t)
(CC) Cl 'PG-13' (CC) From Heaven" (CC)
M... (5:45)** *** THE SCHOOL OF ROCK (2003, Comedy) Jack Black, Joan Cu- ** DICKIE ROBERTS: FORMER
TMC THE COTTON sack, Mike White. Premiere. An unemployed guitarist poses as a teacher: CHILD STAR (2003) David Spade.
CLUB (1984) 'R' C, 'PG-13'(CC) Premiere. ,C 'PG-13' (CC)


The

Show

and


Thursdays






Blue-, i


Time: Seeond Floor of T
Doors open 11 p .


Admission:
$7 w! Movie Tickets
$10 withoPut
Movie Pass Giveawayf


Le-t- Ckarliee tke
BBakamian Pui ppe-t+ anid
kis side-kick IDeek pt4+
some- smiles o yoVAIr
kids's fccess.


Bri yotu ckilddeien to the
McHacppy Hoa cit McDonald's in
Oak's Field every Tkhursday
fpom 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the-
monVo of 3Aly 2005.


Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Los of Fun.


i'm lovin' it
i'mnlIovin' itf


THE TRIBUNE








.COMICS PAGE


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Ivory Coast cocoa monitoring




project to stop child labour


a- -


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..~ -


Baker's Bay Club at Great Guana Cay


ENVIRONMENTAL


MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME


Q o




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The Baker's Bay development will be
monitored to ensure that it follows
guidelines set out by the environmental
impact assessment.


The EIA was researched and produced under an arm's
length grant to the University of Miami, which is solely
responsible for its content.

Dr Kathleen Sullivan
Sealey was the principal
investigator and is an ap-
proved consultant for the
BEST Commission, which
is responsible for environ-
mental oversight in The
Bahamas.
Baker's Bay personnel will
coordinate their activities
with the independent envi-
ronmental management team consisting of the University
of Miami, the College of the Bahamas and the Institute of
Regional Conservation.

Regular reports will be submitted to the BEST Commis-
sion comparing field research to pre-development data, and
offering solutions to any problems that may arise.

Anyone may complete an incident report describing un-
planned negative impacts to the environment that may
potentially violate EIA guidelines.

Internal reports are processed through the development
team. External reports will be posted on a website now
under construction. Reports will be actioned by the environ-
mental management team.

The team includes Dr Livingstone Marshall, senior vice
president of environmental and community affairs for the
Baker's Bay Club, an environmental manager overseeeing
day-to-day affairs; a local nursery and landscaping expert;
a Phd-led group of five researchers from the University of
Miami; and an internationally recognized plant expert from
the Miami-based Institute for Regional Conservation.

The monitoring programme is designed to enforce the over-
all environmental objectives of the Baker's Bay development.
These are:
1. To maintain the island's natural vegetation as far as
possible.
2. To maintain onshore and nearshore water quality at
pre-construction levels.
3. To enhance wildlife habitat in the coastal zone, in
wetlands and in the nature preserve.
4. To promote coastal stability by maintaining dunes and
aiding the recovery of beaches from storms.

The monitoring programme will also improve industry-wide
knowledge of compatible development practices for small
islands.


OLaker' O LBap
GOLF &f OCEAN CLUB


- --- --- ---


- i _;__- __ _


PAGE 24, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


SECTION ___ --


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Government must


'go whole hog' on



BAIC, BDB reforms


*By NEIL HARTNELL
'Tribune Business Editor
THE Small Business Associ-
ation's executive director has
urged the Government to "go
the whole hog" and completely
merge the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank (BDB) and BAIC
as' part of a wholesale reform
ofithe country's approach to
facilitating entrepreneurs and
start-up companies.
vlarlon Johnson told The
Tribune that while the organi-
sa ion recognised the need to
recapitalise the BDB through a
$25 million bond issue, the Gov-
erhment should have seized it as
ant opportunity to completely
restructure the approach to
assisting Bahamian small busi-
nesses.
*He explained that rather than
merge just the Bahamas Agri-
cultural and Industrial Corpo-


,COLINA Holdings (Bahamas)
lias been granted a "final" three
week extension until July 21 to
File its 2004 year-end financials
and annual report.
':The announcement, made by
c1te company late on friday
night,, said its annual report
would be published in a news-
paper "on or before" July 21.


Friday's Soon Come, the
controversial East Bay Street
,restaurant that was embroiled
1iin a copyright battle with the
parent company of TGI Fri-
Oday's, has closed its doors.
The restaurant, which was


Small Business Association

executive calls for deferred

taxes, and urges Bahamas to

look at Jamaica and Colombia

for lending and business

licence reform


ration's (BAIC) business advi-
sory and project units into the
BDB, the two bodies should
have been completely merged,
and independent non-political
directors appointed to run the
enlarged organisation.
Mr Johnson said: "We advo-
cate going the whole hog and


Benchmark turns

down $500,000

settlement
*' s **)* * * ) ** * ; '


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
BENCHMARK Bahamas
has rejected a $500,000 offer
to settle litigation relating to
an incident that forced the
company to take a $1.48 mil-
lion provision in its fiscal
,2003 results, which almost
wiped out its profits for that
period.
The matter is now sched-
ifuled to go to trial in the US
courts, on August 15, but
Julian Brown, Benchmark
(Bahamas) president, told
The Tribune that he was
hopeful of obtaining a sum-
mary judgement in the com-
pany's favour with the mat-
ter settled before trial.
Mr Brown said Benchmark
(Bahamas), which is listed on
the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX),


* JULIAN Brown


had "turned down their offer
to settle" that had emerged
during mediation between the
two sides.
He indicated that Bench-
mark (Bahamas) had rejected
the offer because it paled in
SEE page 5B


reorganise those entities, mak-
ing them one with no mandate
overlaps.
"We believe that there ought
to be no more BDB [in its pre-
sent form]. What we need is a
small business administration
unit to look at small business
lending and small business
administration."
Despite the official launch of
the $2 million government-
sponsored venture capital fund,
a move Mr Johnson applauded
even though it has yet to lend to
any projects, access to capital
remains a major problem for
small businesses.
The Small Business Associa-
tion's executive director said the
Bahamas should look towards
Jamaica and Guyana for ideas
on how to provide financial sup-
port for start-up companies.
SEE page 2B


$175m Great Guana Cay developer

hits at 'groundless' permits claim


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE developers behind the
controversial $175 million
Great Guana Cay project have
vehemently denied claims by


protesters that they have
obtained construction permits
and approvals without going
through the proper channels.
Fred Smith, attorney for the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associ-
ation, said the organisation was


baffled as to how Discovery
Land Company, the organisa-
tion behind the Baker's Bay
Golf and Ocean Club, could
have obtained certain permits
SEE page 9B


Colina Holdings, which is the
holding company for Colinalm-
perial Insurance, said the exten-
sion was granted to allow more
time to complete the annual
audit of investment funds in
which its had invested, plus
ledger account reconcilements
SEE page 4B


being renamed Calypso by
owners DIMCAM LTd, was
said by sources to have been
shut for about a week to 10
days.
SEE page 2B


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P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas
Tel: (242) 328-3040
Fax: (242) 328-3043


Colina gets 'final'

filings extension


"She deserves a bright future. That's why I

called Colma Financial Advisors."






















For professional financial advice in a friendly atmosphere, you should call:



Colina.
Financial Advisors
Make Your Money Grow *
MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com 502-7007

CFLhsprovdtefdthe vaeprojedtAfor mafnaipuiposesonr Past perimancedoesnaguianteeful e resuaspoifafbhao tiarest mdAdray .a ,fMfonW s ima entitaapoissyfrt&B artashe
lpot When Inmesh g ahays rmke 5aieththat the i aestdte, r ar ens ahi&& m m


~


rrr I r I ~ I I


The Ti-.,,i'hu'


--


Ir ---' I-' ~I ~1 -III I ~- ~r I~- sri -I ir -


II~Ca --- ___- ~: I .~e~Wi~llb~~ IIII1~~-~IIII


Controversial restaurant

closes its doors I








-%r"C--.e L), IVIJI'LJAT, dJULY ,'4, -UUO l


Institutional and high net worth investors
dominated trading activity in the Bahamian
market this past week, as 1,458,416 shares
changed hands.
The market recorded both its largest vol-
ume and largest single trade thus far for
the year, as 1,001,000 shares of Cable
Bahamas were traded. For the week, over
1.4 million shares changed hands and 10
out of the 19 listed stocks traded, of which
three advanced, six declined and one
remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week, with
1,001,000 shares trading and accounting for
69 per cent of total shares traded, was Cable
Bahamas (CAB). Other companies trad-
ing large blocks included Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) and Abaco Markets, with
238,275 and 200,000 shares trading respec-
tively.
The big advancer for the week was First-
Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB), whose share price rose by $0.15 to
close at its new 52-week high of $8.75. On
the down side, Cable Bahamas Limited
(CAB) declined by $0.55 to end the week at
$8.
COMPANY NEWS
FamGuard Company (FAM) -
For the first quarter 2005, FAM posted
net income of $1.7 million, which repre-
sents an increase of 7 per cent over the
same period last year. Total income


increased by 15 per cent to $15.6 million,
while benefits and expenses grew by 16 per
cent to total $13.9 million. Earnings per
share increased by $0.01 to total $0.19, com-
pared to $0.18 in 2003.
INVESTORS TIP OF THE WEEK
Wedding (& Financial) Planning 101
How to reduce costs? -
You may ask the question: "How can I
reduce costs but still have a beautiful, mem-


orable wedding?". Some of the biggest ways
to save money are:
Reduce the number of guests.
Have a buffet or hors d'oeuvres instead
of a sit-down reception.
Consider an off-season wedding
(November through April) to reduce costs
for the reception site.
Consider having your wedding on any
day other than Saturday to reduce costs for
the reception site.


Businesses urge full merger




of bank and corporation


FROM page one
Both countries had micro-lending
organisation specifically charged with
financing small start-ups, and Mr John-
son said the Bahamas needed a similar
body that could lend small four-figure
sums to the likes of 'mom and pop'
stores.
He added that the BDB's role had
been more akin to providing conven-
_ tinalUdan osmething that Michael
Halkitis,,parliamentary secretary in
the Ministry of Finance, tacitly
acknowledged last week when he said
the Bahamas Development Bank Act
prevented it from lending to retail ven-
tures.
Mr Johnson said: "While we believe
we need a recapitalised entity, our*
challenge to them is to restructure the
entire thing. Apart from money, let's
look at the fundamentals of what they
do and how they do it."


Besides financing, Bahamian small Mr Johnson said. Mr Johnson also urged the Govern-
businesses needed support in areas FNM Senator John Delaney pointed ment to mirror and extend to Bahami-
such as administration, marketing and out during the Budget debate that it ans the tax breaks given to foreign
financing, took on average 179 days to get into investors.
Encouraging both the public and pri- business in the Bahamas, while in the The Government last week
vate sectors to "think out of the box", US and Canada it took less than 10. announced the creation of a Task
Mr Johnson said the Bahamas should A major cost incurred by many Force, consisting of representatives
look towards Colombia, where busi- Bahamian start-ups is the customs and from the Ministry of Finance, the Busi-
ness licence fees were paid to and stamp duties they have to pay to ness Licence Unit and Customs, to
licences issues by that country's import their first batch of stock, which examine how to remove regulatory red
Chamber of Commerce ratl. vw..,im~wto-r;be-paidt-beforeivtheysell any-",tape'.and'bottleneeks' facingBahami-,.
government body..-.. d. ..., ..g an businesses.
He explainedtthat througrt' ?.. ohis6hion.rc iindbd th t M'MY"IOnson applauded the move,
tem, the Colombian gov ie nt ' apart afromitax holidays, to negate this saying the Small Business Association
received its fee dues, the Chamber problem Bahamian small businesses had agitated for such a group to be
"gets a piece of the pie" and the whole should be given a tax deferment, only formed, having written to the Prime
process runs "a lot more smoothly and paying customs and stamp duty when Minister about "the difficulties small
efficiently", with businesses incen- the inventory has been sold and cash businesses have in getting started and
tivised to become Chamber members. flow generated. functioning in this country".
"We have to think in these sorts of In doing so, the Small Business He added that while the current and
terms; think out of the box, and we Association's executive director said former governments had all been sin-
might determine to do things a lot dif- that while the "Government coffers cere in their desire to help small busi-
ferently than before. It's still hellish lose at the front end, they get a lot nesses, the execution had been lacking.
to start a business in the Bahamas," more at the back end".


Restaurant in

copyright

wrangle shuts

FROM page one
The Tribune understands that the'
former business partners of DIM.
CAM and its franchise and mar-;,
keting developer, Dimitris Kosvo-,
giannis, have obtained a Supreme
Court judgement against him over
monies they are owed.
It is understood that the two.
sides parted company on January 1-
this year, after starting what proved
to be only a seven-week business
relationship with Mr Kosvogiannis
on November 12,2004.
involved it-i lawsui:,briught y
TGI Friday's Restatiats and its
parent, Carlson Restaurants World-
wide, after Carlson accused the
East Bay Street restaurant :i
breach of trademark.
Supreme Court, Justice John
Lyons ordered the restaurant
cease and desist in the use of thie
name and likeness of TGI Frida Y.
Solomon's Mines is due to open
its latest outlet at Caves Village.


FIDEIT ARETWAP


International Markets
FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change
CAD$ 1.2415 0.71
GBP 1.7678 -3.13
EUR 1.1955 -1.18
Commodities
Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $57.83 -3.36
Gold $428.80 -2.99
International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change
DJIA 10,303.44 0.05
S&P500 1,194.44 6.69
NASDAQ 2,057.37 0.20
Nikkei 11,630.13 0.81


BUSINESS


*- *.***w^01'1-^


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.89 $-0.06 200000 -19.09%
BAB $1.05 $-0.01 238275 9.38%
BBL $0.70 $-0.07 3000 -17.65%
BOB $6.35 $-0.05 6000 10.43%
BPF $8.70 $- 0 8.75%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -5.77%
BWL $1.40 $- 1100 -22.22%
CAB $8.00 $-0.55 1001000 12.68%
CBL $9.08 $- 0 27.89%
CHL $2.20 $ 0 0.00%
CIB $8.75 $0.15 1000 16.82%
DHS $2.50 $- 0 66.67%
FAM $4.12 $- 0 4.04%
FCC $1.27 $- 0 -36.18%
FCL $8.46 $0.04 3850 5.75%
FIN $10.50 $0.05 2750 8.25%
ICD $9.60 $- 0 -2.93%
JSJ $8.30 $- 0 0.97%
KZLB $5.69 $-0.03 1441 6.11%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.01 per share payable on July 29, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date July 15,2005.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) will hold an Extraordinary
General Meeting on July 12, 2005, at 5pm at SuperClubs
Breezes, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas for both common
and preferred shareholders.
Kerzner Internationall (KZL) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on July 19, 2005, at 10am at Atlantis, Paradise Island,
Coral Towers, New Providence Room, Nassau, Bahamas.








THE~UINS TRBNIODY UL ,05 AE3


Bahamian re


tors pledge 'two


weeks' co-operation timeline


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN financial ser-
vices regulators have pledged
to advise overseas supervisors
seeking information from them
whether their requests can be
met "within two weeks" of
receiving the information.
In their newly-released hand-
book on information sharing-
arrangements with Bahamian
regulators, designed to assist
overseas authorities in under-
standing how to make requests
for assistance and to whom, this
nation's financial industry
supervisors promise to
"acknowledge receipt" of the
request within one week after a
"written hard copy" is received.
If a Bahamian regulator is
unable to comply with an infor-
mation request, it will explain
Why to the requesting authority
and advise the latter of any fur-
ther steps it may need to take,
spch as applying to another
Bahamian agency.
And if a Bahamian regulator
is unable to meet the one-week
and two-week deadlines, it has
to notify the requesting author-


ity and "thereafter provide
monthly or some other [time-
frame] that is mutually agreed
updates... on progress".
The handbook is seen by
Bahamian regulators as a vital
tool, since overseas regulators
seem generally to have a nega-
tive view of this nation's
responses to their assistance
requests.
This has been a major factor
behind the Financial Action
Task Force's (FATF) decision
to continue monitoring the
Bahamas, although many finan-
cial services 'professionals and
attorneys believe the problem
has been caused by overseas
regulators failing to understand
the processes and procedures
they must follow, sending in
incomplete or incorrect
requests.
The Tribune, though, under-
stands that the major reason
behind the FATF continuing to
monitor the Bahamas is that its
members, chiefly the Group of
Seven (G7) nations, believe this
nation still has not devoted
enough manpower and techni-
cal resources to its financial ser-
vices regulators.


As a result, they believe that
by continuing to monitor the
Bahamas they will force it to
beef up its supervisory capacity
and prevent it from going
backwards.

Information

The handbook produced by
the financial services regulators
said that when a request for
information is incomplete, "a
letter will be dispatched imme-
diately to the requesting author-
ity requiring it to provide the
necessary information or under-
taking lacking in its original
request".
In deciding whether it can co-
operate, the Bahamian regula-
tor will take into consideration
whether the inquiries relate to a
possible breach of a law that
does not exist in this nation.
A supervisor can also decline
to share information unless the
overseas regulator contributes
towards its costs, although this
clause has not been exercised
so far.
The handbook did, though,
reveal one or two potential defi-


ciencies in relation to the Secu-
rities Commission of the
Bahamas' ability to cooperate
with overseas regulators that
may warrant further attention
from the Government.
The Securities Commission,
which regulates the Bahamian
capital markets and investment
funds industry, can only obtain
information on securities trans-
actions, not bank records.
The handbook said: "To
access bank records, the Com-
mission is required to get a
Court Order. In this regard,
however, it is the practice of the
Commission to enlist the assis-
tance of the Central Bank in
accessing such records."
In addition, the Securities
Industry Act and Investment
Funds Act do not provide for
the consolidated supervision of
Bahamas-registered broker/
dealer companies, securities
investment companies or invest-
ment fund administrators that
are subsidiaries or branches of
multinational entities.
However, the handbook said
that many of these entities are
also bank and trust companies,
and are thus subject to consoli-


Bahamas not affected by Winn-Dixie sales


Winn-Dixie said none of its 12 Bahamas-
based stores are among the 79 outlets that
are being sold for a collective $38.7 mil-
lion, as the US supermarket chain bids to
emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
The 79 stores, which are being sold to
about 20 different buyers, will continue to
be operated as supermarkets. They are
among the 326 locations Winn-Dixie said it
would either sell or close as part of its 'new
footprint' strategy.


Peter Lynch, Winn-Dixie's president and
chief executive, said: "To date, we have
sales agreements for 79 stores. We are
working hard to find buyers for additional
stores who will continue to operate them, as
well as offer employment opportunities for
our associates.
"We sincerely regret the impact that our
plans will have on many of our associates
who will not be offered opportunities with
new owners. We recognise this is a diffi-


cult time, and we will provide severance
and other assistance to these individuals
through their transition. Our stores in the
Bahamas remain open, and we look for-
ward to continuing to serve our valued cus-
tomers."
Winn-Dixie owns a majority stake,
around 75 per cent, in Bahamas Supermar-
kets, which operates 12 stores in Nassau
and Grand Bahama under the City Mar-
kets and Winn-Dixie brands.


ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT
Lagan Holdings Limited is engaged extensively in major civil engineering
and construction projects worldwide.

We now require the following to join our current team based at Nassau
International Airport.

Job Ref: ACTBAH/1/14

The applicant will be responsible for various accounts functions including
preparing and the completing of general journals entries, data input and
other general ledger account reconciliations and also assist in the general
accounts department duties as and when necessary.

The above tasks are to be carried out in regard to our Bahamas contract.

Candidates should have experience in a similar role. You should be
highly motivated and be able to work under your own initiative.

Please contact our site office on 377 0094 thru 98 quoting job reference
number ACTBAH/1/14

Only suitably experienced and qualified applicants need apply
Clean police record required.
Honesty and reliability essential


-`Colina
Financial Advisors Ltd.
ricing Information As Of:
29 June 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
'*1.10 0.89 Abaco Markets 0.89 0.89 0.00 -0.208 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.70 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.70 8.70 0.00 1.445 0.340 6.0 3.91%
6.40 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.35 6.35 0.00 0.561 0.330 11.3 5.20%
0.8.5 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.187 0.000 3.7 0.00%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.122 0.000 11.5 4.29%
1.06 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.06 1.06 0.00 0.062 0.050 17.1 4.72%
8.65 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.55 8.55 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.5 2.81%
2.20 1.65 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
9.08 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.08 9.08 0.00 0.673 0.410 13.5 4.52%
2.50 0.58 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.5 0.00%
4.12 3.80 Famguard 4.12 4.12 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.6 5.83%
10.45 9.12 Finco, 10.45 10.45 0.00 0.662 0.500 15.6 4.78%
8.60 6.86 FirstCaribbean 8.60 8.60 0.00 0.591 0.380 12.4 4.42%
8.60 8.31 Focol 8.46 8.46 0.00 0.708 0.500 11.9 5.91%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
,10.14 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
8.25 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.30 8.30 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.8 6.75%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.61 5.64 0.03 0.184 0.000 30.5 0.00%
10.00 .10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.565 5.0 5.65%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.6 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.066 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00, 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2323 1.1703 Colina Money Market Fund 1.232656*
2.3329 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3329 *
10.3837 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Incomne Fund 10.3837*****
2.2072 2.0985 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.207174**
1.1080 1.0435 Colina Bond Fund, 1.107989****
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks- Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fldelit
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted prlce for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
.Ciange Change in closing price from day to Ady EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
illy' Vl..- Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
4/9CP'-l0sng price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
'AS'At 'MAR. 31, 20051 .....**** AS AT APR 29, 2005
AS MAY 20, 2005/1*** -AS AT MAY. 31,20051 *****AS AT MAY. 31, 2005


dated supervision under the
Bank and Trust Companies
Regulation Act 2000.
Consolidated supervision of


other entities is conducted on
terms agreed between the
Bahamian licensee and its head
office.


GN-228









MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT
& AVIATION

ADVERTISEMENT

Bahamas not affe,


The Govern
from prosp' y
review of m


Winn-Dixie sal


Prospective
Reference i
Transport a,
Bahamas.

Bids should be addressed to:

Chairperson
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitefield Centre
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

Deadline for submission of bids
July, 2005 at 5:00 p.m.


is Monday 7th


Opening of bids will be held on Tuesday 12th July,
2005 at 10:00 a.m. at the Ministry of Finance.

The Terms of Reference are set out below.


TERMS OF REFERENCE
Re: Review of Mail Boat Operations

The Mail Boat service plays an integral part in
networking the islands of The Bahamas. Presently,
there are twenty (20) contracted mail boats
operating out of New Providence and connecting
New Providence with the Family Islands, and one
mail boat operating out of Grand Bahama
connecting Grand Bahama with Grand Cay.

The Government is presently considering the
renewal of the Inter-Insular Mail Boat Contracts
with a view to adjusting mail boat routes and
subsidies. During deliberations in this regard, it
was determined that a review of the mail boat
system is necessary in order to properly guide
Government's decision as to the restructuring of
the service.

Services Sought

The Government is seeking the services of a firm
to review the present mail boat system, including
but not limited to:

1. Existing routes and their relevance.

2. The formula for calculation of subsides. In
this regard, the firm should determine the
assessment tool that may be used in
determining increases in mail boat subsidies.

3. Cost structure faced by mail boat operators.
In this regard, the firm should generate a
report on the operational cost of each mail,
boat, including documented frequency of
scheduled places, passenger manifest and
freight lot. These reports should be
independently verified.

4. Economic viability of each route without a
Government subsidy.

In executing its duties, the firm will liaise with the
Ministry of Transport and Aviation and submit
their findings to the Ministries of Transport and
Aviation and The Ministry of Finance. The expected
duration of the project is 6 weeks.


WANTED


Sales

Representative




Expanding Media Company is
s,(energetic experienced
representative. Excellent
Commissions Structure. Must
have own transportation and be
able to work flexible hours.


Fax Resume to 502-2388:
Attn: Sales Manager


/1


I I


I I


mm


I


W" "", ,-'-


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE

















UNCOLLECTED SHORT-TERM BENEFIT CHEQUES
NEW PROVIDENCE LOCAL OFFICE

204 Short-Term Benefit Cheques Await Collection By Eligible Claimants. All Claims
Were Processed In New Providence.

The names of persons with outstanding cheques are listed below. These persons are requested
to collect their cheque(s) from the Cashier's Department, located on the Ground Floor of the
National Insurance Board's buildilng in Jumbey Village, Baillou Hill Road, between 9:15 a.m.
- 5:00 p.m. on weekdays.

Claimants are asked to collect their cheque(s) in person and to produce photo identification.



Lennox McCartwey (Mr.)
Director


NAME BENEFITTYPE NAME BENEFIT TYPE


Development to




bring in $230m


ADDERLEY, Qutell
BAIN, Catherine
BAIN, Crystal
BAIN, Indiana
BAIN, Suzzette
BARR, Louise
BEAUCHARD,Sylvanie
BELLE, Kania
BKETHELL, Chayl
BEVANS,Patston
BHATNAGAR, Deefak
BLYDEN,Tamika
BUCHANAN, Bernadette
BUCHANAN,Joanne
BUCHANAN, Maiy
BUILER,Crystal
BUTLER,Kizzy
BUILER,Mildied
CALMA,Monique
CLARKE,Ian
COLEBROOKE, Crystal
COLEBROOKE, Glenwood
COLLIE,Anthony
COX, Michael
DALENCY, Denc
DARLING, Don
DEAN, Brenda
DELANCY,Myra
DEREUS, Veitu
DOUGLAS, Kenva
DOUGLAS-THOMPSON, Seri


EVANS, Betty
FARRINGTON, James
FARRINGTON,Nadia
FARRINGTON,Nicola
FAWKES,Omar
FERGUSON,Jerome
FERGUSON,Krisna
FERNANDER,Deidre
FINLEY,Pedro
FORSYTH, Linda
FOX, Erica
FOX, Katherine
FOX, Patrice
GIBSON,Idella
GIBSON,Margo
GORDON, Dianna
GARY, Mark
HALL, Denero
HANNA,Don
HANNA, Somaya
HART, Sidney
HENFIELD,Jeinnell
HEPBURN, Dwight
HTITON,Maylyne
HUNT,Lavem
IGNACIO, Leo
JEAN, Benito
JERRER, Jackson
JOHNSON, Bunmeva
JOHNSON, Ernestine
JOHNSON,Michelle
JOHNSON, Ronell
JONES, Aladice
JONES, LaShanda
JOSEPH, Caleb
KELLY, Sybreon
KEMP,Geoige
KISHORE, Adelina
KNOWLES,James
LAING,Lisa
LEWIS, Leslie
LEWIS, Nancy
LIGHTBOURNE,Deon
LINDSAY, Greig
LOCKHART, Paice
MACKEY Corean
MACKEY, Prudence
MACKEY, Sandcra
MACKEY, Steven
MAJOR,Anieka
MARTIN, Pienrre


Maternity
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Maternity
Sickness
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Sickness
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Sickness
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McINTOSH, Christopher
McKENZIE, Gordon
McNEIL,LaShanda
McQUEEN, Jeannie
MILLER, Cora
MILLER, Dianna
MINNIS, Lavanie
MISSICK, Brucely
MITCHELL, Cleveland
MOXEY, Andrea
MOXEY,Edwina
MUSGROVE,Tameko
NEILLY, Twyman
NEWBOLD,Andre
NEWBOLD, Carmetha
NEWBOLD, Shakeria
NEWTON, Lisa
NEYMOUR,Amette
NOELUS, Edwidge
PEARCE, Felix
PETIT-FRERE, Rodelia
PIERRA, Geneva
PINDER, Canvis
PLAKARIS, Yvette
RABER, Renate
RpCHARDS, Vaquicha
RICHARDSON, Ivy
RICHARDSON, Ivy
RIGBY, Jaquel
RILEY, Patrice
RILEY, Ronesto
ROKER, Edward
ROLLE, Anthony
ROLLE, Bradford
ROLLE, Jennifer
ROLLE, Joycelyn
ROLLE, Loma
ROLLE, Omar
ROLLE, Sandra
ROSE,Khamaal
RUSSELL, Victoria
SANDS, Andrea
SANDS, Arlington
SANDS, Boston
SAUNDERS,Angela
SCOTT, Baretta
SEALY, Nestaea
SEARS, David
SHERMAN,Andrea
SHERMAN, Peteral
SIMMONS, Frances
SIMMONS, Roderick
SMALL, Giovanni
SMITH, Curlene
SMITH, James
SMITH, Kendrick
SMITH, Lisa
SMITH, Maureen
SMITH, Reginald
SMITH, Wendy
SPENCE, John
STUlART, Christopher
STUBBS, Marilyn
SWAIN, Bridgette
SWAIN, Ruthann
SWEETING, Georgia
TAYLOR, Joshua
TAYLOR, Michael
TAYLOR, Portia
THELUSMA, Louverture
THOMPSON, Cyril
WARD, Cephas
WATKINS, Telford
WHITE, Tarino
WILLIAMS, Davinci
WILLIAMS, Verdell
WINDER, Cheryl
WITER, Betty
WOODSIDE, Frances
WRIGHT, Loanna
YALLOP. Miles


Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Maternity
Sickness
Maternity
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Maternity
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Maternity
Maternity
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness.
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Sickness
Maternity
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Funeral
Sickness
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Maternity
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Industrial Injury
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness
Sickness


FROM page one
contribution is put at $3.9 mil-
lion, of which some $3 million
comes from infrastructure put
in by the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
and the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (BEC).
A further $756,500 comes
from the Government waiving
transfer tax on the 105 acres of
Crown Land and 19.23 acres of
Treasury Land to be used by
the developers, plus $48,000
from the six-year lease of acres
for storage. Some 55 acres of
the Crown Land is to be used
for the Foundation nature pre-
serve accessible to all Bahami-
ans.
Mr Albury, though, said that
at going commercial rates the
land granted to the developers
by the Government would be
worth a total of $150 million,
rather than the $7,205 per acre
the Global Insight report
implied the developers were
valuing it at.
Discovery Land Company
has also asked for the Govern-
ment to grant it a Business
Licence fee exemption, accord-
ing to the Global Insight analy-
sis, which Mr Albury claimed
worked out at a $50,000 "per
year break", given that he paid
$1500 per year for his business.
The developers had also
requested 18 work permits from


central government at a total
cost of $90,000.
However, in return for its $3.9
million contribution, Global
Insight said the Baker's Bay
Ocean & Golf Club project was
projected to generate $153.594
million in revenues for the Gov-
ernment in the 10 years to 2014.
The purchase of the Meister
property had generated more
than $2.5 million in transfer tax-
es for the Government, with
$24.25 million and $25.068 mil-
lion to come from lot sales and
home sales.

Customs

The Government was set to
realise a further $39.11 million
from customs duties, with
almost $33.5 million to come
from home property taxes.
Global Insight pegged total
guest room tax for the 10-year
period at $3.203 million, with
stamp tax on initial boat pur-
chases art $8.166 million.
Mr Albury criticised the
$85,000 that would be generat-
ed by the Baker's Bay dock
licence, saying this was far too
low for a 180-slip marina when
a 20-slip marina costs $8,000 per
year.
But the Global Insight study
projected that the Government
would also realise a $3.05 mil-
lion benefit from the developers


constructing a community cen-
tre, dock, the paving of roads
and the arrival of a fire truck.
Assuming a 5 per cent rate
over a 10-year period, Global
Insight said the Net Present
Value of government and other
tax receipts totalled $119 mil-
lion, with an implied "benefit
to cost ratio of 30".
For the GDP impact, the Net
Present Value was calculated
by Global Insight at $227 mil-
lion, with an implied benefit to
cost ratio of 58.
Total combined employment
at Baker's Bay construction
workers and operational staff -
will peak between 2007-2010 at
275, slimming down to a con-
sistent 175.
Global Insight projects that
total direct wages paid out
between 2005 and 2014 will be
$57.638 million, and adding in
the indirect and induced job cre-
ation effects, the total will be
almost $87 million over 10
years.
National Insurance contribu-
tions over that period are pro-
jected to be more than $7 mil-
lion, with Discovery Land Com-
pany proposing "to share 5 per
cent of all sales proceeds of 26
lots on Treasury land with the
Government".
The 26 lots are each valued at
$500,000, generating a total of
$650,000 for the Government
once they are sold.


Colina granted final



three-week extension


FROM page one
related to suspense and bank
' accounts.
* Colina Holdings said/that as: a
consequence for the three-week
extension for filing its 2004 year-
end results, it had been given
until July 30, 2005, to file and
publish its 2005 first quarter
results.
Colina Holdings said the
extension application had been
made in conjunction with the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange's (BISX) listing
rules.
There was no mention of the
possible sanctions Colina Hold-
ings said it might face last month.
After BISX had approved a
previous extension request, Col-
ina Holdings had said "a rec-
ommendation was made to the
BISX listing committee to file a
formal complaint for violation


of BISX rules with the Securi-
ties Commission of the
Bahamas, and BISX may
impose sanctions".
The further delay in Colina
Holdings' filing is again likely
to raise questions in some quar-
ters about how good Bahami-
an publicly-listed companies are
about timely disclosure to the
markets.
There was no official word
from the company about
whether the delay in releasing
the 2004 year-end accounts is
at least partly related to the
internal feud that saw James
Campbell, Colina Insurance
Company's former president,
and his management team oust-
ed by fellow Colina Financial
Group (CFG) principals,
Emanuel Alexiou and Anthony
Ferguson.
Mr Campbell held a 45 per
cent stake in CFG, which in


turn holds the majority 66 per
cent interest in Colina Hold-
ings. He and his former busi-
ness partners have been trying
to negotiate a financial settle-
ment ever since.
The Tribune has also been
told that Colinalmperial Insur-
ance is seeking to offload some
of its surplus real estate assets,
including the former Canada
Life head office in Palmdale
and the old Dominion building
it occupies on Collins Avenue.
It was also suggested that the
former Colina Insurance head
office at Village Road might
also be on the market, although
this could not be confirmed,
with all head office functions
transferred to the ex-Imperial
Life building on Collins Avenue.
The company is understood
to be seeking to raise about $8
million from all its real estate
transactions.


U U


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF

REPAIRS/REPLACEMENTS TO OFFICE AND

POWER STATION BUILDINGS SAN SALVADOR

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for
the provision of repairs and replacements to office and power station buildings
as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:-

Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 15 July 2005 by 4:30 p.m. and
addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 587/05

"OFFICE AND POWER STATION BUILDINGS REPAIRS
SAN SALVADOR"


IF


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE
















Renewed call for PetroCaribe details


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMAS-BASED oil
companies have renewed their
calls for Leslie Miller, minister'
of trade and industry, to explain
how the PetroCaribe agreement
and proposed National Energy
Corporation (NEC) will work,
with some expressing concerns
about supply reliability and
security.
Troy Simms, Esso Standard
Oil's country sales manager,
encouraged the Government to
consult with the three oil com-
panies, which also include Shell
and Texaco, saying they were
open to consultation and feed-
back any time the administra-
tion looked at changing the
industry's structure.
On Mr Miller signing the
Bahamas up to PetroCaribe, Mr
Simms said: "This is a pretty
significant action depending on
what he has planned and what
was discussed with the
Venezuelans. I think we need
to get some specifics."
Mr Simms said "the industry
has gotten pretty good" at


* LESLIE Miller


building a sophisticated supply
chain, and warned that safety
and security levels would need
to be at a high standard if the
Government was to buy oil
direct from Venezuela through
the NEC.


He added that Esso and the
other oil companies, due to
their international networks and
expertise, were able to switch
oil suppliers "seamlessly" to
refineries in the US, Europe
and the Far East if produce
from one source was disrupted,
thus guaranteeing security and a
reliable supply.
It was unknown at this point,
though, if the same qualities had
been allowed for when Mr
Miller signed on to the Petro-
Caribe accord.
Mr Simms explained that
because the Bahamas was a rel-
atively small volume user of
petroleum products compared
to other countries in the
Caribbean, gas prices in this
nation tended to be higher.
Meanwhile, a draft copy of
the PetroCaribe accord
obtained by The Tribune shows
how much Venezuela will sub-
sidise Bahamian purchases of
oil from PDV Caribe, an affili-
ate of its PDVSA state-owned
oil company. If the price is
above $15 per barrel, the level
of subsidisation will be 5 per
cent. For $20 per barrel it will


Benchmark rejects



settlement offer


FROM page one
comparison with the $1.48 mil-
lion provision Benchmark
(Bahamas) was forced to take
out in its fiscal 2003 results for
"doubtful debts", which wiped
out operating profits and
accounted for almost 66 per
cent or two-thirds of net oper-
ating expenses.
However, Mr Brown said that
based on the deposition evi-
dence taken, the other-side had
provided no evidence to sup-
port its case against Benchiiark
(Bahamas).
He added: "I feel we're going
to get the entire complaint
kicked out in summary judge-
ment, based on the answers in
deposition."
The issue surrounds a client
account involving "margined
securities" held at Alliance
Investment Management,
Benchmark's broker/dealer and
investment advisory subsidiary
that is targeted at offshore
clients.
The issuer of the securities
had cancelled their trading
claiming they were held as col-
lateral on loans that had been
advanced to them by the
Alliance client, who had no
right to trade them.
Meanwhile, Mr Brown said
that while he could not go into
specifics, as the 2005 second
quarter results would be
released in two weeks' time,
Benchmark's performance for
the year-to-date had been "very
good so far".
Adding that the company was
looking forward to the 2005 sec-
ond half, Mr Brown said Bench-
mark (Bahamas) was ahead of
both 2004 first quarter and sec-


ond quarter comparatives.
Mr Brown said Benchmark
(Bahamas) and its partners in
JSG Holdings, the company
that acquired retailer John S
George last year, had run into
unanticipated challenges -
involving some $600,000 to
$700,000 in revenues that had
thrown their business projec-
tions off track.
Mr Brown said John S
George was "not the true value
distributor it once was", forc-
ing the new owners and man-
agemerit led by former Freeport
Concrete chief executive, Ken
Hutton, to reassess the distrib-
ution aspect.
In addition, the group suf-
fered a "further shock we did
not anticipate when we took
over" when John S George lost
the agency for Baygone, the
popular insecticide product,
which was switched to the D'Al-
benas Agency.


Mr Brown said: "These chal-
lenges are proving to be the
issues that have made the tran-
sition at John S George more
difficult."
However, he added that out-
siders would be "amazed .at
what has been achieved in a 12-
month period", and expressed
full confidence in Mr Hutton
and his management team,
which features former Abaco
Markets chief executive Regi-
nald Sands.
Mr Brown said the distribu-
tion issues were being tackled,
and a replacement agency prod-
uct for Baygone had also been
found.
He added that John S George
was changing the floor space in
its stores and vendors, to
upgrade its image, acknowledg-
ing: "What the market is look-
ing for is the new John S
George and we've not been
able to bring that yet."


be 10 per cent; $22 per barrel at
15 per cent; $24 per barrel at
20 per cent; $30 per barrel at
25 per cent; $40 per barrel at
30 per cent; and for $50 and
$100, 40 per cent and 50 per
cent respectively.
The grace period for financ-
ing will be extended from one
year, as laid out in the Caracas
Energy Accord, to two years,
with the grace period for short-
term financing extended from
30 days to 90 days.
The PetroCaribe deal also
allows for credits and the
exchange of technologies to
allow the Bahamas and other
Caribbean countries to devel-
op fuel efficiency programmes
and systems.


In return, Venezuela can pur-
.chase items such as sugar,
bananas or other goods and ser-
vices "that are believed to be
affected by the trade policies of
rich countries" at preferential
rates from the Bahamas and
other Caribbean nations.
But PDV Caribe proposes to
cut out the oil company inter-
mediaries involved in the supply
process at present, dealing on
a government-to-government
basis. It will be responsible for
organising shipping, storage
facilities and terminals, which
will include "whenever possi-
ble", refining and distribution
facilities for fuels and products.
Priority shall be given to coun-
tries in greatest need".


If an NEC is formed, it is
unclear whether the three pri-
vate oil companies will have to
buy from it, or whether they will
still be able to seek their own
supply sources, which would
effectively make the govern-
ment body a 'white elephant'.
All independent gas station
dealers, whether they own or
rent their premises, are fran-
chisees of either Shell, Texaco
or Esso, and therefore must buy
their gas from them, unless the
Government breaks up the
industry structure.
As a result, Shell's plans to sell
its retail division of gas stations is
likely to be unaffected, for now,
by the PetroCaribe deal.


REDOIT FIRST
SUISSE BOSTON


* ..........~


ASSISTANT FINANCIAL CONTROLLER INVESTMENT BANKING


C ed-Siu1Frt Bosteast a *s r.orawt8ore and COo:mpoMIrWUm
fteltrne~t betmng Th'tnfm rid&ItV oripohe innshm, ~sn~ ~siooowVWftaw~f tok, d M4;s
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plodet 4S usets afi .swpties uss ce1e eeun ?^s Rs~ tos tott ^^se

The pefe^Wed arddae wt! be ^ p wih ql led aId o q o f LWOW cantI Now Wbrlk
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ord MS af te^eG aThin uier b 0** d .ojeets^
syonn~? o ~l f. I pofsitn. safwis asft. fto;aid^etent +;*qN o OW0


The siMcfil *WuKm(t WUI be f.qtlhrd to 00ss"0

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ftRa t^ wo %.m w^,i~i"w"W nAMWW MAM EEW WIWMM M WM-MM M9MX MW(>VIeaWWW OWSf=N VWaWO M
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CSFB I EMPOWERING CHANGE:


MIIOL11C S hC -I~ti l 01I11S CI M Ih -St





Vl il iCM C i. i

Sean Blt Callende B rII& Co.lh'~r
ROm. BoxtlF-44636ll
Freot, [ (4,111dBli'l l im
Tel:(24 ) 351-127 Fax (2 2)I3 1-021
ill al : i I| ii-lm1m fll II|l


mnnanann~


~~~~~a~un~8ln*c~a:c~,~


MBEESB


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGr 3


[ T.\\SPci


EESS2E-


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*E~ufiB








PAGE B, MODAY, ULY 4 2005THEITIBUN


APPLIANCE CENTRE
P.O. Box AB20192
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
BAHAMAS

ACCOUNTANT NEEDED
Looking for lady accountant for office position.
Computer literacy and knowledge of microsoft office programs
a must. Must be able to work on own initiative. Minimum of
five years accounting experience required. Wanted Monday
through Friday, working hours negotiable.
All applicants please send resume to:
Fax: (242) 367-3469, Email marcoac@batelnet.bs
OR MAIL TO:
MARCO A/C
P.O. BOX AB-20192
MARSH HARBOUR
ABACO






CUSTOM BROKER
Responsibilities to include:

Clearing of shipments
Customs Processing
Manage logistics

Qualifications to include:

Good communication (both written and oral) and
interpersonal skills
Strong computer skills with various types of
software including Microsoft Word & Excel
Excellent Organizational skills
Minimum of three years experience in same or
similar position

Position is available immediately salary and benefits will
be commensurate with experience.

To apply for this position please e-mail your resume to:
hr@abacomarkets.com


324 7007: Dr. Eric Bourne


US interest rates




set to move higher


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Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
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alarmI% I hunk%


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FOR SALE


AQUASITION

1995 Defender
55' Long and 17' Wide with 5' Draft
550 Lugger, 20KW Generator Isuzu
18,000 lbs Freezer, 1300 Fuel and 1100 Gas
600 Water & Water Maker


Call 322-4535 or 337-0137


S -


- 0


ilvFOR SALE

Silverton "40 Aft Cabin" Yacht


SL eng th ..........................................4 0'0"
B eam ............................................. 14 0 "
Draft .........................43
Approx. Weight .....................24,000Lbs
Fuel Capacity ............................300Gals
W atcr Capacity ..........................I 00Gals
Sleeping Capacity.................8
Clearance Height.... ........... 3'
Salon ..................14"L x 1'2"W
SunHeadroom eck............87 x 100 W
...."I SuHeadroome....................... ........86'3"
Freeboard Fwd. ................. 6"3""
Freeboard Alt..........................'.*40*
Power ........................ Twin Gas or Diesel
Generato .......................... Gas or Diesel
DIESEL POWERED 240 PERKIN'S ENGINES
8.0 K.W. GENERATOR, FULL AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL SURVEY,
INCLUDING LOCAL SURVEY AVAILABLE
PRICE 120K O.N.O.
FOR COMFORTABLE EXTENDED CRUISING OR LIVING ABOARD, WELL
MAINTAINED YACHT WITH MANY EXTRAS OTHER THAN LISTED STANDARD.
INCLUDING SPARE PROPELLERS, FRESH AND SALT WATER PUMPS AND
SONY STEREO EQUIPMENT
For information please contact Dr. McCarroll
AT
322-2226 324-1072 or 357-4532


CAMP COB


Children between the ages of 5 and 12


4th -15th July, 2005
9:30am 2:30 pm


I.


Youngsters will learn and participate in a number of activities including:

Swimming, Basketball, Crafts, Soccer, Field Trips

Price $60.00 for 2 weeks (per child)
Registration forms are available in COB's Student Activities Department.

For more information, please call Bradley Cooper
at 302-4525 or 302-4591.


THE COLLEGE OF


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


THE BAHAMAS
Enavcaniim& TtimiGmaatrutK


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


.-


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- .1b.- 4ow


- -.00


w -


4






MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 7B


to


EMED REGISRATIO I

Advisement & Registration in Faculty Offices
Registration in Records Department. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Monday -
Thursday (Including LLB, Masters & CEES students)
ABSOLUTELY NO REGISTRATION ON FRIDAYS


Important Dates
June 27
June 27
July 15


July 29


Event(s)


Advisement & Registration Continues
Bill Collection Begins
Last Day for Early Bird Discount
10% on Fees
Last Day for Fee Payment


Ms. Richenda King


College of The Bahamas Alumna
on her elevation to the post of Vice President, Human
Resources, Colinalmperial Insurance Company

T 4e 6 fege of ^ 7he4 B
Fami4/ we~4e4 o t ever success.


F"%,'


Co


KENTSIAYE
College & Grad uate
School of Educatiol

The College of The Bahamas
Graduate Programmes Office
in collaboration with

Kent State University
Graduate School of Education
will offer the

MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREE
PROGRAMME IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
Applications for the programme are available at
COB's Graduate Programmes Office,
School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies,
Thompson Blvd.
Application deadline extended to July 29, 2005
Please direct enquiries to:
Mrs. Sonya Wisdom
Graduate Programmes Officer
Fax: 325-8175 Phone: 323-6804 or 325-0271 Ext. 6604
E-mail: swisdom@cob.edu.bs
or
Ms. Juliet Collie
Secretary, Graduate Programmes Office
Fax: 325-8175 Phone: 323-6804, 323-6804 or 325-0271 Ext. 6607
E-mail: jcollie@cob.edu.bs


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS








PAGE B, MODAY, ULY ,2005THEITNBUN


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RONY ADELSON, GOLDEN
ISLES ROAD OFF CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 4TH day of JULY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






BI II [] P.g I=


NOTICE


UKOBA LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of UKOBA LTD, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.






Legal Notice

NOTICE

AQMOLA S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 1st day of July, 2005. The
Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator







NOTICE


RENEE MANAGEMENT LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of RENEE
MANAGEMENT LTD., has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


Central Amercan trade



deal set for showdown










S"Copyrighted Material

-. Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


--




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*


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-


LEGAL NOTICE


CUPAD SPRINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of
June, 2005. The Liquidator is Argoso Corp. Inc., of P. 0.
Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator





NOTICE


UZBEKA TEKA S.A.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of UZBEKA TEKA S.A.,
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


NOTICE


DONALBAIN ASSOCIATES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of DONALBAIN
ASSOCIATES INC, has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


NOTICE


HIAWATHA LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of HIAWATHA LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


NOTICE


PIGEON WING COMPANY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of PIGEON WING
COMPANY LIMITED, has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


NOTICE


KYLE BRIDGE LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of KYLE BRIDGE LTD.,
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


NOTICE


ZIZERS S.A.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of ZIZERS S.A., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator.


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


* * -













Developers deny any impropriety



in relation to construction permits


FROM page one
when the Hope Town District
Council had dissolved itself for
the recent local government
elections.
Mr Smith alleged that the
Council, which would be
responsible for granting Dis-
covery Land Company certain
permits, had written to V Alfred
Gray, the minister responsible
for local government, saying
they did not have enough infor-
mation to make a decision on
the developers' applications,
and did not want to bind their
successors prior to the election.
But Mr Smith said: "They
[Discovery Land Company]
have received some permits and
gone on with construction, and
we don't know how they could
do this."
The Callenders and Co attor-
ney said he was "drafting -an
application" to the Supreme
Court to seek an injunction that
would prevent the developers
from proceeding because they
had breached the Local Gov-
ernment Act by not obtaining
permits through the required
channels, Mr Smith said he
would also seek a judicial review
of central government's deci-
sions to grant the permits.
But Steve Adelson, a partner
in San Francisco-based Discov-
ery Land Company and vice-
president of development for
the Baker's Bay project, hit
back by describing Mr Smith's
claims as "groundless".
Although acknowledging that
the Hope Town Council had
deferred some decisions due to
the elections, Mr Adelson said:
"Every permit we have
obtained has gone through the
proper channels, whether that
is central government or
whether that is local govern-
ment.
"We've studied the processes,
and had all our Bahamian attor-
neys look at it to make sure we
are following them. Anyone can


file a lawsuit, but they have no
grounds for it.
"We have followed every
process and procedure to the
letter and will continue to do
so."
Mr Adelson said the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association
"love to dramatise" and "put
their spin on it", adding: "The
one disappointing thing about
the Bahamas is that there's 'no
truth in advertising law' that
applies to the Save Guana Cay
people."
Discovery Land Company
hoped to obtain permits within
the next 30 to 45 days for the
180-slip marina, marina dredg-
ing and subdivisions, with Mr
Adelson saying the company
felt "very confident" those
approvals would be forthcom-
ing.
The developers were already
pressing ahead with the $1 mil-
lion clean-up of the former Pre-
mier Cruise Lines site, their
interim sales and hospitality
facilities, docking facilities and
geotech surveys.
Mr Adelson pointed out that
the 105 acres of Crown Land


and 20 acres of Treasury land
being used for the development
were being leased at market
rates from the Government,
while any beachfront areas
included in that package would
be set aside for the Foundation
preserve that would be accessi-
ble to future generations of
Abaconians and Bahamians.
"We fit ourselves into the
environment, not impose our-
selves on it," Mr Adelson said.
"We think we are making sig-
nificant headway with the local
people, and they are going to
be very proud of what will hap-
pen on Great Guana Cay. It's
just going to take time."


Meanwhile, Mr Smith said he
had been met by a "an absolute
wall of silence" from govern-
ment ministries, such as the
Ministry of Public Works and
Utilities and Ministry of Finan-
cial Services and Investments
to his requests for information
on which permits had been
granted to Discovery Land
Company.
He said the only reply
received to date had been from
Captain Anthony Allens, at the
Port Department, confirming
the developers had been given
permits to construct a service
dock and refurbish the existing
docking facilities.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SCHIVON NICOLE MALL,
KEMP ROAD WILLIAMS LANE, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 27TH day of JUNE, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


At


Date: Saturday, July 9th 2005

Venue: Radisson Cable Beach Golf Course




Tee-off Time: 7:45 am



All players must be present by 7:15 am



Players Fee: $110 per player







For more information contact:

Ms. Jordanna Wring or Ms. Corain Smith @
The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
Telephone: 322-2145


KINGSWAY ACADEMY


Kingsway Academy High School invites qualified
applicants for the following positions for September,
2005.
Information Technology
Art and Design
Auto Mechanics with Woodwork
Mathematics and Physics to AP Level
Business Studies
Physical Education with Track and Field
Specialization
Librarian/Media Specialist
Experienced Administrative Assistant

Successful applicants must:
Be a practicing, committed born-again
Christian
Have minimum qualifications of a
Bachelor's Degree in the appropriate subject
areas or higher from a recognized college
or university
Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.

Applications must be made in writing together with
a full curriculum vitae, a recent color photograph
and names of at least three references, one being that
of your Church Pastor to:
Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O. Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas

For further information, please contact the
Business Office at telephone numbers
324-6269 or 324-6887.

Deadline for applications is
Thursday, July 14, 2005


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


cq^wmzlct/


i/~G3c~2~l~3Ze~















ecords continue to fall in




swimming championships


IM By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AF-TER witnessing 15
records fall on the first day,
E\ante Gibson made a big
splash on the second day of the
Bahamas Swimming Federa-
tion's Royal Bank of Canada
National Open Championships
by breaking a Bahamian record


m By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter


WITH a win under their belts, the
Bahamas women's basketball squad head-
ed into game two yesterday against Bar-
bados looking to keep their win-loss record
perfect.
The team's first win came -over the
Jamaican squad, 56-50, and their second
game with Barbados ended in a similar
six point margin, 52-46.

Team
Stepping up big for the women in game
one were Diasti Delancey and Phylicia
Keliy, who were able to take the team
over a one point hump in the second half.
Trailing in the first half of play, the team
went to their full court press in the open-
ing minutes of the second to jump to three
point lead.


Evante Gibson on


form in day two


and two national records.
McKayla Lightbourn and Ali-


cia Lightbourne were able to
add three national records to


The press resulted in five turnovers, but
the team was only able to convert them
into three points.
The shot taken by Delancey give the
team a five point edge over the Jamaican
squad.
Vice President of the Bahamas Basket-'
ball Federation Larry Wilson said: "Our
girls are playing excellent ball, but there
are still some things they need to work
on.
"Going to the full court press worked,
but on the offensive end they made
turnovers, so this erased the ones they
were able to make.
"You can see that the team is coming
together, they are playing incredible ball,
but they are missing a lot of free throws."
In the opening game, Delancey scored
19 points, seven rebounds and five assists.
Chipping in was teammate Delerene Fer-
guson with 14 points and six rebounds -
Kelly scored eight points, but was amazing


their outstanding performance
list, after setting Bahamian
records on the first day of com-
petition.
Gibson broke a 15-year-old
record easily in the boys 9-10
50m fly event.
The record of 35.03 seconds,
which was set by Jonathan Bain
in 1990, was lowered to 32.87
seconds by Gibson.


on the defensive end, forcing 11 turnovers.
The team had to play without Delancey
in the second game, after she fouled out in
the opening minutes of the fourth quarter.
However, the tough defence the team
issued on Barbados allowed them to go
up 15 points heading into the fourth.

Advantage
The point comfort zone was chipped
into by the Bajan team, who took advan-
tage of the Bahamas' foul trouble.
Wilson added: "The game was an easy
one, but the score doesn't reflect the way
the game went.
"The girls played tough defence, offen-
sively they were in control, although they
ended up in foul trouble.
"By the end of the third quarter we had
a least three players deep in foul trouble,
but the other players stepped up to hold on
for the win."


The fast pace gave T'Auren
Moss a chance to dip under the
record time, coming in second
in a time of 35.01 seconds.
Mathew Lowe was third in
36.12 seconds.
The record streak was just
getting started for Gibson, who
lined up for the 100m fly with
no added pressure.
Racing down the first 50m of
the pool in 33.62 seconds, Gib-
son was well on track for the
100m timing.
By the turn he had added a
few seconds to the time, but
strengthened midway through
the pool.
Gibson won the event in a
time of 1:09.03 seconds, the pre-
vious record was set at a time of
1:09.23 seconds.

Event
Coming in second in the
event was Lowe in 1:10.15 sec-
onds, Moss was third in 1:12.81
seconds.
Gibson's third record came
in the breast stroke, a record
which he set in 1994.
Setting the record from his
preliminary rounds of swim-
ming, Gibson raced down the
pool in a time of 1:28.78 sec-
onds in the finals.
The previous record in this
event was 1:33.42 seconds.
Cameron Bruney was second in
the event with 1:38.35 seconds,
with Lowe third in 1:39.76 sec-
onds.
. Lowering the national record
in the 11-12 girls individual
medley was McKayla, swim-
ming to a time of 2:39.55 sec-
onds.
McKayla finished just ahead


of Jessica Greene, who finished
up with 2:47.86 seconds and
Ashley Butler in 2:52.88 sec-
onds.
Dipping under the national
record in the 100m breast stroke
was McKayla's second feat of
the day, as she also took the
100m back.

National
Her time in the 100m breast
stroke was 1:22.02 seconds, the
national record was 1:22.97 sec-
onds. In second was Shante
Moss in 1:23.22 seconds, while
Adrienne Lightbourne was
third in 1:24.12 seconds.
In the 100m back, McKayla
swam to a winning time of
1:16.47 seconds, just ahead of
Butler, who finished up in
1:19.57-seconds.
Alicia might have struggled
in the last 15m of the 13-14 girls'
individual medley, but she was
able to hold on to claim the
title and set a new national
record.
Alicia's time of 2:30.78 sec-
onds erased the old marking of
2:33.49 seconds set by Arianna
Vanderpool-Wallace in
2004.
Vanderpool-Wallace came in
second in a time of 2:30.90 sec-
onds, with Ariel Weech in third
with 2:46.58 seconds.
Je'Nae Saunders wasn't about
to be left out of the record set-
ting day, crushing the girls 9-10
individual medley record.
Saunders' 2:50.49 seconds
lowered the standings of 2:52.76
seconds.
She also won the breast
stroke in a time of 1:31.41 sec-
onds.


Hluss and Moodie take





he men's doubles title


-


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005










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MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


irthday


boy


celebrates


in


st


le


New

national

cycling

champion

storms

home


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
GRAND BAHAMA -
Eleven time champion John-
ny Hoyte watched from the
sidelines as birthday boy
Johnathan Massie came into
his hometown and turned in.
an impressive performance
to become the hew national
champion.
The Bahamas Cycling Fed-
eration, headed by Roy Cole-
brooke, took the National
Independence Cycling Cham-
pionships to Grand Bahama
for the first time over the
weekend.
But while defending cham-
pion Hoyte opted not to
compete and helped out with
the organising of the event
instead, Massie had to out-
maneuver Lee Farmer down
the stretch to pull off the vic-
tory in the 80-mile road race.
It was an extra special vic-
tory for Colorado-based
Massie, who turned 24 on
Friday.
Surge
Colorado-based Massie
had to come from behind to
surge past Farmer to win the
gruelling 80-mile race
through the streets of the
south-western end of Grand
Bahama in two hours, 55
minutes and 50 seconds on
Saturday morning, one day
after celebrating his 24th
birthday.
Farmer, 33, had to settle
for second in 2:59:12 with
Barron 'Turbo' Musgrove
clinging to third place in
3:02.16.
"It's a privilege to be the
new national champion," said
Massie, who was congratu-
lated by Hbyte immediately
after he won the race and
before he hoisted the trophy
in the air, signifying his tri-
umph.
While the conditions
switched from light showers


* BAHAMAS Cycling Federation's president Roy Colebrooke
(right) presents new national champion Johnathan Massie (left)
with his trophy after he won the Independence Cycling Cham-
pionships on Saturday in Grand Bahama.


to a hot, sunny morning,
Massie had to endure the
field that excluded Hoyte and
three other noted Grand
Bahamians, brother David
and Andrew Bell and Kim
'Sprint King' Thompson.
They all watched from the
sidelines, citing their fitness
as the reason for their
absence.
But that didn't deter


But Massie knew that with towards the roundabout at
Massie from achieving his all of the competitors expect- the airport, but he was caught
goal. ed to be at the starting line, and passed by Massie as they
"Ifeltitwould have beena he needed to be healthy to headed north on the long
different race if they were compete in the nationals. highway before they headed
here," he charged. "It would He, along with Farmer, back to the Grand Bahama
have been good to win Barron 'Turbo' Musgrove Sports Complex.
against everyone." and Tracy Sweeting, made an "It was a good hot race. I
Elite early break in the race. But felt okay on the way out
Ultethey eventually dropped there. It was only three of us
Competing with RMCF, an Sweeting three minutes into out there, so I knew it would
elie t im gud rcC an the event. come down to a technical
elite team of under-25 cyclists From there, Massie, race, so I was just attacking,"


* JOHNATHON MASSIE
raises his right hand as he
crosses the finish line as the
new national champion in
the Bahamas Cycling
Federation's National
Independence Cycling
Championships on Saturday
in Grand Bahama.


said Farmer.
"On the way, I tried to go
out by myself, while
Johnathan and Barron
worked together. When he
caught me, I just let him go
because I knew he was the
stronger competitor."
Having defeated Hoyte
already, Farmer agreed that
he didn't think having the
three Grand Bahamians in
the race instead of on the
sidelines would have made a
difference.
"I think our average of 25
miles per hour was the fastest
Bahamas national champi-
onships," he noted.
The race was tactical, so it
didn't matter who was in it.
Johnathan was just stronger
than us all."
Excel
Musgrove, the veteran who
continues to excel at the top,
said this one was just "awe-
some".
"These guys' average speed
was the highest I've ridden
in a long time," he stated. "I
knew I could finish, but hav-
ing the mileage and keeping
up with them, I was really
surprised.
"But when I really had to
work hard coming in, it real-
ly took a lot out of me, so I
didn't have much left in the
tank at the end."
At the end, there was a
battle for fourth place with
Grand Bahamian Keith
Major edging out the field
for fourth in 3:13.16.
Enter
"I only ride because John-
ny didn't ride," said Major,
who only decided to enter on
the day of the race. "They
didn't surprise me. I expected
them to drop me long time.
"But when they didn't and
we came to the line, I knew
they wouldn't have anything
left to go with me. They were
catching crab, but slowing
down. I had to represent
Grand Bahama."
Veteran Sam 'Ironman'
Brown was fifth, Mark
Holowesko sixth, Basil
Goulandris. seventh, Tracy
Sweeting eighth and Tim
Huber ninth, all in 3:15.20.
Wayne Price got 10th in
3:22.10 and Timothy Sturrup
was llth in 3:22.10.


TE YOUR GRADUATION DAY WITH


Massi


~n~ =_ IIPl__l__)_____j__l______ll____ -












MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


-I Tribunilwr


The stories behind the news


A ruling by Supreme
Court Justice Anita Allen
last week dismissed two
charges against Dwight
and Keva Major. The
charges of obscene lan-
guage and threats of death
which date back January
2000 and April of this year
were thrown out yesterday
following agreement by
both the prosecution and
the defence.


The Bahamas last week signed on to
a deal that could lead to cheaper elec-
tricity and lower gasoline and diesel
prices. Trade and Industry Minister
Leslie Miller (pictured at right)
signed the Venezuelan/Caribbean
PetroCaribe Alliance last Thursday
in Venezuela. The agreement, signed
by the Bahamas and 13 other
Caribbean nations, means that
Venezuela will supply the member
nations with cheaper oil...


Workers in the electrical, gas and communications
industry are among the highest annual wage earners, the
Department of Statistics revealed last week in its Occu-
pational Wage Survey. The three industrial groups with
the highest average annual wage were:
Electricity, gas and communications;
the financial intermediation industry; and
real Estate, renting and business activities industry.
The survey was a sample of establishments with five or
more employees in New Providence and Grand Bahama.
In New Providence 579 business establishments were sur-
veyed and 171 in Grand Bahama. All industries were
surveyed except government, hotels and agriculture...


Did a scheming lawyer plot





murder of Sir Harry Oakes?




Newly-released files expose a 'swindler' with a ruthless streak


* By JOHN MARQUIS

was a former
railway clerk
made good. He
worked his way through law
school, qualified as an attorney
and ended up representing
'so-m'dof the most illustrious
high society figures of Palm
Beach.
He was also priggish, insuf-
ferably pompous and a dyed-
in-the-wool swindler with an
eye for the main chance.
And if I were a betting man,
I would lay a very large sum of
money on him being one of the
two key conspirators behind
the wartime murder of Sir Har-
ry Oakes.
Official files released in Lon-
don just a few days ago reveal
that Foskett was suspected of
cheating Sir Harry in the years
leading up to the 20th centu-
ry's most famous unsolved
crime.
They also reveal that he and
Sir Harry were in dispute, the
old baronet having stumbled
upon his attorney's chicanery
and double-dealing.
Foskett has.for years been
one of two men suspected by
American agents of plotting Sir
Harry's death. And that is not
counting the man who was
eventually tried for the crime
and set free.
However, Foskett and his
suspected accomplice Harold
Christie were protected by
what some believe was an
appalling cover-up by the Gov-
ernor of the Bahamas of the
day, the Duke of Windsor.
Now one of the most intrigu-
ing murder mysteries of all
time appears to be moving
slowly towards a solution with
the latest revelations from the
National Archives at Kew in
London.
They reinforce the high soci-
ety gossip doing the rounds in
the Palm Beach area of Florida
for years that Foskett and
Christie were in cahoots in a
scheme to dispose of Sir Harry
for financial gain.
The files, which have been
marked secret and confidential
since 1959, depict Foskett as a
grasping predator who saw the


AiFloridti>Ueyhdemoth30tin ine

an un scIscrupulouscharacercllll Wa'Bj-l'Alt r osk


Oakes fortune as his own per-
sonal cookie jar.
They record evidence from
a wealthy American art dealer
called Fred Maloof, who told
the FBI that Foskett was prob-
ably involved in legal "shenani-
gans" to tap into the Oakes for-
tune.
And he revealed details of a
deal involving two valuable
paintings one of them a Rem-
brandt in which Foskett swin-
dled Oakes. On discovering his
lawyer's deceit, Sir Harry
vowed to "straighten him out"
- a threat which, according to
Maloof, probably led to his
death.
Maloof contends that Fos-
kett, having been confronted
by Sir Harry, hatched a plot to
kill him and gain control of the
Oakes family's financial affairs.
The London files also dis-
close a marked reluctance on
the part of the British authori-
ties to reopen inquiries into the
Oakes case.
Foskett's possible involve-
ment in Sir Harry's murder is
the ultimate irony when you
consider his dealings with
Count Alfred de Marigny, the
man charged with the killing
and ultimately acquitted.
For it was Foskett who,
piously and self-righteously,
refused to help de Marigny
when the suave Mauritian tried
to gain favour with the Oakes
family.
De Marigny, remember,
married the teenage Nancy
Oakes without her parents'
approval in the year before Sir
Harry's death.
He was a handsome man-of-
the-world in his thirties, a
colourful divorcee full of gallic
savoir faire. His bride was a
besotted 19-year-old fired by
the passion and rebellion of
youth.
Sir Harry and his wife
Eunice disliked de Marigny for


designed to block de Marigny's
supposed financial ambitions,
he drew up new wills for Sir
Harry and Lady Eunice pro-
tecting their children's inheri-
tance.
In addition, Foskett took a
lofty posture in relation to de
Marigny's dealings with his for-
mer wife, Ruth Fahnestock.
The lawyer passed on to Lady
Oakes a vicious letter from
Ruth outlining de Marigny's
supposed deficiencies, intensi-
fying her opposition to her
daughter's marriage..
Nancy Oakes was later to
blame Foskett for adding fuel
to the flames as she and her
husband struggled to come to
terms with her family's hostili-
ty. And she told her parents in
a letter that, unless they accept-
ed de Marigny and disregarded
Foskett's venomous advice, she
would never have anything to
do with them again.
At the court hearings in Nas-
sau, Foskett resumed his high-
and-mighty stance, and subse-
quently continued to be the
prime mover in stoking up
Lady Eunice's fervent dislike
of her flamboyant son-in-law.
In light of the latest disclo-
sures, it is little wonder that
Foskett was so keen to see de
Marigny go to the gallows.
And, given the Duke's dodgy
financial dealings and virulent
pro-Nazi sympathies, it is no
surprise that he tried so hard to
draw a protective cordon round
Nassau during the Oakes inves-
tigation.
It now seems certain that the
Duke thwarted a proper police
probe into the case because he
wanted to protect his friends,
Foskett and Harold Christie
among them, and keep Scot-
land Yard and the FBI at arm's
length.
Given his own poor stand-
ing with the British establish-
ment at the time because of his


several reasons, but most
importantly because they
thought he was trying to tap
into the family fortune for the
price of a marriage licence.
In fact, de Marigny was por-
trayed as a fortune-hunter by
the prosecution at his trial,
even though he had refused the
offer of a 1,000-acre farm and
other gifts from his in-laws.
And he spent the rest of his life
trying to live down the smear
on his name left by the court
proceedings and subsequent


deportation.
Foskett, the Oakes lawyer
who liked to claim he was Sir
Harry's close friend, wsas asked
by de Marigny to act as inter-
mediary when the count tried
to heal the rift between him-
self and the Oakes family.
Foskett, however, declined,
saying he disapproved of de
Marigny's behaviour in prey-
ing on Nancy and marrying her
within days of her 18th birth-
day.
Also, in a tactic clearly


Nazi sympathies, and his out-
rageous attempts to breach
wartime currency restrictions
by spiriting a fortune into Mex-
ico, the Duke was disinclined to
invite close scrutiny.
Realising he was under close
surveillance by the FBI, and
the subject of deep suspicion
at Scotland Yard, he kaeathat
high-grade sleuths from Wash-
ington and London would not
confine their inquiries to the
Oakes case alone had they
flown into Nassau.
Hence, he handed over the
investigation to a couple of
crooked Miami cops, both of
whom were cruelly exposed as
liars and cheats by de
Marigny's defence counsel dur-
ing the trial. The deceit of one
of them, James Barker, was the
main reason for the jury's quick
decision to set de Marigny free.
So how did the low-born
Foskett, son of a locomotive
driver, inveigle his way into
Florida's high society, handling
the legal affairs of not just Sir
Harry Oakes, but also the
Duke and Duchess of Windsor
and Sir Harold Christie?
From all existing evidence,
it seems he managed to har-
ness hard work and gritty
determination to a remarkable
capacity for ingratiating him-
self with those he considered
his social superiors. Also, he
was utterly ruthless in his deal-
ings with others, crushing any-
one who blocked his path as
he sought to scale the social
heights.
When deals got tricky, Fos-
kett was not averse to pulling a
gun a fact recorded by Maloof
in his revelations to the FBI.
Although he was in later life
depicted as a figure of stature
and respectability, Foskett was
by all accounts a thoroughly
unpleasant man.
Born in a small Indiana
town, Foskett started out in life
as a $65-a-month railway clerk.
Humble as his position was, it
was later to provide an entree
into the Duke's golden circle.
For the Duchess's uncle,
Solomon Warfield, was a rail
magnate with Indiana connec-


See MURDER, 2C


CELEBRATE INDELPEN-ECE IN STYLE THIS YEA J


-if3


* SIR HARRY OAKES


k Z 1.









PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Dear Editor:

t is remarkable that
after three years as the
nominal leader of the
defunct FNM that
Senator Tommy Turn-
quest still has to prove his lead-
ership abilities to all and
sundry.
I never subscribed to his
leadership role in the opposi-
tion and cannot, even at this
juncture, see him as my leader,
much less Prime Minister of
The Bahamas.
For whatever reasons, Turn-
quest just does not convey a
leadership persona.
He and his followers, such
as they are, seem not to realise,
as quoted by Benjamin Dis-
raeli, one of England's greatest
prime ministers that: "In these
days neither wealth nor pedi-
gree prevail; for the former,
the world is too rich; for the
latter, too knowing..."
Tommy might as well just
pick up his marbles and go
home. What about Dion
Foulkes and the rest of the
FNM wannabes? Foulkes totes
some heavy baggage and there
are so many unanswered ques-
tions about his gravitas and
intellectual capacity that it
might well be impossible for
him to survive the brutalities of


political fratricide. Dog will eat
his lunch and he also, if he is
not strong.
Foulkes is not ready, at this
juncture, to become the Prime
Minister of The Bahamas. His
best bet, as I have consistently
told him, is to seek an alliance
with former Prime Minister,
the Rt Hon Hubert A. Ingra-
ham, MP, PC, as his deputy.
Politics is akin to war and
Foulkes must understand that
he is most qualified to be
Ingraham's armour bearer. He
cannot lead the opposition
forces effectively as comman-
der-in-chief if he has no seat
in the House of Assembly.
Turnquest found this out the
hard way.
The PLP has made some
mistakes, and it seems to have
a knack for attracting minor
scandals, impositions and ques-
tionable deals. Be that as it
may, ordinary Bahamians are
still prepared to give that par-
ty the benefit of the doubt.
With or without the Rt Hon
Perry G Christie, MP,PC, as
leader, the PLP seems set to
be re-elected, unless or until
my leader, Mr Ingraham, toss-
es his hat into the arena.
Carl Wilshire Bethel,
Zhivargo Laing, Nicko Grant
and the rest of them are
whistling in the wind if they


expect to emerge as leadership
material. It just cannot hap-
pen.
Carl and company fumbled
the Holy Cross saga badly. His
apparent indecision to chal-
lenge Stubbs' then bankruptcy
demonstrated his lack of forti-
tude.
Laing ran off to Grand
Bahama after he was humili-
ated in Fort Charlotte. Grant is
viewed, by many, as someone
who is out of his depth by
almost three miles. Alvin
Smith is a mere appendage to
the opposition brigade.
And so, Foulkes is out of the
gate as the marathon com-
mences.
He must be ever mindful,
however, that, as quoted by
biblical sources, the race is not
to the swiftest, but to he who
endureth to the end. Work
with Ingraham and succeed or
fight and be defeated.
OB, Nassau
*.OOOO


DION FOULKES for prime
minister doesn't sound right to
me. If Obie Wilchcombe takes
over from Perry Christie, the
PLP will be in a strong posi-
tion to win the next election,
and Foulkes is not the man to
stop them.
Winton Highway
******

THE FNM has a real lead-
ership problem because, like
him or not, Hubert Ingraham
is the only credible candidate.
However, half the party can't
stand the sight of him and will
resist him at every turn.
The PLP is in better shape
because Obie Wilchcombe
does sound like an acceptable
replacement for Mr Christie,
even though his leadership
skills are so far untested.
Benjamin, Freeport
O.O@OO


Murder (Fror

tions. You can be sure that
Foskett milked his railway
background for all it was
worth as he oiled his. way
into the Florida high life.
And it paid off handsomely.
Foskett, after a protracted
financial struggle, finally
graduated from law school
in 1907. He worked initially
in Indiana, and then Seat-
tle, but found his way to
Florida in 1922, setting up a
Miami Beach practice with
a long-time friend, Bert
Winter.
Winter Foskett estab-
lished itself as a thrusting,
ambitious law firm with
labyrinthine commercial
connections. Before long,
its clients included some of
the south-east's major
movers and shakers.
The Oakes connection
began in 1934 when Sir Har-
ry was looking for ways to
protect his growing fortune
from the Canadian taxman.
The ambitious Foskett
struck the right chord with
the old prospector, and was
hired as his US attorney, a
move which set him on the
road to riches, not all of
.them legally acquired..
It was around this time
that Sir Harry was coaxed
to the Bahamas by the
dynamic young realtor,
Harold Christie, who had
stressed the virtues of the
colony's fantastic climate
and tax-free status. Foskett,
apparently, also cajoled him
into making Nassau his
home. It was a move that
profoundly affected all their
lives.
When Sir Harry and his
family established them-
selves at Westbourne, their
seafront mansion near
Goodman's Bay, it seemed
all their dreams had materi-
alised at once. From their
windows, they could watch
the sun set over a dramatic
seascape. It was a paradise
far removed from the chilly
wastes of the Yukon, where
Sir Harry had first toiled
with pick and shovel to
unearth the gold he yearned
for.
Having struggled as a
prospector in harsh condi-
tions all over the world, Sir
Harry had finally struck it
rich in Canada, amassing
what. was to become the
biggest fortune in the
British empire.
But he resented deeply
the demands made upon
liim by Canadian tax
authorities and sought a
haven for his money. That
resentment brought him to
Nassau, where he quickly
established himself as the
foundation of the local
economy.
In quick time, he bought
up vast acreages of land and
employed battalions of
locals, acquiring a double-
edged reputation in the
process. The Bahamas
became his personal
domain, a fact not wel-
comed by some of those
whose families had been
established in the islands for
generations.
Those who liked him saw
a generous and understand-
ing spirit behind his rough-
and-ready demeanour.
Those who didn't recall a
foul-mouthed martinet with
a vindictive streak who was
becoming much too-big for
his mining boots.

Wealth

Upper-class Bahamians
tolerated his coarse manner
because of his wealth. How-
ever, the Duke and Duchess
saw Sir Harry and Lady
Eunice as "the Charlie
Chaplins of Nassau society",
a condescending term the
Duchess once uttered under
her breath at Government
House. As a snob, the for-
mer Wallis Simpson had
few equals, and she had a
particularly waspish way of
asserting her imagined supe-
riority.
Poor blacks, however,
viewed Sir Harry and Lady
Oakes as the acceptable
faces of whiteness, welcome
counter forces to the racist
whites of Bay Street and the'


haughty British colonial
officials brought out from
London to run local gov-
ernment affairs.
On balance, though, the
Oakes family's presence
was seen as a good thing in
a society enduring wartime
.austerity, and. deprivation.
They provided hope in a
colony which had virtually
no economy at all.
Created a baronet by
King George V1 in 1939, Sir


m 1C)

Harry was a key component
but an awkward fit in local
society. He possessed the.
status and. wealth to impress
even the snootiest of pan-
jandrums, but was also the
source of some embarrass-
ment, especially when he
spat grape pips across some
of the most extravagantly
laden dinner tables in the
land.
So when he was found
dead on his bed on the
morning of July 8, 1943,
with four holes in his head,
the colony was torn apart
by conflicting emotions.

Appalled

Some whispered "good
riddance" while others were
appalled. In over-the-hill
areas, the grief was heart-
felt, particularly as 250 local
jobs in a depressed and
backward colonial outpost
were immediately put on
the line. The murder left
Nassau in shock.
When Alfred de Marigny
was arrested for the mur-
der, reaction was similarly
mixed, because the outspo-
ken count was also admired
and reviled in equal mea-
sure.
While some detested his
"Frenchness" and
renowned prowess as a
seducer of young girls, oth-
ers liked his informality and
easy charm. He was also
admired for his consider-
able skills as a Star class
sailor, expertise which net-
ted him an array of trophies
on the pristine waters of -
Montagu Bay.
His acquittal in the fall of
1943 was the cause of much
jubilation among the blacks,
but considerable disquiet
among those whites who
saw him as the convenient
fall guy for their own
wrong-doing.
Chief among the latter
group was the Duke, whose
handling of the entire affair
was a scandal of mammoth
proportions.

Questions
In fact, the many unan-
swered questions about the
Oakes case, and the dis-
turbing way he supervised
the investigation, probably
stymied once and for all any
ambitions he might have
had of high ambassadorial
rank.
The Duke had hoped his
Bahamas posting would
lead to a major jb in Wash-
ington or one of the great
dominions. Instead he and
his wife spent the rest of
their lives on the interna-
tional social circuit, flitting
from one soiree to the next,
where they exchanged high
society tittle-tattle with
deposed European royals
and other titled nonentities.
It was the Duke's sus-
pected involvement in a
cover-up, plus his question-
able financial transactions
and Nazi connections, which
almost certainly prompted
a deep reluctance by British
authorities to reopen
inquiries into the Oakes
affair.
Had the full story become
known, it's likely the
unsavoury saga of the
Windsors would have
brought opprobrium down
upon the Royal Family at a
time when they could best
do without it..
In fact, it's unlikely that
the whole truth about the
Oakes murder will be
known until all the Wind-
sor papers are opened. And
that might not happen until
the middle of the 21st cen-
tury, when the older gener-
ation of Royals are safely
out of the way and impervi-
ous to the fall-out.
Meanwhile, as the Wind-
sors wandered the world,
Harold Christie and Walter
Foskett continued to pros-
per in their respective
careers, Christie as the ulti-
mate Bahamas realtor with
a keen nose for a sales com-
mission, Foskett as a high-
flying attorney with a
deeply dishonest turn of
mind.


Interestingly, both depart-
ed this life in 1973, the year
after the Duke's demise,
taking with them probably
all we ever needed to know
about the strange and eter-
nally intriguing murder of
Sir Harry Oakes.

The book Blood and
Fire, by John Marquis,
which retells the story of the
Oakes murder, is due for
publication in October.


INSIGHT


-1"


_I_ ___


I








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2005, PAGE 3C


The Bahamas last
week signed on to
a deal that could
lead to cheaper
electricity and
lower gasoline and diesel prices.
Trade and Industry Minister
Leslie Miller signed the
Venezuelan/Caribbean Petro-
Caribe Alliance last Thursday in
Venezuela.
The agreement, signed by the
Bahamas and 13 other
Caribbean nations, means that
Venezuela will supply the mem-
ber nations with cheaper oil.
Venezuela is the world's largest
oil producer.
Signing the agreement were
Antigua and Barbuda, the
Bahamas, Belize, Cuba,
Dominican Republic, Grenada,
Guyana, Jamaica, Dominica, St
Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St
Vincent and the Grenadines,
Surinam, and Venezuela.
However, two Caribbean
nations, Barbados, and Trinidad
and Tobago opted not to sign
the agreement, stating that they
needed more time to study the
terms and conditions of it.
The PetroCaribe deal comes
into effect immediately, and
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez putting up $50 million
to get the initiative "off the
ground", according to Mr
Miller.

THE Supreme Court last
week denied government's
application for a stay of the rul-
ing that Registrar General Eliz-
abeth Thompson was unfairly
terminated.
The unfair dismissal ruling,
issued last month, reinstated Ms
Thompson as the Registrar
General of the Bahamas.
Since then, the position of her
replacement, acting registrar
general Shane Miller has been
questioned.
Ms Thompson has attempt-
ed to return to her office, but
has been denied entry.

WORKERS in the electrical,
gas and communications indus-
try are among the highest annu-
al wage earners, the Depart-
ment of Statistics revealed last
week in its Occupational Wage
Survey.
The three industrial groups


with the highest average annual
wage were:
Electricity, gas and com-
munications;
the financial intermediation
industry; and
real Estate, renting and
business activities industry.
The survey was a sample of
establishments with five or
more employees in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama. In
New Providence 579 business
establishments were surveyed
and 171 in Grand Bahama.
All industries were surveyed
except government, hotels and
'agriculture.
The overall average hourly
wage was $12 ($13 for men and
$11 for women).
The overall weekly hourly
wage was $457 ($487 for men
and $417 for women).
The overall annual wage was
$23,751 ($25,869 for men and
$21,675 for women).
The overall hours worked per
week were 39 (39 for men and
38 for women).

A RULING by Supreme
Court Justice Anita Allen last
week dismissed two charges
against Dwight and Keva
Major.
The charges of obscene lan-
guage and threats of death
which date back January 2000
and April of this year were
thrown out yesterday following
agreement by both the prose-
cution and the defence.


"What we got from the Venezuelans is.
a dream come true. This is an extraordi-
nary achievement, one that I have been
behind for the past two and a half years."
Leslie Miller,Minister of Trade and
Industry on the Venezuelan/Caribbean:
PetroCaribe Alliance deal signed in
Venezuela last week.The agreement was
signed by the Bahamas and 13 other
Caribbean nations, and is expected to
lead to cheaper electricity and lower
gasoline and diesel prices.

"It is, of course, regrettable that attempts
by the executive to find a solution to the


* END OFAN ERA Pictured (1-r) are Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, Abbot Thomas Hillenbrand, Catholic Archbishop
Patrick Pinder, Abbot John Klassen and Monsignor Preston Moss last week during the Service of Thanksgiving
for the Benedictine monks of St Augustine's.
(The Tribune archive photo)


awkward anomaly of having a Registrar
General and an Acting Registrar General
at the same time failed.
"However, in my view, although there is
a concurrent jurisdiction in the Supreme
Court and the Court of Appeal to grant a
stay of execution, in the circumstances of
this case, where the Order of Certiorari
has been signed and the respondents have
filed Notice of Appeal in the Court of
Appeal only the Court of Appeal can
order a stay of the Order of Certiorari."
Supreme Court Justice Hugh Small
rules on government's appeal to stay last
month's ruling by Justice Anita Allen.


Justice Allen had ruled that Elizabeth
Thompson was unfairly dismissed from
her Registrar General post.

"He has already signed formal order
of the court and as such had completed all
of his functions.
"There was nothing left for him to do
because government filed notice of appeal
with the Court of Appeal. It is his view,
that only the Court of Appeal, at this stage,
can now order a stay."
Attorney Thomas Evans on Justice
Hugh Small's decision last week in the
Elizabeth Thompsocase.. ,.


Advantage ACielcol


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Quotes of the Week


INSIGHT


WEEK IN REVIEW


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The Tribune

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THE TRIBUNE


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ISSUES&I DEAS

SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 1 THE MIAMI HERALD


COMMENTARY




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AN TWO YEARS AFTER THE
A DISASTER AND AS NASA
S TO RESUME SHUTTLE
-S, SOME ASK: IS THIS ANOTHER
T WAITING TO HAPPEN?


ZER
.com
NAVERAL After hundreds of additions,
s, repairs and inspections, the result is this: No
arantee the safety of the seven astronauts
board Discovery next week and relaunch' the
e program.
he first flight since a 1.67-pound piece of foam
iggered a cascade of events that destroyed
ibia on Feb. 1, 2003, killing all
uts aboard. READY
's liftoff is set for July 13, but TO FLY?
e as late as July 31 'to An indepth
te any final glitches or look at the
weather. scores of
s safe as it could be," said John safety
member of the board that improve-
d the Columbia accident and ments to the
f the Space Policy Institute at Page 2C
Washington University. "The
is, 'Is it safe enough to.commit a crew?' And I
- I hope the answer is yes."
says NASA appears to have made a good-faith
npt to fortify the shuttle fleet and, of equal
portance, retool a culture that paid insufficient
ention to concerns about safety and reliability.
Others are less sanguine. The
NASA-appointed Return to Flight Task Group
issued an ambiguous report last week, and
outside critics say the agency is overlooking
some risks and ignoring suggestions that
could substantially enhance crew safety.
"Internally, there are some who say this
thing is another accident waiting to
happen," said Don Nelson, an engineer
who retired from NASA in 1999 after 36
years of work on the Gemini, Apollo,
Skylab and shuttle programs.
A member of the shuttle's initial design
team, Nelson long has lobbied for fortified
ejection seats that would serve as escape
pods. Astronauts currently have no way to
escape from a crippled shuttle under most
circumstances.
"Both accidents, Challenger and
Columbia, were survivable if the crews had
escape pods," Nelson said. All seven
Challenger astronauts were killed in that
1986 accident.
NASA says the inclusion of escape pods
would require a total and expensive
redesign of the shuttle, which it says is not
feasible at this stage of the program.
Meanwhile, agency officials say they have


am 4
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--- --- I --- L Ic-- -- I Ir IC-- ----`---~------~-^----p-~-- -- I I


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......................... ................THE MIAMI HERALD


Ready to fly



Improvements to the shuttle
Discovery's mission will be the first since the loss of
Columbia and its crew on Feb. 1, 2003. Scheduled for blastoff
between July 13 and 31, Discovery has been renovated with
scores of safety improvements, many of them major.

L Exterior heat protection
The shuttle's external surfaces are covered
with materials to protect the craft from the Replacement
searing heat of reentry through the Replacement f
atmosphere. Insulation blankets and groscoe for
heat-resistant tiles are used in many areas; Space station
panels made from a high-tech material called
"reinforced carbon-carbon" protect the leading Supplies
wing edges and nose. For this flight, all such for in-space 0
materials have been inspected and repair to
refurbished. shuttle
Container
carrying

2. Wing impact and parts
detection system Shuttle's t
in one of the major robotic
post-Columbia improvements,
embedded sensors have been arm
added to the leading edges of both
wings to help detect any impact of
debris. Data from these sensors will
flow to the flight deck and then to
Mission Control in Houston.


10. Shuttle rudder
Steers the shuttle and slows its
descent by flaring into two surfaces.


Key controllers had
become corroded
and were repaired.
Mechanical
actuators
(turn rudder)
Actuator
drive shaft


/


Insulation
blankets


Ceramic
tiles


---- 22 reinforced
carbon-carbon
panels


- The front wing spar
has been redesigned
to prevent
superheated gases
from penetrating into
the wing during
atmospheric reentry.


9. Booster
separation
motors
When the solid
rocket boosters
separate from the
shuttle after liftoff,
small thrusters fire
to push the rockets
away from the
orbiter. The igniters
and fuel used by
these thrusters have
been improved.


3.Orbital boom
expansion
A 50-foot boom, a
camera and a laser
device have been
added to the
mechanical arm that
is anchored in the
shuttle's cargo bay. j


Shuttle aft
attachment


S8. Liquid
oxygen
feedline
Super-cold liquid
oxygen causes
condensation of water
around this external
pipeline. Water coming
in contact with the
joints may freeze, break
off in chunks and strike
the shuttle.


Before, the
robotic arm
could not
reach all
critical
surfaces
of the shuttle.

Now, the -
arm and its
attachments
will be able to
inspect the
entire wing
edge and
underside.


4. External fuel
tank insulation
These improvements
are among the most
important because the
Columbia accident was
caused by a 1.67-pound
chunk of insulation that
peeled away from this tank
and punched a hole in the
wing.


I
Bboster
thruster


Booster
thruster


Foam: Tainkskin:
1 inch thick approximately
average 1/0linch thick
To reduce the risk of
damaging debris, foam
application techniques
have been refined and
small heaters have been
added to ensure that
nothing more substantial
than a piece of debris
weighing .03 pound can.
break away from the tank.i


line heater


6. Bolt
catchers
Two minutes after
launch, explosive
bolts fire to
separate the fuel
tank and booster
rockets. Each bolt is
encased in a retainer
to absorb the
explosion and
prevent pieces
of the bolt from
hitting the shuttle.


SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY


Ex-astronaut: 'This is truly a test flight..


Full of new technology'


*SHUTTLE

not been asleep at the switch.
As illustrated in the accom-
panying graphic, engineers
have redesigned the external
fuel tank that shed the deadly
chunk of foam, have installed
sensors to detect damage to
the orbiter and have taken
many other steps to reduce
risks in space and on the
ground.
"From what we know, it
looks to be a better vehicle,"
said G. Scott Hubbard,
another member of the inves-
tigative panel and director of
NASA's Ames Research Cen-
ter in California. "I have seen
a heck of a lot of work going
on that is very impressive in
its rigor."
Crew members also praise
the agency, although they
acknowledge the danger and


say they are more vigilant
than they were in the past.
"People aren't perfect, but
I'm proud of the fact that
we're really trying hard," said
Eileen Collins, the retired Air
Force colonel who will lead
the 12-day mission to deliver
supplies and repair parts to
the International Space Sta-
tion. "And I'm confident that
we've come a long way and, in
that respect, we're ready to
fly this mission."
Still, a deeper truth also
resides on Laun6h Pad 39B at
the Kennedy Space Center:
A close look at the shuttle
produces the unavoidable
conclusion that its time has
come and largely gone. It
just somehow looks old-
fashioned. At a minimum, it
certainly is old.
Even with more than
$1.5 billion of post-Columbia


improvements, Discovery and
the two other remaining shut-
tles Atlantis and Endea-
your are based primarily
on 1970s technology. Thou-
sands of parts are "mission-
critical," meaning that a fail-
ure of any of them could
doom the crew.
"It is a fragile, probably
more-risky-than-we-would-
like vehicle," Logsdon said.
"But it happens to be all we
have."
That is something less than
a ringing endorsement of the
technology, and this flight
becomes even more worri-
some when one considers that
the most significant post-
Columbia modifications can
be fully verified only during
launch and flight.
"This truly is a test flight,"
said former astronaut Win-
ston Scott. "In my experience


with the program, I can't
remember a flight that is this
full of new technology,
changes, improvements."
Among them:
Improved foam applica-
tion techniques have sharply
reduced the risk of chunks of
insulation peeling from the 15-
story external fuel tank.
In addition, heaters have
been designed to reduce the
chance that ice can form on
the tank, which holds 535,000
gallons of super-cold liquid
fuel. The heaters replaced
foam at several sites, includ-
ing the point at which the tank
connects to the orbiter.
It was there that foam
ripped away and slammed the
leading edge of Columbia's
left wing, gouging a hole that
allowed hot gases to enter and
melt crucial structures as the
orbiter reentered the atmo-


sphere. But the Return to
Flight Task Force noted last
week that NASA was tardy in
recognizing, the hazards
posed by ice and still has not
eliminated every possible
source of it.
The leading wing edges
now have 66 sensors to mea-
sure debris strikes. The
instruments will alert the
crew of trouble.
A new seal between the
tough carbon panels and tiles
on the leading edge of the
wing will make it harder for
hot gases to creep into the
wing.
A new digital camera
will monitor the external tank
during lift off and send images
to the crew and back td earth.
The camera can spot unex-
pected and potentially harm-
ful debris that may break
loose from the tank. Many


other new cameras have been
positioned on the ground to
help detect and analyze dam-
age.
A 50-foot extension has
been added to the mechanical
arm that lifts astronauts and
equipment out of the shuttle's
cavernous cargo bay. It will
allow astronauts to maneuver
to the shuttle's wings and
nose to inspect for damage.
Engineers have devised
a risky, unproven plan that
might allow spacewalking
astronauts to caulk small
holes on the orbiter.
One problem: Misapplica-
tion of the gooey substance
could render the craft unfly-
able. Another problem: Even
using the caulk, astronauts
will not be able to plug a hole
as large as the six- to 10-inch
gash that brought down
Columbia.


Connects
to tank


Connects
to booster -
rocket

Bolt
explodes
to allow
separation


B~E~.~W~IGBIL~JB~~ a I


6C SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


ISSUES & IDEAS













WWW.HERALD.COM


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, JULY 3,2005 7



OPINION


ALBERTO IBARGOEN, PUBUSHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JAMES L. KNIGHT 0909-1991)


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ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE )



Kudos for speech


BY CAL THOMAS
www.creators.com

P erhaps not since his post-9/11
address to Congress has Presi-
dent Bush laid out with such clarity
the purpose and cost of the war
against terrorism and for the libera-
tion and emancipation of Iraq.
He answered his critics
who had been asking to
know the goal and methods
that he intends to employ to
reach it and gave an indica-
tion of when the troops
might start coming home.
Americans are used to THOMAS
instant oatmeal and instant
replays and they need to understand
there can be no instant war with
instant results. Bush repeated Tues-
day that this war will take time; it
will cost a lot of money and lives
and it will not be over soon. World
wars never are, and the president
said that troops across the world are
fighting a global war on terror.
Perhaps afraid to offend Mus-
lims, the president did not refer to
the real motivational force that fuels
the killings and chaos. He said that
these terrorists "murder in the
name of a totalitarian ideology." But
that totalitarian ideology has a name
and a religion that drives its fanati-
cism Islamo-fascism.


Bush has bet everything on a sin-
gle principle, enunciated by Secre-
tary of State Condoleezza Rice on
her recent Middle East trip and
believed as a matter of faith by the
president: All people yearn to
breathe free and live in a demo-
cratic nation. That ideal remains to
be achieved. But it is now being
tested in the most difficult
region of the world to plant
democracy.
The president properly
warned the American peo-
ple that this world war will
not end soon because the
stakes could not be higher.
He quoted Osama bin Laden
as saying: "This Third World War is
raging" in Iraq. "The whole world is
watching this war."
Bin Laden says that it will end in
"victory and glory or misery and
humiliation." '
Bin Laden and his co-murderers
are making a huge bet of their own.
They are wagering that as in Viet-
nam 30 years ago, Lebanon 20 years
ago and Mogadishu 11 years ago,
America will lose heart and retreat.
This may not be the war to end
all wars, but if it isn't won, it could
be the beginning of endless wars in
which the United States and the rest
of the free world never again know
peace.


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SGQUICK TAKE


War-progress law


BY DAVID S. BRODER
davidbroder@washpost.com

U nder a little-noticed provision
of the defense-spending bill
passed by Congress in May, Secre-
tary of Defense Don Rumsfeld has
until July 11 to send Capitol Hill a
"comprehensive set of performance
indicators and measures of
stability and security."
It is hard to understand
President Bush's resistance
to this perfectly reasonable
demand. He is our first
M.B.A. president, who gen-
erally operates on the prin-
ciple that if you can't mea- BRODER
sure something, you are flying blind.
Why not measure the enormously
expensive investment in Iraq?
Among other things, the report
accompanying May's Iraq funding
bill requires:
A detailed status report on


July 11 and follow-ups every 90 days.
Measures of the security envi-
ronment, including the number of
engagements per day, the count of
trained Iraqi forces and the esti-
mated strength of the insurgency.
Indicators of economic activ-
ity, including unemployment, elec-
tricity and oil-production rates.
Detailed information
on the training of Iraqi mili-
tary and security forces,
their equipment and capa-
bilities and the timetables
for achieving full readiness.
Documentation on
absentee rates and calls for
similar information on the
Iraqi police and their training.
Secretary Rumsfeld to provide
- either in public or in classified
annexes-- an estimate of U.S. mili-
tary forces needed in Iraq through
the end of calendar 2006.
@2005 Washington Post Writers Group


___. ____ ~1__ _11_1___~____________I_


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