Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00135
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: June 16, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00135
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.168 THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005 PRICE 500


sections inside


Police called to


resolve stand-off


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE had to intervene
during" a heated verbal
exchange at the Rodney E Bain
Building yesterday when Reg-
istrar General Elizabeth
Thompson showed up for work
intending to resume her duties.
Squad cars with several police
officers were called to the scene
to maintain order after Ms,
Thompion attempted to
"uphold the Supreme Court's
ruling" that she was unfairly ter-
minated.
Yesterday afternoon govern-
ment filed an appeal against the
Supreme Court decision, which
ordered that Ms Thompson be
either remunerated or reinstat-
ed as registrar general.,
When she approached the
building yesterday, Ms Thomp-
son was informed by a male sec-
retary that she was "not allowed
on the premises" on the instruc-
tions of acting registrar general
Shane Miller.
However, with the assistance
of another staff member, Ms
Thompson, and members of the
press, soon gained entry to the
building :despite Mr Miller's
directives.
It was then that the exchange
took place as Ms Thompson
tried to carry out her duties as
registrar general, but was turned
down by Mr Miller who refused
to vacate his seat.
Ms Thompson said she decid-
ed to leave the building shortly
after lunchtime on Wednesday
when there was no sign of a res-
olution.
However, she said, "a notice
of appeal does not stay the judg-


ment of the Supreme Court".
She said she would return to
work again today unless two
specific courses of action were
taken.
"I will go back to work again,
unless I receive a letter from
the public service or the per-
manent secretary that confirms
I will receive paid leave for my
services, or a notice informing
me that there is a stay of Justice
Small's judgment," said Ms
Thcmasofi. "I ess I get either
one of those two things I will
return to work."
Ms Thompson was hired in
August last year on a three-year
contract to serve as registrar
general and inspector of finan-
cial and corporate providers on
a salary of $51,200 per annum.
She received copies of her
contract on October 18, 2004,
and signed and dated them
before returning them to Par-
liamentary Secretary at the
Ministry of Financial Services
and Investments Sheila Carey
by November 24.
In his judgment Justice Small
pointed out that Ms Carey's
request to the Judicial Legal
Service Commission (JLSC) for
the termination of Ms Thomp-
son's contract was on Novem-
ber 23, 2004.
By January 10, 2005, Ms
Thompson received a letter of
termination.
Attorney General Alfred
Sears told The Tribune yester-
day that the government has
not come to an agreement with
respect to Ms Thompson.
He said he was in a meeting
with the director of legal affairs,
but was "not in a position to
respond to matter."


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ATTORNEY General
Alfred Sears has decided not
to proceed with a "threat of
harm" case against senior
COB lecturer Felix Bethel.
The proceedings have
been annulled, meaning that
the Crown is not prepared
to continue its action against
him.
The decision brings to an
end a 20-month ordeal for
Mr Bethel, who was accused
of threatening harm to COB
vice-president Dr Linda
Davis.
Mr Bethel had been sus-
pended on half-pay since
allegations were first made
in November, 2003.
Mr Bethel's attorney, Mr
Wayne Munroe, will now
SEE page twelve


$200,000 missing from

Inagua, claims Smith

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
ACCORDING to House Opposition Leader Alvin Smith
$200,000 is missing from Inagua's local government account.
Mr Smith made the, allegation during his contribution to the
2005/2006 budget debate in the House of Assembly yesterday.
Mr Smith claimed that the money has been missing since last
year.
He did not know if the funds had been stolen, but urged
Local Government minister Alfred Gray to tell the Bahamian,
people why the funds had disappeared.
Mr Gray said this was the first time he had heard anything
SEE page twelve


One-year-old girl is

killed in house fire


A FIRE in Long Island has
claimed the life of a one-year-
old child.
According to Chief Fire Offi-
cer Inspector Walter Evans,
sometime around 1pm yester-
day, Long Island police report-
ed that a single story wooden
house was destroyed by fire in
Alligator Bay.
The fire also destroyed two
vehicles at the Jerk Pitt restau-
rant.


The rescue of one child dur-
ing the blaze must be credited
to two Long Islanders Dewitt
Miller and Kevin Miller.
Inspector Evans said attempts
to rescue a second child were
hindered because of the inten-
sity of the flames, and that as a
result, the child was killed.
The deceased has been iden-
tified as 1-year-old Gabrielle
SEE page twelve


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BAHAMAS EDITION


Minister

condemns

LNG critics

0 By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
TRADE and Industry
Minister Leslie Miller has
condemned those wvho
opposed the introduction of
liquefied natural gas to the
Bahamas.
Mr Miller, in his contribu-
tion to the Budget Commu-
nication 2005/2006, said
there has been much criti-
cism and half truths, some-
times with personal attacks
and "despicable accusations"
against him over the topic.
"Rather than debate the
issue and arguing the issue
and their case on the facts,
some have resorted to per-
sonal, slanderous attacks on
me. Some who should know
better, have made or sug-
gested the most scurrilous,,
offensive and despicable
accusations against me.
SEE page twelve


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* THE Farm Road Urban Renewal Programme yesterday, at the head office on East Street, launched a week
of activities. From left, standing: Pastor Ulric Smith of Zion East & Shirley St, Courtney Thompson of Evan-
gelistic Temple, Antonio Thompson of Victory Tower Disciplining Centre, Bruce Darville of Evangelistic
Temple. From left, seated: Theresa Wells of Victory Towers Disciplining Centre, Pastor Kenny Carrol of
Healing Tabernacle, ASP Stephen Dean, the Coordinator of the Farm Road Project, and Woman Corpo-
ral Lisa Rahming of the Farm Road Project.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff


'Less crimes committed'


since the launch of the


Urban Renewal Project


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
CRIME is on the decline in
the Farm Road area since the
launch of the Urban Renewal
Project, according to ASP
Stephen Dean.
According to officer Dean,
who heads the community pro-
ject now celebrating its third
anniversary, less crimes are
being committed in the area and
more people are reporting crim-
inal activity to the police.
"Initially when we came in
this area, we had a lot of juvenile
problems; juveniles going before
the courts," he explained.
"But we've found that over
the past years, we rarely heard
of a young person from Farm
Road before the courts for
deviant or anti-social behaviour.
Positive
"'In addition to that, we were
averaging at least ten murders
a year from this area when we
initially came. Now you could
barely get one. So they are some
positive indicators in terms of
crime."
The fear of crime, he added,
has reduced "tremendously" in
the area. People are walking to
church again, he said.
"People are reporting crimes
much more," officer Dean con-
tinued. "We find that residents
call us and tell us that someone
has a firearm hidden some-
where.
"People feel more confidence

TROICA


ASP Stephen Dean:

people feel more

confidence in the police


in the police,.The Farm Road.
project is really highlighting peo-
ple in the inner city, and we have
some very positive, people
here."
The project can boast of other
successes, such as the establish-
ment of the now popular youth
marching band; the donation of
computers to schools and
churches for children; the con-
struction of 14 homes on previ-
ously overgrown lots cleared by
youths; the repair more than 30
homes over the hill, including
the addition of bathrooms to
some homes where families were
without prope-ffacilities.
"We believe it is one of the
most ambitious strategies ever
launched in the country to deal,
with crime, social ills, and the
decaying problems in our com-
munity," said ASP Dean.
The Urban Renewal Project
is celebrating its anniversary
with a week of activities begin-
ning today with a slot on the
radio talk show: "Immediate
Response". The week's theme is
"Transforming our community
through unity".


...Other activities include a
church service at Zion Baptist
on East Street this Sunday; an
island tour for the senior citi-
zens on June 23, a fun walk or
run on Saturday, June 25' fol-
lowed by a fun day, and a youth
march and rally at Windsor Park!-
on June 26 at 2.30pm.
Attention
While the Urban Renewal
Project, which has received
international attention, is the
brainchild of the Progressive
Liberal Party, officer Dean
stressed that the -project's,
emphasis is "apolitical".
He said the success it has had
is as a result of making Christ
the driving force for all of its ini-
tiatives.
The Farm Road project was
the government's pilot initiative.
Today, the programme has
spread throughout the inner
city, as well as to Grand
Bahama.
Project opportunities are now
being explored in the Family
Islands.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


016,MWOO,








THE TRBUNE HURSDY, JUE 16,2005,PAGES


Bahamasair set to lose



$12m by end of the year


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
BAHAMASAIR will close
the current fiscal year with a
net loss of $12 million, said
Works and Utilities Minister
Bradley Roberts during his
contribution to the Budget
debate on Tuesday.
Mr Roberts said that while
fuel surcharges have been
imposed to partially offset the
growing cost of fuel, much of
the impact of those surcharges


has been eroded by fare com-
pression triggered by the low-
cost carriers.
Bahamasair revenue grew
by $4 million while expenses
grew by $5 million, mostly dri-
ven by the cost of fuel.
"Had it not been for the dis-
tribution in service caused by
hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
in the Fall last year, the airline
would have been better by $1.8
million resulting in a net loss of
$10.2 million," said the minis-
ter.


Mr Roberts contends that
this is a major achievement,
given the $13 million reduc-
tion in losses achieved over the
previous year.
He said that by joining mul-
tiple bank-settlement plans in
Europe, Bahamasair has at last
been able to tap into meaning-
ful sales channels to attract
European traffic.
Bulk seat agreements with
Virgin Atlantic, Lufthansa
and British Airways are also
stimulating incremental Euro-


pean traffic growth.
Charter business contributed
an increase of 40,000 passen-
gers and more than $2 million
in incremental revenue in the
past year.
"Thanks to the additional
jets and the airlines improved
product, I am advised that
charter operators like the
Trump Group, Disney Pic-
tures, Apple Vacations and
many local and US church and
civic groups are seeking us
out," added Mr Roberts.


U


T


Bethel; Smith must resign


SENIOR academic Felix
Bethel has renewed his call for
COB president Rodney Smith
to resign immediately.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Bethel urged the Min-
ister of Education to "see to it
that the right decision is made".
Mr Bethel said Dr Smith took
an oath to uphold the highest
ethical standards of academia
and has failed as by his own
admission and confession, he is
a plagiarist".
According to Mr Bethel, Dr
Smith "must resign and if he
does.not resign, the way for-
ward for the council is clear -
he must be fired."
College council members are
considering the next move in
the plagiarism affair. It is under-
stand the council will make a
recommendation to minister
Alfred Sears when discussions
are completed.
Dr Smith's position has been
in question since it was discov-
ered that he plagiarised a
speech given at the college's
annual honours convocation.
Mr Bethel was emphatic that
Dr Smith had violated acade-
mic principles. "Plagiarism is
wrong and it isn't made right
when carpenters, janitresses and
others say that it's not," he said.
Mr Bethel said: "The demon-
strations before COB are irrel-
evant." He added that "only
one faculty member has decided
to support" this academic
offence publicly.
Mr Bethel, who was recently
involved in court proceedings
himself following a row with a
fellow academic, said "there
cannot be different strokes for
different folks" as the people
calling for mercy for Dr Smith
were not supportive when he
encountered some problems
and offered an apology.
Mr Bethel said it would be
below dignity to be in a position
where he had to look towards
the president of COB, as he felt
that he is "unqualified" to be
the leading force behind
Bahamian academia as a result
of last week's admission.
Mr Bethel's comments came
after ZNS reported Dr Smith


as saying that if "I was asked to
resign, I would." Then Dr Smith
claimed that what he did was
not intentional and that when
it was brought to his attention
he apologised immediately.
Dr Smith claimed that he
immediately called John Sex-
ton, president of New York
University, whose work he had
plagiarised, to inform him of
the incident and apologise.
According to Dr Smith, Sex-
ton understood. Further, Dr
Smith went on to claim that pol-
itics had blown the plagiarism
fiasco out of proportion.
Former Minister of Educa-
tion Dion Foulkes, the FNM
Action Group and several oth-
ers have also voiced disapproval
of Dr Smith's actions and have
questioned his ability to lead an
academic organisation.
About 100 of the college's 500
staff and faculty, and Dr Earle
Mclain Johnson, a member of
COB's council and former pres-
ident of the Union of Tertiary
Educators, support Dr Smith
and have asked for the public
and academia to forgive him.




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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


adwohajk


I










PAGE 4,THURSDAYTRIJUNTET16S205THEEERITOBUNE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-


e require


.ones


on


CSME issue


Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



'Mother' Pratt's philosophy of life


IN WINDING up her Budget presentation
on June 1, Acting Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
brilliantly annihilated all those who would dis-
miss her ability to fill Prime Minister Perry
Christie's shoes because she was just a "mere
teacher."
When Prime Minister Christie was suddenly
taken ill last month and "Mother" Pratt as
deputy prime minister Cynthia Pratt is better
known stepped forward to take over the
ship of state, a local tabloid claimed that one of
her colleagues had remarked that he/she did not
intend to serve under a "mere teacher".
In thanking those who had supported and
encouraged her in her present role, Mrs Pratt
had something special to say about those who
"sit in awe" of her achievements. She didn't
know why they should be so awestruck. '
"'Oh, she read the Budget!'" Mrs Pratt quot-
ed them as remarking. "I don't know why,"
she continued. "As though you couldn't do it.
Well, you know I didn't go to school to eat
my lunch!" she smiled as MPs collapsed with
laughter. "Sometimes they believe you only
went to school to eat your lunch only for
recess. No, Mr Speaker, I learned too a
mere teacher!
"A mere teacher, but a teacher who was
able to touch the lives of engineers, doctors,
nurses, judges ,and lawyers and, Mr Speaker,
this mere teacher is able to look back on hun-
dreds of young people who have returned
home and are giving back to this country
because this mere teacher was able to touch
their lives." There was thunderous applause
from both sides of the House.
"And so, Mr Speaker," she concluded, "I
want to reassure my colleagues in this place
that I love you, I love all of you, I appreciate
you and I wish you the best God bless you!"
Mrs Pratt is cricitised for talking too much
about God. But it is this very God that is her
inner strength, that makes her different, that
allows her to bring a refreshing tone and dignity
to the Halls of Parliament, that gives her the
strength and humility to be generous, even
with her detractors.
"There are so many others who could have
done this, who might be more qualified, who
might have more experience, but I, a humble
servant, was the one chosen, and what I want to
do is just to touch lives," she told the House.
She assured members that she means well,
and wants to do "anything that will make this
country better that's what I am about."
She told the House that her mission is "to
build a nation, a people that's proud, a people
that can say when this group was there' they
gave their best. That's all you can do give
your best."
She acknowledged that sometimes "you can
make mistakes, sometimes you will say things
that didn't come out right, but it wasn't intend-
ed to offend you. Sometimes it happens
because in public life things are construed in
another manner but that's not what you


meant and so you have the critics who hope
that you would fail, they are sitting there hop-
ing that you would fail."
A strong believer in destiny, she is confident
she is not destined to failure. "This is an
appointment by God," she told the House,
"and because God placed me here for this
time, I can't fail because God says... 'If I am in
the midst of you, you can smile at any storm'."
And in her typical motherly fashion she
advised House members to be careful how
they try to destroy each other. This is the same
advice she gave them when she sat in Oppo-
sition.
"It bothers me," she said, "when we try to
destroy each other all in the name of politics,
and it's wrong. It's wrong because I believe
that if God had already ordained the moment
for a member to return to this place I don't
care what you do God says you'll return
and you'll return. They can't do a thing about
it, so I don't need to go under the table to
undermine anybody, I don't need to stand up
here and sling mud at anybody, I am the least
of them. But I do know that the Bahamian
people out there appreciate the effort of this
member and this government."
She said people encourage her because they
can see she is trying.
Mrs Pratt has a keen sense of humour that
can ease a tense moment. Many times she gets
her point across through parables.
She hears people criticising her, but, she
says, if she can touch one life such criticism
only makes her stronger. She is stronger
because she knows that no one throws rocks at
a tree that bears no fruit. .
"I know," she said, "that a tree that has no
fruit on it you never see a man throwing a rock
at it, because you will think that something is
wrong with him. 'Look at that fellow throwing
a rock what he think he throwing at?' Dr
Podlewski, you remember him get Dr
Podlewski, this fellow needs a psychiatrist. But
when they are throwing stones at a tree that
fruit is hanging on, it means that you're bearing
fruit, that you are making a difference, and so
I try to get in whatever way that I can."
She says she is stronger when a young man
can walk up to her and say "Mother Pratt, do
you remember me?" "No, I really don't," she
replies. "And he says 'I am the one who was
going the wrong way, and because of you I
turned around.' That's what it is all about," she
told her political colleagues.
Each week students from schools in Nassau
and the Family Islands visit the House to see
their MPs in action. Often they must be
shocked at some of the uncouth behaviour
they witness.
If members would take a leaf out of Mother
Pratt's book of life, politicians might become
more civil and set a better example for young
people to follow. For, according to Mother
Pratt, "what it's all about" is the touching and
changing of at least one life.


EDITOR, The Tribune
CSME... it seems as we indi-
vidually and collectively as a
sovereign people live our lives,
where we show the world just
how naive we really are, when
we come to analysis of concepts,
proposals and change. Change
is something we shy from even
if it is inevitable just look at
the continuous protests against
development projects that will
create new employment.
CSME is no different, in fact
I would certainly describe this
as the one subject since the con-
cept of taking independence,
that has been on the table and
we really have seen, read and
heard a lot of real crazy ideas.
Some will be unwilling to
recall, the FNM posture pre-
1973 and independence, an
immediate time period in which
far more wealth was created in
the merchant class, the minori-
ty 15 per cent, than at any other
time in our history.
The Nassau Institute com-
ments today in a letter indicat-
ing that CSME will create a
"Super Caribbean State", which
reminds me of the hilarious
movie starring the great British
comedian Peter Sellers "The
Mouse that Roared" any valid
research on CSME indicates
that this will create the weakest
single trade alliance existing as
excluded in this alliance is the
prime supplier of these coun-
try's needs the United States
of America, which these coun-
tries rely on to exist not only as
consumers but for their self-
Sdefence. The latter point was
sigifiiardtly confirmed this
week when our Minister of ForL 2
eign Affairs totally excluded the
use of Caribbean Defence
Forces in even a "police-action"
within the region, even in
today's Haiti.
The sudden silence or silenc-
ing of High Commissioner
Leonard Archer from the pub-
lic debate is interesting, as is the
transfer from foreign affairs to
the Bahamas Trade Commis-
sion, which indicated years ago
to the public of the lack of
advantages.
I really doubt anyone would
mind if we retained the status
quo we have today, which is
basically supported on an imag-
inary ego trip that we are a
"player" in international affairs
but everything stops right there
as being part of the Economic
Union, the one currency, "free"
movement of labour, etc, are
unacceptable under any cir-
cumstances. Free movement of
labour means that, basically,


immigration will be abolished
for CSME member countries
and their citizens.
No, CSME will not create
anything but a wimp which will
be totally ineffectual in any lan-
guage and on any day in the
week.
My worry is that we might
not have been told the whole
truth, as Mr Mitchell and
Ambassador Archer clearly
have said many times that the
Bahamas communicated their
position to CARICOM/CSME
back in December 2004 and
that has not changed.
Surely, it is time those docu-
ments should be tabled in the
House of Assembly so there is


EDITOR, The Tribune
I would like for you to
allow me to answer the June
7 article "LNG consultation
halted".
Is this a dictatorship? Is it
not that the government is
supposed to be the voice of
the people? Judging from an
article in theJuhe 7 2005, edi-
tion of the Nassau Guardian
under the caption "LNG con-
sultation halted", the Minister
for Trade and Industry needs
a reminder.
The aggressive, over-zeal-
ous approach to disregarding
the views of the Bahamian
people on LNG is despica-
ble. Why does the minister
fear consulting with the
Bahamian people? Why is
there "no great rush" to meet
with the people?
The minister seems to have
issues with control and the
possession of power that was
only bestowed upon him by
the people the electorate.
The Prime Minister must
immediately seek to reel in
the minister, before his bois-
terousness leads to the par-
ty's collapse in 2007.
The dictatorial notion that
people should not "hog up"


transparency. If the minister
refuses, then we really must be
scared.
J MUNNINGS
Nassau
June 11 2005
(In the House of Assembly
during the Budget debate on
Monday, Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell announced
that "this matter of Chaguara-
mas will not be decided within
this present term (of parlia-
ment). There is too much mis-
information, disinformation,
and emotion, too much political
dishonesty. There is simply too
much politics."
(Mr Mitchell said govern-
ment proposed to refer the mat-
ter of CSME and the signing of
the treaty to the Bahamas Com-
mission on trade for further
review. Ed).


town meetings and are limit-
ed to two questions shows
that the minister is afraid of
the opposition and indicates
that he does not have the
people's best interest at heart.
How dare a minister of the
government supposedly a
servant of the people favour
a LNG pipeline and ignore
the queries of the people? A
democracy is based upon
opposition and dissent. What
really makes no sense is to
approve such a controversial
project then come to a ques-
tioning public and say "hey,
here's what we did".
Just as the Minister of
Agriculture and Fisheries
proposes public discussions
with fishermen on establish-
ing a closed season for the
conch, the Minister for Trade
and Industry should take a
page from his book.
Election time is near, and
an unhappy, not consulted
electorate means a changing
of the guard. Mr Minister,
truly be a minister of and for
the people all egos aside!
ADRIAN GIBSON
COB student (4th year)
Nassau
June 9 2005


Lady Mar guer ite Pindl ing
SturdayJi'8t, 2005 Tl-ejiDsGrtrefcrTieRrfarmingAts. 8FM a idds$30


Remember who


you work for


-IF.


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. (242) 302-7000



PUBLIC NOTICE


NEW BUSINESS HOURS FOR BTC

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) wishes to inform
its valued customers and the general public that with effect from Monday,
June 13, 2005, the new operating hours for its administrative and business
offices will be 9:00am to 5:00pm daily. This change is the result of recent
contract negotiations and effectively brings the Company's operating
hours in line with the terms of Employment Act (2001).


However, customers are further advised that they may continue to make
payments at any of the Company's CTO's during the usual hours of
8:30am and 4:30pm daily.


BTC sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused.


A well-established merchandising company
is seeking the immediate services of a


SALES REPRESENTATIVE
The ideal candidate must be:
Self-motivated
An effective oral and written communicator
Committed to team work
Goal Oriented
Positive / Can-do attitude
Minimum requirements include:
S3 5 years Sales Experience
Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel & Outlook
Valid Driver's License
Recent Police Record
Proven leadership and supervisory skills
The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own with the minimum of
supervision. A competitive salary and employee benefits packages are available to the
successful candidate.
Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to the address below no
later than June 17, 2005:
Human Resources
P.O. Box CR-56766 Suite 1231
or
Fax (242) 328-2067
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNL w,


EBy DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A 20-year-old
man is in hospital following a
near drowning, and an elderly
man is in stable condition after
being catapulted from a truck
during a traffic accident, accord-
ing to police.
Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming reported that Kevin
Sears of Hudson Estates was
discovered foaming at the
mouth and clinging to the side
of the swimming pool at Kwan
Yin Apartment Complex
around 3.20pm Monday.
A 14-year-old girl, who was
also swimming at the time,
called for assistance,
When Police and emergency
services personnel arrived at the
scene, they pulled Sears, who
was in a semi-conscious state,
from the pool.
He was rushed to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
was placed on a respirator. His
condition has been downgraded
from serious to stable.
.Police are advising persons
cannot to swim to refrain from
venturing into above shoulder-
depth water.
Accident victim Lawrence
Bain, 70, of'Pink Pearl Drive,
is said in stable condition with
.injuries to both his legs.
Bain was a passenger in the
back of a Ford Ranger Truck
driven by Ashman Duncan, 65,
of Ihn-OQ-War Circle.
The truck collided into a Toy-
ota Tercel driven by Casey
Williams 20, of Cartier Circle, at
the junction of Midshipman
Road and Balao Road at Coop-
er's Gas Station.
Bain was catapulted into the
airfori impact and thrown onto
thueroad;
:- Both: vehicles were exten-
sively damaged. Investigations
are continuing.



THURSDAY
JUNE 16I
6-30an 'Community Pg./1540
i1 :00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1`00 Ethnic Health America
1:30, Spiritual Impact
4:00 CMJ Club Zone
2;30 Treasure Attic
3:00. Bishop Leroy Emanuel
3:30. Gilbert Patterson
4:00 Look Up Sing Out
4:30 Gospel.Grooves
4:58 ZNS News (Update Live)
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Legends From Whence
We Came: L. Rahming
6:30 i News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 *Native Stew Special
8:30 Da' Down Home Show
9:30 The Darold Miller Show
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Pg./1540





PetCoto
EppcllEteil.op


Not guilty plea to drugs charge

0 By NATARIO McKENZIE Thompson being concerned
and ADRIAN GIBSON with others, was found in pos-
,_session of 546 pounds of mar-
A 39-YEAR-OLD Freeport ijuana.
at r n a :man appeared in Magistrate's The drugs had an estimat-
Court yesterday where he ed street value of $546,000.
pleaded not guilty to conspir- Thompson, who was rep-
acy to possess and supply over resented by attorney Wilbert
$500,000 worth of Marijuana. Moss was charged and then
Ita is I l led that on Fridlaaii~ d tI A d to FoA Hill Pri.qnn


I.L I t/tj .d -U g LII U a L O mucy,
May 27 of this year while at
Lindsell in Freeport Grand
Bahama, Ricky Samuel


S All Fashion Fabrics
(including Bridal, Prom & Evening Farbrics)
20 -50%o0
Upholstery & Drapery Fabrics
20- 25%ic
Junkanoo Tricks


ie larlUU LU .' J. t. a r oison.
The matter was adjourned
to June 22 for a bail hearing.
A 27-year-old Malcolm
Road man appeared in
court yesterday to face the
charge of attempted armed
robbery.
It is alleged that on Satur-
day June 11, James Miller,
being armed with a handgun,
attempted to rob Luther Moss
of a silver 1995 Nissan Sentra
licence, number 109201, val-
ued at $5,000.
Miller was not required to
enter a plea to the charge and
was remanded to Fox Hill
Prison.
The matter was adjourned
to August 17.


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'Expert planning needed' for islands
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE Southeastern Islands of the Bahamas, if not developed
soon, stand a good chance of losing their young population to the
more developed islands of the north leaving these islands as poten-
tial havens for drug traffickers, illegal immigrants and terrorist.
Long Island and Ragged Island MP Larry Cartwright made this
statement during his contribution to the budget debate on Tuesday.
Mr Cartwright also called on the minister responsible for nation-
al security to create a special department in her ministry to address
the matter of illegal fishermen.
He said that organised and expert planning is essential for the
"continuance of Bahamian existence on these islands."
"I implore the government to move quickly to advance the
development of this area of the country so that it too can become
a balancing factor as we move further into and swiftly through
the 21st century," said Mr Cartwright.
The MP said that there is the need for proper town planning and
that it must be put in place before the "present ad hoc exploitation
of our islands progresses any further."
The fishing industry, said Mr Cartwright, is totally out of hand at
the moment.
Government, he said, must do all it can to restore normalcy to the
Great Bahama Bank.
"I call on the minister responsible for national security to create
a special department in her ministry to address the matter of ille-
gal fishermen and who interfere with our marine life illegally,"
said Mr Cartwright.
"I have spoken oftentimes about the poaching problems which
by the way are still going on.
"I have spoken about the use of air compressors out of season
and I have been assured that today divers are using these diving aids
even though their permits are expired to harvest sponges conch, fish
and whatever marine species they desire," Mr Cartwright said.
He suggested that fisheries inspectors, who are a part of the
process of issuing compressor permits, be made responsible for
ensuring that compressors are taken out of boats no later than
the first week of April.


STANLEY
S48-in. /
W I-BEAM
LEVEL
s23


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JUIN. i0,


ap~o~n














'No gay promotion' in schools


By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
Education Director Iris Pin-
der has said "there will be no
promotion of gay or lesbian
concepts" in schools' curricu-
lum although the government
school system "does not dis-
criminate" against homosexual
students.
Mrs Pinder told The Tribune
that in the public education sys-
tem today, "students from as


early as the primary school-lev-
el are discussing homosexuality
as part of the curriculum", but
heterosexual relationships are
being emphasised by teachers.
She said students are partici-
pating in classroom discussions
under the topic "Alternative
lifestyles and making choices",
under which the idea of homo-
sexual relationships is raised.
"They are learning about
homosexuality and discussing
the issue in religious knowledge,


Asian Culinary Week
at the Portofino Restaurant, British Colonial Hilton
Starting from June 14th 26th (serving dinner only)
Our Culinary Team searched the globe and arrived at the Orient
for yet another delightful dining experience.
Dishes featuring:
Indonesian Chicken Satay $19.95
Chinese Noodles with Prawns & Port $21.95
Sti:r Fry BeefTeriyaki $23.95
and much more...
It's always our pleasureto serve you.
For reservations or additional, please call 322-3301 ext. 4045.
All prices are subject to a 15% service charge.
10% Discount for Groups of 10 or more.


oZo


British Colonial Hilton
N.a-


www.hiltoncaribbean.com/nassau +1 242 322-3301
The Hion name d logo are radmarks owned by Hilon. 02004 n Ho spi iliy, Inc.


family life, and health and fam-
ily life sessions, but we empha-
sise opposite-sex relationships,
because this is a Christian
nation," said Mrs Pinder.
Mrs Pinder's remarks were
prompted by a Tribune inves-
tigation into claims that students
in at least one government high
school in New Providence are
holding gay club meetings on
campus.
Mrs Pinder said she has heard
that there are gay and lesbian
students within the school sys-
tem, but said she has no knowl-
edge of there being gay club
meetings in schools.
She said: "Schools are micro:
cosms of society, so it is natural
that many of the concepts seen
or experienced on the outside
have a possibility of trickling
into the schools."
Mrs Pinder said that gov-
ernment schools avoid teach-
ing material which promotes i
homosexuality.

Book

In the United States a stir has
been caused by a particular chil-
dren's book about gay princes
which has been circulating in
some schools and libraries.
The story book, entitled King
and King, is intended for read-
ers age 6 and up, and tells the
story of a prince, whose true
love is another prince.
The main character Prince
Bertie falls for another char- -
acter named Prince Lee. The
book ends with them marrying
and sharing a kiss.
An excerpt from the book
reads: "Once there lived a
lovelorn prince whose mother
decreed that he must marry by


* -.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* KING and King, the children's book about a same-sex
relationship which caused such a stir in the US


the end of the summer. So
began the search to find the
prince's perfect match and lo
and behold... his name wa.s
Lee."
King and King also has a
sequel called King and King and
Family, which joins the newly-
weds King Lee and King Bertie,
"who in the end discover there
is no adventure more wonderful
than starting a family of their
own".
Some parents in North Car-
olina were reportedly "fuming"
and "flabbergasted" according
to international reports, when
they found their children read-


ing the publication.
The book received hon-
ourable mention in the "Most
Unusual Book of the Year" cat-
egory for Publisher's Weekly's
2002 category for "Off the Cuff
Awards" or "Cuffies" selected
by booksellers.
The Philadelphia Gay News
says King and King, is "A great
book to teach young readers
about same-sex couples.
The book, which has been
translated into four different
languages, is the first work by
Dutch writer and illustrator
team Linda De Haan and Stern
Nijland.


II MRS. BERYL HANNA
Saturday June 18th, 2005 The Dundas Centre for The Performing Arts 8PM* Tickets $30


Donationrto

foundation
SCOTIABANK has madea
donation to support the work
of the Kidney Foundation.
With increased funds, the,
Foundation plans to introduce-
national detection programmes
and increase public awareness


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Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
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The Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club is seeking suitably
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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE.


HA*BJ






I .- I I ILJ JI'IL--


I~ 11 ~ -


M By DINA
TSERETOPOULOS
LONG ISLAND MP Larry Cartwright made
an appeal in parliament on Tuesday for local
government officials to be given the freedom to
increase development on their respective
islands.
Mr Cartwright, who made the statement dur-
ing his contribution to the budget debate, said
that government's annual budget often neglects
Bahamian citizens in the Family Islands.
He stated that "the function of government.
.. is to take responsibility for meeting the needs
of [its] citizens in all areas of the common-
wealth" regardless of whether they inhabit Nas-
sau or one of the Family Islands.
As a solution to this problem, Mr Cartwright
called for an increase in correspondence
between Family Island administrations and the
central government, which he feels will enlight-
en the central government to the issues affect-
ing the people of the Family Islands.


Among these issues, he said, are the lack of
public transportation and unlit airports, as well
as "insufficient medical personnel" and
"dilapidated, unmaintained and congested
schools".
Local governments, Mr Cartwright said, want
to be able to increase development on their
respective islands, so as to eradicate the
unnecessary problems Family people are expe-
riencing; however, they are hindered
from going forward with these plans as they
are never sure about the availability of the
funds.
Mr Cartwright argued that no Bahamian
should be forced to inhabit an area with sub-
standard conditions and that with a budget that
"commits a total of $165.1 million toward cap-
ital expenditure, some of which is earmarked for
Family Island Development", he hopes that
plans for developmental projects in the Family
Islands will not be neglected due toa central
government that is out of touch with the needs
of the people.


Government to help


airline decrease debt


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
GOVERNMENT has
agreed in principle to rid
Bahamasair's balance sheets
of unproductive debt and dor-
mant intra-government
payables, said Works and Util-
ities Minister Bradley Roberts.
Mr Roberts made the state-
ment yesterday at the open-
ing of the new Bahamasair
domestic terminal.
The government, said Mr
Roberts, firmly supports the
need for a national flag carri-
er but is not in a position to
provide the necessary capital,
which can only come through
debt.
He pointed out that multi-
lateral agencies and rating
houses, particularly the IMF,
are adamant that the govern-
ment must privatise losing
entities like Bahamasair,
which has a decided negative
impact on the national debt.
The national debt is
presently approaching the
danger threshold of 40 per
cent of GDP, he said.


PHONE: 322-1722


"We have seen what exces-
sive debt has done to the
economy and currencies of
countries like Jamaica.
"They are in a perpetual
tail" spin, said Mr
Roberts.
Bahamasair, said Mr
Roberts, needs to reduce staff
in order to have an appropri-
ate staff number.
Benefits
"We need to adjust salaries
and benefits in some work
groups. These needs are all
best met in a private sector
environment.
"We have become compla-
cent in thinking that the gov-
ernment will be there to
bridge the gap forever.
The government injected
$14 million into the airline
this year, $2 million than last
year.
"This compares very favor-
able when compared with the
$29 million injected in the
years preceding the PLP
returning to office," Mr
Roberts pointed out.


m*;V an unntilities
Minister Bradley Roberts.
IYFORD CAYt~



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ForSaleby Owner


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


LOCANiEWS


lrremngflhS&1I*to hold ehom]bbi[sfair


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
IN THEIR continuing "war against drugs"
the Bahamas National Drugs Council youth,
family and community leaders committee will
host its 18th annual hobbies fair at the Town
Centre Mall this Saturday from 11am to 7pm.
The hobbies fair was launched in 1987 in an
effort to discourage Bahamians, particularly
the youth, from using drugs by giving them
something else to do.
"Creating drug-free communities and devel-
oping young people with clear minds and drug-
free lifestyles are two of the long term goals of
the Bahamas National Drug Council's youth,
family and community leaders committee," said
Andria Archie Deputy Permanent Secretary
in the Ministry of Health.
The theme for this year's fair is: "Creating
positive activities -building a better community".
"The fair is designed to allow our budding,
even latent entrepreneurs, to interact with
skilled professionals to discover hidden tal-
ents," Mrs Archie said.
Eunice Taylor, who has been co-ordinating
this event for the last nine years said all inter-


ested persons will be able to get hands-on expe-
rience in areas such as floral design, shell craft,
computer graphics, jewellery making, native
straw work, junkanoo art and home decora-
tion.
Persons will be given the opportunity to cre-
ate their own crafts, and all materials needed
will be provided by the council.

Encourage
To encourage people to try their hand at
craft-making the council will give anyone par-
ticipating whatever they make free of' charge.
"Whatever you make you can take," Mrs Archie
explained.
The fair will host entertainers such as Kevin
McKenzie, the Oakes Field primary school
dancers and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force
rangers.
"We realise that it is not just enough to teach
our young people to say no to drugs. We have to
provide them with positive alternatives. We
have to show them how to live healthy, how to
adopt new lifestyles in order to say yes to life,"
Mrs Archie said.


Complaints over straw market 'heat'


i ices



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H By KRYSTEL ROLLE
STRAW vendors and tourists
alike have been complaining
about the "unbearable" heat in
the straw market.
Hundreds of thousands of peo-
ple from around the world come
to the Bahamas every year to vis-
it the 'world famous' straw mar-
ket to shop, but vendors say the
conditions are becoming increas-
ingly uncomfortable and are
affecting their livelihoods.
Almost six hundred vendors
earn their living in the straw mar-
ket every day, and the general
consensus among them is that the
market is just too hot.
Since the old straw market
went up in flames almost four


years ago vendors have relocated
to the old BEC parking lot, where
only a thin tent separates them
from the scorching sun during the
summer months.

Tourists
"It's inhumane," said Natisha
Meadows, "We are working in a
warehouse. It's hard to make a
sale in here because the tourists
are uncomfortable and so are
we."
"The heat is killing us," she
continued, fanning herself with a
straw fan.
"If the government can't pro-
vide powered fans for us, then
the least they can do is install
some outlets so that we can bring


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in our own fans."
Long-time straw vendor Geof-
frey Collie agreed with Ms Mead-
ows, calling the situation "embar-
rassing".
"It's embarrassing when
tourists ask, 'how can you stand
the heat?' and I have to make
excuses because I don't want to
make it seem like the government
doesn't care."
"If you don't care about the
natives, then do it for the tourists
whom we depend on every day,"
another vendor added.
Vendors say they have to phys-
ically fan themselves and the
tourists to make the situation
more comfortable.
Edith and Donald Williams of
Greensborough North Carolina
agreed that the market is too hot.
Mr Williams said, "It's hot, hot,
hot! Someone needs to install
some fans or air condition.
"Even some sea breeze will
do." He said.
Joe Odette, visiting from
Toronto Canada said, before tak-
ing a sip of his ice water: "The
heat in here is ridiculous."
He added that shopping under
such conditions is very uncom-
fortable.
Diana Thompson, 85, one of
the oldest straw vendors said,
"the heat is terrible in here."


enrmr~eeana~aear~ ~:


THE TRIBUNE '


*4










Government


recognises union ...w.. ..


as representative

M By KARAN MINNIS ment of the government to promoting the concepts of the
abide by the constitution of the ILO and defending the rights
THE National Congress of International Labour Organi- of workers in the Bahamas".
Trade Unions (NCTU) has zation (ILO)." Mr Bain said that the NCTU
been officially recognized by Mr Bain said that both is thankful to announced Vin-
the government as representing NCTU and the TUC remain cent Peet, Minister of Labour
the workers of the Bahamas. committed to the provisions of and Immigration and the gov-
According to Patrick Bain, the Memorandum of Under- ernment for "taking this bold
President of the NCTU, "This standing, signed January 14. stand as the social partners con-
announcement, although long He added that the NCTU tinues their effort in nation
overdue, speaks to the commit- "will continue to collaborate on building".

Minister urges I5
tolerance for all
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Speaking at the senior graduation of Rfes sunrays upto
Doris Johnson High School students yes- Reduces air-conditioning cost
terday, Fred Mitchell said that education Ideal for concrete, asphalt shingles & wood
should give the choice of peace as opposed Water clean-up
to violence.
"It should teach you the path of resolving
issues and crises through logical thought 5 Gallon White $107.75
and consultation," said Mr Mitchell.
"What I am doing then today is setting
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they are or where they come from."
The choices you make will affect the 5 Gallon Brown $107.75
quality of life you will have, said Mr
Mitchell. "Your education in this place
has equipped you to make decisions about..
your life, not fall into a situation which
you would prefer not to have."
He also advised students that their self-
esteem should not depend on who you
choose to be your companion or spouse.
He said: "You should have a strong
sense of who you are and- remember in
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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE














Barbados a 'hair's breadth' from Bahamas?


DURING the national
debate over the
CSME much was made about
Barbados being a "hairs
breadth" away from The
Bahamas. Is this true? Let's
examine the facts.
Contrary to statements by
others that Barbados' GDP per
capita is some $17,000 com-
pared to The Bahamas' $18,000,
the truth is that, according to
latest statistics available at the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) and the Central Bank of
Barbados, Barbados' per capita
income is about $10,000 com-
pared to The Bahamas' $18,000.
Actually, according the Cen-


STRAIGHT UP TALK


Z H I VA


tral Bank of Barbados Website,
Barbados' per capita income
stands as US$7,350. This writer
chooses to use the higher fig-
ure tossed around to give the
benefit of the doubt.
Those who quote a per capita
income of more than US$10,000
for Barbados could only be
using Barbados dollars (BBD),
which has been fixed by the
Barbados government at a val-


o LAING

ue of only fifty cents US; that is,
the exchange rate between the
US dollar and Barbados is
$1US to $1.98 BBD. At
US$10,000, Barbados' GDP per
capita is a little more than half
that of The Bahamas. If Barba-
dos' Central Bank figure is
used, The Bahamas' per capita
income is more than double that
of Barbados.
The table right shows other


Father G enr oy Nottage
atrdare 18th, 2005 iTerErartefcrhelrfaTnirgAts. 8FM


STATISTIC BARBADOS


Population
GDP
GDP per capita
Exchange Rate
Number of Tourists (High)
Tourist Expenditure (High)
Labour Force
Government Recurrent Revenue
Government Recurrent Expenditure
Government Recurrent Deficit
Total Government Deficit
National Debt
Foreign Reserves
Non-oil Imports
Non-oil Exports


271,000
$2.724 billion


USD (2003)*


$10,051 USD
$1.98 BBD = $1.00 US
4.51 million
$723 million USD
143,200
$931 million (2003)*
$877 million (2003)*
$54 million USD
-$136 million USD
$2.22 billion USD (2003)*
$601 million USD (End 2004)*
$1.025 billion USD (2003)*
$229 million USD (2003)


-lib


BAHAMAS

305,000
$5.533 billion (2003)
$18,141
$1.00 BD= $1.00 US
5 million
$1.8 billion
176,330
$959 million (2003)
$1,091 million (2003)
-$132 million
-$244 million
$2.40 billion (2003)
$668 million (End 2004)
$1.474 billion (2003)
338.5 million (2003)


* Latest figure available
Source: IMF Country Report, Economic Report of the Central Bank of Barbados
Bahamas Department of Statistics, Central Bank of The Bahamas Economic Report


comparative details revealing
that Barbados has some dis-
tance to travel before catching
up to The Bahamas in many
respects.


According to statistics from
the Central Bank of Barbados,
between 1998 and 2003, the
most recent period available,
Barbados's economic growth
has been low, especially in the
years from 1999 to 2002. While
the growth of the Bahamian
economy had slowed in the
same period, in each instance
the Bahamian economy fared
better that that of Barbados.
The table below compares the
two economies between 1998
and 2004.


ernment's chief spokespersons.
Indeed, they found the argu-
ments by those spokespersons
at times simply inaccurate and
misleading.
It is regrettable that while
advising the public of the gov-
ernment's decision not to sign
the revised treaty before the
next general election, which in
and of itself seems curious, Min-
ister Mitchell was so ungracious.
He was insulting to those who
opposed his point of view,
accusing them of spreading half-


COUNTRY 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004


Barbados 6.2
Bahamas 6.8


2.4 -3.4 -.4 2.2 N/A
1.9 .8 1.4 1.9 3.0


* Source: Economic Report, Central Bank of Barbados
Bahamas Department of Statistics


m God cannot use for His glory"


According to the Central
Bank of Barbados Economic
Report, Barbados' GDP in the
year 1998 was $3.91 billion
(Barbados dollars) or $1.97 bil-
lion (US dollars). In 2003, five
years later and the latest year
for which statistics are available,
Barbados' GDP stood at $4.34
billion (Barbados dollars) or
$2.2 billion (US dollars).
This means that over the last
five years of recorded history
of Barbados' economy, the Bar-
bados economy has grown by
only 11 per cent as opposed to
doubling, as some people have
said.
In contrast, according to the
Department of Statistics, The
Bahamas' GDP in 1998 was
$4.49 billion and grew in 2003 to
$5.62 billion. This represents a
growth of some 25 per cent
compared to Barbados' 11 per
cent.
GOVERNMENT CSME
RETREAT WISE

The Christie administra-
tion was staring down
the barrel of a loaded gun on
the issue of CSME and they
knew it.. They knew that they
did not mount a clear and cred-
ible argument for signing on to
the revised Treaty of Chaugu-
ramas creating the CSME.
Bahamians of all walks of
political and socio-economic life
could not support the Decem-
ber 21, 2004, decision by the
government to sign on to the
CSME in July of this year and
could not make sense of the
mixed messages sent by the gov-


truths and fudging the issue.
Such persons included former
governors of the Central Bank,
former cabinet ministers, mem-
bers of Christie-appointed con-
sultative committees, distin-
guished business persons in The
Bahamas, PLP parliamentari-
ans, and average Bahamians
simply concerned about their
nation.
There is no such thing as a
"half-truth", there is only truth
and lies. The fact is, if the min-
ister was more willing to tell the
truth, he could have enjoyed a
much more reasoned dialogue
and debate on the CSME.
Additionally, if he had not
fudged the issue so much, he
could have put the issue to the
society in such a way that they
did not have to constantly ques-
tion his motives in the process.
In any event, even if he reluc-
tantly and ungraciously retreat-
ed from a course that was not
well laid, he did retreat and that
is what matters.
Now, let us let the Trade
Commission, which got lost in
the minister's campaign to sign
the revised Treaty, do its work
and do it with focused deliber-
ation. We look forward to its
conclusion.
THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
"Pride goeth before destruc-
tion and a haughty spirit before
a fall." Prov 16:18


SINGLE DWELLING RESIDENTIAL NASSAU
I - "


JOANS HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1438
PROPERTY SIZE: Split Level Single Family
Residence (5,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Wild Guava Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000


I-IS- SOL UMI FEST PRHS WIHTLPOE OTC NDP-A DRES OCERYMSI


SEVEN HILLS ESTATES TOWER ESTATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 15 LOT NO. 47
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence PROPERTY SIZE: 10,908 sq. ft.
(5,000 sq. ft.) LOCATION: Tower Estates Dr.
SITE AREA: 1,693 sq. ft. APPRAISED VALUE: $195,000
LOCATION: Blue Hill Rd. South
APPRAISED VALUE: $146,000


Share


your


news

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from people who are
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you are raising funds for a
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I


R G












Twenty graduate handicraft course


I dy ERIC ROSE
Bahamas Information
Services
KNOWLES, Cat Island -
Twenty Cat Islanders have
graduated from a handicraft
Otraw training programme with
a view to setting up a self-sus-
taining business.
a The Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) sponsored the training
programme in conjunction with
the Cat Island Association, at
the Media Centre in Knowles,
Cat Island
"When we say that the poten-
tial is limitless, the potential,
indeed, is only limited by your
imagination," BAIC chairman
Michael Halkitis said at the
graduation ceremony on June
10.
SThe programme was designed
to encourage and train persons
to become self-employed in the
art of producing Bahamian-
made handicraft products.
It also taught the participants
to plait, stitch, decorate and fin-
ish products at a high standard.
During the course, partici-
pants were presented with dif-
ferent aspects of the craft,


including design, drafting and
binding.
Graduates had to produce
two handbags, one of which had
to be of their own design; one
hat; one portfolio; one wallet;
four placemats; and four differ-
ent types of plait.
Mr Halikitis, who has family
roots in Cat Island, said that he


remembers sitting on his grand-
mother's porch in Old Bight
and watching her plait at night.
What BAIC aims to do in Cat
Island, he said, is to assist crafts
persons with the further devel-
opment of their creativity, in
learning about new techniques,
and advising them that the
potential for sales now includes


a growing Bahamian market.
"Bahamians are rekindling
their interest in these things
Bahamian," Mr Halkitis said.
"As you look around, more and
more Bahamian ladies are car-
rying straw bags. More and
more gentlemen are carrying
straw portfolios and you are
finding the placemats in more
and more homes."
Conducting the training pro-
gramme was Eldena Miller of
Exclusive Bahamian Craft. She
is a renowned handicraft arti-
san whose line of Bahamian-
made straw products is sold
locally and internationally.
"I am tremendously pleased
and overwhelmed when I see
the incredible work they had
put out," she said.
"As you view the display I
am sure you would be suitably
impressed with the talent that
you see here."


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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


0Q@9J








PAGE 2, TURSDA, JUE 16,2005THE TIBUN


Miller lashes out at critics


FROM page one
"One went so far as to
declare that I had become a
lobbyist for the LNG compa-
nies and to infer that I may be
receiving something for my
strong advocacy of LNG.
"But when opponents attack
not only my credibility but that
of professional public servants,
experts in their field, such as
the qualified professional staff
of the BEST Commission, I
see red. I feel it is my duty to
defend the integrity and pro-
fessionalism of civil servants
who can not easily defend
themselves," he said.
Mr Miller said he is con-
vinced that LNG is safe and
that there is no danger from it


for the people of the Bahamas.
He said he accepts that there is
no adequate legislation to
monitor and ensure safe prac-
tices, and therefore called for
the immediate passing of the
necessary legislation to ensure
safety on LNG.
"I am convinced that this
combination of factors, if
securely in place, will enable us
to make LNG an opportunity
we should not defer," he said.
Mr Miller made special ref-
erence in his 103-page speech
to environmentalist Sam Dun-
combe of ReEarth, who has
been advocating for months
against LNG.
"This lady I am told by pro-
fession is a graphic artist. Who
should I take advice from to


provide my colleagues and my
prime minister whether or not
we should have a regasifica-
tion facility? Should I listen to
this lady here who is a graphic
artist or should we listen to
these qualified Bahamian
experts from the BEST Com-
mission?" he asked.
"Mr Speaker could you
imagine," Mr Miller said, "for-
eigners coming out of Califor-
nia (anti-LNG lobbyists Tim
and Hayden Riley) say that
they love the Bahamas more
than me? Can you believe that?
"That they love my country
more than me? Where my
forefathers, my mother, my
father were born? They could
love it as much as me, but not
more than me."


Smith demands answers


about 'missing $200,000'


FROM page one
about any missing money at
Inagua. He said Inagua's books
had been recently audited.
However, the audit reported
nothing about missing funds.
Mr Smith noted that this is
the second time that funds
appeared to have disappeared,
as $60,000-$70,000 also went
missing from Mayaguana's local
government account last year.
Mr Gray on a point of order
said he was completely
unaware that $200,000 had
gone missing. He said the
account had been audited as
recently as three months ago


M r- Fr an klyn R. Wil son
t&pa.iJne 18th, 2005 TfeD efoatfcrTl~f ds$3


and all funds had been
accounted for.
If such a large amount of
money had disappeared, he
believed the auditors would
certainly have picked it up.
He said it was unfortunate
that Mr Smith did not ask him
privately about the missing
funds. He suggested that if Mr
Smith had any information
about the matter which would
help the minister conduct an
investigation, he should pre-
sent it to the House.
"He alleges that it went
missing, I have had the books
audited and was not advised
that any money was missing."
Mr Gray said if the matter
were true, it would be a serious
offence because, "$200,000 is
not a small amount of money,
that is more money than some
people make in their lives, that
would be destroying people's
lives and be irresponsible."
A heated row followed
when several opposition mem-
bers called for Inagua's audit-
ed reports to be tabled.
Mr Gray said he was not
sure if the audit report could in
fact be tabled, because he- was


unclear whether it could be
considered a public document.
However, several members
who remained seated suggest-
ed that the Public Accounts
Committee had the leeway to
call for any financial report
mentioned in the House.
Mr Gray said that if the
report was a public document,
he would be quite willing to lay
it on the table of the House.
Regarding the missing funds
in Mayaguana's account, Mr
Gray said an audit did reveal
that funds had gone missing
from the local government
account on that island at least
a year ago. Mr Gray said when
the issue was raised in the
House of Asgembly, he told
members then that the matter
had been referred to the police
for investigation.
Mr Gray said as far as he
knew the police investigation
was inconclusive and the mat-
ter was then referred back to
the Treasury.
He said he was unaware of
what the Treasury's position
was or if any determination
had been made as to what hap-.
pened to the funds.


Bethel dase

called of

by Sears

FROM page one
discuss a compensation pack-
age for his client, which will
include back pay.
Mr Bethel was initially
arraigned in early January,,
2004. He had earlier apologised
to the college for the incident,
which arose from a verbal dis-
pute in the COB car park.
According to Mr Bethel, he
was "disappointed in the way
the case was handled by the
police and COB from its early
stages."
But he said after yesterday's
hearing he felt exonerated.
"The question of where I go
from here will be determined
in the future," he said.
"I have dedicated my life's
work to teaching, beginning o
January 10, 1977, to 2003 at the
College of the Bahamas. I have
every desire and every wish to
return to the classroom."
Dr Davis was unavailable f9r
comment last night.



Child,

dies in


blaze


FROM page one
Knowles. Investigators are
expected to arrive on the island
shortly to determine the,cause
of the blaze.
Special thanks are.offered by
police to the Stella Maris: com-
munity fire truck and. water
works unit.
Police are appealing ttethe
public, particularly those living
on the Family Islands to exer-
cise extreme caution at all.times,
especially where electrical appli-
ances and live wiring are con-
cerned.
Persons should ensure that
children are always properly
managed at home, Inspector
Evansisaid.,.


BAHAMAS TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE
STUDENT ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SCHEDULE
Summer Quarter 2005
June 16-17, 2005


DATE TIME PROGRAM DIVISION
Thur. Jun6 9:00a.m. 1:00p.m. Open Registration ALL

2:00p.m. 5:00p.m.

Fri. Jun 17 9:00a.m. 1:00p.m. Open Registration ALL
2:00p.m. 5:00p.m.

Note: Classes begin June 27, 2005. Late Registration is June 20-21, 2005 and there is a late
registration fee of $10.00



IMPORTANT DATES



Deadline to apply to graduate

August 5th, 2005



Distribution of Robes BTVI Campus

September 14-16, 2005



Graduation Rehearsal September 21st, 2005

Bahamas Faith Ministries Diplomat Center

6:00pm



Graduation September 22nd, 2005

Bahamas Faith Ministries Diplomat Center

7:00pm


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005







THE TRBUNE HURSDY,~JCAR16,B005, AGEW1


Castro slams wealthy



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-- --


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY,'JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 13








PAEl4,TURDAALUE 6,205THWTIBN


'he Tribune's


PICTURED from left to right are Dion, Omara and Emma Foulkes.



All in the family


FOLLOWING in her
father's footsteps, Omara, the
eldest daughter of Dion and
Emma Foulkes, was called
to the Bahamas Bar on Fri-
day.
Omara is a graduate of St
Augustine's College, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, and
Buckingham University,
Buckingham, England, where
she obtained an LLB and an
LLM degree with a special
designation as a world trade
specialist.
In March she was admitted
to the English Bar as a mem-
ber of Gray's Inn.
Her Petition was presented
by Mr Foulkes and she was
robed by her uncle and god-
father Mr Carl Bethel. Chief



WORLD renowed pianist
Rafael Cacciavillani will per-
form at Government House
ballroom on Friday, June 24
(8pm).
Known as the Souith
American Liberace, he is
fresh from noted perfor-
mances in Argentina and
Florida.


Justice Sir Burton Hall-
presided.
Omara, 24, will begin her
legal career as an associate at
the law firm of Higgs and
Johnson.
Also called were Randol


MA Dorsett, who was pre-
sented by Mr Michael Barnett;
Linda CY Hanna, who was
presented by Valentine' S
Grimes; Nadia J Taylor.whho
was presented by Ruth BlO.
Darville.


The family of the late William (Billy) Francis Hall ("P' i"),
would like to express their heartfelt thanks to all of tise.,
who may have sent a card, a floral arrangement, p W a\
visit, a phone call, a hot meal or offered a prayer during
his illness and at the time of his death.
Special thanks to Dr. Ilsa Grant-Taylor and Staff of The
Renal House, the Doctor, Nurses and Staff of the Dialysis
Unit of the Princess Margaret Hospital, Mr. & Mrs. Rannie
Pinder and Family & Staff of Pinder's Funeral Home, Dr.
Allan & Tina Lyons and Family, Mr. & Mrs. T. Tsavousis
and Family, Million Air, ZipX Bahamas Ltd, Caribbean
Hydraulics, Hair It Is Ltd., Pastor Irene Russell & Glad
Tidings Church and Family & friends from here and abroad
(Abaco and U.S.A.)
A Special Medical Fund has been set-up at The Royal
Bank f Canada, Palmdale Branch in the name of Hall's
d~ed lun-d. A x2 70025 to help defray medical
lIlls thatiatose during his illness. At this time we would
like to thank all who have made a .donation,


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, JUNE 16,2005, PAGE 16


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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 17


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PAGE 8, TURSDA, JUE 16,2005THE TIBUN


Camp aims



to have



children



appreciate



culture


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A "diverse and enriching"
experience awaits students
enrolled in the Grant's Town
Urban Renewal Summer Youth
Programme.
An exciting agenda is lined
up for Bain and Grant's Town's
youngsters along wit the camp's
theme: nature, arts, nautical and
culture.
"With the careful selection of
these themes we hope to have
the children appreciate their
environment, embrace their cul-
ture and hunger for more
knowledge by the end of the
summer camp," said counselling
psychologist Angelique McK-,
ay.
Based at the St Agnes
Church school room on the cor-
ner of Market Street and Cock-,
burn Street, the camp begins
June 27.
Application forms are avail-
able from the Grant's Town
Urban Renewal Project office
on Baillou Hill Road and
Cameron Street.
Carolyn Bowe is the co-ordi-
nator and officer-in-charge.
The main focus of the camp
will be its youth enrichment
programme (YEP), adolescent
girls enrichment programme
(AGEP), and its peer leader-
ship programme.
YEP was developed because
of the need for inner city chil-
dren to be involved in struc-
tured, positive, enriching activ-
ities over their summer vaca-
tion, explained Ms McKay, who
is assigned to the Grant's Town
urban renewal headquarters.
"This camp will provide social
interaction for our campers by
way of group and individual
activities, field trips and other
things," she said.
"We will also be focusing on
cognitive enhancement because
we don't want our children to
lose any of their skills over the


summer break and not have
anything to carry back to
school."
Field trips will include glass-
bottom boat rides, tours of the
Atlantis resort and visits to the
National Trust Retreat, Adastra
Gardens, and the National Arts
Gallery.
The AGEP will seek to help
girls face some of the challenges
of growing up.
"Adolescence is a difficult
time and it is no less difficult
for our Bahamian girls," said
Ms McKay. "This programme
will focus on the changes our
young ladies are experiencing
with academic, social interac-
tion and, generally, their family
life.
."Many camps do.not focus
on specific genders but'.we'
realise that we are venturing
outside of the box with this par-
ticular camp. But that is when'
change occurs."
The peer leadership pro-
gramme will seek to counteract
misleading information and
negative influences that are
common among youngsters.
"We are going to train some
of these children to be peer
leaders in their schools and,
communities," said Ms McKay.
"We are going to instil a lot of.
positive things in them by way,
of workshops and by way of
interaction with the other chil-
dren."











E By Bahamas
Information Service
THE United States Gov-
ernment has pledged $62.5
million to assist with the cre-
ation of the Caribbean Single
Market and Economy.
Minister of Foreign Affairs
and the Public Service Fred
Mitchell announced the
pledge in response to critics
who claimed that the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mas and CARICOM and its
aspirations to a single market
and economy is anti-Ameri-
can.
"The fact is that in
November 2004, just a few
months ago, the US Gov-
ernment provided a pledge
by agreement with CARI-
COM for $62.5 million in
funds to help with the cre-
ation of a single market and
economy," Minister Mitchell
said during a debate on the
2005-2006 budget.
The minister said that he
had recently chaired a meet-
ing between CARICOM and
US Secretary of State Dr
Condoleeza Rice. Among
other things, the two sides
are pledged to work on a
conference on the future of
the Caribbean.
"No distinction was made
between the Bahamas and
others by the US at that
meeting," Mr Mitchell said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005














Wilchcombe; economic upturn is




linked to tourism and investment


* MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe


* By Bahamas Information
Services
FREEPORT The upsurge
in Bahamian tourism has
brought marked economic
improvement to the Bahamas,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe told the Bahamian
Film Commission's annual
workshop.
The workshop was held this
year at Our Lucaya Resort in
Grand Bahama under the theme
"Make something happen".
Mr Wilchcombe, who deliv-
ered the keynote address at the
workshop, said the' rise in
tourism has caused the econo-
my to grow by 3.5 per cent, and
foreign reserves to leap to near
$800-million.
This growth in the foreign
reserves, he said, was a first-
time achievement in the history
of the Bahamas.
"Let no one fool you, it's
directly related to what is hap-
pening in the Ministry of
Tourism, it's directly related to
what is happening in foreign
investment, it's directly related
to the assets that we are pro-
viding to the entire world, it's
what we are trading that's mak-
ing a big difference."
Mr Wilchcombe added, "We
understand the democracy that
we have in the Bahamas. But
those who come seeking service
and those who wish to have
something done today, they are
not going to wait until tomor-
row: they will go to another com-
peting country for it to happen.
"Because oftentimes in this
country we are so busy worrying
about turf that we risk losing
ground. And if we lose ground
then all of us lose. We are not
going to see the foreign
exchange coming into the
Bahamas; and we are not going
to be happy because we know
when we broke everybody mad.
That's a reality. But we spend a
lot of time in our country wast-
ing time.
"And if we are going to be a
part of this new world order
then we need to change some
attitudes.
"We have to get away from
believing that weare third
world or second best and appre-
ciate that we are the best."
The minister spoke of Rick
Fox and the glorious successes
of Bahamians on the interna-
tional scene: "I had a drink last
evening with Rick Fox. He
played with the Los Angeles
Lakers. He is Bahamian and has
come home and wants to be a
part of everything we are doing
now and I invited him to join
me and the ministry in a num-
ber of projects that we are
doing.
"And sitting and talking to
Rick Fox, I said to him, 'You


know, Rick, my position on the
Bahamas is very simple. We are
the best in the world.
"When I travel around the
world, I don't travel saying I am
from the third world Bahamas. I
stand, I speak, and I behave as if
I am from the first country in
the entire world. And I do that
because I really believe that
when Rick Fox played with the
Los Angeles Lakers they weren't
playing to finish second. They
won the NBA Championships.
"When Tonique Williams-
Darling runs the 400 metres at
the Olympics she wins the gold. '
When our girls run the 4x100
they win the gold medal. What
does that mean? That means
that in spite of our size we are
able to achieve greatness.
"I want someone to show me
a country of this size of our hue
and colour, to tell me any coun-
try as successful as our
Bahamas. You can't do it,
because there is none."
"Individually we are weak.
No matter what's in my head,


no matter how I think, if I don't
have a good tourism team noth-
ing is going to happen. And no
matter what we say, if we do
not have a Customs Depart-
ment that's managing our bor-
ders the way we do, we can't
talk about the money we have
in the Treasury."
The minister spoke of making
things happen: "We are like any
other country, we have our
problems from time to time; but
the truth of the matter is we
have a doggone good country
and some great Bahamians and
we have to begin to look at our-
selves more-with pride because
I believe when we do that we
change the whole concept of
why we can't get something
done.
Minister Wilchcombe also
drew attention to the many tal-
ented Bahamians involved with
television productions.
"Do you know that we have a
young lady who works for Fox
as a producer in New York? Do
you know we have people all


over the world working for these
film companies? They're there.
Then why aren't they able to
participate in this industry?"


Marathon Mall
Opposite B.E.C.
393-6113


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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 0, TURSDA, JUE 16,2005THE TIBUN


Principal's salute


IT was "Mildred Turner Day" on IN .
Monday at Kingsway Academy as stu-
dents, faculty and parents bid farewell
to the school's principal Mrs Turner. I MRS Mildred Turner
Students participated in many choir principal of Kingsway
singing, chorale speaking, poetry read- Academy along with the
ings, and special dances and tributes faculty enjoys the
throughout the morning event. fanfare on "Mildred
Mrs Turner thanked all staff and stu- Turner Day"
dents for their generous support to her
over the years. She retires this summer.



First Sergeant-at-Arms



for FNM passes away


ALPHONSO Rolle, the first national
Sergeant-at-Arms of the FNM has passed
away.
Mr Rolle began his involvement with the
FNM in a by-election in Mangrove Cay,
Andros in 1971
It was during this election that "Fonz", as
he was affectionately known to his friends,
received his political baptism. After that
election he decided to commit the rest of his
life to the Free National Movement.
He died at the weekend after he suc-


cumbed to diabetes, a disease with which he
had been battling for several years.
He was elected as national Sergeant-at-
Arms of the FNM in 1996, a position he
occupied until his passing.
"Fonz" was also a national trustee of the
party and represented South Andros on
the National Central Council of the FNM
for many years. In Nassau, he participated
at every level of the party and he was
awarded the "Freedom Fighter" award in
1994.


Dion Foulkes, the former deputy leader
of the FNM, said: "He has left a void in
our party which will not easily be filled. As
Secretary General, Chairman and Deputy
Leader, "Fonz" and I worked very closely
together.
"On behalf of the FNM Blue Hills Asso-
ciation, my wife, Emma and family I wish to
express my deepest and heartfelt sympa-
thy to Alphonsd Rolle's family and friends.
He will be greatly missed by all of us in the
FNM."


VILLA G E R ArD
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attended an important information session on Wednesday, June 29th, 2005
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applications at this may do so (no application fee required). Call Success
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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE

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Hurricane damage accounted



for 10 per cent of Bahamas' GDP


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
ACTING Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt said Monday that total
losses sustained in the Bahamas as
a result of hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne have been estimated at
$551 million, or ten per cent of


the country's Gross Domestic
Product (GDP).
The acting prime minister said
the high loss in the social and pro-
ductive sectors that may result
from a natural disaster is a clear
indication that the country's
developmental interventions must
embrace available risk manage-
ment practices.


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Mrs Pratt said her government
has placed a "high priority" on -.
pursuing a comprehensive disaster
management strategy that will
integrate vulnerability assessment
and risk assessment reduction
with development planning and
management, thereby creating a
culture of disaster preparedness.
She urged Bahamians to be
"very robust" in their prepara-
tions for the 2005 Atlantic hurri-
cane season, which opened June 1,
saying that disaster preparedness
should be viewed as a team effort.
Addressing the opening of the
National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency's (NEMA) com-
munication and inter-agency co-
ordination conference, Mrs Pratt
said her government, in its elec-
tion platform "Our Plan," com-
mitted itself to the creation of a
permanent national emergency
relief agency, now known as
NEMA, to spearhead the impor-
tant work of preparing for and
responding promptly and ade-
quately to naturally-caused and.
man-made induced emergency sit-
uations.

Action
"This commitment has been
translated into action by the sig-
nificant increase in budgetary allo-
cation for NEMA in the
2005/2006 budget that is currently
being debated by parliament,"
Mrs Pratt said.
She said government is in dis-
cussions with the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) for
accessing additional funding to
address important components in
national risk reduction strategies
such as community preparedness,
legal and institutional strengthen-
ing and the enhancement of com-
munications and shelters.
Mrs Pratt said the Bahamas is
facing increasing threats from var-
ious forms of disasters, both nat-
ural and man-made, and including
those that are a result of flood-
ing, coastal erosion, airline and
shipping accidents, hazardous
material spills and fires.
In addition, Mrs Pratt said,
ongoing developmental and mod-
ernisation efforts have resulted in
increasing housing accommoda-
tions, commercial and industrial


ACTING Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
urged Bahamians to be 'very robust' in their preparations
for the current hurricane season.


activities and improvements in
infrastructure, making the envi-
ronment more complex and
increasing the likelihood of a dis-
aster that could result in econom-
ic and social dislocation.
"Risk management and vul-
nerability reduction is on the
national agenda with an endorse-
ment from the highest level of
government for the articulation
of robust disaster management
policies," Mrs Pratt said.
"My government's commitment
to making improvements to dis-
aster management is underscored
by my presence here this morning
in my capacity as acting prime
minister with responsibility for
disaster management and minister
of national security," Mrs Pratt
added.
The acting prime minister said a
review of the experiences and


lessons learnt from the 2004
Atlantic hurricane season indi-
cated that there were weaknesses
in co-operation and communica-
tion, both in the use of communi-
cation equipment and informa-
tion flow.
She said in recognition of this,
the National Emergency Man-
agement Agency, in collaboration
with the United States Embassy in
Nassau, the US Navy Liaison
Office and the United States
Southern Command, partnered in
organising the workshop in an
effort to "improve upon national
emergency response capability."
"As emergency management
personnel who may use commu-
nications systems in an emer-
gency, you need to understand
the context, protocols and proce-
dures for doing so," Mrs Pratt told
delegates.


"This workshop is therefore an
important activity in our efforts
to further strengthen our pre-
paredness and response capabili-
ties," she said.
Mrs Pratt said disaster pre-
paredness should be viewed as a
team effort and that each sector of
society has a role to play in ensur-
ing that they act as part of that
team concept.
"I must emphasise that pre-
paredness does not mean pre-
paredness on behalf of NEMA
alone. It means all of us as indi-
viduals, as communities, as busi-
nesses and as government," said
Mrs Pratt. "Preparation must be
taken as a team effort and team
stands for together, emergencies
are managed."

Advisories
She urged Bahamians to "pay
particular attention" to the advi-
sories from the Department of
Meteorology and NEMA, espe-
cially in the event of a notice of
evacuation.
"If you are asked to evacuate
an area, we would appreciate your
co-operation in doing so because
it would be for your own bene-
fit," Mrs Pratt said.
Mrs Pratt said it is her vision
that one day, very soon, the coun-
try will move to the point where
each family develops a disaster
plan for disasters that take into
consideration the various hazards
that may impact their homes and
conduct periodic drills to ensure
readiness and preparedness.
"Go through your hurricane
preparedness check lists and get
your emergency supply kits ready
at this time," Mrs Pratt said. "I
take this opportunity to
remind all Bahamians to be pre-
pared."
She also lauded the United
States Embassy in Nassau, and
Ambassador John Rood for the
assistance the United States gov-
ernment provided in making the
workshop a reality.
"I trust that we will continue
to create new partnerships and
strengthen existing ones as a
means of implementing measures
to eliminate or reduce the impact
of a disaster on the Bahamas,"
Mrs Pratt said.


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Sunday, June 19th, 2005
From 12:00 noon 3:00 p.m.


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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 23








PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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Huricae eaonis1 Hel re


THE officers and members of
Central Church of God in
Freeport, Grand Bahama have-
* taken the initiative to erect a mod-
ern, multi-purpose building
designed to serve infants, children
and senior citizens.
Central's new preschool and
home for the elderly is located on
Pioneer's Way, about a quarter
of a mile from the main sanctuary,
which stands at the intersection
of Pioneer's Way and Coral
Road.
A dedication ceremony for the
building was held on Sunday, April
24th.
The ceremony was attended by
a huge congregation, including
clergy and laypersons, representing
the broad spectrum of denomina-
tions active in Grand Bahama, as
well as visitors from Nassau and
the Family Islands, according to
church officials.
Sermon
The dedicatory sermon was
preached by Bishop John N
Humes, National Overseer and
Administrative Bishop of the
Church of God, Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos Islands.
The Bishop observed that most
of the social ills in Bahamian soci-
ety emanate from a lack of con-
cern for the welfare of fellow
human beings by many of the
country's citizens.
He exhorted the congregation
to do all they possibly could to care
for the needs of others.
Leading a delegation of govern-
ment officials at the ceremony was
Minister of Social Services and


Community Development Melanie
Griffin.
Mrs Griffin commended their.
Church on its foresight in building
the facility and pledged the assis-
tance and co-operation of govern-
ment in its operation and mainte-
nance.
After the service, the congrega-
tion marched from the sanctuary
along Pioneer's Way to the site of
the new building. The building's
cornerstone was then.set: by Bish-
op Moses Fred Newchurch.
Cutting the ribbon were Mrs
Griffin, "Mother Butterfield," the
first resident of the home for the
elderly, Prophetess Jennie Humes,
wife of the national overseer and
sister Maryann Newchurch, wife
of the pastor.
The building cost $1.2 million
to construct and sits on two acres
of land donated by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority.
The home for the elderly, con-
sisting of ten rooms complete with
dining and sanitary facilities,
can accommodate 20 senior citi-
zens.
The preschool has enough class-
rooms to cater to 120 toddlers and
forty infants.
According to the Reverend Dr-J
Weir, there are two "urgent, com-
pelling contemporary develop-
ments" which encouraged the
Church to place high priority on
concern for the needs of the elder-
ly.
The first is that in the Bahamas
and around the world, people are
living longer.
"The major social, economic
and even political ramification of
this demographic trend is already


being realised and will certainly be
accentuated in the years immedi-
ately ahead of us," said Rev Weir
in a release.
The second factor has to do with
trends in home and family life, he
said:
."There was a time when.the:
elderly members of the family'
were cared for, with affection with-
in the home, until death. Young
and middle aged persons feltit was
their Chfistian responsibility to
care for their elders."
However according to Rev
Weir, times have changed:
"In some of our modem fami-
lies, where both parents are work-
ing, there is little time to care for
the elderly. In many cases, they
are sent to reside in 'old folks
homes.'
Distressing
"This in itself is understandable.
What is distressing, however, is the
fact that often the old people are
neglected or forgotten by their rel-
atives so, they may become lonely
or even bitter because they
feel neglected by their own chil-
dren."
Rev Weir said that in light of
these two trends, "it is essential
that the Church devote much more
of its resources to the case of, the
elderly."
"Yes, the Church, if it is to be
relevant to the contemporary
world, must devote much atten-
tion to ministry to the elderly. This
means that many more facilities
like that of the Central Church of
God, must be built in the year
ahead."


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THE TRIBUNE








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THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE




33 die in suicide attacks


"Copyrighted Ma.terial
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Available from Commercial News Providers"


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 27
GN-225



MINISTRY OF HEALTH

PUBLIC NOTICE

The General Public is hereby notified
that effective 20th June, 2005, Clifford
Park (playing field) will be closed to
the general public. The Ministry of
Health, Department Environmental
Health services will be preparing the
field for the Country's Independence
day Celebration. The playing field will
be re-opened after the Independence
celebration.

The Ministry of Health apologizes for
any inconvenience the closure of the
playing field may cause to the general
public.


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GN-214

MINISTRY OF WORKS
AND UTILITIES


COMPLETION OF NEW PROVIDENCE
ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT:
INVITATION FOR PREQUALIFICATION
The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas intends to prequalify Bahamian
construction contractors for the following contract under the Completion of New Providence
Road Improvement Project:
SLICE 3 CONTRACT
Corridor Description Proposed Improvements
/Section
1A Bamboo Blvd. The rehabilitation work for this 0.8-mile, 2-lane roadway
(East Street to was commenced by the previous contractor but was not
Buttonwood completed. Some of the works commenced include but
Avenue) not limited to road surfacing, installation of street lighting,
drainage and ducts for future use. Outstanding works
'include but not limited to paving, sidewalks, landscaping,
signal installations and road markings plus completion
of street lighting, drainage and ducts for future use.
1B CW Saunders Approximately 95% of this 1.2 mile, 2-lane roadway is
(Buttonwood completed. Works completed include construction of the
Avenue to Beatrice Beatrice Ave/Savannah junction, reconstruction of Bay
Avenue Junction) Lily Drive, construction of CW Saunders Highway.
Outstanding works include but are not limited to the
rehabilitation of some 300ft of carriageway west of
Buttonwood Drive, Drainage, Landscaping and repairs
to sidewalks etc.
2 Milo Butler The corridor is approximately 30% complete. Outstanding
Extension works include but not limited to drainage, paving,
(Firetrail sidewalks, landscaping, roundabout construction, street
Carmichael Rd) lighting and road markings.
3 Milo Butler Rd This existing 4-lane, 1.2-mile corridor is substantially
(Harrold Road to complete with the northbound and southbound
Firetrail Road) carriageways both open to traffic. Earthworks on the
realigned section that ties into section 2 was commenced
by the previous contractor and this section requires
completion. A roundabout is to be constructed at the
junction of Fire Trail and Milo Butler Roads.
17 Abundant Life Road The corridor comprises minor improvements on Abundant
Windsor Place Life Road with widening only occurring locally at the
three junctions on the corridor (Independence Drive,
Soldier Road / Windsor Place) Some of the works
commenced by the previous contractor include site
clearance, demolition, utility diversions, drainage, ducts
for future use, surfacing, street lights, kerbing and
sidewalks on one side only. As a result of the previous
contractor going into receivership the Employer undertook
the temporary paving of a regulation course on the
northbound carriageway so the road could be opened to
two-way traffic without the requirement for ongoing
traffic management. The treatment of this temporary
pavement is defined in the Contract.
The construction contract will be executed based on the Florida Department of Transport
Specifications for Roads and Bridges 1999 (FDOT99) and FIDIC Conditions of Contract
(1st Edition 1999). This will require prequalified Contractors to satisfy specific standards
for Quality Control, Laboratory Testing and Surveying Services. Guidelines will also be
set for required levels or Engineering Supervision Services and Traffic Management.
The Ministry of Works & Utilities now invites Bahamian Construction firms wishing to
prequalify for Slice 3 to submit their respective prequalification proposals in sealed
envelopes, with documentation of their legal status and technical and financial capacity
for the provision of construction services.
Prequalification documents may be obtained by interested parties as of Monday, 30 May,
2005 from the office of the Special Projects Coordinator, Ministry of Works and Utilities,
between hours of 10:00AM and 3:00PM Mondays to Fridays, upon payment of a non-
refundable fee of B$100.00. Payment may be in cash, certified check, bank draft or money
orders made payable to the Public Treasury of The Bahamas.
Completed Prequalification applications must be clearly marked "Prequalification
Application, Completion of New Providence Road Improvement Project SLICE 3", and
submit one original and two copies to be deposited in the Tender Box in the Department
of Public Works at the address below, no later than 2pm on or before Wednesday, 29 June
2005.
The Director of Public Works
Ministry of Works & Utilities, P.O. Box N-8156, John F. Kennedy Drive,
New Providence, Bahamas
Applicants will be notified of the reults after the evaluation of the documents and
submissions.
Signed: Anita Bernard (Mrs)
Permanent Secretary


_ ___


* --*





PAGE 28, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 29


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY EVENING JUNE 16, 2005
7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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FIVE DESPERATE HOURS (1997, Drama) Sharon SEE JANE RUN (1995, Drama) Joanna Kems, John Shea, Katy Boyer. A
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Everybody Friends Monica Friends Joey re- Friends Rachel Friends "The *** WHILE YOU WERE SLEEP-
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PAGE 30, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 31


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 32. THURSDAY. JUNE 16, 2005


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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


SECTION ... ..IF


Bahamasair




facing $10m


loss in


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
.BAHAMASAIR has been
forecast to make a $10 million
loss in fiscal 2005-2006, a $2 mil-
lion improvement on this year,
with the Government planning
to retain no more than a 25 per
cent stake in the airline after it
is privatised.
Bradley Roberts, minister of
public works and utilities, said
in his contribution to the Bud-
get debate that revenues for fis-
cal 2005-2006 were predicted to
be $76 million, with expenses
pegged at $86 million.
Mr Roberts said revenue
improvements were expected
to come from a new route to
Kingston, Jamaica; more char-
ters and Santo Domingo traf-
fic; seat guarantees; core busi-
ness growth and growth in its
US Airways code share busi-
ness.
However, the minister
acknowledged that the level of
losses and subsidies being
incurred by Bahamasair "can-
not go on much longer".
With Nassau International
Airport set to be managed by
an independent private sector
company, Bahamasair would


have to settle $15 million it cur-
rently owed the Airport
Authority for landing fees and
rents.
And Mr Roberts warned:
"Should privatisation not occur,
the Government will be called
upon to inject another $13 mil-
lion in direct cash subsidies next
year and $4 million in indirect
subsidies from other govern-
mental agencies for a total of
some $17 million in financial
support."
The minister added that the
level of interest from potential
buyers to the advertisement
seeking expressions of interest
in Bahamasair, plus negotia-


Government rejects Cable

Bahamas $5 fee increase
E By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government has "rejected" Cable Bahamas application
for a $5 increase to its basic cable television rate, with the nmin-
ister of tourism attacking the company for failing to extend its
network to the sparsely populated southern islands.
Obie Wilchcombe used his communication to the 2005-2006
Budget debate to launch an extraordinary broadside against
Cable Bahamas, saying it was "unacceptable" for the company
SEE page four


CSME 'basically dead',

but has not gone away


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A NASSAU Institute direc-
tor has warned that the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) would
eventually return as an eco-
nomic and social issue, even
though it currently was "basi-
cally dead".
Rick Lowe, responding to
an attack by Fred Mitchell,


minister of foreign affairs, on
the Nassau Institute's oppo-
sition to the Bahamas signing
on to the CSME, said the eco-
nomic think-tank had never
attacked individuals during
the debate, instead concen-
trating on the issues.
He said: "The Nassau Insti-
tute is very serious in its
efforts to discuss government
SEE page four


05-06


tions with the airline's unions
on right-sizing salary and bene-
fit packages, was crucial to the
privatisation process's outcome.
The airline's management
would also focus on costs cuts
and product enhancements, as
McKinsey & Company, the $1
million consultants, had said
revenue raising opportunities
in the short-term were limited.
SEE page five


Paradise Island U FATHER and
operations confound sou duo.Sol and.
utch Kerzner. }
scepticss' by Closing in
on $160m EBITDA

target, as firm beats
guest satisfaction targets
M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
KERZNER International's
Paradise Island resorts beat
the company's 2004 targets for
guest and employee satisfac-
tion, with the company plan-
ning to further enhance the
visitor experience by building
"a great new nightclub" along-
side the Atlantis casino.
Writing in the company's
annual report, which was pub-
lished yesterday, father and
son duo, Sol and Butch Kerzn-
er, said the Paradise Island
resorts Atlantis and the One
& Only Ocean Club had con-
founded the sceptics by com-
SEE page five......


Talks on new crui se


port for Grand Bahama |


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Ministry of Tourism is "aggres-
sively" holding discussions with Carnival
Cruise Lines and other cruise industry
companies on the creation of a new cruise
port in Grand Bahama, in a bid to make its
facilities comparable to those of Nassau.
Obie Wilchcombe, minister of tourism,
said during his Budget communication to
the House of Assembly that the discus-
sions involved the creation of shopping


and entertainment facilities for cruise ship
passengers in the Williams Town area.
Mr Wilchcombe said this was part of
his plan to increase total tourist visitors
to Grand Bahama by "twofold" within
five years to 1.2 million.
He added: "We must provide the incen-
tives and take the necessary decisions now
to relocate the passenger cruise terminal *
facility, which would in the first year of
operations alone more than double cruise
SEE page five


* OBIE WILCHCOMBE,
minister of tourism


HERE'S THE LOW-COST DIGITAL
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Serious inquiries only.
Contact Larry Roberts for further details.
"Bahamas Realty, the first name in Bahamian real estate."
Contact us or conduct a search on our web-
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on the market including commercial and
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savitl


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T:(242) 393-8618 F:(242) 393-0326


Collins Ave. & 7th Terrace
P. 0. Box N-4950
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-9250
Fax: (242) 323-3581
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PUBLIC NOTICE
RE: Study of the Process to Establish a Small Business
in the Bahamas.

In keeping with the mandate to encourage Bahamian
entrepreneurship, the Government has appointed a task force
with a mandate to present to Government recommendations on
how to simplify the process for the establishment of legitimate
business especially small to medium enterprises. In order to
attain a full understanding of the difficulties encountered by
small to medium enterprises, the Task Force is seeking comments
from small to medium enterprises in the following sectors:

1) Agriculture and Fisheries
2) Legal Services
3) Medical Services
4) Financial Services
5) Dry Good (Retail & Wholesale)
6) Construction Services
. (Including, Architectural, Plumbing and Electrical Services)
7) Tourism Related
(Which include Small Hotels, Souvenir Manufacturing, Jet
Ski & Pleasure Craft Operators)
8) All other goods and service providers.
Responses may be sent to:
Mr Michael Halkitis
Chairman of the Task Force for the Simplification of the Process
to Establish Small Business
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 327-1618
E-mail: mofgeneral@bahamas.gov.bs


The end of the school year is right around the corner and
the question is: Where will your child spend the summer?
Enter: The Meridian School Summer Camp 2005.

Here at The Meridian School, our fun, family atmosphere
doesn't end with the school year. Over the summer
holiday, we maintain our safe, loving environment
where your child will learn, be entertained and have lots
of fun all at the same time! We continue to provide
exemplary Academics and engaging activities like
Hockey, Tennis & Swimming, plus Arts & Crafts, Foreign
Language classes and more.

Your child will also have a blast as he/she prepares to
participate in our spectacular musical production and
variety show. This year's Groovin' Two show is a highly
requested follow up to our acclaimed 70's, 80's and 90's
themed show from Summer Camp'04.

So come out to The Meridian School Summer Camp 2005
where your whole family is welcome to join ours and
share in the fun.


July 4th 29th
7:30 am- 3:00pm
(After ca e vai.ab o0,00 per daV unwit 6O }
Ages 2-12 years


2I


-. AThe
-.< Meridian
SSchool at Unicorn Vilage
Unicorn Village Children's Resort,
JFK Drive behind Imperial Mattress Ltd.,
CB-11924, Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel:.328.1151 Fax:328,1152
E-mail: unckorm@coralwave.com
Website: www.unicorn-village.com


Brian Hassan is no longer associated
with Providence Technology Group
and
he is pleased to announce the launch of

BHC Consulting
"Information Technology Services"
"Achieving Business Value"
















FHC Copsulting
.: Suite 2, Gro'sve hSuites
j^ Grosvenor ClosE8t Shirley Street
P.O. Box CB-1-87, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-356i 462 or 242-457-4911
0,llFax: : 242-356-4747
Email: bhcc@coralwave.com


w a.. -


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


I it I HItUNE


I 1 1 1161 1 $$two 1 6611


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THE TIBUN THURDAYJUNE16,B205,NEGSS


Budget allocates



$2.7m to build



$13m Straw Market


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government
has allocated $2.7
million in the fis-
cal 2005-2006
Budget for the
reconstruction of a $10-$13 mil-
lion Bay Street Straw Market
housing 600 vendors.
Bradley Roberts, minister of
public works and utilities, told
the House of Assembly that
contractors would be invited
to bid on the construction
"shortly", with work to begin
30 days after the contract is
awarded.
Touching on all the Corpo-
rations under his ministry, Mr
Roberts said that in regard to
the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC), the fuel sur-
charge portion of electricity
bills had soared as a result of
rising fuel prices.
These had increased by 77
per cent between October 2003
and January 2005.
Meanwhile, the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny's (BTC) capital budget for
2005-2006 is $163.1 million.
Mr Roberts hit out at illegal
call back and Voice over Inter-
net Protocol (VoIP) operators
for eroding BTC's long dis-
tance revenues, which had fall-
en by 45 per cent between 2000
and 2004, dropping from $90
million to $50 million.
BTC had extended cellular
services to Harbour Island,
Moores Island and Grand Cay,
while homes and businesses in
Mayaguana, Acklins and
Crooked Island now head tele-
phones in their .homes and
businesses.
BTC, Mr Roberts said, had


* BRADLEY ROBERTS


signed 30 roaming agreements
with other cellular providers to
allow visitors to use GSM post-
paid phones in the Bahamas.
A further 40 agreements were
being negotiated.
Operation
BTC's DSL Internet opera-
tion was being extended to
Eleuthera, having already been
deployed in Exuma and
Andros, while some 40 GSM
sites were being built in Abaco.
Mr Roberts said reverse
osmosis, which currently only
produces 20 per cent of New
Providence's water needs, will
supply 80 per cent within three


years.
Apart from the $22 million
contract recently awarded to
Consolidated Water for the
Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant, within six months the
Waterfields Plant, owned by
the same company, would add
another one million gallons per
day to the two million it
already produces.
Mr Roberts said plans were
underway for another reverse
osmosis facility, with the first
phase completed by June 2006,
This would supply two million
gallons of water per day to Par-
adise Island, and serve both the
Kerzner International and
Baha Mar developments.


"Copyrighted Material

- Syndicated Content .-

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- w -. *


Full time position available for someone
proficient in Photoshop.

Candidate must have some experience
and expertise in photographic restoration,
and some knowledge in layout and design
would be helpful


322-3000/1
mrphoto@coralwave.com


Applications are invited from suitably
qualified persons for the following
TEACHING POSITIONS
for Grades 7 12 at
WINDERMERE HIGH SCHOOL
Savannah Sound Eleuthera
1 Computer, 1 General Subjects
1 Mathematics
1 Physical Education with
Sports Coaching/
General Subjects
1 Spanish/ General Subjects


-, .. .
S a __ -


** **


m ee a m

.


Pricing Information As Of:
15 June 2005


Mr Roberts said some $250
million would change hands
over the 20-year life of the
reverse osmosis contracts, and
the minister held up the pri-
vate/public model as being able
to finance the $200 million cap-
ital works requirements faced
by the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration.


New SAT 1 Summer Programme
@ Queen's College
27th June 14th July, 2005


Are you taking SAT 1 for
the first time?




Days: Mon, Tues, __
Wed, Thurs
Time: 5:30 8:30 p.m.


Do you want to improve
your SAT 1 score?

Schedule:
Math: 90 mins.
English: 90 mins.
S (includes citical thinking skills
Jm and a component designed
to help improve memory)


Ideal for PSAT preparation
Then register for the
SAT 1 three week Summer Programme
to ensure success!


DICTIONARY


For the following students:
Senteringgrades 10,11 & 12
applying to North American
University and CoYeges
T r;h p a s


The programme specifically addresses the demands of
the new SAT 1 exam. Maximum score now 2400!


Don't delay sign up today and secure your place.


Cost: $395.00
(includes the recommended book
written by the College Board) }


Contact the C.F.E. Administrator, Queen's College.


* 393-1666/2153/2646
or email:cfe@qchenceforth.com


FColina
A V Financial Advisors Ltd.


)FPBHiELHIT


52wk-Hl 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
1.10 0.95 Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.208 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.50 8.50 0.00 1.445 0.320 5.9 3.76%
6.35 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.35 6.35 0.00 0.561 0.330 11.3 5.20%
0.85 0.77 Benchmark 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.187 0.000 4.1 0.00%
-1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.50 1.50 0.00. 0.122 0.000 12.3 0.00%
1.06 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.06 1.06 0.00 0.007 0.050 14.3 4.72%
8.65 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.55 8.55 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.5 2.81%
2.20 1.54 Collna Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 510 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
9.00 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.673 0.410 13.4 4.56%
2.50 0.54 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.5 0.00%
4.02 3.66 Famguard 4.02 4.02 0.00 0.406 0.240 9.9 5.97%
10.46 8.55 FInco 10.46 10.46 0.00 0.662 0.500 15.8 4.78%
8.52 6.69 FirstCaribbean 8.52 8.52 0.00 895 0.591 0.330 14.4 3.87/
8.60 8.31 Focol 8.42 8.42 0.00 0.708 0.500 11.9 5.94%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
10.16 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.30 8.30 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.8 6.75%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.89 5.87 -0.02 0.184 0.000 32.0 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.565 5.0 5.650%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.066 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2323 1.1703 Collna Money Market Fund 1.232656*
2.3329 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3329 **
10.3837 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3837"****
2.2072 2.0985 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.207174**
1.1080 1.0435 Colina Bond Fund 1.107989"***
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In lest 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelit)
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to das EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
- AS AT MAR. 31, 20051/" AS AT APR. 29, 2005
* AS AT MAY 20, 20051 -- AS AT MAY. 31, 20051 AS AT MAY. 31, 2005
.. .. . . ..." ro ""I .I . *.


HALSBU RY

CHAMBERS

will be closed on
Friday, 17thJune, 2005
due to the observance of the firm's
Annual
"Fun Day"


The office will re-open on
Monday, 20th June, 2005
We regret any inconvenience caused.


I


TESAN


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGF "R


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE4BITHURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005 THE TRUBUSINEES


RESTAURANT MANAGER
Sbarro the Italian Eatery has a position open
for a Restaurant Manager.


I


* The candidate has the opportunity to working a high
energy, exciting, and quick service environment.
* They must have the aptitude to direct and manage a
a team of workers, while maintaining excellent
customer relations.
* The applicant must possess a secondary education
* They must also possess atleast five years
experience in a quick service restaurant environment.
* The position offers the prospect of advancement.
* Transportation essential.
Please forward your resume to The Operations Director
e-mail address: rr(sbarrobahamas.com
Facsimile 356-0333
NOTLPHN NTRIW


Government rejects Cable



Bahamas $5 fee increase


Job Vacancy for
Systems Administrator I
Core Functions:
Maintain, evaluate, and troubleshoot legacy, database, and
other hosted business function systems through audit and
analysis of relevant reports such as problem logs and
performance reports by recording malfunctions or
abnormalities and assisting users.
Education and Knowledge Requirements:
Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science/Management
Information Systems or related field from a recognized
tertiary institution.
AS/400 Systems Administrator and MCDA certifications.
Good oral and written communication skills.
Sound knowledge of AS/400 based products and of
database systems.
Working knowledge of Microsoft Office products.
Interested persons should provide copy(ies) of their degree(s)
and transcript(s)-to:
The Human Resources Manager
c/o DA #4593
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline: Friday, June 24, 2005


to "simply operate with eyes
fixed on the bottom line".
He also criticised the former
FNM administration for giv-
ing Cable Bahamas a 15-year
"monopoly'".
Mr Wilchcombe's attack
seemed to ignore the fact that
private companies, such as
Cable Bahamas, are in busi-
ness to generate profits for
their owners in this case, the
shareholders, as the firm is list-
ed on the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX). Among those share-
holders are government enti-
ties such as the National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) and the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion.
The minister also omitted
that Cable Bahamas' sub-
sidiary, Caribbean Crossings,
has had before the Public Util-
ities Commission (PUC) for
some six months an applica-
tion to extend its cable and
fibre optic network to the
southern Bahamian islands.
This would be done through


the $45 million Bahamas
Jamaica Cable System (BJCS),
linking this nation with
Jamaica. The project received
approval from the Jamaican
regulators at the beginning of
the year.
Cable Bahamas has long
sought an increase in the basic
cable television rate since it
began operating in 1995. All
applications made to the Tele-
vision Regulatory Authority
Board have been rejected.
In the company's annual
report, Brendan Paddick, its
chairman, said the failure to
obtain a fee increase meant
Cable Bahamas' cable televi-
sion operating margins were
"constantly eroding", having
decreased by 6 per cent in 2004
compared to the previous year.
Mr Paddick said: "Over
those 10 years, your company
has expanded its channel line-
up, extended its network,
upgraded its networks and sys-
tems as new technologies
became mainstream, increased
its staff complement, invested
heavily in training and cus-
tomer support, and managed
its business to maintain its


margins in the face of ever-
increasing operating costs.
"Managing this challenging
process without a price
increase for 10 straight years
is simply unprecedented in the
cable television industry."
Mr Paddick said the "cur-
rent status quo" on the basic
cable television rate made the
extension of its services to the
5 per cent of households locat-
ed in the southern islands
"prohibitive".
E George Moss, the PUC's
executive director, told The
Tribune last week that a deci-
sion on whether to approve
Caribbean Crossings' $45 mil-
lion project was still several
weeks away, with staff who
would assess the proposal
engaged on other projects.
However, sceptics are likely
to believe the protracted
Caribbean Crossings approval
process is linked to the Gov-
ernment's desire to preserve
whatever value it can in the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC), and BTC's
rival $59.8 million project to
lay a submarine fibre optic
cable linking the southern


FROM page one


FROM page one

policy and not attack individuals.
"The Institute's work speaks for itself and it
has a body of its work available for the public
to look at. The general public is smart enough
to see who has been consistent with what they
have said and those who have not."
Mr Mitchell, in admitting that the Govern-
ment would not proceed with signing the
revised Treaty of Chaguaramas that would
give effect to the CSME, due to public oppo-
sition, attacked the Nassau Institute for cre-
ating "fear and prejudice" in regard to the
issue.
He accused it of ."parading- around the coun-


try disguised as an economic body,- but the
reality is that they are undisguised and naked
opponents of the Government on the issue".
Mr Mitchell claimed that the list of 29 ques-
tions on the CSME that were drawn up by
the Nassau Institute "were all political" and
not economic. He described some of the ques-
tions as "ridiculous".
In response, Mr Lowe said some of the
issues the Nassau Institute had highlighted
with regard to the CSME "might be different
from other people's", but it had spotlighted
what "the Government was attempting to do".
On the CSME itself, Mr Lowe said: "It's
basically a dead issue for a while. It's not
going to go away. It will come back, but in a
different form". ,


SBank of The Bahamas


I N T E RN AT I


ONAL


"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
ASSISTANT MANAGER, CORPORATE CREDIT
GRAND BAHAMA & FAMILY ISLAND DIVISION

Core responsibilities:

Analyze and investigate financial and non-financial information with a
view to assessing the viability of business proposals. Assess loan
applications and interview potential candidates.

Prepare credit proposals for existing and potential clients.

Manage effectively, a portfolio of corporate relationships and act as
'Relationship Manager' for assigned accounts.

Increase consistently, the value of accounts through personal marketing efforts.

Conduct consistent follow-up on delinquent accounts and institute measures
for the collection of bad accounts.

* Conduct field inspections.

* Assess the local industries and make recommendations for areas of exploration
by the Corporate Credit Division.

* Recommend annual performance objectives and action plans that will help
to increase the Bank's profitability. (Ability to successfully implement plans
to completion is critical.)

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

* Bachelors Degree in Economics/Finance/Business Administration

* Five years experience in the Financial Services Industry

* Strong analytical and organizational skills

* Being a team player is essential; must have excellent interpersonal and
communication skills.

Benefits include: Competitive compensation (commensurate with qualifications);
group medical, vision, and life insurance; and a pension scheme.

Send resume to: The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


islands.
Bradley Roberts, minister of
public works and utilities, said
in his Budget communication
that the Government was com-
mitted to preserving whatever
value it could in BTC for a
possible future privatisation..
The PUC, he added, was'
created to ensure that liberali-,
sation and regulation of the,
telecoms sector occurred with.
the Government's interest,
served.
BTC's network is expected
to be completed by the 2006,
second quarter, with the link
between New Providence and,
Inagua completed by Decem-.
ber 2005.
Mr Roberts said the network-'
would allow BTC to deploy
cellular, Internet and 200 chan '
nels of digital television to the-
Family Islands.
However, it is unclear why.
the Government would;
approve a project costing $58.#
million, when Caribbean-
Crossings a private company ,
- would take on the risk and
do it for much less, $45 mil-
lion.
The BTC cable is unlikely
to generate any investment
return due to the small popu-
lation it will serve, proving a
burden to both the company
and taxpayer, whereas the link
to Jamaica would make the
Caribbean Crossings' venture
profitable.


I &'cliCAi


CSME 'basically dead',


but has not gone away


CARIBBEAN EXPORT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
(Caribbean Export)


The Chairman and Board of Directors are looking for CARIFORUM
nationals to fill the post of Executive Director of the Caribbean Export
Development Agency (Caribbean Export), a regional organisation of the
Caribbean Forum (CARIFORUM), based in Barbados and with a Sub-
regional office in the Dominican Republic.

The Agency provides business advisory and other services in the areas of
market research, marketing, trade information, trade policy dissemination,
training and other related areas. During the period 2005-2008 the Agency
will execute the 9th EDF Regional Trade and Private Sector Development
Programme, financed by the European Union.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The person in this key position is expected to lead and motivate the staff
of Caribbean Export in the design and implementation of programmes and
projects for trade promotion and trade development in the Caribbean and
also be responsible for the implementation of the 9th EDF Regional trade
and Private Sector Development Programme. The Executive Director has
the overall leadership and management role for the Agency.

The successful candidate should possess:

More than 10 year experience in the design, management and
implementation of trade and export development and competitiveness
building programmes in a diversified social and economic
environment.
A compelling vision of a sustainable trade and export development
agency
Experience in working with regional matters, especially
CARIFORUM related matters
In-depth, direct experience in working with international donor
agencies, member-state Governments and private sector clients.
Ability to effectively lead a team of professional and support staff.
Fluency in English. A working knowledge of Spanish, French or
Dutch will be particularly advantageous.

Applications with detailed curriculum vitae should be submitted to:

The Chairman
Caribbean Export Development Agency
P.O. Box 34B
Brittons Hill
St. Michael
BARBADOS

Applications may be faxed to (246) 436-9999 or sent by e-mail to
application@carib-export.com.
The deadline for receiving applications is June 24, 2005.
For more details you may visit our website at www.carib-export.com


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE,








THE TIBUN THURDAYJUNE 6, 205,IPGES5


Kerzner plans 'great




nightclub' for Atlantis


FROM page one

ing close to their target of a
combined $160 million in oper-
ating income per annum.
The Kerzners, chairman and
chief executive respectively,
wrote: "A few years ago, the
executive team at Paradise Island,
under the direction of Paul
O'Neil, formulated a medium-
term strategic plan. At the time,
the business was generating oper-
ating income of around $130 mil-
lion, and many thought the busi-
ness had stabilised.
"But we set the stretch goal of
achieving EBITDA of $160 mil-
lion within a few years many
were sceptical. We are pleased
to report that we would have
made the number last year but
for the hurricanes, a feat largely
attributable to the 5 per cent
increase in non-gaming revenues
at'Atlantis."
The Kerzners said RevPAR
at 'Atlantis increased in 2004 by
3 per cent year-on-year, with


operating income margin
expanding from 28.1 per cent to
29.75 per cent. Operating
income from its Paradise Island
businesses totalled $156 million,
a 9 per cent rise upon the previ-
ous year.
"Increases in our guest satis-
faction and employee satisfac-
tion ratings were significant -
and achieving guest satisfaction
is what it is all about," the pair
said.
They added that guest satis-
faction would be further
enhanced from summer 2005
onwards through the opening of
Atlantis's Marina Village, with
its retail and restaurant offer-
ings.
And the Kerzners wrote:
"Lastly, in response to our cus-
tomers telling us that they 'want,
more stuff to do at night', we
will be building a great new
nightclub alongside our casino."
On the Phase III project, the
Kerzners acknowledged that
altering their plans from a 1,500-
room hotel to a 600-room all-


suite, luxury experience, was a
"dramatic change...... that was
not an easy decision".
They added: "This meant
writing off a portion of our
investment in the original plans
as well as an enormous amount
of time and effort."
The Kerzners said the high-
end, 88-unit condominium pro-
ject, the Ocean Club Estates,
would have an average price
point of $2.5 million. Kerzner
International's.stake in this
development would be the nine
acres of land it was contribut-
ing as equity.
Meanwhile, the 500-room
condominium hotel Kerzner
International was developing in
conjunction with Turnberry
Associates was set to provide
additional revenues streams.
The Kerzners said the pur-
chasers of all 500 units were
expected to put these units back
into a rental pool that their com-
pany would manage.
The father and son team
wrote in their message to share-


holders: "When Phase III is
completed, we will have a very'
broad product offering on Par-
adise Island: residential prod-
uct at Ocean Club Estates and
Atlantis, timeshare units, four
differentiated hotels at Alantis
from the Beah Tower (lowest
price point) up to them planned
all-suite hotel, and an ultra-lux-
ury hotel at the One & Only
Ocean Club.
"We also expect to have two
golf courses, a marina with an
entertainment village, some of
the great chefs of the world and,
most importantly, a vast and
unique array of marine habitats
and water attractions in a high-
ly-themed and emotionally-
engaging environment."



Talks on new

cruise port

for Grand

Bahama

FROM page one

arrivals."
On the airlift side, Mr
Wilchcombe said the Min-
istry of Tourism aimed "to
attract at least one addi-
tional wide body non-stop
European programme" in
2006-2007. Plans were also
afoot for twice weekly non-
stop flights to Canada by
December 2005, and the
addition of a further low-
cost carrier besides Air
Trans Airways "within the
next nine months".
Mr Wilchcombe said the
Ministry of Tourism was tar-
geting China, with its 7 per
cent economic growth, and
Latin America as new
tourist itiarkets.' "'-' "
.However, to do..so the..
Bahamas needed addition-
al room inventory, which
was "fundamental to our
nation going forward".
"We have taken a look at
the inventory and deter-
mined that in order to
expand the earnings of this
robust [tourism] industry,
we must first ensure that our
mid-week business improves
and we mist add additional
inventory here in New Prov-
idence and in Grand
Bahama," Mr Wilchcombe
said.


FROM page one

SMr Roberts said the consultants' report
"has shown that the domestic markets we
serve are mature and saturated, and the
Florida market is overserviced with more
.are pressure imminent.
"They have also demonstrated that
attempts to penetrate the new US markets
vill be met with competitive resistance, if
Successful, and will not likely generate pos-
itive margins for Bahamasair in the short or
long run.
"The attractiveness of our tourism product
and our geographical location does not war-
rant the Government of the Bahamas having
,to allocate so much of its scarce resources to
airlift."
Mr Roberts said the subsidies provided to-
Bahamasair had reduced by $2 million,
falling from $16 million in fiscal 2003-2004 to
$14 million for the year to June 30, 2005.
The airline's accumulated losses at the end
of the 2004-2005 fiscal year are projected to
be $373 million, with total government sub-
sidies reaching $274 million.
Mr Roberts said, though, that the Gov-
ernment would continue to purge Bahama-
sair's balance sheet of "dormant" intra-gov-
ernment debt, with the airline's outstanding


debt having fallen over the past year by $6.5
million to $39 million.
For fiscal 2005, Mr Roberts said Bahama-
sair was expected to close the year with a
$12 million loss, with pressure from low cost
carriers driving international fares down by
25 per cent and fuel costs having risen by
$5 million or 56 per cent.
However, Bahamasair's losses were only
$1 million greater than the previous period,
with revenues up $4 million and expenses
growing by $5 million.
Mr Roberts said Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne cost Bahamasair $1.8 million in rev-
enues, which would have helped the airline
to improve its position from an $11 million
loss in 2003-2004 to a $10.2 million loss.
The airline's charter business generated
an increase of 40,000..passengers and $2 mil-
lion in extra revenue, with total traffic in
2004-2005 up 6 per cent, load factor ahead by
6 per cent and revenue yield up 5 per cent.
Revenue per available seat mile was up
10 per cent, while cost per available seat
mile fell by 5 per cent.
Mr Roberts said Bahamasair had com-
menced legal action against Shell Bahamas to
recover some $2 million in hydrantfees and
interests it felt it did not have to pay over the
past eight years.


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


THE CARTER LIBERTY CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named .Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 13th day of June,
2005. The Liquidators is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


KYLE BRIDGE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 30th day of May,
2005. The Liquidators is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


UKOBA-LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 12th day of May,
2005. The Liquidators is Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-
7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Bahamasair facing


$10m loss in 05-06


Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited
is presently considering applications for a


OPERATIONS MANAGER

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards which go
beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investment counseling and advisory services. Our total commitment is always to our clients
and we focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

Requirements:
A minimum of five (5) years experience in banking with a large international institution
Knowledge of trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities markets with
particular emphasis on emerging market derivative instruments
- Ability to speak and write in Portuguese fluently in order to converse with clients directly and
process documentation internally
- Deep knowledge and working experience with Microsoft products (including access, excel, etc.)

- Must have working knowledge of GLOBUS application
- Must be familiar with EUROCLEAR procedures and have deep knowledge of EUCLID application.

- Significant experience in an extremely active and dynamic operational environment
- Comprehensive knowledge of operational and information technology principles, practices and
processes sufficient to interpret/analyze complex issues and develop innovative solutions to the
challenges effecting the business unit
- Strong problem solving and decision-making skills
- Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills

- Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Key Duties & Responsibilities will include:
- Co-ordinate day-to-day operations functions of the main office
- Oversee various Management functions; particularly the Payment, Settlement and Safe custody
areas
- Risk Management and liaise with managers to ensure maintenance of standards

Applications should be faxed to':
Human Resources Department
Fax: 302-6398
DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 30,2005


NOTICE



FOR SALE BY PUBLIC TENDER


Commercial Building Freeport, Grand Bahama Lot 6, Block
D. In particular the property is on the northeast comer of the
Mall Drive and Pioneer's Way, in the centre of the downtown
business district of Freeport.


The property consists of a tract of 1.04 acres of land which is
the subject of a lease from Freeport Commercial and Industrial
Limited which has 64 years to run. Erected on the said land is
a two-story office building on approximately 9,141 sq.ft.
Approximately one-third of the property is paved with asphalt
for parking and the remainder is landscaped.


Interested parties should submit written offers with telephone
contacts and postal addresses to the Joint Official Liquidators,
P.O.Box N-3748, Nassau,'Bahamas or P.O.Box F-43746,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Telephone Inquires: 326-8737 or 373-3015
Fax: 302-4870 or 373-1468

Terms: 10% deposit upon acceptance of offer; balance upon
completion.

All offers must be received by June 24, 2005


THE LIQUIDATORS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REJECT AND/OR REFUSE ANY OFFER.


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE








PA GE T U D J N 1 2


Heri


tage tourism increasingly


luring black Americans


emb umaf"
ftm. am m


"Copvriahted Material'


-
- - -
- *
-


.Syndicated Content -- s


Available from Commercial.News Providers"'


-
- S.-..


4 4


Dominic Abosi
Phylicia Allen
Annabell Baker
Ashley Barr
Jamie Bastian
Sade Bethell
Mikhail Bullard
Ramon Bullard
Justin Cancino
McKia Carey
Cyrus Chea
Thomas Christensen
Kara Culmer-Wilson
Dennis Dalli
Jordan Darville
Alexandra Deal
Alana Dillette
Kevette Evans
Danielle Farmer
Sonia Farmer
Julian Fernander
Julian Grant-Kinnear
Crispin Green
Thomas Hayden
Cameron Hepple
Ashley Johnson
Nashaka Johnson
Jue'rissa Knowles


- - -

. U.


. 4


a multi-national company resident in Nassau, Bahamas
is currently accepting applications for the position of
Tank Truck Driver.
QUALIFICATIONS:
* High School Diploma
* Minimum of 2 years driving tractor trailers
* Previous experience driving tank trucks
(petroleum products) preferred
PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
* Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
* Ability to learn new tasks quickly
* Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance:,


record
Salary will be commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Excellent benefits offered.
Only Bahamian citizens need apply and interested persons
should submit applications to arrive no later than Friday,
June 17th, 2005. Only suitable applications will be
acknowledged.
The Advertiser
DA #20660
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


Nakita Knowles
Corrine Lampkin
Tara Mabon
Alexandre Maupu
Shrijeet Mondal
Renaldo Neeley
Vanessa Nicolier
Genae Nottage
Thomas Phillips
Christopher Rees_
Mia Roman
Lashana Romer
Michael Russell
Matthew Sands
Vanessa Sands
Christina Smith
Christna Smith
Samantha Smith
Valentino Stuart
Natasha Turnquest


Aleksandr Vanderpool-
Wallace


Kyle Williams
Susanna Williams
Sean Winder
Christine Wong


S-MERCK SHARP& DOHM..

Professional Sales Representative
As part of a leading research-diven pharmaceutical products
and services 'company, we market a broad rnge of
innovative products to improve humIan he
Currently we are searching for qualified candidates-to fill
a Professional Sales Representative position openinfthe.
Bahamas territory. This position is responsible for
implementing sales and marketing programs in their assigned
territory with the objective of increasing sales and market
share
Minimum Requirements:
Bachelor's Degree, MBA or equivalent
Previous medical sales representative experience
preferred,
Availability and willingness to travel
Excellent oral and written communication in English.
Knowledge of PC applications.
Valid and active driver's license
Demonstrated interpersonal and presentation skills.
We strive to create a working environment that rewards-
commitment and performance. As such we offer an excellent
compensation and benefits package.
Qualified candidates may send resumes, with salary history,
td:,
Merck Sharp & Dohme
Att: Mr. S. van Eer
c/o Lowe's Pharmaceuticals
Soldier Road
P.OBox N-7504
Fax: 393 1527
Nassau Bahamas
Deadline, July 1st, 2005
We take affirmative action to consider applicants without
regards of race, color, sex, religion, National origin, Vietnam
Era and/or Disabled Veteran Status or individuals With
disabilities. We encourage females to apply.


Employment Opportunity
A business establishment is seeking to fill a senior
management position.
Role and Primary Responsibilities -
The officer will form a part of the establishment's senior
management team and will report to the Chief Exeutive
Officer. The individual will also be responsible ior:
Providing leadership and technical expertise to
operational departments of the establishment
contributing to the formulation and implhet ;.tati
of policies
participating in the establishment's strategic plannkr
and translating plans into goal-directed work
programmes
providing guidance for continuous improvement of
work processes
ensuring the effective management and development
of the establishment's human resources.
Education, Knowledge, Skills and Experience
Master's degree in finance, business administration,
accounting or related field
Knowledge of financial sector trends
Leadership skills proven record of success in leading
teams through coaching/mentoring and managing
performance
Proven ability to think strategically
Critical thinking and analytical skills proven ability
to assess, evaluate data and formulate opinions and
recommendations
Proven project management skills
Sound interpersonal, oral and written communication
skills
Fifteen (15) years managerial experience
The appointment is being offered on a contractual basis
and carries attractive benefits.
Applications should be made in writing to: ..
The Manager, Human Resources
DA #4584
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


- =


SCHOOL


IThe ,t tmajW .*S.W of e hWaamas
.. ......-..



The Class of 2005
on this day of Graduation
16th June 2005


I


I I -


THE TRIBUNE"


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


.


;








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 7B


MARSHALL ROAD (NASSAU)

Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry
building with eight inch concrete block walls. The
front 2 units are 95% complete.

Appraisal: $256,233.00
Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the
intersection of Cowpen and Blue Hill Road, turn
right onto Marshall Road (Adventure Learning Center
Road), follow road to the final curve before the
beach. The subject property is about 100 feet on
the right side, grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.


house is second on your right with garage..


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)
Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $175,350.00
Heading west along Soldier Road take main
entrance toKennedy subdivision on the left, then
take their 1st corer on the left then 1st right,






EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE (ELEUTHERA),
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera
Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains incomplete
3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen
and tv room.
Appraisal: $141,716.40


GOLDEN GATES #2 (NASSAU)

Lot #1490, section 2 with a 25 year old single family
residence 2,480 sq. ft. consisting of five bedrooms,
two bathrooms, seperate living and dining room with
a spacious kitchen, lot size is 6,000 sq. ft.
i- Appraisal: $120,000.00
Property is at grade and level with adequate drainage,
house situated on road knowns as "Donahue Road"
which is on the southern side of Carmicheal Road.
Last painted green trimmed white. Enclosed on one side with 5 ft., chain link fencing and at
the front with a low cement block wall with two driveways and a walkway.

VALENTINES EXTENSION (NASSAU)
Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex
with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey
section consist of a master bedroom, bathroom and
sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms, one bath,
living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs.
The single storey consist of one two bedroom, one
bath apartment and two efficency apartments, land
size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning on flat land
and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one
hundred feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road,
turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first
right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second
building on right, white trimmed brown.


house which is painted white trim with


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years
the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town
Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete
block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and
. L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26
ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior
walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock
and the floors of vinyl tiles.
Appraisal: $220,500.00



BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA)
Duplex in lot #6625, Bahama Sound #8, East
Exuma, trapezium shaped lot 35 ft above sea
level, 10,000 sq. ft., single storey, 10 year old
duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living
room and porch area. Property is landscaped.

Appraisal: $170,047.50


GLENISTON GARDENS
SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)
30 Year old single story house with floor area of
1,800 sq. ft., Lot #28 land size 14,475 ft., consist
of 4 bed, 3 bath, living, dining, kitchen, utility
room and carport.

Appraisal: $211,050.00
Driving east on Prince Charles, take the corner
before the shopping centre on the right side,
Follow the road around the curve to the subject
blue with a drive way up to the carport.


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft.,
6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below
road level and would flood in a severe hurricane
the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks
with one section virtually finished and occupied
with blocks up to window level and floor ready
to be poured. The'roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1 x6 pine and
the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work.
is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the
structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.
Appraisal: $80,498.00

HAMILTON'S (LONG ISLAND)
Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft.,
dwelling house of solid concrete floors,
foundation column and belt course with finished
plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is
1,237 sq. ft., utilities available are' electricity,
water, cable tv and telephone.

Appraisal: $98,057.00


TOWN (ABACO)
7O, singe storey wood and
Cial building approximately
20 years old.


1,946.00


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill
overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one downstairs.
Each comprising one bedroom one bathroom,
front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 6 feet wide on the upper
level secured with a wooden handrail. The garage
area has been converted into a efficiency
apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be
rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 per month.


Appraisal: $308,402.00
NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The
concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $43,968.75

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles.east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.


BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated and should not flood
under normal conditions.
Appraisal: $8,236.00
The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO), Crown Alotment #21- Vacant land 10,810 sq. ft. off
S.C. Bottle Drive.


BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on
elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence.
Appraisal: $26,250.00
Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.


Hare oli 52334e al*ar. o e ot9* b- .co

I MP l a s v s i w w .f s o b h a s -m o r i ne r i o r p o t o s


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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY



MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES


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airlines on pension fund woes


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NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDINE MERLIEN OF
MARSHALL ROAD, SOUTH BEACH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 16th day of JUNE, 2005 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE






CALLENDERS & CO.

TO OUR
VALUED CLIENTS

Please note that our Office
will be closed on

FRIDAY, 17th June, 2005

to observe our Firm's
ANNUAL FUN DAY

Regular Office Hours
will resume on

MONDAY, 20th June, 2005

We regret any inconvenience
caused.



PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY

PUBLIC NOTICE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

MATERIALS MANAGEMEMNT INFORMATION SYSTEM

The Public Hospitals Authority (PHA), Commonwealth of The
Bahamas is inviting proposals from qualified vendors to provide a
Materials Management Information System (MMIS) solution that
meets its current and future business requirements.

Interested companies are invited to submit proposals in the requried
format and delivered in a sealed envelope in order to reach the PHA
by 29th July 2005.


A comprehensive document outlining impotant information for
vendors, proposal preparation instructions and technical specifications
of the requirements is available upon request; and can be collected
from the PHA Corporate Office, Manx Corporate Centre, West Bay
Street, Nassau.

An electronic version of this RFP is also available by:

* visiting the PHA's website at: www.phabahamas.org (click under
Business Opportunities: Current RFP's); or
* e-mail: REPInquiries@phabahamas.org


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BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED



NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS



Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby
notifies all its shareholders that the Annual
General Meeting of the Shareholders will be
held on Thursday, June 23, 2005 at 5:00 p.m.
at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Nassau,
Bahamas.




Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION MAURITANIA LIMITED
Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 5th July, 2005. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.
Dated the 14th day of June, A.D., 2005.
Gail Huff
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060
U.S.A.









A young aggressive company with a solid track record
is expanding and requires an

In House Marketing Manager
If you are looking for position with:
1) Structure
2) Lots of supervision
3) A daily routine
Then this position is NOT for you.
Applicants must have a degree in marketing.
When applying remember that we are looking for that
applicant who stands out from the rest.
c/o The Tribune Limited
DA# 03251
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN REMY PIERRE, SEA
BREEZE LANE, P.O.BOX G.T. 2627, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 16th day of JUNE, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
ALGERIA LIMITED
Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 5th July, 2005. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.
Dated the 14th day of June, A.D., 2005.
Gail Huff
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060
U.S.A.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION ALGERIA LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION ALGERIA LIMITED
is in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
13th day of June, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Ms Gail Huff, of
16945 Northchase, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.
Dated the 14th day of June, 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorneys for the above-named Company



Legal Notice

NOTICE
EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
MAURITANIA LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
MAURITANIA LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
13th day of June, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Ms Gail Huff, of
16945 Northchase, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.
Dated the 14th day of June, 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY
MANAGEMENT CO. LTD
Attorneys for the above-named Company


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PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Stocks rise despite




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We are looking for people who:
*Know what it means to give outstanding customer service
*Have an interest in Food and Beverage sales and management
*Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our company
*Truly believe the customer always comes first
*Preferably have 1-2 years customer service experience in a retail or restaurant environment

We offer:
*A great group of people to work with
*A competitive salary and benefits package
*All of the training you'll need to be highly successful
We are currently interviewing for:

Baristas
(Coffee Bar Specialist)'
If you want to learn more about Starbucks please visit www.starbucks.com
All interested applicants should bring in person to John BUll Business Centre, Robinson
Road on FRIDAY. JUNE 17th between the hours of 9:30am and 12:30pm the following
documents:
Resume, passport picture, copy of passport, copy of NIB card and, job references.








This development in Ocean Club is comprised of
88 residences and a marina.

PREQUALIFICATION FOR CONTRACTORS & SUPPLIERS

All interested parties, please complete a
Contractor's Prequalification Statement on their company
letterhead and forward to:

email: tbrisby@pbwlbahamas.com
mail: Paradise Blue Water Ltd.,
P.O. Box SS-6386,
Nassau, Bahamas

Thank You.


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear --
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



HOUSE

FOR SALE

Lot Number 8,
Fox Hill Creek Subdivision,
Eastern District of
New Providence


Being sold pursuant to
Power of Sale Mortgage dated
April 14, 2003


APPRAISED VALUE

$570,000


Interested parties,
please submit Bids to


British American

Insurance Co. Ltd,


P.O. Box N-4815
Telephone: 461-1037


NOTICE


IN THE SUPREME COURT
OF THE BAHAMAS


2004
CLE/QUI/01462


IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act
AND
IN THE MATTER
of the Petition of Veronica Rahming
AND
IN THE MATTER of all that piece or lot of land situated Calabash Bay in the
Island of Andros one of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and being a portion
of Parcel One (1) which comprises 13,629 square feet bounded on the
NORTHEAST by a Twenty (20) feet wide road reservation running thereon
64.11 feet on the SOUTHEAST by other portion of Parcel One (1) running
thereon 200.30 feet on the SOUTHWEST by a Twenty (20) feet wide reservation
running thereon 79.00 feet and on the NORTHWEST by land now or formerly
the property of Elmore Cargill and running thereon 193.00 feet. AND
All THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate Calabash Bay in the Island of Andros
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and being a portion
of Parcel One (1) comprising 3,945 square feet and bounded on the NORTHEAST
by a Twenty (20) feet wide road reservation and running thereon (20) feet on
the SOUTHEAST by Parcel Two (2) and running thereon 203.38 feet on the
SOUTHWEST by a Twenty (20) feet on the NORTHWEST by the other portion
of Parcel One (1) and running thereon 200.30 feet. AND
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate Calabash Bay in the Island of
Andros one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and being a
portion of Parcel Two (2) comprising 25,134.00 square feet and bounded on the
NORTHEAST partly by a Twenty (20) feet wide road reservation and running
thereon 21.07 feet and partly by another Twenty (20) feet wide road reservation
and running thereon 80.00 feet on the SOUTHEAST by a Twenty (20) feet wide
road reservation and running thereon 99.00 feet pm the NORTHWEST partly
by Parcel One (1) and running thereon 203.38 feet and partly by a road reservation
running thereon 58.00 feet.
Veronica Rahming the Petitioner in the matter claim to be the owner of the
unencumbered fee simple Estate in possession of the said land have made Application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have this title to the said tract of land investigated and
the Nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the Provisions of the Act.
COPIES of the said Plan may be inspected during normal office hours at the
following places:-
(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
(b) Vogt-Evans & Co., Columbus House, 3rd Floor, Shirley and East Streets,
Nassau, in the City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence, Bahamas.
NOTICE is hereby given that any person having Dower or a right to Dower
or any Adverse Claim or a Claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before
the 26th day of July, 2005 file in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau aforesaid
and serve on the Petitioner a Statement of Claim in the prescribed form verified by
an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
Statement of Claim on or before the 26th day of July, 2005, will operate as a bar to
such claim.
VOGT-EVANS & CO.
P.O. Box SB 52538,
Fax: 326-2955/Phone: 326-2955/328-0567
Attorney for the Petitioner


1


I M..immmolm .


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


b. w














Keeping games information current


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior sports reporter
MICRONET will be making
sure that up-to-date informa-
tion is provided after every
track and field session in the


Colinalmperial Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean games.
The technology company will
computerise all information for
the committee, press and coach-
es after every session, updating
after every event.


BAHAMAS

| OLYMPIC


19th ANNUAL OLYMPIC HEALTH DAY
5 MIL RACE
WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK
7:00a.m., Saturday 25th June, 2005


T-SHIRTS FOR ALL
PARTICIPANTS
TROPHIES FOR ALL
CATEGORIES
INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC
CERTIFICATES FOR ALL
FINISHERS
HEALTH SCREENING
ENTRY FEE:
SCHOOL CHILDREN FREE
REGULAR: $10.00

RUN ROUTE: STARTS Q.E.
SPORTS CENTER, NASSAU
STREET, BAY STREET,
P.I.BRIDGE, ENDS NATIVE
CRAFTS MARKET ON
PARADISE ISLAND.


CATEGORIES
5 MILE RUN: STARTS Q.E.
SPORTS CENTRE FINISHES AT
THE CRAFTS MARKET ON P.I.
MALE: UNDER 19, 20-29, 30-39,
40-49, 50+
FEMALE: UNDER19,20-29,30-
39,40-49, 50+
CHILDREN AND GROUP
AWARDS
WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH
WALK:
STARTS FORT MONTAGU,
PROCEEDS ALONG EAST BAY
STREET, ACROSS THE P.I.
BRIDGE TO FINISH AT THE
NATIVE CRAFTS MARKET, JUST
EAST OF THE ROUND ABOUT
ON PARADISE ISLAND


ENTRY FORM
OLYMPIC DAY 5 MILE RACE AND HEALTH WALK
DROP OFF ENTRY AT THE OLYMPIC OFFICE, #10,7TH TERRACE
WEST, CENTREVILLE OR MAIL TO: THE BAHAMAS OLYMPIC
ASSOCIATION, P.O.BOX SS-6250, NASSAU TEL: 322-1595
Fax: 322-1195
NAME (LAST) FIRST
AGE: SEX: CLUB or FIRM_
TELEPHONE NO.: FAX: E-MAIL:_
EVENT: 5 MILE RUN WHEELCHAIR HEALTH WALK
Liability waiver: In consideration of your accepting this entry, I, intending
to be legally bound heredy for myself, my heirs, executors and
administrators waive and release any and all rights and claims of damage
I may have against the Bahamas Olympic Association and/ or its
successors and assigns for all injuries or other eventualy sustained by
me in this event. I agree to abide by the decisions of the organizers and
medcal advisers.

Signature of Applicant Parent/Guardian if under 18 years old


Information will be posted
on the games' website for the
general public and transported
to the various camps for offi-
cials.
Micronet, which recently
signed on with the committee,
has expressed its sincere thanks
to the committee for allowing
it to be a part of the festivities.
Information will be forward-
ed to the press and technology
room at the stadium, CAC
headquarters, Betty Kenning
Kelly swimming complex, and
the games village, Nassau Beach
Hotel.
Micronet is also responsible
for providing any updated infor-


mation to the public regarding
the games.
The technology company
joins 23 other companies in sup-
porting the games, which are
intended to be the biggest in
history of the championships.

Support

So far, the committee has
accumulated $60,500 in event
sponsorship and, with the clock
ticking, chairman Dr Bernard
Nottage is expecting more com-
panies to sign up.
He said: "Half of the events
have been sponsored, and we


have a number of commitments,
with a third of the events still
open. We are going to sell
them."
One of the major fundraising
events, besides the raffle, will
be a souvenir booklet organized
by Shonnel Ferguson, a former
CAC champion and national
record-holder in the long jump.
She said: "We wanted to do
something that is a first, since
there are so many firsts hap-
pening. So why not do some-
thing that will give a lasting
impression?
"The booklet will talk about
the region, what binds us
together and the significance of


this region. We've gathered a
lot of persons to assist with this
project.
"There will be a section ded-
icated to the celebration and
birthday of the Bahamas. It will
be very wide scope, featuring
everything Bahamian."
The souvenir booklet will also
feature tales from other neigh-
bouring countries. It will serve
as a memorial booklet for all
athletes.
The book will be displayed
in all public and school libraries."
Ferguson is encouraging the
general public to purchase space
in the book, with the printing
time drawing near.


We must expand our




breadth of talent


STUBBS
,.~'..>.'.,. p~C
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OPINION
Mommova", AM


THE stage is set for what
promises to be an exciting
weekend of track and field, as
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations hosts its
annual National Open Track
and Field Championships.
And judging from the perfor-
mances turned in so far this
year, it's a two-day meet that
no track and field fanatic will
want to miss.
From national collegiate
champions to world leaders, the
BAAA will gather some of the
best athletes in the world as it
seeks to put together the nation-
al teams for the upcoming
Senior Central American and
Caribbean Championships and
the IAAF World Champi-
onships.
The Bahamas has always
done well at the CAC Champi-
onships, having produced its
share of champions in each of
the respective 20 meets held
every two years. This year, we
expect no different. With the
actual championships being
staged in our back yard, it will
give Bahamians an unique
opportunity to view our athletes
against some of the best in the
world before they go to the
even bigger World Champi-
onships in Helsinki, Finland in
August.
The marquee events once
again will be the women's and
men's sprints, including both
quarter-mile races. But the
question is, why aren't we get-
ting the calibre of athletes to
compete in the other low-key
events?
Take for instance the field,
where we have predominantly
held our own. The only events
that likely will have at least
three or more competitors in
contention for spots on any of
the national teams are the
men's long, triple and high
jumps and the women's discus
and shot putt.
Why aren't we attracting
more athletes who specialise in
other events like the hurdles,
pole vault and distance run-
ning? Does this mean that with
the championships being hosted


here, we won't be able to field
solid competitors to represent
us on our home turf?
By now, more emphasis
should have been placed on try-
ing to develop at least one ath-
lete in those events where we
have been struggling to main-
tain a level of prominence as
we've been doing in the mar-
quee events.
It would be disheartening to
watch a pole vault event, which
has been one of the areas of
attention by the crew working
to repair the surroundings, and
for there to be no aquamarine,
gold and black uniform in the
line-up.
The same could be said about
the distance running events for
men and women or even the
high jump for women, to name
a few.

Relays

While we know that we will
definitely have a quality wom-
en's 4x100 relay team, albeit
without injured Debbie Fergu-
son, it would be nice to see the
return of the women's 4x400
relay team. And while the
men's 4x400 will be as solid as a
rock with the surge of some of
the rising young stars, let's hope
that our men's 4x100 team can
really regain their rightful place
in the region.
The Nationals, which serve
as the final trials for both the
Sr CAC and the World Cham-
pionships, should be quite inter-
esting this year. There are quite
a few match-ups which should
satisfy any hungry track and
field enthusiast's appetite. Let's
just hope that they all pan out as
they are billed together in
advance.
Like defending men's quar-
ter-mile champion Chris Brown
stated in an interview with The
Tribune earlier this week:
"Nobody should have any
excuse of not being ready, nor
not knowing what time the race
is supposed to be."
Brown will probably have the
most difficult time than any


champion to defend his title at
the nationals. Right on his heels
in terms of time is Grand
Bahamian Andrae Williams,
who joined Brown on the same
day in running a personal best
under the 45-second barrier in
the 400. Add former champi-
ons Avard Moncur and Troy
McIntosh, along with Olympian
team-mates Dennis Darling,
Nathaniel McKinney and Tim
Munnings and NAIA champion
Aaron Cleare, and the men's
quarter will definitely be the
race to watch.
As Brown said: "For the first
time, the field is going to be
really stacked." No doubt that
should provide more than
enough thrills to keep the fans
on their feet for 45 seconds or
less.
That should be followed by
the much anticipated showdown
between Olympic champion
and world leader Tonique
Williams-Darling and Christine
Amertil in the women's race.
The sprints should be exciting
as Dominic Demeritte defends
his double crown against NAIA
champion Derrick Atkins and
collegian Grafton Ifill, along
with former national champi-
ons Rendward Wells and
Andrew Tynes.
The women's field may have
lost some flavour without Deb-
bie Ferguson back to defend
her titles. Chandra Sturrup right
now is the head of the class in
her fantastic return from an
injury-plagued year.
But it will be interesting to
see the progress NCAA Divi-
sion II double champion
Shandira Brown has made, and
whether or not Sevatheda Fynes
is healthy enough to return to
her old form. Timicka Clarke
is going to be the dark horse in
the field.
As soon as the final entrants
have been released by the
BAAA, we will take a further
in-depth look at each individ-
ual event in this column next
week.
Let's get ready for an exciting
weekend of track and field
action.


Improve your technical, tactical, physical and mental skills *

Be at a camp that will encourage future participation in soccer*

Camps open to all boys and girls aged 6-16.

Camps Run from 10am 1pm Daily at St. Paul's Field, Lyford Cay
Bus Pick-Up and Drop-Off at the Village Rd. Roundabout
(Please Ask for Details)

COSt $ 0 .(Includes Camp Football and Tee Shirt)
For Information on Our Summer Camps or
to/Download an Application Form, Check Our Website:
www.bahamassocceracademy.com/summercamps.html


A ..ColinalImperial
.Insurance Ltd.

All persons interested in being food vendors at the

%'Colinalmperial.


CAC Championships


Please submit bids to Mr. Livingstone Bostwick

At

322 1595


Bids must state food that vendor plans to sell and the

fee they are prepared to pay to Organizing Committee



Deadline Tuesday, June 21st


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS













International XI fall to




Marylebone in fundraiser


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Coach helps to



further athletes'



education by



putting basketball



and books together


This article first appeared on
Tuesday and is reappearing due
to a printing error.
* By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter
A LOCAL basketball enthu-
siast/ is focusing his energies on
helping athletes to use basket-
ball as a vehicle to pursue higher
education.
Cardinal Moncur, former
coach of Respect Academy and
Queen's College, has aided a
number of local high school bas-
ketball players to receive
scholarships at American col-
leges.
Moncur, who currently teach-
es at Yellow Elder Primary, has
conducted a number of work-
shops for both primary and high
school players.
His network of coaches has
allowed him to grant a number of
basketball players the opportu-
nity to play abroad.
Moncur began his programme
while at Respect Academy (now
Westminster College) in 1999.
"The main reason I am doing
it is to give back to the commu-
nity," he said, "Because of Cyn-
thia 'Mother' Pratt, I was fortu-
nate enough to receive a schol-
arship and now I want to do the
same for other young athletes."
Moncur said a number of ele-
ments must be in place for an
athlete to succeed at the next lev-
el.
"I believe for.a student-ath-
lete to be successful they must
possess what I like to call the
three As and the D, which are
academics, attitude, athleticism
and desire," he said.


* CARDINAL MONCUR
Moncur is considering creat-
ing a structured programme and
making himself more accessible,
and opening up a much wider
range of communication between
him and the athletes.
He plans to include other
sports, like volleyball, into his
portfolio.
Moncur said many players
have their eyes on the ultimate
prize of Division One college
basketball and the National Bas-
ketball Association (NBA), but
many are not aware of other
options such as Division Two
and Three or NAIA schools.
He said his main focus is to
ensure that these athletes use
basketball as a vehicle for higher
education.
"The odds of becoming a doc-
tor or a lawyer are higher than
the odds of becoming an NBA
player," he said. "There are only
about 500 NBA players but there
are hundreds of thousands of
doctors and lawyers."


He said it is not always the
most talented players who can
receive scholarship opportuni-
ties.
"Many kids may not have
been the best players on their
high school team, but they have
the all-round character and
desire to be successful on anoth-
er level of basketball."
Some of the players that Mon-
cur has helped to pursue their
hoop dreams include Lavar
Gilbert, who currently attends
Lindsey Wilson College, Taige
Adderley, who attended Roane
State Community College, and
David Fox and Isheiko Cleare,
who will both attend Iowa Lakes
Community College this fall.

Improve
Rather than the talent levels of
his athletes or the amount of
games he has won, Moncur said
his proudest accomplishment as
a coach has been the fact that
most of the players under his
tutelage improve at least one let-
ter grade.
"Success on the court is indeed
very important, but more impor-
tant in life is the ability to do well
in the classroom," he said.
While he has had offers to
coach basketball at the high
school and junior high levels,
Moncur said his efforts are cur-
rently being concentrated on
scouting these athletes.
"The more athletes that we
are able to help, the better," he
said, "It is not about me or any
other coach receiving publicity,
it's about helping these young
men use basketball as a vehicle
to higher education."


0 0 0


JASON RONNIE ALBURY, Sr.
1950 2004

Somebody hardworking with visions and dreams,
Who persevered no matter how hard the task seemed.
Somebody who was determined to be educated,
The school of Hard Knocks was how he made it.
Somebody who always said,"There's no it can't be done"
"You exhaust every possibility until there are none."
Somebody who knew he had to take care of himself,
Although putting others first is what brought him great wealth.
Somebody who was truly an optimist at heart,
In the midst of trials and strife, his faith would never depart.
Somebody caring and loving, somebody silly and fun,
Too numerous to count all the hearts he had won.
Somebody firm but gentle, rules he did enforce,
For every action taken, he knew there had to be recourse.
Somebody who was positive, who saw the good in all,
Changing things to make them work was done without a stall.
Somebody attentive to details, perfectionism he displayed,
He worked until it was the best, no matter what the trade.
Somebody sure of who he was, much confidence he had,
No matter what the punch-line, he would have the last laugh.
This Somebody was not just anyone, Dad acquired this name so true,
Because no matter what we asked of him he would always willingly do.
So to you Dad, our Somebody, we will unite again one day,
Until that day comes for us, in our minds and hearts you will always stay.
We love you Daddy!
MICHELLE, JOANNE, CHARMAINE & MELISSA


i ri-UIUAY, JUIVt It), ev, L, "Ur-c nou


I ItIUl IIt rurall 10


.0














.0






14








0,










THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


'Glad to


be


back home'


B By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior sports reporter


THE dream of competing in
front of her home crowd in a
major championship will be
placed on the back burner for
Debbie Ferguson.
Olympic bronze medallist
Ferguson will watch her team-
mates and fellow colleagues
race down the straight from the
grandstands, while she recovers
from an emergency surgery for
her appendix.
The Central American and
Caribbean games, set for the
Independence weekend in the
capital, left Ferguson with
mixed feelings: downhearted
because she cannot compete for
the rest of the season, but grate-
ful to be home to witness the
highly respected event.
The spirited national record
holder in the 200m, encouraged
the public to join her in the
stands, where she will both be
supporting Bahamian athletes
and keeping a close eye on her
competition.
She said: "I am definitely sad
about not competing in the
games, with them being here.
It's been a while since we've
had a major competition like
this being held here.
"Hosting games of this nature
means that we have elevated to
another level. In my opinion
this .is like a mini-Olympics, a
pre-world championships being
held on this side of the world. I
am hoping that everyone, from
Olympics champions to the
world medallist come down to
witness the games for them-
selves.
"I am excited and I am trying
to get the Bahamian people
excited about the event to
see these athletes here will be
great.'
Ferguson was admitted into
Kendall Regional Medical cen-
tre on April 13 after feeling pain
during training in Miami.
"I usually started training in
November, but I wanted to get
an earlier start this year, with
the CAC games and the World
championships being hosted all
this year," said Ferguson. "I was
really disappointed when I
receive word from the doctor
that I would have been side-
lined for the rest of the season.
"This was the our time to
shine, at home in front of the
Bahamian crowd. At one point
when I thought about the CAC
and the World Championships
and not competing I broke
down in tears, but I've seen the
bigger picture now.
"When I look at how fortu-
nate I am to just be there and
witness the event, I count my
blessings. We have persons like
Vernetta, who was a great ath-
lete, who also excelled at these
games, passed. She would have
loved these games and to note
that they are being held at
home would have brought a
smile to her face. I am extreme-
ly lucky and I thank God every
day."
Ferguson, who ran a time of
22.30 seconds for the Olympic
bronze, would have automati-
cally qualified for the CAC
games.
In the 400m relay, Ferguson
led a young team to a fourth-
place finishing, after heading
into the games ranked 17th in
the world.
She added: "We really had a
rough year no one expected us
to make as far as we made it in


* DEBBIE Ferguson (right) has had to take a break from competition after undergoing emergency appendix surgery


the Olympics with the team, but
we did great.
"It proves that anyone can
win on any given day. It was just
unfortunate that everyone was-
n't there. I still believe that we
would have grabbed the bronze
if we had Savetheda there.
"We haven't competed


together in such a long time and
I was really looking forward to
doing it at the CAC games. This
is really unfortunate for all of
us.
"Last year Savetheda and
Chandra had to sit out due to
injuries now I have too, but I
am looking forward to the day


we all can get back on the track
and run one last time, even if
we don't medal."
Ferguson admitted to having
to start over in order to regain
top form.
Not allowing the injury to
dampen her spirits, Ferguson
said she will start her training


two months earlier to ensure
that she is in top shape.
She added: "It will be rough
getting back to the form I was
in, but I am going to try. I can't
go back out there and run, it
will be a 'gradually' process.
"I have to work, than do a
light jog everyday, before I can


get up and run into that full
motion. Unfortunately, there
won't be any games to train for,
like this year, but that won't
dampen my spirits.
"I am ready to push on. If it
was up to me I would have been
on the track at the CAC games,
but it is all out of my hands."


Committee 'on track' to fund CAC games


M By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior sports reporter
The Central American and
Caribbean games committee
announced yesterday, that it is
on track financially to host the
regional games.
Less than a week ago the
committee needed $90,000 to
further cover the expenses of
the games but according to
chairman Di Bernard Nottage,


last week's progress was
"great".
Nottage announced that a
$200,000 bill for the hotel
accommodations for athletes
had been paid in full.
He said: "Last week was a
good week, it was a very good
week. This week we are expect-
ing to receive some additional
funds, a big cheque tomorrow.
"We were able to pay our
hotel bill, before the champi-


onships if you are able to pay
the hotel bill before the cham-
pionships then you are in really
good shape. That is one of the
biggest expenses.
"We expect a minimum of
10,000 persons in the stadium a
night, and if we can do that we
will be able to pay off our other
expenses.
"The only thing that will be of
any concern to me is if we have
more than one world record


broken."
It is the first time that the
CAC committee has offered a
performance incentive to ath-
letes breaking any world, cham-
pionship or Bahamian record.
Athletes who breaks a world
record will receive $50,000;
$20,000 for a CAC record; and
$10,000 for a Bahamian record.
The committee has estimat-
ed'$1,000,000 to host the cham-
pionship games.


Nonetheless, treasurer Mont-
gomery Brathwaite believes
that these figures can increase if
sponsors continue to step for-
ward.
He said: "Hosting an event
of this nature requires a lot of
sponsors. We are extremely
grateful to our title sponsors in
assisting us, we are very appre-
ciative.
"We were able to secure sev-
eral major sponsors, which we


will reveal to the public later
on in the week, in addition to
the sponsorship event sponsors.
We are now looking for sou-
venir sponsors who want to
advertise in the booklet. There's
still time for persons wishing to
contribute to this cost and mak-
ing their presence felt."
Tickets will be on sale on the
June 21 at all Colinalmperial
branches. A ticket promotion
will be launched next week.


_ ~_ _~~ __









THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


F The Tribune


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Josey: Church must take lead in




fight against domestic violence


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
Domestic vio-
lence not only
touches the
secular world.
Contrary to
what some may choose to
believe, both perpetrators and
victims sit in the pews of the
sanctuary from Sunday to Sun-
day.
One pastor believes it is the
church's responsibility to take
the lead in the fight against
domestic violence.
Rev Arnold Josey, pastor of
Commonwealth Baptist
Church, Elizabeth Estates,
recently wrapped up The Word
on Domestic Violence, a three-


day conference at his church.
The conference brought the
issue to a group that included
members of his congregation,
victims of abuse and counsel-
lors from various local church-
es..
In the first night of the con-
ference Dr Sandra Dean-Pat-
terson, director of the Crisis
Centre, was the guest speak-
er. The following night ASP
Elaine Sands of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force spoke
on othe victim's constitutional
rights, and in the final night
senate president Sharon Wil-
soni, attorney and former mag-
istrate, spoke on legal issues
concerning domestic violence
victims.
Each night, Rev Josey high-


lighted some aspect of what
the word of God had to say
about identifying and assisting
victims of abuse (taking most
of his points from Psalms 55).
Rev Josey is a former police
superintendent and saw his fair
share of domestic violence cas-
es during his years on the
force.
He cited one case where a
young man had been beating
his "wife" and the matter was
brought before the magistrate's
court. The abused woman
failed to testify against her
abuser after being intimidated
by him. The couple appeared
before the courts again, but

See VIOLENCE, 2C


* REV Arnold Josey (pictured), pastor of Commonwealth Baptist Church, Elizabeth Estates,
recently wrapped up The Word on Domestic Violence, a three-day conference at his
church.
(Photo: Petura Burrows)


Profiles of'the


perpetrator' and victim


ACCORDING to Rev
Arnold Josey, pastor of Com-
monwealth Baptist Church,
identifying domestic abuse
may not always be easy. But
using the scriptural text,
Psalms 55, he has put togeth-.
er a profile of "the perpetra-
tor", as well as a profile of
the victim.
The perpetrator is:
oppressive
mischievous
hateful
vindictive
restless
corrupt
he befriends
he attends church
loves to talk


a breaker of covenant, so
his words are worthless.
from any educational
background
The victim:
has a weak heart
is always fearful (afraid)
*is always expecting some-
thijng (negative) to happen in
every area of life
wants to constantly get
away (this is where suicidal
tendencies surface)
4* does not trust (suspicious
of everything)
has low self-esteem
Rev Josey notes that one
or two of these traits does not
mean that an individual is a


perpetrator or a victim of
domestic violence; however,
when you put them all togeth-
er you have "the face" of
abuse.
Speaking of the profile,
Rev Josey told Tribune Reli-
gion: "Once you see this, you
know how to pray and you
know specifically what you
are coming against in the spir-
itual world. "The thing is that
they (perpetrators and abuse
victims) have no address.
They are everywhere. One of
the verses of scripture (from
Psalms 55) says that 'you
were my companion in
church'. And that's where
these people go to twist the
scriptures."


Rubie Nottage appointed to Anglican


Communion's Panel of Reference


* CHANCELLOR RUBIE NOTTAGE


RUBIE Nottage, Chancellor
of the Province of the West
Indies has been appointed to
the Anglican Communion's
Panel of Reference to help
resolve a number of difficulties
facing the church.
Mrs Nottage was named
along with 13 other members
representing the Anglican
Communion throughout the
world, by the Archbishop of
Canterbury Rowan Douglas.
The issues that the panel will
be dealing with centre on the
fact that certain parishes have
been unwilling to accept the
direct oversight of their dioce-
san bishops and that certain
dioceses are in dispute with
their provincial authorities,
according to a press release.
The panel has been instruct-
ed to consider and report on
situations where there is seri-
ous dispute concerning ade-


quacy of schemes of delegated
or extended Episcopal over-
sight or other situations where
parishes find it impossible to
follow the direction of their
provincial authorities.
Concerns
The panel has also been
empowered to make recom-
mendations to the primates,
dioceses and provincial and
diocesan authorities and report
their concerns to Archbishop
Douglas.
Although the issue of homo-
sexuality was not directly men-
tioned in the release, it is
expected that the panel will
deal with topic that has recent-
ly divided the Anglican church.
Rev Dr Peter Carnley, retir-
ing Primate of the Anglican
Church of Australia, is chairing
the panel.


!


1 5


~ ---~--~--- - -














'Father of the Year' to be recognised


M By CLEMENT JOHNSON

Pastor Lambert Farrington
will be showered with spe-
cial gifts this Father's Day
when he is recognised as
'Father of the Year' by
the members of St Stephen's Baptist
Church.
Last Sunday members of the church
in Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera described
him as a special father, not only to his
four biological children but also to his
church family and the community at
large.
At the 11am service, Rev Farrington
instructed his congregation on "the


Christian life".
He compared the Christian race to
a long distance race, rather that a short
sprint.
"In the book of Hebrews, Chapter
12 and verses 1-10, some of the
Hebrew Christians were tempted to
drop out of this spiritual contest
because of the severe persecution they
were experiencing," he explained.
Rev Farrington likened the Christ-
ian journey to that of an athlete.
"In the sports arena, an athlete has
conditioned his body and mind to
work together to reach his highest
potential in competition. The athlete
must ingest a proper diet and obtain


"You may even stumble
on the track, but don't
give up. Continue to run
your race with patience,
looking unto Jesus,
our coach, and that
great crowd of witnesses
who are cheering us on."
Pastor Lambert Farrington


sufficient rest," he said.
"Smoking and drinking alcohol are
out of the question. As a matter of
fact, if an athlete is caught using illegal
substances he or she could be banned
from competition. In the sports world,
a Coach demands so much of a long
distance runner. He must follow the
guidelines set forth by the coach and
trainer if he is to be successful."
The pastor told his congregation
that they are also in a race, "and we
have definite guidelines or rules to
adhere to".
In order to run a successful Christ-
ian race, one must have patience, said
Rev Farrington, pointing to 1 Peter


2:1-3, which provides the antidote to
failure in this race.
"Saints, like long distance runners
you may experience some injury while
training," said the pastor.
"You may even stumble on the
track, but don't give up. Continue to
run your race with patience, looking
unto Jesus, our coach, and that great
crowd of witnesses who are cheering
us on."
The passionate sermon appeared to
lift the spirit of the congregation,
which was still grieving over the recent
deaths of two faithful church mem-
bers, and news that another had taken
ill.


SChoosing 12 disciples


' By REV JAMES MOULTRIE

TODAY many companies in our nation and
worldwide screen people for management posi-
tions. Candidates for ordination to the priest-
hood undergo testing to ensure suitability. And
church authorities also screen people for posi-
tions of leadership in the church. I am sure that
the Archbishop and the Vestry of St Matthew's
carefully considered candidates before select-
ing me as Rector in 2004. And that is a process I
fully support.
Let us imagine for a moment that Jesus sent
the resume of the 12 apostles to a firm of con-
sultants to determine their suitability. They
would probably conclude that they did not qual-
ify. Most of them were lacking in background,
education and vocational aptitude for the type of
mission Jesus had in mind. Besides, many of
them did not have the team spirit which was
necessary. Some showed evidence of jealousy
and rivalry among them. Some were emotional-
ly unstable and some had no obvious leader-
ship qualities. And, one in particular, Matthew,
was a tax collector, even though he obviously had
good abilities.

Imperfect

The apostles had some obvious faults and
weaknesses. They were imperfect human beings.
Jesus was not looking for a group of Bay Street
executives; He did not usually work with perfect
material. He worked with ordinary material.
That is why the 12 men He chose from among
the hundreds of disciples were ordinary persons
from ordinary walks of life.
Many of them were fishermen. Many of us
would hardly go to Potters Cay in search of
apostles for Jesus, but Jesus would. In fact, we
may not have chosen any of them! And that is
just what He did; He did just the opposite of
what we would do. They had ino special qualifi-
cations, and far from being perfect, they had
many of the same faults we all have, the same
failings we find in ourselves.
But despite their faults, Jesus saw something
good in each one of them, even in Judas. Jesus
demonstrates that one does not have to be per-
fect or possess all the talents we would expect in
leaders, to be used by God. God calls us just as


* REV JAMES MOULTRIE


Rev Scott


to mark


20 years


as priest

REV Peter A G Scott
will celebrate his 20th
anniversary of ordination
to the sacred priesthood
on Tuesday, June 28.
A special service to
mark this milestone will
take place on Sunday,
June 26, 9am at the
Church of St Christopher,
Lyford Cay.
Father Don Haynes,
assistant priest at St
Matthew's Church will
deliver the homily.
Father Scott was born in
Nassau, obtained his LTh
degree from Codrington
College (UWI) in June
1984 and earned his mas-
ter's in education (school
counselling) from Kent
State University and the
College of the Bahamas in
December 2002.
He has served in New
Providence, Long Island,
North Andros and Exuma,
and presently serves as the
chaplain/counsellor at St
John's College in Nassau.
He also assists as the asso-
ciate priest of St Christo-
pher's Parish.
Father Scott has one
adopted son, Cleveland;
daughter-in-law, Andrea
and granddaughter, Cle-
andra.


Churchots


EAST ST GOSPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class, 11
am Morning Celebration, 7
pm Communion Service, 8 pm
- 'Jesus, the Light of World'
Radio Programme on ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Midweek
Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Conquerors
for Christ Club (Boys & Girls
Club), 8 pm East Street Youth
Fellowship Meeting
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

PARISH CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity-
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call


(242)-328-8677 or visit our web-
site:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the 11
am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST HOLINESS

THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship,. 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pmi -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants.
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service


Violence (From page iC)


this time the woman was dead.
Unfortunately, said Rev
Josey, such scenarios are all
too common.
It was after looking at cases
like this one, and considering
local domestic violence statis-
tics from previous years, that
he decided to host the confer-
ence.
In an interview with Tribune
Religion, Rev Josey said: "I felt
as if it was not anything that
could be left to the police
alone. Having worked in the
court system, I know that the
church has a role to play in all
of this. So this is where the
conference came in."
While Rev Josey believes
that the church (in general) is
aware of domestic violence in
its community, hie says that its
approach may not be the most
effective.
According to the pastor, for
many decades the church's
advice to abuse victims has
simply been: "Go and pray.
The Lord will make a way
somehow."
"So you have people who
got into the habit or took
everything, so much so that
they began to believe these
things like, 'weeping may
endure for a night, but joy
cometh in the morning', 'God


wouldn't put more on you than
you can bear', and stuff like,
'no cross no crown'," the pas-
tor adds.
But the issue does not seem
to be that these scriptures are
incorrect. The real issue, says
Rev Josey, is that there are a
lot of persons in the church
who misquote scripture, which
helps to keep victims of abuse
under the "subjection" of one
who "twists" the scripture to
his (or her) advantage.
"You have a lot of people
saying what the Word says, but
(they are) not mindful of the
context or what it means," says
Rev Josey.
"Remember that this whole
domestic violence thing is
about power, so for church
people, if you use the Word to
get them into subjection the
abuse comes in another fash-
ion."
According to the pastor, one
of the issues that has perpetu-
ated domestic violence is that
the church may be placing its
obligation to preserve marriage
above its obligation to preserve
human life.
He explains: "The church
wanted to keep marriages
together and it would seem to
be a failure if its counselling
was directed in a position


where you knew that this cou-
ple would not make it together
and someone would possibly
be injured.
"But for the sake of keep-
ing the marriage together, we
counsel against that. We tell
them, 'chile' endure, chile' just
pray'.
"But we have to reach a


service, "marriage is a
covenant but with abuse that
covenant has been broken".
Rev Josey says that today's
church counsellors must be
bold enough to help persons
face issues realistically.
"While we want to save the
marriage we also want to save
the life. If there is a danger that


"I felt as if it was not anything

that could be left to the police

alone. Having worked in the

court system, I know that the

church has a role to play in all

of this. So this is where the

conference came in."
Rev Arnold Josey


stage now, where we have to
make the big decisions if we
want to counsel people."
Making the big decision to
"get out" of an abusive rela-
tionship, says the pastor, is the
message he wants to send a
21st century way of thinking.
"Think of it like this," he
told Tribune Religion after a


a life could be lost, a limb
could be lost, someone could
be maimed, children could be
injured, it is better to get out of
there," he warns.
"So make the big decision.
You've got to say that this rela-
tionship is not working. I'm
gonna be injured or I'm gonna
injure someone else. And you


know that's time for you to
move on. And you know that
you have to make the position
without any guilt, understand-
ing that I am doing this for
myself and for my children,"
the pastor adds.
ASP Elaine told Tribune
Religion that she sees "a num-
ber" of domestic violence vic-
tims coming to the police on a
daily basis in New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands.
She estimates that 80 to 90
per cent of domestic calls come
from female victims that have
been physically abused. But in
the case of men, most of the
abuse is emotional.
While ASP Sands noted that
some abusers are acting out
behaviour that they were
exposed to in their childhood,
some abusers cite substance
abuse, anger or the fact that
their partner had multiple rela-
tionships, as reasons why they
lash out in a violent way.
But she noted that none of
these reasons or excuses is
justifiable.
Said the officer: "I want per-
sons to know that even when
your mate commits an infrac-
tion within the relationship, it
is a moral issue. It is not a crim-
inal act, so you don't have the
right to use force against that


person, to take up a weapon
and blow that person's brains
out. You don't have that right.
Everyone has their constitu-
tional right, their God-given
right to be free from violence."
Though he does encourage
an abuse victim to leave the
situation, Rev Josey says that
victims should also let the
abuser know that he needs to
get help.
"One of (the abuser's) traits
is that he always comes back,
saying he is sorry and blaming
everyone else for his actions.
And even after he goes and
gets help and comes back, you
don't accept him just because
he comes back and says he's
changed.
"The Bible tells us, bring
forth fruit meet for repentance.
You gatta show some signs.
Trust has got to be re-estab-
lished."
Some abuse victims make
the mistake of believing that
healing comes only from seeing
the abuser punished for his
actions. This is the attitude that
may lead some women to harm
that abuser. But according to
Rev Josey, that woman's
responsibility is first, to look
after her own salvation, her
own freedom, and to trust in
God.


we are and then He equips us for the work He
calls us to do. Remember, whom God calls, He
also equips. So don't write yourself off as being
unworthy of a call by God. God can use you!
And just as Jesus called ordinary persons to be
His apostles and gave them extraordinary work
to do, He calls each one of us. We can't do
everything, but we can do something. And Jesus
knows best what He wants us to do.
In the busyness of our lives, we too have to
stop and listen to what God is calling us to do.
He sent His Son for a special ministry; Jesus
sent His apostles out to continue His ministry;
and He calls each one of us for the same ministry
today. What is He calling you to do? Is He call-
ing you to do something special? Your response
to His call should be like His response to His
Father's call. WWJD? He called St Barnabas,
and he proved faithful to his call. Would you
do the same, if you could? Would you?

Father James Moultrie is the Rector of St
Matthew's Anglican Parish.


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







I I II IIIIL L1JRIG1-


The 36th Nassau Brownie Pack
and Girl Guide Company at
St George's Anglican Parish
celebrated its 25th anniver-
sary with a special church ser-
vice.
June 9 marked the official anniversary
day, and on Sunday, June 12 the 36th com-
pany attended a 6.30pm service of thanks-
giving. The keynote speaker was Rev Beryl
Higgs.
In keeping with the theme for the week-
end, "Back to Guiding, Back to St
George's", alumni of the groups joined
present guides in a campfire and wiener
roast at the Girl Guides Campsite on Fri-
day night, June 10.
Alumni, guides, brownies and sunflowers
participated in the special service, which
was attended by former leaders and district
commissioners, the chief commissioner
and 15th Bahamas Scouts.
Louise Barry, Guide Leader for the 25
years, paid tribute to Canon Dudley Stra-
chan, the former rector who initially
requested a Girl Guides group, Rev Higgs,
who as Guide Commissioner performed
the first enrollment; and Cleomi Parker,


who has been a supportive parent for the
25 years. Her four daughters and a grand-
daughter are active members of the groups.
Our photos show the past and present


guides from the 36th company and Girls
Guides leaders.
(Photos by: St George's Communica-
tions Ministry)


'When the



master comes'


Celebrating





25 years


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

ONE week before Father's
Day, Pastor Dwayne Johnson
delivered the sermon at his
father's funeral service at St
Mark's Methodist Church in
Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera.
He described it as his most
difficult sermon.
"I have been pastor for 15
years, preached at many funer-
als, comforted a lot of families
at my church in Daytona
Beach, Florida, but never
dreamed that I would have to
do it for my own Daddy's
death.
"But Job said the Lord gave
and the Lord take away," he
said, his eyes filled with tears
and his voice quivering.
The theme of his sermon,
"When the master comes",
was based on the story of
Lazarus, a sick man.
The sisters of Lazarus sent a
message to Jesus to tell him that
their brother, his friend, was
sick. But Jesus did not appear
and Lazarus died, "and still no
Jesus".
"By this time Martha and
Mary were getting upset. That's
how it is on some occasions.
We're sick or in trouble and we
call onJesus but still we get no
answer. Our faith tells us that
when the Master comes every-
thing will be all right," said the
pastor.
Pastor Johnson said that his
father was a good father, not a
perfect one, but one who pro-
vided for his family. "Mom, it's
going to be all right, weeping
may endure for a night but joy
will come in the morning."
Going back to the story of
Lazarus, Pastor Johnson said
that the sick man had been
dead for. a few days and there
was still no sight of Jesus.
By this time, people in the
town had started making fun of
Mary and Martha. "So it us
with us," said Pastor Johnson.
"We are faced with challenges
and our faith begins to waver.
But when the Master comes we
will understand more clearly
our role and our purpose.
"My youngest son Caleb said


'The way we were'


* By REV ANGELA
BOSFIELD PALACIOUS

HOLY scripture provides us
with an excellent picture of our
potential for transformation.
The choice is always ours to
share in the vision or follow
our own agendas.
In Romans 5:6-11 NRSV, we
are described as: "weak",
"ungodly" "sinners" who are
"enemies" of God. The same
passage emphasises that: "God
proves his love for us" by sav-
ing us and reconciling us to
God until we can "even boast
in God through our Lord Jesus
Christ, through whom we have
now received reconciliation"
(v.11 NRSV). Our low self-
esteem is restored by God's
grace to a self-image of the
saved and the justified.
Can you boast in the Lord?
The love which was extended
to the Hebrew slaves is now
available to all who will
respond to God's call to salva-
tion. They had been reminded
that obedience was to be their
gift back to God who had cho-
sen them to serve with holi-
ness: "You have seen what I
did to the Egyptians, and how I
bore you on eagle's wings and
brought you to myself. Now
therefore if you obey my voice
and keep my covenant, you
shall be my treasured posses-
sion out of all the peoples.. .you
shall be for me a priestly king-
dom and a holy nation" (Ex.
4-6 NRSV).
Is this how you see yourself?

Preaching

The ministry of preaching,
teaching and healing that our
Lord faithfully pursued is
intended to be our life work as
well in varying degrees. The
disciples are sent out to do
their "ministry practice" for the
time when they will lead the
church under the power of the
Holy Spirit and move from
learners to authority figures as
apostles: "Cure the sick, raise
the dead, cleanse the lepers,
cast out demons" (Matt 10:8).
Are you engaged in life-chang-
ing ministry of some sort?
The Anglican West-Indian
Prayer Book contains the fol-
lowing prayer: "Keep, 0 Lord,
your household the Church in


MEDITATION


* REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS


your steadfast faith and love
that through your grace we
may proclaim your truth with
boldness, and minister your jus-
tice with compassion; for the
sake of our Saviour Jesus
Christ, who lives and reigns
with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.
Amen." What if each one of


us who are supposed to be
members of the Church were
to pray this and live this every
day? What a difference there
would be in so many people's
lives.

Changed

If you are indifferent, non-
committal, inactive, for any
reason, why not consider that
for Jesus' sake you will allow
yourself to be changed on the
inside? Let this be the way you
were, and present yourself to
God for transformation into
the person that God knows
that you can be. Consider what
it means to be a "treasured
possession", a "priestly king-
dom", a "holy nation".
What would have to be dif-
ferent in the way we conduct
our business affairs, the activi-
ties offered to our visitors, the
quality of our marriages and
family life, and general life-
style? Are you ready to start
the ball of renewed spirituality
rolling?


E5nE^B^Swi~rwTESENTMS^n^^



"PRAISEHI0NHEHIHSEm



















S. -^^^^^^
ga m W.
An


Both Grade 11 prefects are currently attending

the Global Young Leaders Conference in

Washington D.C. this week on scholarship

awards.


xN\ '


Mt. Carmel
Preparatory Academy


to me one day at the dinner
table, 'Daddy I am saved.' How
do you know you are saved? I
asked him. 'Well', said Caleb, 'I
asked Jesus to come into my
heart, so Daddy I know I am
saved, and Daddy is Gramps
saved, because if he is not saved
he is going to hell.' I looked at
my son and said Caleb, my
Daddy is going to heaven.
'How do you know that', Caleb
asked. Caleb, Gramps is saved;
I was there when he asked
Jesus to come into his heart, so
Daddy has gone to heaven."
Where is Jesus when you
need him? That was the ques-
tion Lazarus" sisters must have
asked themselves over and over
again, said Pastor Johnson.
"Death has a way of shaking
up one's faith, it brings tears to
your eyes, brings us a sense of
loss and grief. But when the
Master comes, it will be OK,"
he said.
"The Master will give us new
bodies, sickness will pass away
and be no more. Cancer may
eat the body, but it will not eat
the soul because the soul will
go to be with the Master."
Pastor Johnson recalled that
as a boy his mother would ask
her children to gather around
the bed, to pray for their father.
"We would all pray, asking
the Lord to save Daddy! Lord
save Daddy! Lord save Daddy!
I am so happy my mother's
prayers were answered and my
Daddy got saved, so now he is
with the Lord. "We do not
know when we are going to die,
church, but we will all die so
we must prepare for that time.
When the Master comes He
will break the hold of death,"
said Pastor Johnson.
When Jesus finally arrived in
the Town of Bethany, near
Jerusalem, Mary and Martha
said to Him, 'Lord if you had
been here our brother would
not have died'. Jesus assured
them that Lazarus would be
raised up, but the sisters did not
understand.
Jesus called Lazarus from the
grave and when he came out
Jesus said to the sisters, "untie
him and let him go free".


I I


efi~-Ap to okfm





.PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


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See NextWeek's Page For More Highlights!


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005


I nc- I MIDUoiC






TH e TRIUN IETHU RSDA I, E1,20,P E7


In The Tribune's


Publication date: June 2
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THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE


....................... ................. .......................................................................


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