Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00134
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: June 15, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00134
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"START YOUR
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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.167


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


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Christie receives

favourable

medical report


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
and KARIN HERIG
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie will return to work in
three months which will coin-
cide with the reopenifig of the
House of Assembly after it
returns from its summer recess,
Mr Christie's doctors told The
Tribune.
Mr Christie, after receiving a
favourable medical report at the
world-renowned Johns Hopkins
Hospital, told The Tribune yes-
terday that he will be back to
work soon.
During these three months,
however, Mr Christie will work
for a half day. His working
hours will then be increased to a
three quarter day and then a
full day which will be no longer
than eight to 10 hours.
The prime minister was
attended by the hospital's top
cardiologist, neurologist,
orthopaedic and ear, nose and
throat specialist who all
described Mr Christie's recov-
ery as stellar.
The doctors at the hospital
performed an echocardiogram
when a probe was lowered
down the prime minister's
throat to examine his heart
through his stomach wall. This
process was different from the
one conducted in New Provi-
dence when the examination
was done through the chest.
The investigation confirmed
that there was no holes in Mr
Christie's heart.


Now the only test results
pending are the results of an
investigation to determine if Mr
Christie has a tendency to
develop blood clots.
Heart specialist Dr Conville
Brown, who with the prime.
mini'str's personal physician,
Dr Perry Gomez, accompanied
Mr Christie to Johns Hopkins,
told The Tribune that they
expect the investigation to bring
up negative results as the clots
would have appeared "long
before the age of 61."
However, doctors are not tak-
ing any chances. The prime
minister is expected to continue
his rehabilitation for another
six to 12 weeks.
On arrival at Nassau Inter-
national Airport aboard a pri-
vate aircraft yesterday from
Baltimore, the prime minister
was taken by government offi-
cials to his home, where his
recuperation will continue.
"I am doing exceptionally
well and hope to be at work
soon," he told The Tribune on
arrival at the airport last night.
Two other things were
accomplished during Mr
Christie's visit. He was told by
doctors that he would not need
surgery for his chronic knee and
sinus problems.
Also, the Princess Margaret
Hospital may soon benefit from
a partnership with John Hop-
kins Hospital when some of that
SEE page 10


Tourists

expected

to spend

$2bn in

Bahamas
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
TOURISTS are expected t _.
spend more than $2 billion in
the Bahamas in 2005, a first in
the history of the country.
Addressing parliament dur-
ing the 2005/2006 budget
debate, Minister of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe yesterday for
the first time revealed that had
it not been for Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne last year,
the Bahamas would have
already exceeded this record
number in visitor spending in
2004.
Mr Wilchcombe said that in
SEE page 10



Supreme'

'Cur bck


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie arrives back in Nassau last night.
Looking on is Acting Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt.
(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)


I I''EBy KILAH ROLE
SBy CARA BRENNEN Tribune Staff Reporter
Tribune Staff
Reporter _GOVERNMENT, which
Iu shut down a cancer centre
A MAN was clinging to after it was condemned as
life yesterday after being an imminent threat to public
knocked down by a dump safety, has been vindicated
truck on JFK Drive. for its decision after a four-
When The Tribune year court battle.
arrived at the scene, the The management team of
victim's tennis shoes and the Bahamas Comprehen-
his white baseball cap with sive Cancer Centre claimed
NY embroidered on it had that when government
been flung some distance forced them to close the
Apart. centre, it violated a
Witnesses said that e
before the now uncon- $450,000-a-year contract
before the now uncon-i which it had to provide
scious man was hit, he was radiotherapy services to
exhibiting strange behav- public patients with cancer.
iour, such as walking back- The Supreme Court deci-
wards in the road. He has hesion sided with the gCourt decivern-
not been identified Sby sion sided with the govern-
SEE page 10 SEE page 10



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Plane crashes on the

way to Abaco from US


Share your
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.-


news

. S~ e. \


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
A DC-3 CARGO plane
headed to Marsh Harbour
Abaco crashed on Monday
shortly after lifting off near the
Fort Lauderdale Executive
Airport.
According to the Associat-
ed Press, the crew on board
the World War II-era aircraft
crash-landed on a Fort Laud-
erdale road.
All three people on board
survived the emergency land-
ing. Two men on the ground
were hurt.
Pilot Charles Riggs, co-pilot
Charles Wirt and passenger
Hector Espinoza were all in
faii condition late Monday. '
Assistant chief of operations


for the Ft Lauderdale fire res-
cue services reported that one
of the two engines caught on
fire before the plane was
forced to make the crash land-
ing.
The crash caused extensive
damage to the surrounding
area, uprooting trees and hurl-
ing branches into nearby auto-
mobiles, houses and apart-
ments.
This is the second cargo
plane to crash en route to the
Bahamas in recent months.
A twin-engine Convair
crashed into a lake north-east
of Miami in December of last
year.
The pilot and co-pilot
on that flight made it to
safety., ..


.E.


SUMMES SI BGNJN18


FiMALL 'GUSTm 20TH


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005








THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 20TyS


Defence Force apprehends

more illegal immigrants


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Royal Bahamas Defence
Force's harbour patrol unit yesterday
t-ported the capture of 14 undocu-
mented Haitian nationals attempting
to make landfall in the country late
Monday night.
While on routine patrol at 9pm, the
HMBS P-110 spotted an 18-foot out-
board vessel in the waters just between
Athol Island and Paradise Island in an
area known as the "narrows".
Boarded
The Bahamas-registered vessel, which
was operating without any running
lights, was stopped and boarded by
Defence Force marines.
A search of the vessel uncovered the
14 undocumented male immigrants who
have since been transported to the
:Carmicheal Detention Centre for pro-
cessing.


The vessel was being piloted by a
Bahamian male, who was turned over
to police officials for further investiga-
tions.
So far for the year, there have
been more than 1,989 illegal
immigrants deported from the
country at a cost of over $280,000 dol-
lars.
Flights
The Department of Immigration has
started a new repatriation programme
in which illegal Haitian immigrants are
placed on commuter flights back to
Haiti at $200 a seat, instead of charter-
ing Bahamasair flights for $20,000 a
flight.
Assistant director of Immigration
William Pratt said: "Sometimes we get
specials of like $150 a seat, but we
had to use a Bahamasair flight today as
we were expatriating 114 Haitians
today.
"So that's $20,000 right there."


Call for


FNM


to


take stronger




stance on LNG


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
ACTIVE local environmen-
talist Sam Duncombe is calling
on the official opposition FNM
party to take a stronger stance
on the controversial topic of liq-
uefied natural gas (LNG).
Mrs Duncombe has been
campaigning for months against
proposed LNG projects in the
Bahamas, and in particular
against one intended for Ocean
Cay in the Bimini chain of
islands by AES Ocean LNG
Limited.
The US Fortune 250 compa-
ny is proposing to build a 40-
mile submerged pipeline from
Ocean Cay to South Florida, to
provide the state with much
needed natural gas.
Recently, the utilities compa-
ny Florida Power and Light
(FPL) has canceled its request
for proposals (RFP) for lique-
fied natural gas to supply its 4.2
million customers in Florida.
Mrs Duncombe said yester-
day that it is high time that AES
follow FPL's example and "go
back to where they come from."
"It's time for AES to see that
a large number of people don't


Police search

after stabbing
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
GRAND Bahama Police
are searching for Ezrin
Green, also known as "EJ",
of Hanna Hill, for question-
ing in connection with the
stabbing death of Bobby
Penn on Sunday at Eight
Mile Rock.
Chief Superintendent of
Police Basil Rahming is urg-
ing anyone with information
on Green's whereabouts to
call the police crime hotline
at 352-1919.
Penn, 36, was stabbed
around 9.58pm at Jack
Smith Corner in Hanna Hill,
Eight Mile Rock.
His brother Deno Smith
of Andros Town alerted the
police.
It is believed that Penn,
who lived in Abaco, was vis-
iting his brother.
According to reports,
Penn was involved in an
altercation with another
man a few weeks ago.
Police believe that this
may have led to the stab-
bing.
Penn's death is the ninth
murder for the year on
Grand Bahama.




TRPIA


Environmentalist speaks out


want them here, and they
should gracefully bow out. The
government has done a horri-
ble job putting their cards on
the table talking about doing
things according to US stan-
dards.
"A&far as Iami'aware, i don't
think that AES has looked any-
where in Florida for this pro-
ject. They should do the hon-
ourable thing and put it in their
own country. Not ours," she
said.
Despite FPL's decision to dis-
continue its immediate interests
in the Bahamas, Mrs Dun-


combe said there is no cause for
celebration just yet.
"I don't want people to think
that because FPL made that
statement that LNG is on its
way out totally. Because AES
doesn't seem like they
know how to find their.way
home.
"A lot of people have been
coming to me saying, 'Oh
you've won' but that is not the
case. What we need is for the
FNM to make a firm stance on
this issue instead of sitting on
the fence.
"They need to get up and say


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
AN EXTRADITION hearing is underway
in the Magistrate's Court for a Bahamian
mother accused of abducting her own daugh-
ter from the court ordered custody of the
child's father in Pennsylvania.
The mother, 31, of Nassau, is accused of
taking her 11-year-old daughter out of the
jurisdiction of the court after visiting the child
at the father's residence in West Hempfield,
Pennsylvania in January, 2002. It is alleged
that she brought her daughter to Nassau.
The court had granted the father legal cus-
tody of the child, giving the mother visita-
tion rights.
Last week the father enjoyed his first ray of
hope after a 10-month struggle to bring his
daughter back to her Pennsylvania home
from the Bahamas.


if they are either for, or against
the issue," she said.
Mrs Duncombe made a spe-
cial mention of Minister of
Trade and Industry Leslie
Miller, who she claims is
adamantly pushing for LNG
facilities in the-Bahamas. -
"This is not a racial issue like
Mr Miller is trying to make it.
This isn't a black thing, or a
white thing. This is a green
thing.
"This is about our country,
our air, water, and the environ-
ment. They must all be protect-
ed," she said.


According to the Intelligencer Journal, the
father spent an hour with his daughter during
a supervised visit on June 6 in a Nassau hotel.
The Pennsylvania newspaper said it was
"the longest amount of time he had spent
with his daughter in three-and-a-half years."
Optimistic
The father and his wife returned to Penn-
sylvania from Nassau last Tuesday night opti-
mistic that the girl would be released to them
within the next few months.
Assistant Commissioner of Crime Regi-
nald Ferguson told The Tribune yesterday
that the mother was granted bail. He could
not confirm the bail figure up to press time.
He said, however, that neither the abduc-
tion incident nor subsequent meeting at the
Nassau hotel were investigated or supervised
by the Royal Bahamas Police Force.


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THE TRIBUNE


J 0
Extradtio hearig fo
Baama mother,


774







PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard. (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


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Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15TH day of JUNE, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.







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tion as a symbol of sovereignty
as the flag of the Bahamas, or
any other state in CARICOM,
has. Since 1983, when the
Bahamas became a member of
CARICOM, the nation's flag
has never been relegated to an
inferior or secondary position
to the non-political CARICOM
flag. Hence, there is no reason
to believe that, once the nation
signs the Revised Treaty of
Chaguaramas, this would
change. Finally, nothing in the
Revised Treaty calls for nations
to relegate their national flags to
a position secondary to the non-
political CARICOM flag."
So we have gone from "there
is no flag" to the fact that there
is a flag.
Therefore, who knows what
the Conference of the Heads of
Government, the Council for
Finance and Planning, the Com-
munities Legal Affairs Com-
mittee and the Committee of
Central Bank Governors have
in store for the Bahamas?
Particularly when these groups
meet in private without being
accountable to the electorate.
There are many other exam-
ples that have been raised in
other forums where the gov-
ernment's responses has been
somewhat less than transpar-
ent.
Working toward the unspo-
ken goal, Mr Mitchell's ever-
changing position on the
specifics of the treaty are remi-


EDITOR, The Tribune
Recently, my barber made
the critical observation that
there was no "exit accommoda-
tion" for a vehicle that may
break down while in moving
traffic on the new Harrold
Road. If a driver found himself
in trouble of any kind and had
to pull over to the side, it would
be impossible because there is
nowhere to go.
With regard to the bus sys-
tem, it is time to make some
permanent and innovative
changes: Wherever possible (eg
on Thompson Boulevard), the
Ministry of Works should carve
out bus platforms on the side
of the road, so that drivers dis-


niscent of the denials in the
book by Christopher Booker
and Richard North titled The
Great Deception The Secret
History of the European Union.
"...Their archetypal response
was outlined by The Times in
the summer of 2003, analysing
Britain's response to the pro-
posed constitution: 'It is at first
denied that any radical new
plan exists; it is then conceded
that it exists but ministers swear
blind that it is not even on the
political agenda; it is then noted
that it might well be on the
agenda but it is not a serious
proposition; it is later conceded
that it is a serious proposition,
but that it will never be imple-
mented; after that it is acknowl-
edged that it will be imple-
mented but in such a diluted
form that it could make no dif-
ference to the lives of ordinary
people; and at some point it is
finally recognised that it has
made such a difference, but is
was always known that it would
and voters were told so from
the outset.'"
While this relates to the EU,
we remain confident that this is
the model being followed in the
region and this is backed up by
recent calls from leaders in the
region for more political clout
to make the treaty work.
The rising tide of debate is
confirming the government's
boat is full of holes and sinking
fast. Their comments appear to
be no more than a charade.
We recommend life vests.
THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau
June 3 2005


EDITOR, The Tribune
THE opposition to the
Bahamas joining the CSME by
signing the Revised Treaty of
Chaguaramas is rising like the
tide.
The Nassau Institute, among
other concerned citizens and
groups, has raised numerous
questions, but what is most
interesting is what role CSME
committees like the Conference
of the Heads of Government,
the Council for Finance and
Planning, the Communities
Legal Affairs Committee and
the Committee of Central Bank
Governors will play, and what
wriggle room, if. any, the
Bahamas will have when nego-
tiating at these meetings.
A couple of examples.
The Minister of Foreign
Affairs denies that much will
change, but in response to the
Institute's "29 Questions" he
spends a lot of time noting that
the above CSME committees
will be making decisions on our
behalf, and that they do actu-
ally exist in the treaty. Not only
that, he denies we will be
required to change our laws in
one breath and goes on to state
that we will have to "har-
monise" our laws with those of
other member states.
For the record, the Oxford
dictionary says that to harmo-
nize is to "make consistent".
Presumably this means the
Bahamas will have to change
its laws to make them consis-
tent with what CSME directs?
In fact, the "Right of Estab-
lishment" concerns recently tak-
en up by the minister, were only
brought to the forefront after
the government circulated a
draft bill from the CARICOM
region regarding pharmacists
from that area being allowed to
open businesses here, and sug-
gesting that Bahamian pharma-
cists would have to return to
college. Yet all along, we have
been told there is nothing to
worry about.
Even our (admittedly
tongue-in-cheek) question
about whose flag would fly on
-top here. at home, the CSME
or the Bahamas, was met with
an adamant response at a meet-
ing in Abaco that "there is no
CSME flag".
Yet here is the minister's
response to that question in the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
website: "While there is a
CARICOM flag, it is purely
symbolic because CARICOM
is not a political union. The
CARICOM flag does not have
the same international recogni-


EDITOR, The Tribune
I WISH to add my voice to
the many in congratulating the
Hon. Cynthia "Mother" Pratt,
Deputy Prime Minister, Act-
ing Prime Minister, Minister
of National Security and
Member of Parliament for St.
Cecilia on a masterful or
should I say "mistressful" (in
the sense of skilful and pow-
erful) delivery of the 2005-
2006 Budget communication.
No fair-minded person could
deny that her presentation
was stately and flawless.
Political firsts are becom-
ing the norm for this dynamic
woman. She is truly a role
model for all of us, women,
men, girls and boys. While my
chest swells with pride at her
achievements, the widespread
reactions to them demonstrate
to me how much further we,
as women, still have to go to
achieve our inalienable right


to full equality by law and in
the human consciousness.
I felt certain that a male
DPM, thrown into a similar
situation of Acting Prime
Minister and carrying out the
same functions, short of being
an absolute disaster, would
not have evoked much per-
sonal comment.s
So, 30 years past the decade
of the 1970s and the heyday of
'the women's rights move-
ment, the challenges for
women continue.
I congratulate Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie and the PLP
for once again demonstrating
the security and commitment
to tearing down the barriers
to the growth and full partici-
pation of women in our
Bahamaland!
DR MADLENE
SAWYER-HILL
Nassau
May 27 2005


continue the practice of stop-
ping in the middle of the road
when picking up passengers.
Since bus stops are strategically
placed all along the streets of
New Providence, any driver
caught picking up passengers at
other than designated stops
should be penalized. .
I've often wondered why the
Ministry of Works never saw
the wisdom of cutting a straight
road from JF Kennedy Drive
to the brow of the hill at the
water works station at Prospect.
Having to manoeuvre the exist-
ing curve is dangerous enough.
FSM WILLIAMS
Nassau
May 21 2005


Pratt's delivery


is a credit to


women's rights


in the Bahamas


CSME issue





facing a





rising tide


Addressing road


safety problems


I


o


o o


.






WEDNISUAY, JUI'tl 1 ZUUo, rptu.-. #


THE TRIBUNE


Businesses pleased as the




government delays any




decision on CSME debate


0 By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIANS agitating for
Referendum on Free Trade
(BARF) say they are grateful
that the Bahamian public was
heeded on the issue of CSME. i al
At a press conference yester-
day, BARF asked the govern-
ment to make the issue part of
their platform for the next elec-
tion. en peonr
In Monday's session of the
House of Assembly, Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell TrY DENISE MAYCOCK qtioales bewh eits Or ntg-
announced that the Bahamas Tribu e Freeport tve which we ai ot
government has not signed on epovri clear," h id.
to the CSME, and does not pro-% I Con),ileyo Tih Tn-
pose to sign on before the next FREEPORT The bune on tuesday that there
general election. Freeportbusinessco unity are certain aspects of the
Co-chairman of BARF Fayne U FAYNE Thompsonis ete f ti r SIsuchatrieo
Thompson said that if the ment ha,defcricd signing op ertablihllclnt, whic iitl
CSME is going to be an elec- same energy given to the pro- able or appropriate for the gov- tothe Caribbean Single Ma.notclear and are of great con-
tion issue, it should be.. dealt motion of CSME should be giv- ernment of the Bahamas to sign k and Economyy chamber -
with openly. en to "revamp" the education on to any so-called trade Grand Bahaa Chamber bers.. ... .
"We ask them to take it to system, "so if the Bahamian arrangement, if the effect would of Coiiierce president Dr During his contribution to
Bahamian people as a part of people ever decide to join diminish our sovereignty and Dowell Coakley-said that the2002005 6TBudget debate
their mandate or platform. Say CSME they will be able to com- parliament. The CSME, WTO thr e is a t ned form onMonday. Foreign Affair
to the Bahamian people, 'elect pete with their Caribbean coun- and FTAA would do that," said education on the CSME and Minister Fred Mitchell
us and we will go to CSME'. terparts," said Mr Moss. Mr Moss. what it may.have to con- announced that government
Otherwise, we say to the good BARF said that now that the Said Mr Thompson: "They tribute to the continued hasnot signed on todthe
minister, leave it alone," said CSME issue has been resolved, have now abandoned CSME growth and development of CSME and does not propose
Mr Thompson. it will turn its attention the for now, but they are embark- the Biiahamias, to sign onbefore the nxt
His fellow chairman Paul World Trade Organisation ing on an educational pro- We are quite pleaseto general election.
Moss said that the government's (WTO). The group called on gramme. learn of the decision by\the Th CSME has been aa
bid to sign on to the CSME was the government to withdraw "There is no end to CSME. governmenii t to defer a ys.n. major issue of concernTfor
defeated because the public has from the WTO .until Bahami- The government intends to iig on to CSME becauscewe. ahamiansandparticularly
shown maturity in understand- ans have had their say on that bring the CSME issue back, if feel that while there ar.eisom'III foriseveral civicand political
ing the issues. matter as well. they win the next election," he Ibenefits to being apart IofItheIgroups who were' trongly
The group believes that the "It can no longer be accept- said. (CSME, there are also some opposed to the agreement
D1.. .. . .. . .. .. ... cv aid


'This is the only


decision the


government


could have made'


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"










AN t-N
-


- -~ -
*


S 4


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT businessman
Zhivargo Laing said the gov-
ernment's decision on the
CSME was "appropriate."
He said that far too many
people are confused on the
issue and troubled by what they
perceive are the implications of
CSME for the country.
. "They aren't satisfied that
even the reservations that gov-
ernment wishes to get would
sufficiently address their con-
cerns.
"In light of that, it makes
sense to stop, slow down and
provide for study and reflec-
tion on the issue and to see if
we cannot truly find the best
way of handling our co-opera-
tion with CARICOM going
forward.
"I think this is the only deci-
sion that government could
have made without injuring
itself or injuring society by
implications that it was unpre-
pared for," he said.
Mr Laing added however-
that he felt Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell's criti-
cism of those opposed to
CSME was inappropriate.
"I thought that he was acting
as someone who was hurt by
the fact that people did not
accept his will and his views,
and his way on this particular
matter and that's unfortunate.
"I think that he put those
who were expressing concerns
in a category that was demean-
ing and that ought not to be.
"He ought to appreciate that
there are people with differ-
ences of views on this matter.
That their motives are not
impure and that they have gen-
uine concerns for the nation
and have expressed those con-
cerns.
"And he ought to have taken
those on board and seen them
for what they are.


S.-ii7i;Fniie

U"s"'nt-o


WED., JUNE 15
2:00am Community Pg 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas@Sunrise
9:00 CMJ Club Zone
9:30 Mr. Ballooney B.
10:00 Cybernet
10:30 Treasure Attic
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:30 Immediate Response
1:00 Ethnic Health
1:30 Racing Stripes
2:00 Mr. Ballooney B.
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 Claude Alexander Jr.
3:30 J. Douglas Wiley
4:00 DeWayne Harvey &
Unrestrained Praise
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 52nd Annual National Family
Island Regatta Highlights
9:30 Bahamian Spirit: J. Burnside
10:00 Video Gospel
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Pg. 1540AM
NOE N T 3rsre
therihttomak lstmiut


NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Of the Shareholders and Agenda


Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of
Shareholders of Phoenix Four, Inc will be held on Tuesday,
June 28, 2005 at the main auditorium of the Fortis Bank, lo-
cated 1 rue de la Chancellerie in Brussels.
Registration will commence at 9:00 a.m. in anticipation of a
10:00 a.m. start. The agenda for the meeting is as follows:

AGENDA


Management Opening Statement
Financial Position of the Fund
Valued Redeemer Restructuring Proposal
Management Incentive Compensation Plan
Corporate Organizational Issues
Litigation Status and Strategy


Dated the 27 day of May 2005.

By order of the Board.
Khalila Dorsett
Secretary


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British police expert visits




to train on human rights


A SENIOR British police-
man has visited the Bahamas
to teach police trainers about
human rights and policing.
Amnesty International
worked with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force to bring
in Graham Dossett, a former
superintendent with the British
Police who now works as a spe-
cial consultant on human rights
and policing.
During his visit to Nassau,
Mr Dossett spoke with senior
police officers concerning
human rights and policing.
In particular he spoke on the
Universal Declaration of
Human Rights and the paral-
lels between this document and
the Bahamas Constitution and
the Code of Conduct of the
RBPF.
Mr Dossett, who served as
a police officer in the UK for
30 years, also spent four days at
the police college, where he
worked with Detective Robert
Sherman-Young and several
trainers and officers from indi-
vidual police stations.
His experience includes pub-
lic order work and the police
use of firearms, both as an
operative and commander.
Much of his service was
spent in traning related posi-
tions, including work as a train-
er and ultimately as the head of
the training branch.


Mr Dossett also has exten-
sive experience as a hostage
negotiator, a practitioner and a
high-level trainer.
He served as head of the
complaints and discipline
branch, which deals with com-
plaints about police officers
made by members of the pub-
lic, as well as with internal dis-
ciplinary inquires.
Since Dossett's retirement
from the police service, he has
earned a masters degree in
international human rights law
(LLM) at the Human Rights
Centre, University of Essex.
He also earned bachelors
degree (BA Hons) -in-poQlicy-
making and administration and
is a Fellow of the Chartered
Institute of Personnel and
Development (FCIPD).
The officers were given guid-
ance on the use of force and
firearms, professional and eth-
ical behaviour and proper
police methods for arrest and
detention.
They were also informed
about international law and
told to avoid torture in polic-
ing.
Amnesty International said
it is encouraged by the
response of the RBPF and that
it hopes force will review it's
training, policies and practices
to ensure they are fully human
rights compliant.


* GRAHAM Dossett speaks with Police trainers as the Royal Bahamas Police Force College


*Ir on' "Cl ig wM" o.vI Ia "asVO

S_ Copyrighted Material ...

-". Syndicated Content-. -- -


Available from Commercial News Providers"


U
-







U


- .Elm


- .-o
* .



- _- t .







4 -
-


- ~- -


Heartbreak as blaze



destroys family home


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
MEMBERS of an Eleuthera
family were picking up the
pieces of their lives yesterday
after losing their home of 25
years to an electrical fire.
Kareem St Jermaine, who
currently lives in New Provi-
dence, said that his six relatives
in James Cistern, Eleuthera
were left homeless by the blaze
which occurred around 10am
on Monday.


His mother Deborah John-
son and her husband Isaac,
along with his two sisters, one
niece and one brother were
being assisted the Methodist
Church on the island and were
now considering their next
move.
"From what I understand the
fire was caused by an electrical
shortage.
"They got a call yesterday
around 10am at work that the
house was on' fire," said Mr St
Jermaine.


Mr St Jermaine idespecially
concerned about one of his sis-
ters, who suffered burns on her
leg after attempting to put out
the fire.
"I am very worried about
them all and it's heartbreaking
to know that my family lost
their home and I will be hoping
that things get better.
"It is not only the value of
the house and the things inside
- there are just some important
things that cannot be replaced,"
he said.


Assistant Manager/Administration

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is seeking a suitably qualified
individual to fill the vacant position of Assistant Manager/Administration.

The successful candidate will have a high level of self-motivation, and a
minimum of seven years responsible experience in administrative and
personnel functions including lead supervisory and records management.
The successful candidate must also be proficient with Microsoft Office
applications, spreadsheets and data base management.

Applicants must have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree in Business,
Personnel Administration or equivalenrffrom a leading institution.

The PUC offers a very attractive salary and benefits package and excellent
opportunities for further development. Starting salary will be commensurate
with relevant experience. Applications should be delivered no later than
23 June, 2005 to the:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue,
Nassau Bahamas, Fax No. (242)323-7288
e-mail: puc@pucbahamas.gov.bs
4_


We are looking for people who:
Know what it means to give outstanding customer service
* Have an interest in Food and Beverage sales and management
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All interested applicants should bring in person to John Bull Business Centre, Robinson
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documents:

Resume, passport picture, copy of passport, copy of NIB card and, job references.





Q Shell Bahamas Limited



PUBLIC TENDER INVITATION

Shell Bahamas Limited is pleased to invite interested persons to submit bid tenders
on the LPG Bulk vehicle as listed below. Shell reserves the right to accept, and or
reject any and or all submissions.

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- -


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


. qa


- f


THE TRIBUNE







T H E T IB U N W E D N S D A Y J U N E 15,.00 5, .A G E.
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I ; Syndicated Content

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'Two-step process'

for downsizing dump


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
ACCORDING to Health
'parliamentary secretary Ron
Pinder, following the recom-
mendations of two environ-
mental consulting firms, the
government has initiated a
two-step process for downsiz-
ing the Harrold Road dump.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Pinder said that
it took about three months to
complete the first step, which
involved excavating and flood-
ing existing smoke pockets at
the site.
This process, he said, came
under the recommendations
of SABLE Bahamas Limited
and the US-based Backalamar
firm.
"To date we are just about
95 per cent complete with that
process," Pinder said.
He said the government is
also following recommenda-
tions to reduce, reuse and
recycle all of the existing waste
at the site.


According to Mr Pinder, the
only way to eliminate the
reoccurrence of fires at the
sight in the long term is to dis-
pose of the waste material that
fuels them.
"We will take all of the
excavated material, separate
the various elements, run
them through a grinder, and
therefore reduce the overall
size of the site itself," he said.
Mr Pinder said that that
process would take about two
years to complete.
He said the government has
already begun searching for a
company to undertake the
process.
"We have several active
proposals before the govern-
ment right now and I.think
there are at least two compa-
nies in the forefront who
demonstrate the expertise and
have shown that they
have they have the necessary
resources to undertake
the process," Mr Pinder
said.


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Bahamas to open


embassy in Cuba

* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION SERVICES
FOREIGN Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell has announced
that the Bahamas' Embassy in Havana, Cuba, will be opened
within the next two months.
"The plans are quite advanced, with the Ministry of Works
having approved the design of the building in the Cuban cap-
ital and works have begun," Mr Mitchell told the House of
Assembly on Monday during debate on the 2005/2006 bud-
get.
The minister said that Cuba is one of the Bahamas' mar-
itime neighbours, and that some 20,000 or more Bahamians
travel to Cuba every year.
"There is considerable demand for consular and diplomatic
services. The Embassy is expected to meet that demand," lie
said.
Carlton Wright, undersecretary at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, has been named to head the
Embassy.
Cuba has already upgraded its Consulate in Nassau to an
Embassy and appointed former Consul General Felix Wil-
son Gonzalez to the post of Charge d'Affaires.


- I I, I II


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 7


* -















Fascinating insight into wartime Nassau


* BOOK REVIEW
A NEW book by a leading
authority on porcelain and her-
aldry offers tantalising glimpses
of wartime Nassau, and rekin-
dles memories of an English
prep school which made the
Bahamas its home during the
early 1940s.
The Unforgiving Minute by
David Sanctuary Howard, pub-
lished by The Memoir Club,
captures the mood and atmos-
phere of colonial Nassau at a
time when the free world was
under siege.
Bahamians of a certain age
and anyone else with an interest
in this country's colonial past -
will find it an enlightening read,
especially as it relates to some
of the leading characters of the
day.
This was in some respects a
golden period in Bahamas his-
tory, for the Windsors then
still seen by many as a gilded
pair, in spite of the traumas of
abdication were installed in
Government House, and inter-
nationally renowned figures like
Sir Harry Oakes and Axel Wen-
ner-Gren were very much part
of the city scene.
Mr Howard, who died in
March at the age of 77, viewed
the Nassau of the early 1940s
from a schoolboy's perspective;
and offers fascinating vignettes
of wartime life here in a 464-
page book covering his varied
career as academic, merchant,
publisher and avowed lover of
beautiful objects.
Much of the book deals with
his enthusiasm for Chinese
porcelain, his love of heraldry,
and his life as a traveller and
lecturer, but for Bahamians its
appeal lies primarily in its
account of Belmont School and
its wartime evacuation to a large
colonial-style building in Bay
Street.

Inspiration

Only part of the school was
uprooted from war-threatened
England and transplanted in
Nassau, but for those children
involved, the experience vwas to
prove memorable and charac-
ter-forming, especially as they


were torn apart from their fam-
ilies for three years or more. In
fact, Sir Harry Oakes was the
inspiration for Belmont's
upheaval, for he was an
acquaintance of the school's
headmaster Max Burr and
offered him spacious accom-
modation 4,000 miles away
from the threat of Hitler's
bombs.
The building was Clerihew
House on Nassau's waterfront,
and it was granted free to those
brave enough to risk the perils
of an Atlantic crossing in those
uncertain days when U-boats
were the scourge of trans-ocean
convoys.
Some fearful parents opted
out, but enough agreed to the
scheme to make "Belmont
Bahamas" a reality, and the
children and teachers set out on
August 11, 1940, from Liver-
pool aboard the merchant ship
Orduna.
From the murky greyness of
the Mersey, the ageing vessel -
used in peacetime on the South
American run headed south-
west towards the sun, the chil-
dren aboard countering their
home-sickness with eager antic-


ipation of a colourful new life
ahead of them.
After initial U-boat diffic4-
ties several vessels from
Orduna's convoy were lost in
torpedo attacks the flotilla
enjoyed a relatively easy ride
to Bermuda, then on to Nassau,
Mr Howard recalls vividly the
morning of August 30, as the
ship dropped anchor near the
lighthouse at the mouth of Nas-
sau harbour.
"In those days, the larger
cruise liners always: anchored
off the Bar because the chan-
nel to the main pier in the har-


bour was sometimes too shal-
low, in spite of the busy and
almost continuous work of the
harbour dredger the Lucaya -
which for the next three and a
half years we saw almost daily
as she ploughed up and down
the harbour with piles of sand
which I think we were told
was off-loaded at sea among the
islands."
Only two weeks before, the
Duke and Duchess of Windsor
had landed to much greater
fanfare as they began their
wartime "exile" as governor
and his lady of this remote land
far from the salons of Europe
where they had once held
court.
Mr Howard recalls: "Nassau
was, it seemed to us, a land of
kind-hearted ladies who met us
at the gangway and over-
whelmed us with talk of swim-
ming from their beachside
homes and coming to tea.
"I remember Mrs Mary
Moseley (owner of the Nassau
Guardian), Mrs Solomon, Mrs
Burnside and Mrs Sands in par-
ticular, and we were later treat-
ed to dream-like tea parties at
their homes so that the autum-


nal world of England tem-
porarily faded almost out of
sight as the evacuees were
spoiled and we adapted quickly
to life in Nassau in particular
being made to wear large straw
hats for fear of getting sun-
burn."
Like most prep schools of
the day, Belmont retained sev-
eral Victorian touches, and
pupils were forbidden to eat
ice-cream in the streets or walk
more than two.abreast on the.,
pavements. -
Strict bedtimes were kept,
with rigid discipline the firm


foundation on which the estab-
lishment flourished.
"Clerihew House was a tall,
four-storied, 18th century house'-
with broad verandahs, the front
door on the first-floor verandah
and a wide lawn leading to the
harbour wall, which looked out
on the pier where we had land-
ed," he recalls.
"The rooms were tall and a


winding staircase led to bed-
rooms on the upper floors and a
basement at garden level below.
This was quickly converted into
two top floors of dormitories, a
first floor of dining room and
'kitchen and all the lower floors
into classrooms."

Parties

There were parties on Hog
Island (now Paradise) "as guests
of Mr Mauro, who owned the
principal travel agency in Nas-
sau" and at Cable Beach where
the host was noted traveller
Arthur S Vernay, a golfing part-
ner of the Duke.
In those days, the only big
house on Hog Island was owned
by Wenner-Gren, though a
wooden beach hut graced Par-
adise Beach. Otherwise, the
island was largely undeveloped,
with no road link to Nassau. In
the harbour, 'conchers' and
'spongers' plied their trade
yards from the bustle of Bay
Street.
When Belmont's lessons got
underway in September, 1940,
local teaching talent was
employed, with radio announc-
er Kenneth Brown, Father
Holmes, Baroness Trolle of
Sweden and Mrs Marcelle
Goldsmith (mother of retail.
tycoon Sir Jimmy Goldsmith,
for a time a pupil at the school)f


all weighing in to help out.
Tommy Sopwith, son of the
famous aircraft designer, was
also among the students.

Exiled

The Easter term of 1941 was
to start with 36 boys and 16
girls, but the numbers swelled


by the end of the year, with chil-
dren of exiled British families
joining "locals" like Norman
Solomon, later to be a promi-
nent businessman and politi-
cian, on the roll.
The Cathedral choir soon
enlisted Belmont choristers and
every week "a crocodile of Bel-
mont boys" could be seen on
its way to choir practice
through the quaint streets of
Nassau.
With the governor calling reg-
ularly at the school, and reading
lessons at cathedral services, the
exiled students must have felt
privileged indeed to be enjoying
such royal patronage, especial-
ly as the Duke was then one of
the most famous personalities
on earth.
To reassure families back in
Britain, a short film was made
of school life, with each pupil
interviewed for the purpose.
Parents back home marvelled
at the colourful lives their chil-
dren were leading.
Beach days at Old Fort and at
private homes on Cable Beach
added to the allure of the
Bahamas of the day, and the
annual school play provided a
dramatic interlude for all.
Mr Howard, a boy of 12 at
the time, also had vivid recol-
lections of the devastating fire
which destroyed and damaged
many downtown buildings,
including the old Island Book-


shop, from which he managed
to buy 40 treasured volumes.
And during his sojourn, Nas-
sau was hit by one of the most
dramatic events in its history -
the sensational murder of Sir
Harry Oakes in July,1943.
This, and the subsequent tri-
al of his son-in-law, Count
Alfred de Marigny, knocked
even the war itself off the front
pages of the day.
All in all, however, the
Bahamas provided rich memo-
ries for the Belmont students,
and all those still alive who
knew them will find much to
interest them in these pages.
Mr Howard went on to
attend Stowe, serve in Palestine
with the Coldstream Guards,
and spend 25 years in industry,
mostly in textiles and publish-
ing.
His work took him to more
than 70 countries.
Later still, he was to own an
antiques gallery in London's
Mayfair and write books about
porcelain, which remained one
of his abiding passions.
In the past 30 years he lec-
tured widely in the United
States and became a respected
authority on heraldry.
Throughout, he prided him-
self on retaining the common
touch, a man guided by Rud-
yard Kipling's famous poem If,
from which the title of this book
is taken.
However, it is clear that those
early days in Nassau, and sub-
sequent visits to the Bahamas,
gave Mr Howard a very special
affection for this country, and
his writing adds some valuable
extra touches to recollections
of its recent history.

The Unforgiving Minute by
David Sanctuary Howard
(ISBN 1-84104-U46) carries a
foreword by Canon John
Andrew, who describe the
author as "the world authority
on the particular historical
porcelain he has brought to
international notice."

The Unforgiving Minute is
available at Logos Bookstore
in the Harbour Bay Shopping
Centre and the Island Book-
store in the Island Shop, Bay
St..


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All in all, however, the Bahamas
provided rich memories for the
Belmont students, and all those
still alive who knew them will find
much to interest them in these
pages.


"Mr Howard, who died in March
at the age of 77, viewed the Nassau
of the early 1940s from a
schoolboy's perspective, and
offers fascinating vignettes of
wartime life here in a 464-page
book."


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005








THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 9


Watergate, the role of the media




and thoughts on a 'nation for sale'


IN two days time on June
17 it will be exactly 33
years since the Watergate
break-in that forced US Presi-
dent Richard Nixon from office
after an investigation that has
been described as the greatest
achievement of modern jour-
nalism.
That "third-rate burglary"
made few waves at first. In fact,
Nixon was re-elected by a land-
slide a few months later, and it
was entirely feasible that gov-
ernment obstruction would
have succeeded in putting a lid
on the whole story.
But that didn't happen -
thanks to the secret help of an
official nicknamed Deep Throat
(after an infamous 1970s porn
film).
This anonymous source
encouraged Washington Post
reporters Bob Woodward and
Carl Bernstein to pursue the
story, which led to Senate hear-
ings and finally to the resigna-
tion of the president.


We now know that the
source was Mark Felt, former
deputy director of the FBI.
Until he revealed himself last
month, Felt was the most
famous anonymous person in
America.
But his reliability was also
legendary. Former Post editor
Ben Bradlee told the Public
Broadcasting Corporation
recently that of the 400 Water-
gate stories he published, only
one panned out badly.

n the early 1970s Tough
Call was studying journal-
ism at the University of Miami,
enjoying the tail end of the
counterculture revolution.
Despite all the hoo-ha about
Watergate, it was the Vietnam
War that occupied.the minds of
most American college students
at the time. They faced the draft
after graduation a fate many
considered worse than death.
But Watergate was, n6ver-
theless, a watershed in Ameri-
can history: "1972 was a time
when no one could imagine a
president of the United States
breaking the law," as one forty-
ish commentator recently put
it. "We were trusting and
believed what we read and
heard back then."
Well, that comment certain-
ly didn't apply to the students
that Tough Call hung out with
back then/Watergate only con-
firmed our general cynicism and
mistrust of the political system.
But hopefully it has made it
more difficult for such naivete
7:


to exist in the world's leading
democracy.
According to Simon Wick-
ens, a senior Canadian editor
who has worked in both the US
and the Bahamas, Watergate
was "one of the high points of
modern journalism, setting a
benchmark and creating self-
respect for practitioners of a
profession too long stereotyped
as shallow, sensationalist scrib-
blers out to sell newspapers and
their own grandmothers if need
be."

Watergate inspired a
generation of
reporters. As one young Amer-
ican put it recently: "I wanted to
become a journalist and expose
the truth. I wanted to know
people like Deep Throat who
risked so much in order to do
the right thing."
But although Deep Throat
provided much-needed valida-
tion to the Post's editors, Seattle
Times columnist Floyd McKay


pointed out that Watergate was
"relentless shoe-leather report-
ing. Door by door, night after
night, Woodward and Bernstein
looked for people with some
knowledge of the affair who
would be willing to talk.
"Because their results lacked
graphic detail and were often
based on anonymous sources,
the scandal failed to attract tele-
vision coverage and did not
impact the 1972 re-election
campaign of President Richard
M Nixon."
Perhaps, after all these years,
a little background is in order.
The divisive environment that
spawned Watergate was created
by the anti-Vietnam war move-
ment the first time that Amer-
ican leadership and military
action had been seriously chal-
lenged on a wide scale.
In 1971 the New York Times
began publishing the Pentagon
Papers a secret government
history of the war that con-
trasted sharply with public pre-
sentations.
So White House agents were
sent to burgle a psychiatrist's
office to find files to discredit
Daniel Ellsberg, the former
defence analyst who leaked the
documents.
A year later five men were
arrested trying to bug Democ-
ratic Party offices in the Water-
gate hotel and office complex
in Washington, DC. One of
them (James McCord) worked
for Nixon's re-election commit-
tee and was connected to a for-
mer CIA agent linked to the
White House (Howard Hunt).


According to the Wash-
ington Post, "By
October 1972 the FBI had
established that the Watergate
bugging incident stemmed from
a massive campaign of political
spying and sabotage conducted
on behalf of President Nixon's
re-election and directed by offi-
cials of the White House and
the Committee for the Re-elec-
tion of the President."
But that did not stop the
Nixon administration from cov-
ering up its involvement and
dismissing the Post story as "not
only fiction, but a collection of
absurdities."
The burglars were convict-
ed in January 1973 well after
the election. But soon the pres-
ident's closest aides were forced
to quit as the scandal grew.
They were advisers John Erlich-
man and Bob Haldeman, and
attorney-general Richard Klein-
dienst. White House lawyer
John Dean was fired by Nixon
at the same time and ended up
as a star witness in the Senate
hearings.
In June, 1973 Dean told the
Senate that Nixon knew of, and
helped plan, the Watergate cov-
er-up. And soon it became
known that Nixon had been
taping his conversations in the
White House for posterity. This
led to a furious battle over
"executive privilege", which the
Senate eventually won (with the
help of the Supreme Court).
Then, in October, 1973,
Nixon ordered the dismissal of
Archibald Cox, the indepen-
dent prosecutor he had appoint-
ed to investigate Watergate only
a few months earlier. Both the
attorney-general and his deputy
refused the order on grounds
of principle, and were fired
themselves. These events
became known as "the Satur-
day Night Massacre".
Solicitor-general Robert
Bork became acting .attorney-
general and proceeded to carry
out Nixon's bidding. (Bork'$,
appointment to the Supreme
Court by Ronald Reagan in
1987 was blocked by the Sen-
ate, mainly as a result of linger-
ing hostility over this obse-
quious act).

T he administration then
ordered the FBI to seal
the offices of the dismissed
attorney-general and special
prosecutor. According to Cox,
this amounted to a subversion
of the rule of law: "Whether
ours shall continue to be a gov-
ernment of laws and not of men
is now for Congress and ulti-


mately the American people,"
he said at the time.
In July, 1974 Nixon was
forced to turn over the White
House tapes to Congress.
Despite his protestations that
"there can be no whitewash at
the White House", the record-
ings showed he had, in fact,
tried to divert the investigation.
Shortly afterward Congress
passed the first of three articles


of impeachment, charging
obstruction of justice.
Seeing the writing on the
wall, on August 8 1974 Nixon
became the first American pres-
ident to resign office. Vice Pres-
ident Gerald Ford replaced him,
and a few months later par-
doned Nixon.of all charges
related to Watergate.
Although Ford said that by
accepting the pardon the for-
mer president was admitting his
guilt, Nixon went on to become
an elder statesman, while many
of his top aides and cabinet min-
isters served prison terms for
their roles. Nixon died in 1994.


W .hat was Watergate?
It was about hiding
the identities and wrongdoing
of employees of the Nixon re-
election committees and White
House aides "who had under-
taken to destroy the integrity
of the process by which the
president of the United States is
nominated and elected," Sena-
tor Sam Ervin said at the time.


The Watergate investigation
was brought to a fitting close in
2003, when the University of
Texas (the largest university in
the US) bought Woodward and
Bernstein's Watergate archives
for $5 million. Who would have
thought that a collection of
reporters' notes could fetch so
much money?
Interestingly, Watergate had
some parallels with the "nation
for sale" drug trafficking scan-
dal in the Bahamas during the,
1980s, when NBC television
broke the news alleging that
some government officials were
on the payroll of Colombian


drug lords.
Just like Nixon, the late Sir
Lynden Pindling, who was
prime minister at the time,
angrily protested his innocence.
And just like US attorney-gen-
eral. John Mitchell, our attor-
ney-general, Paul Adderley,
tried to put the blame on a mas-
sive anti-government conspiracy.
But as the international
media pursued the story, the
political fallout was dramatic. Sir
Lynden's closest ally deputy.
prime minister Arthur Hanna -
resigned over the way the crisis
was handled. And cabinet mm-
isters Perry Christie and Hubert
Ingrahamwere fired for urging a
more aggressive approach to the
corruption charges.

I t may be difficult to recall
those days when" the..
Bahamas was known as a crook's:
paradise, ruining our reputation
and spawning social problem s
that still bedevil us today.
But the facts are there -aa
500-page commission of in4 ul.Y
report in 1984 linked a number
of high-ranking officials and:
politicians to-foreign gangsters.
and outlined the consequences.
Unlike Nixon, Sir Lynden f
went on to twinithe 1987 gener-.
al election. But it was his last..
Like Jimmy Carterk in 1976,
Hubert Ingratamcame to office:
in 1992 as a reformer, with. ah,
mandate to address official cor-
ruption and. political, and eco-.
nomic decline.
What was the role of our
press and civil society during.;
this nationat crisis? Unfortu-
nately-andfor a varietyof rea-.
sons -most of the telling infor-
mation was provided; by the.
American media. One wondersI
what would have happened if
-it had all been up to us.
Sounds like a subject for
another time.
What do you think?.
Send your comments to lar.
ry@trbunemedia.net


"I really enjoy reading your articles which
are all obviously well-researched, topical and
with an insight normally only found in news-
papers of international repute." (W)
"I cannot let another moment pass before
complimenting you on your many well-written,
well-researched, informative, thought-provoking
columns" (Lightbourne)

"You are an anomaly in your field to be
sure!"
"... context and particularly historical con-


Praise10or.TOUGHrALL


text is something that is sadly lacking in most
reporting. This is your strongest suit and one I
have always admired in you."
"Man, do I agree with some of what you
wrote in 'Tough Call' today!"
"That was the best piece I have yet read
on the financial services industry in the
Bahamas and how and why it has evolved
over the past few years. Thanks for doing the
research and laying it out so cogently. I expect
you will get some heated reaction from the
political class."


"Copyrighted Material-

Syndicated Content' -- -

Available from Commercial News Providers"


-- -
a *.


SOLOMON'S MINES


Flagship Store, Bay Street (242) 356-6920
www.solomons-mines.com


Watergate only confirmed our
general cynicism and mistrust of
the political system. But hopefully
it has made it more difficult for
such naivete to exist in the
world's leading democracy


It maybe difficult to recall those
days when the Bahamas was
known as a crook's paradise,
ruining our reputation and
spawning social problems that
still bedevil us today.


I


11


o 0 O


O


- 4


. .









PAG 1, EDESDYCJUEL5,200ETESRIUN


FROM page one

hospital's specialists might trav-
el to PMH to offer their ser-
vices to the Bahamian public.
Mr Christie was greeted at
the airport by Acting Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt and
Housing and National Insur-
ance Minister Shane Gibson.
Mr Christie left Nassau
Sunday morning for Balti-
more, Maryland, where he
underwent his final medical
check-up, before resuming his
duties.
This check-up was planned
by Dr Gomez and heart spe-
cialist Dr Brown, who advised
Mr Christie to take this trip
as part of his care pro-


PM
gramme,
office.
The rev
condition,
stroke he
month, wa
about two
The prir
tially host
for severe
awakening
home expi
discomfort
culty wi
numbness
Followi
ical inves
concluded


back in three months
before returning to had suffered a minor stroke.
Within the same week, he
iew of Mr Christie's was released from hospital to
following the slight continue convalescing at
suffered early last home.
as expected to take In the past two weeks Mr
days. Christie has been performing
me minister was ini- "light" prime ministerial .
pitalised on May 3 duties; while still recuperat-
hypertension, after ing at home.
g at his Cable Beach On his trip to Baltimore the
)eriencing physical prime minister was accompa-
rt, including a diffi- nied by his brother, Gary
th speech and a Christie, as well as his physi-
in the hands. cians Dr Gomez and Dr
ng extensive med- Brown. He is expected to
stigations, doctors return to the Bahamas next
d that Mr Christie week.


FROM page one

ment, which pulled out of the contract in April
1998 after learning that the centre, instead of
alleviating the discomfort of its patients, actually
worsened the health of some of them, including
two children under 10 years of age. At that
time the OAL had been operating for three
years.
"If one were to ask, did the Minister get what
he bargained for?" asked Justice Hartman Lon-
gley, "the answer must be no...If a patient had
been asked whether not he had got what he
had bargained for, I am sure the answer would
have been a resounding no."
Government, prompted by concerns raised by
the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, and pri-
vate physicians, decided, just six months after
the centre began operations, to have an assess-
ment done of the facility.
It contacted the American College of Radia-
tion (ACR), whose representative came to the
Bahamas to inspect the facilities at the end of
January 1998.
ACR assessed cancer patients treated dur-
ing the year 1996. It conducted interviews with
personnel along with other local doctors and
health officials.
Immediately, the ACR warned government
that the facility was violating safety standards,
and particularly criticised the practices of Amer-
ican Chief of Radiology Dr Mark Harrison.
Based on the findings then Health Minister
Dr Ronald Knowles immediately requested the
closure of the facility, except for emergency
treatment. Government's contract with OAL
was also suspended.
OAL President Dr John Lunn agreed to close
the centre, and also accepted Dr Harrison's
resignation.
The centre never reopened.
"When one bears in mind that these are but
random samples taken of all the cases in exis-
tence one is forced to conclude that the entire
batch was probably contaminated by this mal-
treatment ad iiSered by Dr. Harrison and
OAL," said Jnficl~edngley. "Thee are most
probably not isolated cases."


Supreme Court

About a year later, OAL commenced legal
action claiming damages for breach of contract
in two respects: Wrongful repudiation and fail-
ure to give 90 days notice to remedy the alleged
breaches before terminating the contract.
One month before the trial began, Dr
Knowles received a final report from ACR
which confirmed its preliminary findings and
reaffirmed its conclusion while also suggesting
that 42 recommendations be implemented.
"To my mind, one would have to accept that
in a contract concerned with the public health
and the administration of a very serious form of
treatment to patients who are seriously ill that
on the evidence of this wholesale departure
from the norm as found by ACR and confirmed
by OAL's own specialist, the Minister did not
get what he bargained for. All players in the
health care field, so far as cancer treatment was
concerned, were not satisfied."
Judy Ward-Carter. President of the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, said she is pleased with
the judgment and the role the Society played in
"serving justice."
"Cancer patients don't have access to reach-
ing people at the top," she said, "and that is
the role the Society plays."
The OAL was established in 1995, and was
the first to provide radiotherapy services for
cancer patients in the Bahamas. Before it start-
ed its operation, cancer patients used to travel
to Mount Sinai in Miami, Florida for treatment.
Justice Longley said it seemed as though the
organisation was licensed broadly because at
the time there was no specific legislation regard-
ing the operation of such facilities.
The incident with the Centre sparked debates
in the House of Assembly, and brought to light
the urgent need for amended health bills.
Ms Ward-Carter said that since the closure of
the facilities, the Society has not heard of any
further problems with radiation: treatment, and
she is hopeful that services will expand forthe
estimated 350 new cancer$ patients on the pub-
lic system each year.


the airbrakes would not stop in
time."
Mr Hall pointed out that air-
brakes do not stop on a dime
and there was simply not
enough time for the truck to
stop.
Mr Hall was adamant that he
had not been speeding, and
pointed to the skid marks,
which were less than 15 feet
long.
"If I had been speeding," he
said, "the skid marks would
have been longer."
According to a shaken Mr
Hall, the man did not appear to
be a homeless person as he was
well dressed, in blue jeans, an
orange shirt, and white Fila
brand tennis shoes.
"I don't know if he was crazy
or not, but he did not try to
move out of the way when he
saw me. I hope he is all right, I
am very sorry it happened. I
feel it, that is a human being,
but it is not my fault something
went wrong."
Yesterday's incident comes
two weeks after three persons
were killed on the same road
on their way to work.
Yesterday, Assistant Super-
intendent Charles Walkine
reminded Bahamians of the
dangers of JFK saying that
many persons have died on that
street.
Mr Walkine said yesterday's


incident was a rare instance
involving a pedestrian. He
reminded pedestrians that dri-
vers on JFK are travelling with-
in the speed limit of 40-45 miles
per hour for cars and 30 miles
per hour for trucks.
"Pedestrians need to be very
careful if they need to cross
JFK, make sure that the driver
of the vehicle sees you before
you try to cross the road and
that they stop to allow you to
cross." o'
Mr Walkine said that the traf-
fic police are still cracking down
on persons who violate traffic
laws and that the punishment
for drivers who endanger the
lives of persons by driving reck-
lessly is a fine, imprisonment or
both.
Mr Walkine noted that inves-
tigations are still ongoing in the
accident that claimed the lives
of 25-year-old Clinton;Lewis
Grant Jr, 36-year-old'Carla
Bethel and'36-year-old Paulette
Davis on May 20.
He said police are still unclear
as to whether they will press
charges against the driver of the
dump truck involved in the
crash who fled the scene.
Mr Walkine said that Alton
Wegner, a Jamaican, might
have been traumatized by the
sight of the bodies of the three
persons who lost their lives in
the crash.


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BTC sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused.


FROM page one

police.
The man was taken to the
Princess Margaret Hospital by
ambulance, but up to press
time, his condition was still
unknown.
Jonathan Hall, driver of the
Mack dump truck, said he saw
the victim run from the bushes
into the middle of the street
where he stood immobile.
"Everything happened so
fast," said Mr Hall that he did
not have time to blow his horn,
or yell at the man to move.
"I just slammed the brakes
and tried to stop the truck, but




FROM page one
addition to reaching the
record number of five mil-
lion visitors to the Bahamas
in 2004, the country was "on
the edge of a much larger
achievement."
He said visitor spending
had almost reached $1.9 bil-
lion, and would have
reached the $2 billion mark,
if the two major hurricanes
had not cost the Bahamas
$100 million in visitor spend-
ing, as reported by an inde-
pendent study.
The minister said the
"promise is even greater"
this year for the country
achieving this historic num-
ber in visitor spending.
Mr Wilchcomibe said0 i
although other eosit -"
attract more visitors,';,
because they have larger
populations to provide ser-
vice to tourists, the Bahamas
is one of the leading coun-
tries when it comes to visitor
spending per capita of resi-
dents.
He explained that the rev-
enue realised last year
equals $6,000 for every
Bahamian.
Contributing to the pre-
dictions for this year are the
increased airlifts, the minis-
ter added.
Mr Wilchcombe said that
the addition of low-fare car-
riers has made a major
impact on the number of
stop-over visitors.
He added that lower air-
fares allow tourists to save
money which they can then
spend in the country and
that because of this, hotels
have already been able to
increase their rates.


; PAGE 10, WEDNESDA, JUNE 15, 2005


Man is





flattened by





dump truck


THE TRIBUNE












Preacher's call for Africa pilgrimages


* DR Munroe lifts the Bible as he speaks to a crowd outside a stadium in Namibia


* SOUTH African children sing the national anthem for Dr and Mrs Munroe outside the home where former
president Nelson Mandela was born.


* GOVERNMENT leaders seated up front listen intently to the motivational words of Dr Munroe in Namibia


* A STADIUM in Africa is packed, and the line continues outside as persons
gather to hear this Bahamian pastor speak inNigeria


M THIS picture was taken in Soweto, at one of the one of the first convocations where whites and
blacks were able to sit together


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE





Rood promotes value of literacy



N By KRISTINA McNEIL
IT was reading time when .
the US Apnbassador to the,
Bahamas paid a visit to Gerald
Cash Primary School for a
reading session yesterday
morning.
Students and facility wel-
comed John Rood td the
school with music, dance and
poetry for his visit to promote
.literacy. Mr Rood read a book
about the late Dr Martin
Luther King Jr and his famous
"I have a dream" speech, '
"These children, have
tremendous talent," said Mr
Rood. "You can see it through
their singing ond dapcing."
They have to realize that
everyone is different with dif-
ferent dreams, he added. "If
you're not literate, it's diffi-
cult to realize your dreams.
What I want [children] to do s
link their reading to their
dream."
Sidney Poitier, the Bahami-
an ambassador to Japan, "is a
person that all of you should.....
be very proud of," Mr-Rood 0 GERALD Cash Primary School's Steel band plays for the US ambassador
told the students. Poitier grew
up in Cat Island and taught .
himself how to read. He read -.
about going to New York.
when he was still farming
tomatoes in Cat Island and
that is how he tchieved his
dream of going to New York,
said Mr Rood.
Mr Rood visited schools in
Exuma, Andros, Abaco, JOHN Rood, read with Theophilus Fox of grade 6s
Eleuthera, and Grand
Bahama, as welt as the Uriah
McPhee and St Johns Primary
schools in Nassau to spread
his views of literacy.
During his visits tothre
schools Mr Rood donated
books to keep the chilIdren "
reading. The books wete all.
donated by private.citizens, so.
more funds are needed for Mr
Rood and his initiative to con-
tinue donating books.
"My goal is to visit every
island and go Into every dis-
'trict and mpet thle Ms," said ,
Mr Rood. "So I can spend
time with them and let them A.-'
show me their part of the
island." ,
(Photos: Felipe Major/ l JOHN Rood read t the children6during,
Tribune Staff) E YOUNG TERS'dance for the ambassador N PUTTING on a show his visit





































A* b&d
..lm ,o ou vu um otw s







a dilA&a Mc~md


A,, i lr












Distributed byLoae, Soldier Rd Quality, variety


laa*aarrraa,~pl*Mnnarraaanan*asu~Mnmu










WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahamas studio




has 'world's best'




tank for filming


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Pirates of the
Caribbean II and III director
has described the 'water tank'
being constructed at the $76
million Gold Rock Creek film
studios in Grand Bahamas as
"the greatest tank in the world".
The statement by Gore
Verbinski, who is currently on
Grand Bahama with the films'
world-renowned producer. Jer-
ry Bruckheimer, is a massive
vote of confidence in both the
Gold Rock Creek project and
the Bahamas in general.
Paul Quigley, Gold Rock
Creek's chief executive, yester-
day told The Tribune that the
pair had suggested some modi-
fications to the water tank, and
the studio was in the process of
working out how to make them
and whether they could be
incorporated.
Mr Quigley said: "They're
very excited about the tank, and
Gore Verbinski said this is the
greatest water tank in the world."
The Gold Rock Creek chief
executive said the $400 million
budget Pirates of the Caribbean
II and III films had been due
to spend two weeks in Grand
Bahama between mid to end-


June, but had rescheduled this
to later in the year due to
adverse weather experienced,in
the island in the past three days.
The cast and film crew were
now filming some indoor scenes
in Los Angeles before their
summer break, having spent 74
consecutive days filming, some-
times for as long as 18-19 hours.

Break

Mr Quigley praised the deci-
sion to reschedule, with filming
due to resume around Septem-
ber 1 after a two-month break.
'It was a very smart move on
their part. I'm glad they decided
to do it," Mr Quigley said of
the decision to reschedule the
two weeks of Grand Bahama
filming. "It wasn't worth them
shooting the amount of materi-
al here" that they wanted due to
the weather.
Filming in the Exuma chain
had already been completed,
and Mr Quigley said "all that's
left" were the water tank and
ocean scenes on Grand
Bahama, plus some shooting in
Los Angeles.
The Black Pearl, the main
ship in the films, has now been
manoeuvred to the 'water tank'


through the reef, after the chan-
nel used previously by the US
military was rediscovered.
The films are expected to
provide a major boost for
Grand Bahama's economy,
injecting at least $30 million into
it. Prime Minister Perry Christie
said in late January that Disney
had committed to at least 16,000
room nights as part of the pro-
duction, and could exceed
30,000 room nights.
On the economic impact of
both the Pirates of the
Caribbean II and III films and
Gold Rock Creek long-term,
Mr Quigley said yesterday: "
It's just phenomenal. I don't
think anyone has grasped the
enormity of this."
He previously told The Tri-
bune that Gold Rock Creek
would help to diversify the
Bahamian economy away from
its reliance on tourism, and said:
"I think it's really going to open
the floodgates in terms of the
Bahamas as a production loca-
tion.
"It's terribly important that
you train as many Bahamians
as you can, as the costs of bring-
ing in labour are not economi-
cally viable. We're looking to
build an indigenous film indus-
try, like Ireland."


FATF still 'holding a gun to our heads'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Financial Services Con-
sultative Forum's chairman has
criticised the Financial Action
Task Force (FATF) for "con-
tinuing to hold a gun to our
head" through its continued
monitoring of the Bahamas.
Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &


Hughes, described the FATF's
action in continuing to watch
the Bahamas for compliance
with international assistance
requests as "both unfortunate
and disappointing". This was
especially so given that it was
"making all reasonable efforts"
to co-operate with properly
completed international assis-
tance requests.
Mr Moree was yesterday


backed up by a statement
released by the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB),
which focused on the positives
contained in the FATF's June
10 update.
Drawing upon the FATF's
findings that the Bahamas had
completed its responses to 90
per cent of international assis-
tance requests between Febru-
ary and May 2005, the BFSB


said: "The pace of response giv-
en by Bahamian authorities for
matters involving predicate
offences in the Bahamas and
other consolidated supervisory
matters is impressive.
"It is important for the
Bahamas to be able to demon-
strate the adequacy of its sys-
tems and resources to meet its
SEE page nine


* 1KIAIN Moree


Reene ar up 2.9 a

Reita Genealsaec


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Registrar General's
Department generated a 22.9
per cent increase in revenues
during the 2005 first quarter
to $11.244 million, with all the
department's registry services
set to be fully automated and
accessible online by Decem-
ber 31 2005.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services


and investments, told the
House of Assembly that the
Registrar General's Depart-
ment was "expected to sur-
pass" financial estimates for
fiscal 2005-2006, with first
quarter 2005's revenues well
ahead of the previous year's
$9.146 million comparative.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the deeds section's records
going back 30 years would be
SEE page nine


PM to receive plan for

downtown Nassau


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
George Mackey, co-chair of
the National Economic Devel-
opment Commission, yesterday
confirmed that the Atlanta-
based consultancy, EDAW, is
expected to present the govern-
ment with the completed master
plan for the redevelopment of
downtown Nassau next week.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Mackey, who has not


seen the final report, said it is
expected that interviews with
all relevant stakeholders, from
Arawak Cay to Montagu,
including hair-braiders and Bay
Street merchants, have been
incorporated, along with other
recommendations, into the final
document.
The Tribune understands that
EDAW will formally present
the downtown redevelopment
plan to Prime Minister Perry
Christie next Wednesday.


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


-s


I II I -- -I I


I








PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


i fI- l- tiliUN


Free trade could generate an





increased financial crime risk


he buzz concept
of late has been
the 'single mar-
ket economy'.
We have seen
this in the formation of trading
blocs such as the European
Union, the potential Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA) and, most recently,
thd Caribbean Single Market
anl Economy (CSME).
The concept has its pros and
cons as expressed by numer-
ous experts on the matter. In
thd Bahamas we hear every-
one from trade unionists to
economists and politicians
commenting on which way to
4
XF 0


Priat Estate Lot 1 1
FrSle by Owner [1viil





2.4 ce


move forward. I am none of
the above, but I know a little
something about asset protec-
tion and security, and from a
social science perspective I
realise that prosperity at any
level brings crime. Very little
has been said about the
increase in crime these initia-
tives will bring. Not so much
the 'stick'em up' type, but
those who are a little more
discrete in their robbery.

Those nefarious endeavours
include:

Fraud/Economic Crime
The intentional use of deceit
to deprive another of money,
property or a legal right.

Asset misappropriation
The theft of company assets
(including monetary
assets/cash or supplies and
equipment) by company direc-
tors, others (including embez-
zlement by employees) in
fiduciary positions or an
employee for their own bene-
fit.

Financial misrepresentation
Company accounts are
altered or presented in such a
way that they do not reflect


PUBLIC NOTICE

RE: Study of the Process to Establish a Small Business
in the Bahamas.

In keeping with the mandate to encourage Bahamian
entrepreneurship, the Government has appointed a task force
with a mandate to present to Government recommendations on
how to simplify the process for the establishment of legitimate
business especially small to medium enterprises. In order to
attain a full understanding of the difficulties-endountefd ib5y
small to medium enterprises, the Task Force is seeking comments
from small to medium enterprises in the following sectors:

1) Agriculture and Fisheries
2) Legal Services
3) Medical Services
4) Financial Services
5) Dry Good (Retail & Wholesale)
6) Construction Services
(Including, Architectural, Plumbing and Electrical Services)
7) Tourism Related
(Which include Small Hotels, Souvenir Manufacturing, Jet
Ski & Pleasure Craft Operators)
8) All other goods and service providers.

Responses may be sent to:

Mr Michael Halkitis
Chairman of the Task Force for the Simplification of the Process
to Establish Small Business
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay street
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 327-1618
E-mail: mofgeneral@bahamas.gov.bs


I








52wk-UHi 52wk-Low


the true value or financial
activities of the company.

Corruption and Bribery
Typically, the unlawful use
of an official position to gain
an advantage in contravention
of duty. This can involve the
(racketeering and extortion)
promise. of an economic ben-
efit or other favour, the use
of intimidation or blackmail. It
can also refer to the accep-
tance of such inducements.

Money Laundering
Actions intended to legit-
imise the proceeds of crime
by disguising their true origin.

Cybercrime
Illegal access to a computer
or computer network to cause
damage or theft For example:
hacking, virus attacks, denial


SA-Colina .
w Financial Advisors Ltd.


1.10
8.50
6.35
0.85
1.80
1.06
8.65
2.20
9.00
2.50
4.02
10.46
8.52
8.60
1.99
10.16
8.25
6.69'
10.00
52wk-Hi


13.00
10.14
0.60
43.00
16.00
0.60
52wk-Hi


0.95 Abaco Markets
8.00. Bahamas Property Fund
5.55 Bank of Bahamas
0.77 Benchmark
1.40 Bahamas Waste
0.87 Fidelity Bank
6.76 Cable Bahamas
1.54 Colina Holdings
6.75 Commonwealth Bank
0.54 Doctor's Hospital
3.66 Famguard
8.55 Finco
6.69 FirstCaribbean
8.31 Focol
1.27 Freeport Concrete
9.50 IcD Utilities
8.10 J. S. Johnson
4.36 Kerzner International BDRs
10.00 Premier Real Estate
52wk-Low S mbl


0.95
8.50
6.35
0.77
1.50
1.06
8.55
2.20
9.00
2.50
4.02
10.46
8.51
8.42
1.27
9.60
8.30
5.81
10.00


BId $


0.95
8.50
6.35
0.77
1.50
1.06
8.55
2.20
9.00
2.50
4.02
10.46
8.52
8.42
1.27
9.60
8.30
5.89
10.00


of service, electronic theft of
proprietary information.

Industrial espionage and
information brokerage
The acquiring of trade
secrets or company informa-
tion by secretive and illegal
means, and/or the selling of
these secrets or information
to interested parties.

Product Piracy/
Counterfeiting
The illegal copying and/or
distribution of fake branded
goods in breach of patent or
copyright. This also includes
the creation of false currency
notes and coins with the inten-
tion of passing them off as
genuine.

How prepared are we to
face the challenges of this type


)llriBLBJ


0.00 -0.20.00.000 N/M 0.00%
0.00 5,500 1.445 0.320 5.9 3.76%
0.00 0.561 0.330 11.3 5.20%
0.00 0.187 0.000 4.1 0.00%
0.00 0.122 0.000 12.3 0.00%
0.00 0.007 0.040 14.3 3.77%
0.00 0.589 0.240 14.5 2.81%
0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
0.00 0.673 0.410 13.4 4.56%
0.00 2,000 0.452 0.000 5.5 0.00%
0.00 0.406 0.240 9.9 5.97%
0.00 0.662 0.500 15.8 4.78%
0.01 1,125 0.591 0.330 14.4 3.87%
0.00 0.708 0.500 11.9 5.94%
0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
0.00 0.561 0.550 14.8 6.75%
0.08 0.184 0.000 31.7 0.00%
0.00 2.010 0.565 5.0 5.65%
st Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield


12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00
28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00
0.35 RND Holdings 0. 0.35
52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD/ It 12 Months l


1,488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
-0.066 0.000 NM n 0.00%
2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
-0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Vld %


.1.2323 1.1703 Colina Money Market Fund 1.232656*
2.3329 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3329 ***
10.3837 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3837***
2.2072 2.0985 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.207174**
1.1080 1.0435 Colina Bond Fund 1.107989"*

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelitl
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/**** AS AT APR. 29, 2005
*- AS AT MAY 20, 2005/ AS AT MAY. 31,2005/***** AS AT MAY. 312005
Xgl:Ig8|g||gggBlglg^^ ^^MM^M~(Si_.j^


of assault? Especially when
we consider that "corporate
or white collar crime is on the
rise, but many companies lack
the defences to fight it, dis-
cover fraud by accident, and
cannot measure the cost of it",
according to a new survey by
PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC).
This report, published in
July, reveals the serious state
that the global community is
in as it pertains to financial
crimes. This could mean an
increase in the risk exposure
to the Bahamas if safeguards
are not in place when we
decide to join any of the free
trade markets mentioned
above.
The next few articles will
focus on the various crimes


mentioned above and how
they can have a direct influ-
ence on success in the global
marketplace. During this
investigation, various metli'-
ods on how to prevent this
type of crime will be suggest-
ed.
Our success or failure in the
market place is not so much
determined by our ability to
acquire wealth, but in our abil-
ity to adequately protect what
we generate.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative
Measures, a law enforcement
and security consulting com-
pany. Comments can be sent
to PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas, or e-mail preven-
tit@hotmail.com


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ANDRE MENES CHERISME OF
STRACHAN'S ALLEY OFF KEMP ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15TH day of JUNE, 2005 to the Minister responsible-
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,'
Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGE MITCHELL OFF
MASON STREET OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send-
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 8TH day of JUNE, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RP.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, RODLIN RAPHAEL
of Baillou Hill Road, P.O. Box N-7101, Nassau, Bahamas,"
intend to change my name to RODLIN JOSEPH. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30),
days after the .date of publication of this notice.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SOYNA BRINKLEY OF PINEDALE
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 15TH day of JUNE,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





EMPLOY'MENT OPPORTUITY


Full time position available for someone
proficient in Photoshop.


Candidate must have some experience
and expertise in photographic restoration,
and some knowledge in layout and design
would be helpful


322-3000/1
mrphoto@coralwave.com


Safe and Secure


by


Gamal


Newry


PUBLIC HOSPITALS

AUTHORITY

.....PUBLIC NOTICE


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

MATERIALS MANAGEMEMNT INFORMATION SYSTEM

The Public Hospitals Authority (PHA), Commonwealth of The
Bahamas is inviting proposals from qualified vendors to provide a
Materials Management Information System (MMIS) solution that
meets its current and future business requirements.

Interested companies are invited to submit proposals in the requried
format and delivered in a sealed envelope in order to reach the PHA
by 29th July 2005.


A comprehensive document outlining impotant information for
vendors, proposal preparation instructions and technical specifications
of the requirements is available upon request; and can be collected
from the PHA Corporate Office, Manx Corporate Centre, West Bay
Street, Nassau.

An electronic version of this RFP is also available by:

* visiting the PHA's website at: www.phabahamas.org (click under
Business Opportunities: Current RFP's); or
* e-mail: REPInquiries@phabahamas.org


.YDO


** - ...














Government gets first Private




Trust Companies draft


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government
has received a
preliminary draft
of the Private
Trust Companies
Bill, a piece of legislation
viewed as vital to cementing
the Bahamas' position as a
leader in private wealth man-
agement, with the administra-
tion also hoping to pass a new
External Insurance Act and
accompanying regulations
before year-end.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments, said the Gov-
ernment had received the
Financial Services Consultative
Forum's report on private trust
companies, and meetings with
the financial services industry
to review the draft Bill were
expected to begin shortly.
Private trust companies are
companies formed to act es
trustees for a specific trust, or


group of trusts, and extremely
attractive to high net worth
individuals and their families
because they give the settlor
more control over how the
assets are administered than a
normal trust.
Families
Describing private trust com-
panies as "a preferred tool in
the structuring of estate and
inheritance planning" for high
net worth families, Mrs May-
nard-Gibson said: "With the
focus of the Bahamas' finance
industry on private wealth
management, and in light of
the significant growth in the
use of private trust companies,
the introduction of specific leg-
islation on private trust com-
panies would allow the
Bahamas to build on recent
positive momentum and fur-
ther develop its position as a
leading choice for the high net
worth family."
However, Mrs Maynard-


Gibson indicated that the
Bahamas had to do more to get
its marketing message across.
She said promotional visits
to areas such as Europe and
Brazil by the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board (BFSB)
had "served to highlight that
while there is a great deal of
interest in the Bahamas, a sig-
nificant number of persons are
unfamiliar with the range of
products and services we
offer".
A study by Pricewater-
houseCoopers (UK) was being
used to review the five-year
strategic plan for the Bahamian
financial services industry,
seeking to define the Bahamas'
position in the international
market.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the report identified a number
of criteria for the "ideal off-
shore centre", including a good
legal and regulatory system;
double tax agreements, trans-
parency and minimal levels of
tax; specialist product and asset


class coverage and structures; a
good reputation and brand;
meeting international bench-
marked standards on regula-
tion without bureaucracy; rele-
vant investment and tax report-
ing; and ease of access to busi-
nesses and skilled employees.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the PwC report showed the
global market for high net
worth individuals would
increase at a 7 per cent per
annum rate.
Regions
Asia and North America
would be the fastest growing
regions at 7.4 per cent and 10.7
per cent respectively, with
Europe at 4.1 per cent, Latin
America at 5.2 per cent and
Africa at 4.6 per cent.
A Merrill Lynch and
CapGemini report also expect-
ed the financial wealth of high
net worth individuals to grow
by 7 per cent, and to exceed
$40.7 trillion by 2008.


Government to a


Registrar General case


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
ALLYSON Maynard-Gib-
son, minister of financial ser-
vices and investments, has hit
back at former Registrar-Gen-
eral Elizabeth Thompson, say-
ing that the Attorney General's
Office would be appealing the
latter's legal victory in the
Supreme Court.
In her Budget contribution,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
verdict quashing Ms Thomp-
son's dismissal would be
appealed on behalf of the Judi-
cial and Legal Services Com-
mission and the Governor Gen-
eral.
The minister used the cover
afforded by House of Assem-
bly privilege to attack Ms
Thompson, with the former reg-
istrar-general responding by
challenging Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son to repeat the allegations
outside Parliament, where she
would be exposed to a libel
action.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson
described allegations by Ms
Thompson that she directed her
to incorporate companies for a
customer who owed the gov-
ernment money as a "bold
faced lie", adding that the for-
mer registrar-general could not
produce any evidence to sup-
port her claims.

Denial

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said Ms
Thompson had not been vic-
timised, and she had been
offered another high-paying
government job with all the
perks of her original post.
The new job would allegedly
have offered Ms Thompson a
three-year contract paying
$56,000 a year, plus a responsi-
bility allowance of $5,000,
together with a car. Ms Thomp-
son was said to counter the offer
with a demand of $65,000 per
annum, and to have three peo-
ple transferred from the Regis-
trar General's Department to
work with her.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson alleged
that Ms Thompson would "con-
duct marriages, however, some-
times charging and pocketing
up to $600 for each, though she
had a directive to stop taking
this work from other marriage
officers".
Mrs Maynard-Gibson further
alleged that numerous com-
plaints were made that Ms
Thompson ignored phone calls
of important clients of the Reg-
istry.
Ms Thompson told The Tri-
bune that she would not be
drawn into the fray, though this
was the first time she heard of
any of the allegations put for-
ward by Mrs Maynard-Gibson.
She added that if the minister
knew of and believed all that
she told MPs, why did she not


include the information in the
court documents which were
placed before Justice Small for
the purpose of judicial review.
Ms Thompson, who said she
was getting weary of the situa-
tion, added that since the Gov-
ernment had not contacted her
in regard to her employment
situation or a settlement, and'
since an appeal had been filed
or stay granted in regard to the


Justice Small's Supreme Court'
ruling, she would be heading
into work today.
"We gave them a week to put
me on the pay sheet or to regu-
larise what was going to hap-
pen. At the end of the day we
will approach the courts again
because this needs to be
re'solved. It can't go on indefi-
nitely," Ms Thompson said.
"I am resolute in the fact that


A young aggressive company with a solid track record
is expanding and requires an

In House Marketing Manager
If you are looking for position with:
1) Structure
2) Lots of supervision
3) A daily routine
Then this position is NOT for you.
Applicants must have a degree in marketing.
When applying remember that we are looking for that
applicant who stands out from the rest.
c/o The Tribune Limited
DA# 03251
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas










RESTAURANT MANAGER
Sbarro the Italian Eatery has a position open
for a Restaurant Manager.
* The candidate has the opportunity to work in a high
energy, exciting, and quick service environment.
* They must have the aptitude to direct and manage a
a team of workers, while maintaining excellent
customer relations.
* The applicant must possess a secondary education
* They must also possess atleast five years
experience in a quick service restaurant environment.
* The position offers the prospect of advancement.
* Transportation essential.
Please forward your resume to The Operations Director
e-mail address: rr().sbarrobahamas.com
Facsimile 356-0333
NOTEEHOEINEVIW


I did the right thing in exercising
my constitutional rights. I have
children who are watching me,
and when you have a child ask-
ing what did you do and you
can't answer that, then you have
to take it as far as the law per-
mits. I really just want a resolu-
tion. It's dragging on too long."


Bank of The ahamas

INT ER.NATIONA L

"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
ASSISTANT MANAGER, CORPORATE CREDIT
GRAND BAHAMA & FAMILY ISLAND DIVISION
Core responsibilities:

* Analyze and investigate financial and non-financial information with a
view to assessing the viability of business proposals. Assess loan
applications and interview potential candidates.

* Prepare credit proposals for existing and potential clients.

* Manage effectively, a portfolio of corporate relationships and act as
'Relationship Manager' for assigned accounts.

* Increase consistently, the value of accounts through personal marketing efforts.

* Conduct consistent follow-up on delinquent accounts and institute measures
for the collection of bad accounts.

* Conduct field inspections.

* Assess the local industries and make recommendations for areas of exploration
by the Corporate Credit Division.

* Recommend annual performance objectives and action plans that will help
to increase the Bank's profitability. (Ability to successfully implement plans
to completion is critical.)

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

* Bachelors Degree in Economics/Finance/Business Administration

* Five years experience in the Financial Services Industry

* Strong analytical and organizational skills

* Being a team player is essential; must have excellent interpersonal and
communication skills.

Benefits include: Competitive compensation (commensurate with qualifications);
group medical, vision, and life insurance; and a pension scheme.

Send resume to; The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


HOUSE


FOR SALE

Lot Number 8,
Fox Hill Creek Subdivision,
Eastern District of
New Providence


Being sold pursuant to
Power of Sale Mortgage dated
April 14, 2003


APPRAISED VALUE

$570,000


Interested parties,
please submit Bids to



British American

Insurance Co. Ltd,


P.O. Box N-4815
Telephone: 461-1037
. .


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 3B








4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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CALLENDERS & CO.


TO OUR
VALUED CLIENTS


I Please note that our Office
will be closed on

FRIDAY, 17th June,. 2005

to observe our Firm's
ANNUAL FUN DAY

Regular Office Hours
will resume on

|MONDAY, 20th June, 2005

We regret any inconvenience
caused.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division
BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL T
Parcel or Lot of Land being Lots
6, 7 and Commercial Land in
the Northern Side of Worcheste
Westwards of Woodstock Road
Estates in the Southern District o
of New Providence.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quietin


2003
CLE/qui/0158


PHAT Piece
s Numbered
Block 2 on
r Road and
in Blue Hill
of the Island




ig? Title Act.


1959

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Levite
Hanna


NOTICE

THE PETITION OF LEVITE HANNA in respect
of:-

ALL THAT Piece Parcel or Lot of Land
being Lots Numbered 6,7 and Commercial
Land in Block 2 on the Northern Side of
Worchester Road and Westwards of
Woodstock Road in Blue Hill Estates in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence.

Levite Hanna claims to be the owner in fee simple in
possession of the following land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said
Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may
be inspected during normal office hours in the following
places;

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street in
the City of Nassau, Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Obie Ferguson & Co., Snug Haven,
Elizabeth Avenue South, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower
or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 5th
day of August, A.D., 2005 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
Statement of the claim in the prescribed form verified
by an affidavit to be filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and served a Statement
of his Claim on or before the 5th day of August, A.D.,
2005 will operate as bar to such claim.

Obie Ferguson & Co.
Chambers,
Snug Haven,
Elizabeth Avenue South,
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner


a multi-national company resident in Nassau, Bahamas
is currently accepting applications for the position of
Tank Truck Driver.

QUALIFICATIONS:
High School Diploma
Minimum of 2 years driving tractor trailers
Previous experience driving tank trucks
(petroleum products) preferred

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
Ability to learn new tasks quickly
Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance
record

Salary will be commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Excellent benefits offered.

Only Bahamian citizens need apply and interested persons
should submit applications to arrive no later than Friday,
June 17th, 2005. Only suitable applications will be
acknowledged.

The Advertiser
DA #20660
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 27, Block 16,
Westward Villas situated in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (3)
Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms with a Cottage consisting of (1) bedroom,
(1) bathroom.
Property size: 7,800 sq. ft.
House size: 1,248 sq. ft.
Cottage size: 584 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-
7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 0641". All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Wednesday, 29th June,
2005.




NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of
the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 1090,
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision, situated in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
family residence consisting of (3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms.
Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,314 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 1693".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Wednesday 29th June, 2005.


A BHA IA copa dale fr he arbban
ny'.mnaingdretr e.TeFieIAst otwr
with I staf frmH iislret o lo s.cmaist
H iti -. ndbakto takIhirfxd set n


NOTICE
FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot "12 A 2",
Malcolm Allotment Subdivision situated in the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (3) Bedroom, (2) Bathrooms.
Building size: 1,266 sq. ft.
Property size: 5,749 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 1741".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Wednesday, 29th June, 2005.






NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of
the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or Lot #8, Donalee-Ville Subdivision
situated in the Western District of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of 2 bedrooms,
2 bathrooms.
Property size: 7,575 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,096 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 1008".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Wednesday 29th June, 2005.


NOTICE


Legal Notice
NOTICE

OLYMPUS UNIVEST LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 19th day of May 2005. Articles
of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is George Clifford Culmer, C/O BDO Mann Judd, P. 0.
Box N-10144, 3rd Floor, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.
All persons having claims against the above named Company arei
required on or before the 12th day of August 2005 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.
Dated this 13th day of June 2005.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator


~BYB~BI~RI~-_-- II I


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamian company



meets Haitian bank


4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005







WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAuE 5B


WEDNESDAY EVENING JUNE 15, 2005
7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Cantors: A Faith in Song Jewish secular and religious Israel Beyond the Horizon A Jour- Favorites
0 WPBT music performed by cantors Alberto Mizrahi, Naftali ney From Heaven to Earth" fl
Herstik and Joseph Molvany. / (CC)
The Insider (N) 60 Minutes Wednesday n (CC) The King of Yes, Dear "Jim- CSI: NY Tri-Borough" Murder vic-
O WFOR n (CC) Queens (CC) my Has tims are found in three different bor-
Changed" (CC) oughs. A (CC)
Access Holly. Psychic Detectives The search for Law & Order A jeweler with ties to Law & Order "Enemy" C (CC)
S WTVJ wood (N) (CC) a missing former paratrooper; locat- the Russian mob is one of four peo-
ing a sexual predator.. (N) pie shot on a sidewalk. (CC)
Deco Drive That '70s Show Stacked Gavin The Inside "Old Wounds" The VCU News (CC)
8 WSVN Jackie freezes on dreams about team takes up the hunt for a serial
camera. A Skyler. n (CC) killer. (N) l (PA) (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dancing With the Stars Quick-step Dancing With the Stars (Live) C Lost Tabula Rasa" C (CC)
* WPLG (CC) routines; rumbas. A (CC) (CC)

(:00) American American Justice "Confession in Angel of Death: Killer Nurse Airline Down to Airline Seat de-
A& E ustice The Question" A man recants his murder Chares Cullen claims to have killed the Wire" (CC) mands; giant
Killer Within" confession. (N) n (CC) 40 of his patients. (CC) clams. (CC)
Hardtalk BBC World World Business BBC World Fast Track BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News Report News News
BET Music Special The Parkers f The Parkers ) Girlfriends Girlfriends ( Classic ComicView
BET (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)
C C Coronation The Canadian Antiques Road- the fifth estate "Who Is Mr. No- The National (CC)
Street (CC) show "Saskatoon" (CC) body?" (CC)
C Late Night With The Contender C (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien
:C(00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN Cooper 360 (CC) ____
Reno 9111 The The Daily Show Comedy Central Comedy Central South Park The South Park "Best Drawn Together
COM deputies deal With Jon Stew- Presents Earth- Presents"Adele boys rescue help- Friends Forever" Trouble in para-
wit prison life. art(CC) quake. Givens" less calves. (CC) dise. (CC)
COURT Cops n (cc) The investigators "Mystery in a Forensic Files Forensic Files Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec-
Small Town (N) Insect evidence., ives tives
That's So Raven ** RECESS: SCHOOL'S OUT (2001, Comedy) Voices of Rickey The Suite Life of Sister, Sister
DISN "Sweeps"(CC) D'Shon Collins, Jason Davis, Ashley Johnson. Animated. Schoolchildren Zack& Cody Housing prob-
battle an evil educator.'G' (CC) "Footloser lems at college.
DI This Old House Home Theater Home Theater Home Theater Home Theater Home Theater Weekend Re.
DIY n(CC) Workshop Workshop Workshop Workshop Workshop modeling
W Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Made in Ger- Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth Tagestema many Depth
Dr, 90210 (Part 2 Anna Nicole Smith: The El True Hollywood StoryThe life of Anna Party at the Partyatthe
E __of 2) Nicole Smith. (CC) Palms (N) Palms
(:00) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Texas Rangers. From Ameinquest Field in Arlington, Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
ESPN Texas. (Live) (CC)
ESPNI (00) MLB Baseball Teams to Be Announced. (Live) SportsCenter- International Edi-
I IN I _tion (Uve)
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EWVTN Lady _________logueI
T :00) FitNation Chasing Lance (N) FitNation "Defending Your Health" The Extremists The Extremists
FIT TV eting styles. Martial arts classes. N) C (CC) n (CC)
FOXNC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
(:00) MLB Baseball Milwaukee Brewers at Tampa Bay Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field in Best Damn Sports Show Period
FSNFL St. Petersburg, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC)
GOLF (:00) Live From the U.S. Open (Live) 19th Hole 10th Anniver-
_-___ _I______sary Special
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire l Dog Eat Dog n (CC) Dog Eat Dog n (CC)
GSN (CC)__________________(C
G4Tech (:00) Attack of X-Pay Cheat Icons Judgment Day Cinematech (N) Cinematech (N)
the Show (N) "Rave Master." R
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Point After" WEDDING DAZE (2004, Comedy) John Larroquette, Karen Valentine,
HALL Texas Ranger n (CC) French Stewart. Parents prepare for their three daughters' nuptials.
n (CC)
Real Renos Mov- Designed to Sell House Hunters Buy Me "House Hot Property Million Pound Property Experi.
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shed. 0 tion"(CC) (CC) gency house in Leamington.
INSP MorrisCerullo Breakthrough Zola LevittPre- This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Old Time Gospel
N ___(CC) sents (CC)' (CC) day Hour (CC)
The Batman Sabrina,the The Fresh Friends The girls Will & Grace Everybody Everybody
KTLA "Riddled" l Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air demand a poker Grace goes to a Loves Ramond Loves Raymond
(CC) (C (CC) /3 (CC) rematch. school dance. Ray volunteers. Amarital secret.
WITHIN THESE WALLS (2001, Drama) Ellen Burstyn, WALL OF SECRETS (2003, Suspense) Nicole Eggert, Dean McDermott.
LIFE Laura Dem. Female convicts leam how to train dogs to A woman's neighbor dies under mystenous circumstances. (CC)
aid the disabled. (CC) (DVS)
MSNBC 00 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Situation With Tucker Carl- Scarborough Country
NICK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Unfabulous Full House Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of TheCosby
NI K Boy Genius SquarePants C Cliques. (CC) (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show (C C)
T (:00)Gilmore ** NOW & FOREVER (2001, Drama) Mia Kirshner, Adam Beach. News ( (CC) News
N'V Girls (CC) Longtime soulmates must fight for their friendship.
OLN Outdoor Out- U.S. Army Rangers: The Best of Bull Riding PBR The Nile Invitational. From Billings, Mont. C (CC)
OL takes trie'Best
SPEED :009)NASCAR Build or Bust Unique Whips (N) NASCAR Nation
action (N)
(:00) Billy Gra- Behind the Hal Lindsey Taking Authority Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN am Classic Scenes (CC) (CC) Presents (CC)
Crusades
Everybody Everybody Everybody The Real Gilligan's Island The The Real Gilligan's Island More
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond contestants face elimination from contestants are eliminated. (N)
Early retirement. Robert models. "The Mentor" the island. (N)
(:00)In a Fix Trading Spaces: Town and Coun- Untold Stories of the E.R. "No Untold Stories of the E.R, "We
TLC Nightmares and try New Yorkers trade places with Down Time" Mysterious illness. (CC) Need a Miracle" Injured teenagers.
Beams" Oklahoma farmers. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order The death of a dis- ** *s JERRY MAGUIRE (1996, Comedy-Drama) Tom Cruise, Cuba
TNT der Bumed" A abled teenage boy raises questions Gooding Jr., RenBe Zellweger. A crisis of conscience costs a sports agent
(CC) (DVS) about the motive. nC his job.
TOON GrimAdven- Life & Times of MuchaLucha Ed, Edd n Eddy Static Shock Teen Titans Ti- Dragon Ball Z
S tures Juniper Lee n (CC) "Linked" (CC) tans East" "Reunions"
TV5 (:00)L'lnvitation Envoy6 special (:15) Histoires Arte reportage TV5 Le Journal
T(6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Don Francisco Presenta Carmen
UNIV i Dominicci; Luny y Tunes; Conjunto
Atardecer.
:00) The Dead Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA one "Broken An abducted girl faces certain death A murdered teacher's illicit sexual Two famous singers ignore their
Circle" (CC) in three days. Cl (CC) history is exposed. (CC) children's well-being. (CC)
VH1 100 Greatest Kid 100 Greatest Kid Stars "Hour 2" 100 Greatest Kid Stars "Hour 3" InsideOut Juli- Fabulous Life
Stars _(N) ette Lewis. C Of... C
Home Improve- ** THE 6TH MAN (1997, Comedy) Marion Wayans, Kadeem Hardison, WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WGN ment Dreams of David Paymer. A ghost helps his younger brother bask in basketball glory.
literary success. C (CC)
Everybody Beauty and the Geek (N) n (CC) Smallville The star player from Met WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond U visits Clark to try to recruit him for Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
A marital secret. the football team. C (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) All of Us Robert Eve Shelly cooks Veronica Mars Veronica is suspi- Dr. Phil
W SBK (CC) and Tia find a for Grant. C cious when Duncan wins an election
pregnancy test. (CC) for student council president.
S(615)**50 EMPIRE FALLS (2005, Comedy-Drama) (Part 2 of 2) P. Diddy the Bad Entourage The The Comeback
HBO-E FIRST DATES Ed Harris, Helen Hunt. A restaurant worker lives in a Boys of Comedy New Car" Valerie goes to
(2004) 'PG-13' declining New England town. C 'NR' (CC) (CC) New York. (CC)
6:30) ** VAN. The Wire "All Due Respect" Omar * A CINDERELLA STORY (2004, Romance-Come- (:45)Costas
HBO-P SHNGPOINT makes strikes against stash houses, dy)Hilary Duff. A teenager meets a high-school quar- NOW n (CC)
(1997) C 'NR' C (CC) terback online. n 'PG' (CC)


WRONGFULLY ACCUSED (1998, Comedy) Leslie (:15) ** 50 FIRST DATES (2004, Romance-Comedy) Adam Sandier,
HBO-W Nielsen, Richard Crenna. A violinist is falsely accused Drew Barrymore, Rob Schneider. A man falls for a woman who has short-
of killing his benefactor. n 'PG-13' (CC) term memory loss. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) ** ROMEO & JULIET (1996, Drama) *** CONFIDENCE (2003, Crime Drama) Edward (:45)The Making
H BO-S Leonardo DiCaprio. Two youths from rival families Bums, Rachel Weisz. A con man must swindle a Of: 50 First
share a doomed love affair. C 'PG-13' (CC) crooked banker to repay a gangster. Cl 'R' (CC) Dates r (CC)
(6:00) THE PEO- (:15) *, ENVY (2004, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Rachel Weisz. A TAKING LIVES (2004) An-
MAX-E PLE VS. LARRY man becomes jealous of his wealthy friend. C 'PG-13' (CC) gelina Jolie. An FBI profiler helps
FLYNT (1996) detectives search for a killer 'R'
(:15) ** GOTHIKA (2003, Horror) Halle Berry, ** DAREDEVIL (2003, Action) Ben Affleck, Jennifer Gamer, Michael
MOMAX Robert Downey Jr., Charles S. Dutton. Strange events Clarke Duncan. A blind man is a lawyer by day and a superhero by night.
plague a confined psychologist. n 'R' (CC) C) 'PG-13' (CC)
BOBBY JONES: * THE CORE (2003, Science Fiction) Aaron Eckhart, Hilary Swank, (:15) ** SEEING OTHER PEO-.
SHOW STROKE OF GE- Deiroy Lindo. iTV. Earth's dead core must spin again or humanity will per- PLE (2004) Jay Mohr. iTV Premiere.
NIUS (2004) ish. 'PG-13' (CC) n'R' (CC)
(6:05) **% * s IT RUNS IN THE FAMILY (2003, Comedy-Drama) Michael Dou- ** WILD ORCHID (1990) Mickey
TMC BLOW OUT glas, Kirk Douglas, Rory Culkin. A dysfunctional New York family tries to Rourke. A lawyer finds passion dur-
(1981) 'R' (CC) communicate. ,C 'PG-13' (CC) ing a business trip to Brazil.


REA. W .DU.ITURFI


I


Daybeds


l: 9 6 6 3


3 25 WOOD
46 Madeira Street


Oerfeember


Let Chkalie the
Bakcimican PLuppet caid
his sidekick Derek p-iL4+
some smilesI on yoLAr '
kids's faces.



Bring your4 ckildien to the

MCcHtappy Houia McDonald's in
Palmdale every Thurisday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm duAing the
movth of 3une 2005,


Enjoy Great Food, Prizs and Lots of Fun.


i'm lovin' it


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS







PAGE 6B. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


GN-224


SUPREME




THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00154

IN THE ESTATE OF Marjorie Grace Jedny, late of the
County of Hunterdon, in the State of New Jersey, one of
the States of the United States of America.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by SANDRENA C.
BENJAMIN of East Bay Street, in the Eastern District on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to SUSAN J. BROCK,
the administratrix by the Surrogate of the County of Hunterdon,
in the State of New Jersey, United States of America on the 24th
day of February A.D. 2004.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00268

IN THE ESTATE OF Malissa Williamson Roos, late of
the County of Riverside, in the State of California, one
of the States of the United States of America,
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by LOUREY C. SMITH
of No. 44 George Street in the City of Nassau on the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of Testamentary
in the above estate granted to MICHEAELY. ROOS, the Executor
by the Superior Court of California County, Riverside, one of the
state of the United States of America on the 22nd day of August
A.D. 2002.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
-- ------- ----------------------
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00273

Whereas JONATHAN FORBES of Chippingham, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for letters of administration of the real and personal estate
of THOMAS FORBES, late, of the City of Nassau, in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Island of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JUNE 16, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00274

Whereas LOWELL J. MORTIMER of the Eastern District, in
the Island of New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for RUTH SWEETING WALKES has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
of the real and personal estate of OSWALD ATHELSON
WALKES, late of 3373 Thomas Avenue, Miami, Florida, one of
the States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00275

Whereas ANDREW P. BOWE, of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney
by Deed of Power of Attorney, has made applications to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for letters of Administration of the real and
personal estate of ELVINA DEAN late, of Fifth Street and Poinciana
Avenue, of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas,


deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005


IN THE ESTATE OF Lucy Sermarini, late of 432 Melrose
Avenue, Maple Shade in the State of New Jersey one of
the United States of America,


deceased


NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by HARRY BRACTON
SANDS of Skyline Drive, in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of Testamentary
in the above estate granted to DENISE M. CZYZEWICZ, the
Executor by the Burlington County Surrogate's Court in the State
of New Jersey, one of the states of the United States of America
on the 1st day of Novembr A.D. 2004.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00279

Whereas RICHARD HEBERT ROGER LIGHTBOURNE of
Mareva House, No. 4 George Street, on the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Mallory Vail
Weymann has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of
the real and personal estate of DOLORES LUTTERBACH VAIL,
late of apartment 2206, 122 Palmers Hill Road, in the City of
Stanford, in the County of Fairfield, in the State of Connecticut
06902, one of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00280

IN THE ESTATE OF Sofia L. Dobell a.k.a. SOFIA
LOPEZ DOBELL late of the Town of Baraboo, in Sauk
County, in the State of Wisconsin, U.S.A.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate Side by LORI ELIZABETH
LOWE of Lakeview Road, Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Domiciliary Letters in
the above estate granted to PAUL BEAGAN, the Personal
Representative by the Circuit Court of Sauk County, in the State
of Wisconsin, US.A., on the 25th day of April, 2002

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00282

Whereas RONALD MISSICK of Lango Place, in the City of
Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration as
Creditor of the real and personal estate of JOSEPH BERTRAM
MISSICK a.k.a. BERTRAM JOSEPH MISSICK, late of the
City of the City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
------- ------------------- -

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00283

Whereas DERRICK NATHANIEL MUSGROVE a.k.a. DEREK
NATHANIEL MUSGROVE of Adderley Street, Fox Hill, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the lawful son has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real
and personal Estate of ORELIA ANTHA MUSGROVE, late, of
49 Victoria Boulevard, Joan's Heights, Southern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
- -- -- --... ... --... .. --... .. .
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00284

Whereas DARNELL HANNA, of Golden Gates, and STEPHANIE
HANNA-BOWE both of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of MABLE HANNA aka MABEL
HANNA, late, of Lewis Street, Nassau Village, New Providence
one of the Island of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard


I


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00288


IN THE ESTATE OF ARMAND A. ANGELONE, late
of Cuyahoga County, in the State of Ohio, one of the
States of the United States of America.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by RICHARD RAWLE
MAYNARD of the 3rd Floor Millennium House, The Mall Drive,
in the City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealed Grant
of Entry Appointing Fiduciary Letters of Authority in the above
estate granted to GWEN ANGELONE, the Executrix by the
Probate Court of Cuyahoga County, in the Sate of Ohio, U.S.A.
on the 30th day of April, 2002

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
. - - - -
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00291

Whereas ROSALIE LIGHTFOOT of East Storr Court, Yellow
Elder Gardens, New Providence, The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for letters of administration
of the real and personal estate of ANTHONY LIGHTFOOT, late
of the East Storr Court, Yellow Elder Gardens, New Providence,
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


2005/PRO/npr/00276


JUNE. 13,14,15


I I "


I I


a r


by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00285

Whereas BERNARD A. MILLER, of Harold Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for SAMUEL
ROSS, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the real
and personal estate of ELSIE AGALLA FRANKS, late, of the
city of West Palm Beach, Florida, USA, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00286

IN THE ESTATE OF HARRIET J. RICE late of Broward
County in the State of Florida, one of the States of the
United States of America,
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by SIDNEY
ALEXABDER CAMBRIDGE, JR., of No. 9 Chancery Lane,
Winton Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, BERYL ANDREA
WILLIAMS of No. 8 Benson Road in Dannottage Estates, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to LINDA DIANE
STEINLAGE, the Personal Representative by the Circuit Court
for Broward County, Florida, US.A., on the 6th day of November,
2003

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00287

IN THE ESTATE OF EDWARD BEVIER late of 10495
Whittaker Road, County of Washtenaw, Ypsilanti, in the
State of Michigan one of the States of the United States
of America.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by VANRIA M.
LIGHTBOURN of Stratton Drive, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing
of a Grant of Letters of Authority for Personal Representative in
the above estate granted to MARION BEVIER, the Personal
Representative by Washtenaw Courty Court, Probate Division in
the State of Michigan, U.S.A., on the 15th day of March, 2002

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar








.I IL I I IIU I'IL- UJ ,iLiL. .u


WtLUNtiUAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE


PRCESVTERHOUSCOOPERS 0


PrlcewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House
East Hill Street
P.O. Box N-3910
Naau, The Bahamas
Wcbsitc: www.pwc.com
E-mail: pwcbs@bs.pwc.com
Telephone (242) 302-5300
Facsimile (242) 302-5350


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT


To the Shareholders of Summit Insurance Company Limited


We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Summit Insurance Company Limited (the
Company) as of 31 December 2004, and the related statements of income, changes in
shareholders' equity and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the
responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on
these financial statements based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those
Standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining,
on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An
audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that
our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial
position of Summit Insurance Company Limited as of 31 December 2004, and the results of its
operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards.





Chartered Accountants
29April 2005


Summit Insurance Company Limited
(Incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2004
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)
2004
S


ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents (Note 3)
Term deposits (Note 3)
Due from reinsurers
Due from agents (Note 15)
Claims advances to agent (Note 15)
Other receivables and prepayments (Note 4)

Available-for-sale investments (Note 5)
Originated loan investments (Note 6)
Investment property (Note 7)
Property, plant and equipment, net (Note 8)


LIABILITIES
General insurance funds:
Unearned premiums
Outstanding claims (Note 9)

Other liabilities:
Due to reinsurers
Claims advances from reinsurers
Other payables and accruals


SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital:
Authorized: 10,000,000 shares of $1 each
Issued and fully paid: 5,000,000 shares
Gnal reserve (Note 10)
Reaind earnings


11,683,584
4,252,683
1,001,405
4,907,521
6,128,897
122.954
28,097,044
1,369,396
515,606
225,513





6,677,639
6.295,253
12,972,892

2,609,432
6,313,745

2,191,73970



5,000,000
1,000,000
2.412.364
8.412j"4


2003
S
(Note 20)

13,132,725
2,226,690
196,763
5,495,906

186.891
21,238,975
1,183,014
515,606
230,362
353,664




7,852,898
5.747.927
13,600,825

1,679,542

259.108
15,539,475



5,000,000
1,000,000
7,982,146
7.982.146


TOTAL LIAILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY


SIGNED O EHALF OF THE BOARD:


Director Director

29 April 2
Date
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


Summit Insurance Company Limited

Statement of Income
For the Year Ended 31 December 2004
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)


2004
$


Premiums written (Note 15)
Less: Premiums ceded to reinsurers

Net premiums written

Decrease / (increase) in unearned premiums reserve
Portfolio transfer (Note 12)

NET PREMIUMS EARNED

Claims incurred, less recovehes from reinsurers
Net commissions (Note 13)
Cost of catastrophe/excess of loss reinsurance
Premium tax



UNDERWRITING SURPLUS

Interest income
Dividend income
Net change in unrealized appreciation/ (depreciation) on
available-for-sale investments
Other income


2003
$ .
(Note 20)


29,179,285 29,364,467
(14.063.972) (12,007,380)

15,115,313 17,357,087


1,175,258
(742,291)


(59,057)


15.548,280 17,298,030


(7,234,412)
(2,362,112)
(3,822,842)
(453.459)


(6,298,683)
(2,076,855)
(4,852,837)
(384,567)


(13.872.825) (13,612,942)

1,675,455 3,685,088


605,816
92,144

186,382
17,466


546,714
103,537

(79,795)
45,000


2.577,263 4300,544


Employees' costs
Depreciation
General and administrative expenses


(666,273)
(23,064)
(460,208)


(583,710)
(40,978)
(406,939)


(1,149.545) (1,031,627)

NET INCOME FOR THE YEAR 1.427.718 3.268.917




The accompanying notes are an Integral part of these financial statements.


Summit Insurance Company Limited

Statement of Changes in Shareholders' Equity
For the Year Ended 31 December 2004
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)


Shhre General Retained
-Canital Reserve Earnins


Balance as of 1 January 2003 5,000,000


General reserve (Note 10)

Net income for the year


$ $


(Note 20)

(286,771) 4,713,229


1,000,000 (1,000,000)

3,268917 33,268.917


Balance as of 31 December 2003 1000000


Balance as of 1 January 2004 5,000,000

Dividends paid (Note 11) -

Net income for the year


1,000,000 1,982,146


7,982,146


(997,500) (997,500)


1.4272718


1A427,718


Balance as of 31 December 2004 1000.000 2.4126
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
Summit Insurance Company Limited


Statement of Cash Flows
For the Year Ended 31 December 2004
(Amounts expressed in Bahamian dollars)


Cash flows from operating activities:
Net income for the year
Adjustments for:
Depreciation
Interest income
Dividend income
Net change in unrealized (appreciation)/ depreciation
on available-for-sale investments
Unearned premiums
Operating (loss)/ income before working
capital changes

(Increase) I decrease in operating assets:
Term deposits
Due from reinsurers
Due from agents
Claims advances to agent
Other receivables and prepayments

Increase / (decrease) In operating liabilities:
Outstanding claims
Due to reinsurers
Claims advances from reinsurers
Other payables and accruals
Net cash (used in) / from operating activities

Cash flows from investing activities:
Interest received
Purchase of available-for-sale investments
Purchase of fixed assets
Net cash from investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities
Dividends received
SDividends paid
Net cash (used in) / from financing activities
Net (decrease) / increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the year


2004
$


2003
S


1,427,718 3,268,917


23,064
(605,816)
(92,144)

(186,382)
(1.175.259)


40,978
(546,714)
(103,537)

79,795
59.057


(608,819) 2,798,496


(2,025,993)
.(804,642)
588,385
(6,128,897)
(26,580)


547,326
929,890
6,313,745
36,562
(1,179,023)


697,166

(61.095)
636,071


91,311
(997.500)
(906.189)
(1,449,141)
13,132,725
11g3 8


(106,033)
2,960,717
(420,011)

19,416


(173,321)
(890,432)

51.923
4.240.755,


501,451
(73,200)
(32,485)
395.766


79,635

79.635
4,716,156
8.416.569
1312.2


Tntal


I - -


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
Summit Insurance Company Limited

Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004
1. Incorporation and Activity

Summit Insurance Company Limited (the Company) was incorporated on 1 December 1994
and commenced operations on that date. The Company is licensed under the Insurance Act
of 1969 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas to operate as an other than life insurer.

The registered office of the Company is located at the offices of Graham Thompson &
Co., Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.

The average number of persons employed by the Company during the year was 7 (2003:
7).

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements
are set out below:

(a) Basis of preparation

The Company's financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost
convention except for available-for-sale investments which are stated at fair value
and in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The
preparation of financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires management
to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and
liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of
the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses
during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

(b) Foreign currency
The currency of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas is the Bahamian dollar.
Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the Bahamian
dollar are translated at the closing rate of exchange prevailing at the end of the
reporting period. Income and expenditure items dominated in currencies other
than the Bahamian dollar are translated at a rate of exchange approximating the
actual rate prevailing on the date of the transaction. Such foreign exchange
differences are included in statement of income.
Summit Insurance Company Limited

Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004


2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

(c) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash in hand and at banks and term deposits with
original contractual maturities of three months or less.

(d) Valuation of Investments
The Company classified its investments into the following categories: available-for-
sale and originated loans. Management determines the appropriate classification of
its investments at the time of purchase. Investments intended to be held for an
indefinite period of time, which may be sold in response to the needs for liquidity or
changes in interest rates, exchange rates or equity prices are classified as available-
for-sale investments. Available-for-sale investments are initially recognized at cost
(which includes transaction costs) and are subsequently carried at fair value. Fair
value is determined as follows: (i) for investments listed on a national securities
exchange, at the closing bid price and (ii) for investments that are not'listed on a
national securities exchange, at representative bid quotations. Originated loans are
investments created by the Company by providing money directly to a debtor and


Iare measured at amortized cost.
| 11 I II I I I I I I I II i


6 I utal


-1


7B


7B







































7,







I
I


S


/. ,








PAGF RR WEDNESDAY. JUNE 15. 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


(e) Investment property

The Company classified its property held for long-term rental yields and capital
appreciation as investment property. Investment property comprise of residential
property, which is treated as long-term investments and is carried at cost less
accumulated depreciation. Investment property will be depreciated on a straight-
line basis over 50 years.

Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with
carrying amount and are included in operating profit. Repairs and maintenance
costs are charged to the statement of income when the expenditure is incurred.
Summit Insurance Company Limited

Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004


2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

(f) Property, plant and equipment

All property, plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less accumulated
depreciation, including leasehold improvements. Depreciation is calculated on a
straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives as follows:
*Motor vehicles. 3 years
Furniture and equipment. 3 years *.
.Computer software. .. 3 5 years
Leasehold improvements Lesser of lease and 20 years
Land No depreciation is charged on land

Where thecarrying amount of an asset is greater than its estimated recoverable
amount, it is written down immediately to its recoverable amount.

Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the
carrying amount and are included in operating profit,:Repairs and maintenance
costs are charged to the statement of income when the expenditure is incurred.

(g) General insurance finds .

Unearned premiums represent the proportion of the net premiums written which
relate to periods of insurance subsequent to the balance sheet date after a deduction
of 10% representing commission expense.

Outstanding claims comprise the Company's net share of the estimated cost of all
claims incurred but not settled at the balance sheet date whether reported or not.

Provision for claims incurred but not reported is estimated by the Company's
directors at approximately 1% of the gross written premiums for the period.

Summit Insurance Company Limited

Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004


2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)
(h) Investment income, revenue and expense recognition
All purchases and sales of investments are recognized on the trade date, which is the
date that the Company commits to purchase or sell the assets. Realized gains or
losses and unrealized appreciation or depreciation arising from changes in the fair
value of available-for-sale investments are recognized in the statement of income ini
the period in which they arise.
Premiums are recognized as revenue over the periods covered by the related policies
after allowing for premiums ceded. Commissions are recorded as earned when the
policies are sold. No adjustment is made for commissions relating to unexpired
portion of long-term premiums.

All other revenues and expenses of the Company are recognized on the accrual
Sbasis.-.,.

'( ..Premlumtax
Effective 1 October 2003, premium tax was incurred at a rate of 3% of gross
premiums written less that element which is recoverable from reinsurers.

(J) Accounting for operating lease
The Company leases office space under an operating lease agreement. Payments
made under operating leases are charged to the statement of income in the period to
which the payment relates.

3. Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of:


Cash in hand and. at banks
Term deposits


Less: Term deposits 90 days and over




Summit Insurance Company Limited

Noe to theFinacialStatements
31 December 2004


4. Other Receivables andPrepayments

Other receivables and prepayments comprise:




Interest receivable
Dividend receivable
Other receivables
Prepayments


5. Available-for-Sale Investments




At beginning of year
Additions
Net change in unrealised appreciation/ (depreciation)
on available-for-sale investments
At end of year ...

6. Originated Loan Investments
Originated loan investments comprise;


Fixed income securities:


Bahamas Government Treasury stock
Bahamas Government Treasury stock
Bridge authority bonds
Preference shares:

Commonwealth Bank Ltd Class "D"
Caribbean Crossings Ltd.
Cable Bahamas


2004 2003
.. .. .

11,683,584 1,066,669
_4,252,683 :14.292.746..:

1. 5,936,267 15,359,415
(4 683) (2.226.690)

riHS8 D 3272


2004
$


53,893
24,735
4,686
39,640



2004
$


Interest Rate Due Date


Prime + 0.875% 14/06/2011
Prime + 0.375% 14/0612011
Prime + 1.500% 24/03/2029


9.000%
8.000%
7.500%


2003



145,243
23,902
400

196.91


2003
$
(Note 20)


1,183,014 1,189,609
73,200

186.382 (79.795)


2004 2003
$ S


32,100 32,100
21,906 21,906
11,600 11,600


250,000 250,000
100,000 100,000
100.000 100,.000
15.,606 515.606


perpetual
perpetual
30/06/2005


Summit Insurance Company Limited


Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004 .

7. Investment Property
On 6 July 2001, the Company acquired a condominium located on AbaLo Island whichlis
classified as investment property. Movement in investment property can be summarized as
follows:
2004 2003


Cost at beginning of year

Depreciation expense

Net book value at end of year

8. Property, Plant and Equipme




Year ended 31 December 2003
Opening net book amount
Additions
Depreciation charge ,.
Closing net book amount

-As of 31 December 2003
Cost or valuation (Note 20)
Accumulated depreciation
(Note 20)


Net book amount
Year ended 31 December 2004
Opening net book amount
Additions
Depreciation charge
Closing net book amount

As of 31 December 2004
Cost or valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount


Summit Insurance Company Limited

Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004
9. Outstanding Claims


Gross claims reserve
Claims reserve recoverable
from reinsurers

Provision for reported claims

Provision for incurred but not
reported claims


230,362


242,450


(4.849 112.088

225.513 230.32


ent


Leasehold
Led Im tnmn


Furniture
and Computer
Fou.tm.nt. S tan..


T s0


s s s s


278,052 40,034 31,983 350,09
21,985 10,500 32,485
(8.579) (20.311 (28.890
27.52 31.455 33.657 10.50 35,1"4


278,052 46,951 202,497- 10,500 538,000












(24,073) (178,478) *-. 2551
(15.49) (1 68.8401 (184.33e)
2738.051 11.45 .33.65.10.500 153


278,052 31,455 33,657 10,500 353,664
-, 61,095 61,095
(8.577) (9.638) - (18,215)
278.052 22.878 24.019 71.595 396.544


278,052 46,951 202,497 71,595 599,095
(24.073) (178.478) (202.551'
273.0-2 22.38 -- 4.012-71.59 36684


2004
S
24,859,468


2003
S
6,713,792


(18.856.008) (1.259.510)

6,003,460 5,454,282


293.645


~~Z2 5 7J7I2ZZ


10. General Reserve
On 24 March 2004, the Board of Directors approved an appropriation of $1,000,000 to a
general reserve account for unforeseeable risks and future losses. General reserves can only
be distributed following the approval of the Board of Directors.


1.


Dividends

On24 March 2004, theBoar ofDirtrsdeclared a4iidend of $997,500 in respetof
earnings for the year ended 31 December 2003. Dividends were paid to the shareholders bn
record as of 19 May 2004. Subsequent to'31 December 2004, the Board of Directors
proposed a dividend of $262,500 in respect of eamings for the year ended 31 December
2004.


12. Portfolio Transfer

As of 1 January 2004, the Company reduced its percentage retention on its properly
portfolio resulting in the Company transferring the unearned premiums and outstanding
claims reserves to reinsurers, along with the funds corresponding to those liabilities.

13. Net Commissions

This amount comprises $5,673,384 (2003: $5,383,659) paid to agents less $3,311,272
(2003: $3,306,804) received from reinsurers.
Su;:m.. l t Insurance Company Limited

'Notes to the Fianelal Statements
31 December2004*
14. Retirement Benefits
The Company's employees are members of the Insurance Management (Bahamas) Limited
S. . and Summit Insurance Company Limited Pension Plan, a defined contributory plA
Covering all eligible employees. The Plan was established on 1 January 1990 and.is
administered by Colina Financial Advisors. The Plan requires employees to contribute 5%
or their basic salary and thme employer contributes an equivalent amount WThe amo
Recognized as an expense for the year ended 31 December 2004 is 526,891 (2003: $26,525)
and is included in general and administrative expenses in the statement of income.

.'. 'Related Party Transactions ..

Related parties include those entities and directors which have the ability to control or
,exercise significant influence over the Company in making financial or operational
decisions, and entities that are controlled, jointly controlled or significantly influenced by
them. Of the premiums written during the year 99% (2003: 95%) were generated by a
related agent whose principal holds 23% of the Company's shares. Amounts due from the
related agent at 31 December 2004 amounted to $4,875,458 (2003: $5,196,390) and is
included in due from agents in the balance sheet. In addition, the Company advanced
$6,128,897 to the related agent for outstanding claims as a result of damages caused by
Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in September 2004.

16. Contingent Liabilities

The Company is involved in litigation matters arising in the normal course of business and
it is not expected that the disposition of such litigation will have a material effect on the
financial position of the Company.

17. Commitments

The Company entered into a lease agreement with Out Island Traders Limited for a
period of 5 years commencing on 1 September 2002. The future minimal rental
commitments under this lease are as follows:


Not later than one year
Later than one year and less than 5 years


2004
$

39,438
73,033


2003
$

39,438
113,932


18. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Financial instruments utilized by the Company include recorded financial assets and
liabilities. These financial instruments are carried at fair value or are relatively short-term in
nature and accordingly, the estimated fair values are not significantly different from the
carrying value as reported in the balance sheet.
Summit Insurance Company Limited

Notes to the Financial Statements
31 December 2004


Financial Instruments Financial Risk Management


The Company engages in transactions that may expose it to credit risk, interest rate risk
and liquidity risk in the normal course of business. The Company's financial
performance is affected by its capacity to understand and effectively manage these rfsks.
The Company's challenge is not only to measure and monitor these risks, but also to
manage them as profit opportunities.


"~ ~-) -'--'---~ -~~--- ~- ~ - -- ~ i;


:: ':


291,793


.:::


__


V










Credit risk.
Credit risk arises from the failure of counterparty to perform according to the terms of the
contract. From this perspective, the Company's credit risk exposure 'is primarily
concentrated as follows:
(i) Deposits placed with other financial institutions. The Company's deposits are
placed with well-known high quality financial institutions.
(ii) Reinsurance arrangements with reinsurers. In the normal course of business, the
Company seeks to limit the amount of loss on any one policy by reinsuring certain
levels of risk in various areas of exposure with other insurers. Reinsurance is
primarily placed using a combination of proportional, facultative and excess of
loss treaties. Obtaining reinsurance does not, however, relieve the Company of its
primary obligations to the policyholders. The Company is exposed to the risk that
the reinsurers may be unable to fulfill their obligations under the contracts. The
Company seeks to mitigate this risk by placing its reinsurance coverage with
reputable companies and syndicates.

Interest rate risk
Interest re-pricing dates occurring on the maturity of term deposit balances exposes the
Company to interest rate risk as market interest rate changes may occur at times outside of
the scheduled maturity dates of term deposit balances. The Company manages this risk by
maintaining tear deposits which mature on a short-term basis.

Liquidity risk
Liquidity risk is the possibility that the Company might not have the necessary cash to meet
its contractual obligations. The Company manages its liquidity by attempting to match
liabilities with assets of similar maturity periods.
Summit Insurance Company Limited
Note to the Fl ndal Statements
31 December 2004

20. Correspoding Figures
The corresponding figures for available-for-sale investments and originated loan
investments on the balance sheet, depreciation and general and administrative expenses on
the statement of income, retained earnings on the statement of changes in shareholders'
equity and fixed asset cost and accumulated depreciation in Note 8, have been reclassified
to conform with the cument year's presentation.












This development in Ocean Club is comprised of
88 residences and a marina.


PREQUALIFICATION FOR CONTRACTORS & SUPPLIERS

All interested parties, please complete a
Contractor's Prequalification Statement on their company
letterhead and forward to:

email ,tbrisby@pbwlbahamastcom
mail: Paradise Blue Water Ltd.,
RO. Box SS-6386,
Nassau, Bahamas


Thank You.






Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

is presently considering applications for a


OPERATIONS MANAGER

CreditSuisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards which go
beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investment counseling and advisory services. Our total commitment is always to our clients
'. aind '- we focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

Requirements:
- A minimum of five (5) years experience in banking with a large international institution

- Knowledge of trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities markets with
particular emphasis on emerging market derivative instruments
Ability to speak and write in Portuguese fluently in order to converse with clients directly and
process documentation internally

Deep knowledge and working experience with Microsoft products (including access, excel, etc.)

Must have working knowledge of GLOBUS application

Must be familiar with EUROCLEAR procedures and have deep knowledge of EUCLID application.

Significant experience in an extremely active and dynamic operational environment

Comprehensive knowledge of operational and information technology principles, practices and
processes sufficient to interpret/analyze complex issues and develop innovative solutions to the
challenges effecting the business unit

Strong problem solving and decision-making skills


Approved investments


to have $1.35bn impact


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
INVESTMENT pro-
jects already approved by
the Government are
expected to have a direct
economic impact of $1.35
billion and create 16,477
jobs, with an indirect
impact of $2.7 billion.
In a Budget presenta-
tion that showed she
could 'talk telephone
numbers', Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, minister of
financial services and
investments, predicted
that approved investment
projects would have an
indirect economic impact
of $2.7 billion.
She based her statistics
on one third of an invest-
ment project's total cost
staying in the economy -
the direct economic
impact and used a "con-
servative" multiplier of 2x
the total cost to deter-
mine the indirect impact.
She defined the indirect
impact as including more
hirings by other business-
es and increased govern-
ment revenues.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said that adding together
approved projects with
those that were still under
consideration gave a cap-
ital investment figure of
$16 billion, jobs created
of 137,519, a direct eco-
nomic impact of $3.3 bil-
lion and indirect impact
of $6.6 billion.


* ALLYSON Maynard-Gibson


Incentive negotiations



delay Ginn investment


FROM page one
foundation for the redevelop-
ment of a community devastat-
ed by two hurricanes, Frances
and Jeanne, Ginn has also pro-
posed to install sewerage and
water lines to points at its prop-
erty line to allow sewer and
water connections to the West
End settlement.
They will also provide, on an
annual basis, an agreed level of


FROM page one
international commitments.
FATF has confirmed that the
Bahamas is in fact meeting its
commitments on an expedi-
tious basis."
The BFSB said it had been
in consistent dialogue with the
Government and regulators on
FATF-related matters.
Meanwhile, Mr Moree said:
"It is both unfortunate and dis-
appointing that given the very
significant effort the Bahamas
has been making to upgrade
the regulatory environment,
and to comply with all reason-
able international standards
and expectations with regard


water and sewerage service to
the settlement.
These provisions were said to
have been initially included in
the Heads of Agreement in
March of this year.
It is believed that together
with the jobs produced by the
project, the provision of the
foundation and water and sew-
erage connections will not only
enable the reestablishment of
the West End settlement, but


to our anti-money laundering
regime, that the FATF would
continue to hold a gun to our
head by extending the moni-.
toring period for the
Bahamas."
Given that most other delist-
ed countries had been
removed from FATF monitor-
ing, Mr Moree added: "There
doesn't seem to be any proper
basis for keeping the Bahamas
under scrutiny through an
additional period of monitor-
ing."
The Financial Services Con-
sultative Forum chairman said
none of the other delisted
countries had shown "a greater
commitment" to enhance


the creation of that communit)
as a major population and cony
mercial centre of the BahamasI
An additional provision
included in the Heads of Agree-
ment involves the establishment
of a $500,000 fund for hurricane
emergencies.
The details of this provision
however, have not been full,
fleshed out, but project official
have placed it within the Head$
of Agreement.-


supervision:of their financial
services industries over the
past four to five years.
He added: "''In such circum-
stances, it is difficult to under-
stand the agenda of the FATF
in refusing to remove the
Bahamas from the monitoring
list.
"It would appear that all
reasonable efforts are being
made to co-operate with prop-
erly documented requests
from other jurisdictions, and
hopefully the FATF will
recognise this fact in the near
future and remove the
Bahamas from the list and the
stigma attached to being on
that list."


Registrar General office


'to surpass estimates'


FROM page one
imaged and made accessible
over a secure Internet link by
December 31.
As a result, law firms would
no longer have to "wait months
or years" for their documents
to be returned.
She added: "After the deeds
registry is completed we will
then move on to automating the
births, deaths, marriages and
industrial property registries so
that by December 31, 2005, the
entire registry system will be
automated. Thus once the infra-
structure is in place, a customer
from any location in the
Bahamas will be able to utilise
the Internet and obtain registry
services."
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the Registrar General's corpo-
rate registry had been automat-
ed during phases one and two of
the project, and 200 agents were


now using the Agent Internet
Module (AIM) system to file
documents and register compa-
nies online.
The Registrar General's
Department had also been cho-
sen as the 'pilot test' agency for
a programme, initiated by the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
and the Treasury, that will
enable Bahamians to pay for
government services with cred-
it cards.
"Thus clients anywhere in the
world will be able to access the
services of the Registrar Gen-
eral's Department and make
credit card payments online,"
the minister said.
She added that the Registrar
General's Department's relo-
cation from 50 Shirley Street
and the Rodney Bain Building
had been delayed by a govern-
ment review of building plans
for the new premises on Market
Street. However, the Depart-


ment was set to move in by Jan -
uary 1, 2006.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson, in her
contribution to the Budge.
debate, said her own ministr ,
was focusing on designing anI
implementing e-governmen:
services that deal with the elec
tronic registration and issuanc
of birth certificates, plus the
digitisation of deeds and docu-
ments.
She added: "Once this initial
tive is completed the Ministr '
will be able to provide infoi
mation directly to the Ministr r
of Finance and other releva t
government agencies on invest
ment proposals, Hotel Encour -
agement Act applications an,
other issues which fall withi i
my Ministry's portfolio.
"This will assist with the co -
lection of revenue and th -
development of relevant ecd-
nomic statistics that will in tur i
facilitate economic planning.';


- Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills

- Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Key Duties & Responsibilities will include:
- Co-ordinate day-to-day operations functions of the main office

- Oversee various Management functions; particularly the Payment, Settlement and Safe custody
areas

- Risk Management and liaise with managers to ensure maintenance of standards

Applications should be faxed to:
Human Resources Department
Fax: 302-6398

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 30, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 9B


Crjitismof Bahamasonitorin








PAGE 1OB, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15,:

-p




pM


2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
I


GN-226


MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT AND AVIATION



PORT DEPARTMENT


Notice Of Sitting For New Providence Port Authority Board
To Consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277)

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration
Building Prince George Wharf on the 30i* June 2005 at 3:00pm for the purpose of
granting Licenses under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277)

Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least
six (6) day before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing to
the Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
..s.Athorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written
-notification from the New Providence Port Authority.

The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licenses as specified below:



NEW JET SKI NEW PROVIDENCE


REG NO APPLICANT


NB/01/05 Sherman Gerald
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/02/05 Sherman Gerald
Nassau, Bahamas

NB/03/05 Tynes Levardo
Nassau, Bahamas

N/B/04/05 Tynes Levardo
Nassau,Bahamas


NB/05/05 Sutherland Ishmael
Nassau,Bahamas


BOAT
NAME

No Name
8ft Jet Ski

No Name
8ft Jet Ski

No Name
8ft Jet Ski

No Name
8ft Jet Ski


No Name
8ft Jet Ski


CLASS PASS


USE


2 Rental


2 Rental


2 Rental


2 Rental



2 Rental


RENEWAL BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


APPLICANT

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP:6424 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6425 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6418 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box cb-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's stuart:
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6467 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13:137
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6469 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.OB6x CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, BahamaIs


BOAT NAME


No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft'

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

NoName
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft


No Name
Water Bike
10ft
No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft


CLASS PASS

D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2 ,



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2




D 2


D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2


USE

Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental




Rental


Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental
Rental


NP: 6478 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6479 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6480



NP: 6481



NP: 6482



NP: 6483



NP: 6485


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6486 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6484


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6456 Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6457



NP: 6432



NP: 6430



NP: 6433


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6434 Cove's Stu art
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas,


NP: 6454



NP: 6458



NP: 6455


Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas

Cove's Stuart
P.O.Box CB-13137
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6618 Promax shipping
Service Limited
P.O.Box EE-16314
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6611


NP: 251



NP: 254




NP: 256



NP: 253



NP: 248



NP: 251


NP: 6295



NP: 6294



NP: 6092


Luther Moss
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas
VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 1058 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6255


VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6325 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6252 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
10ft


No Name
Water Bike
10ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft


No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

No Name
Water Bike
8ft

"M/V La
Providence"



"Ace"

No Name
10 Oft Surfboard



No Name
10 Oft Surfboard



No Name
12ft Kayak


No Name
10ft Kayak


No Name
12ft Kayak


No Name
1 Oft Kayak

No Name
12ft Aqua
Cycle

No Name
14ft Hobie Cat


No Name
14ft Hobie Cat


No Name
20ft Master
Craft

No Name
21ft Paramount


No Name
12ft Aqua Bike


No Name
9ft Paddle Boat


D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2




D 2



D 2




D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



A 15




B 10

D 2




D 2




D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2


D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2


D 2


REG NO

NP: 6423


Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental




Rental



Rental




Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Charter




Charter

Rental




Rental




Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental


Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental


Rental


NP: 6453



NP: 6459


NP: 6463



NP: 6461



NP: 64,60



NP: 6420



NP: 6487




NP: 6466


NP: 6470



NP: 6471



NP: 6488



NP: 6476



NP: 6477


-- I


: : ---: ::-:;li;-


-)Wool'







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


VWEUNt-BUAEv, 'u1a 10, tuWo3, rmtC I


GOENETNOIE IIS FTANSOTADA VI*ATI*N3/ORT 3EARMN


NP: 252


VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6244 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6254



NP: 624





NP: 6241


VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas



VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


NP: 6240 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau ,Bahamas

NP: 6292 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6291 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6503 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau ,Bahamas

NP: 6504 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau Bahamas

NP: 6505 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 6506 VRL Nassau Ltd
West Bay St
Nassau, Bahamas


No Name
12ft Paddle
Boat

No Name
17ft Hobie Cat


No Name
12ft Paddle
Boat

No Name
14ft Hobie Cat




No Name
14ft Hobie


No Name
17ft Hobie


No Name
16' Hobie


No Name
16ft Hobie


No Name
12ft WindSurf


No Name
10ft Windsurf


No Name
10ft Windsurf


No Name
12ft.-Windsurf


D 2


D 2



D 2



D 2


Rental


Rental



Rental



Rental


D 2


D 2


D 2


D 2




D 2
:D'": 2'





D 2


D 2,



D 2:


Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental


RENEWAL BOAT LICENCE FAMILY ISLANDS


EG NO APPLICATION BOAT NAME


NP: 4980 Morton Salt
Bahamas
Limited

NP: 685 Morton salt
Bahamas
Limited

NP: 1494 Morton Salt
Bahamas
Limited


Salti Midget



MV Mally



Mighty
Midget H


CLASS P

B -



B

B .. .
B .. *


ASS US]

4 Charter



4 Charter



4 Charter


NEW BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


REG NO APPLICANT

N/B/01/05 Bower Nigel
Nassau Bahamas


NB/02/05 Taylor Basil
Nassau Bahamas


BOAT NAME CLASS PASS


M/V "New
Horizon"
60ft


A 60


"Silver Fish" D
21ft


USE

Charter



Rental


NEW MASTER'S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


REG NO

NM/01/05


APPLICANT

Adderley Gregory
P.O.Box N-8759
Nassau, Bahamas


CLASS

B


RENEWAL MASTER'S LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND


7317


6562



7318


7315.


6277


NAME


Ewing S. Walter
Matthew Town ,Inagua

Fawkers S. Cecil
Matthew Town, Inagua


Missick C. Donathan
Matthew Town ,Inagua

Moultrie F. Vivian
Matthew Town, Ingauna

Rose C. Willard
398 Florida Ave Ft Laud Fl
33312

Smith L. Quinten
Matthew Town ,Inagua

Weir F. Eugene
Matthew Town,Inaguna


CLASS


A


A



A




A



B


A'


RENEWAL MASTER'S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


LICENCE #


NAME


Archer A Tyrone Sr
Nassau Bahamas

Davis Floyd
P.O.Box F-43327


CLASS

A


A


7965



7841


7952


7614



6699


1145



6104


Demeritte Phillip
P.O.Box SB-52717
Nassau Bahamas

Higgins Dwight
P.O.Box CR-54622
Nassau, Bahamas

McKinney J. Alexio
Nassau Bahamas

McKenzie Brian
St Vicent Ave
Nassau Bahamas

Patton Joseph
Nassau Bahamas

Smith H. Ellis
Nassau ,Bahamas


Taylor Limas
P.O.Box SS-6411
Nassau Bahamas


Captain Anthony J. Aliens
Port Controller


Publish your


CARD OF THANKS

or

IN LOVING MEMORY

in The Tribune's NEW




OBITUARY SECTION




Every Thursday




Call us today


502-2352 or 502-2354











PUB.. .


LICENCE NO


-Y I I
















Smaller government a prerequisite




for a boost in manufacturing


A& m





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CREDIT LYONNAIS MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in United States dollars)


2004


ASSETS
Cash (Note 4)
Due from related party (Note 4)
Interest and fees receivable
Other assets (Note 5)
Fixed assets (Note 3)
TOTAL


LIABILmES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
LIABILITIES:
Due to parent company
Deferred income
Accrued expenses
Total liabilities
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital:
Authorized, issued and fully paid:
1,000,000 shares of US$1 each
Contributed capital (Note 7)
Deficit
Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL


2003


$ 1,108,507 S 1,085,392
33,897 39,583
22,195 41,932
17,870 -
1,130
$1,182,469 $ 1,168,037


0 0,00(fe
9,898
28,990
58,888


1,000,000
588,775
(465,194)
1,123,581


$ 20,000

28,500
48,500




1,000,000
588,775
(469,238)
1,119,537


$ 1,182,469 $1,168,037


See notes to balance sheet.

The balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on May 17, 2005 and is signed on its
behalfby:


6~7


Dir


CREDIT LYONNAIS MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTES TO BALANCE SHEET
DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed In United States dollars)
1. GENERAL

Credit Lyonnais Management Services (Bahamas) Limited (the "Company") was incorporated
in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas on October 2, 2000, under the provisions of the
Companies Act 1992 (as amended). A trust license was granted to the Company on March 8,
2001. The Company is 100% owned by Credit Lyonnais Management Services (Luxembourg)
S.A. (the "parent company").

The business objectives of the Company include Wealth Engineering and Company
Administration Services as well as Asset Management.

The number of persons employed by the Company as of December 31, 2004 is 2 (2003: 2).

2. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards. The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International Financial
Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the
reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at
the date of the balance sheet. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

a. Fixed assets Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation.
Depreciation is being provided by the straight-line method at the following rate:


Computer equipment


b. Foreign currency translation All amounts in the balance sheet is expressed in United
States dollars. Assets and liabilities in other currencies are converted at the exchange
rates prevailing at the balance sheet date.

c. Related parties Related parties include the parent company and companies with
common ownership.

d. Assets under administration No account is taken in the balance sheet of amounts held
as trustee, custodian or nominee.


K.


3. FIXED ASSETS
The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:


COST:
Computer equipment




ACCUMULATEb
DEPRECIATION:
Computer equipment
2004 Net movement
2003 Net movement


2004
Beginning Ending
Balance Additions Disposals Balance


$ 18,152 S 8$ ,152

2004
Beginning Depreciation Ending
Balance Expense Disposals Balance


S 17,022 $ 1,130 $ $ 18,152
S $ 1130$ (1,130) 5 -$
$ 7120 (5,990 $ $ 1,130


4. RELATED PARTY BALANCES

A cash balance of $1,097,738 is held with the parent company.

5. OTHER ASSETS


2004 2003
$17,790 $
80


Client expenses receivables
Prepaid expenses


6. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

The fair value of the financial assets and liabilities of the Company approximates their
carrying value as reported in the balance sheet.

7. CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL

Total contributed capital paid in by the parent company totaled $588,775 as at December 31,
2004 (2003: $588,775).

8. ASSETS UNDER ADMINISTRATION

Total assets under administration in the Company's fiduciary capacity is $85,521,180 (2003:
$49,886,888).





Deloitte.
Deloltte & Touche
Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centrevllle
P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www.deloitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To the Board of Directors of
Credit Lyonnais Management Services (Bahamas) Limited:

We have audited the above balance sheet of Credit Lyonnais Management Services (Bahamas)
Limited (the "Company") as of December 31, 2004. The balance sheet is the responsibility of the
Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the balance sheet based on
our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance
sheet balance sheet is free of material misstatements. An audit includes examining, on a test basis,
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as
evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable
basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Company as of December 31, 2004, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.



May 17, 2005


I I; : :i 9 1 ; I `


PAGE 12B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






2 EI I MI


In The Trib


Publication date: Ji


Deadline for ads:


rune


IMMlmImtmImlMIuIMIMI


With Th


CI


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Sections wil be printed over three di
Deadline for ads: June


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 13B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS






TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


The best has


to come


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
CHRIS Brown was excited
about his personal best time
in the 400 metres on Saturday
in Monterrey, Mexico. And
he anticipates that it will only
get better when he comes
home next weekend.
"It was pretty exciting for
my second race out, but hope-
fully for the fourth and fifth
and sixth races, it will come
together like I want it to," said
Brown in an interview with
The Tribune on Monday.
At the Galatletica Banamex
meet in Monterrey, Brown ran
44.89 seconds to pick up a sec-
ond place finish in the quarter
at the one-day event that saw
Tonique Williams-Darling and
Chandra Sturrup prevail in the
women's 400 and 100 respec-
tively.

Faster
It was just a tenth of a sec-
ond faster than Andrae
Williams' third place finish in
44.90 at the NCAA Outdoor
Championships in Eugene,
Oregon on the same day.
Looking back at his race,
Brown said if he had to re-run
it, he would have accelerated a
little more on the last 100
where he eventually lost out to
Alleyne Francique from
Grenada (44:60). American
Dereck Brew was third in
44.96.
"I was looking forward the
whole time, but I only saw the
shadows on the ground
because it was night," Brown


stressed. "I couldn't see any-
body except the guy who was
ahead of me in lane six. I
couldn't see the field behind
me."
Francique and Brew, who
are ranked in the top five in
the world, were both running
behind Brown.
"These guys were able to
stay right behind me. I was
able to hold off at least one
of them, but I couldn't
hold off the two," Brown stat-
ed.
"I didn't have lane seven
and eight to feed off because it
was only a six-lap track. So I
told myself that they had to
come and catch me.
"I knew I was in 44 shape
and if they wanted to get me,
they will have to run at least
44-low."
Brown is now looking for-
ward to coming home next
weekend to participate in the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations' National
Open Track and Field Cham-
pionships at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.
"I'm really excited because
for the first time, the field is
going to be really stacked,"
Brown reflected. "Nobody
should have any excuse of not
being ready, nor not knowing
what time the race is supposed
to be.
"It's always an excuse for
our quarter-milers, but so far
so good. Everybody is healthy
and that is the key factor.
Once we get to the track, we
shouldn't have any excuses."
One quarter-miler who


Brown may be looking at with
keen interest, as he prepare
to defend his title, is Andrae
Williams.
The Grand Bahamian
native is coming off a sensa-
tional season for Texas Tech
where he wrapped up his
junior year with a third place
finish in the 400 at the
NCAA Championships in
Eugene.
"I congratulate him for run-
ning well, but we're not on the
same level," Brown stated.
"He's been running from Jan-
uary with indoors, regionals,
NCAAs and relays. That's a
lot of quarters.

Sharp
"Unlike me, this is just my
second race and I ran 44.89,
so he's race sharp, but once I
get the ball rolling and if I had
ran six relays and eight or nine
quarters and a couple of 200s,
I probably would have ran
44.2s."
Brown, however, said he's
not going to be concerned
about the time that Williams
produced because he wasn't
in the race.
"I said the same thing when
Avard Moncur ran 44.7. Until
he came and did it in the race
with me, I gave him his props.
If you did 44.7 with me in
the race, I must have done
44.5.
"So if Andrae cam come
here and run 44.9,1 I definitely
feel that I can run 44.7 or 44.5
because there's no way that
I'm going to lose.
"He's not where I am yet."


* CHRIS BROWN is hoping to impress when he comes home next weekend.


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VVWUNESLAY, JUNE 1o, /uUb, PAt~t 1l00


By RENALDO DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter
THE CAC games will now
host the sprinter with the title of
'World's Fastest Man."
Jamaican Asafa Powell set a
pew record of 9.77 seconds in the
men's 100m yesterday.
;At a Tsiklitiria Super Grand
- Prix-meet in Athens -Greeee.
Powell 's 9.77 seconds was one
hundredth of a second better than
Tim Montgomery's previous
mark of 9.78 set in 2002.
Powell, 22, finished a disap-


pointing fifth at the Athens
Olympics, so it is only fitting that
he returned to Athens to set a
new world record.
It is the third time Powell has
run a sub-10 second 100m this
year.
He had previously posted the
world's fastest time of 9.84 sec-
onds at the Jamaica Internation-
al Invitational-in- May,.and also
ran 9.85 seconds in the Czech
Republic.
In an interview conducted with
the Associated Press, Powell said
he was confident he had the abil-


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter


THE New Providence Volleyball Associa-
tion (NPVA) is hoping to use this upcoming
season to rejuvenate the sport in the Bahamas,
by introducing a junior league.
The second most popular indoor sport has
declined throughout the nation, but the NPVA
believes that it will "catch on" again, when the
junior league is incorporated.
This proposed season is set torun simulta-
neously with the association's premier league,
(division A).
The season is expected to open July 17th,
with a pre-season tournament set for July 1st-
4th.


ity to set a new mark.
"I knew I could break the
world record," said Asafa Pow-
ell on Tuesday, "and I am very
happy I succeeded."
The International Association
of Athletic Federations (IAAF),
now lists Powell as the overall
number one athlete in the
world.
Powell is the first non-Ameri-
can sprinter to hold the world
record since Donavan Bailey held
it from 1996 to 1999, and only the
fourth non-American to ever hold
the record.


Paul Farquharson, the association's president
said: "The number of young persons playing
the sport has dropped drastically. We are trying
to attract young persons by establishing a league
they can call their own.
"Lately the junior players were forced to play
with the older teams, or against them. This
proved to be fruitful for only a handful, but
discouraging for many others.
"The problem we have with this was the lev-
el of play. We can't expect the young players to
be on the same level as the more experienced
players, sometimes the defeat to senior players
can be discouraging."
The executives are encouraging all division A
teams entering this year's league to register two
junior squads.


Camp to focus on




leadership skills


* By RENALDO
DORSETT
Junior Sports Reporter
COACH Greg Cash,
coach of Spirit of Excellence
Track and Field Club, will
be hosting his fourth annual
Royal Priesthood Basketball
Camp and Summer League.
The four-week camp will
take place from June 27th to
July 23rd at the Temple
Christian gymnasium in Cen-
terville.
Passing
Cash said the camp seeks
to readdress basic dribbling,
passing and shooting skills
and to also place a further
emphasis on developing
leadership skills through
sound "team-orientated"
basketball. He said the camp
is a continuation of his pre-
vious summer programme
"Shooting for Christ" which
he had to discontinue


because of high school
coaching commitments.
"Now that I'm out of the
high-school ranks I can real-
ly take time out to concen-
trate on developing our
younger athletes and help
them to use basketball as a
means to educate themselves
and better equip themselves
for life," he said.
Cash said he is also con-
cerned with the campers
developing unity outside of
the camp.
"We're not simply limited
to basketball, we're also giv-
ing the campers other oppor-
tunities to have fun as well,"
he said, "We set aside days
within the five day week des-
ignated to be 'Movie Days'
and 'Beach Days' to bring
the campers together off the
court as well."
To instill proper technique
and leadership skills, the
camp will feature lectures
and instructionals from some
prominent names in Bahami-


an basketball. Names such
as Peter Gilchard, Perry
Thompson, "Slanks" Mus-
grove, Reggie Forbes and
others can be expected to
lend their support.
Cash said the camp's
theme "We Are The Light
of the World," encompasses
what the camp sets out to
do.
Developing
"It's all about developing
our younger ballplayers to
become better athletes and
to be able to take the games
to better heights and to use
basketball as a stepping
stone to become leaders in
the community," he said.
The camp is limited to 60
athletes per session to ensure
a more hands on approach
and cater to personal devel-
opment.
It is open to boys aged sev-
en and older and girls aged
10 and older.


So pyrightecd Materia


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* 1h


'World's Fastest Man'


set for CAC games


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


1








a a


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


"Copyrighted Material U

Synd icated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Field
But she admits that she's not
just focussing on Jones. She's
keeping her eyes on the entire
field as she did in Monterrey
including Lauryn Williams, who
was second in 11.30, and Muna
Lee, who finished third in 11.39.
Jones had to settle for fourth in
11.40.
"It's a win. I don't go in the
race saying 'oh, I want to beat
Marion'. I go in the race saying
that I will beat whoever is in it,"
Sturrup stated.
"She's a competitor and I just
happened to win the race over
all of the competitors. I'm happy
and ecstatic that I won the race
over all of them."
As a training partner and
friend of Jones, Sturrup said she
doesn't want to bask in her dis-
appointments, but, at the same
time, she's not going to let it get
the better of her goal.
"I don't think too much about
it, but as a friend, I am con-
cerned," said Sturrup about


Faster
With the Bahamas Assocra'
tion of Athletic Associations'
National Open Track and Field
Championships here next week-
end as her next event, Sturrup
said she's looking forward to
running even faster.
"Probably none of the girls
are running the times that I'm
running, but I'm still going to
come home and run," Sturrup
said. "The times I'm looking for
are important to me, so I have to
come home and run.
"I can't be concerned about
who is running or who is run-
ning up to par. I'm going to
come home and perform."
The nationals will serve as the
final trials for the Central Amer-
ican and Caribbean Champi-
onships and the World Champi-
onships.
"I'm just kind of disappointed
that the CAC will interfere with
one of the Golden League
meets, but they say we have to -
come home and perform, so I
will be there," she confirmed.
And with Debbie Ferguson
sitting out with an injury and
Sevatheda Fynes coming off of
one, Sturrup said the
Bahamas will have a lot of work
to do with the 4 x 100 relay at
both of the international
meets.
"If Sevatheda isn't there, it
will take a lot of work with the
three other girls," Sturrup
reflected.
"The foot speed just won't
be there."


Knowles finds new doubles





partner for Wimbledon


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
A LEFT wrist injury to Dan Nestor at
the French Open last week has forced
Mark Knowles to play with a different
partner at the prestigious Wimbledon tour-
nament in London, England next week.
Nestor was forced to quit in their semi-
final match at Roland Garros as they
trailed American twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan 3-2 in the second set. The
Bryans had won the first set 6-3.
According to Knowles, they were lead-
ing 3-1 in the set when Nestor hit a fore-
hand and he popped the tendons in his
risk. He tried to continue, but they realised
that the pain was too much to handle.
"Unfortunately it was his left wrist, but
we couldn't do anything, so we had to
retire," said Knowles, about his southpaw
team-mate from Canada.
"Things just turned for the worse
because we started out well, we were play-
ing well and we were ahead. We really
liked our chances to win the match and
even the tournament."
The injury is so severe that Nestor has
been forced to sit out the next 8-10 weeks,
which means that he won't be able to suit
up to play in Wimbledon.
This will mark the first time since 2001
that Knowles and Nestor have not played
together. They have dropped from the top
spot to number three in the world in the


Wrist injury rules


Nestor out of event


doubles rankings.
Over the past two weeks, Knowles was
busy trying to find a new partner and now
he has sealed a deal with Michael Llodra
from France.
Llodra, another southpaw, normally
.teams up with countryman Fabrice San-
toro. But, with Santoro injured, Llodra
was available.
Llodra and Santoro, ranked No.7 in the
world, won their first title of the season at
the Telecom Italia Masters Roma with a
victory over the Bryan brothers. They were
named the ATP doubles team of the
month of May.
Since 2002, Llodra has six doubles titles.
He is currently ranked at No.14 in the
individual doubles standings. Knowles is
sitting at No.3.
For Knowles, it's a big change, but one
he welcomes.
"It's the first time that I played a Grand
Slam without Dan. But, like I said, we had
a lot of momentum. We were playing very
well at the French Open," he reflected.
"We geared our whole year around
Wimbledon. That's the title we were after
and that's the one we thought we could
get. So that's very disappointing, not only

I


to have to withdraw from the French
Open, but not play in Wimbledon."
Knowles will leave for Wimbledon
today and will begin working out immedi-
ately with Llodra before the main draw
on Tuesday.
If they were playing, Knowles and
Nestor would have maintained their top
seeded ranking at Wimbledon. But he and
Llodra will probably drop to No.3.
That, according to Knowles, should give
him and Llodra sufficient time to practise
before the draw gets underway. But
Knowles said there's nothing like playing
with Nestor.
"It was initially tough to withdraw from
the French Open, but we also thought we
had a good chance of winning Wimble-
don, but, unfortunately for him, he's been
getting bad news after bad news.
"I think he's a little bit frustrated
because the injury has gotten more delicate
and he's already gotten four or five dif-
ferent opinions. But the best case scenario
is eight weeks. The worse case scenario is
12 weeks."
On the plus side for Nestor, he is due to
get married on July 24 in Toronto, with
Knowles standing as a groomsman.


* MARK KNOWLES is looking forward to Wimbledon.


~C~ __ ___ ___ _~ __ I__ _~ __









EXHIBITIONS MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


National Choir





in tune with





adult vocalists


B By JANICE MATHER


WHEN national choirs perform
at Independence next month, there
won't just be young voices; look
out for vocalists who are a bit old-
er, more numerous, and who are
singing without any fancy dance
moves.
I Although auditions were held
just last night, the National Choir
Of The Bahamas expects to make
its debut at Independence celebra-
tions at Clifford Park on July 9.
While younger national groups like
The National Children's Choir and
the National Youth Choir have
long been local fixtures, the Nation-
al Choir marks a first for adult
vocalists.
Open to singers aged 25 and old-
er, the mature choir is expected to
be larger, if not as mobile as groups
for younger Bahamians.

Qualify
"The idea is to have a very large
group that is, if persons come out
and qualify. We're not limiting any
numbers, so with a very large group
you can really do very big works of
music," says Cleophus Adderley,
executive director, National Musi-
cal Heritage and Research at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture.
Mr Adderley will co-direct the
National Choir with College of the
Bahamas senior music lecturer
Pauline Glasby.
Auditions for sopranos, tenors,
altos and bass singers were held
last night at COB's music depart-
ment. On Monday, Mr Adderley
was hoping auditions would yield at
least 100 new adult voices for the
choir, with the option of having a
core group of about 40 for smaller
performances. Members' can


Plans for larger,


mature group


expect shorter rehearsal commit-
ments than are required from
Youth Choir members-- four
weeks of twice weekly rehearsals -
to allow for job and family com-
mitments. The season also won't
be as long; performers are expect-
ed to become a regular during the
Independence season, and again
for six weeks in January and Feb-
ruary. The choir isn't likely to take
annual trips to exotic international
locales like China, and there's one
other significant difference.
"They probably won't be danc-
ing around the way the Youth
Choir does, because they're older
si,;-&;rs," laughs Mr Adderley,
founder and director of the youth
choir, whose members are 15-27
years old.
The senior choir will, though, be
performing classical, Bahamian,
and spiritual selections, and may
have the chance to perform with
large orchestras, according to Mr
Adderley.
And while there are already var-
ious privately operated choirs for
adults, the National Choir will pro-
vide a format for the vocally gifted
to continue singing nationally even
after they reach their late 20s.
"Persons in the Youth Choir
who really become hooked, I've
always felt guilty having to ask
them to move on," says Mr Adder-
ley. "Now I feel so much better
about it because there's some place
for them to move on to, in terms of
national service. There are other


choirs for them to go to, but there
are no other national choirs for
older persons."
Hoping to pull those already
versed in singing techniques, but
also willing to take on newcomers
who are willing to learn, Mr Adder-
ley says in addition to the challenge
of preparing for a spectacular debut
next month, the choir should per-
form again next February, although
details haven't been finalised yet.

Turnout
While there have been other
adult choirs put together for nation-
al occasions, according to Mr
Adderley, like a 300-voice choir
for Independence 32 years ago, this
is the first national choir. While
he's not sure what the turnout for
auditions will be, he expects the
chosen singers will step up to the
plate.
"I know a number of the talent-
ed persons right now are either just
finishing a concert or preparing for
a concert, so that may hamper
some of them coming to audition.
So all I can do is work with what-
ever I can, and just hope for the
best," he says. "Fortunately,
Bahamians tend to be so talented,
generally, even those persons who
don't have the training once you
train them, we tend to rise to the
occasion... we like the pressure, we
like the lights, and we'll really per-
form when the occasion demands
it."


I CLEOPHUS ADDERLEY (above), executive director, National Musical Heritage and Research at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture is pictured (top) conducting the National Youth Choir.
(Photos by National Youth Choir photographer)








PAGE 0, WENESDY, JUE 15,2005HEE ARTSN


Cpy riht d M at ial
Syndicate d Con tP Ont
Available from Commercial News Providers"


I .


atican reporter




takes a second




look at Pope




Benedict XVI


* By J MICHAEL PARKER
"The Rise of Benedict
XVI: The Inside Story
of How the Pope Was
Elected and Where He
Will Take the Catholic
Church"
by John L Allen.

THERE'S a lot more to the
former German Cardinal
Joseph Ratzinger, who became
Pope Benedict XVI, than is
suggested by his media image
as "God's Rottweiler" a
rigid doctrinal policeman bent
on crushing dissent.
John L Allen, the National
Catholic Reporter's Vatican
correspondent since 2001, con-
tributed to that one-dimen-
sional stereotype with his 1997
biography, "Cardinal
Ratzinger: The Vatican's.
Enforcer of the Faith".
Balanced
Already moving toward a
more nuanced and balanced
view of Ratzinger before the
April conclave, Allen recently
issued a mea culpa in his NCR
,column for the book,'stunbal-
anced portrayal of the long-
time Vatican doctrinal chief.
That didn't stop the publisher,
Continuum, from re-issuing
the book in April as "Pope
Benedict XVI".
But Allen's just-published
new book, "The Rise of Bene-
dict XVI," portrays a much
more positive man who
didn't expect to be
pope but clearly
sees the moral,
ethical and spir-
itual chal-
lenges fac-
ing the
Catholic j
Church
in the
21st
cen-


tury and knows what he can
do about them.
Although as surprised as
anyone at Ratzinger's election,
Allen quickly assembled a
characteristically cogent and
compelling analysis of how it
happened and what direction
the Benedictine pontificate is
likely to take. He also includes
a short chapter summing up
Ratzinger's life and ministry.
The cardinals focused dur-
ing the April conclave on lead-
ership qualities needed in the
next pope, quite in contrast
with journalists' pre-conclave
preoccupation with geography
and Catholic population
growth in the Third World.
Many cardinals didn't know
each other well, but all knew
Ratzinger. They wanted his
world-class intellectual quality
to battle the "dictatorship of
relativism." His actions and
words during the 17-day inter-
regnum in April reinforced
this.
"The Rise of Benedict XVI"
- like Allen's earlier books
on Vatican culture, "Con-
clave" and "All the Pope's
Men" covers the subject
thoroughly and thoughtfully.
In smooth, readable prose
. devoid of polemics, he outlines
competing expectations and
explains the strengths and
weaknesses of
each. Allen
predicts
that


Benedict's pontificate will be
as alive, active, dramatic, cre-
ative, political, organised and
forward-looking as any before
it. The most articulate theolo-
gian elected pope in more than
a century, Benedict is deter-
mined to confront four cen-
turies of a Western drift away
from objective truth.
But his focus may be less on
the rigid doctrinal enforcement
dreaded or hoped for by some
Catholics than on challenging
individual Catholics to live
their faith joyfully enough and
convincingly enough to attract
others to it.
Crackdown
Ratzinger's very choice;of
the name Benedict may reflect
that. Pope Benedict XV (1914-
22) called a halt to the aniti-
modernist crackdown of his
predecessor, Pope Pius X, and
is remembered as a healer and
reconciler.
And St Benedict, the father
of Western monasticism, coun-
tered the intellectual and
moral darkness of his times by
fostering communities found-
ed on faith and love.
Like John Paul II, Benedict
XVI will be concerned about
doctrinal unity, .but Allen
believes he's likely to appoint
more high-quality theologians
as bishops than did John Paul,
streamline the Roman Curia
and waste little energy trying
to maintain institutions that
have lost their Catholic identi-
ty.
The jury is still out on many
issues, but Allen an
astute analyst of Vatican
life clearly believes
surprises are in
store for both
conservative
and liberal
Catholics.


'I .


S/"Copyrighted Material

Aibf Syndicated Content Pro I
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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THE TRIBUNEi


PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


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WMN














National Art Gallery series features





renowned artist LeRoy Clarke


IN THE second installment of
the "Artist and Critic" speaker
series at the National Art Gallery
internationally renowned artist
LeRoy Clarke will share his work
,and conduct in-studio visits with
local artists.
Clarke was born in Gonzales, a
suburb of Port of Spain, Trinidad
in 1938, where, in an almost trib-
al, primarily African community,
he became keenly aware at a very
early age of Afro-Caribbean reli-
gious beliefs and folklore.
A teacher and self-taught artist,
.Clarke went to New York in
1968. Fueled by the political fer-
ment that existed in the United
States at the time and the philos-
ophy of the Black Power Move-
ment, he sought to provide a
validity and integrity to his
African heritage.
Clarke's journey to self-aware-
ness is reflected in his metaphor-
ic climb from the decrepitude of
Douendom to the summit of El
Tucuche, one of Trinidad's high-
est mountains. This epic journey
is a continuation of the living spir-
it of Africa transplanted to
Caribbean soil.

Journey
The phases of the journey are
represented in his work. The first
movement, 'Fragments of a Spir-
itual', was mounted at the Studio
Museum in Harlem in 1972, when
he was an artist in residence, and
in Port of Spain later that year.
His second movement, exhibited
in Trinidad in 1979, used the pow-
erful symbol of the faceless lost
souls of Trinidad's mythology, the
douen representing the soul in
limbo of the unbaptized child as
the image for a lost people.
Clarke travelled from Douen-
dom to a greater self-realization
in 'In the Maze, There is a Single
Line to My Soul' (1988), the
acknowledgment of the individual
in 'The Eye Am' (1989), the first
articulations of the spirit in
'Utterances' (1991), and the
unfinished 'Pantheon'. The move-
ment 'Fossil of Memory', was, a
tribute to the Guyanese artist,
Aubrey Williams.


INTERNATIONALLY
renowned artist LeRoy Clarke

As, the journey continues, the
iconography of Africa, in partic-
ular the spiritual and religious
symbols of the Orisha, become
more and more apparent in the
unique weave of the Afro-
Caribbean fabric of Clarke's
work. Although it is easy to draw
references in Clarke's work to
that of Wilfredo Lam of Cuba,
their images are common to their
culture and the source of inspi-
ration the same Africa.
Clarke is meticulous in his pre-
sentation, building his images
. through a series of glazes, some-
times using resist methods for tex-
ture, his brilliant colors weaving
intricate patterns. He represents
life, regeneration, promise and
hope.
Artists are invited to arrange
private consultations with Mr
Clarke for Tuesday, June 21 and
Wednesday, June 22 by calling
the Gallery at 328.5800/1.
While in Nassau, Mr Clarke
will also be speaking at MDR's
Festival in the Workplace Dia-
logue, starting tomorrow at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel.

See Arts in Brief
(this page) for times.


* CLOCKWISE FROM T-O


-,Ah Man, Eye Crossing and Alphabet of a Soundless Place by LeRoy Clarke.


arts brief
^^^ '. a i ,; .....


An Evening of Sacred Music will be
held on Thursday, June 16 at Christ
Church Cathedral, beginnig at 8pm. Fea-
tured performers include Jamie Sturrup,
Leon Wilson, Allyson Dean, Chorale
Ensemble, GHS Hand Bell Ensemble,
Kendrick Coleby, Kristi King, Donniecea
Rahming, Geoffrey Sturrup, Dishon
Rolle and Strings n' T'ings.
Artists will be interperting works by
Bach, Purcell, Handel, Mozart, Andrew
Lloyd Webber and others.
The concert is part of a series by the
Artists Guild International, which seeks
to promoted young talented musicians.
The event is free of charge, however an
offering will be collected to defray
expenses.

Up Close & Personal, an exhibition
of recent collages and monoprints by Sue
Katz-Lightbourn opens on Friday, June
17, 6pm-9pm at the artist's home on Sun-
set Drive, Port New Providence. You
can also contact the artist for a private
viewing at 324-5362 or e-mail
slight@coralwave.com.

Christopher Cozier, an. exhibition
of drawings and a series of prints runs
until June 17 @ New Providence Art &
Antiques, Bank Lane. Time: 11am 5pm.
Christopher Cozier is an artist and writer
living in Trinidad.
His work explores the ambitions,
hopes, and contradictions of Caribbean
society in the post-colonial era.
Cozier's work has consisted of multi-
media projects involving sound, video,
live performances and installations,
including drawings, constructions and
appropriated objects. For more infor-
mation call 328-7916 or visit www.npar-
tantiques.com

LeRoy Clarke, internationally
renowned artist of Trinidad, is the
upcoming featured "Artist and Critic"
in the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas' special series. Clarke, a
teacher and self-taught artists, will talk
about his work at the NAGB on June
21, 7.30pm and will meet privately with
local artists in-studio on Tuesday, June
21 and Wednesday, June 22. Please call
the NAGB at 328-5800/1 for more infor-
mation.

The Agronomist, an inspiring yet
heartbreaking documentary about a


Haitian journalist, will be screened on
Thursday, June 23, 7.45pm at the Nation-
al Art Gallery on West and West Hill
Sts.
The documentary is directed by
Johnathan Demme and focuses on the
life of Jean Dominique, a hero trying to
uphold democratic values in his country
but who fell victim to assassination.
Discussants following the screening
will be Dr Ian Strachan, chair, School
of English Studies, COB; Dr Eugene
Newry, Bahamas Ambassador to Haiti;
and Antoine Ferrier, Haitian-Bahamian
photographer.
The screening is part of the Wide
Angle series by the NAGB and the
School of English Studies, College of the
Bahamas.
Call 328-5800 for more info.

Self Expressions, .an exhibition of
mixed media works by artist Desmond
Darville at Segafredo Cafe, Charlotte St
North.

The National Collection @ the
National Art Gallery of the Bahamas,
an exhibition that takes the viewer on a
journey through the history of fine art in
the Bahamas.
It features signature pieces from the
national collection, including recent
acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.

Past, Present and Personal: The
Dawn Davies Collection @ the National
Art Gallery of the Bahamas, Villa Doyle,
West and West Hill Streets.
. The exhibition is part of the NAGB's
Collector's Series. Call 328-5800 to book
tours.

*, The Awakening Landscape: The
Nassau Watercolours of Gaspard Le
Marchand Tupper, from the collection
of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @ the
National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
The mid-nineteenth century paintings
that make up the exhibition are part of
one of the earliest suites of paintings of
Nassau and its environs.
Tupper was a British military officer
stationed at Fort Charlotte in the 1850s.
The works show a pre-modern
Bahamas through the decidedly British
medium of watercolour.
Call 328-5800 to book tours.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PA~it- 3U


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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005, PAGE 5C


W H A T S ON IN A N D A R 0 U ND N A S S A U


E MAI : UTTHERE@ TR I B U N E M E DIA NET


IMIMParties, Nightclubs
NEW & Restaurants

Seduction @ Dicky Mo's Seafood Restaurant, West
Bay Street. Saturday, June 18. Time: 9pm 2am. Ladies:
$10, Gents: $15 (one drink included). Dress code:
Smart Casual (wear black and white for a free glass of
champagne). Featuring: Reggae, Soca, Hip- Hop,
Bahamian and R & B music, plus dance contests, door
prizes, games and giveaways. Logon to bahamianson-
line.com for more information.

Junkanoo in June, every Saturday @ Arawak Cay.
Featuring: performances by local Bahamian artists and
a Junkanoo group comprised of several local groups.
Admission: free. The festival will be held every Satur-
day until July 2.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club
Trappers, Nassau's "upscale" gentleman's club. Fea-
turing a female body painting extravaganza. Free body
painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission:
Men free before 10 pm. Females free. There will be free
food and hors d'oeuvres between 9 and 10 pm. Open
until 4 am.

Exotic Saturdays @ Fridays Soon Come starts with 3 for
$10 drink specials. Admission: $10 before midnight
and $15 after. Ladies free before 11pm.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning
the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive
food and drink.

Fever @ Bahama Boom, Elizabeth St, downtown,
every Friday night. Admission $10 before midnight.
First 50 women get free champagne. First 50 men get a
free Greycliff cigar. Dress to impress. For VIP reser-
vations call 356-4612.

Cool Runnings is back with a Conscious Party @ Hard
Rock Cafe, Charlotte St North every Friday. Classic.
reggae style music. Admission $10.


Mellow Moods every Sunday @ Fluid Lounge and
Nightclub, Bay St, featuring hits from yesterday -.old
school reggae and rockers downstairs, and golden
oldies upstairs. Admission: Free. Doors open 9pm.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar.
Drink specials all night long, including karaoke warm-
up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-until;


Karaoke Nights @ Fluid Lounge and Nightclub. Begins
10pm every Tuesday. Weekly winners selected as
Vocalist of the Week $250 cash prize. Winner select-
ed at end of month from finalists cash prize $1,000.
Admission $10 with one free drink.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge
includes a free Guinness and there should be lots of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and Men
$15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

Flash Nights @ Club Fluid every Thursday. The ulti-
mate Ladies Night. Join Nassau's and Miami Beach's
finest men. Ladies only before 11.30pm with free cham-
pagne. Guys allowed after 11.30pm with $20 cover.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10
with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late '80s
music in the VIP Lounge, Top of the Charts in the
Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers. Glow
sticks for all in before midnight. Admission: Ladies
free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Happy Hour every Friday
- 3 for $10 mixed drinks and $1 shots. Bahamian Night
(Free admission) every Saturday with live music from
8 pm to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8 pm to
midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte
St kicks off Fridays at 6pm with deep house to hard
house music, featuring CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and
Sworl'wide on the decks.


Junkanoo



lovers,




enjoy!

I t's not Boxing Day or New Year's,
but Junkanoo lovers can enjoy a bit of
the season during the Junkanoo in
June festival. The festival, hosted by
the Ministry of Tourism, was offi-
cially launched last weekend and will contin-
ue every Saturday until July 2.
Though the festival was established to
attract tourists to the Bahamas during the
traditionally slow month of June, it is also a
means for Bahamians to celebrate a part of
their own culture. Come and enjoy concert
performances by some of Nassau's hottest
acts, mini-plays inspired by Bahamian life
and a wide variety of Bahamian food.'
The festival will be held at Arawak Cay.
Admission is free.


Chill .Out Sundays @ Coco Loco, Sandyport, from
4pm-ntil, playing deep, funky chill moods with world
beats.

Sweet SundayChill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday,
4pm-midnight @ Patio Grille, British Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal,
Cay Beach. Admission $10, ladies free.


Carib Scene @ Club Fluid every Sunday. A night of
Caribbean, Latin and Reggae flavours for all audi-
* ences. Latin Flair in;the VIP Lounge; Old School Reg-
gae and Soca in the Main Lounge. Ladies in free before
1pm. $10 after llpm. Men, $15 cover charge.


TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and
Skyline Drive. Singer/songwriter Steven Holden per-
forms solo with special guests on Thursday from 9pmr
- midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal and
Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the Caribbean
Express perform at Traveller's Rest, West Bay St,
every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.


The Arts


In celebration of Father's Day, the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas will provide the opportunity
for fathers to accompany their children in an awesome
activity, kite-making. Learn the fundamentals of mak-
ing kites then make your own, under the tutelage of
David Weech. Date: Saturday, June 18. Time: 10am -
1pm. Location: NAGB. Cost: $5 (members) / $8 (non-
members)
Cost:

Self Expressions, an exhibition of mixed media works
by artist Desmond Darville is open for viewing, 6pm-
9pm at Segafredo Cafe, Charlotte St North.

Christopher Cozier, an exhibition of drawings and a


series of prints runs until June 17 @ New Providence
Art & Antiques, Bank Lane, 11m 5pm. Christo-
pher Cozier is an artist and writer living and working in
Trinidad. His work, which explores the ambitions,
hopes and contradictions of Caribbean society in the
post-colonial era, has been exhibitedin museums and
galleries worldwide. His work has over the;years, con-
sisted of multimedia projects, involving sound, video,
live performances and installations, including draw-
ings, constructions and appropriated objects. For more
information call 328-7916 or log on to www.npartan-
tiques.com

An Evening of Sacred Music will be held on Thursday,
June 16 at Christ Church Cathedral, beginiig at 8pm.
Featured performers include Jamie Sturrup, Leon Wil-
son, Allyson Dean, Chorale Ensemble, GHS Hand
Bell Ensemble, Kendrick Coleby, Kristi King, Don-
niecea Rahming, Geoffrey Sturrup, Dishon Rolle and
Strings n' T'ings.
Artists will be interperting works by Bach, Purcell,
Handel, Mozart, Andrew Lloyd Webber and others.
The concert is part of a series by the Artists Guild
International, which seeks to promoted young talent-
ed musicians. The event is free of charge, however an
offering will be collected to defray expenses.

The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas; an exhibition that takes the viewer on a
journey through the history of fine art in the Bahamas.
It features signature pieces from the national collection,
including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius
Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to
book tours. *

Past, Present and Personal The Dawn Davies Col-
lection @ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas,
Villa Doyle, West and West Hill Streets. The exhibition
is part of the NAGB's Collector's Series. Call 328-
5800 to book tours.

The Awakening Landscape: The Nassau Watercolours
of Gaspard Le Marchand Tupper, from the collection
of Orjan and Amanda Lindroth @ the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas. The mid-nineteenth century
paintings that make up the exhibition are part of one of
the earliest suites of paintings of Nassau and its envi-
rons. Tupper was a British military officer stationed at
Fort Charlotte in the 1850s. The works show a pre-
modem Bahamas through the decidely British medium
of watercolour. Call 328-5800 to book tours.


Health


Doctors Hospital Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr
Robin Roberts will speak on the topic "Male
Menopause, Fact, Fiction or Reality" on Thursday,
June 16, 6pm in the hospital's conference room.

Yoga: Stretch, Breathe, Relax, for Body...Mind...Spir-


it, yoga classes for all levels will be conducted by Mar-
garet Evans, registered yoga teacher.
* Tuesdays & Thursdays: May 24 through June 30 (six
weeks) from 6pm 7:30pm. Cost: $120.
* Saturdays: May 28 through July 2 (five weeks) from
10am- 11:30 am. Cost: $50. There will be no class June
4. Sessions will be held at the Trinity Methodist Church
Parking Lot (air-conditioned). Wear loose comfort-
able clothing, bring a yoga or exercise mat, and a tow-
el. Call 394-2121 or 477-3903, for more information.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on
the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323-4482
for more info.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Mon-
day every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference
room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2.30pm (except August and December) @ the
Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes certi-
fied by the AHA.'The course defines the warning signs
of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strategies to
avoid sudden death syndrome and the most common
serious injuries and choking that can occur in adults,
infants and children. CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training
Representative at 302-4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets from 7pm 9pm the second
Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC
building, Blue Hill Road.
.Civic Clubs 4M..iiil:II|MM|

Toastmasters Club:1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C C
Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, college
Avenue off Moss Road. Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm
@ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm A19,
JeanSt. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7:30pm @ British
Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @
The J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave. Club
2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday
at the J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm.
Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every
Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-
West Highway. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
7pm @ Gaylord's Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please
call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tues-
day, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor
meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the
second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St
Augustine's Monestary.


Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St
Augustine's Monestary. For more info call 325-1947
after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of
the month at COB's Tourism Training Centre at 7pm
in Room 144 during the academic year. The group
promotes the Spanish language and culture in the
community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune via
fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribunemedia.net


B


...;..::: I


.......... ..


I.









PAG 60 WENEDAYTJUET1,I005THETRIUN


Organisers say Independence





festivities will be 'scaled down'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

Bahamians are being
encouraged to partici-
pate in the upcoming
Independence celebra-
tions, though organisers
say that this year's festivities will be "a
little bit scaled down".
Government has decided to host
huge Independence celebrations every
five years, which will place the next big
celebration three years away (at the
Bahamas' 35th anniversary).
But for now, the country's 32nd
anniversary, though scaled down, does
not mean obsolete, organisers assure
the public. In fact, Bahamians will be
celebrating days before and after the
actual Independence day, on July 10.
On Tuesday, July 5 at 7.30pm, there
will be a National Art Festival Gospel
Extravaganza at Golden Gates
Assembly. Then on Wednesday, there
is the National Arts Festival Dance
and Drama to be held at the College
of the Bahamas at 7.30pm.
Friday, July 8, is dubbed National
Pride Day, and beginning 9.30pm at
Arawak Cay there will be an all-
Bahamian concert to feature top
Bahamian artists like KB, Ronnie
Butler, Gino D, Terez Hepburn, to
name a few. There will also be per-
formers in various Family Islands. The
concert will be preceded by a one-
hour Junkanoo Parade.
Celebration
On July 9, the eve of Independence,
the celebration beings at 8pm on Clif-
ford Park. Those who turn out can
look forward to presentations by the
National Liturgical Dancers; and a
Youth Band Explosion featuring the
Pathfinders Band, Bain and Grants
Town Band and the Church of God of
Prophecy youth band.
The energetic Prophet Lawrence
Rolle, known as the 'Singing Prophet',
is also in the line-up.
Following Rolle's performance is
an ecumenical service to be led by the
Bahamas Christian Council.
There will-also be the traditional
inspections of the RBPF and RBDF
officers, followed by a prayer for the
nation and a moment of silence all to
take place before midnight to accom-
modate the flag raising ceremony.
The night will end with fireworks.
On the actual day of Independence,
The National Youth Orchestra, the
Bahamas Boys Choir, The National
Dance Company, the National Chil-
dren's Choir, C V Bethel High
School's Pop Band, the National


* LIVING LEGEND Ronnie Butler (pictured) is expected to perform during
an all-Bahamian concert at Arawak Cay on July 8.
(The Tribune archive photo)


Dance School and National Youth
Choir will all perform in Rawson
Square, beginning at 4pm.
The 32nd Independence Day Cele-
brations will conclude with a People's
Rush-out beginning at 4am on Mon-
day, Julyll11. The rush-out starts at Par-
adise Island Bridge and ends at
Arawak Cay.
Winston Saunders, chairman of the
Independence Day Celebrations Com-
mittee, is expecting Bahamians to turn
out in large numbers to support their


culture.
"I think people look forward to
Independence and I think they look
forward to celebrating it. I think we
are now beginning to take ourselves
more seriously and not just looking
for a party but for events that cele-
brate us as a people, as a whole, as a
nation, and that expresses us as we
know ourselves or are trying to get to
know ourselves," he says.
Director of Culture, Dr Nicolette
Bethel, also on the committee, told


Tribune Entertainment that this year's
theme, "A Bahamian Celebration",
was chosen by the committee to show
Bahamians that Independence is a
time to "ground us".
"It's to help us to understand what
it means to be Bahamian and why we
are not American and why we are not
British what it is to be Bahamian,"
she added.
With a view that every culture
changes over the years, Dr Bethel not-
ed that not every change is good. It is


important then, that Bahamians make
certain it recognises the culture that
has been passed down from previous
generations," she said.
"But there is a generation of people
who can understand the roots of our
culture...what it means is that if people
in the generation behind mine raise
children and we don't teach them
about our culture, they will not even
have the context that say people in
the generation before mine had, in
that, we will have a group of people
running the country who don't under-
stand the roots of what make up
Bahamian culture."
And what is this exclusively
Bahamian culture that the country
will be celebrating?
"It's the stuff that Ronnie Butler
sings about. It's all of that," according
to Dr Bethel.
"The only thing we still maintain,
really, is food and to some degree
Bahamian music. But if you talk to'
(some persons in the music industry),
even that is under attack and disap-
pearing. It's debatable."
Significant
According to Dr Bethel, Bahami-
an music will play a significant role
in this year's Independence celebra-
tions. And not so much music simply
written or performed by a Bahamian.
The focus will be on music that cap-
tures the Bahamian sound.
"We mean music in a recognisable
Bahamian style, because Bahamian
music can be much broader than
that," she notes.
"Some Bahamians prefer to sing
and write and perform in somebody
else's style, which is fine. But there is
a certain type of music, like reggae,
calypso and soca, which is Caribbean
music and we are part of the
Caribbean, so that is our music too.
But our own specific indigenous music
that we developed for ourselves in
our context, we cannot lose that."
That would be music like Rake n
Scrape, and Goombay, which Dr
Bethel describes as "the entertain-
ment music of the 1950s; a kind of
mix of calypso with Bahamian music".
Independence Day, a time when the
Bahamas celebrates what sets it apart
from other countries of the world, is
an ideal time to focus on "the Bahami-
an sound", says Dr Bethel.
"And we could, if we really tried,
expand that (Bahamian music)
beyond our shores if we don't let it
die," she adds. "But we have to be
careful because if people don't learn
what is Bahamian music, we can't
reproduce,'it globally."


Comedy show


'puts on lots of new faces'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

BEGINNING on Tuesday,
June 28, and every Tuesday
night until August 30,
ThoughtKatcher Enterprises
will host its 2005 season of Da
S.P.O.T, a comedy sketch show
that parodies Bahamian life.
According to Anku (Cleve-
land Eneas III) one of
ThoughtKatcher's partners,
this season of DA S.P.O.T will
feature lots of new faces. The
group recently wrapped up
auditions where talented young
performances turned out to be
a part of the popular show.
Anku says that they are still
getting the group's "chemistry"
together, but the season is sure
to be a success.
This season will be recorded
to be either aired on Cable 12
or put in the form of a DVD.
For those wondering what hap-
pened to the DVD of last sea-
son that was to be released,
Anku says that what has been
edited will be cut into segments
and aired on television at a
time to be announced.
With mostly all new material,
and "revisits" to popular skits
which included The Shadow
Government and crowd
pleasers Brakeisha and Shak-


well, those who turn out can.
expect some great entertain-
ment.


"We have a lot of
new characters.
They are not
parodies of a
person per se,
but it's making
fun of the kind
of things that

Bahamians do."

-Anku (Cleveland
Eneas III)


fun of the kind of things that
Bahamians do," Anku shares
with Tribune Entertainment.
New material includes court-
room scenes, something that
the group has never ventured
into.
"It's a slew of stuff," says
Anku.
"You know, the regular
spoofing of Bahamian life. For
example, let's say, if someone
was in a minor fender bender,
by the time the news reaches
down the road people are get-
ting dressed for a funeral," he
added.
Da S.P.O.T has also changed
its venue to the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts, Mack-
ey Street.
According to Betty Knowles,
manager at the theatre,
ThoughtKatcher brings "new
blood" to the theatre with its
comedy show.
"It feels great to have them
here because it is young people
who will take over the arts. We
have much older people who
have been in the arts for 20, 30
years but we need some young
blood and I think this group,
and others like it, will bring
that," she tells Tribune Enter-
tainment.
Da S.P.O.T runs from 8pm
till 11pm. Admission: $10.


* COMEDY lovers enjoy a show during the 2004 season-of Da S.P.O.T, which has
changed its venue to the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts, Mackey Street.


(The Tribune archive photo)


"We have a lot of new char-
acters. They are not parodies of
a person per se, but it's making


PAGE 6C, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









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