Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00132
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: June 13, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00132
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"START YOUR
MORNINGS WITH i
McGRIDDLES" -
HIGH 88F
LOW 76F

I SUNNY AND
BREEZY
^'^..2. *DC7
BREEY i


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.165 MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005 PRICE- 500


Perry Christie

flies to Maryland

before returning

to his duties


H By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
EAGER ut.',turn to work,
.frime Minister Perry Christie
left Nassau yesterday morning
for Baltimore, Maryland, where
he will undergo a final medical
check-up, before resuming his
duties.
In Baltimore, the prime min-
ister will be attending the world-
renowned Johns Hopkins Hos-
pital for a final, routine review
of his medical condition.
This check-up was planned
by his personal physician Dr
Perry Gomez and heart spe-
cialist Dr Conville Brown, who
advised Mr Christie to take this
trip as part of his care pro-
gramme, prior to his return to
office.
The review of Mr Christie's
condition, following the slight
stroke he suffered early last
month, is expected to take
about two days.
Acting Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt told The Tribune yes-
terday that Mr Christie is "very
excited about this trip because it
means he will be able to finally
return to work."
"The prime minister is in very
good spirits. He has lost weight
and is looking fit and trim and
15 years younger," she added.
Depending on the results of
this final check-up, Mrs Pratt
said the prime minister is hop-
ing that, rather than return only


part-time, he will be able to ful-
ly take on his duties again.
"I'm looking forward to
having the prime minister
returned to his rightful place,"
she said.
Mrs Pratt said she expects Mr
Christie to be back in office by
the time she travels to the
Global Summit of Women 2005,
which will be held in Mexico on
June 21.
Stroke
The prime minister was ini-
tially hospitalised on May 3 for
severe hypertension, after
awakening at his Cable Beach
home experiencing physical dis-
comfort, including a difficulty
with speech and a numbness in
the hands.
Following extensive medical
investigations, doctors conclud-
ed that Mr Christie had suffered
a minor stroke.
Within the same week, he
was released from hospital to
continue convalescing at home.
In the past two weeks Mr
Christie has been performing
"light" prime ministerial duties,
while still recuperating at home.
On his trip to Baltimore the
prime minister is being accom-
panied by his brother Gary
Christie, as well as his physi-
cians Dr Gomez and Dr Brown.
He is expected to return to the
Bahamas next week.


I SIR John was out and showing his many moves to the sound of the Junkanoo at this
summer's Junkanoo In June. See page three for the story.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/tribune staff)

First woman director of tourism announced


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
VERNICE Walkine, a 26-
year veteran of the Ministry of
Tourism, has been named as the
new director general of tourism,
the first woman to hold this
position in the history of the
Bahamas.
Following the departure of


the former director general,
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
who was elected secretary gen-
eral of the Caribbean Tourism
Organisation (CTO) last week,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe last night officially
announced the appointment of
Ms Walkine.
Having served as deputy
director general of tourism since


2001, and with an extensive pro-
fessional history, Ms Walkine
was seen as the right choice by
Minister Wilchcombe. He said
he is confident Ms Walkine is
the right person for the future,
which will include campaigns
such as re-establishing a
stronger market in Canada and
SEE page fourteen


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
LONG-TIME visitors to
the Bahamas have raised
concerns that the controver-
sial Bimini Bay Resort will
keep environmentally-mind-
ed tourists from coming to
the island.
In several letters to Prime
Minister Perry Christie,
copies of which were also
sent to The Tribune, tourists
appealed to the government
to halt construction of Phase
I of the $75 million resort to
preserve the island's man-
grove eco-system.
They expressed their fears
that going ahead with the
development, which has
been scaled down by 50 per
cent since the original heads
of agreement was signed in
SEE page fourteen







I By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
AFTER consultation with
Bahamian fishermen and the
public, there is a possibility
of a conch ban being
imposed, said Minister of
Agriculture, Fisheries, and
Local Government V Alfred
Gray.
In an interview with The
Tribune, Mr Gray revealed
that his ministry has been
advised that the conch pop-
ulation is dwindling.
Fisheries officers are being
told by local fishermen that
conchs are being found fur-
ther from the shore and are
in deeper waters, he said.
He said that, within the
next week or two, the min-
istry will start its consulta-
tive process.
"We will consult the public,
SEE page fourteen


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PAGE MONAY, JNE 13 2005CAE NEWSN


Students reap the



rewards for their



school success


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* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
NINE students of the St
Cecelia constituency were
rewarded for their academic
achievements when they were
presented with brand-new bicy-
cles on Friday.
A short ceremony was held
for these students who could
not attend the May 27th awards
presentation part of the two-


* Clyde Rolle of Rdgeland Primary, Beautisca King of Stephen Dillet Primary, Latoya Green of
Yellow Elder Primary, Diondra Johnson of Mable Walker Primary, Dervinque Edwards of
Stephen Dillet Primary with theiur new bikes
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


day St Cecelia's festival when
20 primary students received


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bicycles for their Tcademici
achievements.
All smiles, the primary school
children of four different schools
mounted their new bicycles,
which were donated by Mr and
Mrs Harry McPike of Paradise
Island for the St Cecelia Honour
Awards programme. The
McPikes, who could not be at
Friday's function, attended the
festival and awards ceremony
on May 27. They donated all of
the bicycles for the 29 primary
students and the Dell computer
?for the only high school student
to make the grade....... .... ..
Mr McPike was so impressed
by the work being done in the
constituency that he told Acting
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt,
MP for the area and organiser
of the events, that he might be
interested in assisting in other
ways.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mrs Pratt .said she
wants to encourage and moti-
vate the children of her con-
stituency to excel academically.
These events were planned to
reward primary students, who
were able to maintain a GPA of
3.0 or higher for the 2003/2004
school year, with a bicycle.
Among the high school stu-
dents only one qualified for an
award. Instead of a bicycle a
Dell computer was presented
to the 12th grade student of-CR
Walker.
Mrs Pratt said she is extreme-
ly grateful to Robert Carron of
the Santa Claus Committee,
which has been providing chil-
dren of St Cecelia with toys for
the past six years, for introduc-
ing her to the McPikes and
making these events possible.
"I am so grateful and happy,
and the children are so excited,
it is truly a wonderful thing,"
she said. "It's important for us
to identify the sponsors of these
events so that we're able to
teach young people who these
--people-are-who-ge-the- extra
mile to help them.
"Many times the children see
the end product, but they don't


know who is behind it. They see
me, their MP, but it is important
for them to know that I am only
the one who goes in search of
sponsors to assist with these
programmes. It's the sponsors I
want them to know, these are
the people who give of their
time and their money to make
life better for them."
Among the recipients of the
bicycles were Clyde Rolle of
Ridgeland Primary, Beautis(a
King and Dervinique Edwards
of Stephen Dillet Primary,
Latoya Green of Yellow Elder
Primary and Diondra Johnson
of Mable Walker Primary.S ,
Mrs Pratt said the children's
GPAs were verified with the
principals of the respective
schools, so that only legitimate
grades would be rewarded. Mrs
Rochelle Hill, former teacher of
Ridgeland Primary and now in
charge of the Ministry of Edu-
cation's after school programme,
and Senator Paulette Zonicle,
assisted in verifying the students'
grades to make certain that they
qualified for their prize.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area.or-have-won-an -
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale
tel: 393-7111 fax: 393-0440.


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUNEMUNVA, JUN k.LCUAiN E S


.Festival presents




'living culture'




to our visitors


2 By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Junkanoo in June Fes-
val presents "living culture"
4o visitors, according to newly-
appointed Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine.
The celebration, which com-
bines Bahamian foods, crafts,
and music under one umbrella,
is held every Saturday in June at
Arawak Cay.
' This past Saturday, at the offi-
cial opening ceremony, Ms
Walkine noted that all Bahami-
ans are an important part of the
festival.
"We are happy to present our
living culture to our visitors. At


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are investigating a
'number of criminal matters
which occurred over the week-
end, including a shooting, two
-cases of armed robbery and an
attempted vehicular robbery.
Investigations are underway
into the circumstances which'
led to a 20-year-old man being
,shot in the leg.
According to reports, Rod-
iney Thervil was walking along
,Johnson Road when he heard
:gunshots ring out and noticed
that he had been struck by a
,bullet in his right leg, Chief Supt
JHulan Hanna told The Tribunie.
| A relative'assisted Mr-Thervil
'to Princess Margaret Hospital,
4Where; he was treated for his
injury,
"His injuries were not life-
,threatening and it is expected
that he will be released soon,"
.Mr Hanna added.
: On Friday, officers on mobile
'patrol were able to locate the
;vehicle of Jacquelyn Ferguson,
",which had been stolen from her
tat gunpoint earlier in the day.
At 1.50pm on Friday, Ms Fer-
i.guson was returning to her
1,home on Spikenard Road, off
'Carmichael Road, when she
twas accosted by an armed man
;who stole her champagne-
,coloured 2000 Honda Accord,
licence plate number 32000.
Later that day, at 10.30pm,
police officers observed the
'stolen vehicle on Palm Beach
Street. It was occupied by three
"dark males" at the time, Mr
",Hanna said.
Upon seeing the police, the
'three men abandoned the Hon-
i: da and fled on foot.
A search for the men is
,underway and the vehicle has
been impounded for forensic
Investigations.
SPolice are also investigating
a second armed robbery, which
occurred early Sunday morning


the same time, however, we
have not forgotten that this is
also an opportunity for.our res-
idents to interact with our visi-
tors. So, all Bahamians are an
important part of the festival,"
she said.
She added that in creating a
true heritage festival, included
in this year's activities are bush
tea demonstrations, bread bak-
ing demonstrations from the
rock oven, drama presentations
from such individuals as James
Catalyn and Friends.
Many aspects of Bahamian
culture are represented out at
Arawak Cay. Bahamians and
tourists alike can buy straw
crafts, read up on the history


CRIME

on Shirley Street.
Marquinn Edwards, 32, and a
female friend were walking
along Shirley Street, near the
Sacred Heart Roman Catholic
Church, when they were held
up by two men, one of them
armed with a handgun.
The men robbed Mr Edwards
of $800 and stole the woman's
personal effects, before fleeing
on foot east on Shirley Street.
Also in the early hours of
Sunday, police were able to stop
two men from stealing a Nissan
,Sentra on West Bay Street.,,
Officers on mobile patrol in
the area observed two men near
the Cocktails and Dreams bar
trying to break into a burgundy
Nissan Sentra.
Following the arrest of the
two men, a 23-year-old of Nas-
sau Village and a 26-year-old
of Union Village, police dis-
covered in their possession two
master car keys.
It was further discovered that
the sky blue Nissan Sentra,
which the suspects had driven to
the scene of the attempted rob-
bery, was also stolen property
and had been recently re-paint-
ed.
The two men are expected to
appear before the courts early
this week.
Cars of the Nissan Sentra and
Sunny brand pose a significant
problem for police, as they are
more easily broken into, said
Mr Hanna.
"The problem is that there is
a ready market for the parts and
unscrupulous persons take
advantage of this fact," he said.
Mr Hanna further explained
that these types of vehicles are
often used in other offences,
such as armed robberies.
He cautioned all Nissan Sen-
tra and Sunny owners to make
their cars less attractive and
accessible, by installing alarm
devices and parking the vehi-
cles in well-lit areas.


and events surrounding
Junkanoo at the "Junkanoo
Museum and shack."
Also, while sipping on a
daiquiri or eating conch fritters,
they can listen and see the sights
and sounds of a small-scale
Junkanoo parade.
Purpose

Geneva Cooper, director of
product and marketing at the
Ministry of Tourism, explains
the purpose for putting on the
annual extravaganza.
"Originally, the festival start-
ed out to attract visitors here
during the slow periods, and
June was one of those months.
In addition, we wanted to have
a cultural event for Bahamians
to enjoy themselves and interact
with the visitors," she com-
mented.
Ms Cooper said that, starting
next week, finalists in the
Junkanoo in June song compe-
tition will perform their origi-
nal Rake and Scrape, Goom-


bay or Junkanoo songs. This is
the second year for the song
competition, and this year there
are ten adult finalists and ten
junior finalists.
Additionally, each week a
Bahamian musical legend will
be featured. They include
Becky Chipman, Freddie
Munnings and Blind Blake.
Ms Walkine said that the
ministry wants to go "deeper"
into our culture than ever
before.
"At the Ministry of Tourism,
we recognise the importance of
culture to our daily life and to
the development of our econo-
my through tourism. Our visi-
tors are eager to know who we
are as a people. So we must use
every opportunity to show
them," she said.


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MONJUAY, JUNt- T i, /UUO, r-mut: 5


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE4, MNDA, JUE 1, 205 TE TRBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., KM., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


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In support




of the COB's





Dr Smith


EDITOR, The Tribune
We the faculty and staff of
the College of The Bahamas
wish to express our strong sup-
port for Dr Rodney Smith,
our President.
He is the legitimate and
highly capable leader of this
institution and we stand
behind him. He has publicly
apologised for the regrettable
error made during his address
at Honours Convocation and
we accept his apology.
We recognise that profes-
sionals at all levels and from
all walks of life are capable of
error. As educators we know
that plagiarism is a serious
academic offence and we nei-
ther overlook nor minimise
it.
Dr Smith's performance in
his first year as president of
this institution has been stel-
lar; and he has earned the
respect and confidence of fac-
ulty and staff alike.
This has been one of the most
promising and productive years
for the college in recent memo-


ry.
Faculty and staff are moti-
vated and excited by the vision
Dr Smith has brought to the
institution and by the new cul-
ture he is fostering.
Anyone who would care to
look objectively at the insti-
tution would see that remark-
able progress is being made
under Dr Smith's leadership,
and under the leadership of
the college council and its
chairman, Mr Franklyn Wil-
son. The growth and improve-
ment of the institution in the
years to come will attest to Dr
Smith's innovative and proac-
tive approach to educational
development.
It is disturbing to see that
certain individuals within the
community overlook all the
positive developments at the
college and instead advance
in the media the false notion


that the institution is in disar-
ray.
It is also unfortunate that in
recent years the media
appears to have focused more
on the negative than on the
tireless efforts of hundreds of
faculty and staff committed to
creating a university of which
all Bahamians can be proud.
The future of the College
of The Bahamas is brighter
than ever and that is largely a
consequence of Dr Rodney
Smith's leadership and the
optimism he has engendered.
We feel that a call for Dr
Smith's resignation is an over-
reaction.
We are astonished by
some of the negative state-
ments made in the press.
Though we are disappointed
by the mistake made by Dr
Smith, we stand behind him
and we support him as presi-
dent.

FACULTY AND STAFF
College of the Bahamas
Nassau
June 11 2005


Government




takes ali of




the credit


EDITOR, The Tribune
REFERENCE is made to
your editorial dated Monday,
May 30 2005, under the sub-
ject heading "Minister forgets
past scandals".
For your information and
that of the public I am sorry to
say that this government has
no intention of giving any
credit to anyone other than
themselves.
They want to promote the
view that all important eco-
nomic and social activities
began and remain with this
new government. No-one else
contributed.


That is the reason why
almost all the ministers, upon
assuming their new roles (of
which they had no previous
experience), sought to belit-
tle all ongoing work left
behind by the FNM govern-
ment, and the strangest thing
is that few people, if any,
protested this irrational behav-
iour by these novices.
After the FNM had made
tremendous progress in revi-
talising the Bahamian econo-
my, the foolish Bahamian
electorate voted for another
party. It is equivalent to a
farmer who ploughed his field,
planted his crops, took care


to shield them from natural
ravages, and just at harvest
time, another reaped his
bountiful harvest.
Also, these new people have
the gall to say that God did it
- that God removed the pre-
vious government. No way.
Their lies did it.
So this new government
could do us a favour and cease
any further repetition of their
religious hype, when more and
more Bahamians should know
better.

ANONYMOUS
Nassau
May 30 2005


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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1. This Friday June 24th, 2005 1


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THE TIBUN MONDY, JNE 13 200, PLN...


Stroke victim


can boast


of being COB graduate


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
AFTER she suffered a
paralysing stroke as a teenager,
some doctors had given up
hope for the recovery of Mia
Miller. However, she has over-
come obstacles and can boast
of being a recent graduate of
the College of the Bahamas.
It was all smiles for Mia on
her graduation day. She was
pushed in her wheelchair on to
the stage and gleefully accept-
ed her Bachelor's degree in
Secondary Education from
COB's president, Dr Rodney


Smith.
Remembering that proud
moment, Mia laughed and said:
"I felt great, I was excited.
When I looked down from the
stage, and saw all my friends
cheering me on, it was great.
Those four years were actually
worth it."
Challenges
Before making it to that day,
Mia and her mother, Louise
Miller, faced what looked like
insurmountable challenges.
In December of 1995, at the
age of 14, Mia had a stroke.


Ministers deliver



'keys of hope' to


15 Abaconians


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
FIFTEEN Abaconians had
much to celebrate on Friday
as the Minister of Housing
and National Insurance,
Shane Gibson, along with the
Minister of Social Services
and Community Develop-
ment, Melanie. Griffin, "deliv-
ered help and'hope" by pre-
senting them with the keys to
their new houses.
In the aftermath of Hurri-
canes Frances and Jeanne,
hundreds of homes through-
out Abaco were damaged and
destroyed. A's a result the
government, along with the
National Emergency. Man-
agement Agency (NEMA),,
have been repairing and
rebuilding houses for the
islanders.
The seven residents of
Snake Cay whose homes were
particularly vulnerable
because of their close prox-
imity to the coastline, along
with the eight residents of
North and South Abaco, all
lost their homes during the
hurricanes.
The residents of Snake Cay
have all been relocated to
Spring City, a sub-division
developed at a cost of
$393,000. Seven houses were
built in Spring City, three in
South Abaco and five in
North Abaco. To date 45
houses have been built.
Everyone receiving a house
will be required to apply for a
mortgage. Those who don't
qualify will have to pay rent.
According to Neil Camp-
bell, co-ordinator, through the
hurricane relief efforts in
Abaco 19 persons have been
directly employed, 350 per-
sons indirectly employed,


FI lzu i


$1,274,000 has been earned in
labour and $171,000 has been
spent on repairs.
"Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne brought devastation
and despair for many. This
situation has been turned
around for the good. These
families now enjoy the expe-
rience of home ownership
again and they have every
reason to celebrate," Mr Gib-
son said while addressing the
audiences at the key presen-
tation ceremonies.
Both corporate and private
citizens made contributions
to the Abaco community,
including the Wujak Fund
Foundation, Subway Restau-
rant, Scotia Bank (Bahamas),
The department of social ser-
vices and former prime min-
ister Hubert Ingraham.
David Smith, a farmer on
the island, said his house
could not stand up to the
powers of both hurricanes. He
lost his roof after Hurricane
Jeanne hit. Because he had
nowhere else for his family to
go, he covered his roof with
tarpaulin and continued the
best he could. He says he is
grateful to the government.
"I appreciate it a lot," he said.
Roberta Russell, of Green
Turtle Cay, said she was
"overjoyed" when she
received her keys. "My home
is beautiful," she said, "I will
take care of it. I am very
thankful," she said.
Eight more houses are in
the final stages of building.
The keys for those houses will
be presented to the recipients
at a later date.
"We are not doing any
favours," the minister said,
"this is our sweet responsibil-
ity."


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$339.00

7 CUBE FRIGIDAIRE
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7 CUBE HAIER
$367.00
9 CUBE FRIGIDAIRE
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15 CUBE FRIGIDAIRE
$725.00

25 CUBE WOODS
$995.00


After investigations it was dis-
covered that she had an arte-
rio-venous malformation. With
this disorder, a large collection
of blood vessels in her brain
had ruptured. As a result, her
right side was paralysed and
her speech was-slurred.
A doctor referred Mia to a
medical facility in Canada.
Their hopes were dashed when
doctors said there was nothing
they could do.
She was then referred to a
second hospital in Canada.
There, hope was delivered for
the stroke victim.
Doctors at Sunnybrooke
Hospital said they were able to
perform a new method of
surgery called radiation brain
surgery.
In February, 1996, the
surgery was performed through
holes drilled in Mia's head. The
surgery was to mend the blood
vessels. Ms Miller said the
operation was termed "very
successful."
Ms Miller said her daughter
was the 110th person to get
that type of surgery.
Eventually, Mia went back
to high school at St John's Col-
lege a year after surgery. She
started off very slowly, going
to school only for half a day,
then a full day, only to observe.
In 1997, she got to the point
where she could go to school to.
perform.
Mia's mother said she has
been supportive of her daugh-
ter "one hundred per cent."
"A lot of people do not
accept their family member
being disabled. First you have
to accept it. Some people are
embarrassed and do not like to
bring them out. The more you


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
HUNDREDS of Haitians
stood around and watched as
four construction workers
wielding hammers and hatchets
tore down a house in The Mud
that was recently vacated by
Haitians.
The Mud and Pigeon Pea in
central Marsh Habour, Abaco,
were visited by the Minister of
Housing and National Insur-
ance, Shane Gibson, and Min-
ister of Social Services and
Community Development,
Melanie Griffin, who were on
the island to present 15 per-
sons whose houses were
destroyed by Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne last year
with the keys to their new
homes.
Destroyed
Both ministers, accompanied
by an entourage of police and
other government officials, also
watched as the house was
destroyed. The house, made of
little more than pieces of ply-
wood, was torn down in less
than 10 minutes.


bring them out the better for
them and you. There is nothing
to hide. Everywhere I moved
she was there," said Ms Miller.
Her advice was that despite
someone's disability they
should not "just sit down and
play dead", but make adjust-
ments and move on with life.
Ms Miller said that her
daughter's health has improved
"tremendously." Looking
through a photo album of the
stages of her daughter's illness
she said: "It is two different
persons altogether."
At first Mia was not able to
feed herself, but now she can.


Over the last 20 years there
has been an influx of illegal
immigrants in Marsh Harbour.
Richard Gibson, office manag-
er of the Department of Hous-
ing, said there are more than
1,000 Haitians living in the two
settlements. "This is one of the
biggest problems on the island,
if not the biggest," he said.
Problem
"There is a whole communi-
ty living here illegally. The
problem is they have been
allowed to live here. Nobody
has done anything about it,"
Mr Gibson said.
Mr Gibson said the Haitians
built their houses after mid-
night. "They paint the wood
before putting the house
together, so that when officials
visit the next day they can't tell
which house just went up
because you can't tell the new
ones from the old ones.
"As soon as a house is vacat-
ed we have to tear it down,
because if we don't, others will
move in."
Mr Gibson said the residents
are now working hand-in-hand


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K, '" Harbour Bay Shopping Centre .'
....' Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 .,


In the year 2000, Mia entered
COB as a full-time student.
Both Mia and Ms Miller said
that COB was very accommo-
dating and the students were
very nice to her. "COB is the
place to be," Ms Miller added.

Teaching
Since January this year, Mia
has been teaching at C R
Walker Secondary School. Mia
said she uses the projector to
teach, so that she does not have
to write on the board.
She said that teaching so far


with the ministry to combat this
problem. "This didn't happen
overnight. We have to take this
one day at a time."
He explained that a lot of the
people living there are eligible
for citizenship.
Zalode Philippe, Haitian
working with the urban renew-
al programme, expressed his
joy at seeing the house torn
down.
"I am glad to see you," he
said, referring to the ministers
and the construction workers
who destroyed the house.
"I want to keep the place
clear because I am glad to be
here," he continued, "when
people build, I tell them not
to."
Minister Griffin said that
some social workers are now
pursuing Creole lessons so they
can communicate effectively
with the Haitians.


7I7A~


has been going "all good."
Mia sends out words of
encouragement to all disabled
persons.
"Do not give up, where there
is life there is hope always
remember that."
Mia is now learning how to
drive and can take steps with
the assistance of her mother
and supportive boots. Mia said
she will write a book on her
life experience.
Mia and her mother thanked
everyone who assisted them up
to this stage in her life. She
especially thanked COB's stu-
dents and staff.




MONDAY
JUNE 13
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
12:58 Caribbean Today News Update
1:00 Health For The Nation
1:30 Newsmakers
2:00 Mr. Ballooney B.
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop NeilEllis
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Hurricane Preparedness Cont'd
5:30 Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
6:00 Holy Hip Hop
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Island Life Destinations
9:00 Legends From Whence We
Came: Leon Rahming
10:00 Sports Lifestyles
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
NOE:ZS-V -3reere


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Are we the victims of success?


THE historical strength
of the Bahamas has
always been its strategic loca-
tion in relation to economic cen-
tres of power.
In early colonial times, the
power centres in question were
Mexico and the Spanish Main
(South America), whence fleets
laden with bullion would run
the gauntlet of our reef-stud-
ded seas.
By the early 18th century, a
geopolitical shift in favour of
the British maritime empire saw
the repositioning of the econo-
my to respond to new opportu-
nities ranging from piracy
(against British imperial ship-
ping) to breaching a series of
historical blockades of South-
ern North America (1776-81;
1812-15; 1861-65).
This historical setting has
coloured every aspect of
Bahamian economic culture,


creating a resourceful, short-
term and highly opportunistic
economic ethos, which placed
little emphasis upon investment
and great emphasis on imme-
diate consumption.
Since 1945, with the United
States at peace and free from
foreign blockade, economic
opportunity has generally come
to the Bahamas in the form of
(external) investment in those
products and services that enjoy
a ready market in adjacent
North America ie tourism and
financial services.
As with all previous sources
of opportunity, this postwar
model has had its impact on the
lifestyle and economic culture
of Bahamians and once again
that impact has not always been
good.
The unique dilemma for the
Bahamas today, as highlighted
in the disparities between it and
its southern neighbours, is that


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PERSPECTIVES


AND


R EW


while our closeness to the Unit-
ed States has produced greater
wealth than anywhere else in
the region, that same closeness
is responsible for a consumer
culture that has idled away
much of that wealth.
The Bahamas not only col-
lects and spends less of its GDP
on national development goals
than most of its neighbours, but
its people save less than many
of them, opting instead to fund
an increasingly consumerist,
high cost but low quality
lifestyle.
The difference shows. While
we boast of being so much bet-
ter off than our neighbours,
most of them are in fact better
educated than us, have lower
infant mortality and higher life
expectancy.

WE NEED MORE
SOCIAL SPENDING


T he total revenues col-
lected by the Bahami-
an government amount to
around 20 per cent of GDP, as
compared to 35 per cent in Bar-
bados, 40 per cent for the UK
and 45 per cent for the EU
average.
This means that, even when
the economy is at its most buoy-
ant, social spending on health,
education and programmes
whose value is beyond question
cannot match that of other
countries as a proportion of
GDP.
While wealthier Bahamians
sit about and complain about
crime, sub-standard employees
and bad roads, they would
almost certainly be the first to
resist the obvious answer to
most of these problems: more
public investment, which, unless
it is to come through borrow-
ing, means more taxes.


A L L E N


RUNAWAY
CONSUMERISM
MUST BE TACKLED

n the meantime, there are
things government can do
to control runaway con-
sumerism and encourage
Bahamians to save more of
their income for more valuable
investments than they do.
Far more than most countries,
Bahamians of all economic
backgrounds share a somewhat
crass value system, in which con-
spicuous objects (like cars) are
deemed to confer status.
In an island nation, this kind
of consumption can be tackled
directly through import and
licensing policy. In Bermuda,
cars are limited to the very
smallest categories in terms of
engine size, making consump-
tion on cars far less of a prob-
lem than it is in the less wealthy
Bahamas.
By capping the value of
motor vehicles that can be
imported into the country, gov-
ernment would be freeing thou-
sands of young, impressionable
Bahamians from the destruc-
tive-pressures of competitive
consumption.
A value limit of say $20,000
would have a powerful effect
on this one element of Bahami-
an consumer culture. Just imag-
. ine, if you will, how many fewer
young recruits the local drug
dealer would attract when he
drives up in his Morris Minor.
CULTURALLY AND
DIPLOMATICALLY,
CARICOM IS AN
IMPORTANT
COUNTER-BALANCE


f the present CSME,
debate were really (as!.


"The unique dilemma for the
Bahamas today, as highlighted
in the disparities between it
and its southern neighbours, is
that while our closeness to the
United States has produced
greater wealth than anywhere
else in the region, that same
closeness is responsible for a
consumer culture that has
idled away much of that
wealth."


Fred Mitchell pretends it to be)
about whether we want to
deepen cultural ties to the
Caribbean region and avoid
becoming an extension of
Dade country, then this writer
and many others would be at
the vanguard of the 'yes' cam-
paign.
Few prospects are more trou-
bling than the Bahamas becom-
ing any more absorbed into
South Florida (culturally, social-
ly or economically) than it
already is.
But, of course, the debate is
not about that at all.
It is about whether we want
to enter a single economy
(which, according to its greatest
proponents, must eventually
involve a loss of sovereignty)
with countries with which we
have little economic relation-
ship.
There is no doubt that, while,
on the one hand, the north
remains the direction of eco-
nomic value to us, the south
(and east) offers us an impor-
tant alternative reservoir from
which to broaden the cultural
exposure of Bahamians and bal-
ance our understanding of the
world,. ,


G-iv'en our economic
reality, the medium
term challenge for the Bahamas
is to remain in the first tier of
countries considered friends of
the United States while avoid-
ing the damaging consequences
that would necessarily flow
from any further cultural
absorption.
It is also important to remain
generally uncritical, but essen-
tially neutral of US policy in the
region and beyond.
This task will sometimes
become difficult, such as over
the US's misguided policy
toward Cuba and the tendency
of some of its politicians to seek
to deputise, small neighbouring
countries into agents of Ameri-
can power or to pressure them
to choose sides.
At times such as these, the
CARICOM relationship,
becomes important, because it
conveniently allows us to,differ-,
entiate ourselves diplomatically
from certain US positions while*
remaining bilaterally close.
For similar reasons, it is help-
ful to maintain strong diplo-
matic alignments with such levr
el-headed friends of the US as
the European Union. ..


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Flagship Store, Bay Street (242) 356-6920
Mall At Marathon (242) 394-7771/4
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---------


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE.TRIBUINE








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PAGE MONAY, JNE 13 2005THE TIBUN


Awards presented to reco


e


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
JUNIOR Achievement (JA)
Bahamas has recognised its
most distinguished achievers.
On Saturday, the 26th annual
JA awards presentation was
held under the theme "Winning
With Teamwork" at the Rain-
forest Theatre, Nassau Wynd-
ham and Crystal Palace Casino.
Derek Smith Jr, adviser for
the achievers association, said


the purpose of the awards cere-
mony is to highlight the merits of
the achievers over the 25-week
period of the JA programme.
Thirty-one young people
from the various JA companies
were awarded the "Most Dis-
tinguished Achievers" award.
Points were tallied from the
JA general and economic exams,
speech competitions, sales, atten-
dance, and an interview.
The "Most Distinguished
Achiever" title was awarded to


Andr6 Curry. He received a
$10,000 scholarship donated by
the Bahamas Supermarkets
Scholarships Foundations.
Mr Curry is a third year
achiever and is stationed with
PricewaterhouseCooper.
St Leo University, a leading
liberal arts institution, north of
Tampa, donated five scholar-
ships to JA students: Mr Curry,
Andero Astwood, Deangria
Carey, Diandra Gibson and
D'andra Ferguson.


Public Utilities Commission


Assistant Manager/Administration

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is seeking a suitably qualified
individual to fill the vacant position of Assistant Manager/Administration.

The successful candidate will have a high level of self-motivation, and a
minimum of seven years responsible experience in administrative and
personnel functions including lead supervisory and records management.
The successful candidate must also be proficient with Microsoft Office
applications, spreadsheets and data base management.

Applicants must have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree in Business,
Personnel Administration or equivalent from a leading institution.

The PUC offers a very attractive salary and benefits package and excellent
opportunities for further development. Starting salary will be commensurate
with relevant experience. Applications should be delivered no later than
23 June, 2005 to the:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue,
Nassau Bahamas, Fax No. (242)323-7288
e-mail: puc@pucbahamas.gov.bs


* ST Leo University presents scholarships to Ja student Deangria Carey, Andre Curry, Beverley
Griffith Assistant Director of Admission Diandra Gibson, Andero Astwood and Diandra
Ferguson.


* CIA Exclusive, counseled by The National Insurance Board, won the Company of the year.


* THE Junior Achievers most distinguished achievers 2004-2005


.NAUTICA
JEAN S COMPANY


AVAILABLE AT
The Royal Palm Trading Company, Sandyport
Solomon's Mines, Mall At Marathon


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. (242) 302-7000




PUBLIC NOTICE



NEW BUSINESS HOURS FOR BTC

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) wishes to inform its valued
customers and the general public that with effect from Monday, June 13, 2005, the
new operating hours for its administrative and business offices will be 9:00 am to
5:00 pm daily. This change is the result of recent contract negotiations and effectively
brings the Company's operating hours in line with the terms of Employment Act
(2001).

However, customers are further advised that they may continue to make payments
at any of the Company's CTO's during the usual hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm daily.

BTC sincerely apologizes for any inconvenience caused.


- I- I


I LI


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





THETRIUNEMODAY JUE 1, 005 PAE


achievements


* BEVERLEY Griffith, assistant director of admission presents 2nd year achiever Andero
Astwood of National Insurance Board with a scholarship to the university


* BEVERLEY Griffith present 3nd year achiever Andre Curry of PricewaterhouseCoopers with
a scholarships to the university.
(Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune Stnff)

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Your trust-.


Our responsibility

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_ -I_,_------b~


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 9







PAGE 0, MODAY, UNE 1, 200CALL NEWSN
P,~


of TourismBRITTON receives a straw gift basket from Diana Lightbourne, under secretary of the Ministry



Dream vacation




for brothers



with anaemia


TWO children with a life
threatening illness fulfilled their
dreams of a tropical vacation in
the Bahamas through the Make
A Wish foundation.
Britton Glynn and his brother
Logan, along with dad, Timo-
thy, and mom ,Tracy received
a four day all-expense paid
vacation in the Bahamas at the
Atlantis Resort and Casino.
Britton and Logan, who both
have a rare form of anemia that
doesn't allow their bodies to
produce antibodies, were nom-
inated for their dream vacation
by a local nurse in their com-
munity of Jupiter, Florida.


"I have always wanted to vis-
it the Bahamas because it is the
only place where I can enjoy my
love of sea creatures, and get to
try the Mayan waterslide at the
Atlantis," said Britton.
Britton and Logan were
greeted by a special welcome
ceremony held in the VIP
lounge of the Nassau Interna-
tional Airport. In attendance
were Diana Lightbourne, under
secretary of the Ministry of
Tourism and Van Diah, Mar-
keting Director at Bahamasair.
Mr Van Diah encouraged the
special guests to leave their wor-
ries and troubles behind, and


enjoy the tranquility and relax-
ation that the Bahamas offers.
"I am extremely thankful to
the Bahamian government for
providing us with such great
hospitality, and the Make a
Wish foundation for making my
sons' life long dream come true,
said Mr Glynn.
They were each presented a
custom straw embroidered gift
basket along with the friendly
hospitality of the Bahamian
people. While vacationing, the
Glynn family plans to enjoy
snorkeling, swimming and the
many aspects of the Bahamian
culture.


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005








THE TIBUNEMONDA, JUN 13, 005, AGE 1


Farms closure to



cost Bahamian




economy $20m


* By Bahamas Information
Services
The closure of the canker-
infested Bahama Star and BG
Harmons citrus farms in Abaco
will cost the Bahamian econo-
my $20 million annually, Minis-
ter of Agriculture, Fisheries and
Local Government Alfred Gray
has announced.
Mr Gray also said that his
Ministry has no knowledge. of
the canker disease spreading to
other farms in Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama.
"I spoke a few weeks ago
about the canker disease in
Abaco, and I canr you that the
canker disease is a terrible dis-
ease that hit the citrus industry
in our country," he said during
debate on the 2005-2006 bud-
get last Thursday.
He said the Bahama Star
Farm, which employed more
than 100 persons, and the BG
Harmon Farm, which was just
about to reap a harvest, are no
longer able to contribute to the
Bahamian economy.
"I am advised that we are los-
ing some $20 million plus per
annum as contributions to our
economy from these farms clo-
sure. That is a lot of money to
lose as a result of an unfortu-
nate disease," Mr Gray said.
He revealed the destruction
of the Bahama Star Farm is
about completed and the
destruction of the BG Harmons
Farm will begin very shortly.
"I can tell you that while the
destruction is not going on,
security is tight at the BG Har-
mons farm, and we hope that
we could begin the destruction
process in a few days," Mr Gray
said.
The Minister also responded
to concerns about the citrus
industry raised in Parliament


0 ALFRED Gray


Thursday by Tennyson Wells,
independent MP for Bamboo
Town and a former Minister of
Agriculture and Fisheries, and
Robert Sweeting, MP for South
Abaco and Shadow Minister of
Agriculture and Fisheries.
Mr Wells said he had
received information from for-
mer directors of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture, and that
the canker disease has spread
from Abaco to Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama, and urged Min-
ister Gray to "tell the Bahamian
public what the true state of
affairs is with canker in the
Bahamas."
South Abaco MP Robert
Sweeting said he was concerned
about the "several thousands"
citrus plants from one of the
canker-infested farms in Aba-
co, which were shipped to New


Providence and stored at the
Gladstone Road Agricultural
Centre.
Mr Gray said that Mr. Sweet-
ing had visited the Gladstone
Road Agriculture Centre on
Wednesday. "So he knows that
the trees of which he now
speaks, had not been distrib-
uted. He saw them yesterday,
so he knows they are still
there," Mr Gray said.
Mr Gray said none of the
trees which were brought to
New Providence before the out-
break are infected with canker.
"They will not be distributed.
Up to now, they have not been.
I have no intention of distribut-
ing them until they are clear
and free by the Bahamian pro-
fessionals and the USDA (Unit-
ed States Department of Agri-
culture) of the United States."


The data generated from the survey will be used to measure each
sector's contribution to the Gross National Product
of The Bahamas.


lved in the production of goods and services, you
tribute to our national statistics as well as learn
your sector's performance by completing the
s Establishment Survey questionnaire accurately
and in a timely fashion.

estionnaires should be returned to the
of Statistics.


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MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 12, M N YJ


SKENNETH Francis and mCouple
wife Stephanie leave his-
can after witnessing their celebrate
daughter's marriage to
ebil Alexander Ne"


wedding

day at St

Andrew's


3 yeasCecil Alexander Newry
P cejoined hands in marriage to
the former Kenrah Nicole
Phillipa Francis at historic St
Matthew's Anglican Church
on Saturday.
Friends from all over the
world joined in witness to the
special occasion as Father
S James Moultrie, Father Don
Haynes, Canon Neil Roach
and Archdeacon James Pala-
cious conducted the service.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE,








THE ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ,.4OA TRBNNONAEJNE1,205SAE1


UN agriculture expert




on loan to Bahamas


* By Bahamas Information
Services
AN expert from the United
Nations Food and Agricultural
Organization (FAO) is on loan
to the Bahamas government.
Alfred Gray, Minister of
Agriculture, Fisheries and Local
Government, said the expert
will be stationed in Long Island
but will travel to other islands
engaged in livestock farming.
Mr Gray made the announce-
ment during debate in the
House of Assembly on Thurs-
day on the $1.379 billion budget
for 2005-2006.
He said the FAO specialist
in pigs and goats was engaged
by the government with the
assistance of Godfrey Eneas,
The Bahamas Ambassador to
the FAO.
"He has made it possible for
an expert to be given on loan to
us by FAO, who is now going to
be stationed in Long Island, for
the purpose of assisting Long
Island sheep growers, and he
will travel to Eleuthera and he
will travel to Abaco, and from
there to wherever he needs to
travel within the Bahamas, to
help those who are involved in
livestock development to do
those things at the right time
and multiply their yields," Mr
Gray said.
He said his ministry intends


* THE government wants more produced locally


to significantly expand the pro-
duction of bananas, tomatoes,
sweet peppers, cassavas,
coconut and coconut trees,
sweet potatoes and hot peppers.
"I believe that the expansion
of crops that I just mentioned -
if we could produce them in suf-


ficient quantities to feed our-
selves it would bring us much
closer to self sufficiency, and
we hope to do that in the short-
est possible time," Mr Gray
said.
He said feed mills are in oper-
ation and able to supply farmers
involved in livestock farming.
"We are producing feed. Let
them (farmers) know that they
can go and buy feed for their
cattle," he said.
The minister said that over
15,000 disease-resistant coconut
trees were brought in from
Jamaica over the past six
months, and supplied at cost to
farmers throughout the coun-
try.
"If it cost $2, we sell them to
farmers for $2," he said, adding
that a further 30,000 trees are
currently on order.
Mr Gray said with the explo-
sion of touristic development
throughout The Bahamas, there
is a need to link agriculture with
tourism.
"Wouldn't it be wonderful if
hotels could offer their guests
a wide range of herbal tea,
grown in the Bahamas, in the
mornings, rather than tea from
England. Why couldn't we offer
them herbal tea as part of our
Bahamian thing?
"Could you imagine how
refreshing it would be for a
tourist who comes out of the
pool, to drink a glass of
Bahamian papaya juice. When
he looks at it, it is juice made in
The Bahamas. That is what he
comes here to see," he said.
"I really believe that tourists
who come to our country come
for a vacation and when they
leave they want to leave with a


Bahamian experience in the
food area, in the aqua-sports
area, whatever, let it be a
Bahamian experience, and you
will find that they will come
back again and again," he said.
Mr Gray said most, if not all,
of the hotels are willing to buy
Bahamian produce and farm-
ers need to find markets in the
hotels, restaurants and other
places.


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Invite applications for the positions of:


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Positions offer attractive compensation
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Applications should be sent to:
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P.O.Box CB-13005

Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com


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The Government of the
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas
Invites all interested parties to




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Tuesday, June 14, 2005 at The College of The Bahamas
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Sopranos, Tenors, Altos and Basses are needed.
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There is no upper age limit.
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* Must come prepared to sing one (1) song only.
E Must be a Bahamian Citizen or Resident of The Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 13
















Concern at level of development


FROM page one
1997, will result in irreparable
damage to the island's environ-
ment and that this fact will stop
nature-conscious tourists from
visiting Bimini.
However, Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe said
that although the government
understands the concerns of the
people regarding the environ-
ment, he feels that many of the
more outspoken opponents of
the project are following their
own selfish agendas.


The minister further empha-
sised that the government
would never approve any pro-
ject which would endanger the
environment.
"It is our country, given to us
by God, why would we destroy
it? We love our country, I don't
understand why people get the
idea that we would recklessly
destroy it," he said.
Fay and Jack Bussel, from
Portland, Maine, in their letter,
appealed to Mr Christie to
recognise that Bimini's man-
groves will provide natural pro-


tection from storms and a habi-
tat for a wealth for economical-
ly valuable species.
They asked government to
implement the Bimini Marine
Protected Area.
"Both my husband and
friends favour countries where
natural resources are protect-
ed. The devastating tsunami last
year shows that mangrove
forests provide the best protec-
tion for life and property," they
said.
Nicholanna Prince, another
tourist concerned about man-


grove habitats, said:
"I like to visit places where I
can enjoy exotic wildlife and nat-
ural surroundings which are pro-
tected by the locals instead of
exploited for a quick a profit."
An anonymous writer said he
feels the Bimini Bay develop-
ment is "terribly short-sighted
and ecologically destructive."
"Money may speak now, but
the ecological disaster will speak
later. Bimini's mangrove estu-
ary serves as a fish nursery and
is a special place both biologi-
cally and historically. It needs


international help if it is to sur-
vive," the writer said.
A letter signed Danislava
Marinova read: "As a tourist I
am reluctant to choose a desti-
nation, a country or a resort ,
that destroys valuable eco-sys-
tems."
She said that through the
media and non-governmental
organisations, numerous tourists
have become aware of the con-
troversy surrounding the Bimi-
ni Bay development.
"Tourists are unlikely to
patronise the Bahamas or Bimi-


ni Bay Resort and Casino, if
ever completed, because of the
environmental destruction that
your administration has allowed
on the island," she warned.
Minister Wilchcombe, how-
ever, pointed out that in his
opinion an unstable economy
and society or the country's
crime rate would prove much
more detrimental to the
Bahamas tourism industry.
"These people seem to over-
look the opportunities such a
project would provide for
Bahamians," he said.


Consultation on conch fishing


FROM page one
not so much to find out if a ban
should be placed on the conch,
but to advise the public of the
information we have. Also to
get their support for instituting
a ban, if that is necessary," he
said.
Mr Gray said the ministry will
get the public's views on how
long a ban should be in place, if
it should be imposed.
Mr Gray admitted that if a
ban has to be placed on the
conch there will be some
impact. However, he said that
when one weighs having a ban
against preserving the conch for
generations to come, he thinks


the ban will be preferred to
extinction of the species.
"If a ban has to be institut-
ed, it will not be at the same
time as the ban on the grouper
or the crawfish. Therefore, we
will have to juggle them around,
so that no three species are
banned at the same time," Mr
Gray noted.
The Tribune visited Potter's
Cay Dock on Saturday to find
out from fishermen if they have
seen a decrease in the conch
population and establish how
they would be affected by a ban.
Stephan Plakaras, a fisher-
man for many years, said that in
certain areas, like the Berry
Islands, the Exuma Cays, Aba-


co and Eleuthera, conchs are
dwindling.
.;He said it is notibecause the
conehs are dym~i 'ut, but due
t r iacactice of cracking the
co'ch ,shells underwater and
lenaingthem on the seabeds.
'.".fWe introduced our country
to divers from another country,
whlo crack the conch shells under
water and, leave them on the
beds, where the rest of the
conchs are breathing. Those
conchs that are left will run
away. Our conchs are not deplet-
ing as such, but just moving to
other areas," said Mr Plakaras.
Donnie Bastian, a fisherman
for 22 years, said from his expe-
rience he does not find the,


conch to be dwindling. He said
the more conchs he moves, the
more he finds.
He said if a ban is enforced'it
will affect his business totally
and also vegetable vendors and
others who provide items such
as spoons and bowls needed for
conch salad.
Another point of concern for
the ministry is that fishermen
are now catching juvenile conch.
"We are stepping up o i'yig-
ilance of the landing sites in
New Providence and the Faini-
ly Islands," he said.
"There are laws in place
which protect juvenile conchs,
and we cannot low,:that to
happen withimpunity," he said.


Walkine takes over tourism job


FROM page one rooms in the Bahamas.
"The economy continues to
tapping into the Latin-Ameri- grow, and we continue to live
can market, in a stable and peaceful envi-
- "She has the expertise, the ronment, so average room
experience and has understud- nights and occupancy rates have
ied Vincent Vdnderpool-Wal- gone up, cruise ship arrivals
lace for the past 12 years. Now have increased.
.she follows in thefootsteps of "So now the problem that we
such greats as Baltron Bethel are faced with is the need for
eco more rooms, especially in
) an Grand Bahama, and now that
ncetllace, we have to replace Royal Oasis,
he said. the need is even greater. Our
One of the biggest challenges 'airlifts have increased, our
that Ms Walkine will have to rooms have not," he said.
face is the need for more hotel During her tenure at the Min-


VIhon 303-5310 or 34-237A

Phone 393-5310 or 384-2378


istry of Tourism, Ms Walkine
has developed marketing plans,
overseen worldwide advertising
programmes, managed and
restructured Bahamas tourist
offices throughout North and
South America, and managed
the ministry's product improve-
ment initiatives in promotion
of the Bahamas as a premier
vacation destination.
'.She has also actively repre-
sented the Bahamas on several
' Caribbean regional committees,
including chairing the commit-
tee that prepared the first
Caribbean Strategic Develop-
ment Plan in 2002, after serv-
ing as co-ordinator for the first
CARICOM Ministers of
Tourism Summit in Nassau in
2001.
Mr Wilchcombe said Mr


Vanderpool-Wallace's appoint-
ment to CTO Secretary-Gener-
al was "a major accomplishment
for the Bahamas.".
"I support it completely. It is
the first time that a Bahamian
has taken a leading role.in
tourism in the Caribbean. I feel
with the Bahamas leading in
tourism, it is right that the
Caribbean should look to us'
he said.
The minister further said|hlat
having Mr Vanderpool- ape
at the head of CTO, willlt
ly benefit the Carilbi|%)i i
the Bahamas.
Mr Vanderpool-Walr
expected to take over
duties in mid-June ah Il
move from the B iah I 'b
CTO's headquar if j
Bridgetown, Barbados ,i


:retarial services business proposals
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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


. . ..










Pope to hold


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with children


this October


at the Vatican


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 15


%)d(^f


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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005,PAGELNE17


Andros


festival


crowd


is far


from


crabby


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services
FRESH CREEK, Andros -
What was hailed as the "widest
variety of land crab dishes in the
world" was demonstrated last
weekend at the 8th annual Crab
Fest.
Crab culinary artists titillated
.patrons' palates with their .er-
satility in preparing crab meat
in new and exciting ways, limited
only by their imagination.
Besides the popular crab and
rice/native corn grits,
stewed/steamed crab, crab and
dough, crab soup, and baked
crab, already gaining attention
are crab souse, crab fritters, crab
patties, and crab tarts.
"Crab is one of the most tasti-
est ingredients you can cook
with," declared crab specialist
Mildred And.erson of Cargill
Creek, six-time winner of the
best crab dish contest.
"It adds a dynamic flavour to
your food. And it is healthy too,"
she added.
The colourful reconstructed
Crab Fest site at Queen's Park
welcomed thousands from
throughout the islands, and visi-
tors to one of the country's pre-
mier heritage events.
The festival represents a huge
infusion into the economy of
Central Andros especially for
vendors, hoteliers, apartment
owners, taxi cab drivers, airlines,
ferries, mailboats and the wider
community.
A virtual who's who in
Bahamian entertainment rocked
the crowd with their super hits
from KB with the Civil Service
and Jus' 'Cause She Fat, to Elon
Moxey with 'Catch Der Crab'
and 'Oh My Andros.'
A new feature of the Fest was
the giant pen where hundreds of
crabs were kept in a replicated
habitat. Research offered indi-
cated that crabs are predomi-
nantly vegetarians and not the
unclean scavengers, eating any-
thing, they are made out to be.
The crowd was sent into a fren-
zy Friday and Saturday nights
when sackfuls of the crustaceans
were released in the 'keep all you
can catch' crab hunt.
Crabbing has become a very
lucrative industry. The season
represents the opening of the
'Bank of Andros' as each live
crab brought to market has a
potential value of at least $1.
By the time it reaches New
Providence, the value could
triple as the demand grows. In
1975 one dozen crabs sold for $3
to $10 dollars. In the Nassau
market a dozen crabs could eas-
ily go for close to $40 depending
on the size and the season.
Crabs come out in large num-
bers from June to August to
mate and are harvested. Har-
vesting the crab is called crab-
bing. Although crabs are found
throughout the Bahamas, the
104-mile long, 40-mile wide
Andros, the largest of the
Bahamian archipelago, seems to
.provide the best environment
for them to breed in swarms.


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MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 8, MODAY, UNE 1, 200CTAE RIBUN


Ratko Mladic 'not hiding

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* -


"Copyrighted.

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BRACELETS RINGS *
CHAINS WATCHES *
CHARMS & PENDANTS



ALSO GIVE YOUR DAD A 24KT GOLD PLATED PEN MADE
WITH EXOTIC AFRICAN WOODS. ALL PENS 30% DISCOUNT
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See The Full Line Of All Your Favourite Fords At

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THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


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TH- TRIBUNE
SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
I l M a dollar, with One filled SAVA.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
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SFREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


STORE MON.- SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
w HARBOUR BAY ONLY


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


DELMAR
FLAKE TUNA
IN WATER
6 OZ
2/.990


LIBBY'S
LITE MIX
FRUIT & DICE
PEACHES
4.5 OZ
*369


LIBBYS
CANNED VEGETABLES
ASSORTED
s5 OZ
.89


PAMPERS
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JUMBO
40 CT
J 12900


JBI
MACKERAL
BRINE/ TOMATO
SAUCE
15 OZ
.89


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VEGETABLE
OILS
24 OZ


SAWYERS
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1 39


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/$2 O
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PORK & BEANS
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49 0


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PLANTAINS RIPE
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EACH

RED
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LIMES 200CT
2.LB
5/.- 99


;P>READ
BOWL
$-179
SLB


DANNON
CARB CONTROL ASST FLAV YOGURTS SIBERRY,
RASBERRY, PEACH, VANILLIA
oad?* s


CORN ON COB FL
4 EAR
PILLS BURY
TOASTER STRUDDLES CINNAMON'S/
BERRY, BLUEBERRY, APPLE & CHERRY
12 11.5 OZ

ROBIN HOOD


FLOUR
5 LB
S4 99


ARMOUR
VIENNA
SAUSAGE
REGULAR &
CHICKEN
5 OZ
2/$I 09


WOOLITE
LIQUID ORIGINAL
& ECYCLE
32 OZ
$ so89


BROCCOLI
EACH

CABBAGE
GREEN
LB
.49<.

POTATOES
BAKING 5.LBS
EACH
*34 99


LA ASST CHEF STYLE CHEESE CHEDDER
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& BROCCOLI CUTS
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28 -OZ
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$349
64 OZ


RICE LAND
REG &
PERFECTED RICE
5 LB
$239


HUNTS
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BOTTLE
36 OZ

$219

COTTONELLE
BATH TISSUE DOUBLE
ROLL, ALOE &
ULTRA SOFT
4 PAK
$339^ft


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REGULAR OR THIN SPAGHETTI -
VERMICELLI a-oz .................2/$1.49
HUNTS
SPAGHETTI SAUCES 7.5- oz ..........$1.79
MARTINELLI
SPARKLING CIDER 25-oz ..............$3.99
BRAWNY
NAPKINS so CT...... .............$2.89
KRAFT
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COLEMANS
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SPICE WORLD
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FRESH
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17 OZ
.990


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6/s -I oo


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2/$300

DEVON
CORNED
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12 OZ
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REGULAR MEAT
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LB
WHOLE
ROTISSERIE CHICK
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WHITE & YELLOW
AMERICAN CHEESE
PER LB
93990


IEN


HONEY GRAHAMS
VANILLIA WAFFERS
& CHEEZE IT
12-16 OZ



TOASTED
WHEAT
CRACKERS
8- OZ
$ 4 75


FRANCO AMERICAN
SUPERIOR SPAGHETTI
I MEATBALLS
14.75 OZ
$ 39


TOUFAYAN
PITA BREAD ALL VARIETY
2/1250
12-02X


MOTTS
APPLE JUICE
REGULAR
64 OZ






PEAS




KRAFT
SALAD DRESSING
REGULAR FLAVOURS
ASSORTED
8 OZ
2/$300


(C


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Italians decide whether to loosen

a.sisLted fertility law in referendums


0


"Copyrighted Materia

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

Sid only of the lution in Afri0a


Aid only part of the solution In Afri
0 a -


Gladstone Road,
[ast Bay St-ct,
Somittsn' Buiildihg
I a.t "e\ ltlf ),
Boatl Harfbour (Abact, ,
Cc(LA si dCI (Ahtca),
llarlw-ur Island
i,"; ldl f;boUr (Alwol


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WINES & SPIRITS


Gladslone Road
P. 0. Box N-i i
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Ph: 242- 341-93oo
lastp://wiww.Inst>od IAh*llhtam as.r ot


but not at Te Tribne


The Tribune is preparing its biggest ever



and needs graduating and college students, plus schools, to send in as much
information as possible on academic and other achievements. Students should
send in a photograph of themselves, and we need schools to supply information
ong plans for the new academic year, plus any appropriate photos.


^'N 'al M
M WE


PAGE 20, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


0


6





MONDAY, MAY 13, 2005, PAGE 21


CHICKEN CO


PER LB


PIER-L
TU RKEY ,i


PER LB
$199


FRESH GROUND

BEEF
PER LB

1 9 9___


RED OR GOLDEN HARVEST FRESH IDAHO BAKING
APPLES CABBAGES POTATOES
LOOSE
3/99 49 P 3/9U90
PER LB
SWEET DELICIOUS HARVEST FRESH GREEN OR RIPE
STRAWBERRIES BROCCOLI PANTAINS
T99 ?ucH99 2/990


MIBOW
CORNEDU


MUELLERS
9 9! oz^^n


STARKIST

TUNA
IN WATER OR OIL
6 OZ


( MUELLERS
READY- CUT

MACARONI

9 91 60ELZL


S MAHATMA
LONG GRAIN/PARBOILED

12RICE


0o? 5\BW


Car Mats
HS Car Seat Covers
Bondtech Car
Cover
HS Foot Pump
Irons
Toasters


Coffeemakers
Blenders
Towels
Wall Pictures
AM/FM Radio
Alarm Clock
Pot Sets


Sheet Sets
Rugs
Shower Curtail
Cutlery Sets
Flatware Sets


Pay Less at Discount Mart
WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


BED BATH & HOME
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FARBERWARE 3PC BBQ TOOL SETS 20% OFF
BARTENDER 4 BOTTLE ROTATING DRINK DISPENSER 20% OFF
Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


"Your Bahamian Supermarkets"

SUPER
VALUE
NOW ACCETING
0SSUNCARD
U iGHTjSAW PRiCF RESERVE j


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OFF
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GRILL


U.S. CHOICE
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STEAK
OR ROAST
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$39 91


SHELLMANNS PEP
REGULAR

MAYONNAISE


imp@ M6&f


THE TRIBUNE


O~f// /67 $?'tAS YTYJ


tl:al







PAGE 22, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


MONDAY EVENING JUNE 13, 2005

7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- Sentimental Piano With Enrique Chia Chia performs Andre Rieu: Live In Tuscany Violinist Andre Rieu and
B WPBT show FYI Carey 15 classic romantic and sentimental songs at the Bilt- his orchestra perform romantic songs at the Piazza
American Atlas. more Hotel in Coral Gables, Fla. ( della Republica in Cortona, Tuscany. (CC)
The Insider (N) Still Standing Still Standing Everybody Two and a Half CSI: Miami "Recoil" (iTV) n (CC)
D WFOR n (CC) Lauren and her "Still Lying" Loves Raymond Men Judith stays
boyfriend. (CC) (CC) "Not So Fast" with Alan.
W Access Holly- Fear Factor Best friends must Las Vegas Danny and Ed introduce Medium A frustrated Allison con-
B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) transfer live, blood-sucking leeches a suicidal guest to the thrill of gam- suits Catherine about the health of
mouth-to-mouth. n (CC) bling. n (CC) her husband. f (CC)
SWSVN Deco Drive Nanny 911 "Lorimor Family" Nanny Hell's Kitchen The contestants pre- News (CC)
S WSVN Stella helps the Lorimors whose pare for their third dinner. (N) n
children are out of control. (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) The Scholar The contestants team * MEN IN BLACK II (2002, Science Fiction) Tommy Lee Jones, Will
V WPLG (CC up to see who can boost the school Smith, Rip Tom. Agents Jay and Kay defend Earth from a sultry alien en-
spirit of USC students. emy. n
(:00) Cold Case Inside the Playboy Mansion A guided tour of Hugh Hefner's palace. Paul McCartney in Red Square
A&E Files (CC) (CC) The ex-Beatle visits Russia in 2003.
_(CC)
Hardtalk BBC World World Business BBC World Click Online BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News Report News News
ET BETcom Count- ** I'M GONNA GIT YOU SUCKA (1988, Comedy) Keenen Ivory The Parkers The Parkers/
E down Wayans. A freewheeling parody of the 70s black exploitation films. (CC) (CC)
Coronation **x THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS (2001, Comedy) Gene Hackman. A The National (CC)
CBC Street (CC) scheming patriarch attempts to reconcile with his family. (CC)
Late Night With The Contender ,) (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien
S :00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN ooper 360 (CC)
* NATIONAL The Daily Show Ellen DeGeneres: The Beginning South Park Cart- Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV
COM LAMPOON'S With Jon Stew- n (CC) man inherits $1 "Bad Jobs" f "Funerals" ,)
VAN WILDER art Colin Powell. million. (CC) (CC) (CC)
COURT Co ps Decoy ve- The Investigators 'The Trenchcoat Forensic Files North Mission Trace Evidence: From the Case
COURT hicle. n (CC) Gang" Bank robbers. I Road (N) Files of Dr. Henry Lee (N)
That's So Raven * HOCUS POCUS (1993, Comedy) Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Phil of the Fu- Sister, Sister
DISN "Opportunity Parker, Kathy Najimy. Youths conjure up three child-hungry witches on ture "Comer Tia's self-defense
Shocks" Halloween. t 'PG' (CC) Pocket" (CC) moves.
DIY This Old House Weekend Deco- Fresh Coat Scrapbooking Embellish This! Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx
Depth Tagestema Depth
E! The Soup "The That Was Huge Totally High Dr. 90210 "Reconstruction" Two- Dr. 90210 Mother and daughter re-
SBest Of Ricky Martin. "1993 time breast cancer survivor. lationships.
ESPN 00) Baseball MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Texas Rangers. From Ameriquest Field in Arlington, Texas. (Live) (CC)
night (CC)
ESPNI ESPN Perfiles Beach Soccer: Beach Soccer: The Season (N) Bull Riding PRCAXtreme Bulls.
P FIFA Wodrld Cup FIFA World Cup (CC)
EWTN Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
TV 00) Ultimate FitTV's Housecalls "Darlene and FitNation "Generation Xtra Large" The Extremists The Extremists
GFIT TV oals n (CC) Nic; Couple Workout" 1) (CC) Measuring fat. (I (CC) A (CC) ,t (CC)
FO X C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-N Shepard Smith _Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL Marlins on Deck MLB Baseball Florida Madins at Chicago Cubs. From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Subject to Blackout) (Live)
,GOLF :31) Golf Channel Academy Live (:43) Golf Channel Academy (N) Playing Lessons :08) Champions Tour Learning
GOLF Live) _____ Center
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A Weakest Link 11 (CC) Celebrity Blackjack (CC)
GSN* (Cc)
G4Tech (:00) Attack of X-Play Cheat Icons "Mortal Video Game Vix- Filter "Summer Judgment Day
G4Tec the Show (N) IKombat." ens Shwag" (N) (N)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker and * x PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE NOTORIOUS NUN (1986,
HALL Texas Ranger Trivette guard a visiting Mexican Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, William Katt. Mason defends a
"Standoff" (CC) presidential candidate. (CC) nun accused of murdering a priest. (CC)
Holmes on Rooms That Design U Creat- Debbie Travis' Facelift "Ms. Bigg's Holmes on Homes "A River Ran
HGTV Homes "Hell's Rock "Calm and ing an inviting Bedroom" A Through It" (I
Kitchen" (CC) Collected" space. A
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W. Scham- This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Love a Child
P(CC) bach (CC) (CC) day
The Batman Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends Joey Will-& Grace ,) Everybody Everybody
KTLA "The Big Dummy' Teenage Witch A Prince of Bel-Air asks Phoebe's (CC) Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
(CC) ghost hunter. I (CC) sister on a date. I n (CC) ft (CC)
NOWHERE IN SIGHT (2000, Suspense) Christopher BLIND INJUSTICE (2005, Suspense) Jamie Luner, Theresa Russell,
LIFE Heyerdahl, Andrew McCarthy, Helen Slater. Two crimi- Josie Davis. Premiere. A rapist torments a blind woman after escaping
nals threaten a woman's life. (CC) from prison. (CC)
MS BC Hardball With Countdown With Keith Olber- The Situation With Tucker Carl- Scarborough Country
MSNBC Chris Matthews mann son (Series Premiere) (N)
NICK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Drake & Josh Full House f Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of The Cosby
NICK Boy enius SquarePants The Bet" (CC) (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air Show 1 (CC)
NTV Still Standing Fear Factor "Best Friends No. 2" Las Vegas 'Things That Go Jump in News n (CC) News
"V "Still Fast" (C ) t (CC) the Nig t" f (CC)
OLN Hunt for Big Best & Worst of E-Force Ultimate Play- Mysterious En- Outdoor Investi- This Happened
OL Fish Tred Barta I ground counters gallons To Me
SPEED ; .oNASCAR Inside Nextel Cup (N) NBS 24-7 (N) NASCAR Nation
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jessb Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Chandler Friends The Seinfeld 'The Seinfeld Jerry Family Guy Family Guy Pe-
TBS Loves Raymond and his es- One With the Doorman" f leams a costly Stewie is smitten ter undergoes li-
"Slave" n (CC) tranged dad. Boobies" (CC) (CC) lesson. ,t (CC) with a girl. (CC) posuction. (CC)
(:00) In a Fix Trauma: Life in the ER The staff of Untold Stories of the E.R. A man is Operation Homecoming "Long Dis-
TLC Superhero Bed- Vanderbilt University Medical Cen- kept on life support so his organs tance Delivery"A father meets is
room" (CC) ter's emergency room. (CC) can be harvested. baby boy for the first time. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Hands Free" Detec- The Closer (Series Premiere) A Law & Order "Open Season" A cop-
TNT der "House Calls" tives search for a killer when body special police unit probes sensitive killer's acquittal leads to the murder
1) parts are found in the trash, and high-profile crimes. (N) of a defense attorney. n
TOON Grim Adven- Home for imagi- Aloha, Scooby-Doo The gang travels to Hawaii for a Teen Titans Dragonball GT
TOON tures nary Friends surfing contest.
TV5 Vie prive, vie publique Coeurs Cool classique TV5 Le Journal
TWC ,6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
M Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
U NIV 00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Cristina Amigos con privilegios.

(:00) JAG "The Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ** MAJOR PAYNE (1995, Comedy) Damon Wayans, Karyn Parsons,
USA Killer'" (CC) "Asunder" A police officer is accused William Hickey. A hard-nosed ex-Manne takes command of pint-sized
(DVS) of raping his wife. (CC) cadets. (CC)
VH 1 (00) America's America's Next Top Model "How 100 Greatest Kid Stars "Hour 1" Behind the Music "Backstreet
ext Top Model the Girls Got Here" f (CC) (N) ft Boys" Backstreet Boys. f (CC)
Home Improve- ** STEEL (1997, Fantasy) Shaquille O'Neal, Annabeth Gish, Judd Nel- WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WG N ment "Not-So- son. An armor-clad superhero battles a former colleague. f (CC)
Great Scott" f
Everybody 7th Heaven "Why Not Me?" Eric Summerland When Bradin returns WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond and Annie help one of Simon's from his surf tour in Hawaii, he is Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
f (CC) school friends-in need of a home. asked to replace Jay. (N) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Flex Cuts "The Hook Girlfriends Half & Half "Big Dr. Phil
W SB K (CC) and Diane tryto Up" Kevin buys Lynn's brother All Bets Are Off
win dates, new spa oils. comes to town. Episode" (CC)

6:30) * SexandtheCity Sex and the Ci Six Feet Under "Dancing for Me" The Comeback Entourage 'The
HBO-E JOHNNY ENG- f (CC) "Boy, Interrupted" Nate spends time with friends from Valerie goes to New Car" f
_____LISH(2003) ft ,j (CC) high school. (N) f (CC) New York.(CC) (CC)
H (6:15) CRIMES ** MALCOLM X (1992, Biography) Denzel Washington, Spike Lee, Angela Bassett. Spike Lee's portrait
HBO-P ANDMISDE- of the late civil rights advocate. 'P G-13' (CC)
MEANORS (CC)


(:45) ** THE MIGHTY DUCKS (1992, Comedy) Emilio Estevez, Joss ** JOHNNY ENGLISH (2003, Comedy) Rowan
H BO-W Ackland, Lane Smith. An arrogant lawyer coaches an unruly peewee Atkinson, John Malkovich. A bumbling agent tries to re-
hockey team. t 'PG' (CC) cover stolen jewels. 'PG' (CC)
(6:15) ***s THE ENGLISH PATIENT (1996, Dra- **** DRIVING MISS DAISY (1989, Comedy-Dra- (:45 The Making
HBO-S ma) Ralph Fiennes. Flashbacks reveal a plane-crash ma) Jessica Tandy. An elderly widow becomes friends Of: Seabiscuit
survivors ragic tale. ft 'R' (CC) with her black chauffeur. ) PG' (CC) nT (CC)
MAX 6:00 **L **'* TAKING LIVES (2004, Suspense) Angelina Jolie, Ethan Hawke, ***% THE EXORCIST (1973,
MAX-E LETHAL Kiefer Sutherland. An FBI profiler helps detectives search for a killer. f Horror) Ellen Burstyn, Max von
WEAPON 2 'R'R'R (CC) Sydow, Linda Blair. n 'R' (CC)
* MALIBU'S MOST WANTED (2003, Comedy) * THE EDGE (1997, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins, Alec Baldwin, Elle
MOMAX Jamie Kennedy. A white politician hires black actors to Macpherson. A plane crash strands two rivals in the Alaskan wilderness.
kidnap his son. ft 'PG-13' (CC) A 'R' (CC)
(6:05)O *L ** *AGAINST THE ROPES (2004, Drama) Meg Ryan, Omar Epps, Ton Penn & Teller: Penn & Teller:
SHOW GRUMPY OLD Shalhoub. iTV. Afemale boxing-manager bonds with a fighter. 'PG-13 Bulls...! Surveil- Bulls...! Psy-
MEN (1993) (CC) lance society. chics' tricks. (CC)
LARA CROFT *** BULLETS OVER BROADWAY (1994, Come- (:45)*** HUSBANDS AND WIVES (1992, Come-
TMC TOMB RAIDER dy) John Cusack. A mob bodyguard secretly helps pol- dy-Drama) Woody Allen, Mia Farrow. A married teacher
ish a playwright's work. 'R' (CC) silently yearns to live a single life. 'R' (CC)


The

Show


t Rcst


I nhUrsdays








Tot cIN F;LOr N


Time:Floor ofThe
Doors Open 1llpm


Admission:
$7 w/ Movie Tickets
$15 without
Movie Pa3 Giveaway!


"lb


Let Chalie tke
Bahamican Puppet and
kis sidekick De rek pt+
somek smiles Oc yoVur
kids's faces.


Binhg youA children to the

MlcHappy Hor acit McDonald's in
Palmdale every Tktnsday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
moth of 3Tune 2005,


Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.


i'm lovin' it


:_? 1


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, JUNE 1,, zuub, PAut- o


I-


I


The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the
following posts:

BOOKSTORE MANAGER
DIVISION: Finance and Administration
DEPARTMENT: The College of the
Bahamas Bookstore
START DATE: JULY 1, 2005
JOB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY STATEMENT
The Manager of The College of the Bahamas Bookstore will
be responsible for:
* Direction and management of all aspects of a retail college
bookstore
* Overseeing and coordinating inventory control, sales and
returns, vendor relations, cash management, and related
reporting.
* Responsible for purchasing all general merchandise and
supply items.
* Responsible for day-to-day functions of the Bookstore
and. supervision and direction of support staff.
RELATIONSHIPS
* Reports to: VP Finance & Administration/Financial Controller
* Subordinate Staff: Bookstore Clerks/Assistants
* Other internal contacts: Faculty, Students, and Staff
* External contacts: Manufacturing & Sales Reps, Customers
within the community, including community groups, and
General Public

REQUIREMENTS/QUALIFICATIONS
* At least a high school/secondary diploma. A degree in
business or retail management or equivalent would be viewed
favourably.
* Minimum of five years background in retail sales work at
manager's level; experience in a bookstore preferred.
* Good computer skills and database management
Store hours are 7:00am to 7:00pm from Monday to Saturday.
Manager will work shifts; week, weekend and evening work
required.


CAFE MANAGER
DIVISION: Finance and Administration
DEPARTMENT: The College of the
,Bahamas Bookstore Cafe
START DATE: July 15,2005
JOB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY STATEMENT
The Manager of The College of the Bahamas Bookstore
Caf6 will be responsible for:
* Direction and management of all aspects of the College
Cafe
* Overseeing and coordinating inventory control, sales and
returns,,vendor relations, cash management, and related
reporting.
* Responsible for purchasing all food supplies and general
merchandise.
* Responsible for day-to-day functions of the caf6 and


supervision and direction of support staff.
RELATIONSHIPS
* Reports to: VP Finance & Administration/Financial Controller
* Subordinate Staff: Cafr Assistants/Clerks
* Other internal contacts: Faculty, Students, and Staff
* External contacts: Suppliers of food, restaurant equipment
and general merchandise and general public
QUALIFICATIONS/EXPERIENCE
* At least a secondary education.
* Minimum of five (5) years experience in food and beverage
management
* Success in managing in a high volume retail/fast food
environment would be an asset
* Excellent leadership, supervisory, communication and
organizational skills. Proven ability to train, develop, and
motivate associates.
* Ability to work with deadlines.
* Outstanding customer service skills
* Certificates in culinary arts, food service hospitality
operations, etc would be an asset.
* Good computer skills and database management
Store hours are 7:00am to 7:00pm from Monday to Saturday.
Manager will work shifts; week, weekend and evening work
required.


BUSINESS CENTRE MANAGER
DIVISION: Finance and Administration
DEPARTMENT: The College of the Bahamas Business
Centre
START DATE: JULY 15, 2005
JOB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY STATEMENT
The Manager of The College of the Bahamas Business
Centre will be responsible for:
* Direction and management of all aspects of a business/copy
centre
* Overseeing and coordinating inventory control, sales and
returns, vendor relations, cash management, and related
reporting.
* Responsible for purchasing all general merchandise and
supply items.
* Responsible for day-to-day functions of the Business
Centre and supervision and direction of support staff.
RELATIONSHIPS
* Reports to: VP Finance & Administration/Financial Controller
* Subordinate Staff: Business Centre Clerks/Assistants
* Other internal contacts: Faculty, Students, and Staff
* External contacts: Manufacturing & Sales Reps, Customers:
within the community, including community groups, and
General Public
QUALIFICATIONS/EXPERIENCE
* A least a high school/secondary diploma or equivalent; an
Associate degree (two-year program or two to three years
of college) or equivalent formal training would be an asset.
* At minimum of four years of work experience in printing,
reprographics and other areas related to responsibilities
/duties. One year of supervisory experience is required.


* Good communication skills required, oral and written. Must
be able to compose memos, letters and reports.
Store hours are 7:00am to 7:00pm from Monday to Saturday.
Manager will work shifts; week, weekend and evening work
required.


PUBLISHING EDITOR/PUBLIC


RELATIONS SENIOR WRITER


DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
DEPARTMENT: Publications/Public Relations


START DATE: SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


JOB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY STATEMENT


* Participate in the preparation of publications to include
planning, analyzing and reviewing materials, writing articles,
reviews of literary and academic writings, reports, marketing
copy and editing copy to conform to proper grammatical
style, supervising the printing and distribution of publications,
liaising with licensing and other regulatory agencies related
to publishing.
* Participate in the development and implementation of
promotional ideas and activities in support of a
comprehensive public relations programme to publicize and
promote The College/University of the Bahamas activities
and programmes for general and specialized audiences.
* Participate in the development of a strong writing team.


RELATIONSHIPS


* Reports to: Associate VP Institutional Advancement
* Subordinate Staff: Institutional Advancement/Public
Relations Clerks/Assistants
* Other Internal Contacts: Faculty, staff, students
* External Contacts: Members of the general public, printers,
designers, illustrators, photographers, journalists, media
houses, distribution houses, reproduction agencies, design
agencies and consultants, external publishers, translation
agencies and cultural advisors.


QUALIFICATIONS/EXPERIENCE


A minimum of a bachelor's degree or equivalent professional
certification; a master's degree is preferred. Work requires
an impeccable knowledge of the English Language, the
ability to perform creative writing at a very high level and
related activities such as conducting interviews and research,
and copy editing normally acquired through attainment of
a bachelor's degree in English or a related discipline and
teaching language skills to others.

Detailed job descriptions are available from the Human
Resources Department, Administration Block, Oakes Field
Campus. Interested candidates should submit, by hand or
post, a detailed curriculum vitae and a cover letter of interest,
giving full particulars of qualifications and experience no
later than June 17, 2005 to:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
P O Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas


The School of English Studies

announces the

Bachelor of Arts Degree in English

Start Date: 29th August, 2005

Application deadline is extended to July 29, 2005

Please direct enquiries to:

Dr. Ian Strachan
Chair, School of English Studies
Phone: 302-4381
or
Dr. Marjorie Brooks-Jones
Programme Coordinator
Phone: 302-4581/4510
E-mail: miones@cob.edu.bs


A I

Advisement & Registration in Faculty Offices

Registration in Records Department. 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Monday -
Thursday (Including LLB, Masters & CEES students)

ABSOLUTELY NO REGISTRATION ON FRIDAYS


Important Dates


June 20
June 27
July 15

July 29


Advisement & Registration Begins
Bill Collection Begins
Last Day for Early Bird Discount
10% on Fees
Last Day for Fee Payment


THE COLLE'


E *uc


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


Deadline: June 20, 2005


ENTRY REQUIREMENTS


The normal entrance qualification for the UWI LL.B DEGREE is the basic UWI
Matriculation standards of:

(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at "A" Level and the remainder at
CXC general or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education);

(b) ASSOCIATE OR BACHELOR'S degree with a CUMULATIVE GPA OF 2.5 OR
HIGHER. There are no special subject requirements in addition to those necessary
for Matriculation at the UWI. The competition for places in the programme is very
high "A" Level grades and very high averages in undergraduate degrees (AT LEAST
3.0) are required for an application to stand a reasonable chance of gaining admission.

The College of The Bahamas is prepared to consider a limited number of
applications from persons who do not strictly satisfy Matriculation standards
but who have equivalent academic qualifications. In particular, MATURE
APPLICANTS OVER 30 WHO HAVE SHOWN EVIDENCE OF ACADEMIC AND
PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT CAN BE CONSIDERED. This is an opportunity
to read for a law degree for those who have already been associated with the practice
of law in some way. A resume must be submitted with your COB and UWI applications.
Please note that the programme is only offered on a full-time basis.

All LLB applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam. The date of this exam
will be communicated to you, but is expected to take place during third week
in June. An application must be in the Office of Admissions in order to be
allowed to sit the exam.

Both COB and UWI applications must be completed and are available in the Office
of Admissions, COB.

The completed applications, original certificates (which will be returned to the
applicant), copies of these original certificates, transcripts sent directly from universities
or colleges previously attended to the Director of Admissions at COB, and proof of
payment of the forty-dollar application fee (paid at the BUSINESS OFFICE AT
COB), must be submitted by the deadline, June 20, 2005.


[l L LB]PROGRAMME
(FULLTIME OFFEEDA


i


Event(s)


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 24, MONDAY,:JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Blair to visit Moscow and Paris



in final round of G-8 diplomacy


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MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


ITHE NEW YORK TIMES


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Pension fund gains



court win against


Ro

* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
he Bahamas
Hotel and
Allied Industries
Pension Fund
has won a
Supreme Court judgement
against Driftwood (Freeport),
which requires the holding
company for the Royal Oasis
Crowne Plaza & Golf Resort
to repay the $4.1 million owed
to the fund once the Grand
Bahama property is sold.
But Pat Bain, president of
one of the fund's settlors, the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU), in the mean-
time expressed concern to
The Tribune over a situation
that was becoming "desper-
ate", as hundreds of former
Royal Oasis workers
remained unemployed.
Mr Bain said the judge-
ment against the Royal Oasis
stipulated that any time a sale
was consummated, the pen-
sion fund would gain the
money owed to it from the
sale proceeds.
He reassured current and
future pensioners that they
would receive the monies
they were entitled to under
the pension fund's pro-
gramme, and would'not stand


Oasis


Fund to recover $4.1m owed
once property sold, with union
chief saying situation becoming
'desperate' for former employees


N PAT BAIN


to lose any benefits as a result
of the Royal Oasis situation.
Meanwhile, Mr Bain said
the inability of Harcourt
Developments, the Irish prop-
erty company, and Lehman
Brothers' private equity arm
to come to a successful deal
for the Royal Oasis had
pushed the tourism industry


in Grand Bahama back even
further, negatively impacting
spin-off industries and entre-
preneurial ventures.
Lehman Brothers' private
equity arm, which holds the
mortgage on the Royal Oasis,
and is its senior creditor and
effective owner, failed to
grant an extension to the due
diligence process, prompting
Harcourt's decision to pull
out of negotiations.
"Other components
depend on tourism in Grand
Bahama, and if the resort
does not resume operations
shortly, you will likely see
more people leaving Grand
Bahama to find work," Mr
Bain said.
"It will also affect the Inter-
national Bazaar. Even
though they [the Royal Oasis]
weren't the best, their guests
supported the businesses
there and now they are hard-

See FUND, Page 9B


FATF may end



monitoring of



the Bahamas



'in near future'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Financial Action Task
Force (FATF) has pledged to
stop monitoring the Bahamas
for compliance with interna-
tional anti-money laundering
standards "in the near future",
but only if this nation "contin-
ues to respond adequately" to
other countries' assistance
requests.
In its June 10 review of coun-
tries it was still monitoring, the
FATF praised the Bahamas'
attempts to address concerns
regarding international
requests for assistance.
It added: "The FATF will
continue to monitor the situa-
tion in the Bahamas for the
time being. However, if the
Bahamas continues to respond
adequately to requests for
international co-operation, the
FATF will end monitoring in
the near future."
The Bahamian Financial
Intelligence Unit (FIU) had
received 67 suspicious transac-
tion reports (STRs) between
January and May 2005, and
was now in the process of
analysing 55 of these, with eight
already passed on to the Royal


Bahamas Police Force (RBPF)
for further investigation.
The FATF added that the
Government "continued to
respond productively" to inter-
national assistance calls, with
the Bahamas receiving 20 new
requests between February and
May 2005, making for a total
of 27 requests outstanding.
Report
The FATF report said the
Bahamas had already respond-
ed to 19 of these new requests
The report from a body that
blacklisted the Bahamas in
summer 20o00 for being "non-
cooperative" in the fight


against money laundering will
give the Government and
financial services industry fur-
ther confidence that they have
put the worst of this process
behind them.
Several regulatory officials
had last year privately voiced
concerns to The Tribune, which
they did not want published,
that. the Bahamas might once
again be blacklisted by the
FATF due to the ongoing
problems surrounding co-oper-
ation with overseas supervisors
and judicial authorities. This
was born: out by the FATF's

See REVIEW, Page 98


Expert questions

whether Bahamas

could join CSME for

'the wrong reasons'


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
A FREE trade expert is
questioning whether the
Bahamas could end up joining
the Caribbean Single Market
& Economy (CSME) for the
wrong reasons, saying it is
"easy to understand" why there
is substantial opposition to the
revised Treaty as a result of its


contents and the arguments of
its supporters.
Addressing a luncheon
meeting of the Rotary Club of
East Nassau, Alejandro Cha-
fuen, president and chief exec-
utive of the Atlas Economic
Research Foundation, said the
Bahamas' CSME reservations
on the free movement of peo-
ple, membership in the

See TRADE, Page 5B


Bahamasair subsidy

increased by $1m
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government has increased its annual subsidy to Bahama-
sair by $1 million for the 2005-2006 fiscal year, raising questions
about whether the airline will be privatised by summer's end as the
administration hopes.
The subsidy Bahamasair will receive has been increased from $9
million in fiscal 2004-2005 to $10 million, suggesting that the Gov-
ernment is not overly confident about completing the privatisation
in the year to June 30, 2006.
Much work remains to be done to ready the carrier for privati-
sation, with consultants McKinsey & Co set to complete their
development of a new business plan for Bahamasair, seeking to
transform it into a low-cost carri': to compete with US-based
rivals, within the net few months.
The Government will then have to decide upon the structure of
the privatisation how much equity is will keep, and what will be
sold to a strategic partner and Bahamian investors and what it will
do to clean up the $120.277 mil-
lion in liabilities in the airline's
balance sheet, some $91.587 mil- See SUBSIDY, 7B


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Tel: 242-322-6492/4 or 242- 357-4772
email:deliverynews@coralwave.com


End depends on adequate
international co-operation;
FlU deals with 67 STRs
between January and May,
with Government getting 20
more assistance requests
in three months


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


A MODERATE level of
trading activity took place in
the Bahamian market last week
with almost 20,000 shares
changing hands. The market
saw seven out of its 19 listed
stocks trade, of which one
advanced, three declined and
three remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
with 6,210 shares trading and
accounting for 31.48 per cent of
total shares traded was Bench-
mark (Bahamas). The big
mover for the week was Doc-
tors Hospital Health Systems
(DHS), whose share price rose
by $0.16 to record a new 52-
week high of $2.40. On the
down side, Kerzner Interna-
tional's BDR declined by $0.30
to end the week at $5.79.
COMPANY NEWS
Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF)-
Fiscal 2004 proved to be
another banner year for the real


estate investment trust (REIT).
Net income rose by 12.63 per
cent to total $3.5 million, com-
pared to $3.1 million in 2003.
Total revenue increased by
6.33 per cent to total $5.6 mil-
lion, while operating expenses
declined by 3.21 per cent to
total $1.6 million. Income from
operations rose by $389,000
year-over-year to total $4 mil-
lion, while earnings per share
increased by $0.16 to total $1.44
as at December 31,2004.
Bahamas Supermarkets
(BSL) -
For the quarter ending April
6, 2005, BSL posted net income
of $2.2 million, representing an
increase of $558,000 or 33.43
per cent over the equivalent
period last year.
Net sales rose by $2.9 million
or 10.32 per cent to total $31.5
million, while operating expens-
es increased marginally to total
$6.3 million. Operating income


stood at $2.2 million, up
$556,000 year-over-year. Earn-
ings per share rose by $0.12 to
total $0.49.
The catalysts behind BSL's
sales increase were twofold.
Firstly, the falling of Easter with-
in the third quarter instead of
the fourth boosted sales levels.
Secondly, the Grand Bahama
stores are still capitalising on
the fact that some competitors'
stores are still not operating at
full capacity as a result of the
hurricanes of 2004.
Benchmark (Bahamas)
(BBL) -
First quarter 2005 net income
stood at $245,000, representing
a decline of $72,000 over the
corresponding period last year.
Total revenue grew by $113,000
or 48.50 per cent to total
$346,000, while expenses
increased by $13,000 or 8.23 per
cent to total $171,000.
Net investment income


increased by $100,000 year-
over-year to total $174,000 as
at March 31, 2005.
For the first quarter, Alliance
contributed 52 per cent of BBL's
net income, Benchmark 47 per
cent and Advisors 1 per cent.
BBL recorded a $75,000 loss
from its equity investment in
John S George during the first
quarter, reducing its investment
in the company to $520,000.
However, BBL's management
is optimistic that its perfor-
mance for the remainder of the
year will be positive.
INVESTORS TIP OF
THE WEEK
Wedding (and Financial)
Planning
June is here, and in the
Bahamas the month brings with
it long, hot summer days, hurri-
canes and, of course, weddings.
Oh, the blushing June bride!
What a wonderful sight to


behold. Sadly, many of these
couples have not given much
thought to pre-marital financial
planning and their life after the
wedding. With the average wed-
ding costing about $20,000,
some couples are opting to get
loans in order to fund their
grand affair.
However, starting a new life
laden down with $20,000 bank
debt is not a good start to a
marriage. In the coming weeks,
we will explore some practical
tips that engaged couples or


those planning a wedding can
use to have both an affordable
and memorable wedding.
Putting it all in perspective -
When all is said and done,
what will you have to show for
your wedding day? The rings,
the bridal gown, the photo
albums and the videos. The
rings will be worn for the rest of
your married life and the photos
and videos will be shared untold
times over the years. Don't
skimp on these items.


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.95 $- 0 -13.64%
BAB $1.06 $- 0 10.42%
BBL $0.77 $-0.08 6210 -9.41%
BOB $6.35 $- 300 10.43%
BPF $ 8.50 $- 0 6.25%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -5.77%
BWL $1.50 $- 0 -16.67%
CAB $8.55 $-0.10 1000 20.42%
CBL $9.00 $- 640 26.76%
CHL $2.20 $- 1730 0.00%
CIB $8.51 $- 0 13.62%
DHS -$2.40 $0.16 3750 60.00%
FAM $4.02 $- 0 1.52%
FCC $1.27 $- 0 -36.18%
FCL $8.41 $- 0 5.13%
FIN $10.46 $- 0 7.84%
ICD $9.60 $- 0 -2.93%
JSJ $8.30 $- 0 0.97%
KZLB $5.83 $-0.26 6097 -4.46%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB) has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share payable on June 30,2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date June 15, 2005
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of.
$0.08 per share payable on June 30, 2005 to all common share-
holders as at record date June 15, 2005
RND Holdings (RND) will hold its Annual General Meet-'
ing on June 29,2005, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) will hold an Extraordinary
General Meeting on July 12, 2005, at 5pm at SuperClubs
Breezes, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas for both common
and preferred shareholders
Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on June 30,2005, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton,
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
* Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB) will hold its Annual Gen-
eral Meeting on June 30, 2005, at 6pm at the British Colonial
Hilton, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas


(iii) Increase the Bank's caoabilityto devise new products more relevant to helping


(iv) Through the Bank's existing Business Advisory Unit established last year, to increase the range and scope of the accounting and business advisory services already
rendered to SMEs by the Bank
STRATEGIC MOVE

This move is part of the ongoing strategic plan of the Bank to improve its performance.

It marks the culmination of a joint Memorandum of Understanding Summit Meeting held in April between the two entities which sought to identify ways and means of
cooperation to better fulfill BDB's mandate to Bahamians of promoting and enhancing the greater participation by Bahamians in agricutural, industrial and commercial
development of The Bahamas through their ownership and participation in sustainable SMEs which provide linkages into other economic sectors of The Bahamas.

It also comes at a time when the government who is the sole shareholder of the Bank is providing other avenues for small businesses which are not
permitted to be funded under the BDB Act by providing a separate Venture Capital Fund and by other programs.



Bahamas Development Bank

Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation

May 27th 2005


SUCti,


717N


BUSINESS




FIDELITY MARKET WRAP








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGe" `B


BISX still requiring




amendments on




foreign exchange


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter

The Bahamian cap-
ital markets will
only experience
the liquidity and
trading activity
they need to satisfying pricing
concerns when exchange con-
trol amendments are enacted,
the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange's (BISX)
chief executive told The Tri-
bune.
Keith Davies, though, said he
was encouraged by the fact that
BISX was continuing to experi-
ence strong growth, a trend.first
spotted by analysts over a year
and a half ago. Its All-Share
Index ended May 2005 up 22.86
per cent or 214.52 points ahead
of 2004's close.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Davies said the
growth in trading activity on
BISX spoke to the fact that
markets which are growing and
maturing will increase in value.
Over time, the Bahamian capi-
tal market had experienced the
type of growth he knew it
would, a position Mr Davies
found very encouraging.
Despite the strong showing
of the All-Share Index, year-
on-year trading volumes and
the value of shares traded were
down on 2004.
Mr Davies explainedm how-
ever, that the value of any share
is determined by persons who


are interested.
"Shares are bought and not
sold, and what that means is the
value of any particular share is
worth what someone is willing
to pay for it and not what they
would sell it for," the BISX
chief executive said.
"It is the buyers in the indus-
try that determine the price, and
if you don't have a lot of buyers
or the market is small, then you
will see a reflection in the
depression of prices because
there are not enough people
who are willing or able to buy
what is there.

Securities

"By reverse, some good secu-
rities are increasing in value and
some that were not doing well,
their prices are beginning to
reflect what analysts say they
are worth. This feeds back into
the statement that markets need
time to grow, and ours is five
years in the making."
Mr Davies said thast what
will eventually allow Bahami-
an securities to begin to see the
type of liquidity and trading
activity that will satisfy pricing
concerns is when the market
opens to other interests.
At that point, he said, the
market will be visited by specu-
lators, day traders and long-
term holders of securities, all of
which will help build the critical
mass of individuals needed to
make it more liquid and fluid,
and allow price discovery to
take place. Outside of this sce-


nario, it was likely to take a lot
longer for market prices to
reflect their true value over the
short term.
The report on revitalising
BISX recommended that the
exchange control regulations be
altered to allow Bahamians to
invest in stocks and bonds listed
on foreign markets via the
exchange, subject to certain lim-
its and restrictions.
It also called for regional
cross-listings, whereby BISX-
listed stocks would be able to
take secondary listings on other
Caribbean exchanges, and vice
versa.
A further recommendation
was to allow non-residents to
invest in Bahamian securities -
temporary residents such as
work permit holders, perma-
nent residents with the restrict-
ed right to work, companies
designated non-resident aapd
resident companies with some
degree of foreign ownership.
Meanwhile, May's results
continued the trend BISX has
exhibited since the 2005 first
quarter ended, with the All-
Share Index ending April up
some 18.6 per cent or 173.02
points over the previous year. It
was up 19 per cent over March's
end.
Data released last week by
BISX said that its All-Share
Index closed some 4.59 per cent
or 50.6 points ahead of April's
close on May 31, indicating that
many stocks are still perceived
as possessing greater value than
their current listed prices.


Few Bahamas companies


base decisions on statistics


1 By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FEW Bahamian companies
base their business decisions on
data provided by the Depart-
ment of Statistics, meaning that
they are unable to "rationalise"
the time and costs involved in
responding to the Department's
surveys.
The situation was outlined in
the Department of Statistics
plans to ensure it now produces
regular annual gross domestic
product (GDP) estimates,
which in the past have been sev-
eral years out of date and failed
to provide the Bahamian busi-
ness community with accurate,
reliable data.
The Department of Statistics
said "the wealth of information
collected" by its Business
Establishment survey was
"underused" by Bahamian
companies.
It added: "Few, if any, have
based their business decisions
on information provided by the
Department of Statistics. Con-
sequently, it is difficult for busi-
nesses to rationalise the invest-
ment that is required on their


part to complete the survey.
This, in turn, weakens the sur-
vey estimates and delays the
statistical process."
In an effort to improve rela-
tions with Bahamian companies
and develop better links
between their response and the
statistical output, the Depart-
ment plans to include spe-
cialised tabular information in
its 2005 mail-out.
Meanwhile, the Department


of Statistics is also revising the
production process for the
Establishment Survey in a bid
to get preliminary results out
more quickly.
Estimates will be provided
two or three times during the
survey cycle, so that while it can
be "kept open in order to coax
out reluctant respondents, the
reluctant respondents will not
hamper production of early
results".


Jo avertse n Th Triut3


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division


2005
CLE/qui/00511


IN THE MATTER of ALL THOSE two pieces parcels or parts of a tract of land comprising
an area of 28.6 acres and an area of 178 acres, respectively, and being portions of a tract
originally granted by the Crown to John Bootle and situate in the vicinity of the Settlement
of West End in the Island of Grand Bahama one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Grand Bahama Hotel Co.


NOTICE

The Petition of Grand Bahama Hotel Co., a Company incorporated under the laws of the State
of Delaware,.one of the United States of America, and a copy of whose Act or Charter of Incorporation
has been filed in the Companies Registry in the City of Nassau in the Island New Providence one
of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, in respect of:.
"ALL THOSE two pieces parcels or parts of a tract of land comprising an area of 28.6 acres
and an area of 178 acres, respectively, and being portions of a tract originally granted by the
Crown to John Bootle and situate in the vicinity of the Settlement of West End in the Island
of Grand Bahama one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said pieces
parcels or parts of a tract of land are bounded as follows:
The said 28.6 acres being bounded:


Northeastwardly:
Southeastwardly:

Northeastwardly:


Southeastwardly:
Southwestwardly:
Northwestwardly:


By land occupied by various squatters and running thereon Two Hundred
and Fourteen and Forty-one hundredths (214.41) feet.
By another portion of the said Tract of land originally granted to
John Bottle and now claimed by one Audley Russell and running thereon
Seven hundred and Thirty-nine and ten hundredths (739.10) feet.
By another portion of the said Tract.of land originally granted to
John Bootle and now claimed partly by the said Audley Russell and partly
by one John Barr and running thereon One hundred and Fifty and Sixty-
four hundredths (150.64) feet.
By land the property of the Petitioner and running thereon Three
thousand and Twenty-one and Three hundredths (3021.03) feet.
By the Sea at high water mark and running thereon Three hundred and
Ninety-six and Forty hundredths (396.40) feet.
By other land theproperty of the Petitioner and running thereon Three
thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety-eight and Sixty-three hundredths
(3798.63) feet.


The said 178 acres being bounded:


Northeastwardly:

Southeastwardly:

Northeastwardly:

Southeastwardly:

Southwestwardly:
Northwestwardly:


Partly by a Public Road known as Queen Highway and partly by
land claimed by one Ida Colebrook and running thereon One thousand
One hundred and Forty-one and Thirty-one hundredths (1141.31) feet.
By land now or formerly the property of the Estate of Beatrice Williams
and running thereon Two hundred and Nineteen and Thirty-four hundredths
(219.34) feet.
Again by other land now or formerly the property of the Estate of the
said Beatrice Williams and running thereon One thousand Five hundred
and-Nineteen and Thirty-four hundredths (1519.34) feet.
By other land the property of the Petitioner and running thereon Two
thousand Six hundred and Twenty-three and Twenty hundredths (2623.20)
feet.
By the Sea at high water mark and running thereon One thousand Nine
hundred and Thirty-six and Eight hundredths (1936.08) feet.
By land partly the property of the Petitioner and partly by land now or
formerly the property of Joseph Hollingsworth and running thereon
jointly Three thousand and Seven hundred and Fifty and Seventy-six
hundredths (3750.76) feet.


GRAND BAHAMA HOTEL CO. claim to be the owner in fee simple in possession of the
said land free from encumbrances (subject to an Agreement for Sale to Ginn-LA West End
Limited) and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the said Act.
A Copy of the Petition together with a Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, in the City of Nassau, Bahamas;
2. The Administrator's Office situate in the Settlement of Eight Mile Rock in the Island of
Grand Bahama;
3. The Administrator's Office situate in the Settlement of West End in the Island of Grand
Bahama;
4. The Chambers of Messrs. Dupuch & Tumquest & Co., situate in Chancery House, The
Mall, in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or right of dower, or an adverse
claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition, shall on or before the 23rd day of July, A.D.
2005 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of
his/her claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit, together with any other prescribed
papers to be filed therewith. Failure of any person to file and serve a Statement of his/her claim
within the prescribed time with operate as a bar to such claim.
Dated the 2nd day of June, A.D. 2005
SIR ORVILLE TURNQUEST
Chambers,
Librery House
Dowdeswell Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Counsel for the Petitioner


PHOENIX



NOTICE OF

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Of the Shareholders and Agenda


Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of
Shareholders of Phoenix Four, Inc will be held on Tuesday,
June 28, 2005 at the main auditorium of the Fortis Bank, lo-
cated 1 rue de la Chancellerie in Brussels.

Registration will commence at 9:00 a.m. in anticipation of a
10:00 a.m. start. The agenda for the meeting is as follows:

AGENDA

1. Management Opening Statement
2. Financial Position of the Fund
3. Valued Redeemer Restructuring Proposal
4. Management Incentive Compensation Plan
5. Corporate Organizational Issues
6. Litigation Status and Strategy

Dated the 27 day of May 2005.

By order of the Board.
Khalila Dorsett
Secretary


Consolidated Water planning stock split
CONSOLIDATED Water, the company that won the $22
million contract to build and operate the $22 million Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant, has urged that its shareholders approve
a two-for-one stock split.
Shareholders will be asked to approve the split at the com-
pany's annual general meeting (AGM) on August 17. Consol-
idated Water also has the majority stake in, and operates, the
Waterfields reverse osmosis plant in Nassau.
Jeffrey Parker, Consolidated Water's chairman, said: "The
two-for-one stock split, along with our policy of increasing our
cash dividends as earnings grow, illustrates a strong commitment
by management and the Board of Directors.
"We also believe the expansion in public 'float' that will
result from a stock split will improve liquidity in the market and
further broaden the appeal of Consolidated Water shares to
institutional investors."


WI- Colina ,o, ,o g]gg
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of: POW
10 June 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.10 0.95 .Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.208 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.50 8.50 0.00 1.445 0.320 5.9 3.76%
6.35 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.35 6.35 0.00 0.561 0.330 11.3 5.20%
0.85 0.77 Benchmark 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.187 0.000 4.1 0.00%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.122 0.000 12.3 0.00%
1.06 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.06 1.06 0.00 0.007 0.040 14.3 3.77%
8.65 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.55 8.55 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.5 2.81%
2.20 1.54 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
9.00 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.673 0.410 13.4 4.56%
2.40 0.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.452 0.000 5.3 0.00%
4.02 3.66 Famguard 4.02 4.02 0.00 0.406 0.240 9.9 -5.97%
10.46 8.55 Finco 10.46 10.46 0.00 0.662 0.500 15.8 4.78%
8.51 6.69 FirstCaribbean 8.51 8.51 0.00 0.591 0.330 14.4 3.88%
8.60 8.31 Focol 8.41 8.41 0.00 0.708 0.500 11.9 5.95%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
10.16 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.30 8.30 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.8 6.75%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.87 5.83 -0.04 0.184 0.000 31.9 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.010 0.565 5.0 5.65%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.066 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41 00 43 00 41 .00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2323 1.1703 Colina Money Market Fund 1.232656*
2.3329 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.3329 **
10.3837 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3837"**
2.2072 2.0985 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.207174"
1.1080 1.0435 Colina Bond Fund 1.107989""

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit)
62wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE -'Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** AS AT MAR. 31, 20051/ AS AT APR. 29, 2005
* AS AT MAY 20, 20051-* AS AT MAY. 31, 2005/***** AS AT MAY. 31, 2005
g|||~igM|||J~l^^^^SitlKPi O| TRAM CAL: Cgemlii


BUSINESS I








PAG 4, ONAYBJUES3,200ETESRIUN


JOINT CONSULTRTIUE COUNCIL

dCC

In Collaboration with

N&N &
VENTURES LIMITED















The programme will consist of an introduction to new FIDIC documents
and address the following areas/ issues:
Construction! Design-Build Contracts, Responsibilities of Main Parties, Management of
Projects-Key Areas, Workmanship & Time, Financial Clauses & Procedures, Risks, Force
Majeure & Termination. Claims & Disputes & Arbitration and the First 100 Days of
Responsibilites.
Throughout the programme there will be opportunites for questions, and where
appropriate, case studies will be introduced.


ONE .RIBBEAN...
ONE COMPANY
twwwctigrT p.com


VACANCY NOTICE

ACCOUNTANT II


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of
Accountant II.

MAIN DUTIES INCLUDE:

1. Ensuring that systems are in place so that the Investment and Fixed
Assets transactions are monitored and processed in an accurate and timely
manner, and in accordance with the policies of the Board.

2. To make recommendations on new and continuing investments of the
Board to enhance the investment portfolio yield.

3. To ensure that monthly and annual financial information from the Investment,
Insurance and Fixed Assets sections are accurately prepared and completed
on a timely basis.

4. To recommended policies and procedures that would result in the
implementation of current best practices and proper internal controls in the
Investment and Fixed Assets areas.

5. Ensuring that the Board's insurance portfolio is properly administered to
adequately safeguard assets of the Board.

6. To ensure that technology is effectively used in the Investment and Fixed
Assets areas to improve efficiency and improve the quality and timeliness
of information.

7. To develop, train, motivate and monitor staff.

8. Provide assistance in the overall operation of the Accounts Department.

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS:

1. Professional accounting qualifications that entitles one to membership
of the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

2. Minimum of two years post qualification experience

3. Work or audit experience in a major financial institution

4. Computer skills are essential

5. Strong supervisory, communication and analytical skills

SALARY:

This is a contract position with a salary of $60,000 per annum. Fringe
benefits include group medical/life insurance.

APPLICATION:

Application forms may be obtained from the Security Booth of the National
Insurance Board's Jumbey Village Complex. Interested persons may submit
a completed application form along with the necessary proof of qualifications,
no later than 4:00 pm on Thursday, June 16, 2005, to:

The Senior Manager Human Resources
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Headquarters Building
Nassau, Bahamas


Jamaican named


economic adviser



of the PUC


THE Public Utilities Com-
mission (PUC) has appointed
a former senior economist at
Jamaica's utilities regulator as
its economic adviser.
Franklin Anthony Brown,
who joined Jamaica's Office
of Utility Regulation (OUR)
in 1997, is seen as having expe-
rience vital to aiding the PUC.
Much of his experience is in
telecoms, the one Bahamian
utility that the PUC currently
regulates.
At the OUR, Mr Brown was
involved with projects such as
licensing procedures, cost of
capital study, tariff rebalanc-
ing, price cap modelling, rules
for the arbitration of pre-con-


tract disputes for wholesale
and interconnection arrange-
ments and accounting rules for
regulatory purpose.
Papers
Mr Brown's resume also
includes a list of papers in
telecommunications published
by him in.both Jamaican,
regional and international
journals between 2002 and
2004.
These include: Telecommu-
nications Liberalisation in
Jamaica, Mobile Interconnec-
tion: Experience from Jamaica,
Mobile Competition in Jamaica
and preefitations given at con-


ferences of the Organisation
of Caribbean Utility Regula-
tors (OOCUR).
E. George Moss, the PUC's
executive director, said of Mr
Brown's appointment: "He has
excellent academic credentials
in economics and finance,
which have created a very
good foundation for regulato-
ry training and development
at the OUR, which is probably
the most advanced regulator
in CARICOM.
"We looked forward to the
benefit of his input and exper-
tise as we advance our mission
and mandate to regulate utili-
'ties in the Bahamas and train
Bahamtians," Mf M6s added.


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
EUGENE DUPUCH LAW SCHOOL

FORTY-HOUR MEDIATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAMME

JULY 25 30, 2005

A programme presented by the Eugene Dupuch Law School and the Dispute Resolution
Foundation (Jamaica) (DRF). The DRF will deliver the programme of training that was
designed by Capital University Law and Graduate Centre in Ohio. The DRF has trained
mediators for the Supreme Court of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States and the
Supreme Court of Jamaica. At the end of the programme, each participant will be presented
with a certificate.

This programme aims to sensitise and train participants in the techniques and skills of
successful mediation.

Who should attend:
Lawyers, magistrates, judges, court officers, arbitrators, academics, police officers, social
service officers and anyone interested in becoming a certified mediator.

GENERAL INFORMATION


DATE
July 25 30, 2005

VENUE
Nassau, Bahamas

NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS
25

HOW TO REGISTER
(first come first served basis)
Registration forms are
available from:
Eugene Dupuch Law School
Old National Insurance Building
Farrington Road
P.O.Box SS-6394
Nassau, Bahamas

Due to the limit on the number of
participants (25), applicants are
advised that completed registration
forms together with payment in full
must be submitted to Mrs. Persis
Hepburn at the Eugene Dupuch Law
School no later than June 24, 2005


FEES (B$)
$1,250.00


FEES INCLUDE
Attendance at all working sessions:
workshop materials; tea and coffee breaks;
lunch on all days.

PAYMENTS OF REGISTRATION FEES
Cash or bank draft

CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION
No refund of fees can be made for
cancellations after July 8, 2005

NOTE: that registration is not transferable

CONTACT INFORMATION
Eugene Dupuch Law School (EDLS)
(www.edls.edu.bs)
Tel: (242) 326-8507/8508
Fax: (242) 326-8504
e-mail: admin(@edls.edu.bs


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 5B


Trade (From iB)

Caribbean Court of Justice at
the appellate level, the Com-
mon External Tariff and the
use of a single currency and
monetary union, would not
impact this nation's position in
the international community.
Mr Chafuen told Rotarians
that over the long term, free
trade was a game where every
party could win. He noted,
though, that in the short-term
any benefits seen from the
opening of a country's borders
would depend, among other
things, on the level of produc-
tivity.
In deciding whether the
Bahamas should join the
CSME, Mr Chafuen said it
must decide whether member-
ship would increase "the peace
and tranquility among
nations", and whether the
move would increase the level
of trust the world has in prod-
ucts and services originating
from the Bahamas.
He said the Bahamas has
some 5 per cent of the popula-
tion of the CSME region, but
ranked among the top 5 per
cent of the world for economic
freedom and governance,
another consideration that
needs to be examined.
Generally a proponent of
free trade and a liberalised
economy, Mr Chafuen recom-
mended that the Bahamas
approach potential member-
ship in the CSME cautiously,


weighing the benefits against
any setbacks the economy or
nation could experience. He
suggested, however, that from
a social standpoint the
Bahamas was unlikely to lose
its cultural identify, even with
the free movement of people
across its borders.
Success

Mr Chafuen said further that
essential to the success of the
CSME was proper timing in
regard to membership. He xit-
ed a number of examples,
including Ireland and Spain, as
countries that had greatly pro-
gressed in their move to pros-
perity because they opened and
liberalised their economies
before joining regional trade
initiatives. Others, such as
Greece, did not attain the same
level of economic profitability,
having joined in the belief that
the European Union (EU)
would automatically grant this
and avoiding internal reform.
Countries such as Chile and
Singapore, which had been
able to achieve great advances
from their participation in free
trade, were able to experience
those gains because they
opened their economies before
signing a bilateral trade agree-
ment with the US. Mr Cha-
fuen noted that like these two,
small nations can lead the way.
Using the example of the US


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, FAYNETTE ADDERLEY,
of P.O. BOX GT-2249, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to CHARISE TAYLOR. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROSEVERT JEAN-PIERRE,
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalizatioIn should ,nt be granted, should send a written
and' sighed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6TH day of JUNE, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.









RESTAURANT MANAGER
Sbarro the Italian Eatery has a position open
for a Restaurant Manager.

The candidate has the opportunity to work in a high
energy, exciting, and quick service environment.
They must have the aptitude to direct and manage a
a team of workers, while maintaining excellent
customer relations.
The applicant must possess a secondary education
They must also possess atleast five years
experience in a quick service restaurant environment.
The position offers the prospect of advancement.
Transportation essential.
Please forward your resume to The Operations Director
e-mail address: rr(S)sbarrobahamas.com
Facsimile 356-0333





NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of
the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #1479, Golden
Gates #2, situated in the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence on one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence (3)
Bedroom, (2) Bathrooms.

Property size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,251 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 0883".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 24th June, 2005.


attempt to create a similar eco-
nomic association in 1988, to
show how trade arrangements
can fail, Mr Cahfuen said Latin
American governments were
invited to Washington to con-
sider a number of measures
including preserving peace and
security, forming a customs
union, adopting a common cur-
rency, and a uniform system of
copyrights and trademarks.
While most of the measures
were voted for, the association
was essentially dissolved when
the US passed the McKinley
Tariff Act, which implement-
ed a 49 per cent import tariff,
making it one of the most pro-
tective measures of its time.
Other examples of failed
trade arrangements include a
loss by European companies
of almost half their presence in
the Mexican market after the
integration to North American
Free Trade Arrangement
(NAFTA). It was said of Pres-
ident George Bush that: "The
Third Summit of the Americas
has confirmed the expressed
will of George Bush to place
the Latin American and
Caribbean relationship as the
prime objective of US foreign
policy."
Mr Chafuen said he and oth-


* ALEJANDRO Chafuen, president and chief executive of the Atlas Economic Research
Foundation, speaks during the Rotary Club of East Nassau luncheon meeting.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune Staff)


er economic libertarians were
keeping a close eye on Hugo
Chavez, the left-wing populist
president of Venezuela, who
was still running a fiscal deficit
at a time when the price of oil
had jumped from $10 to $40


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 131 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
BRASPARTS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, is in dissolution.
Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and particulars
of their debts or clams to the Liquidator before July 9, 2005.



ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR




NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of
the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Unit #36, Sandyport
situated in the Western District of the island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Condominium consisting of (2) Bedrooms, (2)
Bathrooms.

Unit Size: 1,744 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 7868".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 24th June, 2005.









a multi-national company resident in Nassau, Bahamas
is currently accepting applications for the position of
Tank Truck Driver.

QUALIFICATIONS:
High School Diploma
Minimum of 2 years driving tractor trailers
Previous experience driving tank trucks
(petroleum products) preferred

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Ability to interact with others in a professional manner
Ability to learn new tasks quickly
Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance
record

Salary will be commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Excellent benefits offered.

Only Bahamian citizens need apply and interested persons
should submit applications to arrive no later than Friday,
June 17th, 2005. Only suitable applications will be
acknowledged.

The Advertiser
DA #20660
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


per barrel.
"The potential use of this
money for mischief or for gain-


ing political control of small
countries is a matter of con-
cern," Mr Chafuen said.


NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of
the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot "1137",
Pinewood Gardens situated in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of.
the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence
consisting of (3) bedrooms, (1) bathroom.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS'
LIMITED.

Property size: 7,334 sq. ft.
Building size: 980 sq. ft.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 5782".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm,
Friday 24th June, 2005.





NOTICE
RBC/ROYAL BANK OF CANADA INVITES TENDERS

RBC/Royal Bank of Canada invites tenders for the purchase of
the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 516,
Garden Hills #2, situated in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single family residence
consisting of (2) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms, with one bedroom
efficiency with bathroom.

Property size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,350 sq. ft.

This propel y is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Loan Collections Centre,
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 0817"
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm.,
Friday 24th June, 2005.




Camperdown Riding Club









SUMMER CAMP!!
Weekly camps running July and August.
9am 3pm, Mon Fri
Cost: $170.00/Week
Ages: 6+


Please contact Judy Finder at 324-2065 between
the hours of 8am 12pm & 2pm 6pm to reserve
your sp The camp only has 20 spots per week
and it is on a first come, first serve basis. There
is a deposit of $50.00 non-refundable to reserve
a spot.

Activities:
Learn to ride English style.
Swim with the horses.
Grooming & tacking up.
Basic care of horses.
and lots more


BUSINESS I






PAGE 68. MONDA JUNE' 13,'2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


GN-224


SUPREME

COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00154. " ";' ..

IN THEESTATE OFMarjorie Grace Jedny, late of the
County of Hunterdoni,in the State of New Jersey, one of
the States of the United States of America.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The .Bahamas on its Probate Side by SANDRENA C.
BENJAMIN of East Bay Street, An the Eastern District on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to SUSAN J. BROCK,
the administratrix by the Surrogate of the County of Hunterdon,
in the State ofNew Jersey, United States of America on the 24th
day of FebruairyA.D. 2004. .


DesIiree oinson
(for) Registrar

**.. THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005.

2005/PRO/npr/00268

IN THE STATOlMiiiiaWilliatnson Roos, late of
the Co:ity of ivetside, in the State of California. one
of the StUniesof the UnitedStates of America
deceased:

NOTICE isiherebry given ,that after ithe expiration of fourteen days
front the date hereof, a ication will be made to the Supreme
Cobrt of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by LOUREY C. SMITH
of No. 44 George Street in the City of Nassau on the Island of New
Providence, one of the IslAnds of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, A tIr %yra V.w; i the.AiUthori ed Attorney in The
Bahamas for thie sealing of a Grant of Letters of Testamentary
in the above estate granted to MICHEAELY. ROOS, the Executor
by the Superior Court of California County, Riverside, one of the
state of the United States of America on the 22nd day of August
A.D. 2002.

signed
DesireeRobinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
S:. JUNE 16, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00273

Whereas JONATHAN .fORBES of Chippingham, Western District,
New Providence, one of the .Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has miiade application t te Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for letters of administration of the real and personal estate.
of THOMAS FORBES, late, of the City of Nassau, in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Island of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased..

Notice is heieby given that such applications willbe heard:
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof..

signed

(for) Registrar
-" - - - - - --. "-. .: . -. - - -



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
SJUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00274

Whereas LOWELL J. 1ORTIMER of the Eastern District, in
.the :Island of New 'Providence oneof the Island of the
Co Cionw th of The ahama Attoineyby Deed f Powerof
Attorney for RUTH SWEETING WALKES has made application
to the Supreme Court of-The Bahamas for Letters of Administration
of the real and personalestate of OSWALD ATHELSON

the. States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is ereby gvn ha such applicaio wilbe heard by the
.said Court at the expitation of 14 days from th date hereof.
signed ,
': .*. . .' ? .' . .. . ;: '



** ?ROBATE SIDE
JUNE 16, 2005


Whereas ANDREWP. BOWE, of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney
by Deed of Power of Attorney, has made applications to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for lettersof Administration of the real and
personal estate of ELVINA DEAN late, of Fifth Street and Poinciana
Avenue, of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the


Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
: si gned.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT.
PROBATE REGISTRY

2005/PRO/nptr/00276


IN THE ESTATE OF Lucy Sermarini, late of 432 Melrose
Avenue, Maple Shade in the State of New Jersey one of
the United States of America,
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by HARRY BRACTON
SANDS of Skyline Drive, in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of Testamentary
in the above estate granted to DENISE M. CZYZEWICZ, the
Executor by the Burlington County Surrogate's Court in the State
of New Jersey, one of the states of the United States of America
on the Ist day of Novembr A.D. 2004.
signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar .


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00279

Whereas RICHARD HEBERT ROGER LIGHTBOURNE of
Mareva House, No. 4 George Street, on the Island of New
Providence, one of the. Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Mallory Vail
Weymann has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of
the real and personal estate ofDOLORES LTTERBAC VAIL
late of apartment 2206, 122 Palmers Hill Road, in the City of
Stanford, in the County of Fairfield, in the State of Connecticut
06902, one of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof..
.. signed
Desiree Robinson
S. '(for) Registrar.

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PR0/npr/00280

IN THE ESTATE OF Sofia L. Dobell a.k.a. SOFIA
LOPEZ DOBELL late of the Town of Baraboo, in Sauk
County, in the State of Wisconsin, U.S.A.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate Side by LORI ELIZABETH
LOWE of Lakeview Road, Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Domiciliary Letters in
the above estate granted to PAUL BtAGAN, the Personal
Representative by the Circuit Court of Sauk County, in the State
of Wisconsin, US.A., on the 25th day of April, 2002

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00282

Whereas RONALD MISSICK of Lango Place, in the City of
Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islainds of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration as
Creditor of the real and personal estate of JOSEPH BERTRAM
MISSICK a.k.a. BERTRAM JOSEPH MISSICK, late Of the
City of the City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,. deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.
signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
SJUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00283 .. ..

Whereas DERRICK NATHANIEL MUSGROVE a.k.a. DEREK
NATHANIEL MUSGROVE of Adderley Street,;Fox Hill, Eastern




Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased. .

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00284

Whereas DARNELL HANNA, of Golden Gates, and STEPHANIE
HANNA-BOWE both of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of MABLE HANNA aka MABEL
HANNA.late, of Lewis Street, Nassau Village, New Providence
one of the Island of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard


by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005
2005/PRO/npr/00285

Whereas BERNARD A. MILLER, of Harold Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for SAMUEL
ROSS, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the real
and personal estate of ELSIE AGALLA FRANKS, late, of the
city of West Palm Beach, Florida, USA, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/00286

IN THE ESTATE OF HARRIET J. RICE late of Broward
County in the State of Florida, one of the States of the
S United States of America,
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by SIDNEY
ALEXABDER CAMBRIDGE, JR., of No. 9 Chancery Lane,
Winton Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, BERYL ANDREA,
WILLIAMS of No. 8:Benson Road in Dannottage Estates, Eastern
District, New Providence, one ofthe Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorhey-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to LINDA DIANE
STEINLAGE, the Personal Representative by the Circuit Court
for Broward County, Florida, US.A., on the 6th day of November,
2003

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16,2005
2005/PRO/npr/00287

IN THE ESTATE OF EDWARD BEVIER late of 10495
Whittaker Road, County of Washtenaw, Ypsilanti, in the
State of Michigan one of the States of the United States
of America.
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by VANRIA M.
LIGHTBOURN of Stratton Drive, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing
of a Grant of Letters of Authority for Personal Representative in
the. above estate -granted to MARION BEVIER, the Personal
Representative by Washtenaw Courty Court, Probate Division in
the State of Michigan, U.S.A., on the 15th day of March, 2002
signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
JUNE 16, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00288


IN THE ESTATE OF ARMAND A. ANGELONE, late
of Cuyahoga County, in the State of Ohio, one of the
States of the United States of America.


.... . deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days
from the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by RICHARD RAWLE
MAYNARD of the 3rd Floor Millennium House, The Mall Drive,
in the City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of.The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealed Grant
of Entry Appointing Fiduciary Letters of Authority in the above
estate granted to GWEN ANGELONE, the Executrix by the
Probate Court of Cuyahoga County, in the Sate of Ohio, U.S.A.
on the 30th day of April, 2002
signed
S.. Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 16,2005

2005/PRO/npr/0029l1

Whereas ROSALIE LIGHTFOOT of East Storr Court, Yellow
Elder Gardens, New Providence, The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for letters of administration
of the real and personal estate of ANTHONY LIGHTFOOT, late
of the East Storr Court, Yellow Elder Gardens, New Providence,
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


JUNE. 13,14,15


I I I i I I


I .I I; . ;. i:,:;..r. :: :..; : :.. .. ? I


2.







THE TIBUNEMONDA, JUN 13,205SIPGES7






Ii 41''
'Radisson executive+++++++ ;++ii

replacesSa-"ndsa
Nassa Beac.Hote


BAHA Mar Development
Company has named Earle
Bethell as the new general
manager for its Nassau Beach
Hotel, an appointment that will
take effect on June 13.
Mr Bethell, a long-time
Senior manager at the neigh-
bouring Radisson Cable Beach
Resort, will replace Robert
Safids, who has become Baha
Mar's vice-president of admin-
istration and external relations.
Assume
Mr Bethell, will assume
responsibility for the overall
management of the hotel and


its short, medium and long-
range planning and develop-
ment, and will report to vice-
president of operations,
Andrew HeLal.
Officer
Micahel Sansbury, chief
operating officer for the Cable
Beach Resorts, of which the
Nassau Beach Hotel is. part,
said: "Earle also brings a
wealth of experience to the role
and I am sure that he will make
important contributions to the
establishment of the resort as
an integral part of the redevel-
opment of Cable Beach."


Subsidy (From 1B)


* ROBERT SANDS AND EARLE BETHELL


lion of which are current.
Current assets are only
$12.136 million, with total assets
standing at $31.212 million.
Meanwhile, the FNM
spokesman for Bahamasair,
Neko Grant, hit out at the $1
million fee paid to McKinsey &
Co, saying during the House of
Assembly Budget debate that
this should have been between
$300,000 to $500,000.
He claimed that the prelimi-
nary report delivered by the
consultant did not reveal any-
thing new, adding that sugges-
tions such as better revenue
.management to achieve higher
yields, reducing costs and cap-
turing market share through


better on-time performance and
minimising downtime were
,what he had been saying "for
years".
Mr Grant said there appeared
to be a discrepancy between
McKinsey & Co's assessment
of the average load factor being
only 51 per cent, and assertions
Bahamasair that it was greater
than 65 per cent.
According to Mr Grant, the
McKinsey & Co report found
that only during one month in
2004 did the load factor for
Bahamasair exceed 65 per cent,
the level it needed to break
even, with the load factor rarely
exceeding 70 per cent during
peak times.


wi--u g-h UfGOUGH C'-

Througb bCopera-ivel


Music

announces it's


Centre


'F SUMMER 'P'
FINE ARTS CAMP























A young aggressive company with a solid track record
is expanding and requires an

In House Marketing Manager
If you are looking for position with:
1) Structure
2) Lots of supervision
3) A daily routine
Then this position is NOT for you.
Applicants must have a degree in marketing.
When applying remember that we are looking for that
applicant who stands out from the rest.
c/o The Tribune Limited
DA# 03251
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


AND WHEREAS, ite L,-operaive iviovement m in
; phenoImena l ?irowthl' i ift itenibehip and consequent

AND WHEREAS, Co-operative members recognize t
Development and have decided to emphasize and higl
others through the adoption of both senior citizens' an
continued development of the Bahamian Community;


AND WHEREAS, The Bahamas Co-operative Movement (the Department of Co-
operative Development and the Bahamas Co-operative League) is celebrating thirty-
one (31) years of co-operative development in The Bahamas;

AND WHEREAS, The Department of Co-operative Development and the Bahamas
Co-operative League Limited have organized a full slate of events for the month of June
to heighten public awareness of the achievements of the Bahamian Co-operative
Movement, under the theme: "WEALTH CREATION THROUGH CO-OPERATIVES";

NOW THEREFORE, I Cynthia A. Pratt, Prime Minister (Acting) of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of June 2005 as "CO-OPERATIVE
MONTH".

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto
set my Hand and Seal this -of June, 2005

CYNTHIA A PRATT
PRIME MINISTER (ACTING)


Celebrate Co-ops Month and learn more about
this vibrant movement that can change your life!


May- June, 2005 Health and
Fitness Challenge
Thursday May 26 Press
Conference- Ministry of
Agriculture, Fisheries & Local
Government Conference
Room, East Bay Street
Sunday May 29 Epiphany
Anglican Church- Prince
Charles Drive
June 1-30 Radio Talk Shows
June 1-30 Youth/School
Cooperatives
June 1-30 Primary School Kids
Club
June 1-30 Old Folks &
Children's Home visits
June 1-30 Testimonies of Co-
operatives members
June 1-30 Media Promotions


June s 30 Credit Unions Open
House
Wednesday, June.1 -
Proclamation
June 6,13,20,22 Profiles on
Co-operatives
Friday, June 17 Board of
Directors & Employees Family
Fun Day
Saturday, June 18 Fun/Run/
Walk & Family Fun Day-
Goodman's Bay 6:00am
(Application form can be
obtained from the Department
of Co-operative Development-
356-3152 or Bahamas Co-
operative League- 393-3691
Friday, June 24,12:30 pm -
Annual Awards Luncheon-
British Colonial Hilton


Saturday, June 25 Health Fair-
Town Centre Mall 10am-3pm
Thursday, June 30 Presentation
to Old Folks & Children's Home
Saturday July 2 International
Co-operative Day (Radio &
Television Message)


.AM -3 L-SL
4 .11g )V '


Department of Co-operative Development
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries a Local Government, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel 356-3152 Fax: 356-4622


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a =
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. .
f so,,cmal us on.322-1986
and share your story.


Gray
y


---- -~--


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Colinamp ecut
Conalmperial executjye


lands top round-table


AN executive life under-
writer at Colinalmperial Life
;Insurance has become the first
*person from the Caribbean to
,be appointed to the Manage-
ment Council of the Million
'Dollar Round Table
(MDRT).
Anthony (Tony) Longley
know heads the International
"Membership Communications
Committee of MDRT as divi-
sional vice-president.

Attended

Mr Longley recently attend-
;,ed a management council
,meeting in Laguna Beach,
California, which was chaired
-by the MDRT's president,
*Adelia C. Chung, and was the
'final one for the administra-
tive year 2004-2005. At this
"meeting, several important
resolutions were ratified,
:which are expected to posi-
tively impact the direction of
the organisation in the future.
Just before this meeting in
California, Mr Longley was in









' The Baham Natio
(Bay


Tokyo, Japan, where he was a
special guest of the Japan
Chapter of MDRT for their
annual MDRT Day Confer-
ence.

Members

MDRT members are noted
as the best sales professionals
worldwide in the insurance-
based financial service indus-
try. The MDRT annual con-
vention is scheduled for June
25-29 in New Orleans,
Louisiana.



0 PICTURED (1-r) are
Anthony Longley, MDRT divi-
sional vice-president; Chris
Chung, spouse of president;
Adelia C. Chung, MDRT pres-
ident; Hiroki Shima, MDRT
zone chair, Japan; Rose,
guest from Thailand; Kiyomi
Shimizu, immediate past
chair, MDRT Japan; Ben-
jawat Tentivongaskij, MDRT
zone chair, Thailand.


GN 223

MINISTRY OF FINANCE


.sl Geographic Information Systems (BNGIS) Centre
Office of The Prime MAnister
& Armstrong Streets, Nassau, Bahamas)


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR THE PROCUREMENT OF COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES

OBJECTIVE:

The Bahamas National Geographic Information Systems (BNGIS) Centre, Office of The Prime
Minister is requesting proposals from suitably qualified vendors for the procuremeri of hardware
software, peripheral devices and consumables to support its national mandate as the government's
technical focal point for the collection, integration, analysis and management of geographic
information'for use in land'use planning and monitoring of development

BACK GROUND:

The BNGIS Centre, by Cabinet decision, was firmly established within the Goveinmental
hierarchy operating as a unit under the auspices of the Office of the Prime Minister, The Centre's
national mandate is to serve as Government's central repository fobll geospatial data on the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas; is responsible to set and implement GIS Policy including data
standards and data sharing protocols; maintain a clearinghouse for the dissemination of
geographic information to both public and private sector; and provide training in the use of
geographic information systems (GIS) technology to personnel in various government agencies.
As such a large amount of geospatial data and images of various Islands will be collected, stored
and used for planning research and analysis at the Centre in the short to medium term.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS:

Requlrements/Speciflcatons Doemment should be collected from the reception desk, 3rd
floor at th Ministry of Finance, Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfleld Centre, West Bay Street, Cable
Beach, New Promdelace, Bahamas.

INSTALLATION & CONFIGURATION:

Installation of software and computer servers and configuration to the existing network
infrastructure may be required and should be included as a line item in the request for proposal,

Proposals should indicate the time required for installation.

'"TEiNICAL TRAINING:
Training in Network administration including a) System backup procedures
b) Recovery etc. will be required for three technical officers and should be included as a line item
in the proposal.

Training materials should be provided by the Vendor,

MAINTENANCE & SUPPORT:

Proposals should include the cost for ninety (90) day post implementation support. Please include
your support policies and procedures including contact information for support calls and the
response time for onsite support.

WARRANTY:
Proposals should include the cost and a detailed warranty program offered to the government.
Warranty should be provided for a period of three (3) years. Warranty should include the ability
to replace malfunctioned hardware within New Providence and the Family IslandS within the
shortest period of time to avoid extensive down time and non-production.

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION:

Vendors wishing to submit bids should ensure that they meet the following
qualificationsexperience:
An excellent track record, demonstrating their ability to setup, supply, configure and
support the proposed the system,
Demonstrate experience and access to strategic alliances with experience partners.
Training experience for the transfer of technology as required
Proposals should indicate date of delivery

DELIVERY OF PROPOSALS:

Proposals should be delivered to the reception desk at the Ministry of Finance, Sir Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield Centre, West Bay Street, Cable Beach, New Providence, Bahamas,

Proposals should be in copied triplicate and delivered in a sealed envelope addressed as follows:

Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Fimance
Nassau, NJP. Bahamas
Telephone: 242-327.1530

Label: RFP BNGIS Centre Computer Equipment & Supplies

SUBMISSION DEADLINE"

The deadline for submission is Friday 176' June, 2005 before 4:30pm.


OPENING OF BIDS:


Bids would be opened at the Tenders Board on Tuesday 21" June, 2005 at 10:00am.



The Government reserves the right to reject any or all proposal/quotes submitted

The Bahamas National GIS Centre
EQUIPMENT SPECIFICATIONS
item No. Description
IBM Server with intel Xcon processor 3.4GHz/IMB with 800MHz system bus windows Server
2003 Standard Edition with 8 client licenses,
Raidi Raid 5
2GB DDR2400MHZ,4bMMs O 12MB+4Split Backplane Daughtercard,
73GB,U320,SCSI. IIN,15KPE2850
730B,U320,SCSL IIN 10K, PE2850.
146GB, U320,SCSI, IN 10K, PE2850,
146GB, U320,SCSL IIN 10K, PE2850,
1460B, U320.SCSL ifN 10K, PE2850,
146GB, U320,SCSI, 1IN 10K, PB2850,
Embedded Raid PERC4 Embedded Integrated (ROMB),
Raid PERC4 Card, 2 externally channels, a interialchanels,
Intel Pro 1000MT Copper Gigabit Network Adapter (1000MSP).
Redundant Power Supply,
24X IDE CD-ROM, Hoppy Drive, 3.5, 144mb, Standard Windows Keyboarni,
15" Monitor,
Mouse,
1 Riser with PCI-X Support and embedded Raid (ROMB) support


- 4 ____I -


External SCSI Storage Array, Rack for use with Server Redundant 600w power supply, 146GB
Ultra 320, SCSI cations),
Dual U320 Enclosure Management Module,
3 year same day 4 hour response parts & onsite labor (7 days x 24 hours) (L3Y7X24)
1460B Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with li0k rpm,
1460B Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ulra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with l0k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
1460 Ultra 320, SCSI 1 inch with 10k rpm.
1460B Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, I inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, I inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch with 10k rpm,
1460B Ultra 320, SCSI, 1 inch.witbh 10k rpm,
146GB Ultra 320, SCSI. 1 inch with 10k rpm,,
two 4 meter, PERC/39160 cable for PV22XS (wide HD to slim VHDCI),
Hardcopy documentation,
Locidng Bezel,
Verse Rallc.


HP Design Jet Plotter 5500PS (42in) (Q1252A) Hard
disk400B Memory 256mb,
3 40GBHD 1
4 Plotter ink cartridges for HP Dcsign et 5500PS 15 of each colour
5 HPColour Laeet3500n printer 2
6 HP Laerjet 5100 Printer (large format)
7 HPLaserje 1012 Printer 2
8 rIk cartridges for HP Laserjt 1012 Printe 10 of each colour
9 Ink cartridges for HP LaserJet 3500n Printer 10 of each colour
10 nkcartridgesfor HP Laseriet5100 10 of cach colour
11 Rack mountable tape with backup system with additional SCSI card for use with Server 1
12 high capacity Tapes foruse with backup system 24
S 13 lat arccn color monitor 19" 1
S 14 Visio supporting Windows 2000/XP 1
15 Ar&SDE software 1
16 Microsoft sqL for Windowi 2003 server environment with 10 CALs (licenses) as described
17 Publisher Software 1
18 Diskceper suite for server 2003 1
19 Diskeeper suite forcomputer workstations XP & windowsa2000 15
20 Veritas Power backup software suite for 2003 server 1
21 Mirror/Ghosting softhvare 1
22 DVD tead/write compact disks 100
. 23 DVD read compact disks (in individual cases) 100
24 Canon Faxphone B740 ink cartridge 3
25 Network tester 1
286 Category 5 patch cables 15
27 CD cabinet 100 capacity .2
28 Computer network technician tool bag 1
29 Toshiba e studio 350/450 Copier ink cartridge 4
HP High Gloss photo bright white paper for use with HP Plotter 5500PS-42 x 150.361 150 and 24 x 150
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ost


I'


_ _1


"""""""


------Tl


1 11









TH TRBUESODAINUEE3,205SPGE1


Fund (From page 1B)


ly seeing any traffic. The local
market is not sufficient to sup-
port those businesses."
Neko-Grant, the FNM MP
for Lucaya, told the House of
Assembly last week that the
International Bazaar resembled
a "cemetery", with many stores
closed and other expected to
follow suit either "voluntarily
or involuntarily in short order".
He added that unemploy-
ment on Grand Bahama fol-
lowing Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne was close to 20 per cent,
with many workers in the hotel
sector back to working two to
three days per week.
Isle of Capri, the casino oper-
ator at the Our Lucaya resort,
was only opening its restaurant
at weekends, Mr Grant alleged.
The FNM MP said the resort
itself was considering convert-


ing part of its property into
timeshare.
Meanwhile, Mr Bain said it
will be difficult for the 1,300
former employees of the Royal
Oasis to find similar employ-
ment on Grand Bahama, unless
the Government is able to pro-
vide them with the support nec-
essary to begin their own entre-
preneurial ventures.
He added, though, that such
a measure would have mini-
mum impact on the community
because the population of the
island is not large enough to
sustain such activities.
Mr Bain said: "It is develop-
ing into a desperate situation.
We have to find a way to bring
some closure to the matter,
either in opening the property
as a hotel or some other enter-
prise."


Last Wednesday, Harcourt
Developments, the Irish land
developer looking to purchase
the Royal Oasis Crowne Plaza,
pulled out of negotiations with
Lehman Brothers' private equi-
ty arm to purchase the crisis-
stricken resort.
Tourism minister Obie
Wilchcombe, though unaware
of the end of negotiations
between the two, said Harcourt
was not the only group inter-
ested in purchasing the Royal
Oasis and there were several
interested parties.
He indicated further that a
US-based group had already
come forward offering a sub-
stantial purchase price, and was
willing to underwrite the sig-
nificant cost for renovations.
If approved, the potential
investor, said to represent one


Review (From page 1B)


June 10 report, which said it had continued to
monitor the Bahamas "in light of continuing
and serious concerns expressed by FATF mem-
bers regarding areas of international co-opera-
tion". The FATF report credited the Bahamas,
though, for "making progress" on this issue by
December 2004, having responded to all out-
standing regulatory requests from FATF mem-
bers by that date. This nation had also signed a
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for
regulatory information exchange with the US
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).
The FATF's concerns with the Bahamas' on
international co-operation are twofold. Firstly,
the MOU with the SEC aims to patch over dif-
ferences between Bahamian law and US law.
Regulator-to-regulator exchanges of infor-
mation are governed by the Central Bank of
the Bahamas Act 2000 and the Securities Indus-
try Act 1999. Both those acts, while allowing
the Central Bank and Securities Commission to
share information with their SEC counterparts,
require that that information can only be passed
on by the US regulator to third parties with their
express consent.
Regulators
However, under US law, the SEC has to pass
on information received from foreign regula-
tors to the Congress and Justice Department if
those bodies request it, bringing it into conflict
with the provisions of Bahamian law. This con-
flict and the problems stemming from it are
what caused the US to complain to the FATF
about the Bahamas.
The second issue has involved requests made
by overseas judicial authorities for assistance
from the Attorney General's Office under the


Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) and
other available avenues.
The response times to these requests were
perceived as being too slow, although The Tri-
bune understands that in many instances the
requesting states failed to provide the Bahamas
with all the required documentation and did not
fully understand this nation's legal processes.
Since then, the Attorney General's Office has
established an international co-operational unit
to deal with requests from overseas judicial
authorities.
Assistance
Many financial services executives and com-
mentators have been convinced that the failure
to respond to overseas requests for assistance
was a key factor behind the Bahamas' initial
blacklisting in 2000.
However, members of the former FNM
administration have said many of these requests
were related to tax matters, and the Bahamas
was not going to act as a vassal collector for
their states, enforcing their tax laws. The Tax
Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA) with
the US had also not come into force.
Meanwhile, the FATF's June 10 report praised
the Bahamian FIU, saying had "continued to
function effectively" since this nation was delist-
ed from the blacklist in June 2001, both in co-
operating and exchanging information with its
overseas counterparts and dealing with STRs.
Acknowledging that the Bahamas had "made
progress" in implementing its anti-money laun-
dering regime, the FATF report noted that this
nation was set to finalise in June 2005 a hand-
book that aims to assist foreign regulators when
making requests.


of the top hotel brands in the
world, has committed to hav-
ing the property up and run-
ning by January 2006, the min-
ister said. The investor is
expected to meet with the Gov-
ernment later this week.
The legal representative for
Harcourt, Kirk Antoni, a part-


ner in the Grand Bahama-
based firm Cafferata and Co,
said officials at Harcourt want-
ed a longer due diligence period
to do inspections of the prop-
erty ande determine the actual
cost of upgrade and restora-
tions.
However, Lehman Brothers'


private equity arm declined to
extend the due diligence period
unless Harcourt made a sub-
stantial non-refundable pay-
ment to them to keep the prop-
erty off the market. The
Dublin-based firm declined to
make the payment and walked
away from negotiations.


5,000


S'K


NOTICE



FOR SALE BY PUBLIC TENDER


Commercial Building Freeport, Grand Bahama Lot 6, Block
D. In particular the property is on the northeast comer of the
Mall Drive and Pioneer's Way, in the centre of the downtown
business district of Freeport.


The property consists of a tract of 1.04 acres of land which is
the subject of a lease from Freeport Commercial and Industrial
Limited which has 64 years to run. Erected on the said land is
a two-story office building on approximately 9,141 sq.ft.
Approximately one-third of the property is paved with asphalt
for parking and the remainder is landscaped.


Interested parties should submit written offers with telephone
contacts and postal addresses to the Joint Official Liquidators,
P.O.Box N-3748, Nassau, Bahamas or P.O.Box F-43746,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.


Telephone Inquires: 326-8737 or 373-3015
Fax: 302-4870 or 373-1468


Terms: 10% deposit upon acceptance of offer; balance upon
completion.


All offers must be received by June 24, 2005


THE LIQUIDATORS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REJECT AND/OR REFUSE ANY OFFER.


ome & Lot


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE









PB OJ1 0IS


Rodgers does




the triple in




tournament


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IT was the Alanna Rodgers show at the
National Tennis Centre yesterday as she
clinched three titles at the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association's Gatorade Open Nation-
als.
Rodgers, 18, secured the triple crown when
she and her coach Jeff Spiers teamed up with
win the mixed doubles with a 6-1, 6-2 decision
over JJ and Nikkita Fountain.
The victory came moments after Rodgers
pulled off the women's open singles title with
a 6-1, 6-4 victory over the youthful Kerrie
Cartwright.
On Saturday, Rodgers and Dyphany
Mortier combined to clinch the women's
doubles title, defeating Skye Powell and
Channelle Clare 6-2, 6-4.
"I'm excited to have won all of the divi-
sions," said a jubilant Rodgers. "I'm pretty
pleased with the win over Nikkita Fountain in
the semi-final of the singles yesterday (Sat-
urday).
"It's been very difficult for me the past
year because of the international baccalau-
reate program at school and playing tennis.
I've just been so busy tied down with school
work, I haven't had a chance to play or trav-
el that much this year with tennis."
While Rodgers celebrated her triple feat,
No 1 seed Chris Eldon returned as the men's
singles champion, beating his cousin and No
2 seed Matthew Sands 6-3, 6-4.
It was a rematch of last year, with Eldon
staying ahead of Sands in their head-to-head
match-up.
Meanwhile, there was a double dose of
victory for Spier as he teamed up with Neil
MacTaggert to beat the youthful No 4 team
of JJ Fountain and Jonathon Hanna 6-2, 6-0
for the men's doubles title.
Although she was busy preparing for
her graduation from St. Andrew's
School before she head to Rice University
on an athletic scholarship, Rodgers said
she had found sufficient time to get


prepared for the tournament.
As an unseeded player, Rodgers was par-
ticularly pleased with her upsetting 6-3, 6-2
win over Fountain, the top seed and defend-
ing champion, in the semis of the singles.
That seemed to have given Rodgers the
confidence to play even better in the final, as
she faced 14-year-old Kerrie Cartwright in
the final.
Rodgers easily won the first set and was
looking to close out the second set after she
took a 4-0 and held a 5-1 lead, but almost
blew it when Cartwright bounced back.
Overcoming her fear of losing the match,
Rodgers was able to go on and pull off the
well-deserved victory.
"I just became so nervous and tight that I
started pushing the ball and hitting it out,"
Rodgers reflected. "My tightness controlled
my emotions and Kerrie was able to dictate
the play in that set.
"I had a major mental let-down there. I
was really disappointed in my play, in the
sense that I wasn't able to continue to play
without any fear and aggressiveness."
However, coming out as the champion
helped to erase her lacklustre performance at
the end.
"I won the overall battle, but I lost the lit-
tle war, so to speak," she said.
Rodgers, however, was pleased with her
overall, performance, especially clinching the
doubles victory with Mortier and teaming
up with her coach, Spier, to take the mixed
title. \
"I think the turnout for the tournament
was great. There were a lot of people out
there," she noted. "So I was really content
with playing again. It was a fun week for
me."
After a week off to recuperate, Rodgers
will be back on the court practising for the
International Tennis Federation's Junior
Tournament here next month.
After the tournament, she will be head-
ing to France to play in a tournament before
she enrols in Rice University on her athletic
scholarship in August.


Tournament


moves to


indoor site

THE Street Legends Basketball Tournament,
which was previously played at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex, has been moved indoors
to the AF Adderley Gym.
Four games are on the schedule, starting at
6pm today at the new site.
In the opener, the RM Bailey Pacers will play
the CI Gibson Rattlers in a high school match-
up.
At 7 pm, the Kentucky Fried Chicken
Colonels will play the Real Deal Shockers in a
men's game.
At 8 pm, the CR Walker Knights will face the
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins gold in
another high school encounter.
And at 9 pm, the Radisson Cable Beach will
play the Stuart's Plaza Giants in the men's fea-
ture contest.
Result from games played Saturday at Baillou
Hills are as follows:
Leron Colebrooke scored a game high 14
points and Tyrone Sands added 12 as the Soldier
knocked off the Atlantis Thundercats 54-50 in
the men's feature contest.
Jeremy Hutchinson scored 10 and Ernest
Saunders added nine in the loss.
The Giants were awarded a victory over
Memendem after making a 25-12 lead when the
game was stopped in the third quarter because of
unsportsmanlike conduct by Memendem.
Delick Eugene was leading the Giants with
nine points when the game was stopped.
Two high school games were also contested.
In the opener, CI Gibson knocked off CR
Walker 51-41 as Timeko Moxey scored a game-
high 17 and Jason Collie added 15 in the win,
Leon Bain scored 14 in the loss.
The other game saw Doris Johnson blue team
blow out their gold team 37-23 as S Rolle led
the way with a game-high 10 for the winners.


"Copyrighted Material


SyndicatedContent


Available from Commercial News Providers.


Williams breaks 45 seconds for the 400m


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
ANDRAE Williams made history
on Saturday at the NCAA Division 1
Outdoor Championships when he
became the just the fourth Bahamian
to dip under the 45-second barrier in
the men's 400 metres.
Competing in the finals of the
event in Sacremento, California for
Texas Tech, Williams clocked 44.90
seconds to lower his personal best of
45.29 that he ran in the preliminary
rounds.
The junior from Grand Bahama
was the only of the four Bahamians
competing in the four-day meet that


made it to an individual final.
But Williams and his Grand Bahami-
an team-mate, Michael Mathieu, both
competed for Texas Tech in the final of
the men's 4x400 relay.
Mathieu, also a junior, ran on the
second leg, while Williams was on
anchor. Tech Tech finished a disap-
pointing seventh with a time of 3:02.33
after they had posted the fastest qual-
ifying time of 3:01.69.
The final was won by Louisiana
State on 2:59.59, with Arizona State
second with 3:00.57 and Oregon com-
ing in third with 3:00.81.
Also at the nationals, which closed
out the collegiate season, were throw-
ers Ayr1ara Albury and Chafree


Bain, both from Alabama.
Williams' time of 44.90 in the 400m
was listed as the 14th best in the world
so far this year.
It was just shy of the 44.89 that Chris
Brown ran for second place at the
Galatletica Banamex in Mexico on Sat-
urday as well.
Winning the NCAA one-lap race
was Darold Williamson, who clinched
the second straight title for Baylor.
Williamson, a senior, clocked the
world's second fastest time in taking
this year's title in 44.51.
In the first round of the 400,
Williamson ran 44.27 to post the
world's fastest time, surpassing the pre-
vious best of 44.53 by Olympic cham-


pion and last year's NCAA champion
Jeremy Wariner, who ran 44.53 on May
22.
Williams, who will turn 22 on July 12,
beat Mathieu in their head-to-head
showdown in the first round as they
competed in the same heat.
Williams had the fastest qualifying
time of 45.41 to win the heat with
Mathieu third in the 11th fastest time
of 46.24.
In the semi-final, Mathieu, who will
be 21 on June 24, was eliminated with
his last-place finish in 47.28 in the same
heat that Williamson won in the
world's fastest time of 44.27.
Williams was entered in heat two
where he was third in 45.18. Jamal


Ashley won the heat in 44.98 and Kel-;
ly White got second in 45.12.
In the women's shot putt, Aymara-
Albury, a junior at Alabama who will!
be 20 on July 25, had a toss of 49ft lOin!
for eighth place in flight two. That put,
her 17th overall, as she failed to
advance to the final.
Miberli Barrett, a senior from Mia-
mi, won the event with a heave of 56ft
7 1/4in.
And in the women's discus, Chafree
Bain was 17th overall. The senior
closed out her collegiate career at
Alabama with a distance of 146-8.
The winning throw was 178-3 by
Rachel Lomgfors, a senior from Flori-
da.


* WILLIAM 'JJ' Fountain gets set to
return a volley in his doubles match with
Jonathan Hanna against the veteran team
of Albert McKinney and John Pintard.
Fountain and Hanna easily won the match
to advance to the semifinal.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune Sports)


I


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


. ...............














Cox triumphant with close finish




in New Providence road race


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
SPRINT specialist John Cox
managed to wiggle his wheel to a
close finish over Tracy Sweeting
in the New Providence Cycling
Association's road race on Satur-
day.
The 36-mile race, which covered
a six-mile course six times in the
western district, was contested
under light, rainy conditions.
While there was a four-man field
that rode out front for the majori-
ty of the small field of competitors
in the race, it came down to a
sprint to the finish.
Using his height, Cox managed
to get the jump and stayed ahead
of Sweeting as he crossed the finish
line in one hour, 35 minutes.'
Sweeting ended up in second on
1:35.05. Tim Hauber came in third
with 1:35.24 as he held off Eddie
Bethel (1:35.35).
It was Cox's first victory in six
races for the year and he credited
Bethel for "softing up" the field
to allow him to prevail.
"I think after I won the sprint
lap (third lap), I was able to recov-
er behind Eddie's wheel and I just
kept attacking and that softened.
up Tracy," Cox said.
"My goal was to get around Tra-
cy at the line because he's been
beating me for the last couple of
races. I wanted to stop that."
A jubilant Cox raised his right
hand pointing it in the direction of
the finish line as he pulled away
from Sweeting for the close victo-
ry.
Now he has a victory under his
belt, Cox is hoping to travel to
Grand Bahama this weekend for a
40-mile race and to continue his
winning streak.
While he was the lone competi-
tor in the junior division, Kevin
Richardson continued to ride with
the open men, coming in fifth in
1:37.35.
He beat out Wayne Price, Sam
"Ironman" Brown and Robert


Jones, who came behind him in
that order.
Two ladies competed in a short-
er 30-mile race over five laps. It
also came down to a sprint, with
Julianna Glinton coming out on
top in 1:30.13 over Christine Jones
(1:30.15).
For Glinton, who competed in
only her third race, it was her sec-
ond straight victory after winning
the divisional title at-the Pineapple
Festival over 20 miles over the
Labour Day weekend.
"It feels good but the weather
was terrible and kind of treacher-
ous," Glinton admitted. "The
brakes don't hold that well when it
wet, so you couldn't speed that
much.
"But I'm pleased with my per-
formance. Christine was riding a
lot longer than I have, but we used
each other for most of the race. At
the last lap, we just went out in
own race and I beat her in the
sprint."
Jones said she wasn't disap-
pointed in the defeat because she
did her best under the weather
conditions and she enjoyed her-
self.
"It was tough around Clift6n
Pier when it got dusty and dirty,"
Jones said. "Overall, it was a good
race. I enjoyed the sprint.
"I made one mistake slowing
down at one point which I thought
was the finish line. But it was a
good workout. I enjoyed it. I'm
ready for another one."
There was also a continued bat-
tle in the junior division with Jay
Major outsprinting TresSmith for
the victory in the 30-mile race.
Major clocked 1:41.12, compared
to Smith's 1:41.14. Yorkin Bain
was a distant third in 1:43.35.
"It was slippery and rainy, but it
was good," said Major about the
conditions of the race. "The com-
petition was tough.
"It was hard at the end. But I
don't think I deserved it. Tres did
all the work. I only waited for the
sprint to beat him."


g


a::r;:L:~--"i::. ':.::S:~~


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2uub, PAGE 11B


TRIBUNE SPORTS










MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


U


Bahamas falls to Jamaica


- but still goes through to next round


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior sports reporter
BAHAMAS came out of the Northern Caribbean Rugby
World Cup qualification tournament as the top ranked
team on Saturday, despite falling to the hands of the
Jamaican squad in a 5-3 loss.
Team Bahamas, who had a late charge in the game, were
unable to use their speed in the first half against the quick-
er Jamaican squad.
The Bahamas came storming through with a powerful
surge during the opening minutes of the second half; but the
taller Jamaica defensive front
line were notably physical upfront.
BJ Saunders, chairman of the Bahamas Rugby Federation
said: "The loss today isn't a disappointing one we are
very proud of the boys. They played exceptionally well.
"We have had a lot of nagging injuries on the team, and
besides the other teams didn't have to go through what our
guys went through.
"Our guys came in from a hard, long day on their jobs to
play in the tournament the other teams were able to
relax."
Bahamas made some fantastic tackles in the first half,
denying the Jamaican team. The hard-hitting Bahamas
team, who had banged themselves up from previous games,
picked up two loose balls in the second, converting on one.
With both sides not willing to give an inch, the defence
picked up in the second half, with the tackles becoming
more forceful.
Both teams had great runs during this time period, gain-
ing excellent field position. Neither team wanted to give up
ground or possession easily, which led to a fierce battle
exchange right up until the final
whistle.
"We are going to give the boys at least a two weeks' rest,
and then start practicing and training again," said Saun-
ders. "We have a lot of things we need to focus on. We are
still a little short skill-wise, the mental aspects of
the game are still not there. We have to try and clean up
on the little mistakes that were made not only this game
here today, but the games we were able to win as well.
"It was very hard preparing for this tournament. The
Cayman Islands have professional players on their team
and we were able to defeat them. The Bermuda team, they
have excellent players who have played in England. Unlike
them, we play the game for the fun and to keep in shape.
"We are taking it to another level. We are excited about
the win; this has made us plan a number of things for the
team, which should prepare them for the upcoming tour-
nament."
Executives in the Bahamas Rugby Association are plan-
ning a few trips, clinics and tournaments in order to prepare
the team for what they are calling their biggest tournament
in September.
This southern match-up is set for August, with the show-
down between the two regions scheduled for September.
The win moves onto play either the United States or Cana-
da for the right to participate in the 2007 World
Cup series, in France.
The Bahamas finished the tournament with a 2-1 win-loss
record, and ranked 88th in the world with a 35.87 rating.


* A MOMENT from Saturday's game in which Jamaica beat the Bahamas 5-3


Williams-arling leaves Guevera trailing


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
UNDAUNTED by the tremendous hometown
support for her rival, Tonique Williams-Darling
went to Mexico over the weekend and showed
why she won the title of the fastest women's 400
metre over Ana Guevera last year.
In a rematch of their rivalry at the Galatletica
Banamex meet in Monterrey on Saturday,
Williams-Darling fed off the huge crowd to con-
trol the race and win with a time of 49.85 seconds,
leaving Guevera behind in 50.05.
Running out of lane two behind Guevera in
three, Williams-Darling went on to lower her
world-leading time of 49.95 that she achieved the
weekend before at the Prefontaine Track Classic
in Eugene, Oregon.
Williams-Darling and Guevera were scheduled


to buck in what would have been their first
encounter since Guevera had revenge for her
defeat at the Olympic Games with her victory at
the World Athletic Final in Monaco.
But Guevera opted not to compete at Pre-
fontaine, using her time instead to stay in Mexico
to continue her high-altitude training for Satur-
day's meeting on Monterrey.
It was also a good day in Monterrey for sprint-
er Chandra Sturrup and quarter-miler Chris
Brown. Long jumper Jackie Edwards also pro-
duced a good showing.
But the focus of attention was definitely on
the women's quarter, which was the last event
on the calendar of the one-day meet.
Williams-Darling, 29, easily won the much-
anticipated race that also served as prelude to
the Central American and Caribbean Champi-
pnship in Nassau over the Independence holi-


day weekend in July.
Guevera, 28, is expected to be at the champi-
onships to defend her title. She was able to
improve on her previous season's best of 50.55 she
ran to win in Hermosillo on May 21.
Coming in third in the race was Karin Shinkins
of Ireland in 52.08. Debbie Dunn of the United
States was fourth in 52.56 and Gabriela Medina of
Mexico was fifth in 54.05.
Chandra Sturrup, 33, pulled off a big victory in
the women's straight away as she clocked a sea-
son's best of 11.14 to beat a field of Americans.
Lauryn Williams, the Olympic silver medalist,
was second in 11.30 and Muna Lee came third in
11.39. Marion Jones had to settle for fourth in
11.40.
It was the third consecutive time that Sturrup has
won a race against Jones. Her last outing prior to
Monterrey came in Hengelo on May 29, when


Sturrup ran her previous season's best of 11.15.
Sturrup now holds the 11th and 12th fastest
times so far this year.
Chris Brown, the national quarter-mile cham-
pion, ran a personal best of 44.89 for second place
in the men's 400 that was won by CAC defending
champion Alleyne Francique from Grenada in
44.60.
Dereck Brew of the United States came in
third in 44.96.
Brown, 25, lowered his previous season's best of
45.28 for the world's 13th fastest time this year.
Francique now has the third fastest time.
On the field, Jackie Edwards popped a dis-
tance of 6.49 metres for third place in the women's
long jump. Elva Goulbourne of Jamaica won in
6.55. She is the CAC and NACAC record holder
with a leap of 7.16 after she won last year's
Banamex meeting.


_ I __ __ __IIVI~-LIP --I~----








MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


The stories behind the news


Dr Rodney Smith's admission of plagiarism last week sparked
a great debate over whether the Harvard-trained president of
COB should resign. Dr Smith publicly admitted and apolo-
gised for not attributing a portion of a speech that he delivered
during the Honours Convocation. COB students are sched-
uled to hold a rally in support of Dr Smith on the front lawn of
the Oakes Field cagmpus. The FNM Action Group has urged
government to use the summer months to find a suitable replace-
ment to head the college, which is currently working to establish
itself as a university. Senior lecturer Dr Felix Bethel and Bish-
op Simeon Hall have also called for Dr Smith's resignation,
among others. And the college's union, UTEB, has expressed
concern over the situation...


The region saw its first
named weather system for
the 2005 hurricane season
last week when Tropical
Storm Arlene formed off
the coast of Cuba. Arlene
developed in the north-west
Caribbean Sea last Thurs-
day and led to Cuba issuing
a tropical storm warning
for their western provinces
in Havana...


PMH confirmed last week that a patient on the dialysis
unit tested positive for the "super-bug" MRSA. The
patient is being kept in isolation for the next four weeks.
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)
is so named because of its resistance to methicillin, the
antibiotic commonly used to treat staph infections. The
bacteria lives on the skin, around the nose, mouth, geni-
tals and rectum. It can also survive on inanimate objects
such as lab coats, gloves and bedding. Staph is a common
bacteria found in hospitals and is fairly harmless in healthy
people. But it can cause a wide variety of suppurative dis-
eases and other complications when it gets into the blood-
stream...


'If Dr Smith stays, lock






the gate and call it a day'





[nd [i


Most sensible Bahami-
ans know how Dr
SRodney Smith
should react to the
furore over his pla-
giarism confession. He should clear his
desk, pack his briefcase and leave qui-
etly by the back door.
Having been caught committing the
-ultimate.academic felony -passing off
another person's work as his own he
knows there is only one honourable
course left open to him. Many people
at the Oakes Field campus sincerely
hope he will act accordingly.
It is disturbing, therefore, to hear
what faculty dissemblers have to say
about it. They believe Dr Smith's con4
fession needs to be considered "in the
context of Bahamian society" where,
they believe, high ethical standards are
neither upheld nor expected.
It is tragic but true that some people
charged with our children's education
actually believe the Bahamas is so
crooked, so corrupt, so lacking in any-
thing resembling an ethical framework
that Dr Smith's behaviour should be
regarded as just another manifestation
of this society's moral bankruptcy.
Two weeks ago, INSIGHT reported
on Rev C B Moss's contention that the'
Bahamas is on the brink of a crime
explosion. If Dr Smith's confession is
overlooked, then this society is also on
the verge of a moral implosion.
Because nothing, absolutely nothing,
will be considered beyond the pale,
according to his critics.
COB sources who believe the presi-
dent should do the decent thing say
the college finds itself at a watershed.
"We must treat it like a hurricane. We
need to sit down and consider how to
rebuild. We need to draw a line and
start again," said one lecturer.
Those who believe the college is now
at crisis point feel the departures
should not be restricted to Dr Smith.
They feel that college council chair-
man Franklyn Wilson and his col-
leagues should also upsticks and tiptoe
into oblivion.
"Let's have a clean sweep," said a
college source, "The place has so little
credibility, it needs to act properly this
time or risk being regarded simply as a
joke.
"Dr Smith knows that his plagiarism
would not be tolerated at Harvard. Yet
he evidently expects it to be tolerated
at COB. If we go along with this kind
of thinking, we are saying, in effect,
that the Bahamas is a fifth-rate society


How the College of the Bahamas handles the plagiarism

scandal involving Dr Rodney Smith will determine the

standards by which a new generation of Bahamians

will conduct their lives, INSIGHT examines the moral
dilemma now facig the couintrfs number one

educational institution...


Had he said "Yes, we have a real
problem here and we are addressing it
urgently", backing his words with
action, observers might have allowed
him some respect. As things stand, he
looks very much like the pilot with a
parachute who waves goodbye to his
passengers as he jumps out of the door.
The embarrassment of the Dr Smith
imbroglio is deepened by its back-
ground. His was no low-profile
appointment with modest expectations.
He was hired to replace the unfor-
tunate Dr Leon Higgs a well-meaning
man who found himself savagely
undermined by campus conspiracies -
and was billed as an expensive acade-
mic superstar with the ability and
dynamism to turn the ailing college
round.
This trumpeting of his virtues was
accompanied by a certain amount of
institutional pan-handling among Nas-
sau's prosperous leading businessmen.
INSIGHT was told that the college
sought money to make up the shortfall
between Dr Higgs' salary $60,000 a
year and the $120,000 demanded by
Dr Smith. What's more, businessmen
were asked to cover the rental on the
Eastern Road home where Dr Smith
would be living. The bill: $8,000 a
month, which is apparently substan-
tially less than the market value, thanks
to the generosity of property owner
Mr Ian Fair.
Worse still, they were implored to
stump up for student fees for Dr
Smith's children at St Andrew's School.
In total, Dr Smith's remuneration
package was estimated at well north
of $200,000 a year.
All this was to ensure the appoint-
ment of someone Mr Wilson described
as a "world class" academic with a Har-
vard degree to prove it.
Dr Smith's appointment went ahead

See SMITH, Page 3C


where anything goes and no-one is
accountable.
"Do we'really want COB to advance
towards university status with such a
shaky ethos in place'? Do we really'
want a new generation of Bahamian
students to believe that cheating is
okay, and that in the Bahamas the
fifth-rate is good enough?"
No-one, so far, has emerged from
this latest COB debacle with any cred-
it except the anonymous person who
blew the whistle in the first place.
Dr Smith apologised, certainly, but
he knows that saying sorry is not suffi-
cient in a situation where the moral
implications are .so far-reaching, say
those calling for his head.
Mr Wilson himself hardly covered
himself with glory when confronted
with the facts. All he could muster in


response to a reporter's perfectly rea-
sonable questions was an intemperate
rant in which nothing he said made
any sense at all.
He berated the reporter for men-
tioning his name in connection with
Dr Smith, as though he had absolutely
no part in the recruitment process and
no responsibility for anything going on
at the college.
The impression left was that he -
having espoused Dr Smith's claims to
the presidency so vociferously only a
year ago was now desperately looking
for an escape hatch.
Far from being the all-powerful,
much-feared college chairman every-
one says he is, he appeared to be
adopting the posture of a basically
good guy who. simply wanted to show
community spirit and lend a hand.


Plus More In-Store Specials Now Thru June 30th, 2005.)


The rmibunie]


COB faculty


describes

-Smith as-


'highly


capable


leader'
FACULTY at COB issued a
statement on Friday supporting Dr
Smith, describing him as "the legit-
imate and highly capable leader of
this institution."
Describing his performance in
his first year as "stellar", the state-
ment describes staff as "motivated
and excited" by the vision he has
brought to the college. (See Letters
on Page Four in Main section)
The statement bore 100 staff and
faculty signatures but was said by
some faculty members to be at
odds with their views. Others said
they were unaware of the petition
and were not asked to sign.
One said: "It tries to imply that
this was compiled as a result of a
unanimous vote among faculty.
That simply isn't the case. On the
contrary, it sounds like a classic
piece of orchestration."
The statement said Dr Smith had
earned the respect and confidence
of staff and faculty. "Anyone who
would care to look objectively at
the institution would see that
remarkable progress is being made
under Dr Smith's leadership, and
under the leadership of the college
council and its chairman, Mr
Franklyn Wilson.
"The growth and improvement
of the institution in the years to
come will attest to Dr Smith's inno-
vative and proactive approach to

See FACULTY, Page 3C


* DR RODNEY SMITH


I


- --- --








P 2 O 12T R


The ultimate


'crime'


in


the world of words



Plagiarism now major concern in academia


In the worlds of litera-
ture, journalism and
academia, there is no
greater crime than
passing off the work of
others as your own.
Among writers, it is the road
to perpetual ignominy. In jour-
nalism, it means instant dis-
missal. In academia, it is the
ultimate folly and the most
damning indictment.
Washington Post journalist
Janet Cooke had to hand back
her Pulitzer Prize when it
became known that she had
copied the work of others to
win the award.
A British author once suf-
fered the indignity of exposure
as a cheat when it became clear
she had lifted long passages
from other people's work in
writing a book about the aris-
tocracy.
Politicians have been
ridiculed in the past for repro-
ducing other people's thoughts
wholesale and using them to
make themselves look brighter
than they are.
And there have been numer-
ous occasions when academic
qualifications have been called
into question after students
have been exposed as cheats.
All the more surprising,
therefore,, that Dr Smith a
Harvard graduate with many
years of college experience -
should fall into such a yawn-
ing trap.
In his convocation speech to
college students last week, he
incorporated quite substantial
passages, without attribution,
from the work of a fellow aca-
demic.
Over several paragraphs, he
lift-, entire sentences from the
orinal and grafted'tfem into"
his-'wn speech, failing to men-
tion that he was quoting from
another source.
We have yet to hear a full
explanation from Dr Smith of
how this travesty came about,
so it is impossible to say
whether this was a careless
oversight or something more
serious.
But, whatever the cause,
there can be no doubt that his
professional reputation has
been seriously damaged by
exposure, and it's hard to see


how he can maintain any sem-
blance of credibility on cam-
pus, especially as intellectual
integrity has been a recurring
theme among faculty and stu-
dents for some years now.
Having seen both the origi-
nal material and Dr Smith's
speech, INSIGHT is left with
the impression that the presi-
dent was using another per-
son's ideas, and indeed his
unique way of expressing them,
with no attempt to make clear
their origins. In other words,
the ideas were being presented
as Dr Smith's own.
The implication is that he
was sufficiently impressed by
his fellow academic's thoughts,
and his way of expressing them,
to want them to be thought of
as his own.
On the face of it, then, his
plagiarism was blatant, but
there are grey areas in research
where the boundary lines
between one's own work and
that of others are not so clear-
ly defined.
The editor of the London
Guardian, Alan Rusbridger,
addressed this point some
weeks ago when he pointed out
that journalism, by its very
nature, was essentially a deriv-
ative pursuit.
Fault
What newspaper readers are
seeking is information, inter-
pretation and comment, not
entirely fresh creative thinking,
as they would expect from a
novelist, poet or playwright. In
fact, total originality in jour-
nalism can, in many instances,
be considered a fault rather
than a virtue.
In their everyday work, and
in formulating their own ideas
on anything, whether it's the
CSME or the Iraq War, jour-
nalists are constantly tapping
into the work of others to
achieve new perspectives.
There is nothing wrong with
this indeed, journalism would
be impossible to practise with-
out it but over-reliance on a
single source is where trouble
lies. Journalists and other writ-
ers must always be aware of
where to draw the line when
they are using the work of oth-


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ers to support their own theo-
ries.
There is an old saying in lit-
erature and journalism that
depending on one source is pla-
giarism but using several
sources is research.
This is a very simplistic way
of capturing the essential truth
of the matter. Most non-fiction,
whether in books or newspa-
pers, is actually an intellectual
mosaic or patchwork a coa-
lescence of information from
different sources, oral and writ-
ten, with an emphasis and pat-
tern of its own. The only excep-
tions are first-hand, eye-wit-
ness accounts and those occa-
sions when a topic is being
tackled for the first time.
Leaning too heavily on a sin-
gle source, incorporating huge
chunks of information which
the original writer probably
spent months compiling from
solid research, is something all
writers must avoid.
And lifting sentences and
paragraphs in their entirety,
with no attempt at re-writing
or re-fashioning, and with no-
attribution, is the ultimate sin
in the world of words.
The plagiarism issue is now
becoming a hot topic on col-
lege campuses everywhere,
mainly because modern tech-
nology has made: the act of
copying so simple. ,
Stressed-out students striv-
ing to hit essay deadlines have
been caught out repeatedly cut-
ting-and-pasting from websites.
In fact, Google has now
become probably the world's
number one research tool,
offering access to more than
eight billion websites with a
click of a mouse.
If you want to find out about
crocodiles in the Bahamas,
Google can provide answers in
two seconds flat. When
INSIGHT tried it, information
spouted forth about a now-
closed outdoor restaurant of
that name in less time than it
takes to shout "Conch salad,
please!" It wasn't entirely what
we expected, but the speed of
delivery could not be faulted.
However, such easy access
to the abundant fruits of inter-
national research has its pit-
falls. It can lead to complacen-
cy and laziness. The tempta-
tion among students who don't
recognise the seriousness of
plagiarism to download mater-
ial off the Internet is enormous.
But the computer wizards
who provided them with the
facility in the first place are
now on their trail. Plagiarism
detection programmes are
being used increasingly by col-
leges to sniff out the cheaters.
To define plagiarism in detail
is not easy. At its simplest, it is
the act of using other people's
ideas, language, writing or
information without citing the
source. In the academic world,
citing sources is considered a
crucial part of the writing
process. Trying to claim credit
for thoughts which aren't one's
own is the ultimate crime.
In the newspaper and book
publishing fields, plagiarism is
covered to some extent by


international copyright law.
Infringement can be costly -
and sometimes devastating,
especially if a book has to be
pulped following exposure.
What the law says, in
essence, is that ideas and infor-
mation in themselves cannot
be subject to copyright. It is
reproduction of the presenta-
tion, or format, which can be
held to be an infraction.

Passage
Hence, if you lift a passage
from a book or newspaper
without permission or attribu-
tion and, generally speaking,
permission is essential you
can be held liable for redress or
penalties.
If you glean information and
ideas from such sources, then
re-fashion the material in your
own style and mix it with mate-
rial from other sources, it is
unlikely to become a copyright
issue. In fact, most non-fiction
books rely heavily on previous
works in the field, and this is
invariably noted and acknowl-
edged by authors.
However, as suggested earli-
er, any writer leaning too heav-
ily on a single source, making


use of other people's hard work
to facilitate their own conve-
nience, can find themselves in
trouble.
In the Bahamas, intellectual
and creative property rights
have been considered low-pri-
ority in the past. But the ease
of electronic communication is
now forcing proper recognition
of their importance.
Downloading and reproduc-
ing for gain financial or oth-
erwise text and images which
others have worked hard to
create is, quite rightly, consid-
ered an act of gross dishonesty.
The personal, professional and
financial standing of offenders
can be severely undermined as
a result.
Some years ago, The Tribune
received several articles from
a freelance whose talents
seemed particularly impressive,
considering the person's com-
parative inexperience in jour-
nalism.
Luckily, this newspaper was
alerted to the contributor's dis-
honesty. The material was
being lifted, virtually
unchanged, from a prominent
American publication. This
could have had massive impli-
cations for all concerned.


I VOTED for Alfred Sears in the Fort Char-
lotte constituency in 2002 because I could not
support'Zhivargo Laing or the defunct FNM. If
I had to do it again, I'd still vote PLP but I
would have to beg God not to let Christie
appoint Sears Attorney General.
All lawyers are not, automatically, qualified
to become Attorney General. One must be
sensitive, and a hands-on administrator to make
the judicial department function effectively
and productively. Sears, regretfully, is neither
of these.
In fact, in my view, he is an unimaginative
dilettante sort of person. Always preening, but
displaying little, if any, vision or agenda. Our
courts are in a bad state of disrepair. Judges'
accommodations are disgraceful. Our schools
are in chaos and security is virtually non-exis-
tent.
Ideally, Sears might make a good Minister of
Transport or Agriculture, if Prime Minister
Christie feels obliged to give him a Cabinet
job. In my opinion, however, he is one of the
worst Attorney Generals we have had in years.
Only Tennyson Roscoe Gabriel Wells, in my
considered opinion, was worse.
Temperamentally, Sears is not suited for this
particular office. If he did cuss out a senior
staffer, he should be ashamed of himself, as a
so-called Christian and a learned professional.
The legacy of the new PLP is evolving and it
will turn out to be a wonderful one, if only we
were to fix the judicial system and its adminis-
tration. Sears has got to go.
There are too many pending cases and too-
often bail is not opposed by Crown counsel.
Bail in rape cases, where the complainant
knows her assailant? No. Bail where police or
government property is damaged? No. Bail in
domestic cases, despite court orders? No. As a
messenger, Sears cannot carry the message.
The solution? Get rid of him, post haste. To
God then, in all things, be the glory.
ORTLAND H. BODIE JR.
Former Member of The Bahamas Bar


*Whatever happens now to
Dr Smith, his predicament has
at least focused attention on
the seriousness of intellectual
property rights in the Bahamas.
A few years ago, the Central
Bank used a local photogra-
pher's image of Sir Lynden Pin-
dling on its new banknotes
without consultation or per-
mission. It was a serious breach
of copyright, but also a reflec-
tion of local ignorance towards
a subject which is now very
much in the international spot-
light.
Copyright
Plagiarism and copyright
issues and the intellectual and
creative rights of all those
engaged in journalism, litera-
ture, music, photography and
the visual arts can no longer
be treated lightly.
Those who transgress must
recognise that their personal
and professional integrity is at
stake, with enormous financial
penalties lying in wait for the
reckless, dishonest and unwary.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


******
INSIGHT'S article on the problems at the
Attorney General's Office was enlightening
and disturbing. It seems this department must
be functioning well below expected standards
if there is so much discontentment and infight-
ing.
I now hear from my own contacts that the
troubles there are far from over, and that there
are likely'to be more confrontations. No won-
der the lawyers have blood pressure problems.
GHB
INSIGHT note: Mr Sears has now claimed
the problems have been resolved.
******

Re: Mum's Howitzer by John Marquis, an
INSIGHT article about crime in the Bahamas.
For strong humorous effect, it is best for one
family member to read it out loud to the others,
as Joan did to me. It had me laughing out loud
time and time again, and the smile on my face
has persisted for 24 hours.
Ron Lightbourn
******

The wonderful item about Mom's Howitzer
in the Insight article on crime was a journalis-
tic gem. The article had a serious intention,
and a powerful message, but it's the image of
that fearsome lady's right hand that keeps
springing back to mind, causing me to smile
uncontrollably. Please keep producing writing
of this quality.
'Tribuneite', Sandyport
******

The story of Cay Sal and the 'battle' of 1956
was a piece of Bahamas history. Insight told it
with humour and panache. Thanks for another
marvellous read.
BHH, Freeport


Dr Rodney Smith's confession to plagiarism staggered
fellow academics at the College of the Bahamas and left a big
question-mark over his future as the institution's president.
INSIGHT looks at the whole issue of intellectual property
rights and the legal measures in place to protect them...


I.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005


FEEDBACK







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2005, PAGE 3C


D r Rodney
Smith's admis-
sion of plagia-
rism last w k
sparked '.'a
great debate over whether the
Harvard-trained president of
COB should resign.
Dr Smith publicly admitted
aid apologised for not attribut-
ing a portion of a speech that
he delivered during the Hon-
ours Convocation.
COB students are scheduled
to hold a rally in support of Dr
Smith on the front lawn of the
Oakes Field campus.
The FNM Action Group has
urged government to use the
summer months to find a suit-
able replacement to head the
college, which is currently
working to establish itself as a
university.
Senior lecturer Dr Felix
Bethel and Bishop Simeon Hall
have also called for Dr Smith's
resignation, among others. And
the college's union, UTEB, has
expressed concern over the sit-
uation.
Other lecturers, who feel that
the president is being unfairly
targeted, have come forward
in support of Dr Smith. A letter
supporting Dr Smith, and
endorsed by 100 members of
the college's faculty and staff, is
published in today's paper on
page 4.
Dr Smith, who apologized
for using a portion of a speech
originally delivered by the pres-
ident of New York University,
was not available for commirint
last week.
*****

THE jury hearing the dou-
ble murder trial of Henry Hugh
Smith was dismissed last week
due to a perceived problem
with one of the jurors.
The problem is said to be a
personal one, and involves a
woman juror.


The case is expected to
resume with a new jury,
although no date has been set.
Smith is accused of killing
his estranged wife, Terah
Smith, and her friend, Larry
Fernander.
*****

REINSTATED Registrar
General Elizabeth Thompson
is ready to take legal action
again if government fails to
resolve her employment situa-
tion expeditiously, she said last
week.
Having won her Supreme
Court case against the Gover-
nor General and the Judicial
and Legal Service Commission
(JLSC), Ms Thompson has not
yet been given back her office
or received the remuneration
due to her.
If these matters are not
resolved by Tuesday, Ms
Thompson intends to renew
her legal action against gov-
ernment, according to her
counsel Milton Evans.
Ms Thompson told The Tri-
bune that she tried to go back
to work on two separate occa-
sions last week but was told to
return home, as her office was
still being occupied by the act-
ing Registrar General Shane
Miller, who was appointed to
replace her when her services
were terminated in January.
*****

PMH confirmed last week
that a patient on the dialysis
unit tested positive for the
"super-bug" MRSA.
The patient is being kept in
isolation for the next four
weeks.
Methicillin-Resistant Staphy-
lococcus Aureus (MRSA) is so
named because of its resistance
to methicillin, the antibiotic
commonly used to treat staph
infections.


* PLAYERS and supporters of the Bahamas' rugby
team celebrate last week after defeating Bermuda
25-15 to advance from the Northern Caribbean
Rugby World Cup qualification tournament.


The bacteria lives on the
skin, around the nose, mouth,
genitals and rectum. It can also
survive on inanimate objects
such as lab coats, gloves and
bedding.
Staph is a common bacteria
found in hospitals and is fairly
harmless in healthy people. But
it can cause a wide variety of
suppurative diseases and other


complications when it gets into
the bloodstream.
Dr Perry Gomez said that
nurses and patients of the unit
had been tested and only one
person tested positive for staph.
He also noted that isolation
isn't necessary because staph
isn't carried in the air, it is
transmitted through touch. Dr
Gomez said that the simple act


of washing one's hands and Arlene formed off the coast of
equipment is all that needs to Cuba. Arlene developed in the
be done to get rid of the bacte- north-west Caribbean Sea last
ria. Thursday and led to Cuba issu-
ing a tropical storm warning
***** for their western provinces in
Havana.
THE region saw its first Forecasters predicted that
named weather system for the there was only a small chance
2005 hurricane season last that the storm would reach hur-
week when Tropical Storm ricane strength of 75mph.


Smith (From page 1C)
in the face of strong misgivings from the
FNM Action Group, who wanted more
research into the incoming president's back-
ground.
Mr Wilson gave assurances that thorough
research had preceded the job offer, a claim
doubted at the time and now dismissed as
utter fantasy by his critics in the light of
the latest developments.
In any event, the research evidently did
not include a long, hard talk with Dr Smith's
previous employers because two phone calls
by The Tribune established more about the
president's academic past than anything
previously disclosed by the COB council.
At Ramapo College, New Jersey, where
Dr Smith was president between 2001 and
2004, his resignation was not an occasion for
deep gloom and despondency. On the con-
trary, the college faculty had already
showed concern about his leadership qual-
ities, expressing disquiet about his style and
decision-making prowess.
Gail Brady, chairwoman of the college
trustees, sent a resolutionr,t the college
board declaring "a crisis presidential
leadership" hardly the ki'il of appraisal
that earns world-class status.
Instead of being the iconic leader pro-
claimed by Mr Wilson, Dr Smith was appar-
ently seen by Ramapo as a bit of a liability,
even though his salary stood at $195,000
per year.
All round, Ramapo's assessment matched
the feelings of many of those at COB who
have had a year to consider the president's
talents. "He's a very nice guy, but..." they


say. The "but" has now acquired new status.
Plagiarism was never seen as part of his
profile.
Where does COB go from here? Bishop
Simeon Hall, one of Nassau's leading
churchmen, has already weighed in with a
call.for.a, commission to probe deeply into
the college's current woes.
He said there is clearly "something amiss"
at COB, which some lecturers feel deserves
an award as the understatement of the year.
Bipartisan talks are now essential, he says,
to hammer out a new direction for the col-
lege.
Former education minister Dion Foulkes
has joined the cry for Dr Smith's head,
claiming his position is now untenable. And
senior academic Felix Bethel has predicted
that the president will not survive, what-
ever his supporters say.
In 1977, when COB was launched, its
objectives were laudable, and the early
years encouraging. However, since then its
fortunes have dwindled to a point where
some faculty members are seriously won-
dering whether it can carry on in its present
state.
The high-flown talk is still all about uni-
versity status, but this in itself seems to
indicate the unrealistic thinking behind Dr
Smith's appointment.
"At COB, looking good is all that
counts," said one lecturer. "Frankie Wil-
son was mesmerised by Dr Smith's Har-
vard credentials"...'
Last year, Dr Smith was seen as the man
who could lead COB to university level by


2007. However, Ramapo faculty felt he
lacked vision, with no clear sense of direc-
tion. It is extraordinary that no-one among
COB senior management was able to
uncover this discrepancy during, their
recruitment deliberations in 2004.
The big question now is whether any
accreditation body worthy of the name
would grant university status to an institu-
tion whose president has admitted pre-
senting a fellow academic's work as his own.
Informed academics think not. The many
fine lecturers at COB who have despaired at
administrative failings over the years believe
Dr Smith's departure is crucial if the college
is to maintain its credibility.
If he is allowed to stay, they say, COB
should forget becoming a university, lock
the gate and call it a day.
What do you think? Fax 328-2398 or e-
mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


Faculty, from ic
educational development."
The statement described the call for
Dr Smith's resignation as "an overreac-
tion" and said: "We are astonished by
some of the negative statements made in
the press." It concluded: "Though we
are disappointed by the mistake made by
Dr Smith, we stand behind him and we
support him as president." A rally of
support for Dr Smith is being organised
today in the college grounds.


"I used three sources from
the works of writers, whose
words are felt would be par-
ticularly beneficial to an
audience in the Bahamian
context. In the Convocation
remarks, I referenced the
names of the writers of two
of these sources but failed to
provide the name of the
third."
President of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, Dr
Rodney Smith apologises
for plagiarizing a portion of
a speech he delivered at the
college's Convocation cere-
monies.

"In his admitted plagia-
rism during his address at
the college's 2005 Convoca-
tion Dr (Rodney) Smith in
fact took the intellectual
property of another person,
and he did so while speaking
to the total COB student
body, with emphasis on hon-


esty. "
FNM Action Group on
Dr Rodney Smith's admis-
sion that he plagiarized a
portion of a speech he deliv-
ered at the College of the
Bahamas' convocation cer-
emonies. Dr Smith is the
president of COB.

"At the moment, I only
want to work again, be that
as Registrar General or in
the private field. Right now, I
only want to have the situa-
tion resolved, I want to know
if I can return to my post or
not. The government by not
resolving this matter effec-
tively stops me from working
altogether."
-- Former Registrar Gen-
eral Elizabeth Thompson on
trying to return to work
after a Supreme Court jus-
ttice ruled that she was dis-
missed unfairly from her
post earlier this year.


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Quotes of


the Week


I


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WEEK--IN REVIEW







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ISSUES & IDEAS


THE MIAMI HERALD


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