Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00119
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: May 26, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00119
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.152 THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005 PRICE 500


U


E


m


Other forms of

taxation possible


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE government is finding
.it increasingly challenging to
collect revenues equalling 20
per cent of the country's GDP,
which means that it may be
more difficult to ensure a strong
economy without resorting .to
other forms of taxation, Acting
Prime Miiigser Cynthia Pratt
said during the 2005/2006 bud-
get communication in the
House of Assembly yesterday.
Mrs Pratt, who became the
first woman in Bahamian his-
tory to read the budget com-
munication, said that the level
of government debt has risen
inexorably since the year 2000
as the result of expansion of
essential public services.
This expansion has resulted
in fiscal deficits which have so
far been met by borrowing, she
added.
In this year's budget the gov-
ernment is expected to spend


approximately $1.2 billion in
recurrent expenditure, an
increase of $39 million over the
previous year, and bring in
approximately $1.1 billion in
recurrent revenue, an increase
of $93 million over the previ-
ous year.
The acting prime minister
said that expert advice has indi-
cated that the Bahamas should
limit the ratio of government
debt to GDP to as near as pos-
sible to 30 per cent of GDP, so
as to uphold a strong economy.
"To bring the ratio of gov-
ernment debt to GDP to as
close as possible to 30 per cent,
revenues must consistently
attain the level of 20 per cent of
the GDP," she explained.
Mrs Pratt said that in recog-
nition of this, government in the
2005/6 budget aims to contain
the ratio of government debt to
GDP to under 38 per cent this
year and to about 30 per cent
SEE page ten


* THE PLP Cabinet walks to the House of Assembly yesterday
to present the Budget for 2005/2006
(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune Staff)


Re-Earth takes LNG petition to the House


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
RE-EARTH yesterday took to Rawson
Square to encourage Bahamians to sign
their national petition against a proposed
liquefied natural gas facility at Ocean Cay.,
A team of about a dozen supporters
wearing their "Say No to LNG" T-shirts
lined Rawson Square with placards listing
some of the groups' concerns about the
facility and its financial rewards for the


country. A banner even encouraged
motorists who couldn't stop to sign the
petition to honk their horns to show their
support of saying no to the LNG project.
Local environmentalist Sam Duncombe
said they are confident that Prime Minister
Perry Christie will not sign the proposal, as
they have received more than 1,000 sig-
natures already against the LNG site.
"The Prime Minster has said that they
will not endorse any project that would
have a negative impact on the country, so


we are confident that he will not approve
this. Yes we have to diversify our economy
but not at the expense of our environment.
"Yes every development is going to have
an impact, we understand that. But we
have to be responsible and leave some-
thing for our children. But if money is the
only thing that guides you, then fine," she
said.
However, the Minister of Trade and
SEE page eleven


* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas continues to violate
international law by repatriating Haitians
and Cubans before actually determining
if they are political refugees, said
Amnesty International.
In Amnesty's 2005 report released yes-
terday, the Bahamas was chided for
continuing to "forcibly return" illegal
SEE page eleven


Three persons held
over stabbing of MP
* By KRISTINA McNEIL
THREE persons were taken into custody yes-
terday morning in connection with the stabbing of
St Thomas More MP Frank Smith earlier this
month.
The three persons in custody are 21-year-old
and 24-year-old residents of Elizabeth Estates
and a 23-year-old resident of Bain Town.
Mr Smith was attacked shortly after returning
to his Eastern Road home around 9pm on May 12.
While robbery was not the motive of the
attack, Mr Smith did receive stab wounds
and some personal items were later found to be
missing


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Tiffany Smith-
Laroda, the 30-year-old mother of
four who was stabbed to death on
Tuesday, had sought police pro-
tection just hours before her death,
according to the victim's mother.
Alfrida Cooper-Rolle told The
Tribune that her daughter had
SEE page eleven


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1









PAGE2, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


Government 'to spend $39m




more' this fiscal year than last


^!Pin'AINDEX


Providenciales to Nassau
Flight # RU401 departs I 0:00am
Arrives in Nassau I I.:30am


* By CARA BRENNEN and
DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporters
GOVERNMENT is expected
to spend $39 million more in
the coming fiscal year than it
did in 2004/2005, it was
announced during the budget
debate.
Acting Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt told members of the
House of Assembly during her
budget communication that the
total recurrent expenditure for
2005/2006 will be $1.214 billion,
which is an increase of three per
cent over last year's budget.
The percentage, according
to Mrs Pratt, is $64 million more
than what government predict-
ed they would spend this year.
"Therefore recurrent expen-
diture shows a significant
increase in real terms, that is
well in excess of the rate of
inflation.
"The single major component
of the increase is the provision
of financial estimates for pay
increases for public servants and
related groups, arising from pre-
sent negotiations, as well as
some increase in benefits for
retired public servants," said
Mrs Pratt.
Another important increase
is for the improvement of insur-


Nassau to Providenciales
Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
Arrives in Providencialps '"2:0nm


ance arrangements for the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force,
Defence Force and the other
law enforcement officers.
The distribution of recurrent
expenditure is as follows:
Debt interest and redemp-
tion: $188 million, or over 15


FLIGHT SCHEDULE:
DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday


3-day advance purchase return tickets as low as TL
TAXES NOT INCLUDED
Call your local travel professional for reservations and ticketing





SThe way to fly in the TCI and beyond
4


per cent of total recurrent.
expenditure.
Education: $216 million -or
17.8 per cent
Health: $185 million or 15
per cent
Security Services: $146 mil-
lion or almost 12 per cent
The legal system: $25 mil-
lion or 2 per cent
Works and Utilities and the
Department of Works: Over
$23 million
Finance: $44 million, of
which $24 million is for pay set-
tlements for the public service,
and $2 million is for pension
adjustments for retired public
servants.
Customs: $23 million
Treasury: Over $8 million
Department of Statistics:
Over $3 million
Foreign Affairs and the
Public Service: Over $16 mil-
lion
Housing and National
Insurance: Almost $5 million,
which includes a new depart-
ment of Urban Renewal with a
budget of almost $2'million.
Trade and Industry: Almost
$4 million
Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments: Almost
$4 million
Also covered in this year's
budget are vital government
offices, including the Office of
the Prime Minister, Deputy
Prime Minister, and Governor
General.
Mrs Pratt said there will be
an increase of $165 million in
capital expenditure, the major
components of which are:
An allocation of almost $56
million to the Ministry of
Works.
An allocation of $19 mil-
lion to the Ministry of Educa-
tion.
The Royal Bahamas Police
Force will receive $7 million; an
increase of nearly 60 per cent
over last year's allocation.
The Royal Bahamas
Defence Force will receive
almost $5 million.
The Department of Local
Government will receive $2.3
million; over 20 per cent more
than in 2004/2005.


ive Your Fami


The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture receives 3.5
million; an increase of over 60
per cent.
Mrs Pratt said it is reasonable
to expect that government will
bring in $93 million more in the.
coming fiscal year than in the,
previous one.














WENDY Craigg will
become the first woman to
assume position of gov-
ernor of the Central Bank
of the Bahamas, Acting
Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt announced while pre-
senting the budget commu-
nication on Wednesday.
Mrs Craigg, who is cur-
assentume tyhe deputy gover-
nor, succeeds Julia nk
Frances who is retiring to
become chairman of the
Grand Bahama Port
Authority.
The new governor has a
record of distinguished ser-
vice at the Central Bank
said Mrs Pratt, adding that
she isysure all government
officials wish Mrs Craigg
well in her new role.
Mrs Pratt, who also
the first woman to make a
budget communication to
parliament due to the ill-
ness of Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie, used the
opportunity to express the
nations appreciation to Mr
Francis.
"Mr Francis was closely
involved in the develop-
ment of the Central Bank's
regulatory functions. I am
sure that I am reflecting
the views of all members of
this honourable Housed the
when I express our deep
appreciation to Mr Francis
for his work.
"I sure that I amreflecan add
thate vitakes with him our
sincerest wishes that he
will have a similar out-
standing record of achieve-
ment at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
which is one of the most
important entrepreneurial
enterprises in the Bahami-
an economy," Mrs Pratt
said.
She also announced that
the government is estab-
lishing a committee repre-
senting all financial regula-
tory institutions including
the Ministry of Finance,
the Central Bank, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance, the
Securities Commission,
andthe Registrar General,
to consider options for
consolidating these agen-
cies.
Mrs Pratt said former
minister of finance Sir
William Allen, has agreed
to participate in the work
of the committee.

TOICALI

EXERIATR


-


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE ..















* Smaller duty payments for generators




andt mntna ITPerela ciftr anninmnint


By KRISTINA
McNEIL

POLICE have issued a
public advisory in the
wake of an armed rob-
'bery and shooting by
three men impersonating
-police officers.
The incident, which
took place on Monday
shortly after 2am on
Davis Street in the Fox
Hill area, is the second
case of police imperson-
ation to be made public
in as many days.
Police report that a 37-
year-old Davis Street
man was asleep at home
with his fiancee and oth-
er relatives when they
were awoken by a loud
banging at the door.

Door
S'his
-,~':and et by,

police officers who then .
forced their way inside.
One of them had a
('handgun, another had a
shotgun and the third
'-had a wrench.
>i -After taking a large
,.s'tum of money, the three
,men struggled with the
resident and two shots
went off from the hand-
iijrig one of the
.' iu.its iin his chest.
-be meV then fled on ,
opotfanid police say they
A"reb now e0 ollowing signifi-
ica~itleads.
wviry, officer who per-
intorns duty out of uni-
form carries a warrant
Card, Inspector Evans
.told The Tribune yester-
day.
Identity
The warrant card gives
the identity of the offi-
cer, along with the offi-
cer's .rank, badge number
and photo..
This is the official iden-
tification card of the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force and is signed by
both the officer and
Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson.
If approached by some-
one who claims to be an
officer, but cannot pro-
duce a warrant card
members of the public
should call 919 right
away and keep the indi-
vidual off of their prop-
erty.
Two Haitian men were
charged with impersonat-
ing a police officer in a
Nassau Street court
Tuesday.
The men had Yeported-
ly been stopping
motorists and knocking
on doors in the Winton
area.


E1I9199IIU UUI ICd JYUL~C U YAUIj)III UL


Hurricanes Jeanne and Francis,
Mrs Pratt announced that the
rate of duty on generators has
been reduced to ten per cent
from 35 per cent.

Safety
The 35 per cent custom duty
on safety head gear for persons
who ride motorcycles and scoot-
ers has been totally eliminated
and the government has also
eliminated the 35 per cent cus-
toms duty on visual teaching
aids.
Customs duty on certain
paper used by commercial print-
ers is being reduced from 35 per
cent to 15 per cent.


Mrs Pratt also announced that
a variety of air navigational fees
and related charges in the fami-
ly islands will be increased and a
passenger facility fee at
major airports will be imple-
mented.
The measures are intended
to pursue the improvement of
all national airports to raise
them to the highest standards
required, she said.

Innovations
Mrs Pratt also announced that
this year's budget featured new
innovations designed to show
revenue projection more accu-
rately.


For the first time, up to date
national accounts data from the
Department of Statistics is avail-
able.
Mrs Pratt said this is a major
advance over previous years,
where only provisional data was
available.


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
NO NEW taxes were intro-
duced in the 2005/2006 budget,
which featured a number of new
Customs duty concessions.
Generators and motorcycle
safety equipment are among a
list of items that will be that will
incur smaller duty payments or
be totally exempted in the
future.
Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt presented the budget
communication in the House of
Assembly yesterday.
Bearing in mind the discom-
fort thousands of Bahamians
endured in the aftermath of


Ministry funding in anticipation of pay increases


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE Ministry of Finance has
provided some funding in antici-
pation of pay increases for public
servants and related groups, Act-
ing Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
told the House of Assembly yes-
terday.
Mrs Pratt made the statement
while delivering the budget com-
munication.
Due to the fiscal situation, she
said it is crucial that any pay
increase must take into consider-
ation the ability of the Treasury to
meet the increases without addi-
tional taxation.
The acting prime minister said
that there is clearly a heightened
concentration on the importance
of training by the Bahamian pub-
lic and Public Service for the
eventual transition to a.value
added tax (VAT) and for the
implementation of the National
Information and Communications
Framework.
She said this heightened con-
centration on training forms an






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important element of public ser-
vice reform.
To ensure that the framework
is implemented resulting in "e-
government" and that revenues,
including VAT, are properly col-
lected and accounted for means
that government must have a
highly disciplined motivated and
trained workforce in the public
sector, said Mrs Pratt.
"Every member of the public
service will be encouraged to par-
ticipate and there will be no
redundancies and cutting back on
the public service. Public service
reform does not involve such.
measures but aims to increase
productivity and improve the
quality of service to the public,".
she said.
Mrs Pratt said a climate of
"harmonious industrial relations


in the public sector is important to
the government and the nation.
The government is presently
reviewing its responses to the pro-
posals on labour issues by the
public sector unions and staff
associations."
The government is also inter-
ested in requests from some of
the staff associations and public
sector representatives to exam-
ine the issue of "leap-frogging",
whereby a pay increase granted to
one group and not to another
results in anomalies which cause
dislocations in the service.
"The idea is to further study
these issues with a view to estab-
lishing transparent principals so
that increased demands by one
group will not be met without
regard to the principles applied
to another group," said Mrs Pratt.


For many years, the Ministry
of Finance had to rely either on
projections from the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF), or
on the various methods to pro-
ject the movement of the nation-
al accounts on the basis of indi-
cators.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 3


Iufi I Wr'Il _










PAGE4,THURSDAYMAY26IT2005TT0ST THEETRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.I LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama:] (242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


The spider and the fly and CSME!


"WILL you walk into my parlour? said the
spider to a fly,
'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you
did spy".
The spider and the fly story came to mind
when we read in yesterday's Tribune the com-
ments of Steven MacAndrew, a Barbados-
based specialist in the movement of skills and
labour under the CSME, and how badly
CARICOM members want the Bahamas to
be a part of the new trading block.
"The Bahamas is one of CARICOM's most
valued members, even though we understand
that the Bahamas does not want to fully par-
ticipate in CSME," he said. "At the moment
CARICOM will take the Bahamas on any
terms, in any which manner the Bahamas
chooses."
Like the spider the CSME parlour is going
to be made to look so enticing, that the
Bahamas, if it is like the foolish fly, will get
caught in a web from which it will never be able
to extricate itself. Just remember that the little
fly once in the parlour, never came out again -
he made an exotic supper for the spider.
And that is just what will happen to the
Bahamas. When people want you, promises
flow to clench the deal, but once the deal is con-
summated, bingo! That's it!
The Caribbean Single Market and Economy
(CSME) is a trading block. The Bahamas wants
to sit around the table as a full member, but
does not want to take on any of the burdens
that are the very essence of CSME. If it cannot
participate fully then what is the advantage of
membership? Just to belong to CARICOM? If
that is all the fuss is about, then we must ask,
how important is CARICOM? In the opinion
of many the Bahamas has very little in common
even to the fact of geographic location -
with CARICOM.
In her Budget Communication today in her
capacity as acting finance minister, Acting
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt said that gov-
ernment had "no intention of committing to
any international or regional grouping which
could or would be damaging to the interests of
the Bahamas."
She said that the Bahamas has "derogations
from any aspects of the CSME which would be
contrary to our interests. The primary advan-
tage of the CSME to The Bahamas is the
avoidance of isolation in international and
regional discussions on economic issues."
We agree that the Bahamas does not want
to be sidelined when it comes to international
and regional discussions, but CSME is not
needed for the Bahamas to participate in inter-


national affairs. The important trading block
that will bring the desired international par-
ticipation and which has a great deal of influ-
ence and to which every member of CARI-
COM belongs is WHO. At present the
Bahamas is an observer, working towards
membership. However, this will take some
time to qualify for membership as the Bahamas
will have to reduce its import duties and devise
a new tax regime to replace them not
income tax, but probably Value Added Tax
(VAT). This will be a slow process as the Act-
ing Finance Minister told the House in her
Budget address. However, WTO is what the
Bahamas should concentrate on. Its member-
ship comes without all of the hidden pitfalls of
CSME and gives this country its desired inter-
national participation.
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell, who
seems determined to get the Bahamas into
CSME "with reservations", sounds like the
enthusiastic Randol Fawkes of yesteryear who
desperately tried to rope this country into a
West Indies Federation that lasted only four
years.
Mr Mitchell has assured Bahamians that
the Bahamas can sign on to CSME with certain
reservations: non-participation in the free flow
of labour, the single currency and the Court of
Appeal. In other words the Bahamas would
belong, but it wouldn't belong, which doesn't
make much sense.
Mr Mitchell would have us believe that as
long as the Bahamas signs on to the revised
treaty it will be safe it will not have to grant
access to its local markets and accept nationals
from member countries as if they were
Bahamian.
But along comes Mr MacAndrew and opens
another Pandora's Box these "reservations",
he said, have a five year limit. At the end of five
years, if the Bahamas wants to continue mem-
bership "with reservations", it will have to
app! for a waiver. Approval is not automatic.
It has to be voted on by CSME members. If, as
Mr MacAndrew says, members will do any-
thing to get the Bahamas in, it is not too far to
speculate that once in, they will do anything not
to let it out. Remember, the Bahamas, one of
the smallest, but the wealthiest of the bloc,
has only one vote against 13. And if the 13
vote a resounding "No", then that's one little
fly that will be sorry it every heard of CSME
and its "prettiest little parlour."

Read page 4 of tomorrow's Tribune for an
interesting letter from the Nassau Institute on
subject of CSME.


A CSME






scorecard


EDITOR, The Tribune.

A BRIEF statistical
analysis of the CSME treaty
participants provides a
comparative insight regard-
ing Bahamian membership
in the proposed regional
federation. What is high-
lighted by this analysis is
that given the proposed
CSME group, the Bahamas
stands apart in several sig-
nificant areas. Regional
Score 6,443,802 27.15 5.74
7,521

POTENTIAL MEMBERS POPULATION


Antigua & Barbuda
The Bahamas
Barbados
Belize
Dominica
Grenada
Guyana
Jamaica
Montserrat
St. Kitts & Nevis
Saint Lucia
St. Vincent
Suriname
Trinidad & Tobago
Regional Score


68,722
301,790
279,254
279,457
69,029
89,502
765,283
2,731,832
9,341
38,958
166,312
117,534
438,144
1,088,644
6,443,802


The Bahamas 4.68 per
cent; 101.47 per cent; 37.97
per cent; 235.33 per cent.

Ref: Figures sourced from
the CIA World Fact Book
website

Of the 14 members, The
Bahamas represents only
4.68 per cent of the group's
total population which is a
statistically insignificant
proportion.
The populations of the
four largest members
include 5,023,903 citizens,
or 78 per cent of the total
proposed CSME's popula-
tion. Even if voting as a
block, the ten smallest
members including The
Bahamas comprise only
22.1 per cent of the popula-
tion, which is less than a
quarter of the CSME's pop-
ulation. Not enough to
swing a majority vote.
Thus 10 of the 14 states
are subject to the mercy of
the four largest.
The four largest States
are also significantly poor-
er, with an average income
of $5,675 per capita, less
than one-third of the eco-
nomic productivity attained
by Bahamians. Excluding
20 per cent of this group,
which represents the oil and
gas driven economy of


Trinidad and Tobago, the
remaining 80 per cent of the
"group of four's" popula-
tion has an average annual
per capita GDP of only
$4,066: less than one-quar-
ter the annual productivity
of The Bahamas.
It is obvious that eco-
nomically, The Bahamas


MEDIAN
AGE
29.67
27.55
34.15
19.35
29.59
21.26
26.91
27.25
28.56
27.60
24.81
26.36
26.13
30.91
27.15


EMIGRATION
PER 1000
6.11
2.18
0.31
0.00
11.60
13.25
7.51
4.07
0.00
5.90
2.19
7.61
8.78
10.87
5.74


GDP PER
CAPfITA
11,000
17,700
16,400
6,500
5,500
5,000
3,800
4,100
3,400
8,800
5,400
2,900
4,300
10,500
7,521


enjoys a much higher stan-
dard of living compared
with all other CSME mem-
bers, save Barbados.
Statistically, the Bahami-
an GDP is 235 per cent.
higher than the group's
average a tremendous dif-
ference.
The emigration rate for
the region is on average sig-
nificantly higher than that
experienced by The
Bahamas: averaged on a
14-member basis, Bahami-
ans emigrate at 37 pr cent
of the regional emigration
average. This points to a
much more stable and sat-
isfied population than
found regionally. In fact, 10
members ,had higher rates
of emigration, and two
more have rates that were
unmeasured.


Besides the economic
and population differences,
there is an important geo-
graphical distinction. The
Bahamas is physically
removed from the entire
CSME, with seven nation-
al territories in between,
including significant land-
masses with very large pop-
ulations when compared
with The Bahamas.
Between The Bahamas
and the rest of the CSME
are Cuba, Haiti, the
Dominican Republic, and
territories of the United
States, United Kingdom,
France and the Nether-
lands. Kingston is more
than 400 miles from Nas-
sau, and the CSME's cen-
tre of mass lies some one
thousand miles to the
southeast in the Antilles.
From a perspective of phys-
ical access, The Bahamas is
actually isolated from its
other CSME relations. The
natural routes of trade and
migration pass through
countries that are not only
much larger, but actually
have more direct impact
upon the daily life, national
concerns and policies of
The Bahamas. Historically,
The Bahamas' ties are with
its immediate neighbours.
In summary, The
Bahamas contrasts as vastly
wealthier and significantly
smaller as compared with
the CSME's proposed
membership. The statistics
show that The Bahamas is a
blessed nation. The bene-
fits of joining can only
dilute Bahamian's many
wonderful national accom-
plishments. As such, The
Bahamas shouldn't sacrifice
or jeopardize its precious -
and regionally unique -
standing as a successful and
sovereign nation.

THE NASSAU
INSTITUTE
Nassau,
May 24, 2005.


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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
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you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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--- ---- --- -- -------- --------- ,......-......--.-..~.............


L-


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA TRBNNTUSAYEAW6,208,PS


BEC 'sixth


C


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
BEC is the sixth cheapest out of elec-
tricity companies in 32 Caribbean coun-
tries.
Assistant general manager for energy
supply at BEC, DeCosta Bethel made
this announcement at the Caribbean
Electric Utilities Services (CARILEC)
CEO symposium's technical tour of
Clifton Pier Power Station yesterday
afternoon.
Mr Bethel told delegates that no mat-
ter how small or uneconomic any one of
the power systems that are spread over
the 15 islands and cays may be, the price
for power throughout the Bahamas is
the same.
"It does not matter whether you live
here on New Providence or on one of
our smaller cays, the price for power is
the same."
Individuals from the electricity indus-
try in the Caribbean put on their hard
caps and earplugs, before viewing the
infrastructure which provides the capital
with electricity.
In viewing the facility, the delegates
were showed the plants control room.


Technical trainer for all of the power
stations in the Bahamas Edward Virgil
said that the room is the "nerve centre"
of the station.
When one enters the room, it is almost
as if looking at the cockpit of an air-
craft. Mr Virgil explained that each sta-
tion within the control room monitors a
particular engine, and tells the engine's
speed, temperature and how long it has
been running.
Also, observed were power stations
B and C, which contain powerful diesel
engines that supply the bulk of electric-
ity for New Providence.
The CARILEC CEO symposium
ended yesterday and was held under the
theme "Business Continuity: An Imper-
ative for Caribbean Electric Utilities."
Issues pertaining to disaster manage-
ment, benchmarking, regulations and
insurance for infrastructure were dis-
cussed during the meetings.
"We looked at the issue of bench-
marking, whereby we compared our per-
formance to other utilities of the same
size and character, therefore we would
be able to look at best practices and
raising the bar in what we do, said BEC
general manager Kevin Basden.


School a 'health hazard'


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
SANDILANDS Primary
School became "a health haz-
ard", according to parents and
teachers who claim that there
was no running water at the
school for three days.
One school parent yester-
day claimed that the stench at
the Fox Hill campus was
"unbearable," and that the
health of students was being
threatened.
The mother said she could
not remain silent, because her
children -- aged five and 10 -
can no longer function under
such conditions.
"The stench is horrible, and


you have students defecating
and urinating and it is all piling
up there, not to mention there
is no water to wash their hands
after they relieve themselves."
Education permanent sec-
retary Creswell Sturrup told
The Tribune confirmed that
the water had in fact been dis-
connected.
But he added that the prob-
lem was only reported late
Tuesday, and said it was
"unlikely that the water was
disconnected for three days".
Mr Sturrup said that stu-
dents had not been evacuated
because of GLAT exams.
The water problem result-
ed from a faulty pump, which
has now been replaced.


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Action needed to save reefs


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
ACTION must to be taken
to preserve the coral reefs,
beaches and fisheries, which are
essential for the Bahamas'
tourism industry, a renowned
marine biologist has said.
Dr Brian Lapointe, senior sci-
entist with the Harbour Branch
Oceanographic institution, said
the Bahamas take advantage of
available science to learn from'
the mistakes made in' plAes like.
the Florida Keys and Jamaica.
He explained that before sci-
entists understood the impor-
tance of water quality to the
sustainability of coral reefs,
coastal areas such as Key West


lost of more than 90 per cent of
their coral reefs.
In heavily developed areas,
sewage and agricultural run-off
caused an increase of nutrients
like nitrogen and phosphorus
in coastal waters, resulting in
increased algae growth and the
coral reefs dying due to lack of
oxygen andisunlight.
He said: "Once the reef dies
you no longer have any protec-
tion for the beach from the
waves, and 'because organisms
that produce sand only live on
healthy coral reefs, there is no
more sand production."
"In Jamaica we now have
hotels falling into the sea
because of this it is a very seri-
ous issue," he added.


BNU becomes official

negotiator for nurses


* By KRISTINA McNEIL
THE Bahamas Nurses Union
yesterday became the official
bargaining agent for nurses
after signing a recognition
agreement with the Ministry of
Health.
Minister of Health Dr Marcus
Bethel said: "It became a per-
sonal commitment of mine to
ensure that the working condi-
tions of nurses were brought to
optimal level. "
Cleola Hamilton, president
of the Bahamas Nurses Union,
highlighted the progress that
has been made in terms of the
socio-economic status of nurses.
She said nurses now have bet-
ter employment benefits,
enhanced human resource
development and a greater
degree of social justice as a
result of the agreement.
Members of the union,
including those in the Depart-
ment of Public Health, the Pub-
lic Hospitals Authority and


those who work as private duty
nurses, will all enjoy the bene-
fits, she said.
"No one truly understands
the intricacies of nursing like
the nurse, therefore our pref-
erence of representation will
always be a nurse," said Mrs
Hamilton.
A similar agreement between
the BNU and the Public Hospi-
tals Authority signed in August,
2004 had "laid a foundation"
for yesterday's agreement, she
said.
The agreement was signed by
Mrs Hamilton, Elma Garraway,
permanent secretary of the
Ministry of Health and Julia
Knowles, secretary general of
the BNU.
FO N AN EVC

Uetiizr"".gcie


Dr Lapointe has been
researching coral reef ecology
for the past 30 years and devel-
oped the theory that increased
nutrients eventually lead to the
collapse of the reefs decades
ago, without ever receiving val-
idation from the international
scientific community.
"Then finally when the Mil-
lennium report (Millennium
Exosystem Assessment report)
came out, we had the consensus
of 1300 scientists on our theory
that when an excess nutrients
are introduced, a threshold is
reached at which point coral
reef eco-systems collapse."
He said: "What saves the
Bahamas right now is that the
phosphorous levels are still low,



THURSDAY
MAY 26
6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 Spiritual Impact
2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 Bishop Leroy Emanuel
3:30 Gilbert Patterson
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News (Update Live)
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Legends From Whence
We Came: St. Anne's
6:30 News Night 13
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8:00 Native Stew Special
8:30 Da' Down Home Show
9:30 The Darold Miller Show
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Pg,/1540
NOE ZN- 3 -eere
th.rgh.t. mkelat int


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otherwise we would have
reached that 'tipping point'.
Dr Lapointe said that he
would like to see a ban on phos-
phorous detergents, which are
commonly used in automatic
dishwashers.
He added that the advanced
waste treatment should be put
in place for all developments
and private homes.
"The Bahamas shouldn't be
using septic tanks and soak-
aways, those don't work very
well in these settings. The lime-
stone that is found throughout
the islands is very porous and
nitrogen and phosphorous can
migrate through it into the
ground waters and run into the
coastal waters," he said.


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StUm


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 20058, PAG: 5


WE'VE GOTPf~









PAGE 6, THURSAYMAY26,2005TLOCAL NEWSHETRIB


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College not



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by Ministry


* By KARAN MINNIS
EDUCATION chiefs say
that qualifications offered by a
new private college will not be
recognised by the Bahamian
government.
Ministry of Education offi-
cials say that Excelsior College,
which is due to begin teaching
courses in September, has not
applied to become an recog-
nised institution in the Bahamas
- and that as such any certifi-
cates it offers will be useless as
official qualifications.
At a press conference on
Tuesday the chairman of the
college, Osbourne Stuart,
explained that the Excelsior's
focus would be to expose stu-
dents "not only to academic
training but also to skills and
motivational training".
He said: "Higher education
has gotten more important
because of the job market.
Everyone wants a person who is
educated and skilled."
The college, currently based
in "temporary" accommodation
at Adler Realty and Investment
Company on Arundel Street,


has yet to set any fees for cours-
es even though registration is
scheduled to begin on June 2,
just one week away.
The college plans to offer
classes in areas such as business,
social science, computers, real
estate management and mass
media studies.
But Mr Stuart said that there
would be no teachers at the col-
lege. Instead, training would be
given by "part-time lecturers
from the workforce".
Dr Clayde Phillips, president
of Excelsior College, said: "We
feel as though experience is the
key to the best teachers. If a
teacher has already been in the
working world, we are confident
that he/she can train others."
Orline Rodgers, a senior offi-
cer at the Ministry of Educa-
tion, said that this was allowed.
"Part-time lectures can be
from the workforce as long as
they have been trained in the
area in which they are teach-
ing," she said.
The Tribune tried to contact
Mr Stuart several times yester-
day about the validity of Excel-
sior's qualifications, but he had
not responded at the time of
going to press.
Classes at Excelsior are
scheduled to begin on Septem-
ber 12.


Four in

court for

school

arson

* By NATARIO McKENZIE
FOUR juveniles accused of
setting fire to CC Sweeting
High School appeared in mag-
istrate's court yesterday.
Two 16-year-olds, one a Hait-
ian, along with a 17 and 13-year-
old appeared before Magistrate
Roger Gomez at Juvenile Court
to face charges of arson and
breaking and entering.
The four young men are
charged with breaking and
entering into the administrative
complex building of the school
on Moss Road and setting it on
fire. 6
The alarm was raised after
police discovered the fire in the
principal's office on the after-
noon of May 15.
The 13-year-old juvenile was
-granted $4,000 bail with one
surety.
The other three defendants
were remanded into police cus-
tody until today, when they will
return to court.
A preliminary inquiry date
has.been set for August 3.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005






i rl I HIBUNE


LOCALN1EWS


Pastor Cedric Moss


hits


out over erotic nightclub


* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
PASTOR Cedric Moss,
senior pastor at Kingdom Life
World Outreach, has voiced
his displeasure and utter
bewilderment at the existence
of an erotic nightclub on East
Bay Street.
Yesterday, The Tribune
published an article revealing
the existence and workings of
the Butterfly Club, a new
erotic club featuring Russian
hostesses.
Letter
Mr Moss said that he has
sent a letter to the Ministry
of Trade and Industry and a
copy to the commissioner of
police and the department of
Immigration, asking them to
investigate the establishment.
"I was very dismayed and


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


concerned when I read the
description of the -reporters
experiences in there.
"Our country is founded on
Christian principals and stand-
ings. My thinking of it is that
the Ministry of Trade and
Industry did not licence,
knowingly, a strip dancing
place.
"So I wrote to the minister
asking for clarification on it,"
he said.
Mr Moss said nightclubs
that feature "erotic dances"
bring with them social ills and
other vices.
"It is very unusual that that
club would have been open


now for some two weeks. Why
wasn't that a place that was
raided with the others this
week?
Girls
Is it because these girls are
white, and Russian that they
are not raided?
"It is graphic live reality
pornography. If they are
doing life dancing in my opin-
ion that is one or two shades
away from prostitution.
"Anyone who believes that
that is all they do was not
born just yesterday; they were
born last night," he said.


* WORKERS' PARTY MEETING
CRIME, and specifically the attack on MP Frank Smith,
will be on the agenda at a Workers' Party meeting tonight.
Members will also discuss the CSME treaty when they
meet at Harry's Restaurant, Arawak Cay, at 8pm.

E BIMINI BAY PROJECT MEETING
DEVELOPER Gerard Capo and four Cabinet ministers
are expected to attend a town meeting in Bimini tonight to
discuss the controversial Bimini Bay project.
The meeting at the Bimini All-Age School starts at 7.30pm.
A large turnout is expected.




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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


TM FOR A NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEBATE AND PLAN?


The Great Guana Cay Debate underscores the urgent
need for our nation to engage in a debate about what
is our vision for the future of The Bahamas.

It is urgent because we all recognise that sustained
development is necessary to provide employment
opportunities for the current labour force and for the
thousands of young Bahamians entering the job market
every year.

It is urgent because The Bahamas needs constant local
and foreign investment to maintain economic growth
and opportunities.

And it is urgent, because for everyday that we do not
have a plan, or vision for our future, one more little
piece of our culture, our heritage, our environment and
our marine and land resources is irreplaceably lost and
disappears into the hands of foreign and Bahamian
developers, whose only legitimate business goal is to
get in, make money and leave to go on to the next
project.

A turning point?

Great Guiana Cay is is a turning point in the affairs of
qr nation. It is ,a crucial time, calling for politically
mature national debate and cultural introspection.

Does The Bahamas want development at any and all
cost? Are we ready to accept; are we willing and even
encouraging the complete wipe out of what is left of
the Old Bahamas in the Family Islands?

The question really is; at what price is our nation for
sale?

Do we really want everywhere in The Bahamas to
become an Atlantis? So that when tourists come to The
Bahamas, they can buy postcards of what it used to be
like in the Family Islands.

Those of us, who remember Nassau up to the 1960s,
can reminisce fondly about what a quaint little place it
was. Hence, the passion felt in New Providence to Save
Clifton Cay!

To save for New Providence, just one little remnant of
some clean and pristine land and marine environment,
some vestige of our past, our culture and history.

This is our Wake up call Bahamas!

Great Guana Cay is a wake up call for the entire Bahamas.
Save The Bahamas!
The fight to Save Great Guana Cay is in truth a fight to

It is time for our politicians to become serious about
The Bahamas. It is time for Bahamians to become serious
as well. It is not every piece of land, every little island,
every cay that a foreign or Bahamian developer decides
he can make a quick buck turning over that should be
available for exploitation.

Great Guana Cay is a remnant of the "Old Bahamas" in
the Family Islands. It is where Bahamians and foreign
visitors go to escape the hustle and bustle of city life.
It is every tourist's dream "Get Away". In The Abaco's
they call it "Gods Country".

There is full employment on the Cay. It is small,
manageable, its' marine and land environments are
pristine.

Why would the government want to destroy it? What
does the Bahamas gain? What part of our heritage is
preserved? What part of our culture is celebrated?


The Passerine Heads of Agreement for
Great Guana Cay
$500 Million?
$500 Million is and sounds like a lot of money. It is a
vast sum. But, in truth, who is going to make the $500
Million? Certainly not Bahamians; certainly not the
economy of Great Guana Cay; certainly not the Abacos;
and certainly not Bahamian Real Estate Agents.

I. The Discovery Developers from California will,
tightly control and sell each and every piece of their
exclusive development. The Heads of Agreement makes!
no provision for the Developers to use Bahamian Real
Estate Agents and Brokers.

Wake up Bahamas Real Estate Agents Association! r
Wake up Bahamas!

2. American brokers, American lawyers, American
building supply companies, American construction
workers, and American construction project
management companies will make hundreds of millions
of dollars. While Bahamians get to sell their handicrafts,
pick up towels at the pool and be maids and servants
in the exclusive 75 room hotel:

Does The Bahamas get anything else?
Do we deserve better Bahamas?

No Taxes?
The Heads of Agreement gives Real Property Tax
exemptions and 'All concessions available" under the
Hotels Encouragement Act.

It exempts the developers from Stamp duties & Customs
duties.

Our Treasury gets NO taxes from a
$500 Million dollar development.

Free Sand
The Developers even get to extract and dredge whatever
sand they need, and get this "Without Charge"'!!!!!!

Quick Approvals
The Heads of Agreement also says that the Government
will "expedite the approval and permitting ...of sale of
lots....to non-Bahamians" under The International
Persons Landholding Act.

And last, but not least, the Government says it will
"facilitate on an accelerated basis all necessary approvals,
permits, agreements, licences and concessions" required.
by the Developers. ,

Guaranteed Approvals
Not only that, but even if a customs officer or any other
Government agency has the temerity to try to do its
job in so far as the Developer may need, for instance,
some approval or permit under lawfully enacted
legislation (i.e. where the official is just doing its job);
the Government agrees that it will "take appropriate
action to expedite the issuance of such delayed
permissions or approvals"!

Even If Illegal
Even more astoundingly, if a court declares any part of
the Heads of Agreement "void, avoidable, illegal, or
otherwise unenforceable" the Government will amend
the Heads of Agreement to still achieve the "intention
of the parties".
Thus, our Government has promised to the developer,
that even if the Heads of Agreement is unlawful, it will
still find a way to go through with the agreement and
provide the Developer with all the concessions it agreed
to give to it!!!

Do Bahamians Get The Same Treatment?
Do Bahamians get these sorts of comprehensive
concessions and this kind red carpet and carte blanche
treatment from their own Government?


I I


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY. MAY 26. 2005. PAGE 9


Buy Local?
Despite the requirement in the Heads of Agreement to
"buy local" the building supply stores in Marsh Harbour
simply cannot supply $500 million dollars worth of
building materials. 99% of the building materials will all
be purchased abroad. The Heads of Agreement even
gives the Developer, a company from California, uniquely,
the right to be its own "Project Manager". American
Bridge is already there.

Foreign Project Management
So none of the big Bahamian construction companies from
Nassau or Freeport will even get to bid for the construction
of the development, and despite the promise of hiring
Bahamians, the Heads of Agreement says that "The
Government agrees to facilitate on an expedited basis the
grant of work permits....on a short term or on a longer
term".

Crown Land Given Away for FREE
The Heads of Agreement gives away 148 acres of Crown
and Treasury land on a beautiful beach. No provision is
made for the payment of even a single dollar. Again, The
Bahamas, the Bahamian people, the taxpayer, the voter, gets
no mondy for it. Would the Government have given Crown
land to residents of Guana Cay to develop bed and breakfasts?

Exclusion of Bahamians
The Heads of Agreement permits construction of an 18-
acre golf course. However, no residents will be are allowed
to use it. The Government is approving a high-end residential
resort and first class private members Club with security.
It will also have a big gate for security. Security from what?
The local Bahamians.

So, Bahamians have become foreigners in their
own homeland.

Sewage Treatment Facility
Even the required $850,000 sewage facility is only to be
made available to the development and not to the rest of
the Cay!

Housing for Bahamian Employees
The Government gives 148 acres of Crown Land on the
beach away to these foreigners but puts housing for Bahamian
workers next to the Sewage Facility with no beach access
for the Bahamians; not even a beach view!

So.......what does the local economy get
from this development?
Nothing!

Vision for the future?
Now, a vision for the future of the Bahamas might suggest
an alternative approach. One where we decide where the
investment takes place; not the developer! Remember, The
Bahamas belongs to Bahamians.

The approach respects our marine and land environment,
preserves the variety and diversity of our Family Island
culture and saves our heritage whilst still encouraging and
facilitating foreign development and creating far greater
economic impact where it is most desperately needed

Looking at the Guana Cay issue, our government should
have said No. One third of Great Guana Cay is not for sale
free to foreigners as a private destination to the exclusion
of Bahamians and to the destruction of our culture and
environment.

Planning
After all, that is why the Immovable Property (Acquisition
by Foreign Persons) Act was passed by the PLP government
in 1984, and its replacement, The International Land Persons
Holding Act in 1992, by the FNM.

It was to give the Government a lawful mechanism to direct
when, where and how development and growth would
occur in these unique islands, in recognition of our very
limited land resources. It was to stop helter skelter investment
everywhere. It was to stop exploitation and speculation. It
was to stop, for instance, putting in a WalMart over the Hill
thereby destroying dozens of small Bahamian businesses. It
was to preserve the Bahamas for the most part for Bahamians.


So let us be smart Bahamas!


$500 Million Dollars! Where could that best be spent in the
Bahamas? Not on a small Cay, lost out in the middle of
know where; where there is minimal economic impact.
Where we get nothing in taxes. Where we destroy the
environment.

Why not for example, look at Grand Bahama? Freeport in
particular. Where there are miles and miles of beautiful
beaches available for development. With hundreds of miles
of already paved roads? Where sanitation, water, telephone,
cable, internet and electricity facilities, and infrastructure
are already in place in a master plan designed for 300,000
people and where there are only 75,000?

Where there are lawyers, architects, engineers, construction
workers, accountants, entertainers, restaurants, bars, bankers,
real estate agents, brokers, and all other professional services
hungry for business and eager to help a development of this
magnitude happen. Where there are churches for our foreign
guests to worship with us. Where all government
infrastructure and personnel are available? Where there are
thousands of acres of land, ready willing and able to be
developed. Where there is no need to give away Crown
land? Where land is privately owned; and where the owners
can make a profit selling the land? Moreover, where
Government can get stamp duty on the sales?

And MOST IMPORTANTLY!!!! Where there are thousands
of unemployed Bahamians in the construction, hospitality,
and tourism field available for work. Where local building
supply businesses Would be able to provide Hundreds of
millions of dollars of building materials. Where the eco6homy
needs a steady stream of investment to survive and prosper.
In short, where there would be the greatest economic
benefit to the Bahamas, and the least environmental and
social disruption.

In truth, we should begin to look at what kind
of Bahamas we want in the future and
plan a little better.

We have a rare, unique, and scarce resource, and it is time
we manage it for our own enjoyment and future generations
of Bahamians, lest nothing be left of our precious Bahamaland,
ourselves, or the soul and spirit of our cultural and heritage.

This is why what is happening in Great Guana Cay matters F
so much for the entire Bahamas today, and why Saving Great
Guana Cay means Saving The Bahamas!

So, a message to the leaders of this Nation from the People
of this Nation; please stop The Great Guana Cay Give Away!

Please Save The Bahamas!


Please sign the petition to help the 170 residents of
Guana Cay participate in their island development.

Fax completed petition to 1-242-365-5163
or log on to www.saveguanacayreef.com


I


Name

P.O.Box

Email:
Please send your $ donations for the cause to
Save Guana Cay Reef Assoc. Ltd. PO,. Box F41227, Freeport, Bahamas.


I


I r ~ r I. Ir I I n ._


THE TRIBUNE















Change in taxation system possible


FROM page one
within a five-year period.
However, due to "the nar-
rowness of our revenue system,
heavily dependent as it is on
customs revenues and the non-


taxation of services", achieving
a 20 per cent revenue intake has
become exceedingly difficult,
said Mrs Pratt.
Mrs Pratt said that is now
necessary for the Bahamas to
have in place the "most efficient


possible revenue system oper-
ating the most appropriate tax
handles."
As it concerns the Customs
Department, she said, the Trade
Information System (TIMS) is
now operational and there has


BIG HOLIDAY


already been an improvement
in collections and administra-
tion but other major revenue
agencies also need to be
reviewed.
As an example Mrs Pratt
named the renting out of invest-
ment properties, such as apart-
ments and homes, which if not
picked up by the present tax
handle results in the hotel room
occupancy tax, an important
taxable stream, not paying its
fair share of the tax burden
The acting prime minister said
that measures that were taken in
2004/05 to strengthen revenue
administration "are being con-
tinued where appropriate in
2005/06 and augmented by addi-
tional specific measures."


Mrs Pratt pointed out that
even with significantly improved
revenue administration and col-
lection, "the task of reaching
and sustaining the ratio of debt
to GDP of 20 per cent would
be difficult."
She said that within the next
five to ten years the Bahamas
may have to radically change
its revenue system and that at
some point in the future, the
consideration will have to be
made as to how best to reform
the country's present taxation
system.
"In the case of international
forces, within the context of the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) there will be pressure
on the Bahamas to reduce and


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simplify its Customs Duties,"
she said.
Reduction in customs ddu-
ties, however, would mean that
the Bahamas will have to find a
satisfactory replacement to yield
the same level of revenues, said
Mrs Pratt.
The acting prime minister
said that the national consen-
sus is that the Bahamas should
not adopt an income tax sys-
tem, therefore in order to
reform the revenue structure,
the implementation of a Value-
Added Tax (VAT), or a similar
tax, would be needed.
Mrs Pratt emphasised that
government has "no intention
of introducing such a tax
(income tax) now or in the near-
future."
She said that no government
would be able to implement
a VAT at short notice, as it
is a complex measure, which
would also involve the prepa-
ration of legislation to give
effect to it.
Mrs Pratt yesterday also said
that government anticipates a
3.5 per cent GDP growth in
2005, based on recent projec-
tions made by the International
Monetary Fund (IMF).,
The GDP growth rate was at
three per cent in 2004.
This increased growth is
largely as a result of the volume
of investment projects: coming
on stream, the acting prime.
minister explained. .
"Moreover there is every
likelihood that these strong
rates of growth will be sustained
in the years after 2005," said
Mrs Pratt.
However, the Bahamas must
still take the outlook for the
global economy into considera-
tion, she noted.
Mrs Pratt said that a benign
global outlook cannot be tak-
en for granted but while the
Bahamas will heed these cau-
tionary remarks, the growth of
the Bahamian economy, which
commenced in 2004, could con-
tinue for the rest of the decade,
she added.
"The commencement of a
period of strong growth is due
in verylarge measure to the suc-
cess of the government's invest-
ment policy," she said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005









THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 11


L CAL EW


Woman 'told of danger'


FROM page one
appeared in Magistrate's Court
Tuesday morning for a legal
separation hearing.
Before leaving the court-
house, she was told by the Mag-
istrate that she was to seek
police protection, Mrs Rolle
said.
"If the police had done what
they were supposed to do my
daughter would be alive today,"
Mrs Rolle claims.
Mrs Laroda had gone to
court to file for legal separation
and to have her husband bound
over to keep the peace. The
matter was adjourned to June 8.
Inspector Loretta Mackey
said the Magistrate told Mrs
Laroda to go to a police station
to seek assistance.
According to relatives, Mrs
Laroda went to Central Police


Station after the hearing for an
escort to her apartment in Car-
avel Beach to pack up her
belongings, but was told that a
patrol car was not available to
escort her.
While at the apartment pack-
ing up her belongings around
1.45pm Tuesday, there was an
altercation. The mother of four
was found with stab wounds to
the neck, chest and abdomen.
She was taken to hospital, but
later died around 2.45pm.
Her husband, a 37-year-old
housekeeping employee at Our
Lucaya Resort, is in custody
assisting police with investiga-
tions into her death.
This is the seventh homicide
for the year on Grand Bahama.
Mrs Tiffany Laroda, who was
also employed in the house-
keeping department at Our
Lucaya, had made several com-


plaints to police regarding ongo-
ing domestic disputes.
Her mother said that Tiffany
and the children had spent the
night with her on Pioneer Way
on Monday.
Mrs Rolle said: "She was very
upbeat about going to court to
look about her legal separa-
tion," she recalled.
Mrs Rolle said that her 18-
year-old granddaughter had
accompanied Tiffany back to
the apartment to help her pack.
She said the granddaughter,
who witnessed an argument, ran
for help.
She claims the granddaugh-
ter saw a police officer and told
him what was happening, who
went upstairs to the apartment,
but then left.
"I was told the officer said he
was off-duty and would radio
for help," said Mrs Rolle.


1,000 names on petition


FROM page one
Industry Leslie Miller said he felt
sorry for Mrs Duncombe and the
turnout they had in the square.
"I was hoping that they would
have more people and frankly I
was disappointed. The average
person can appreciate the fact
- that having a gas tank in their
backyard poses a greater risk
to them than an LNG facility.


"The government still has not
yet decided on a course of
action whether we will finalize a
licence for LNG, but certainly
the BEST Commission has
advised us that it will not pose
any danger to the environment,
the marine life, or the country.
And the revenue to be derived
from this project will be
amongst the best anywhere in
'the world," he said.


"There is no inherent danger
with the incorporation of this
facility. And it is wrong for
someone to put fear in the
minds of Bahamians and try to
stop them from involving them-
selves in the safest gas industry
in the world. But they will still
be allowed to voice their side
at the town meeting, and have
their questions answered by the
experts," he said.


Amnesty criticism on immigrants


FROM page one
immigrants without giving them
access to a "full and fair refugee
determination procedure".
The human rights watchdog,
which also slammed the United
States for its human rights abus-
es yesterday, made the interna-
tional community aware of the
December 2004 riot by
detainees at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre.
Said thd report: "There were
reports of inadequate medical
attention, food and water at the
Carmichael Detention Centre.
"At least five children were
detained in violation of inter-
national standards.


"In October, several Haitian
and Cuban detainees were
reportedly beaten. The report
of a police investigation into the
allegations was presented to
parliament in December.
"On December 9, at least
nine detainees and 11 guards
were injured during a fire and
confrontation at the Centre."
Everyone's rights need to be
respected, whether they are a
migrant or a refugee, Amnesty's
Bahamas branch said yesterday.
"But refugees have special
rights that need to be-protected.
"Amnesty is not saying that
they should all be granted polit-
ical asylum, but if you are repa-
triating them in 48 hours, there


is no way to properly assess
their claims."
"The Bahamas is a state par-
ty to the United Nation's con-
vention relating to the status of
refugees and the protocol. We,
therefore, have a legal obliga-
tion under international law to
investigate claims.
"Once their claims are prop-
erly investigated and were
found to be with merit, we have
an obligation to grant them asy-
lum.
The report also said that four
years after the September 11
attacks, human rights are "in
retreat worldwide" and that the
United States "bears most
responsibility".


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THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 1, THUSDAYMAY 2, 200CTHE RIBUN


Misleading on CSME


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STRAIGHT UP TALK

Z H IVAR G o L A I N G


T was truly appalling to
listen to Minister of For-
eign Affairs, Fred Mitchell, on
both Jones and Co and the
Darold Miller shows mislead-
ing listeners about the Bahamas'
proposed signing of the Revised
Treaty of Chauguramas.
THAT ELUSIVE
DECEMBER 212004
CABINET DECISION

No matter how many
words Mr Mitchell
offers in his public discussions
of the treaty, he never fully dis-
closes what the government
decided on this date.
He will not say that on
December 21 2004 the cabinet
of the Bahamas, of which he is a
member, "agreed in principle"
to sign the Revised Treaty of
Chauguramas establishing the
Caricom Single Market and
Economy (CSME) this July,
provided the government
receives the requested reserva-.
tions and following the issuance
of a "white paper" on the issue.
The exact details of that cab-


inet decision never come out of
the minister's mouth. This
writer has asked persons who
follow the CSME discussions if
they have ever heard a full dis-
closure from the minister of the
cabinet decision, and no one has
been able to say that they have.
In fact, listen to all of Mr
Mitchell's interviews, read all
of his press releases, read all of
his published speeches or view
the numerous web publications
by him and his propagandists,
one cannot find any full disclo-
sure of that cabinet decision.
Why not? Because the minis-
ter does not want the Bahamian
public to know that his govern-
ment has made a decision to
sign a treaty establishing the
CSME and that his job is not
to consult the Bahamian peo-
ple to determine whether they
support the signing or not, nor
to educate them; rather the min-
ister's job is to proselytise
Bahamians so that they can sup-
port a decision already made.
Indeed, he has made recent
attempts to formally advise the
secretary general of CARI-
COM that the government will
be signing the treaty this July
but his attempts were blocked
because they did not have the
consent of the Prime Minister.
"NOT SIGNING ONTO
THE CSME"

O n Darold Miller's
show, Mr Mitchell put
Mr Miller's mind at ease by say-
ing that the government would
not be signing onto the CSME
but only the geo-political
arrangements of the Revised
Treaty of Chauguramas. This is
an outright untruth. Establish-
ing the CSME was the inspira-
tion for revising the original
Treaty of Chauguramas and the
protocols of the revised treaty
have the CSME threads inter-
woven throughout it.
Look at the 28 statements of
the preamble to the revised
treaty and almost all of them
have references to the econom-
ic integration that the CSME
seeks to bring about. Prime


Minister Owen Arthur, lead
prime minister for Caricom on
the CSME, spends the bulk of
his speeches on the issue of the
Revised Treaty of Chaugura-
mas discussing the importance
of establishing to the CSME,
not the geo-political advantages
of signing onto the treaty.
Contrary to Mr Mitchell's
assertions, the Bahamas'
requested reservations do not
exempt it from the CSME. The
CSME is more than the Com-
mon External Tariff, the Free
Movement of People, the
Caribbean Court of Justice and
Single Currency.
The CSME also includes the
free movement of goods, ser-
vices and capital, the right of
establishment, common sectoral
policies, macro-economic co-
ordination and fiscal policy har-
monisation.
The Bahamas is not seeking
exemption from these things,
therefore it is signing onto these
provisions of the CSME. It is dif-
ficult to sign the Revised Treaty
of Chauguaramas and not sign
onto the CSME, since the two
are intrinsically connected.
"THE RIGHT OF
ESTABLISHMENT IS
ABOUT WORK PERMITS"

t was shocking to hear Mr
Mitchell explain the
"Right of Establishment", which
is a provision of the CSME, as
merely a matter of providing
work permits to an investor's
family and top executives.
It was even more shocking to.
hear the minister suggest that
investors in the Bahamas today,
such as Jamaican Butch Stuart,
have the same right. This is
absurd! The Right of Establish-
ment means that any national
of any country that has singed
onto the revised treaty estab-
lishing the CSME is entitled to
do business in the territory of
any other country that is a sig-
natory to the Treaty.
Put plainly, the Right of
Establishment would entitle any
Trinidadian or Jamaican to the
right to set up business in the


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would have the right to set up
business in their country.
Other Caribbean nationals
would be treated the same as
any Bahamian when it came to
setting up business in the
Bahamas. Work permits do not
even arise in this matter; the
right to establish a business
would be automatic.
According to the minister,
having reviewed the situation,
the Bahamas will not be seeking
reservation from the Right of
Establishment. Therefore, the
Bahamas is signing onto the
CSME.

SIGNING THE TREATY
IS A GEO-POLITICAL
STRATEGY

Ninety per cent of
Bahamian trade is
done with the United States of
America and Canada. The USA
is the Bahamas' closer neigh-
bour and ally. The greatest
amount of aid that this country
receives, either monetarily or
in kind, comes from the US.
Bahamian nationals receive
more education, health, security,
disaster relief and preparedness,
technological support, and eco-
nomic assistance from the Unit-
ed States than from any other'
country in the world, including
countries of the Caribbean.
If the Bahamas suffered a
natural or man-made disaster,
the bulk of its assistance would
come from the USA. It seems
inconsistent that we feel the
need to advance our fortunes
by signing onto a treaty that we
must gut in order to tolerate!
rather than pursue greater inte-
gration>,ad geo-political co-
operation with the USA.
In fact, our foreign policy in
the past three years seems to
have been more inclined to put
off the USA than to draw it
nearer. Besides, there is not one
geo-political benefit that Mr
Mitchell claims we will get from
signing the revised treaty that
we cannot get otherwise.
WE CANNOT OPT OUT

M r Mitchell claimed
that this writer in his
book "Who Moved My
Conch?" said that the Bahamas
cannot "opt out". That was
untrue. This writer quoted PM
Owen Arthur, who during a
speech in the Bahamas pro-
moting the CSME said that the
Bahamas cannot "opt out" and
this was in reference to the
broader issues of globalisation
and trade liberalisation, not the
CSME.
This writer noted in his book
that PM Arthur "was right to a
certain extent". I wrote: "We
cannot opt out without nega-
tive consequences to ourselves."
In any event, if Mr Mitchell
believed that we cannot opt out,
how does he explain the fact
that he and his government
seeks to opt out?
The fact is that we can opt
out, especially if we are asked to
.sign onto something that is so
inconsistent with our interest
that we feel the need to gut it.
We can have a bilateral
agreement with CARICOM
that maintains the so-called geo-
political advantages of which
Mr Mitchell speaks without the
risk of joining an arrangement
that could negatively impact our
economy.
TIME FOR THE COUNTRY
TO HEAR FROM ITS
PRIME MINISTER
This country does not need
to hear from Mr Mitchell a'
more..It is clear that he is conhs
fused, overly sensitive, offeri-
sive and misleading on the issue.
It is time to hear from a more
trusted figure; it is time to hear
from the Prime Minister. We
know that he is convalescing
and we wish him a speedy
recovery. This much is true: lis-
tening to Mr Mitchell offers no
reason to trust that the govern-
ment knows what it is doing
about the CSME or is being
truthful on the issue. We must
hear from our Prime Minister.

THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK
"The attempt and not the
deed confounds us."


This serves as a letter of thanks
to the people that contributed
to the funeral of the late
Wealthy Dons "Tit" Sweeting
of Culmers Alley.

Thanks to Naioka & Monalisa
Clark for their dedication and
hard work during and after her
life. To her oldest daughter,
Ethyn Smith who gave
$1,000.00, thanks to her second
oldest daughter, Grace
Cartwright who gave $100.00
thanks much. To all of those
family members that attended the service, we send our appreciation
and thanks to you all, may God bless and keep each and everyone
of you. Special thanks to my brother for his support, Michael
Sweeting, love you.
From Betty Sweeting & Family
(youngest daughter)


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE















Amnesty International condemns


uan


tanamo and other US centres


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Bachelors degree in Human Resource Management/Adult Education preferred;
Associates Degree or Certificate in Training accepted in one or more of the
following areas:
* Human Resources Development/Communications/Personnhhel
* Relations/Business Administration/Teaching;
* 2 3 years experience in Corporate or business setting preferably in -Human
Resources;
* Personnel or administration preferred;
* Outstanding Customer Service and excellent computer skills required;
* Outstanding written and oral communication, multitasking and presentation
skills required.

POSITION SUMMARY:
The successful candidate will:
* Plan, organize and facilitate various workshops for Associates and
Coordinators;
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programs;
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results;
* Modify training programs as needed;
* Develop effective training materials utilizing a variety of media;
* Exemplify the desired culture and philosophies of the organization
* Prepare and review all required educational material
* Monitor and follow-up on compliance of Associates;
* Prepare monthly, quarterly and annual reports and submit to the Asst. VP HR
* Assist in developing and monitoring the educational budget;
* Act as a liaison between Education and the Human Resources Department.

__Please_ submit letters to: Hu^^man Rsoures eparmen


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THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE,
t


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Rood lecturing




on democracy


ELU SW. BODIEMI OUNiC TRNLfCONS IErANT PHONEI FA.X:2)393432*'P.O. BOX N.-424
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* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
THE Southeast Rotary club
of district 7020 brought in the
US Ambassador John Rood to
address his rotarians yesterday
on the importance of promoting
democracy.
A Rotarian himself, the
ambassador first learned to
enjoy and appreciate serving
others through the Rotary Club.
He said: "If it were not for
Rotary,I would not be here as
the United States ambassador
to the Bahamas."
The Bahamas has a 275-year-
old democratic tradition. The
Bahamas and the United States
are "united by democracy and
divided by an ocean".
"We have shared values," he
continued, "and these shared
values have shaped our rela-
tionship and made us, according
to Prime Minister Christie, clos-
er than friends we are kin."
Democracies have proven to
be "beneficial to the countries
themselves and to the world-
wide communities".
He explained that democracy
is both complex and multifac-
eted. It is more than people
choosing who will rule their
country. It is freedom of
speech, freedom of religion,
equal protection, basic human
rights, and many other things.
According to Freedom
House, a democracy think tank
that produces annual rankings
of civil and political liberties,
there are currently 117 democ-
racies in the world, which
accounts for approximately 63
per cent of the world's coun-
tries and 40 per cent of the
world's population.
According to the statistics of
democratic countries, the
Bahamas being a democratic
country should be more eco-
nomically prosperous, less inter-
nally violent, more respectful
of human rights and civil liber-
ties, healthier and more peace-
ful toward other international


* US ambassador John Rood visited the Rotary Club'


democracies compared to coun-
tries with different forms of gov-
ernment.
The ambassador said that
countries like Afghanistan and
Iraq, which are toiling under
"tyranny and oppression", have
taken their first steps toward
becoming democratic countries.
The people of these countries
have "had enough" he said and
have risen up to take control of
their own destiny. More than
eight million Iraqis defying
intimidation and threats of vio-
lence -voted in the most recent
elections.
Closer to home is Haiti.


There will be elections lat"i ijig
year to bring in a Onei gerix
ment. "Few countries afimore
impacted by Haiti's success or
failure than the United States
and the Bahamas," he said,
adding that more than $10 mil-
lion would go to support the
election process in Haiti in 2005.
"A democratic system offers
the best opportunity for a coun-
try to grow, develop and become
a contributing member of the
international community.
"With perseverance and
patience the world will become
more democratic, for the bene-
fit of all," said Mr Rood.


I1 0iHodnsCoLt


CHAIRMAN'S REPORT
UNAUDITED RESULTS FOR THE THE SIX MONTHS ENDED
JANUARY 31, 2005

Despite a challenging business environment on Grand Bahama
since the hurricanes of 2004, our Company continues to produce
positive financial results.

The net income for Freeport Oil Holdings Company Limited for
the fiscal 2005 was $2.915 million up from $2.907 million for the
same period last year. Earnings per share for the year to date 2005
remain at 34 cents.

The prospects for Focol remain positive and our Company is on
target to maintain the same level of financial performance.


Sir Albert J1IMiller
Chairman & President


FREEPORT OIL HOLDINGS CO. LTD
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET


(B $000)


January 31,2005


Assets
Liabilities
Total shareholders' equity


July 31,2004


$ 23,409 $ 25,618
5,050 7,989
18,359 17,629

$ 23,409 $ 25,618


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
(B $000)


Six months ended January
31,2005


Sale & revenues
Cost and expenses
Income from operations
Other income (expense)

Net Income

Earnings per share

Dividends per share


$ 33,772
1 01


Six months ended January
31,2004

$ 25,924
T Q?4A


11, IV I 44, "
2,672 2,980
244 (73)

$ 2,916 $ 2,907


0.34

0.28


0.34

0.28


Copies of a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
Stephen Adderley, Finance Manager at the Freeport Oil Company located on
Queens Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday
from 8:30 AM TO 5:00 PM.


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* STUDENTS form
Long island Glintons
Primary school visited
the downtown area of
-Nassau yesterday. The
students, on a school
trip to New Providence,
visited the House of
Assembly and heard
some of the debate on
the budget.
(Photo: Felipi Major/
Tribune Staff)


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


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.THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


EXCITING AND CHALLENGING
OPPORTUNITY FOR YOUNG BAHAMIANS

Imagine a career which will take you to the world's most fascinating ports and far
flung destinations. A Maritime career could take you there.

Do you have, or are likely to have, 5 BGCSE passes, including Math, Physics/Combined
Science and English Language at grade 'C' or above?

Have you obtained a combined SAT score of at least 1000?

Are you physically fit?

If you have answered "yes" to the questions above then read on.

The Bahamas Maritime Authority and the Bahamas Shipowners Association are
offering attractive scholarships to young academically sound Bahamians who are
keen to train for an exciting and challenging career in the Maritime Industry which
is gaining increasing national importance.

This generous scholarship is inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommodation
and transportation costs. Commencing in September 2005, successful candidates
will follow a 4 year degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique
campus of the California State University. Upon completion of the degree, the
qualified officers will be expected to serve on board a Bahamian flagged vessel for
at least 2 years providing the solid foundation upon which to build your Maritime
career.

Further information and application forms
can be obtained from Mrs Erma Mackey,
Assistant Director, Bahamas Maritime
Authority, Gold Circle Complex, East Bay
Street,
P.O.Box N-4679, Nassau, Bahamas, email:
HYPERLINK "mail to:
emackeyvbahamasmaritime.com,
tel: 394.3024, fax: 394 3014. Completed
applications must be submitted in person
or by post, with copies of academic
certificates/transcripts and proof of
Bahamian citizenship, no later than
Monday, 30 May 2005. Interviews will be
take place in :.
Nassau from 13-.4 Juie.


I I


* By KARAN MINNIS
THE vice-president of the
College of the Bahamas is to
attend a special course at Har-
vard to assist in the institution's
transition to a university.
Dr Linda Davis is the first of
several senior administrative
officers to take the three-week
executive leadership course -
the Institute for Educational
Management (IEM) Pro-
gramme
IEM comes under the
umbrella of the Harvard Insti-
tutes for Higher Education
(HIHE), which provides high-
guality professional develop-.'
ment experiences to leaders of
colleges and universities, while
providing opportunities to cre-
ate strong professional networks
for years to come.
According to President Rod-
ney Smith, the IEM programme
is considered the most intense
and most difficult of all the
executive development offer-
ings of HIHE, especially as,
regards gaining entrance.
He said: "Hundreds of uni-
versity administrators, govern-
ment leaders and executives of
educational agencies apply each
year and applicants are rigor-
ously screened."
"IEM is designed for senior
administrators with solid
records of effective perfor-
mance who would benefit from
an opportunity to step back
from the pressures of daily
events and gain perspective on
their own leadership," he said.
IEM also offers participates a
once-in-a-lifetime chance to
sharpen the decision-making
skills required for effective lead-
ership.
While presenting ideas and
'insigftsgfrom experts in higher
education, IEM also creates a


* DR Linda Davis will be attending the leadership course 'i


stimulating learning environ-
ment that enables talented lead-
ers to share their experiences
with others from across the US
and around the world.
"Much-of the learning during
IEM results from interactions
among programme participants.
To ensure rich and.productive
dialogue, IEM; seeks to attract
senior administrators from a


wide array of postf-econdary
institutions," said Dr Smith..
Dr Linda Davis is one of 85
senior higher education admin-
istrators selected for the class
of 2005.
She will spend a significant
part of her summer at Harvard
.and.will graduate with a speial
'dipliomai i the management of
higher education....


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THE TRII6UE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 19


Sir Burton honoured university



Sir Burton honoured university


* SIMEON C R McIntosh, professor of jurisprudence at University of the West Indies Faculty of
Law, presents Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall the Pelican Peer Award 2004 for Outstanding Alum-
nus of the University of the West Indies, during a ceremony at the Supreme Court


* By LINDSAY THOMPSON
CHIEF Justice Sir Burton
Hall has been honoured by the
University .of the West Indies
for his outstanding contribu-
tiont 'the development of life
a idthe judicial system in the
I e CR Mclntosh, pro-
soof jurisprudence at UWI,
r ted Sir Burton with the
an Alumni Peer Award
for outstanding alumnus
t the University of the West
Indies in recognition of the
great honour and prestige he
has brought to the university
through his exemplary personal
and professional achievements
and contributions to Caribbean
society.
"This is a distinct honour for
the faculty of law that some-
body like Sir Burton has been
chosen from amongst his peers
to get this reward," Professor
McIntosh said.
Underscoring the importance
of the presentation in the pres-
ence of Sir Burton's colleagues,
Professor McIntosh said it was
also symbolic of the relation-
ship between the faculty of law
and the College of the
Bahamas.
Professor McIntosh said: "We
are celebrating excellence not
simply of Sir Burton, but we are
celebrating the excellence of the
Bahamas, we are celebrating
the excellence of the Caribbean,
and we are celebrating the
excellence of the University of
the West Indies and last but def-
initely not least, we are cele-
brating the excellence of the
faculty of law."
Sir Burton was one of seven
individuals chosen as distin-
guished alumni of the Universi-
ty of the West Indies. The
award on May 13 marked the
40th anniversary of the UWI
Cave Hill Campus in
Bridgetown, Barbados.


The award recognises those
who excel in their field of
endeavour.
Sir Burton was the only one
chosen in law and the only one
who was unable to attend the
official award ceremony at Cave
Hill.
Sir Burton began his profes-
sional career in 1968 as a pro-
bation officer and was subse-
quently assistant clerk to the
House of Assembly from 1969
to 1976.
He received an LLB degree
with honours from the Univer-
sity of the West Indies faculty of
law in 1974, and the Legal Edu-
cation Certificate of the Council
of Legal Education of the West
Indies in 1976.
His admission to practice as
counsel and attorney of the
Supreme Court of the Bahamas
in October 1976 was the start
of ah illustrious professional
career which included appoint-
ments as counsel in the office
of the Attorney General (1976
to 1983), Solicitor-General
(1983 to 1990), Justice of the
Supreme Court (1990 to 1997)
and Justice of Appeal (1997 to
2001), culminating with his
appointment as Chief Justice of
the Bahamas in 2001.
Sir Burton has served as
chairman of the National Crime
Commission (1998) and mem-
ber of the administrative tri-
bunal of the Inter-American
Development Bank (1999 to
2004).
He is presently course direc-
tor in constitutional law and
legal systems at the Eugene
Dupuch Law School, Council
of Legal Education and was
made a fellow of the Common-
wealth Judicial Education Insti-
tute at Dalhousie University
school of law in 2002.
In 2001, Sir Burton was made
Knight Bachelor by Her
Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II on
becoming Chief Justice and
Knight of the Equestrian Order
of St Sylvester by his Holiness,
Pope John Paul II in 2003.


(BIS photo: Derek Smith)

He is married to the former
Camille Aranha and they have
three children and two grand-
children.
"The fact that one is appoint-
ed Chief Justice of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas is
no ordinary achievement,
because this is a wondrous,
splendid opportunity and an
awesome responsibility," Pro-
fessor McIntosh said.
"He's engaged in acts of self-
definition because he is building
a body of knowledge, a body of
literature about our political
identity as a Commonwealth
Caribbean."


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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT


EQUIPMENT UPGRADE FIRE TRAIL ROAD

The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd. wishes to
inform the public that in an effort to improve service, an
equipment upgrade in the Fire Trail Road area will take place
during the period Wednesday, May 25, to Friday, June 10,
2005 between the hours of 9:00am and 4:30pm.

As a result, subscribers in the following areas will experience
some service disruption:

Fire Trail Road South of Frelia Subdivision and all
side corners up to Linkford Close
Fire Trail Road West of Linkford Close and all
side corners up to Hamster Road
Shell Fish Road West up to Stanford Street
Hamster Road West

BTC apologizes for any inconvenience caused and assures
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AMERICAN
SINGLES
v 16 OZ


CORN ON
THE COB
S629
24 CT
PRESTIGE
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS
5 5QTS


KRAFT
BBQ
SAUCES
ASSORTED
18 OZ
2/$300


TOASTED

WHEAT
CRACKERS
8 OZ



FRANCO AMERICAN
SUPERIORE
SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALLS
14.75 OZ
$o1 39


LYSOL


ALL PURPOSE CLEANERS, ORANGE
TRIGGER 32-oz ........................$3.99
LYSOL
POUR ABLE LEMON & LAVENDER
BREEZE 35-oz..............................$4.65
LYSOL
TBC CLEANERS, CLING COUNTY,
PACIFIC, SUMMER & TBC 24-oz .....$3.99
LYSOL
BTTC, SUMMER BREEZE TRIG, BASIN,
TUB, TILE TRIG, GREEN APPLE, TRIG,
BASIN TUB TILE
AEROSOL 29.3- oz.........................$4.65
EASY OFF
HEAVY DUTY REG &
FUME FREE 16- oz....................$5.69
SPRAY-N-WASH
REGULAR & LEMON i -oz..............$4.65
LYSOL
AEROSOLS ORG SCENT, SPRING WATER
FALL, COUNTRY SCENTS, CRISP LINEN,
SOFT POWDER, CITRUS SCENT,
SUMMER BREEZE i2-oz..................$6.99


DEVON
CORNED
BEEF
12- OZ
$ 09


HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQUEZE BOTTLE
36 OZ



PALMOLIVE
DISH LIQUIDS
ASSORTED
SCENTS
13 OZ

$219


KRAFT
SALAD DRESSING
REGULAR FLAVOURS
ASSORTED
8 OZ
2/s$30oo0


WOOLITE
LIQUID ORIGINAL
& ECYCLE
32 OZ
s7a9


BLANCO

BLEACHREG
1 GAL

$Maee


PORK
RIBS
L.99
.990


CHICKEN
WINGS
LB
-996


TURKEY
WINGS OR
DRUMSTICKS
LB
-99

PRESTIGE PRESTIGE DL LEE
CHOICE CHOICE BONE-
BOTTOM IN N.Y. STRIP WHOLESOKED
ROUND ROAST STEAKS PICNIC HPi
LB
$329 ;- 13
$3> LB ^ *Lo


PORK LOIN
END CUT
CHOPS
$ 79
m LB


N.Z.
LAMB
SHOULDER
CHOPS


HOT
WINGS
s's
a8/o$00
WHOLE
ROTISSERIE CHICKEN
$799


JBI
COCONUT
WATER ALSO
11.5 OA ON
SPECIAL RETAIL
2/1.39
17 OZ



COTTONELLE
BATH TISSUE DOUBLE
ROLL, ALOE &
ULTRA SOFT
4 PAK



CREAMETTE

SPAGHETTI
7 OZ
2/.99


HICKORY
GLEN MEAT
FRANKS!
2.5 LB/ EACH
$-99


WHITE & YELLOW
AMERICAN CHEESE
$399"


L B
DELI
SLICE TURKEY
BREAST
LB
!;29g


BLUE RIBBON
PARBOILED
RICE |
5 LB


$


CARDINAL
EVAPORATED
MILK
410 GR
2/$1 391


p 0


P


LAYS
VARIETY PACK
(24 PACK) CHIPS
(NASSAU ONLY)
24,-PACK
$ m10 99


71sl ~: / ,


/*.~ /~ /;'


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I


- ,I_


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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE:T


s


I


~ 9'9





JNE


JBI CARIBBEAN
MACKERA CHUNK LITE
BRINE/ TOMATO UN TE
ySAU 0 ITUNA WATER
15-OZ 66 -OZ


CHUNK DOG
FOOD
50-LBS

S2499
THRIFTY MAID

LEMON
JUICE
32-OZ
$239

Y SUNCHY




12 OZ


FAB


LIQUID
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT


LIBBYS

SLICED
BEETS
104- OZ


APPLE

JUICE
64 OZ


MARINA


VEGETABLE
OIL

2.5 -GAL
$ 399


W/D


FOAM CUPS
*20CT1
16 OZ
$149

FLORIDA

CRYSTAL

SUGAR
25-LB


ICE CREAM
ASSORTED
5-QTS


-3/$189 289 $899

KERRY GOLD i PIGS MINI
r I I -A L


SALTED OR
UNSALTED
8 OZ


FEET
5LBS
LBS


PORK
RIBS
.99
PER LBS


* VERNICE Cooper, past president; Judy Brown, president-elect, Pilot club of Nassau; Deborah
Archer, treasurer, Pilot International; Judy.Breaud, second vice-president, Pilot International;
Maryann Frazer, president, Pilot International; the governor general; Katrina Cartwright; Loretta
Parris, governor-elect, Bahamas district; Frances Ledee, charter member, Luncheon Pilot club of
Nassau; Zelma Dean, president, Luncheon Pilot club of Nassau; Ironaca Morris-Baker, charter
member, Pilot club of Nassau; and Elizabeth Sweeting, treasurer, Bahamas district

Pilots take a trip to

Government House


INTERNATIONAL and
Bahamian pilots, led by Katrina
Cartwright, governor of The
Bahamas district Pilot Interna-
tional, paid a courtesy call on
Her Excellency Dame Ivy
Dumont, Governor-General, at
Government House on Friday,
May 13.
Pilot International, a civic ser-


vice volunteer organisation was
chartered on October 18 1921 in
Macon, Georgia for business and
professional leaders who,
through volunteering, make a
difference in the lives of persons
in their communities with brain-
related disorders and the elderly.
Pilot International Foundation
was established in 1975 to fur-


ther these humanitarian efforts.
Pilot clubs sponsor Anchor
clubs in colleges and high
schools. The clubs, founded in
1949, specifically focus on com-
munity service and the devel-
opment of leadership skills.
There are 18 Anchor clubs in
the Bahamas in private and
public high schools.


"Copyrighted Material
.. Syndicated Content


b


Available from Commercial News Providers"


just for you


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LOCANEW


------------- -


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 21


- -


N NIW DIX1E







PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

Our Nassau Office

Will Be Closed On

Thursday June 2nd, A

2005 For Our Annual


200O


We Will Re-Open For
Business As Usual On
Monday June 6th, 2005.
We Apologize For Any
Inconvenience Caused







INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


THE TRIBUNE




Officer Ferguson passes



counter-terrorism course


* By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services
COUNTER terrorism spe-
cialist Constable 1807 Darrell
S Ferguson has successfully
completed a course in counter
terrorism and counter intelli-
gence in Houston, Texas.
More than 600 law enforce-
ment officers from the United
States, Puerto Rico and the
Bahamas participated in the
intensive training exercise last
month which was conducted
by current and retired FBI
agents, Islamic leaders,
experts on terrorism and sev-
eral other qualified profes-
sionals.
Topics covered included
International, domestic, tran-
sitional and state-sponsored
terrorism; Understanding the
Middle East; Recognising ter-
rorist indicators and warning
signs; Explosives and explo-
sive devices; Al Qaeda elec-
tronic timing and firing mech-
anisms; Suicide bombers; and
officer training issues.
Sponsored
The course was sponsored
by the Counter Terrorism-
Counter Intelligence Group,
the Joint Terrorism Task
Force, the Houston Police
Department and the Federal
Bureau of Investigation,
Houston Office.
"The knowledge and train-
ing that I gained from this
course are immeasurable and
can only serve its true purpose
by being utilised to train and
teach others involved in the
protection of our country,"
said Ferguson, 33.
Ferguson has also been
trained in bio-terrorism, chem-
ical-terrorism and interna-
tional terrorism. He is a mem-
ber of the Grant's Town
Urban Renewal Project, Bail-


lou Hill Road and Cameron
Street.
"it is extremely important
that Bahamians understand
what terrorism is and how it
impacts us," said Ferguson, a
16-year police veteran.
Three years ago, the
Bahamas 'was placed
on a 'soft target' list for ter-
rorists.
"It's no secret that ours is a
tourism industry," he said.
"And, whereas we as Bahami-
ans may not be directly
involved or affected by ter-
rorism attacks, we do serve a
large tourist population.
"It is in this vein that I
decided to undertake studies
in terrorism and counter ter-
rorism activities.
"If in the unfortunate event
that we do come under attack,
it is my trust and hope that we
will have enough persons suf-
ficiently trained to deal with


the direct impact until imme-
diate help can arrive."
Ferguson has a Bachelor's
degree in political science and
an Associate Degree in
human resources manage-
ment.
He is pursuing his Master's
degree in public administra-
tion, international relations,
and diplomacy.
He was extended the invi-
tation to attend this course by
one of the co-ordinators, Fred
Kessler, a regional director for
the FBI in the Houston area.
They met earlier at similar
courses.
"When he contacted m&"
Ferguson recalled, "he si
my name was the first to cop
to his mind when he was
putting the course together
because I had shown such
enthusiasm along the lines of
counter-terrorism related
activities."


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THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 23


up MI 6%

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Syndicated ontent

Available from Commercial News Providers"







Fk'. rk itr

Burns House Group
Star Performer Honored by
Moet Hennessy
Answell Johnson Brand Representative
For Hennessy In The Bahamas
Recognized For Exemplary Performance


Pictured L-R:Wendell Seymour-Marketing Manager, Butler & Sands
and Wholesale Wines & Spirits; Dominique Schewebach Purchasing
Manager; Burns House Group; Pascal Bony Market Manager, Moet
Hennessy Latin America & Caribbean; Answell Johnson Hennessy
Brand Representative, Butler & Sands; Guillaume Duverdier- Group
Commnercial Manager, Burns House Group and Neko Grant Group
Corporate Manager; Burns House Group


April 2005; Nassau
Bahamas -- In a surprise
ceremony held in the
boardroom of The Butler &
Sands corporate offices,
Answell Johnson was
honored by Moet Hennessy
for his effective
management of sales growth
and brand building
initiatives.
On hand to present Mr.
Johnson with a personally.
engraved crystal decanter of
Richard Hennessy, the finest
Cognac in the Hennessy
portfolio, was Mr. Pascal
Bony, Market Manager,
Moet Hennes'sy Latin
America and Caribbean. Mr.
Bony, who was enthusiastic
in his praise of Mr.
Johnson's performance,
reiterated that Moet
Hennessy has complete trust
in Answell and his handling


of the brand as well as in the
management of the Burns
House Group and their
support of him.
Answell who joined the
.company in 1995 became
the brand representative for
Hennessy in 1998 and from
then to now has increased
the sales of the brand by an
unheard of 600 percent.
"We all know that what is
impossible for most people
is not impossible for
Answell" said Guillaume
Duverdier, the Group
Commercial Manager for
The Bums House Group.
"Answell is an example
within the organization
because the performance
that has been achieved
shows his dedication and
passion for the Hennessy
brand."


Starting at $24 619.00


I',License And Inspection To Birthday, Floor Mats. Full Tank Of Gas,
3 Year Road Side Assistance, First 5 Services To 12,000 Miles Free


3 Year or 36,000 Mile Warranty

See The Full Line Of All Your Favourile Fords At



FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD
i THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com r WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


The data generated from the survey will be used to measure each,
sector's contribution to the Gross National Product
of The Bahamas.
So, if you are involved in the production of goods and services, you
can help contribute to our national statistics as well as learn
more about your sector's performance by completing the
Annual Business Establishment Survey questionnaire accurately
and in a timely fashion.,

All survey questionnaires should be returned to the
Department of Statistics.

A ,, ,,


a


_--~111-1"


_ I~--~------


THE TRIBUNE


.







PAGE 24,THURSDAY MAYT26N2005OTHLTRNBUN


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Plumbago
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Oleander
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Ixora
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Weed Killers
Irrigation Supplies
Pond Supplies
Umbrellas
Shade Cloth
Landscape Fabric
Mulch and Soils


MODYSTRA am **


Fertilizers, Fungicides

and Insecticides for

Lawns, Shrubs &

Orchids


/?


~ ___ _I __


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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shark, needs


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Travel is valid from 7/4/05 -11/2/05, and must be purchased by 6/03/05. Fares do not include government imposed taxes, fees and charges of approximately $138. The above advertised fare does not include the addition of a $32. one way [$64 round trip] security and fuel surcharge which will be added to the total fare
as art ofthe government acres fees and charges Offer valid for Bahamas originating passeners only Full ticketing for the entire journey must be made at time of booking No refunds are permitted Minimum stay is 5 days and the maximum stay is 2 months 7 day advance purchase required Child pays 75% of fare
ant pays 100 of fare. Fares booked in N class will not earn Flying Club miles This offer may not be combined with any other Virgin Atlantic promotion or other discount offer Subject to availability and capacity controlled Fares are subject to change without notice, Other restrictions apply 2005 Virgin Atlantic Airways


- -- -, --,---


- loqmw w l


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26,_2005, PAGE 25


to 4ma,


- ,----L ~31) `~











Water & Sewerage Corporation




Essay Copetition

The Water and Sewerage Corporation is proud to serve the' community by encouraging young
people to participate in worthwhile and rewarding programs such as its National Essay Competition.
This is the second year the Corporation has sponsored this competition and we look forward to
doing so for many years to come, as it is our way of giving back to the community particularly the
youth of our nation.

The topic; Groundwater Supply Versus Alternative Sources. of Water Supply was chosen based on
the Corporation's current and future means of providing water to its customers throughout the
Bahamas.

The prizes offered were:


1st place $3000 Scholarship Award
2nd place LaptopComputer


3rd place $1000 Gift Certificate
4th place -$500 Gift Certificate


CYRILEE THOMPSON
Nassau Christain Academy
First Place Winner


CYRILEE THOMPSON
Presenting her Essay


CYRILEE THOMPSON
First Place Winner Receving her Award from Minister
Bradley Roberts $3000.00 scholarship


KEZIA ETIENNE
Second Place Winner


KEZIA ETIENNE
Presenting her Essay


KEZIA ETIENNE
Second Place Winner Receiving her Award / Laptop
Computer


CRYSTAL CASSIDY ROLLE
R.M. Bailey High School
Third Place Winner


CRYSTAL CASSIDY ROLLE
Presenting her Essay


CRYSTAL CASSIDY ROLLE
Third Place Winner Receiving her Award from WSC
Chairman Donald Demeritte, Gift Certificate $1000


SEAN D. STRACHAN
Presenting his Essay


SEAN D. STRACHAN
Fourth Place Winner Receiving his Award from WSC
Chairman Donald Demeritte $500 Gift Certificate


TEL: 325 5742 WEBSITE: www.wsc.com.bs


SEAN D. STRACHAN
St. John's College
Fourth Place Winner


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PR + MARKETING DEPT. *






THE TRIBUNE


*


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$3


Fila |
Women'
JFGT950


*


Fila
Men's
Stardu
RAnnim


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 27
UPPER LEVEL
TOWN CENTRE MALL
PHONE: 322-6593


4


Fila
Men's
Vuel P


_____ AS


Fila
Men's
Tennis


Fila
Men's
FGTi0


Fila Mito
Running
Tennis
White


SNike
Your Men's
Choice Alternati
Basketbal
White/Silve
Reg. 179.99

s p SYour Men's
Choice Air Zoom
Thrive II
White Blue
Reg. 89.99


Men's
cotton Plaid
Shorts
i699


Reg. $27.99


Nike
Men's
Devastate
Cross Traini
IBlack


Adidas
Men's
Attune
nRunnina


American
Legacy
Men's 5Pckt.


F9 9


Reebok
Women's
Club Pro


I White/Silver
Re. $79.99


Nike |g
Women'
Walker
Wide Width
White/Navy

And 1
Men's
Represent
Basketball
White/Silver
Reg. $89.99


in
aimer
te/Blu
. $89.


Men's
Maverick i
Basketball
White/Navy
and White


Russell Men's
Athletic Mesh
Jerse s or Shorts

$4 99


99


$109.


SHumel
Men's Nylon
Warm Up Suit


Ice Women's
S/L Hooded
Pants Set

$r 10)99


Body Glove &
XOXO Women's
Swim Suits

$199


Everlast
Logo Tank Tops
Or Bike Tights

Each


~O'LaLa

2 pc. Short Set
;4 t 99.


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THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, MAY 26, 200b, PAGE 29


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THE TRIBUNE


I- --)


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THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


SECTION .


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Target fiscal deficit





to rise 5.5% to $172m


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor.
THE 3 per cent real eco-
nomic growth that the
Bahamas enjoyed in 2004
"could continue for the rest
of this decade", the acting
prime minister said yester-
day, with the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) pre-
dicting 3.5 per cent growth
in 2005.
In unveiling the 2005-2006
Budget in the House of
Assembly yesterday, Cyn-
thia Pratt said economic
growth in 2005 would large-
ly be driven by the "volume
of investment projects com-
ing on stream".
She added: "There is*
every likelihood this strong
rate of growth will be sus-
tained beyond 2005 due to
capital inflows approved and
coming on stream in these
years."
Mrs Pratt said that while
the Government would
heed the recent meeting of
SEE page eight.


H By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government yesterday
predicted that its target fiscal
deficit will increase by $9 mil-
lion or 5.5 per cent in fiscal
2005-2006 to $172 million, as its
struggles to earn adequate rev-
enues and maintain an accept-
able debt to gross domestic
product (GDP) ratio continue.
Statistics accompanying the
Government's 2005-2006 Bud-
get showed that the GFS fiscal
deficit, which strips out redemp-
tion of $55 million in debt prin-
cipal, would increase upon the
$163 million deficit that is now
predicted for fiscal 2004-2005.

Debt
In her address to the House
of Assembly yesterday, acting
prime minister Cynthia Pratt
said this year's Budget was aim-
ing to keep the government
debt to GDP ratio at 38 per
cent, below the 40 per cent dan-
ger threshold,
The 40 per cent threshold is
an "absolute ceiling" as far as
government policy is concerned,
as going above this level would
leave the Bahamas badly
exposed to an external shock to
its economy, and make it


lic hospitals.
James Smith, the minister of
finance, struck a relatively
upbeat tone yesterday, though,
saying the Bahamas "ought to
be out of the woods" if it man-
ages to avoid a major hit from a
hurricane during fiscal 2005-
2006.
He added that the GFS fis-
cal deficit for 2004-2005 was
likely to be nearer 2.4 per cent
of GDP, as opposed to 2.8 per
cent that had been predicted -
and has been projected for
2005-2006 due to a rebound*
in revenue collections follow-
ing Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne.

Revenues
The Government is now fore-
casting that it will earn $1.052
billion in revenues for 2004-
2005, compared to the $959
predicted in the Budget last
May, reducing the recurrent
deficit to $123 million from $132
million.
However, capital expenditure
for 2004-2005 has risen from
$116 million to a likely $148 mil-


8 ACTING Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt reads the Budget
yesterday in the House of Assembly.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


extremely difficult to borrow
funds on the international cap-
ital markets at suitable rates of
interest.
The Government is thus
seeking to being the govern-
ment debt to GDP ratio down
as far as possible to 30 per cent
within a five-year period, and
it is projected to be at 37.5 per
cent at the end of this fiscal
year.
Mrs Pratt also said the nar-
rowness of the Bahamas' tax
system and its dependence on
customs duties was making it
"increasingly hard to achieve"
the Government's third key fis-
cal target:- revenue.tollection
that was equivalent .to 20 per


cent of GDP. For fiscal 2005-
2006 this ratio is forecast to be
18.4 per cent, improving the fol-
lowing year to 18.7 per cent.
She pointed out that missing
out on 1 per cent of this, or col-
lecting revenues equal to just,
19 per cent of GDP, meant the
Government lost a sum equiva-
lent to $60 million.
The acting prime minister
said the $60 million was equal to
two thirds of the subsidies paid
to Bahamasair, the Water '&
Sewerage Corporation and the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas; half the com-
bined amount spent on the
police and defence forces, and
half the amount spend on pub-


lion, with recurrent expenditure
rising by a whopping $84 mil-
lion above projections to $1.175
billion. The GFS deficit is stay-
ing at $163 million.
The 2005-2006 Budget was
essentially an unexciting docu-
ment, seemingly intent on hold-
ing the course and avoiding any
tax rises that knock the econo-
my back, with the hope that for-
eign direct investment will stim-
ulate growth that eventually
feeds through into the fiscal
position.
However, the increase in the
projected GFS deficit is likely to
further discourage those who
are concerned about the public
finances, and the Government's
seeming inability to rein in
recurrent expenditure, which
goes on fixed costs such as
wages, salaries and rents.
Recurrent expenditure in.fis-
cal 2005-2006 is forecast to
increase by 3.9 per cent upon
the 2004-2005 Budget or $39
million to $1.214 billion. This
represents a 5.5 per cent or $64
million increase on the project-
SEE page five


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Cable Beach deal

generates $27.8m

to pay outstanding

taxes and bills
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE sale of the Radisson Cable Beach Resort and Philip
Ruffin's two hotels on the Cable Beach strip generated $27.8
million to help pay taxes and Bills owed to the Government,
public utilities and hotel union pension funds, it was disclosed
yesterday.
Obie Wilchcombe, minister of tourism, said the sale of the
Hotel Corporation's Radisson resort, plus the Wyndham Crys-
tal Palace and Nassau Beach Hotel properties, as part of Baha
Mar's $1.2 billion Cable Beach redevelopment had "consider-
SEE page five


'No plans" for VAT


in the near future

0 By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ACTING Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt yesterdaypledged
that the Government had "no plans" to implement a value
added tax (VAT) "now or in the near, immediate future",
adding that it would continue to enhance the collection of
existing taxes through measures such as amendments to the
Stamp Tax Act and Casino Act.
Unveiling the Government's spending and revenue-raising
plans for fiscal 2005-2006, Mrs Pratt said that while there
appeared to be a consensus that the Bahamas would have .to rad-
ically alter its revenue raising mechanisms through a switch to
VAT in five to 10 years, it could not be effected in the short
term.
This was impossible, she added, because the switch to a VAT
tax would involve a great deal of investment and capital plan-
ning, plus consultation with affected parties such as the business
community and the general public.

Pressure
The Bahamas faced international pressure to reform its tax-
ation structure de to its ongoing negotiations to enter the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) and other free trade arrangements,
plus domestic pressure from the fact that the Government was
not earning sufficient revenues to pay for the required level of
public services. The revenues the Government needs to raise are
equivalent to 20 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP).
Until then, Mrs Pratt said the Government would "continue
to enhance the administration and collection of existing revenues
until this process was exhausted".
Among the revenue-enhancing methods to be introduced in
the 2005-2006 Budget are an amendment to the Casino Tax Act,
allowing casino taxes to be paid to the Gaming Board and
SEE page five


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PAGE B, TURSDA, MA 26,2005UHEITIBUN


Ignore the potential


ofIT


at your company's peril


* By Caroline Moncur
Many, if not
most, busi-
nesses in the
Bahamas
perceive the
Information Technology (IT)
division within their organisa-
tions as a cost burden. This is
highlighted by the fact that the
majority of IT spending is
devoted to maintenance and
support items. The IT Man-
ager is also largely perceived
as no more than a high-level
technician.

Value of Technology
The perception of the IT
Division in many companies
around the world has been
evolving as business leaders
reap the financial rewards of


an innovative and strategic IT
Division. It is now widely
accepted that technology can
deliver:
Improved business per-
formance
Effective business intelli-
gence
Improved and integrated
business processes

Success
The success of the 7-Eleven
organisation in the US, as.
recently reported in CIO Mag-,
azine, is a good example of
how IT can be used to
advance a business. The com-
pany has experienced 33 con-
secutive quarters of improve-
ment in sales, which,its chief
executive attributes primarily
to the company leveraging;
IT's capabilities.


The growth in sales can be
traced back to a chief execu-
tive-sponsored investment in
IT to improve the decision
support systems at each store.
This gave the organisation
access to crucial business intel-
ligence: daily information on
customer-buying trends. Now,
the chief executive states:
"Technology is a key part of
our strategy, and our CIO is a
key member of our executive
committee and involved in our
strategic planning process."

Adding value to the
bottom line
For companies in the
Bahamas to take advantage


of IT's potential, there are sig-
nificant changes required,
both within the executive
team and within the IT Divi-
sion.
Assess
Executives must first assess
how separate the IT function
is from the decision making
and strategic planning func-
tion of their organisation. If
the answer to all the following
questions is 'No', -executives
will first need to close the gap
between the IT Manager and
the executive team before
being able to harness the full
potential of IT:
Have you, as an executive,
used IT to advance the organ-
:;;;. s? w' ; -.' n-." i *- "".t .7 ,en ::iS :


isation's strategic goals?
Is the board involved in
the development of the IT
strategy?
Is there a long term com-
mitment to IT in the organi-
sation's financial planning?;
Address
In closing the gap, there will
be a need to address a range
of barriers. For example, there
may well be. skills shortages
within your IT Division, which
means your IT Manager must
spend a significant portion of
their ay fire fighting.. Qr .
there may be a need to
address cultural issues in
changing the perception of IT
amongst the executive team.

Changes required in the IT
Manager role
There are also changes "
required within the IT Man-
ager role. According to the
Gartner Group, the IT Man-
ager must be capable of:
a. Delivering an efficient
core of IT services
b. Building a strong chief
executive relationship
c. Aligning the. IT Division
with business strategy
d. Paying attention to secu-
rity and risk
e. Building business process
capability


...M


IT ma
been pri


'n ertaI
.indersta


and marketing. They must be
able to delegate and develop
high performing IT teams.
IT Managers must also
learn how to build credibility
with the executive team. They
cannot assume that the exec-
utive team value or even know
what they do. IT. managers
must learn to value what they
do in business terms and com-
municate that value success-
fully.
Division
No business division has the
.potential to deliver as much
growth and competitive.
advantage as the IT Division
does. Comripanies that can suc-
cessfully incorporate their IT
Divisions into their strategic
planning and decision-making
processes will reap these
rewards..




To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail Makin-
gITwork@providencetg.com


About the Author:
Caroline Moncur is manag-
er, business development at
Providence Technology


Group. Ms Moncur has over
a agerS ;. -six years' business develop-
ment experience within the IT
nagers have always .Industry. Providence Tech-
marily assessed on nology Group is one of the
Suie, Bahlamas'.eadig 17jfirms,
ger-illnea :fa new -,..p-eialis ng in NtYrking
oQdelf~r i||^ '|Eut.~Csofsultb.i*& Advi-
Maifager, n.eeads' to sv ri Services and Softw.are
nd business :finance::: Solutions. ;
. ........ .. . .. . . . . . ..S,' . ;


reta'


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I PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


^








THE RIBUE I l~flLIMI MM!XiCAJItBUSINESS o


Companies


are urged


to


remove


'turfdoms'


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
B ahamian busi-
nesses were yes-
terday urged to
rid themselves of
internal "turf-
doms", where business units
aggressively competed against
one another to the detriment of:
the company.. ,: : :
Charles Sealy, chief operating
officer for Doctors Hospital, said
that in order for organizations,
to perform at their best, they
must be able to attract the best
and brightest mindsand become-
the employer of choice.-
As a result of extraordinary
vacancies and the need.for man-
power, the correct response to
recruitment must centre on 'best
fit'. Mr Sealy said that many
times employers give in due to
financial costs or other prevail-
ing factors to their own detri-
ment, but it was important that
employers invest in talent man-
agement and find persons who
are capable and willing.
The final ingredient for com-
panies looking for the perfect fit
is the 'it factor', he said, noting
that the recruitment process
must be able to find an individ-
ual who sees the prize and is
gung-ho to help the organiza-
tion attain it. The successful can-
didate is someone who will
accept the hurdles in the way,
but is adamant not to be dis-
suaded.
Mr Sealy suggested that com-
panies may want to employ pro-
ficiency testing, multiple or peer
interviews, role play interview
and extensive background
checks were applicable.


He added that transparency
and early declaration of critical
information reduces the chance
of failure or perceived breaches
by either party, and that expec-
tations can be agreed upon
upfront.
"The truth, however, is that
even though we would want to
find the ideal individual in every
instance, we are sometimes, too,
the victim of circumstance and.
are many times completed to get
a body in the space. When faced
with this dilemma, a strong.
defined culture must be estab-.
lished so as to allow the person.
to walk in harmony with the
direction of the institution," Mr
Sealy said.
Companies
Addressing the 8th Annual
Corporate Wellness Forum held
at the Radisson Cable Beach
Resort, Mr Sealy used the,
acronym 'ROCKETS' recruit-
ment, orientation, collaboration,
knowledge, equipment, time-out
and succession planning to
demonstrate what facilities were
needed by companies to incor-
porate, maintain and improve
their human resources and level
of productivity.
He told participants that new
members to any corporate team
should be provided with the best
opportunity to succeed. The ori-
entation process is often
described as too little, too late,
with researchers showing that in
many companies an 80:20 rule
exists, where 20 per cent of the
companies' employees yield 80
per cent of the positive results.
As a result, Mr Sealy said
employers may want to ensure
that new hirers have as their


WENDY Craigg has become the Central Bank of the Bahamas'
first female governor, moving up from her post as deputy governor
to succeed Julian Francis, who is taking over as co-chair of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority at the end of this month.
In sending "a deep appreciation" for the work performed byMr
'Francis on behalf of the Government and Parliament, acting prime
minister Cynthia Pratt described Ms Craigg as having "a record of
distinguished service to the [Central] Bank".,
Mrs Pratt added that the Gove nent;had also established a com-
mittee of all the nation's financial services regulators "to consider
the options for consolidation of these agencies into one or more reg-
ulatory organisations". .
Represented on this committee will be the Ministry of Finance,
Central Bank of the Bahamas, Registrar of Insurance, Securities
Commission. of the Bahamas and Registrar General.
The committee will be chaired by James Smith, minister of state
for finance, and will have the heads of each supervisory body
among its membership .
Mrs Pratt said the committee's "bi-partisan" approach was evi-.
denced by the fact that Sir William Allen, the former FNM finance
minister, had made himself available to advise the committee and
participate in its work.


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mentor this 20 per cent, so they
can appreciate the quality and
excellence expected.
Orientation must also be con-
sistent with the bag of goods that
was given to the would-be 'new-
guy' during the recruitment
process, Mr Sealy said, adding
that a successful process must
have at its heart constant com-
munication to reduce the oppor-
tunity for misunderstanding.;
Mr Sealy said: "It recognises
and makes allowances for cul-
tural and individual differences.
This process initiates, the
requirement of providing the
individual with te tools and
details to effect their jobs. Many
times, great expectations- ate
wagedeind therabsencehof'the-
*needed resources or thepres-
ence of incorrect resources."
The corporate culture must
also be clear and consistent in
order to combat opposing or-
threatening behaviour that may
be acceptable in other instifu-
tions or social environments.
Managers should, at a mini-
mum on an annual basis, assess
the performance and productiv-
ity of the employees. They
should also look to establish
growth plans and opportunities
for self-actualisation.
Mr Sealy said: "Realised pas-
sion is fertile and germinates in a
culture that promotes integrity,
empowerment and high perfor-
mance. The culture establishes
the boundaries, fairly and
unashamedly rewards and recog-
nises excellence in performance,
while at the same time shuns and
appropriately discourages dele-
terious or substandard perfor-.
mance."
Participants were told that a
passionate company must have


at its genesis purposed vision,
supported by a clearly under-
stood mission. It is this com-
mon sense of purpose, whether
religious or secular, that acts as a
powerful motivational force for
even the largest and most com-
plicated companies. It is there-


fore important that the crafters
of the intent and direction of the
organisation completely believe,
espouse, model and enforce this
vision.
Mr Sealy said: "Leaders must
walk the talk, and not just expect
it from those whom they govern


or superintend. This is where the
rubber meets the road. Do as I
say, not as I do, has quenched
and destroyed the passion of
many individuals. Leaders appli-
cation of 'why we exist' is essen-
tial to the survivability and a
consistent modelled behaviour."


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RESPONSIBILITIES
* Managing complex Internal Audit work across all businesses and locations of the Bank to provide
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Effectively managing relationships with designated Line-of-Business executives
Reporting of Audit matters to Executive Directors, Risk Committees, Audit Committees and Boards
in the Group
The Senior Audit Manager deputises for the Executive Director, Internal Audit

PREREQUISITES
Qualified Accountant or equivalent with university degree
* Proven track record at Senior Audit Management level in Finance or the Financial Services industry
* Expert-level knowledge of Auditing, Audit techniques and Banking products
* Extensive experience of Audit, Finance or Financial Services in a multinational, multiregulatory
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Apart from the opportunities for professional growth, we offer an attractively structured compensation
and reward package as well as performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed resumes should be submitted no later than 3rd June, 2005 to:

Lisa Watson
Internal Audit Department
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office
Warrens
St. Michael
Barbados :. .
Email: lisa.watson@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be. contacted.


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Manager and Senior

Successful candidates for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years
professional public accounting experience, two of which will have been at a
supervisory level. Candidates for the Senior position will have approximately
two to four years of work experience in a public accounting firm. The Manager
and Senior positions will require the individual to hold a CPA, CA or other
professional designation recognized by, the Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants.

Entry Level

Candidates must have obtained the necessary education requirements qualifying
them to write the CPA examinations or have already done so.

KPMG's entry level program provides financial support to write the CPA
examinations including travel costs, hotel accommodations, paid study leave and
the costs of revision courses such as the Becker Review.

Excellent opportunities exist in our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden your
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and benefits packages.
Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification end a copy of their
transcripts if applying for an entry level position, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau,
Bahamas or tdavie. kma- .coim.bs.
AUDIT m TAX m ADVISORY

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Inunovnr, nrlni rCi, ~ir^u7;i, ~ir~i'itji~i~


THE TRIBUNE


- "M


Craig to replace Francis

as Central Bank governor


.. I









PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


Government injects another





$ 1m into start-ups fund


W By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
The Government is
investing a fur-
ther $1 million
into the proposed
venture capital
fund to assist small business
start-ups, it was announced yes-
terday, bringing the total ini-
tial amount to $2 million.
Acting Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt made the announce-
ment during yesterday's 2005-
2006 Budget communication,
delighting small businessmen.
The increased funding is
expected to provide desper-
ately needed support for entre-
preneurs crying out for capital
funding, said Marlon Johnson,
vice-president of the Small
Business Association of the
Bahamas, the principal organ-


isation that has long lobbied
for the creation of such a fund.
Expressing his happiness
over the Government's deci-
sion, Mr Johnson reiterated the
Association's call for the Gov-
ernment to increase the fund's
bottom line to $5 million.
Future
He said, though, that short
of this goal he was pleased with
the Government's decision and
hoped it would maintain its
commitment to the develop-
ment of the fund over the fore-
seeable future.
Mr Johnson said: "One of
the key issues raised consis-
tently by the Small Business
Association is the whole access
to capital question. This
increase will allow entrepre-'
neurs to get the capital they
are often starved for. "This is a


very positive step, along with
the Government's commitment
to the private management of
the fund, which means there
will be no political influence
on the board. This bodes well
for the independence of the
fund going forward."
SBA president Johnny Out-
ten said the Association appre-
ciated the increase, particular-
ly in light of budgetary con-
straints for the period. He
added that with the Govern-
ment's push to adequately fund
the venture capital fund, the
private sector will also be called
on to make a contribution.
Mr Outten said the addition
of $1 million to the fund means
that more entrepreneurs will
be able to get assistance, and
he congratulated the Govern-
ment for having the foresight
and taking a leading role in this
endeavour.


A PIME I


Moves afoot to bridge productivity, wage gap at Bahamasair


N By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE chairman of the Gov-
ernment-appointed Bahama-
sair privatisation committee,
Basil Sands, said yesterday that
officials from McKinsey &
Company are expected to meet
with the airline's executive
management team and union


officials in a bid to bridge the
gap between productivity lev-
els and wages.
Mr Sands said once this
phase of the consultations had
been concluded and prospec-
tive investors canvassed, the
Government will be present-
ed with a comprehensive plan
outlining productivity, wage
and fleet recommendations,
along with prospective investor


prerequisites to privatisation.
He said the privatisation
process was on track, and that
a final report was likely to be
presented to the Government
within a 60-day period.
Carrier
McKinsey & Company, the
firm selected to prepare the
national flag carrier for pri-


She College of The Bahamas.


announces that groundbreaking for its new

COLLrthern BIVERhamasITY OFampus which was

scheduled on Thursday, 19th May, 20D5 in

reeport,ducating and Trand Baham, has been

postponed The groundbreaking has

www.coben rescheduled tntatively.b t

Thursday, 4th August, 2005 to

coincide with celebrating the 50th

anniversary of the city of Freeport.

Further notice will be given at a

later date,





THE COLLEGE t UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS
Educating and Training Bahamians

Tel: (242) 302-4499- Fax: (242) 302-4539 P. 0. Box N-4912 Nassau, The Bahamas
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vatisation, had already pre-
sented a raw analysis of where
Bahamasair was in compari-
son to its low cost carrier com-
petitors, with consideration
also being given to the suit-
ability of the fleet. The airline
is seeking to realign its cost
structure and address balance
sheet issues to be able to
secure suitable partners that
would sustain Bahamasair
without support from the Pub-
lic Treasury.
Mr Sands indicated that
union officials have expressed
their willingness to work along
with management and the pri-
vatisation committee to assist
in reducing the losses of the
airline, ultimately making it
profitable, following meetings
between the two sides.


To date, McKinsey & Com-
pany have presented prelimi-
nary perspectives to the pri-
vatisation committee, the Gov-
ernment and the four unions
representing Bahamasair's
staff.
Focused
At this stage, this has
focused mainly on the state of
the airline industry, Bahama-
sair's operational deficiencies,
and productivity and wage dis-
parities in relation to the air-
line's competitors.
As part of its mandate,
McKinsey & Company is
expected to submit a detailed
analysis of Bahamasair's oper-
ations, make recommendations
for operational improvements,


develop an economically sus-
tainable business plan, estab-
lish a valuation range for the
airline and identify potential
investors or funding sources.
The privatisation committee
is comprised of representatives
from Bahamasair's Board of
Directors and other govern-
ment and industry experts, in
collaboration with representa-
tives from McKinsey & Com-
pany.
The committee has also
worked jointly with all stake-
holders, including Bahama-
sair's executive management,
union officials, prospective
investors, government min-
istries, tourism industry exec-
utives, business persons and
the public since the initial con-
tract signing in January.


.H.. ... ...


Visit our websie at www.cob.edu.bs


BUSINESS


~P~Ra~ 31 1 lr I I ,,


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 5B


Cable Beach deal generates $27.8m


to pay


FROM page one

ably benefited" the Treasury,
hotel pension funds and the
likes of BEC and BTC to the
tune of $27.8 million.
He did not break down how
much was owed by the Radis-
son and Mr Ruffin's properties
respectively, although it is
understood that the latter's
resorts owed between $15-$18
million.
Mr Wilchcombe told the
House of Assembly that the
Government did not have to


assume a
a result
as happe
ous admi
over thel
on the fo
Hotel, wt
The m
that the
sold to t
$8.5 mill
sador Be,
Clubs Br
lion. Bot
posed of
ration.
Mr Wi


outstanding taxi

ny debt obligations as of the $45 million paid by Baha sury, while the remaining pro-
of the Baha Mar deal, Mar for the Radisson and other ceeds were used to pay
ened when the previ- government-related assets at accounts payables, fees, wind-
inistration had to take Cable Beach, some $18 million ing down costs, and termina-
$16.5 million mortgage was used to satisfy an $18 tion of the previous manage-
rmer Royal Bahamian million loan the Hotel Corpo- ment agreement for the Radis-
hich is now Sandals. ration took out from Scotia- son that was held by the Myers
inister of tourism said bank. Group.
Royal Bahamian was The loan was taken out to Mr Wilchcombe said that as
he Sandals chain for help finance repairs to 150 part of the Heads of Agree-
ion, with the Ambas- rooms at the Radisson that ment, Baha Mar would create a
ach Hotel (now Super- were damaged by Hurricane programme for making loans
eezes) sold for $7 mil- Michelle in late 2001, and to to small businesses involved in
h properties were dis- cover operating losses incurred agriculture and fisheries, with
by the Hotel Corpo- that year. the intention of featuring their
A further $10 million was produce in restaurants at the
lchcombe said that out deposited with the Public Trea- development.


s and bills


The minister indicated that
Baha Mar was not receiving
favourable treatment in being
allowed to cease paying casino
fees to the Hotel Corporation
until the remodelled casino re-
opened in 2009, saying that all
casinos had been allowed to
discontinue such fee payments
in 1999.
Mr Wlchcombe added that
amendments to Stamp Tax leg-
islation that were foreshadowed
in the Baha Mar Heads of
Agreement were necessary to
bring the incentives granted to
the Cable Beach developers


into line with those given to
Kerzner International for its
Phase III development on Par-
adise Island.
As Atlantis is on Paradise
Island, Mr Wil'chcombe
explained that it enjoyed the
status of a Family Island, and
was exempt from stamp duty
on all materials required for
construction, equipping and
furnishings, plus construction
plant and vehicles.
To grant Baha Mar the same
incentives, the Government
found that legislative amend-
ments were necessary.


'No plans' for VAT


in the near future


FROM page one

enabling better monitoring of payments to
ensure these are timely.
Another amendment is being targeted to
close "loopholes" in the .Stamp Tax Act and
improve administration of revenues it collects,
while other efforts will involve the Real Prop-
erty Tax Act improving the assessment process
to bring more properties on to the register and
enforcing the stipulation that to qualify for the
exemption on properties valued at $250,000
and under, homeowners must first pay off all
outstanding real property taxes.
Other initiatives involve the introduction of
cash receipting systems to replace manual sys-
tems, further reducing revenue leakages, and the
use of major credit cards to pay taxes and fees
owed to government agencies.
Mrs Pratt said "a new category of trade offi-
cers" will be created to act as compliance offi-
cers, reviewing and analysing the collection and
administration of revenues generated by Busi-
ness Licences, Stamp Tax, Ticket Tax and Hotel
Room Tax.


Mrs Pratt said the Government faced a
"major challenge' in collecting the revenue
owed to it, saying that some activities could be
transformed into others not covered by existing
taxes, citing the example of renting out of homes
and apartments as investment properties.
The acting prime minister made a thinly-
veiled call to the public sector workers and their
unions to exercise "restraint" in their talks on a
new industrial agreement, given the current
state of the public finances and ongoing fiscal
deficit, saying they needed to take into account
the capacity of the Consolidated Fund to meet
any pay rise.
The 3 per cent or $39 million rise in recurrent
expenditure to $1.214 billion for 2005-2006,
compared to this fiscal year, was largely driven
by provisions in the Ministry of Finance's
estimates for pay increases for public servants
and improved benefits for retired civil
servants.
The only fee increases planned for fiscal 2005-
2006 are air navigational fees and related
charges in the Family Islands, to assist with air-
port upgrades, plus a passenger facility fee for
the Bahamas' major airports.


Target fiscal deficit to rise 5.5% to $172m


FROM page one

ed outturn for 2004-20005, and
it was noticeable that the Bud-
get communication did not
speak to reducing recurrent
expenditure or the size of the
public service, instead focusing
on revenue enhancement.
Education received the
greatest share of recurrent
expenditure allocation at $216
million or 17.8 per cent of the
total, but the next greatest
spending allocation was for
debt servicing, which was
granted a $188 million or 15
per cent share.
This was slightly higher than
the $185 million allocated to
health. Ministries with an eco-
nomic focus are Tourism,
which was allocated $78 mil-
lion or 6 per cent of the recur-
rent total; the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries,
which gained $34 million; the
Ministry of Finance, which got
$44 million, with some $24
million of that earmarked for
public service pay and bene-


fits increases; and $4 million
each to the Ministry of Trade
and Industry and the Ministry
of Financial Services and
Investments.
Capital expenditure for
2005-2006, meanwhile, is fore-
cast to be $165 million, an $17
million or 11.4 per cent rise
on the $148 million now pro-
jected for 2004-2005.
However, while total recur-
rent revenues are predicted to
rise by 9 per cent or $93 mil-
lion in 2005-2006 to $1.145 bil-
lion, this still generates a
recurrent deficit of $69 mil-
lion. Throw in the capital
deficit of $158 million, and the
fiscal deficit before stripping
out the debt principal of $55
million for the GFS measure-
ment is $227 million.
And the total government
debt, despite having risen at a
relatively slower rate in 2004-
2005, is forecast to have
increased to $2.33 million at
year-end.
The Ministry of Finance's
fiscal projections for 2005-2006


assume GDP growth in cur-
rent prices of 5 per cent per
annum, and also assume that
recurrent revenue will grow inr
2006-2007 and 2007-2008 by
7.5 per cent as investment
inflows strengthen the econo-
my.
No provision, though, has
been made for any proceeds
from the possible privatisa-
tions of Bahamasair and the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC).
For 2006-2007, recurrent
expenditure is already forecast
to increase slightly again,
growing from $1.214 billion
this year to $1.28 billion, with
revenues strengthening to
$1.22 billion.
This would produce a recur-
rent deficit of $60 million
which, combined with a capital
deficit of $165 million, gives a
total deficit for 2006-2007 of
$225 million. Stripping out
debt redemption payments of
$90 million gives a projected
GFS deficit of $135 million,
some 2.1 per cent of GDP.


SIR LYNDEN PINDLING
ESTATES
(Nassau)


the back. Grounds


All that lot of land having an area of
5,000 sq. ft., being lot 2480 of the said
subdivision situate immediately
eastward of Pinewood Gardens. This
property consist of a 3 year old single
storey house with floor rea of 1,071
sq. ft. The house is comprised of 3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living, dining
area and kitchen. The property is on
elevated terrain and yard is open with
chain link fencing on the sides and
are neatly maintained with minimal landscaping in place.


Appraisal: $144,900.00
Heading south along East Street, turn through Pinewood Gardens corner left. Drive
all the way to the round about, continue towards Charles Saunders Highway then take
the first right after round about then first left and first right again. The subject house
is second on theright peach trimmed white.






MUST SELLC C


the front with asphalt paved driveway.


WEST RIDGE ESTATES
(Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 34,089 sq. ft., being lot #152,
of West Ridge Estates Subdivision, zoining
is single family residential with all utilities
awailable. The subject property is on hilly
terrain at the top of a ridge that offers a
lovely view to the northeast. The grounds
are attractively landscaped with a grass
lawn, ornamental shrubs and flowering
plants. Other improvements include chain
link fencing along the sides and rear
boundaries, with a concrete block wall at


There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house is located at the
highest point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate gross floor area of 4,8000 sq.
ft., upstairs consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each with a full bathroom), inlcuding a master
bedroom suite, an office with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist
of living room, formal dining area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious kitchen (at
least 500 sq ft)



Ps- - *C -l. CU Cfrfer** C


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of: 1 -
25 May 2005

52wk-HIl 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ DIv $ P/E Yield
1.10 0.95 Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.208 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.50 8.50 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.4 3.76%
6.35 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.35 6.35 0.00 0.,561 0.330 11.3 5.20%
0.85 0.82 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.187 0.000 4.5 0.00%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.122 0.000 12.3 0.00%
1.06 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.06 1.06 0.00 0.007 0.040 14.3 3.77%
8.50 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.4 2.82%
2.20 1.54 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
8.60 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.60 8.60 0.00 0.673 0.410 12.8 4.77%
1.79 0.39 Doctor's Hospital 1.79 1.79 0.00 0.452 0.000 4.0 0.00%
4.02 3.40 Famguard 4.02 4.02 0.00 0.406 0.240 9.9 5.97%
10.46 8.55 Finco 10.46 10.46 0.00 0.662 0.490 15.8 4.68%
8.46 6.60 FirstCaribbean 8.46 8.46 0.00 0.591 0.330 14.3 3.90%
8.60 8.31 Focol 8.35 8.35 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.7 5.99%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
10.38 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.7 6.81%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.19 6.09 -0.10 6,438 0.184 0.000 33.6 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.979 0.350 5.1 3.50%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Dlv $ Yield %
1.2164 1.1609 Colina Money Market Fund 1.216402*
2.2420 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.2420 **
10.3539 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3539***"
2.2214 2.0941 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.221401"
1.0931 1.0320 Colina Bond Fund 1.093141".

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fldellbt
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidellty
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today, NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningE FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT MAR. 3?, 2005/** AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
S- AS AT MAR. 24, 2005/ AS AT APR. 30, 2005/ "** AS AT APR. 30, 2005
TO TRgDS CAL^j'1OLg4 IAjW-IN0j/ WIT VUj 40.j






PAGE B, TURSDA, MA 26,2005UHEITIBUN


NOTICE

TO: OWNERS OF LAND IN THE NUMBER 1
SUBDIVISION OF LYFORD CAY situate in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence.

Re: Gufo Limited v El Mirador Limited
Supreme Court Action No. 1529 of 2004

TAKE NOTICE that the above-mentioned action has
been commenced by Originating Summons in the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in which
Gufo Limited a company incorporated under the laws of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Court for declarations to the following effect:

(1) that the purported rights of way or easements
granted to purchasers of lots in the Number 1
Subdivision of Lyford Cay over the road
reservations (hereinafter referred to as "the said
roadways") in a 44 acre tract owned by the Plaintiff
and lying immediately South of the Lyford Cay
Boundary Fence and North of West Bay Street
which formed part of the original Plan of the
Number 1 Subdivision of Lyford Cay recorded in
the Crown Lands Office as 335 NP are not
enforceable.
(2) that the restrictive covenants pertaining to
setbacks from the said roadways are not
enforceable.
AND THAT pursuant to the Order of the Court made
the 10th day of May, 2005 this advertisement constitutes
service on you of the said Originating Summons and any
amendment thereof
AND THAT the hearing of the said Originating Summons
has been adjourned to Friday, July 1st, 2005 at 10:30am
before Hon. Watkins, J.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must within
14 days from the publication of this advertisement inclusive
of the day of such publication acknowledge service of the
said Originating Summons on you by completing a
prescribed form of Acknowledgment of Service which
may be obtained at cost from the Attorneys whose name
and address appear below. In default of such
acknowledgement such Order will be made and
proceedings taken as the Judge may think just.

CHANCERY LAW ASSOCIATES
CHAMBERS
CHANCERY HOUSE
21 DOWDESWELL STREET
RO. BOX N-8199
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 356-6108
Attention: K. Neville Adderley
Counsel and
Attorney-at-Law


E


A NNK


I


PT7


E


(2


I I


I. I NI I V F


For The Road

More Travelled aS


A/C Service
Check refrigerant pressures
Top up freon if low
Clean condenser fins
.... .-Check compressor drive belt


* Check temperature at centre air
conditioning duct
* Check refrigerant, hoses and fittings
for deterioration and obvious leaks


(Extra charge for any refrigerant or leak detector dye used) Special 70


HO1TDA
The Power of Dreams

Dowdeswell Stree
322-4626
E-mail: service@nassaum<


All Honda vehicles are serviced by NMC's factory-trained
technicians using manufacturer parts and recommended
service routines suitable for our severe driving conditions. Your
vehicle should be serviced every three months or 3,000 miles
for maximum performance and safety.

otocNMo
NASSAU MOTOR CO.
otor.com "


)u^sl


Deltec accountant




passes Series 6


* A SENIOR mutual fund accoun-
tant at Deltec Bank & Trust has passed
the Series 6 examination after studying
with the Nassau-based Securities
Training Institute.
Anya S.J. James is pictured above
after passing the exam. Michael Miller,
STI's president, said: "Our goal is to
remain the recognised leader in pro-
viding high quality investment and
legal compliance training.
"STI provides comprehensive course
materials, and out instructors offer rel-
evant insights that are critical to exam
success."


I hare your news


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Public Notice
It has been evident since the latter part of 2004 and particularly
during the past few months, that the incidence of illegal indiscriminate
dumping of solid waste in New Providence is once again on the
increase. This unhealthy bad habit of unscrupulous individuals is a
poor reflection on residents of New Providence, and unfortunately,
on The Bahamas as a premier tourist destination in the region.

Only recently in January of 2003, the Department of Environmental
Health Services and the Royal Bahamas Police Force initiated a
surveillance programme in New Providence in an effort to discourage
and control the problem, but this unwarranted/despicable behavior
has one again become a matter of grave concern for the department
and the Ministry of Health as a whole.

It is regrettable therefore that we resume, at great expense, a
surveillance exercise aimed at controlling and or preventing illegal
dumping and pollution of the environment.

This notice is given to provide fair warning to all who dump waste
matter illegally and indiscriminately, in contravention of
Environmental Health Legislation that the full weight of the law
will be brought to bear without exception.

While we are not anxious to take criminal prosecution against
anyone, we must however, remain committed to safeguarding and
promoting public and environmental health and is therefore
determined to carry out our taw enforcement mandate under
environmental health legislations.

The public is hereby reminded that a person convicted under
provisions of the Environmental Health Law, faces a fine of up to
five thousand ($5,000.00) dollars and one (1) year imprisonment.

We hereby admonish all persons who engage in the habit of illegal
indiscriminate dumping to discontinue the practice and to ensure
that their waste is properly disposed of at a recognized disposal site
at all times.


I


I -.


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


-6~2~a~


I






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MILLARS HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION
Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old,
single story triplex with floor area of
2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist
of 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining area
and kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq. ft.



Appraisal: $268,411.00
Heading west on Carmichael Road,
enter West Ave., on the southside immediately after Topps Laundermat. Take first right which
is Wimpole St, go around curve on left which is London Ave., travelsouth on London Ave.,
property is 2nd to last building on the right before T, Junction (High street) L shape triplex,
painted green, trimmed white.

No. 8 BELL SNOW CLOSE
BEL-AIR ESTATES SUB.
(Nassau)
.All that piece parcel or lot of land
having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. (60 x
100) designated as lot No. 348 of Bel-
Air Subdivision, situated on Turtle
Drivve on Bel Snow Close, being the
fourth lot east of Turtle Drive, on the
south side of the road. The subject
i! property is on flat terrain with grass
j lawn and paved driveway in front, the
grounds are competley enclosed and
fairly maintained. This property consist
of a 6 year old single story, 4 bedroom,
2 bathroom, livingroom, diningroom,
familyroom and kitchen single family
residence with floor area of 1,711 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $193,200.00
Driving west on Carmichael Road until you reach Turtle Drive, turn left onto Turtle Drive and Bel
Snow Close is the first corner on the left after the Fedder Road that runs parallel to Charmichael
Road. The house is the 4th on the right painted white trimmed pink with wall in front.

S~bjt pro TROPICAL GARDENS
(Nassau)
Lot #3 a four year old single story house
with floor area of 1,340 sq. ft., and
consisting of 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, living room, dining room,
tv room and kitchen. Lot size is 7,200
sq. ft., wide in front, and 98 ft wide at
the back, 84 ft long at the north and
80 ft long at the south.

Appraisal: $189.963.90
Traveling west on John F Kennedy
drive, pass the second entrance into the airport, the first right after Esso's Division Office which
is Tropical Gardens Road, then first right which is Kiskadee Drive, then first corner on the left,
property is third house through on the right.


BOILING HOLE
(Eleuthera)
Lot #7, Boiling Hole Subdivision,
Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera, contains
10,000 sq. ft. building size 55 x 27 sq.
ft., apartment building consists of two
units, two bedrooms, one bath, kitchen,
dinning and living room.


Appraisal: $113,338.57




CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)
All that lot of land numbering as "H" being
one of several lots in Cyclops Gardens
located off the northern side of Cowpen
Road one corner west of Faith Avenue
Junction. This property comprise of a two
and a half year old single storey duples
with a gross floor area of 1,512.42 sq. ft.,
each unit consisting of 2 bedrooms all wth
wall airconditioning units, 1 bathroom,
Seliving, dining and kitchen building is
Effectively new.
Appraisal: $219,450.00
Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction
off Cowpen road make a right then first right again. The subject property is the 4th on the right
tan trimmed brown.


side of the road white trimmed blue.


MCKINNEY DRIVE
(Nassau)

Lot #H2 a five-year old single storey house
with floor area of 1,751 sq. ft. and
consisting of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms,
living room, dining room, laundry room,
foyer, and kitchen. Lot size 11,816 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $183,750.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road, after
passing the Community Clinic, turn north
onto McKinney Drive. Continuing north,
the subject property will be the house
behind the second house on the right hand


DUNDAS TOWN
(Abaco)
2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre lot no.
lt25, living room, dining room, family room,
kitchen downstairs, upstairs there are 4
bedrooms and 2 bathrooms.Age is 16
S years, color is yellow trimmed with white,
ue as a nupperlevel 1,080 sq. ft., lower level, 1080
sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft., covered
verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the land is portion
W of one of the Dundas Town Crown
Allotment parcels situated near Forest
orDrive being just under half acre in size.
Located on the southern side of a ridge
being 12 feet plus above sea level with
little likelihood of flooding grounds well
kept with above average landscaping including grass cover with palms and citrus trees. Enclosed
on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the fron. 30 ft., by 36 ft., roof garage now
used as a nursery school. At the upper level on the eastern side is covered wooden verandah
6 ft., x 30 ft., interior walls concrete, ceiling of sheet rock and floor of ceremic tiles.
Appraisal: $267,987.91



PINEWOOD GARDENS
(Nassau)
I d o Lot #1906, Maple Street contains a 19 yr. old
single story house with floor space of 1,532 sq.
ft. Consisting of four bedrooms, one bathroom,
living and dining area, tv room, kitchen and
utility room. Land size 5,000 sq. ft., 50 x 100.
Single family zoning. The property is on flat land
and ground neatly maintained with minimal
landscaping in place.

Appraisal: $159,919.20
Travel south on East Street until you get to
Bamboo Blvd., where South Beach Police Station is on the corner, travel east on Bamboo Blvd., and take
the third comer on the right then a left at the fifth corner subject is the sixth house on the left yellow trimmed
white.



MURPHY TOWN
(Abaco)
Lot #78, crown allotment, single story
concrete building which serves as a duplex
apartment complex 2 unit, each with 2
bedrooms, bathroom, living, dining room
and kitchen areas. The building has a total
floor area of approximately 1,800 sq. ft.,
land size 11,232 sq. ft.,



Appraisal: $187,257.42



JOHNSON ROAD
(Nassau)
.All that lot of land having an area of 5,520
sq. ft., (60 x 92) situated on the corner of
Johnson Road and Step Streeet. This
property is rectangular and comprised of
a 12 year old single storey house that
consist of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living,
dining room and kitchen. Also an efficiency
apartment attached. The subject property
.... is slightly above the level of the abutting
roadways with minimal landscaping. The
property is open with chain link fencing
along its western boundries.
Roa,, Appraisal: $139,868.40
Heading east along Bernard Road, turn
through Johnson Road opposite St Augustine's College Drive all the way to the curve heading
west the subject house is first house on the right all white trimmed yellow.


BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated and should not flood under normal
conditions. The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road. Appraisal: $8,647.80

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on elevation of
approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the
Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50

MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding under normal conditions. Land size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277
sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33


LOWE SOUND (ANDROS) All that parcel of lot of land located next door to the New Mt Freedom Baptist Church or approximately five miles from the administrative complex approximately
5,000 sq. ft,, and rectangular in shape with a 3 bed, 1 bathroom wooden residence. Appraisal: $52,258.50


FLAMINGO BAY SECTION 3 (EXUMA) Lot #102, Palm Hill situated inland in the Flamingo Bay development. It is Hillside Residential and has 150 ft., footage on Hill Road and contains 10
438 sq. ft., in area. This property is undeveloped. The subject property is about one mile south of the George Town township. Appraisal: $33,075.00


BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA) Lots 12571 & 12572 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 10 underveloped residenial lots located near the Forest and Mt Thompson on Utopia Drive. 80 feet frontage
and depth of 125 ft 10,000 sq. ft., in area each there is no service in the area. The road is gravel George Town 10 miles away. Appraisal: $26,250.00 EACH

BAHAMA SOUND NO. 18 (EXUMA) Lot No. 17861 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 18 a subdivision situate approximately 2.5 miles north westwardly of George Town. The property is zoned
residential and is level. Electricity, paved roads, water, telephone lines and cable tv services are available along Queen's Highway. Water is also available from dug wells but city supply is available.
The propert is undeveloped. Land size 82.10 x 122.11 x 82.10 x 121.0 Estimated Value: $33,075.00


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 7B


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NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that HERLY MONDESIR OF FOX HILL,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 26th day of MAY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ERMA MAE COLLIE,
of, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to ERMA
MAE CAMPBELL AND that I declare that I will at all times
from now on in all records deeds and instruments in writing
and in all Actions and Proceedings and in all dealings and
transactions and on all occasions use and sign the name
of Campbell instead of my former surname of Collie which
is now renounced.






THE TRIBUNE


is seeking a Main Section Editor

to design news pages and write

eye-catching head-lines. Solid

journalistic credentials essential,

including a keen news sense,

excellent text-editing ability and

an aptitude for supervising staff.

Applications please to:





Managing Editor

The Tribune

P.O.Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas


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Strong economic




growth 'could last




for the decade


FROM page one
the world's finance ministers at the IMF,
which warned of risks to the global econ-
omy posed by rising oil prices and iunbal-
ances, such as the US fiscal and current
account deficits, "the growth of the
Bahamian economy, which commenced in
2004, could continue for the rest of this
decade".
This prediction is likely to have result-
ed from the fact that once Kerzner
International's $1 billion Phase III
expansion is completed by the end of
2006, coming on stream in 2007, work
on Baha Mar's $1.2 billion Cable Beach
redevelopment will begin, ensuring that
the economy keeps growing.

Investment
The Acting Prime Minister's Budget
communication showed the extent to
which the Government is relying on
foreign direct investment to generate
growth and control the. fiscal deficit,
creating employment and rising incomes
that will spur businesses and house-
holds to consume more, fuelling a rise in
imports which generate the bulk of gov-
ernment revenue through duties and
stamp tax.
The 2005-2006 Budget effectively
adopted a 'neutral' position, continu-
ing the present government's policies
of focusing on improvement collection
and administration of existing taxes and
fees, and avoiding any tax rises or new


taxes to further stimulate the econo-
my.
Net private foreign investment
inflows into the Bahamas "rose consid-
erably" in 2004, increasing to $430.5
million from $313.3 million in 2003.
Out of this, $346.5 million was chan-
nelled into productive enterprises, with
the remaining $84 million being spent,
on real estate purchases, mainly in the
second homes market. -
The Ministry of Finance said that the'
3.5 per cent economic growth rate pre-
dicted for 2005, which translates into.
5.4 per cent growth at current prices
compared to 4.2 per cent for 2004, was
likely to reduce the unemployment
rate, which stood at 10.2 per cent last
year.
Of the increasing rate of economic
growth, the Ministry of Finance said in
an annex to yesterday's Budget state-
ment: "The acceleration arose primari-
ly from modest annual increases in real
private sector consumption, steady
growth in government expenditures and
a healthy pickup in business and resi-
dential investments."
Tourism earnings were estimated to
have increased by 4 per cent to $1.8 bil-
lion in 2004, with room revenues up by
3.4 per cent compared to 2003's 6.1 per
cent decline.
Mrs Pratt yesterday said that one of
the Bahamas' greatest challenges was
ensuring that its infrastructure and
workforce were prepared to cope with
the influx of foreign investment pro-


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, CORI ALASTRIA
ELIZABETH NEWMAN, of #172 Mt Royal Avenue, Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to CORI ALASTRIA
ELIZABETH STRACHAN. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the















NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES BERNADIN, 1649 S.W.
8TH STREET, HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA, 33030, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19TH day of MAY, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


jects into this nation, with the Govern-
ment facing a dilemma of whether to.
make "commitments" before the mon-
ey started flowing or waiting until after-
wards.
She revealed that the Ministry of
Finance had hired a Canadian govern-
ment agency, Consulting and Audit
Canada, to help develop a National
Communications and Information
Framework, which will provide on-line
access to healthcare, education and oth-
er governmentf'seirices stich -As land
administration and land use policy.
Mrs Pratt said this would be a "dri-
ving force in developing e-commerce
in the Bahamas".

Bolster
One part of this Framework would
involve transforming the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company (BTC)
ipto "a state-of-the-art telecommuni-
cations leader". International consul-
tants were working to bolster BTC's
current operations as well as ready the
company for another attempt at pri-
vatisation, the acting prime minister
said.
BTC was also attempting to provide
fibre optic cable linkage to all Family
Islands, ensuring the presence of
telecommunications services for the
development of hotels and other pro-
jects, in accordance with the Govern-
ment's plan of having an 'anchor pro-
ject' for each island.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, DEPARIS ROSTON
SAUNDERS, of PRO. Box EE-17054, Springfield Road,
Foxdale, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to DEPARIS PRINCE JORDAN SAUNDERS. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL -
The Public is hereby advised that I, CLERVIUS DESIR, of Oxford
Avenue, C/O P.O. Box N-7108, Nassau, Bahamas, the legal
guardian of DADLEY VALCOURT (an infant) intend to change
my name of the said DADLEY VALCOURT to DADLEY DESIR.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VERLICE CHARLES THELUSMA,
PETER STREET OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
25TH day of MAY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 9B


MAY 26, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Cooking Under La Cocina La Cocina
SWPBT FireFood for a
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B WSVN Caleb and Julie's wedding; Jem per-
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Dodge" (CC) .vie for a boy. as a dog sitter.
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LIFE Lawrence, Harley Jane Kozak. An artist seduces her (2000, Drama) Penelope Ann Miller, Mercedes Ruehl. A married teacher
best friend's 18-year-old son. (CC) has an affair with a 13-year-old student. (CC)
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(CC) son Finale) (N) 3(C ) A (CC)
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stinct can Safari Beretta fan Hunts
SPEED :00) NASCAR Racing Nextel Cup Series --Coca- Michael Waltrip Celebrity Poker NASCAR Nation
SPEED ;ola 600 Qualifying. (Live) Tournament (N)
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"Mozart" ( C) opera role. (CC) ex's wedding, friends try to reconcile a mother and daughter. (CC)
(:00) In a Fix Mega Machines "Gatebreaker and Extreme Machines: Million Dollar Overhaulin' "Twins Bel Air" A1962
TLC (CC) Jaw" Colossal and powerful ma- Motors Chevy Bel Air. (CC)
chines. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order A murder case leads Law & Order "Atonement" Alimo Law & Order A father and daughter
TNT der "Savior n detectives to a 13-year-old boy en- driver-drug courier is suspected of running a prostitution ring become
(CC) (DVS) slaved by a drug dealer. killing a model. n( (CC) (DVS) suspects in a murder. n
TOON Ed, Edd n Eddy Oz & Drix "Re- Mucha Lucha Codename: Kids Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) Teen Titans "Af- Dragonball GT
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(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA der: Special Vic- A young beauty queen's body is Stabler is teamed-with a bitter and- Women are accused of assaulting a
tims Unit found in a suitcase. (CC) opinionated cop. n (CC) male stripper. n (CC)
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Home Improve- ,s HIGHWAY (2001, Drama) Jared Leto, Jake Gyllenhaal, Selma Blair. WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WGiN ment "Room For Two friends set out for Seattle to escape a mobster's wrath. (CC)
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(:00) MLB Baseball New York Mete at Florida Marlins. From Dolphins Stadium in Miami. WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX (Live) Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
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(a5 c L O ** *THE LAST SAMURAI (2003, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Ken Watanabe, Timothy Spell. Making
HBO-E BARCELONA A Westemer leams the ways of the samurai in the 1870s. A 'R' (CC) Ire Falls n
HB5:45) DIE HARD *s THE WHOLE TEN YARDS (2004, Comedy) Bruce (:45) *** LOVE ACTUALLY (2003, Romance-Com-
HBO-P THA Willis, Matthew Perry. A mobster pursues a retired hit edy) Alan Rickman, Bill Nighy. Various people deal with
VENGEANCE man and a dentist. A 'PG-13' (CC) relationships in London. n R' (CC)


(5:30) * MALCOLM X (1992, Biography) Den- (:15) *** BARCELONA (1994, Drama) Taylor Nichols, Christopher
H BO-W zel Washington, Spike Lee. Spike Lee'sportrait of the Eigeman, Tushka Bergen. Two American cousins pursue life and love in
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(:00) ** UP ATTHEVILLA (2000, Drama) Kristin I***' MYSTIC RIVER (2003, Crime Drama) Sean Penn, Tim Robbins,
H BO-S Scott Thomas. In 1938, a British widow's life takes an Kevin Bacon. A detective probes the murderof his friend's daughter. Cl
unexpected tum. 1 'PG-13' (CC) 'R' (CC)
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(6:30) * THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION *** BATTLEGROUND: 21 DAYS ON THE EM- *i OUT OF
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BAHAMAS
Ku OLYMPIC
ASSOCIATION
19th ANNUAL OLYMPIC HEALTH DAY
5 MIL RACE
WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK
7:00a.m., Saturday 25th June, 2005


T-SHIRTS FOR ALL
PARTICIPANTS
TROPHIES FOR ALL
CATEGORIES
INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC
CERTIFICATES FOR ALL
FINISHERS
HEALTH SCREENING
ENTRY FEE:
SCHOOL CHILDREN FREE
REGULAR: $10.00
RUN ROUTE: STARTS Q.E.
SPORTS CENTER, NASSAU
STREET, BAY STREET,
P.I.BRIDGE, ENDS NATIVE
CRAFTS MARKET ON
PARADISE ISLAND.


CATEGORIES
5 MILE RUN: STARTS Q.E.
SPORTS CENTRE FINISHES AT
THE CRAFTS MARKET ON P.I.
MALE: UNDER 19,20-29,30-39,
40-49, 50+
FEMALE: UNDER19, 20-29, 30-
39, 40-49, 50+
CHILDREN AND GROUP
AWARDS
WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH
WALK:
STARTS FORT MONTAGU,
PROCEEDS ALONG EAST BAY
STREET, ACROSS THE P.I.
BRIDGE TO FINISH AT THE
NATIVE CRAFTS MARKETr, JUST
EAST OF THE ROUND ABOUT
ON PARADISE ISLAND


ENTRY FORM
OLYMPIC DAY 5 MILE RACE AND HEALTH WALK
DROP OFF ENTRY AT THE OLYMPIC OFFICE, #10, 7TH TERRACE
WEST, CENTREVILLE OR MAIL TO: THE BAHAMAS OLYMPIC
ASSOCIATION, P.O.BOX SS-6250, NASSAU TEL: 322-1595
Fax: 322-1195
NAME (LAST) FIRST
AGE: _SEX: CLUB or FIRM
TELEPHONE NO.: FAX: -E-MAIL-
EVENT: 5 MILE RUN WHEELCHAIR HEALTH WALK
Liability waiver: In consideration of your accepting this entry, I, intending
to be legally bound heredy for myself, my heirs, executors and
administrators waive and release any and all rights and claims of damage
I may have against the Bahamas Olympic Association and/ or its
successors and assigns for all injuries or other eventualy sustained by
me in this event. I agree to abide by the decisions of the organizers and
medcal advisers.

Signature of Applicant Parent/Guardian if under 18 years old


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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


.*









TRIBN SPRSTUSAMY 6 05 AE1


First class boxing event was





anything but a 'nightmare'


D ESPITE getting off
D to a slow start, pro-
moter Michelle Minus left the
Nyndham Nassau Resort &
rystal Palace Casino smiling
irom ear to ear.
Her First Class Promotions
organisation pulled off a first
,cIass professional boxing show
Qon Friday night.
The show, dubbed "Night-
mare," had been hampered by
a church service that was
Being held in one half of the
-ballrooms at the resort until
after 10pm.
But, as soon as the partition
.as taken dowp, seats were
.available for the large groupof
Spectators who waited until
)the main event between for-
)ier champion 'Marvellous'
:Marvin Smith and new cham-
tpion Jermaine 'Choo-Choo'
Mackey.
Mackey went the distance,
jabbing his way to a unani-
mous decision as he
dethroned Smith.
The show was an excellent
one and, while some people
had some doubts about the
challengers that came in for
Jerry 'Big Daddy' Butler and
Meacher 'Pain' Major, they
had to take in consideration
that the Bahamian fighters
were prepared for their oppo-
nets, regardless of who they
,were.
The same would have to be
said about two other bouts on
the undercard.

Punch
It appeared that neither
Earnest Ellis or Eric 'Iceburg'
Minus were prepared for the
show. They couldn't get a
-punch off before they were
stopped by Kato 'Red Lion'
Ferguson and Ramon Rolle
respectively.
Ferguson needed just 27
seconds in the first round
before he unleashed a flurry of
punches that forced Ellis to
call it quits. Rolle was just as
impressive as he only lasted
one round before Minus was
finished in the second round.
While there were a number
of people who showed up to











0 By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas Football
Association (BFA) will open
up its indoor soccer (futsal)
league on Wednesday, June,
1st.
The futsal league is a new
initiative which the BFA offi-
cials believe will help to
improve the general standard
and level of play in the coun-
try.
Futsal is expected to teach
skills and techniques that will
be beneficial to all of the play-
ers in the BFA's league.
The league will be opened
to the first ten teams, with its
home being the DW Davis
gymnasium.

Matches
The rules differ slightly
from the outdoor game, with
matches consisting of two
periods of 20 minutes. Time
will be running and will only
stop during time-outs.
A penalty will be taken
from the second penalty mark
for the sixth foul in each half.
Players who have been sent
off the court may not re-enter
the match due to penalties.
SHowever, the BFA will allow
the player tobe substituted
after the two minute marking.
The game will be played on
the basketball court with the
basketball arch being used for
penalty points.
Kick-ins will be utilised as a
method of restarting play
instead of throw-ins.
Goal clearances will be used
as opposed to goal kicks. The
ball may be thrown from any
point within the penalty area.
Free kicks and corners must
be taken within four seconds


or the kick will be awarded to
the opposing team.


support the undercard com-
petitors, it was obvious that
the crowd came to see the two
combatants in the main event.
If you were a Smith fan, you
would probably have left a lit-
tle disappointed in his perfor-
mance.
He looked nothing like the
champion who won the title
in 2000 before defending it
that same year against Kenny
'Lightning' Minus.
He fell behind on the
judges' card in the early


rounds as he tried to defend
the barrage of jabs from
Mackey.
After waiting too late to
mound a comeback, thanks to
the telling blows he received
and with cuts above both of.
his eyes, Smith didn't have any
answer to get inside and box
with Mackey. He tried to land
at least one solid blow knock-
out blow, but he couldn't get
one off.


After his performance,
don't think Mackey .will be
able to secure another part-
ner in the Bahamas. So his.
best bet would be to give
Smith the rematch that he
feels he deserves as the for-
mer champion. .
At least the Bahamas Box-
ing Commission will have a
championship fight to-
approve.
There are a number of titles


available in the Bahamas,:but,
there's very little contenders
to fight for them.
One of the titles that I think
the public will be anxious to
watch is the Bahamas light-
weight crown.
With the retirement of Ray
Mifw iJr -and' Quincy-'Thrill
A-Minute' Pratt, the only oth-
er fighter who may provide
some competition for Major
would be Duran Miller.


Miller issued a challenge to
Major for a fight. But Major
said it's not up to him who he
fights.
He did warn Miller, howev-
er, that if gets the opportunity,
he will fight him any place,
any time.
He said it's up to the pro-
moters and if they set it up,
he will be willing to fight.
Sounds like we have a deal.
.So let's get ready to rumble.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 11B







"HURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005

SECTION


B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


counting


01


he


a


COS1





b0 t


E By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
IT WILL cost a quarter of a
million dollars for the Bahamas
Associations of Athletic Asso-
ciation (BAAA) to ensure that
all teams travel to the six inter-
national meets this season.
The BAAA is expected to
field six teams, five of which
will compete in international
meets three for juniors and
two for senior athletes.
The announcement by pres-
ident Mike Sands was revealed
yesterday, with Sands confirm-
ing all junior trials will be
held in Freeport, Grand
Bahama.
BAAA will host all the trials
there due to the repairs to the
Thomas A Robinson stadium,
however, the senior nationals,
which will also be considered a
trial event for the World Cham-
pionships in Helsinki and CAC
games, which will be held in
New Providence on June 24th-
25th.
Trials
The BAAA was hoping to
host three separate trials for
juniors wishing to make the
Youth Central American and
Caribbean championships,
World Youth championships
and the Pan American cham-
pionships teams.
Since the association was
forced to host the trials in
Grand Bahama, the three trials
will have to be combined.
President Mike Sands said:
"We had all three trials sched-
uled for separate days, but our


M ATHLETES such as James Rolle (above) and Tonique Williams-Darling (right) will be hoping
to make a big impression at the CAC games in Nassau and the World Championships in Helsinki.


a





for, taheLion'tidrns


"Copyrighted Material
Avaial SyndicatedrContewnt
Available from Commercial News Pro


. ,1


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SC MCPHERSON SHARKS junior boys
took a bite out of the HO Nash Lions to
win the first game of the best of three series
in the Government Secondary School Sport-
ing Association (GSSSA) championships.
The pennant winning Sharks defeated the
frustrated Lions 14-5.
Sharks' bite was to much for the Lions to
handle in the first inning as they brought in
six runs from eight hits.
Facing a full count, Sharks' Lorenzo
Williams slammed a ground ball past the
third baseman to bring Breon Adderley
home.
Triple
Williams remained on third, after his stand
up triple, and teammate Quentin Williams
was tagged by the Lions' pitcher.
Hitting the field to start the second inning,
the Sharks were determined not to let the
Lions score.
Lions scored two runs in the first inning,
but failed to score again until the bottom
of the fifth inning, when their bats came
alive.
Although Anthony Thompson struck out
the first batter in the inning, Lions were
able to sneak on base thanks to Shark's
errors.
With a runner on third, Jordan Gibson
popped one to the right field, which seemed
to be an easy out for the Sharks, but
the right fielder tripped and dropped the
ball.
Gibson was able to bring the runner home


for the Lions' third run.
Stepping to the plate next was David Cox.
Cox faced a 1-1 count, grounding the ball to
the short-stop for his single.
Although the Lions came alive in the fifth,
pitcher Walter Bell believed that the loss
was his fault, since he was unable to pitch
continuous strikes.
Defence
He said: "I blame the loss on me, I wasn't
able to do my job like I should have.
My team were playing very well, they
played great defence but I wasn't able to
put the ball across the plate like I wanted
to."
Bell walked five of the Shark's batters in
the third inning and pitched seven wild balls
that advanced the runners.
Several times he resorted to the lob after
his windmill brought in runs.
The Sharks scored six runs in the second
and third innings and two more in the fourth.
Their defence prevailed in the end when
pitcher Anthony Thompson fell short.
Thompson said: "We have to continue to
work together as a team if we want to win
the championship.
"There were some innings where I just
got tired and started throwing balls. When
this happened my teammates helped me out.
"They fielded the ball very well, this
helped us get couple double plays. We
played very well together today and we are
looking to close out the series on Thurs-
day."
In the senior girls game, the CR Walker
Knights trounced the Doris Johnson Mystic
Marlins 20-3.


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The Tribune


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Mass of Thanksgiving held to





celebrate monastic profession


I By CLEMENT JOHNSON
"Lord, I thank you for your
faithfulness and love, your love,
0 lord is eternal"
Psalm 138.
his was the psalm
used at the Mass
of Thanksgiving
to celebrate 25
and 50 years of
monastic profession for Sisters
Marva Coakley, Cecilia
Albury, Agatha Hunt and Ena
Albury. The concelebrated
Mass was presided over by
Archbishop Patrick Pinder,
STD.
The new St. Francis Cathe-
dral was filled to capacity with
clergy, religious, laity, digni-
taries and well-wishers from
around the nation. The jubi-
larians recommitted themselves
to serving God and His church.
The Prioress, Sister Annie
Thompson, led the call and dia-
logue with the nuns. They were
invited to respond to the ques-
tions posed in St. Benedict's
Rule.
"What is it you seek?" was
the first questioned posed by
Sister Annie. To which the
nuns responded: "I seek to con-
tinue my life serving God and
the Church in this Benedictine
Community". Then there was
the renewal of vows when the
jubilarians promised to live
celibate and simple lives. At
the end there was thunderous
applause.
Powerful
Monsignor Preston Moss,
Vicar General of the archdio-
cese of Nassau and pastor of
St Anselm's Catholic Church
in Fox Hill, delivered a pow-
erful and heart-warming homi-
ly. He reminisced about the
early days of those celebrating.
He thanked them for their sup-
port in the past and future. He
encouraged them to remain
faithful to the life they have
chosen.
"I am living a full life, and if
I had to do it all over again, I
would do it no other way, that's
God's way," said Sister Agatha
Hunt who renewed her com-
mitment 50 years later.
Winifred Barbara Hunt was
born on September 2, 1933 at
United Estates, San Salvador,
to Edmund and Geneva Hunt
(nde Williams). She attended
the All Age School, United
Estates, San Salvador, Xavier's
College, Nassau, and College
of Saint Benedict, Saint John's
University, Collegeville, Min-
nesota, and Barry University,
Miami, Florida.
Sister Agatha taught and
worked in schools and parishes
in New Providence: St. Joseph,
St. Francis, Sacred Heart,
Aquinas College and. St.
Augustine's College. She was
assigned also to the parishes in"
San Salvador, Holy Name
School in Bimini, St. Vincent
de Paul, Hunter's, Grand
Bahama, and Grand Bahama
Catholic High School. She


* THE Prioress, Sister Annie Thompson, speaks during the concelebrated Mass which was presided over by Archbishop Patrick Pinder, STD.
(Photo by Franklyn G Ferguson)


retired,from education in June,
1999.
The positions she held with-
in the monastic community
were varied and included For-
mation Director, council mem-
ber, regional Superior, Admin-
istration Team and Director of
the Benedictine Oblate Pro-
gramme.
"I am rejuvenated and ready
to do it all over again," said
Sister Cecilia Albury when
questioned about her 50 years
of monastic profession. "I
would like to encourage more
women to enter the convent so
that the Bahamian legacy of
the Benedictine Community
would continue to develop and
grow in our nation. I feel espe-
cially strong about this, as I am
the Vocations director of the
Community," she said. She's
often referred to as the
"Singing Sister",
Picturesque
Sister Cecilia was born
Pauline (Paula) Margaret
Albury on picturesque Har-
bour Island to George and
Romalia Albury. On Septem-
ber 15, 1952 at the age of 16


she entered Blessed Martin de'
Porres Convent as a postulant.
On March 19, 1953 she was
received into the novitiate
receiving the name Sister Cecil-
ia. During the Marian year,
Mary was added to her name.
She has since been known as
Sister Mary Cecilia.
Vows
On March 19,1955 she made
her final vows. She attended
Our Lady's Catholic School in
Nassau and Catholic senior
School, Madam Saunders
Beauty School, Xavier's Lower
School and Aquinas College,
College of The Bahamas, St.
Benedict's College, Minneso-
ta and Barry College, Miami
Shores, Florida.
Sister Mary Cecilia taught in
various Catholic schools St.
Bedes, St. Joseph, St. Thomas
More, St. Francis/Josep.h,
Xavier and Our Lady's in Nas-
sau; St. Vincent de Paul, Grand
Bahama, Holy Name, Bimini
and St. Bontfort and St. Antho-
ny's, Minnesota.
Sister Mary Cecilia is now
director of St. Joseph's Day
Care Centre and Song Leader


at Sacred Heart Parish. She. is
also a member of the Dioce-
san Chorale and Renaissance
Singers.
"I feel, like it was only a few
years ago that I joined the con-
vent,' said Sr. Ena Albury. "To
think that 50 years has passed
already, God is truly good,.
whom I am most grateful to for
allowing me all of these years
to serve His church and His
people. I am always grateful to
Him for allowing my mother
to still be alive to see me reach
such a milestone; out of all of
the Jubilarians I am the only
one whose mother is still alive.
She is not in the best of health,
but she is here nonetheless. I
am most grateful to the
Bahamian people for the way
they came out to support us,
the church was packed, it was
most remarkable and over-
whelming to experience such a
gift."
Sister Ena Albury, who cele-
brates her golden jubilee, was
born to Mr and Mrs Ralph
Albury in the settlement of
Lower Bogue, Eleuthera, on

See NUNS, Page 3C


100%,

Bible Bo ib&4'ft Shop






Ao a ,


,


_I_ __


I--------------- - -~- -- - -








.PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


ZION METHODIST
MINISTRIES

THE church in the South
Beach Shopping Centre, East
Street south, is scheduled to
hold the following services on
Sunday:
May 29, 10:15 am Sunday
School, 11 am Divine Wor-
ship. Service (Preacher: Sister
Jeannie Gibson and Youth)
Third Monday, 7:30 pm -
Ladies Ministry
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Prayer
and Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Music
Ministry
Saturday, 3 pm Dance Min-
istry, 4 pm Children's Choir
Ministry (Minister: Pastor
Charles Lewis)
MACEDONIA
BAPTIST
CHURCH
THE Rev David S Johnson,
officers and members of the
church. on Bernard Road, Fox
Hill, are scheduled to celebrate


39 years of Christian ministry
on Sunday.
May 29, 10 am Hour of
Power service, 11 am Divine
Worship Service (Guest speak-
er: Rev Austin Saunders, pas-
tor of Faith Mission Church of
God)
CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, May 29.
(Speakers: Elder B M Clarke,
Pastor Dorothy Stubbs and
Pastor James)
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Service,
7 pm Men's Fellowship Meet-
ing
Tuesday After School Pro-
gramme
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session,
Thursday, Band and Praise
Team Rehearsal
Friday Massive Youth


Meeting
Saturday Girl's Brigade
Upcoming events
June 18 Park Service
(Flamingo Gardens Parks)
June 19 Father's Day
June 20-24 Healing and
Breakthrough Crusade
June 27 Women of Integri-
ty Meeting
ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
May 29, 7 am '- Sung Mass,
10 am Sunday School and
Adult Bible Classes, 11 am -
Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6.40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pastors'
Training, Laying A Solid Foun-
dation, Adult Band Practice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7


RSEPIGI I


pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrichment
Class, 7 pm Prayer Band and
Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice, 7
pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins and
Mass, 4 pm Confirmation
Classes, 6 pm St Ambrose
Guild, 6:30 pm Christian
Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm -
Youth Alpha (every third Sat-
urday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm Boys
Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm-
Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions
EAST STREET
GOSPEL CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class, 11
am Morning Celebration, 7
pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of World'
Radio Programme on ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Midweek
Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Conquerors
for Christ Club (Boys & Girls
Club), 8 pm East Street
Youth Fellowship Meeting
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN CHURCH

SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of May 29 to June 4:


Sunday, 9 am Family
Eucharist, 6:30 pm Mass
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's,
Anglican Church Women
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm -
Anglican Church Men, Prayer
Group Meeting
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale Prac-
tice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice, 7:30 pm Senior
Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 7 pm Parish
Dinner and A.G.M (Commu-
nity Centre)
Saturday, 6 am Intercessory
Prayer Meeting, noon to 6 pm -
ACW Steak-Out, 2 pm -
Acolytes Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian
Campbell)

PARISH CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our Web-
site: www.holytrinityba-
hamas.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings. The Kirk is located at
the corner of Peck's Slope and


Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST HOLINESS
CHURCH OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry. (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays -Men's:Day
Service

UNITED FAITH .
MINISTRIES iNt
THE church in the Summer
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 8 am Morning, Glo-
ry Breakthrough Service, 1i:30
am .Divine Worship Service
(Live broadcast at 11 am on
More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer meet-
ing every Wednesday and Sat-
urday at 5 am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm .Qhir
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm -
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
For further information, e-
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949
7 -'- .rl 1 r .f


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Elder


McIntosh


to be


installed


as pastor

ELDER Samuel McIntosh
will be installed as pastor of
Greater Bethel Temple Mission
Church on Hospital Lane south,
off Blue Hill Road, at 3 pm on
Sunday, June 5.
The installation service is
scheduled to be held at Greater
Bethel Cathedral on Faith Way,
off Blue Hill Road, under the
theme, "Be An Example ...
Feed God Flock".
Bishop David Dawkins, D.D,
J.P. will be the chief celebrant.
Elder McIntosh, who accept-
ed Christ at an early age, has
been involved in the ministry
for more than 30 years. He
served as assistant pastor of
Greater Bethel Mission Church
for many years, and as acting
pastor for the past three years.
He also served as an elder in
the Bahamas State Council of
P.A.W., under the leadership
of Bishop David Dawkins.
Elder McIntosh is the son of
the late Geneva Lightbourne
and Samuel McIntosh Sr.


* ELDER SAMUEL McINTOSH


`i" '"















Parishioners celebrate





feast of the Holy Trinity


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
"H undreds of Holy Trin-
ity parishioners and
other Anglicans
joined in festal Even-
song and Benediction
last Sunday to celebrate the feast of
the Holy Trinity.
The service was filled with pomp
and praise that only The Parish
Church of the Most Holy Trinity could
have done on its patronal feast day.
The rector, the Venerable E. Etienne
Bowleg, concelebrated the mass with
the Rev DeAngelo Bowe, assistant
curate, and associates, Rev Canon
Kirkley C. Sands, the Rev Fr. John F.
Kabiga, and priests from the diocese.
Blessings
It was a service filled with praise
and prayers, as the congregationgath-
ered together to ask the Lord's bless-
ings. There were biblical readings,
psalms and hymns. The Office Hymn,


Nuns (From page 1C)


"Adesto, Sancta Trinitas" truly
summed up the teaching on the Holy
Trinity, in the sixth stanza it reads:
"Praise to the Father, made of none;
praise to His sole-begotten Son; praise
to the Holy Spirit be, Mysterious God-
head, One in Three".
The Rev Denrick Rolle, rector of
All Saints Parish, Mangrove Cay,
Andros, delivered the sermon. He
explained the teaching on the Trinity.
He asked the congregation never to
forget God, regardless of how rich or
influential they become. He said that
church-goers needed to get back to
basics, and pray how their parents,
grandparents and great grandparents
prayed. "Father I stretch my hands to
thee, no other help I know..."
"We must," he said, "turn to where
we came from for answers, simplicity
has it value." He challenged the church
to work together for the development
of God's Kingdom here on earth. He
told them that it is not the people who
put plenty of money in the collection
plate that makes them powerful. Each


person has a part to play, and they
must work together.
There are people in the church, he
said, with different gifts and they must
all come together to work for God's
church. God is variety, Father is Cre-
ator, Son is redeemer, and Holy Spir-
it is the one who lives with us and
guides.
Inspiring
The festival of praise was inspiring
with the following choirs participating
- Holy Trinity Senior Choir, Voices
of Trinity, Holy Trinity Echoes of
Dawn, Angelic Voices of Praise, Holy
Trinity Chevaliers and the Holy Trin-
ity Men's Choir.
Solemn Benediction followed when
many traditional hymns, combined
with some of the newer ones, were
sung.
Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday
after Pentecost. It was instituted to
honour the Most Holy Trinity. A man
named Arius, using the language of


John's gospel, taught that the eternal
Word of God became flesh in Christ.
But Arius then insisted that Christ did
not possess a human soul. Thus Arius
separated the Son of God from the
creator God, insisting that there was a
time when the Son (Christ) did not
exist. This is what is known as the Ani-
an heresy.
There was major discussion on this
topic at the Council of Nicea. It was at
this Council that The Creedal formula,
which articulates a Trinitarian concept
of God, became the orthodox teaching
of the church. Hence the Nicene Creed
is held as that which holds the tenants
of the Christian faith. It was written to
counteract the dangerous Arian
heresy, which denied the full and
unqualified deity of Christ, and pro-
vided a very positive affirmation of
what Christians believe.
So when we recite the Creed or
express our belief in God the Father,
Son and Holy Ghost, we must remem-
ber the men who fought hard to main-
tain the teaching of the Holy Trinity.


As Christians we often refer to the
Bible as the only teaching tool of
Christianity, forgetting that had it not
been for the early fathers of the church
some of theological doctrines would
have been watered down or com-
pletely lost.
Captured
Many of the tenants of the faith are
also captured in some of the old hymns
of the church. One of the most com-
prehensive hymns, which encapsulates
the essence of the teaching on the
Trinity, is: "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord
God Almighty!
"Early in the morning our song shall
rise to Thee;
"Holy, Holy, Holy, merciful and
mighty!
"God in three persons, Blessed Trin-
ity!"
The Christian Church will cele-
brate the feast of Corpus Christi, the
feast of the Body and Blood 6f Christ,
this Sunday, May 29.


January 24, 1937. She received
her early education at Lower
Bogue primary school. On
March 17, 1953, she entered
the Scholastic programme of
St. Martin's Convent. After a
brief training period, she
received the habit on October
15 and for the next five years
she studied and worked toward
the completion of her dreams
and was then accepted as a full
member of the Community on
August 6, 1960.
September 2, 1963 she trans-
ferred her vows to the Bene-
dictine Sisters in St Joseph,
Minnesota.
She began her teaching
career in 1958, teaching at the
following schools: St Vincent
de Paul Primary School,
Hunter, Grand Bahama, St.
Joseph's Catholic Primary
School in Nassau, St. Bede's
Primary School. In 1980 she
was appointed Acting Princi-
pal at St. Vincent de Paul Pri-
mary School. Later she became
Deputy Principal in 1981-1985.
-From 1990-1999, she was Prin-
:cipal at Holy Name Primary
Catholic school in Bimini. In


IPastor Ben Bailey
Program Organizer


2002-2003 she taught religion
at Aquinas College.
She obtained her Bachelor's
degree from St. Benedict's/St
Joseph, Minnesota.
She returned to the classroom
at the University of Duquesne
in Pittsburg, Pa. where she
obtained a Masters degree in
Counselling.
Sister Marva Bernadette
Coakley, who celebrates her sil-


ver jubilee, was born February I:_them entered the convent. April
26, 1955 in Nassau. Her forma- i~;Q, 1977 Sister Marva entered
tive years were spent on Har- *'" "". ,
bour Island with her grandpar-
ents. Later she relocated to Nas-
sau where she continued her
Catholic education at St. Fran-


cis and then at Aquinas Col-
lege.
Sister Marva began her jour-
ney with seven other young
ladies and eventually three of


Appropriating the Promises
Text: Deuteronomy 6:1-25 and Mark 12:28-30
An anonymous writer penned these words concerning Victory over Moods,
"It will be a sorry day for this world, and for all the people in it, when
everybody makes his moods his masters, and does nothing but what he
is inclined to do. The need of training the will to the performance of work
that is distasteful; of making the impulses serve, instead of allowing them
to rule, the higher reason; of subjugating the moods instead of being
subjugated by them, lies at the very foundation of character. It is possible
to learn to fix the wandering thought, to compel the reluctant mental energy,
to concentrate the power upon the performance of a task to which there
is no inclination. Until this victory has been gained, life holds no sure
promise; the achievement of this conquest is the condition of future success.
No matter how splendid may be the natural gifts, unless there is a will
that can marshal and command them, the life is sure to be a failure."


The Prophetic Voice Let us focus on two scriptures which enable us to constantly remain united
P. 0. Box N-9518 to the Person, Presence, and Purpose of God with all our Heart, Soul,
Bahamas and Strength: The 'Way' to maintain that connection, strangely enough,
assau, aamas is not our reverential fear of God, but rather, our abounding Love for God.
Moses wrote the 'Books of the Law;' in Deuteronomy Chapter 5:1 "Moses
called all Israel, and said to them: "Hear, 0 Israel." An important fact to consider when you read the
Bible: It is necessary for your ears to hear what you see. Mr. Science discovered that we remember
90% of what we see, and 10% of what we hear. The paraphrased version of Romans 10:17 says,
"Faith comes by hearing, and hearing comes by words."
Moses addressed the heart first: The heart being the seat of the intellect, emotion, and will. The four
key words in the whole book of Deuteronomy reminded Israel to: Shema, Hear His Voice: Lamad,
diligently teach their children God's Words; thereby affecting their intellect: Shamar, Keep His
Commandments: Biblical Love is neither warm nor sentimental; it contains a calculated objective, to
cause the will of people to conform to the 'Revealed Will of God:' and Casah, Do what God says!
Moses repeats the Shema, Hear, when he addressed Israel concerning the Ten Commandments at
Deuteronomy Chapter 6.
Christ Jesus fulfilled Moses' Law, and introduced the 'Law of the Spirit.' However, He pointed man
back to a personal relationship with God by quoting from Deuteronomy 6; using the text to summarize
the first four of the Ten Commandments; whose central theme is Love, because there is no commandment
higher than Love. Jesus admonished His Disciples in John 13:34-35, "A new commandment I give to
you, that you love one another; as I have loved you. By this all will know that you are My Disciples."
Jesus answered the scribe in Mark 12:28-30, 'The first of all the commandments is: Hear, 0 Israel,
the Lord our God, the Lord is one. You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your
soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength." Many relationships have failed and foundered
because persons involved in relationship had not fully discovered themselves. A relationship based
on Love requires each partner to first learn to Love and appreciate themselves before seeking another
to share that affection. In Mark 12:39 Jesus continued, 'The second, is this: You shall love your
neighbour as yourself." Love of self is necessary; because you cannot give to another, something you
do not possess.
In summation, Moses and Jesus told us the same thing: Shema, Hear, Lamad, Learn, Shamar, Keep,
and Casah, Do. When Satan attempted to corrupt Jesus in the wilderness; Jesus' first response was:
"It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of
God." When He wanted the seas to be calm: He rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, "Peace, be
still! The wind ceased and there was a great calm." He commanded 'Legion', "Come out of the man,
unclean spirit!" He cured sickness with a word: "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace,
and be healed of your affliction." Moses and Jesus are telling us the Word of God will help us to
appropriate the promises. Believe without doubting, remind God of what he has promised, and ask
Him for all He promised.
C. H. Spurgeon .wrote concerning Walk and Trut, "Sooner walk in the dark and trust to a promise of
God thanfrust in the lightof the:brigtitest day that ever dawned."
The choices, after all, my friends, are always yours to make!


St. Martin's. Her first vow was Rome for two years, and sub-
made in 1980 and in 1984 she sequently she completed a dou-
made her final vows. ble major in theology and ele-
In 1979, Sr. Marva began her mentary education at the col-
teaching practice at Xavier lege of St. Benedict in Min-
Lower School. Two years later nesota in 1993.
she was assigned to St. Francis In 1994 she was posted to
and St. Joseph. After her final Xavier's as the religious co-
vows she was sent to Holy coordinator and in 1997 she
Name Catholic School in Bimi- was promoted to Vice Princi-
ni and later to St. Vincent, de pal. She spent five years as
Paul School in Hunter's, Grand Principal at the Holy Name
Bahama for two years. She School in Bimini. At present
returned to Nassau where she she is senior mistress and Fam-
enrolled at Benedictine Uni- ily Life teacher at Our Lady's
versity full time. She was post- Primary school. She is also the
ed at Resurrection Catholic religious Education Coordina-
Church for two years in an tor at St. Bede's Parish.
administrative capacity. Final remarks were made by
Bishop Lawrence Burke, SJ, Sister Cecilia Albury. She
former Archbishop of Nassau, thanked the congregation in
e eniouaged SitrMarvain- t songafter which-she
198 udy ? 4,0a iug ov4i9


The Adventure LeaIMrng Centre Presents:













a Dy
Family Fun Day




SFridd and Saturdy




1am 6pm









(2 and under FREEI) sOle!


















South on Blue Hill Rd.0to South Beach, turn right on Marshall Rd. just before ZNS

towers, opposite pink apartments ALC is 1/2 mile on left.


THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE -





PAGE4C, HURDAYMAY 6, 005 I1E


"Your Bahamian Supermarkets"

SUPER
VAL UE[
_J NOW ACc-'rW NG
SUNCARD
S ,PIAL O W. YHTS A PRICES RESERVED i
A A


PAR-EXCELLENCE
PARBOILED
RICE
$ 19
5- LBS


MONTH END,


SAVING



$ 4 -

14.75-S 2 4- -LBS
EVERCANE

$139


PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


TW


>tw)
41







RIBUNE
w, w GRILLMASTER
HOTISS BEEF
?^~ ~~~AT ES.^* ^*l^Wk


Sil


101


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK
STEAK
OR ROAST
PER LB


THURSDAY, MAY 26,2005, PAGE 5C


PATTIES
5 LB BOX

$599


a~AI


I n:


a a
1 ml,


CHICKEN
LEG

QUARTERS
PER-LB
119
2= .;-.


TURKEY


TURKEY


R- WINGS


Rugs
Towels
Sheet Sets
Table Cloths
Throw Pillows
Conforter Sets


Bath Scales
Shower Curtains
Bathroom
Accessories
Cookware Sets
Glassware Sets


Dinnerware
Sets
Irons
Lamps
Blenders
Figurines


Bakewares
Wall Clocks
Wall Pictures
Picture Frames
Flatware Sets


Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center


Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 ,..


D AIR &FRZE---FODSPCAL


GALAXY SLICED 18 OZ
SANDWICH CHEESE... 990

WHITEWAVE 32 OZ
LAIN/VANILLA/CHOCOLATE
0SY MILK ...... $3.19

TAM1ICO ASST'D GAL
RUii PUNCHES .... $2.99
I '


ISLAND QUEEN
FRENCH FRIES

FROSTY ACRE
MIXED
VEGETABLES


4.5 LB BAG
.m..... $3.79


16- OZ


..... $1.79


PEPPERIDGE FARM
ASST'D 19 OZ
CAKES .............. $3 .59


END OF MONTH SALE


>iCAR MAYER 1 LT OSCAR MAYER
SbEEF 1MI/i WIENERS/
JLOGNA FRN KTP BUN LENGTH

59 $-59
s15 OZ 2..
-- - -


WHOLE ROTISSERIE
CHICKENS


$7E99
7-EcH


GOLDEN RIPE BAHAMIAN IDAHO BAKING
GROWN
BANANAS TOMATOES POTATOES
LOOSE
PER-LB ^^PER-LB L9!9
WEET RED SWEET RED GREEN OR RIPE

PEPPERS GRAPES PLANTAINS
s99 $4I89 2/99 8
"l PER LB i PER LB W


Sheet Sets
Towels
Computers
Rugs
Kitchen Curtains
Place Mats
Table Cloths
Toasters
Irons
Dinnerware Sets
SGlass Sets,


Cutlery Sets
Pot Sets
Flatware Sets
Cord Craft Flowers
Picture Frames
Wall Mirrors
Blinds
Throw Pillows
Air Beds
Feather Beds


m 0I I *I


Pay Less


at Discount Mart


W'E1ACEPT....RCA EPRES /I STAMP1C


PORK CHO


I I I I


c


'


I


WE ACCEPTAMERICAN EXPRESS I


STAMP CARDS


I















The Adventists.(
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists www bahamasconference.org

A dven Ist sM IIAI II I II I[ I i 1e In P o U le s" " !I,

Kencot Adventist Men Chorale
Inspire Congregation
More than seventy Adventist Men from the Kencot
Seventh-day Adventist Church, Jamaica, were guest of
the Living Faith Adventist Church for the weekend of
May 20 22. They provided a unique combination of
inspirational music, and true-to-life testimonies of
God leading in their lives. The melodious and harmo-
nious singing uplifted the hearts of those in atten-
dance. The Kencot Men Choral have been traveling to
several Caribbean Islands sharing God's message in
song and testimony. The director of the chorale was
Herbert Blackwood, a Christian banker. The coordi-
nator the trip was Errol Homes, Vice President for
Suber Clubs. Pastor Paul Scavella was the host pastor.
See photos on the right

Top Aard fo.Baama
Acadey Stdent
W ~ r~.AP


Photos: The Kencot Adventist Men at the Living Faith Church this past weekend. They provided inspirational music and special tes-
timonies to encourage and transform lives.


Students of Bahamas Academy. Left: Pharez Rolle Right:Kevin Dion
Rolle
Bahamas Academy extends congratulations to Kevin
Dion Rolle, Jr. for placing second in the Bahamas
Primary School Student-of-the-Year Awards
Ceremony held May 21st at Government House.
Kevin was among hundreds of primary school stu-
dents nominated throughout the Bahamas for the cov-
eted award and we are proud of the fact that he was a
second place finalist. In addition to receiving a trophy,
Kevin received a cheque for $1,000 applied as a schol-
arship to the high school of his choice. Kevin is a
Grade 6 student at Bahamas Academy, the son of Joan
and Kevin Rolle, and is an active member of the
Maranatha Seventh-day Adventist Church.
Congratulations also go out to Pharez Rolle for
receiving the top award in the Outstanding Students in
Bahamian High Schools category. Pharez was cited
for achieving a 4.0 grade point average for three con-
secutive years and the only student in the Bahamas to
have done so. For his achievements, Pharez received
a computer system- and a watch, presented by the
Governor General at Government House recently.
Pharez is a Grade 12 student at Bahamas Academy, the
son of Godfrey and Lorraine Rolle, and attends the
Hillview Seventh-day Adventist Church.


Bahamas Academy Old Trail Road

Early Learning Center.
Now Registering Children Ages 2 to 5 Years
Call 393 8898


BOOKS THAT

CHANGE YOUR LIFE


CAN -


For many decades, the Home Health Education
Services has been producing been producing and
promoting materials on health, education and charac-
ter-building for families. As the exclusive agent for
these book and magazine in the Bahamas, the
Adventist Book and Nutrition Center is please to
invite the public to stop by its store on Harrold Road
to view what is available. The Encyclopedia of
Heath and Education (photo on left) should be of
interest to every Bahamian family. Get this
Education and Health Library for your family. If
you are unable to come our store, a trained salesper-
son can come to your home or office and deliver the
books fbr you. Just call 341 1429 and ask for the
book salesperson.


-- ... *1,*.


-- II


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE





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