Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00113
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: May 19, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00113
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"TRY OUR n
COOKIES JJ
FOR CANCER" m lovin,.,
HIGH 86F
LOW 72F

L CLOUDS
AND SUN


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.146 THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005 PRICE -500


nt again


A LEADING government
lawyer has lodged an official
complaint against Attorney
General Alfred Sears following
what one source has called "a
massive cussing match"
between them.
Cheryl Grant-Bethell, a
senior attorney who works
alongside Director of Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner, has
reportedly accused Mr Sears of
using bad language in a row
over the new Chinese-spon-
sored sports stadium in Nassau.
It is also claimed that high
tension exists between the pair
over the controversial Guana
Cay development, in which Mrs
Grant-Bethell was to have pre-
sented the government's case
at a judicial review.
In a heated exchange, Mr
Sears is alleged to have lost his
temper in front of staff and used
what some observers have
described as intemperate lan-
guage.
Now, according to well-
placed sources, Mrs Grant-
Bethell has lodged formal com-
plaints with the Bahamtas Bar
Association and Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie, who is still
off sick following his stroke two
weeks ago.
One source told The Tribune:
"The bottom line is that she is
alleging that he swore at her in
front of several people, includ-
ing junior staff, in the office.
"There is also a suggestion
that she was withdrawn from


the Guana Cay case at the last
moment, and that other outside
attorneys have been consulted
without her knowledge.
"It seems that government
lawyers, including Mrs Grant-
Bethell, feel they have been
sidelined and humiliated in this
affair."
The source added: "There
was also a dispute over an
agreement being drawn up in
relation to the. new sports sta-
dium in Nassau. Apparently, it
was claimed that certain docu-
mentation was not prepared in
time for talks with a Chinese
delegation.
"There was a cussing match
after which a complaint was
lodged over Mr Sears' alleged
bahaviour."
The dispute occurred against
a backdrop of growing dis-
gruntlement in the Attorney
General's Office.
Staff have felt for some time
that they have been overloaded
with work a situation made
worse by their prolonged
involvement in the Sidney
Stubbs bankruptcy affair.
There is widespread annoy-
ance over so much time being
devoted to "getting Stubbs out
of a hole" to the detriment of
more routine business, accord-
ing to sources.
The result is that a huge back-
log of civil litigation has now
built up, with staff having to
SEE page 14


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A young mother is miss-
ing and has not been seen or heard from
for a week since leaving her two-week-old
infant with her sister in Holmes Rock.
Rosnell Russell, a resident of Moore's
Island, Abaco, was staying with her sister,
Nicole Pinder in Holmes Rock when she
disappeared on May 10. A missing per-
son's report was filed with Eight Mile
Rock police on May 17.
Ms Pinder told police that her sister,
Rosnell, moved in with her on May 2 or 3
with her baby, Jasmine. She agreed to
allow her sister stay until she got on her
feet.
According to reports, on May 10 Ros-
SEE page 14


$6.2m payout for

Royal Oasis staff
* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter.
GOVERNMENT yesterday approved
the disbursement of $6.2 million in sever-
ance pay for Royal Oasis employees in
Grand Bahama.
However, in accordance with the Finan-
cial Administration Audit Act, only $5 mil-
lion will be paid out today to cover the
initial disbursements. Workers with a total
payout package of $10,000 or less will be
paid in full, and others with a higher sever-
ance package will receive 50 per cent of its
value. The remainder will follow once the
residual $1.2 million is approved by Par-
liament when it meets again.
Of the 900 workers who were affected,
the total payment of the severance packages
equates to some 650 workers, a gesture that
SEE page 15


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BAHAMAS EDITION


CO


Lawyer 'accuses

Attorney General of

bad language in row'


Sears


Give Your Family



Bring Home A Bucket..


Tropical storm

threatens Bahamas
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
and PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters
THE Bahamas may experience the first
Tropical Storm of the 2005 hurricane sea-
son by Monday morning.
Tropical Storm Adrian emerged in the
eastern Pacific Ocean on Tuesday and
currently the storm is drifting to the
Bahamas at eight miles an hour. Howev-
er this trajectory is unusual because Pacif-
ic storms generally move to the west-
northwest.
Tropical Storm Adrian will not retain
that name if it arrives in the Caribbean or
Gulf of Mexico with tropical storm winds.
The storm will be renamed Arlene, the
scheduled name for the first Tropical
SEE page 15


pi








P E T R Y A 1 2T T B


Playing in the sun
can mean
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AND...


Irreversible damage
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Whatever


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FLOODING hit some of the main settlements on the island.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)



Andros flooding


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damage ass

FROM page one age and make his own assess-
ments. He also thought it impor-
tant to invite the media to see the
earby government-supported areas for themselves.
senior citizen's home, but fam- While in Driggs Hill, an elder-
y members insisted that the ly woman told him that in all of
wo ladies stay with them in her 59 years she had never seen
earby homes. so much flooding. However, said
Bahamas Electricity Corpora- Mr Bastian, it had turned out to
ion Linesman Mate Shelton be less damage than he had
Zolle said that all homes in expected.
ndros had electricity, except the "To me it really was not what I
omes of the two sisters, thought it would be after I heard
"It rained very heavily and this the story," he said. "I have seen
Sthe first time it has flooded so water like that in Mangrove Cay."
nuch," said Mr Rolle. "We had
o cut, the power to these-two4 Assistance


Iuss L;Deaue;i; Uy aU a IUL UI.
drop cords hanging down and the
water is still pretty high around
their houses."
Joel Rolle, also from Driggs
Hill, said his furniture was badly
damaged by the flood water, and
there seemed to be a problem
with drainage in his neighbour-
hood.
. South Andros MP Whitney
Bastian visited his constituency
yesterday and said he is taking it
upon himself to evaluate the dam-
TROI


Mr Bastian said that although
the damage was not outstanding,
he still expects government to
give immediate assistance to those
who need it.
"I have faith that persons who
are in need will be given the help
that they require," said Mr Bast-
ian.


Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin and Housing
Minister Shane Gibson, visited
South Andros yesterday and
touched base with Ministry of
Works engineers who also
inspected government buildings.
A tour of the Congo Town
International Airport revealed
that there was some roof damage
which created-leaks into the build-
ing. Engineers confirmed that a
new roof is necessary. '
"The structural damage is min-
imal," said Mr Gibson, also rep-


essed

resenting the National Emer-
gency Management Association
(NEMA), "but any relief that is
required will be addressed imme-
diately."
Mr Gibson said that a total of
five homes were affected by the
flooding in the areas of Long Bay
Cays, Congo Town, and Driggs
Hill which was affected the most.
He estimated that the cost of
repairs to the homes would be
less than $10,000.
He also said that NEMA mem-
bers have been going through
extensive training to put measures
in place to minimise the effects
of natural disasters, and the Min-
istry of Housing was actually just
the "executing agency" for those
measures.
He said one of the reasons
some homes suffered more than
others was the difference in con-
struction. He observed that some
of the homes in Andros had foun-
dations which were set too low.
compared to the height of the
roads.
He also said that homeowners
should learn from the flooding
how to better protect their homes.
He said that those who qualify
for assistance will be helped as
soon as assessments have been
completed.
Mr Bastian said that when the
water has completely receded he
will return to South Andros to
speak to all the residents to
ensure that all their needs are
met.


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- INDEX


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY.19, 2005, PAGE 3


LAN


Mitchell plea for CSME




calm to businessmen


E By CARA BRENNEN agreement with reservations.
Tribune Staff Reporter "What is happening now is
that the Bahamas proposes to
FOREIGN Affairs Minister sign the revised treaty, but still
Fred Mitchell has assured Aba- reserve itself on most of the
co businessmen that the signing economic issues, thus leaving
of the revised treaty of us in the same position that we
Chaguarmas will not mean the were in under the 1983 treaty.
free flow of labour into the No more, no less."
country.
Mr Mitchell told a Chamber Reservations
of Commerce meeting yester-
day that the Bahamas has
always been a signatory to the He explained that proposed
initial agreement in the treaty reservations included those
which created the Caribbean dealing with the free move-
community. ment of people, the monetary
Prior to now, the Bahamas union, the Caribbean Court of
has not joined the Common Justice on the appellate side
Market because the Bahamas and the Common External.
economy and those of the "The right of establishment
region were too divergent and is another issue that has been
the country had no manufac- identified as an area of con-
turing base to speak of. tention. However, the treaty
However, he said that when provides for the right of estab-
the original treaty was revised lishment principally in areas
in 2001, it called for the CARI- that earn foreign exchange
COM and Common Market to such as hotels, which are
be put into one document. This already open to foreign
meant that the Bahamas Would investors.
have to sign the revised edition "So, in essence, no retail or
to continue in the treaty. wholesale operation in the
However, Mr Mitchell Bahamas will be threatened.by
explained that while the revised our joining the CSME."
treaty contains the agreement He also pledged that the
to move toward a single market decision to sign on to the
and single economy, because CARICOM Revised Treaty
of the peculiar nature of the has no implications for the soy-
Bahamas it will enter the ereignty of the Bahamas. N FRED Mitchell defended to revised treaty


DON'T miss Monday's great INSIGHT section, with two
major articles on the PLP leadership and Bahamas crime.
After his health scare, can Perry Christie carry on? Following
the knifing of MP Frank Smith, has criminality reached the
point of no return?
Read INSIGHT'S- thought-provoking conclusions, only in
The Tribune.





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brother, Cordell Brennen.
The brothers are both
charged with conspiracy to com-
mit murder as well as two
counts of conspiracy to prevent
a witness from giving evidence.
Angelo, 36, of Derby Road,
and his older brother, Cordell,
38, are accused of conspiring on
April 30 to cause the death of
16-year-old Calvonya Grant.
It is alleged that between.
October and December 2004,
Angelo and Cordell conspired
to prevent Aaron Woodside
from giving evidence in
Angelo's murder trial.
In the second count of con-
spiracy to prevent a witness, it is
alleged that between Novem-
ber 2004 and April 2005 Ange-
lo and his brother Cordell con-
spired to cause Leander Cul-
mer from giving evidence in the
same trial.
Angelo, represented by
lawyer Raynard Hefifield, is on
remand in Her Majesty's Fox
Hill prison after being charged
with the murder of Ruthmae
Pinder, mother of the 16-year-
old he is accused of conspiring
to kill.
Magistrate Linda Virgill ruled
that the case be adjourned to
June 21.


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PAGE 4,THURSDAYMAY19I,2L05TTRSBTUNTHEEDTOE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I WANT to personally wish
the Prime Minister, Perry Glad-
stone Christie, a quick recov-
ery from his present health sit-
uation.
It was quite a relief when I
heard that he was doing fine.
All Bahamians wish him well.
While I must take the Prime
Minister's word that he didn't
take a vacation in over three
years, and the insinuation that
this contributed to his ill-health,
I must also add that his minis-
ters have certainly not helped
his situation.
I have a mother who suffers
from hypertension, so I am well
aware of some of the factors
that can contribute to Mr
Christie's condition. Some of
the factors are poor diet, lack
of rest and a condition Bahami-
ans call "worrying".
The Bahamian people in part
can be very passive but they do
have an appreciation of right
and wrong. They also have an
innate sense of when they are
being taken for a ride. It seems
a vicious cycle that when politi-
cians are granted their status by
the people they soon forget the
source of their political exis-
tence. They become, in one
word, arrogant.
Politicians believe that they
can make wrong right with slick
rhetoric or repeating a lie often
enough. The good book says
"that pride goes before destruc-
tion and a haughty spirit before
a fall".
I see today this very deadly
pattern of arrogance, abuse of
power and sheer political indif-
ference emerging in the "New,
PLP",under Mr Christie.
Taking a quote from Shake-
speare's Julius Caesar, they "do
bestride the world like a colos-
sus and we must find ourselves
dishonourable graves". Let the
PLP keep strutting; we will see
in 2007 who will be buried in
dishonourable graves. It is this
writer's firm belief that this pre-
sent cabinet has no credibility
and not a thread of respect left.
They continue to embarrass the
Bahamian people.
Scandals after scandals have
followed this cabinet from its
inception. In the space of about
three weeks we, the Bahamian
people, had the unfortunate
misbehaviour of about three
ministers, one junior minister
and two cabinet ministers. We
had the Cat Cay row of Minister
Leslie Miller and Emanuel
Diaz, when the minister almost
came to fisticuffs.
We also had Ron Pinder


pulling his arrogant weight in
Abaco and Minister Wisdom
and the Four Seasons' fiasco in
Exuma.
The Prime Minister created
this "Frankenstein monster"
and it is he who will have to
. remove this albatross from the


backs of Bahamians. This cabi-
net is a weight too heavy to
bear.
I, like many Bahamians, sus-
pect that it is not only a lack of
vacation that has contributed
to our Prime Minister's mild
stroke, but in fact the uncouth
and aberrant behaviour of some
of his ministers.
STEPHEN ROLLE
Nassau
May 6 2005


EDITOR, The Tribune
I DO not know Mr Brent
Symonette personally. I have
never met him, nor spoken
with him. I have no personal
feelings either for; or against
him. I hold no office in the
Progressive Liberal Party and
never have nor do I have any
political aspirations or objec-
tives.
I do care deeply, however,
about my brother Perry, who
is a politician, leader of the
Progressive Liberal Party, and
our country's Prime Minister.
Through him, I have been
exposed to front line politics
practically all of my adult life.
Therefore, I expect that as
the "political season" ap-
proaches, his detractors and
adversaries will declare war
on him. There is absolutely
no problem with that as
my brother is a tested and
proven political warrior who
can do battle with the best of
them.
Mr Symonette, however,
perhaps in his exuberance to
score political points, crossed
the line of decency and fair
play by his callous and cava-
lier public reaction to my
brother's illness. His insensi-
tive remarks offended me and
my family when I heard them
on the radio, and these feel-
ings intensified when I saw


his gleeful display on televi-
sion.
Yes, perhaps my brother
did flirt with death, or in Mr
Symonette's caustic words,
"almost died". As a family,
we certainly were aware that
his illness could lead to severe
injury or worse. Mr Symon-
ette's comments were there-
fore most unkind.
I am certain that as my
brother's health improves, he
will respond to Mr Symonette
in his own fashion. Mean-
while, I can only advise Mr
Symonette that as he seeks to
serve the "Bahamian masses"
at a higher level he must learn
to empathise. with them.
When it was time to show
genuine concern and big-
heartedness for a fallen col-
league, he failed miserably.
For me and my family as
my brother recovers, we and
he, gain strength in words tak-
en from Psalm 139, "If I take
the wings of the morning and
dwell in the uppermost parts
of the sea, even there thy
hand shall guide me and thy
right hand shall hold me".
In Perry's own words, that
morning he awoke, God took
him into troubled waters and
brought him back.
GARY W CHRISTIE
Nassau
May 12 2005


SECOND CALL NOTICE OF THE
ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited
East Street South and Independence Drive.


Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-Eight (28th)
Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-
operative Credit Union Limited will be held at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel located on Bay Street, on Saturday
May 21, 2005 commencing at 8:00 am for the following
purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for
2004.
To receive the Audited Accounts for 2004.
To elect members of the Board of Directors.
To discuss and approve the Budget for 2005.
To take action on such matters as may come before
the meeting.

Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary

NB: Visitors are welcomed, however, they will be responsible
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Reasons for




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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TIBUNETHURSAY MY 19,2005,PAGE


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union has
launched a hurricane preparedness
campaign.
The union is urging everyone to
begin the process of securing their
homes from loose shingles, broken
windows, glass doors, and the like.
They are also encouraged to remove
all loose objects from around the
yard that can be picked up in high
winds, and alert relevant govern-
ment agencies where tree branches
threaten electrical wires.
Residents in low-lying flood areas
are urged to secure the necessary
sandbags in an effort to prevent
flooding and do a general check of
home and property.
First vice-president Qubelle Rolle
said the union remembers the suf-
fering of many of its members fol-
lowing last year's hurricane season.
"We felt compelled to sound a
warning this time around with the
hope that all would heed. We can
never do enough to remind our peo-
ple of the potential dangers and get
them in a state of readiness.
Last year the Bahamas sustained
more than $1 billion in damage after
hurricanes Frances and Jeanne.


Prison officers




found guilty


* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
SIX prison officers on duty
the night number one escape
risk Barry Parcoi fled from
the Fox Hill compound were
found guilty of dereliction of
duty and given minimal fines
of $20.
Prison Supt Dr Elliston
Rahming said the antiquated
Prison Act only allowed for
a maximum $20 fine, along
with working extra days.
However, the new Depart-
ment of Corrections Act,
which will soon be tabled in
the House, will enable much
heftier fines and stiffer penal-
ties to be levied in future.
Dr Rahming called it
"unfortunate" that the maxi-
mum penalty could not be
more serious, but added that
stern warnings were issued.
"We could have taken
them to the department of
public personnel, who have
the power to impose a stiffer
penalty, but that requires


N BARRY Parcoi
months of to and fro and we
just wanted it done with. So
we did what was in our power
to do," said Mr Rahming.
Dr Rahming said that the
vast majority of officers work
against tremendous odds and
do a very creditable job. But
in the few isolated cases were
there clearly were breaches


in attention paid to prisoners,
the new Prison Act would
give far more leeway to the
administration to apply a
more fitting penalty, said Dr
Rahming.
"You can understand when
certain things happen, but
when things happen that are
beyond explanation, from just
gross negligence or derelic-
tion of duty, a clear message
has to be sent."
The six officers were not
suspended from duty after the
incident, which occurred in
early March.
Sometime in the night of
March 2, Parcoi, a 43 year-
old inmate serving life for
rape and forcible detention,
escaped from the medium
security housing block, where
he had been for two years.
He had spent 19 years in
maximum security. Prison
officers said he escaped
through a bathroom wall.
The escape brought a new
resolve for heightened secu-
rity measures.


Programme to reduce

capital's power outages


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A PLANT replacement and
upgrade programme will help
reduce power outages on New
Providence, says BEC general
manager Kevin Basden.
Mr Basden was responding
to complaints from residents
in the Gladstone Road, Rocky
Pine Road and Carmichael
Road areas who experienced
power shortages at the week-
end.
He said generator trips had
been the cause: "We had a
couple of generators out for
short periods and we had to
run up additional generators
to bring them back on line."
He said BEC had looked
into the problem, and he
thinks they have solved it.
Mr Basden said power out-


ages in the area should be
reduced.
"We have done as much as
we can to try and minimise the
impact. However, outages will
happen from time to time for
various reasons such as light-
ning storms or a traffic acci-
dent," he said.
Craig Lowe, of Gladstone
Road, told The Tribune that
on Whit Monday his power
went off four times, damaging
a new satellite receiver at his
house. A Rocky Pine Road
woman said her lights were off
-nearly the whole day.
The upgrading programme
will take a while, but BEC
hopes to continue to improve
its service delivery, said Mr
Basden.
"A generator is not installed
overnight it takes time and
money," he said.


Plea to prioritise labour issues


TRADE unions yesterday
called for labour issues to be
placed at the top of the nation-
al agenda to improve conditions
for the working classes.
The Bahamas Trade Union
Congress (CBTUC) and the
National Congress of Trade
Unions (NCTU) held a press
conference to urge government
"to put labour on the front
burner."
The organisations have
already drawn up a memoran-
dum identifying issues that the




KFetill'ilie




THURSDAY
MAY 19
6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 Spiritual Impact
2:00 CMJ Club Zone
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 Bishop Leroy Emanuel
3:30 ,Gilbert Patterson
4:00 Lonnie Hunter
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News (Update Live)
5:00 Inside Hollywood
5:30 Legends From Whence
We Came: F. Ferguson
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Native Stew Special
9:00 A Classic Performance
9:30 The Darold Miller Show
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Pg./1540


Ministry of Labour should
address.
Lack of education and knowl-
edge about the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market Economy (CSME)
was a hot topic for Robert Far-
quharson, general secretary of
the NCTU.
"The government should take
the initiative and educate the
public," said Mr Farquharson.
"They need to know how it
affects their daily lives."
Collaboration with churches,
radio and television broadcasts
and town meetings were some
of the ways Mr Farquharson
proposed for the government's
education programme.
At the Grand Bahama Con-
tainer Port, workers signed a
casual employment agreement
which overruled the previous


agreement that entitled work-,
ers to 42 hours a week, restrict-
ing workers to no more than 16
hours a week.
"They have casual hours now
- vacation, sick days, gone," said
Obie Ferguson, of the CBTUC.
The agreement is in violation
of the Employment Act of the
Bahamas, said Mr Ferguson,
and adjustments must be made.
The Employment Act is just
one of the acts that the CBTUC
and NCTU want revised.
The Health and Safety Act is
also under the microscope of
trade unions, who want it
reviewed to protect the health
of Bahamian workers.
In 2001 the Minimum Wage
Act was introduced by the gov-
ernment, but according to Mr
Farquharson there are still a lot


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of people making less than min-
imum wage.
Decisions being made are not
in the interest of the working
class, added Mr Ferguson.
According to Cleola Hamil-
ton, of the CBTUC, unions
have recently signed an agree-
ment with the Ministry of
Health for nurses in public
health. The agreement will be
final on May 25, 2005, and is
just one of the successes the
CBTUC and NCTU are look-
ing for in the future.


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THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 5


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


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THE TRIBUNE






'Walking symbols





of healthy living'


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
THE women of the Nassau
chapter of LINKS Incorporat-
ed added a splash of colour to
the British Colonial Hilton yes-
terday, hosting a symposium
luncheon to mark "Health and
Heart".
Dressed in red, the women
were walking symbols of
healthy living.
The festivities began at 11am
and went on until about four.
LINKS (Bahamas) is one of
300 chapters that represent
10,000 women worldwide.


Women of Nassau chapter

of LINKS Incorporated

host symposium luncheon


Every two years the organi-
sation focuses on a particular
matter affecting women. This
year the focus was placed on
the heart, particularly heart dis-
eases and how to prevent them.
The goal of LINKS is to bring
awareness and to educate
women across the nation and


the world.
LINKS brought in leading
medical authorities to help
Bahamian women and men
alike appreciate and under-
stand their hearts, how serious
conditions of the heart really
are, and also to give the "hard
truth" so that they can do


something about them.
The first presenter was car-
diologist Dr Armando Garcia
of the South Miami Hospital,
who said the leading cause of
death in women is heart dis-
ease.
Most women, and in some
cases their doctors, do not
recognise the symptoms. Most
people regard heart problems
such as heart attacks as a man's
disease, but "heart disease does
not respect sex. We have to be
aware that women do have
heart attacks," Dr Garcia said.
The doctor explained that
most physicians and health care
professionals do not know
enough to assess health prob-
lems in women. Thirty seven
per cent of women die from
heart disease because the con-
dition is not detected early
enough.
In today's society "women
don't have time to get sick,"
he said. Women are too busy
working, taking care of the chil-
dren, buying groceries, cook-
ing and cleaning to worry about
getting sick. But every year
more than half a million
women die from heart disease.
Dr John Dylewski, cardiac
specialist of the South Miami
Hospital, talked about fainting
spells in women and how the
heart is connected.
Expected
In the olden days it was
expected of a woman of gentle
upbringing to faint, and fall
gracefully to the floor. But now
when a woman faints it should
be taken much more serious-
ly.
"Fainting spells or 'syncope'
in technical terms is not a dis-
ease," he explained, "it's a
symptom."
Syncope is more often than
not associated with heart dis-
eases. "This is a serious condi-
tion," Dr Dylewski said, "It's a
common symptom, often with
dramatic consequences, which
deserves thorough investiga-
tion and appropriate treat-
ment."
He further explained that
fainting can result in "bruises,
car accidents, loss of con-
sciousness, and even death."
Before taking his seat he
advised that adding salt to your
food helps with syncope, to the
amusement of the audience.
Last to present was Dr David
Galbert, cardiothoracic sur-
geon. His topic was "How to
Mend a Broken Heart."
Being the father of sixgirls,
he is thought of as an expert
in both fields.
"The key to a healthy heart
is both physical and spiritual,"
he said. At the South Miami
Hospital he encourages all of
his patients to maintain a
healthy heart, including sever-
al Bahamians.
So far he has operated on 36
Bahamians. He says they come
to him because they feel they
can't get the quality service
here.
His goal for the 21st century
is for better outcomes, lower
mortality rates and continued
quality service for patients
around the world.
The presentation ended with
questions from the audience.


; 1 --I-]


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neighbourhoods. Perhaps
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 7


Injunction fied to



stop development


TEST DRIVE & COMPARE




200 KIA OPnIMA


M By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The lawyers
for the Save Guana Cay Reef
Association yesterday filed an
application in the Supreme
Court for an injunction order
to stop the government leasing
150 acres of crown land at
Great Guana Cay to Baker's
Bay Developers.
Guana Cay residents are
strongly opposed to the pro-
posed development by the
developers. They believe that
such a major development
would have "disastrous" affects
to the natural environment
there and have held several
demonstrations to protest it.
Fred Smith and George Mis-
sick of Callenders and Co, who
represent the SGCA, applied
for an order to stop the prime
minister, who is responsible for
Crown Lands and the Treasury,
from issuing leases to the devel-


opers at Baker's Bay.
They have also sought to
cease all development at Guana
Cay until the judicial review
had been concluded.
Mr Smith submitted affidavits
by Erin Lowe and Troy Albury.
They alleged that the develop-
ers had cut down trees, bull-
dozed roads through the forest,
destroyed protected vegetation,
and were conducting construc-
tion and development activities
without the necessary permits
required by law.

Permits

Mr Albury also alleged that
the developers did not have any
permits as required under the
Local Government Act.
In their affidavits, Lowe and
Albury referred to the publica-
tion by Minister of Investment
and Financial Services Allyson
Maynard-Gibson which stated


that Out Island Consultation
Committees would be set up,
that the government would pro-
tect the environment, respect
the interest of the local com-
munity, and have consultation
with residents before develop-
ment occurred.
The attorneys for the devel-
opers argued that the associa-
tion had no legal standing
before the court. They claimed
that two employees in the
offices of Callenders owned
shares of SGCA Limited.
However, evidence was pro-
duced by Mr Albury that the
shares were held in trust for all
residents and landowners of
Guana Cay that had signed the
petition to stop the Baker's Bay
development.
He added that evidence sug-
gest that the environmental con-
sequences of such a develop-
ment on Guana Cay would be
disastrous and the environment
might never be able to recover.


Learning from each


other's bright sparks


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
ELECTRICAL companies
from across the Caribbean are
to meet next week in a bid to
learn from each other's experi-
ences.
THE Caribbean Electric Util-
ity Services (CARILEC) CEO
symposium in Nassau will be
hosted by BEC between May
22 and May 25 at the Atlantis
hotel under the theme "Busi-
ness Continuity: An Imperative
for Caribbean Electric Utili-
ties."
CARILEC is an association


of electric utilities, suppliers,
manufacturers and other stock-
holders operating in the elec-
tricity industry in the
Caribbean.
Speakers from various cor-
porations will speak on topics
such as "Improving the Perfor-
mance of Pacific Island Power
Utilities: Lessons for Caribbean
Utilities" and"Performance
Measurement and Benchmark-
ing Within Electric Utilities",
while a Bahamian presenter will
address "Business Interruption
in the Aftermath of Hurricanes
Jeanne and Frances."
BEC general manager Kevin


Basden said his corporation was
vital to the existence of the
economy. With this in mind, he
explained that it is important
that the corporation be on the
"leading edge" in relation to
disaster management and
response to disasters.
"There are lessons we can
learn from Grenada, the Cay-
man Islands, and lessons they
can learn from us," he said.
CARILEC members have
become well known for send-
ing technical teams to assist in
times of natural disasters any-
where in the Caribbean region,
said Mr Basden.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 7


Monday to Sa












How Safe is Bahamas needs a


N his book Quest for the
Best, Stanley Marcus
wrote: "An attempt to forecast
the future for fine quality is as
difficult as trying to predict what
a 25 beauty will look like when
she is 60, but it's worth a try."
He continued: "Obviously,
human life on earth is going to
be affected by the type of eco-
nomic system prevailing but,
barring a proletarian dictator-
ship which reduces everything
to a standard of uniformity for
one and all, I find it difficult to
conceive of a time when there
won't be a premium for the
best. As long as there are dif-
ferent sizes of oranges, there
will be customers willing to pay
more for the largest and juici-
est."
In these words Stanley
Marcus, one of the co-
founders of Neiman-Mar-
cus, lay a truth that our nation
must embrace. That truth is this:
the key to our continued and
increased prosperity as a nation
is our ability to produce the
best.
What is that great shield that
will protect us from succumb-
ing to any negative effects of
globalisation, trade liberalisa-
tion or increased international
competition?
* What is it that which will
transform the challenges of the
CSME, FTAA, WTO or open-
ing up of Cuba into opportuni-
ties for our further national
development?

The answer is an unre-
lenting commitment on


STRAIGHT

Z H IVA R G
the part of a critical mass of
Bahamians to produce the high-
est quality in every aspect of
their lives. It is a resolve to do
with all their might every decent
endeavour to which they put
their hands.
Let there be no mistake about
it, there are Bahamians who
have already embarked on this
quest for the best.
I interact with a number of
them weekly: that barber who
takes care both trimming his
customer's hair and explaining
what the customer can do fur-
ther to care for his hair; that
waitress who watches her table
like a hawk waiting to attend to
the most subtle need of her din-
ing guests; that food vendor
who takes immaculate care of
her surroundings to ensure that
her customers are guarded
against health risk; and that
roofing contractor who
responds to every query of his
clients, even when they seem
unreasonable.-
There are on every island in
our nation these heroes of qual-
ity. What is absent is sufficient
of such persons to define a
national culture of quality dis-
tinguished in the world as exem-
plary.

Can we produce this
national culture of
quality? Can we create a critical
mass of Bahamians, young and


There are on every island in
our nation these heroes of
quality. What is absent is
sufficient of such persons to
define a national culture of
quality distinguished in the
world as exemplary.


UP TALK


LAIN


old, for whom a quest for, the
best is an unrelenting passion? I
believe we can, not in a year.or
a political term but perhaprin a
generation or two.
We must approach national
problem solving of this, nature
with a longer time horizon an
we tend to allow because ofthe
short-termism of our politics.
T oo often our view is
that politics and politi-
cians must solve a
problem.
The politician's view is that
he or she only has the time in
between general elections to
solve the problem; not an
unreasonable view considering
that if the problem endures he is
likely to be voted out.
The fact is, however, some of
the problems that we face in our
nation cannot be solved in
between elections and therefore
politics and politicians cannot
solve them in their time frames.
A national culture of quality is
one such problem. It needs
time.

W hat else does a
national culture of
quality need besides time to
develop? It needs national goals
that provide focus for the ambi-
tions of our people.
In education, health, politics,
business, religion, culture, fam-
ily life and so on we must have
national marks that we strive to
hit.
Ask your child's school what
is its goal in math, English, sci-
ence or career counselling. Ask
your pastor or priest what is the
goal in evangelism, devotion,
worship or service to the needy.
Ask your employer what is the
productivity goal. Ask your
national leaders what are the
legislative, policy, economic or
cultural goals. Ask yourself
what are your goals in personal
development, personal finance
and national service.,,
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005













culture of quality .


"The employee who does not earn his or her
wages in productivity should be fired. The busi-
ness that cannot compete in terms of quality or
price must be allowed to suffer the punishment
of the creative destruction of a free enterprise
system. And the politician who does not serve
the interest of his or her people must be voted
out."


some nebulous answer to these
questions or some broad plati-
tude around which you cannot
wrap your mind. A goal is spe-
cific, achievable, clear and time
sensitive.
Creating a national culture of
quality needs a more acute sys-
tem of punishment and rewards.
There is in our society too much
of a tendency to be soft on our-
selves.
Parents are too unwilling to
deny children the pleasures of
TV, PlayStation, Game Cube
and outings with friends when
they have failed to demonstrate
excellence in their efforts and
achievements.

The admonition "spare
the rod, spoil the child"
has not only lost its meaning in
terms of physical discipline, it
has lost its meaning in terms of
discipline, period. Bad, poor
and inadequate effort and out-
put must be punished every-
where.
The preacher who gives an
unfocused, ill-prepared sermon
must not be commended for so
doing. The educator who con-
stantly fails to produce lesson
plans must be removed from
the classroom rather than
rewarded with tenure.
This seemingly harsh system
of punishment will preserve a
sense of accountability if it is
enforced with regularity and
.consistency over time.,

C conversely, good deeds
must be promptly and.


properly rewarded. It is also
true that in our society we are
not so inclined to reward good
performance. Some parents
respond to their children's good
achievement with a bland
"that's nice, dear". That will not
cut it.
The child needs the same
enthusiasm with regard to his
or her achievements as with
regard to his or her failings. Too
many employers enjoy the ben-
efit of their workers productiv-
ity without sharing some of the
company's gains with those
workers.
"Let's grow together" should
be the calling card of today's
business culture. In leadership,
a season of praise and progress
can be dismissed in a brief
moment of agitation.
As a society and as a state,
we must reward high achieve-
ment in every sphere. The
Golden Girls and the Guidance
Counsellor must both be
rewarded if they excel in their
endeavours.

Finally, a national culture
of quality needs leader-
ship and leadership by exam-
ple.
"Leadership is influence,
plain and simple" so said the
leadership guru, John Maxwell.
Any person who cannot influ-
ence others to action is no
leader at all, even if he or she
occupies the highest post in the,,
land.
We need persons who can
influence the masses of Bahami-'
ans to take up the cross of


excellence and quality in a quest
for the best.
The danger here is to imme-
diately set our minds on those
prominent political, religious
and business leaders. This is
fine, if they are among the per-
sons who can influence others
to action and if they do so by
example.
The problem is that more
often than not, they are not.
Notwithstanding their widely
publicised rhetoric, they cannot
get masses of people to follow
them in matters of principle and
personal change.

T he'truth is that the
masses of the Bahami-
an population are not as
much .influenced by these
media icons as much as they are
by souls in their ordinary cir-
cles. A small child is more influ-
enced by a nurturing parent and
a caring teacher than any prime
minister this country has ever
had.
Thus the leadership needed
to create a national culture of
quality must come from a vari-
ety of circles.
Whoever the persons are who
exercise influence in the lives
of various groupings in our soci-
ety, we must recruit them for
our national mission.
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK
Q uality is the only
standard for a
maturing people."


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 9








PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 19,B 2005T^HETRIHBUNE


Labour Day planners


go back to basics


* By KRISTINA MCNEIL
LABOUR Day this year will
remember the late Sir Randol
F Fawkes, the "Father of
Labour", under the theme
"Labour; United We Conquer,
Together We Rise".
Labour Day week will be
celebrated by the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas Trade
Union Congress (CBTUC)
and the National Congress of
Trade Unions (NCTU) in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Inagua and
for the first time in San Sal-
vador from May 29 to June 4.
"There is no Bahamas with-


out labour," said Mr Obie Fer-
guson of CBTUC. He added
that .the right for women to
vote and more seats in the
House had all been achieved
with the help of labour.
The week will begin with the
annual Labour Day church ser-
vice at the Evangelistic Temple
on Collins Ave on Sunday May
29 at 11 am followed by lunch
at the British Colonial Hilton.
A public lecture by George
Mackey will be held on the
Tuesday on "The History of the
Trade Union Movement in the
Bahamas" in the ballroom of
Workers House, Harold Road.
Mr Obie Ferguson and Mr


John Pinder of the NCTU will
make a live television address
on Thursday evening after the
ZNS news. The address will
highlight some of the issues
that face the labour unions and
working class of the Bahamas.
The annual Labour Day
parade and rally will be held
on Friday June 3 at Sam, start-
ing at Windsor Park.
"Windsor Park is the peo-
ple's park where the seed of
independence was planted. We
are going to take Labour Day
back to the people and cele-
brate the right to be free," said
Robert Farquharson, general
secretary of NCTU.


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Union president


in


spirits'


* By KRISTINA McNEIL
THE president of the
National Congress of Trade
Unions remains in high spir-
its after surgery at Princess
Margaret Hospital.
Pat Bain underwent
surgery several weeks ago
and is now recovering at
home, with hopes of return-
ing to work soon.
"I am thankful to God
and my fellow Bahamian
brothers and sisters whose
concern, love and prayers
got me through the surgery,"
said Mr Bain.
Mr Bain, who is also pres-
ident of the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union, is now serving his
second three-year term, dur-
ing which he is seeking bet-
ter conditions for the work-
ing class.
First vice-president of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers 'Union,
Mr Quebelle Rolle, ex-
pressed gratitude to the pub-
lic for its support during Mr
Bain's illness.
"The Hotel Union is
grateful to its members, affil-
iates and the Bahamian pub-
lic for their expressions of
love and best wishes for the
president's health," said Mr
Rolle.


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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


FIZEE

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W ,My4Wed .


o


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for having a


on


We know you are
a Government of consultation,
and will listen to the PEOPLE.


Grand Bahama Human Rights Association
..I.. .. . .


THE TRIBUNE BUSINE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 11









PAGE12,THURSDAYMAY19,2005TLOCALPEOPLEHETRIB


When the company




is part of the family


In our quickening world, one

woman believes people should

work their way up a company


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IN an age when moving up is
synonymous with moving on,
an employee who has been with
the same company for 40 years
still treasures her job.
She thinks more people
would be happier with their
careers if they chose the com-
pany they worked for carefully
and worked their way up
instead of jumping for what
seems like quick pay.
Yvonne Williams, accounts
payable supervisor at Bahamas
Supermarkets, bucks the think-
ing so prevalent among Gener-
ation X: Get a job, move on,
get another job, boost your pay
and pack your resume, move
on...
The woman who started in
1964 as a junior typist, long
before computers were standard
office equipment, long before
even the electric typewriter was
invented, pounded out orders
for City Markets and Winn-Dix-
ie on an old manual typewriter.
But it wasn't the job particu-
larly and certainly not the
challenge of typing before
white-out tape was invented -
that fascinated her and kept her
loyal for four decades. It was
the people, and the company.
"It was the camaraderie that
was displayed from the first day,
the togetherness that made the


company special," said Mrs
Williams.
"There may have been all of
40 people in the office but we all
gelled like one great big family.
We shared. We shared the pick-
ing up of children from school.
"Lunchtime, if one person
was going out to lunch, we all
ate. If someone got married or
had a baby, we all got together
to help them. Showers, birth-
days, anniversaries, any occa-
sion for celebration our co-
workers were there to help cel-
ebrate. They were not just folks
we worked with, but family."
That warmth, she said, is
often missing from the work-
place today, a value that many
don't consider when choosing
where to work, how long to stay,
when to wave a hurried good-
bye and say a temporary hello
to something new.
"There was the friendship and
the family feeling, but also I
chose the company carefully
and I knew there was room
for advancement," said Mrs
Williams.
"You felt a part of the opera-
tion. They came to you and said,
'This is your area. What would
you suggest? How could we bet-
ter this?' They cared about what
we thought and they listened.
We were the ones with our pulse
on the everyday situation."
Impatience drives today's
generation, she believes that
and the desire for the quick
buck rather than the nurturing
of a career.
"Young people today, if it
seems that they're not going
anywhere immediately, they
move on," she added.


Seaman completes

Gunners course

in United States


LEADING Seaman Grego-
ry Burrows of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force has
returned home after an 11-
week academic and practical
training course at the United
States Coast Guard Engineer-
ing and Weapons Schools in
Yorktown, Virginia.
The course was sponsored
through the International Mil-
itary Education Training
(IMET) scheme, which is pro-
vided through the United
States Embassy.
The Gunners Mate "A"
Course, from January 3 to
March 18, provided Burrows
with advance training and
knowledge of the different
small arms and ammunitions.
Participants were required
to repair and perform routine
and preventative maintenance
on all weapons.
Some of the areas covered
included basic leadership, fun-
damental electricity, adminis-
trative and preventative main-
tenance, MF-36 decoy launch-
ing system and range work,
weapon assembly, along with
the safety and stoppages of
weapons.
An introduction to the gen-
eral operations of launchers and


* GREGORY Burrows
machine guns was also taught.
Special emphasis was placed
on physical fitness as a well-
rounded athlete on the
Defence Force, Burrows
achieved a certificate as the
most outstanding physical stu-
dent within his class.
A 1984 graduate of St
Augustine's College, Leading
Seaman Burrows joined the
Defence Force in 1985.
He is currently in the com-
mando squadron of the force.


Lecture Series
Schedule FREE Health Lecture


May 26th
Senior Health


Speaker: Dr. Agreta Eneas-Carey


Topic: Senior Health


June 16th
Men's Health

July 21st
Arthritis
Hip & Knee Replacement

August 18th
Mental Health
Alzheimer's Disease

September 15th
Children's Health

October 20th
Cancer Awareness Month

November 17th
Diabetes Awareness Month

December 15th
Managing Stress &
Depression


Date:

Time:


Thursday, May 26th, 2005

6:00pm 7:30pm


Venue: Doctors Hospital Conference Room

Q & A: Question and Answer Session to follow lecture.

RSVP: To ensure available seating.

Screenings: Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, and Glucose
screenings between 5pm & 6pm.

Please join us as our guest every month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues affecting society
today.




Refreshments will be provided.

Call 302-4603

DOCTORS HOSPITAL
Hka'lh For Life,


Thompson Boulevard



"NOW HIRING"


All Positions

Apply in person to the Manager
Thursday, May 19th, 2005
between the hours of
10:00 a.m. 12 noon


-------


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE











T lphE TRlBUNE THURIAYh MAY 19,2005,tPAG3lm


Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated, the oldest black intercollegiate Greek-
lettered fraternity, will honour fifty-one (51) young men from throughout the Bahamas
at its 2005 Honours Day Convocation. This annual national recognition ceremony,
which was established 18 years ago, strives to showcase and recognize high school
males who will be graduating from their respective schools with grade point averages
of 3.00 or higher. Each high school was invited to submit the top two graduating
males for this high honour.
The men of Alpha Phi alpha Fraternity have determined that the achievements and
~ I I


RANJITH BABU
Queen's College
New Providence


CRISTOVIAN BASDEN
C.V. Bethel Senior High
New Providence


CHRISTOPHER BASTIAN
Mt Carmel Prepoaratory
Academy, New Providence


commitment to excellence of these young men are worthy .of national recognition
and commendation.

The 2005 Alpha Phi alpha Fraternity, Inc. Honours Day Convocation will be
held on Sunday, May 22nd, 2005 3pm, The Ballroom at Government House.
The event is free and open to the general public.
The 2005 Honourees are:


DARRYL BENEBY
Jordan Prince Williams High
New Providence


DAREN BETHEL
Doris Johnson High School
New Providence


DEVONN BRENNEN
Mt Carmel Preparatory
Academy New Providence


FRANKLYN CAMILLE GREGORY CLARKE
Doris Johnson High School West Minister College
New Providence New Providence


DEANGELO FERGUSON
South Andros High
Andros


MARVIN FOWLER
Galilee Academy
New Providence


LASHAWN COOPER
Jack Hayward High School
Grand Bahama












ROTADIO GAITOR
C. I Gibson High School
New Providence


MARVIN DARVILLE
L.N. Coakley High School
Exuma


PATRICK GREENSLADE
St. John's College
New Providence


NIKOLAS DEAL-LARODA
St Augustine's College
New Providence


KHALID HASSAN
St. John's College
New Providence


SAMUEL EVANS
Galilee Academy
New Providence


KENDRICK HUTCHINSON
C.V. Bethel Senior High
New Providence
.. nm i


SEON JACK
South Andros High
Andros


CHARLES JOSEPH DWAYNE KEMP
Aquinas College Aquinas College
New Providence New Providence


KELLEN KNOWLES
Kingsway Academy
New Providence


TREVOR LONGLEY, JR. ALEXANDRE MAUPU
Bahamas Academy St. Andrew's High School
New Providence New Providence


DEANGELO MOSS
Charles W. Saunders High
New Providence


PHAREZ ROLLE
Bahamas Academy
New Providence


JOHN TAYLOR
Government High School
New Providence


BRIAN WILLIAMS
North Andros High
Andros


RENALDO NEELEY
St. Andrew's High School
New Providence


AHMAD RUSSELL
Tabernacle Baptist Academy
Grand Bahama












TYRAN THOMPSON
C.R. Walker Senior High
New Providence


GEORGE WILSON
West Minister College
New Providence


STEPHAN PEARCE
Jack Hayward High School
Grand Bahama


FREDRICK SEYMOUR
Charles W. Saunders High
New Providence


CHARLES WALKER
Abaco Central High
Abaco


ANTOINE WOODSIDE
Tabernacle Baptist Academy
Grand Bahama


TRESOR RAHMING
Government High School
New Providence


NASHID SMITH
Sunland Baptist Academy
Grand Bahama


SHANAIO WHITFIELD
Jordan Prince Williams High
New Providence


DARIO WOODSIDE
C.R. Walker Senior High
New Pr evidence


DELVANO MCINTOSH
Sherlin C. Bootle High School
Abaco


COLIN SWAIN
Abaco Central High
Abaco


GAILIN ROLLE
R.M. Bailey Senior High
New Providence


JAVON TAYLOR
L.N. Coakley High School
Exuma


TRVS BEHE






St.Ane' HghScoo

S


I -W II~LIIW-mmI -


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 14, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Complaint lodged


FROM page one

make up ground lost during the
protracted Stubbs hearings.
The source said: "During
the Guana Cay row, it seems
that Mrs Grant-Bethell told
Mr Sears she was better qual-
ified than him and had a bet-
ter education.
"With staff morale being so
low, it seems that this whole
thing has added insult to
injury as far as the govern-
ment attorneys are con-
cerned."
Another source said: "This
whole business is well-known
in the legal fraternity, but
they have been trying to keep
the lid on it. However, people
feel very strongly about it and
it was inevitable that it would
get out.
"The Stubbs case undoubt-
edly created tension because
a tremendous amount of time
was spent on it by govern-


ment staff.
"The attorneys complained,
understandably, because
Stubbs took precedence over
a number of other issues that
had been outstanding for
years," the source claimed.
"They had a tremendous
backlog of civil work as it
was, but the Stubbs affair
meant a lot of it had to go on
the backburner. Senior peo-
ple had apparently been try-
ing to reason with Mr Sears
for some time over how things
would get done, but they now
claim he was relying on out-
side consultants in the Guana
Cay issue."
Some lawyers reportedly
feel aggrieved because atti-
tudes adopted by Mr Sears
and Financial Services Minis-
ter Allyson Maynard-Gibson -
another attorney suggested
the department's legal staff
were not up to the job.
"Several feuds have been
going on in the office and it


seems this entire business
brought the whole thing to a
head," said the source.
It was reported that Mrs
Grant-Bethell wrote a letter
of complaint to the Attorney
General and sent a copy to
Bar Association president
Wayne Munroe.
However, yesterday, Mr
Munroe would neither con-
firm nor deny he had received
a complaint from Mrs Grant-
Bethell.
He said if such a complaint
were filed, and if it went
through the ordinary ethics
process, it would call for pub-
licity on the conclusion.
Mrs Grant-Bethell sound-
ed taken aback when The Tri-
bune approached her for
comment. But she said she
had no comment at this time.
Mr Sears was in Cabinet
and could not be reached.







FROM page one

nell left the baby with Nicole
around 9am to keep a doc-
tor's appointment. She has
not returned since then to
care for the baby.
Supt Basil Rahming said
Ettamae Jones of Holmes
Rock telephoned the Eight
Mile Rock Police Station
around 7.30pm on May 17
to file a missing person's
report on behalf of Ms Pin-
der.
Rosnell was last seen
wearing a pair of light blue
jeans, an orange t-shirt and a
pair of slippers. She is of
light brown complexion and
is about five feet, six inches
tall of medium build. She
has dark brown eyes and
light brown curly hair exten-
sions.
Anyone with information
on her whereabouts should
contact the police at 348-
3444'.


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NOTICE OF AGM


SECOND CALL

Due to the lack of a quorum,
the second call of the Annual General Meeting of the
Bahamas Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union
Limited
will be held on

Saturday, May 21st, 2005
at 9:00am
at Casuarinas of Cable Beach
West Bay Street, Nassau

ALL MEMBERS ARE REQUESTED TO ATTEND


I


~__ _~~__ _ ~ __~___ I_









TE N TY MY 1
pN


I % Y All.l
FROM page one

t e Minister of Labour and Immigration Vincent
I eet says is a shining demonstration of "a caring
Government."
"The reality of the matter is that in Grand
Bahama we have spent in excess of several million
dollars on hurricane relief and housing initia-
ives.
"These severance pay funds are being disbursed
just prior to the start of yet another hurricane
season, one that the experts tell us will be just as
active as last year's season. And without knowing
what this season has in store for us, we are pre-
pared to help the workers as best we can," he
said.
Today a team from the attorney general's
office, with staff from the Ministry of Labour
and Immigration, will arrive in Grand Bahama to
personally disburse the cheques at the Father
Pestina Auditorium.
Mr Peet advised those persons who were eligi-
ble for pay packets to bring a photo identification,
preferably a company one showing their depart-
ment and employee number.
"As we speak, the Attorney General's office is
putting together a recommendation that will


ensure that in the future all redundancy entitle-
ments will be protected by legislation. And that
workers throughout the Bahamas will be guar-
anteed redundancy payments which will come
from a non-contributory fund set up for that spe-
cific purpose," he said.
Mr Peet hoped that this kind of disbursement
would be a "one shot" type of arrangement.
"This is a special case, one that the govern-
ment felt obligated to on act in the public interest
because of the number of Bahamians that were
effected by the sudden closure. This is not some-
thing that one would hope or expect to happen
often.
"We have learnt from this most unfortunate
experience. This is something that perhaps should
never have happened, but it has. So it is our job
now as a people, as a government, as a country, to
learn from this experience," he said.
Mr Peet said that the money being disbursed by
government will be paid back to the treasury by
Driftwood, the Royal Oasis owners. He said gov-
ernment will reserve the option to go to court if it
has to, to ensure that the money is repaid.
"We have access to properties which the own-
ers have in the Bahamas, and we have access to
the owners, which will allow us to recoup the
public funds we are now paying," he said.


Tropical storm threaten
FROM page one ili


storm of the Atlantic Season.
Yesterday evening,
Adrian was about 295
miles southwest of
Guatemala with sustained
winds of 40 mph with sea
wakes of 12 feet.

Trajectory
The five day trajectory
places the depression in
the central Bahamas by
Monday morning, howev-
er meteorological analysts
are hesitant to assume
what 'type' of storm can
be expected.
Basil Dean the chief
meteorologist at the
department of meteorol-
ogy said that while there
should not be too much
alarm about the force of
the storm, residents
should be concerned as
anything can happen once
the storm reaches the


Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Dennis
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katrina


Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Phillipe
Rita
Stan
Tammy
Vince
Wilma


Gulf of Mexico.
"The storm could bring
a lot of rain and cause a
lot of flooding. That could
be a big area of concern.
Even though the storm
might have been down-
graded it might still be a
very wet storm.
"But it is really too ear-
ly to say what kind of
storm it will be when it
reaches us. But the model
is telling us that it will
weaken, but we will keep
our eyes on it for the next


[S Bahamas
few days and possibly
issue a warning if neces-
sary," he said.
Mr Dean said that this
storm travelling from the
Pacific to the Atlantic
ocean is not a very fre-
quent occurrence, and
that the last storm that
achieved such a feat was
in 1965.

Caribbean
Arnold King the chief
meteorological officer
said that after the storm
moves across Guatemala
and El Salvador, it is
expected to be downgrad-
ed as it moves into the
Caribbean Sea.
"Winds are expected to
fall off to just a tropical
depression with sustained
winds on Monday expect-
ed to be about 34.5 mph
with tropical storm, gusts
of about 46 mph," he
said.


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CONGRATULATES








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Ms. Monique G. Adderley, Senior Operations Officer,
for being the recipient of the "Employee of the Quarter"
Award. Monique was chosen by her colleagues. Her
willingness to support and assist has been remarkable.
We applaud you for your efforts and valuable
contributions Keep up the great work! L to R Mr.
Luis Carlos Ochoa, Business Head; Ms. Monique
Adderley and Mrs. Pearlene Moxey, Operations Head.


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 15






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


An Association Of Electric Utilities


cc


AN IMPERATIVE F


MPOSIUM 2005


:SS CONTINUITY:
CARIBBEAN ELECTRIC UTILITIES


23


Three dc


to 25, 2005


of informative meetings


May 23rd 2005


)0 Opening Ceremony
25 Coffee Break
15 Presentation
Bahamas Electricity Corporc
)0 Performance Measurement
Benchmarking Within Electri
Steven Martina, Aqualectra


nt of GIS for M
rkley Technolo!


11:30- 12:15


12:15-
13:30 -


13:15
14:15


14:15- 15:00


Utilities


Wedi


Business Continuity in a Changing
Economic Environment
Pier Nabuurs
KEMA Consulting
Lunch
Business Interruption In The Aftermath of
Hurricanes Jeanne & Frances
Dave Dunbar
Grand Bahama Power Company
Improving the Performance of Pacific Island
Power Utilities: Lessons for Caribbean Utilities
Tony Neil
Pacific Power Association
3y, May 25th 2005


My








THE TIBUNETHURSAY MA 19,O005, AGEW1


Woman to


Woman Expo


is declared a success


THE Town Centre Mall's
third annual Woman to
Woman Health and Beauty
Expo was declared a success
by both promoters and par-
ticipants.
This year's event featured
more than 25 booths, a
supervised children's corner,
product giveaways, health
screenings and more than
$900 worth of mall dollar
giveaways.
Booths included Curves,
which provided health and
fitness advice. C&S Cater-
ing, Diet Snapple, Slim Fast,
and Bacardi Rum Cake all
gave samples of their prod-
uct to visitors.
Beautify
Full of ideas on how to
beautify homes and any spe-
cial event was M&S Flowers
with Enchanted Designs and
D6cor, while Bahamian
designer Cederic Bernard's
Earthtone Designs and Ele-
ments displayed eye-catch-
ing original designs and fash-
ion pieces that tempted even
the most conscious spenders.
And for the women who
wanted a little makeup
advice on how to perfect
their look, Fantasy Designs
offered professional make-
up advice and beauty prod-
ucts.
AMS International gave
all healthy eating alterna-
tives and sound e-commerce
opportunities on how to sup-
plement incomes. Aspiring
actors and actresses were
also catered to with Thought
Katcher hosting auditions
for their upcoming comedy
production, The Spot. For
those wanting a little rela-
tionship advice, Cia Monet
Productions provided books
and video tapes by Michael
Baisden that provoked .de.p.
thought with topics like
"How aind Why Men
Cheat", "Never Satisfied"
and "Men Cry in the Dark".
Relaxing
With all the activity,
Kaaraw;Bu Nat provided a
break from it all with relax-
ing massages on site.
- Free Dominoes pizzas
were given to Doctors Hos-
pital and the Department of
Public Health for their con-
tribution in providing free
health screenings and immu-
nisations to the general pub-
lic.
The Town Centre Mall's
stores weren't to be out-
done, hosting a fashion show
that highlighted spring fash-
ions by Lorene's, The Sports
Locker, Jarfi's Fashions,
Khalfani (who gave out free
samples of their fragrant oils
during the show), Bata
Shoes and Fashion Hall.
Tops and Jeans provided still
models with outfits to pro-


U EARTHTONES representatives are seen manning their booth at Woman To Woman.


mote displays set up by Fur-
niture Plus and the Home
Centre. Ladies were treated
to an "All Male Review"
after the fashion show that
added even more excitement


to the event.
"We think that this year's
Woman To Woman exercise
went very well. It gave
everyone the opportunity to
win money and giveaways as


well as be entertained, edu-
cated and exposed to prod-
ucts that are available," said
Selina Roberts, spokesper-
son for the Town Centre
Mall.


* TARA HANNAH, who won $50 mall dollars after producing a Lorene's bag, is shown.
Left to right: Friends of Tara, Kira Horton from Carter Marketing and Tara.


Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale Drug Agencies Tel: 393-7111 Fax 393-0440


15% OFF ALL SWIMWEAR


Plus SALE racks starting at $10

One Week Only

SALE begins Tuesday May 17th


Now located on Parliament Street
in the Bayparl Building,
PH: 326-1333


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa


Invites applications for the positions of

EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF
DIRECTOR OF FOOD & BEVERAGE

Applicant must be experienced in their field,
excellent communication skills, both written
and oral, team building and management
skills. Both position offers attractive
compensation packages, competitive with
relevant experience.

Applications should be sent to:

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005
Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com


I I _


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


t





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALANDITRATINLNW
Students
from Florida
pay visitto
Dame Ivy
EIGHTH-GRADE stu-
dents from Calvary Christian
Academy in Fort Lauderdale,
Florida, paid a courtesy call on
Dame Ivy Dumont, Governor-
General, on Thursday, May 5,
at Government House. The
group was given a brief history
of Government House and the
duties of the Governor-Gen-
eral. The group gave a drama
performance and presented a 4
gift to the Governor-General. .
The Governor General is pic-
tured addressing the students.
(BISphoto:
Raymond A Bethel)









Queen Elizabeth II flies into

0 M110 0
coyrig e Material Inoil


(KPrrSyndicated Content -

SAvailable from Commercial News Providers"



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I HUHSUAY, MAY 19, 20Ub, I-AUt 1i


THE TRIBUNE


SBuiy any three Reckitt Benckiser products
rid )' and enter to win one of three Deluxe
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PAGE 20, THURSDAYMAY19,R005IOTNHELTi NEWS


Poles celebrate what


rould have


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- N N

1


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear from people who
are making news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award..
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your
story.


GLUCOSE MONITOR FREESTYLE FLASHTM
NOW AVAILABLE AT LOWE'S PHARMACIES
MONTEHIEDRA Abbott Laboratories Puerto Rico, Inc.
announced today the distribution of its blood glucose meter
FreeStyle FlashTM in Lowe's Pharmacies throughout the Island.
FreeStyle Flash'T is the world's smallest glucose meter. It uses
a single blood sample of 0.3mL (micro liters), which is 50 to
90% less than most meters.
FreeStyle Flash'T tests for blood glucose in 7 second or less.
This product offers diabetes patients the ability to test in
different, less painful areas of the body, such as the palms of
their hands, forearms, thighs, or calves. The monitor also has 4
alarms to remind them when it is time to test.
"FreeStyle FlashTM simplifies diabetes control. Its compact size
and easy use make the monitor ideal to handle diabetes,"
indicated David Freeman, Associated Business Manager Abbott
Diabetes Care. "As a special introductory offer in Lowe's
Pharmacies, clients who purchase a pack of 50 Freestyle Test
Strips will receive the FreeStyle FlashTM meter free" during the
month of May. This supply will be available at Lowe's
Pharmacies located at Soldier Road 394-6312, Harbour Bay
393-4813, Town Centre 325-6482 and Palmdale 322-8594. Blood
glucose clinics will also be held, along with demonstrations of
the product throughout the month of May in local pharmacies.
Abbott Laboratories also manufactures Glucerna, and
Glucerna, Weight Loss products, nutritional supplements for
people with diabetes. Abbott is a proud sponsor of the Bahamas
Diabetes Association (BDA).


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


o








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 21


The Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST) Commission
Ministry of Health and Environment
invites public comment on


THE DRAFT.
NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
FOR THE
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


INTRODUCTION

The Bahamas comprises an archipelago of over 700 low-lying islands plus more than 200 cays,
islets and rocks, covering approximately 100,000 mi2 (260, 000 km2) mostly comprised of the
country's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the Atlantic Ocean. The total land area is small,
approximately 5,380 mi2 (13, 934 kin2), and only a very small number, approximately 30, of the
islands are inhabited. Coastal areas, holding the vast majority of the population and economic
activity, are vital to the prosperity of these islands.

The archipelagic nature of The Bahamas creates a unique natural environment. However, The
Bahamas natural resources are limited and its size, complexity and ecological isolation have
important implications for biodiversity, and human development. With some 80% of The
Bahamas landmass within 5 ft (1.5 m) of mean sea level, its fragile coastal ecosystems are
extremely vulnerable to the effects of global climate change and sea level rise. In addition, water
pollution, land degradation, destruction of wetlands and introduction of invasive species are all
issues of growing concern for The Bahamas. Addressing these environmental issues together
with growing developmental pressures on the limited land base, declining populations on several
of the inhabited islands and the need for a more diversified economy, requires a comprehensive
integrated long-term planning and management strategy that is consistent with the goal of
sustainable development.
The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas (GOB) recognizes that a healthy, and
safe environment reflected in biological diversity and functioning ecosystems, clean water,
cleim air and productive soils is essential to the economic and social well-being and health of
its citizens and that its citizens influence and are influenced by their environment. It also
recognizes that its citizens must live in an environment of a quality that permits a life of dignity
and allows the attainment of the highest possible level of health and well-being; and that this can
only be achieved if economic and social development is in harmony with ecological principles.

Chapter V of The Bahamas 1973 Constitution grants the Parliament of The Bahamas the
authority to make laws and policies with a view to maintaining a safe, productive and healthy
environment that will enhance the health and well-being of its citizens and sustain a high quality
of life.

Vision

The Government envisions a Bahamas in which all people and institutions treasure its unique
natural environment and voluntarily choose to act in a manner that contributes to its
conservation, protection and enhancement. We foresee a time when all our people, rich and
poor, young and old, show respect and appreciation for their natural environment, and share in
the benefits that maintenance of a healthy, safe and productive environment provides to present
and future generations,

Policy Goal and Objectives

The Government of The Bahamas recognizes the fundamental rights of its people to a healthy
and safe environment that is essential to sustaining the quality of life to which all its citizens are
entitled. The GOB is committed to the sustainable use of the environment and consequently the
promotion of economic and social development that fully integrates the environment in a manner
consistent with the goal of sustainable development. However, the fundamental rights of the
people are accompanied by certain responsibilities -a solemn duty of all who reside in The
Bahamas to share in the stewardship of its unique natural environment and resources so that
these are sustained and available for the benefits of future generations.

The goal of the GOB is the sustainable use of the environment of The Bahamas to meet the
needs of present and future generations.

Government's approach to attaining this goal is to pursue a strategy of sustainable development,
meaning improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of
supporting ecosystems. Its specific objectives are to:

prevent, reduce or eliminate various forms of pollution to ensure adequate protection of
the environment and the health of its citizens;
conserve the biological diversity of the country and the stability, integrity, resilience and
productivity of ecosystems; and
provide for environment to be fully integrated in policies, plans, programs and
development project decisions that might be detrimental to the continued health, safety
and productivity of the country's environment.

BASIC PRINCIPLES

The Government of The Bahamas' environmental policy will be guided by the following basic
principles:

Respect and Care for the Community of Life

An ethic based on respect and care for each other and for nature is the foundation of sustainable
development. Development ought not to be at the expense of other groups or future generations,
nor significantly threaten the survival of other species. The benefits and cmsts of resource use
and environmental protection, conservation and enhancement should be shared fairly among
different communities, among men, women and children, among people who are poor and those
who are affluent and between our generation and those who will come after.us.

All life, with soil, water and air, constitutes a great, interdependent system the ecosystem.
Disturbing one component can affect the whole. Our survival depends on the use of other
species, but it is a matter of ethics, as well as practicality, that we act as stewards to ensure their
survival and safeguard their habitats. Implementation of this principle requires that:

all sector of society (industry, citizens' groups, non-governmental organizations)
incorporate the ethic of stewardship and sustainability into their own policies and
practices; and
people in all walks of life incorporate the ethic of stewardship and sustainability into their
personal behaviour and conduct.

Improve the Quality of Human Life

The aim of development is to improve the quality of human life. It should enable people to
realize their potential and lead lives of dignity and fulfillment. Economic growth is an essential
part of development, but it cannot be a goal in itself.

Development should result in long and healthy human lives, improved education, access to


decent housing, adequate nutrition and safe water, political freedom, guaranteed human rights,

cultural and religious freedoms, and freedom from violence. Development is only real if it
makes our lives better in all these respects.


Conserve the Diversity, Integrity and Productivity of Natural Resources

Development must strive to:

a) Conserve life-support systems, i.e. the ecological systems that cleanse air and water,
regulate water flow, recycle essential elements, create and regenerate soil and enable
ecosystems to renew themselves.
b) Conserve Biodiversity. This includes not only species of plants, animals and other
organisms but also the range of genetic stocks within each species, and the variety of
different ecosystems, including those in protected areas. This may also include national
parks and conservation areas.
c) Use renewable resources sustainably. These resources include soil, wild and
domesticated organisms, forests, agricultural land, and the marine and freshwater
ecosystems.
d) Conserve non-renewable resources. The use of these resources will be optimized to
obtain the best possible benefit for all citizens and without impairing the value of other
resources.
e) Utilize alternative technologies. The use of alternative, less harmful technologies for
exploiting natural resources.

Keep within the Country's Carrying Capacity

There are finite limits to the carrying capacity of The Bahamas' ecosystems so its renewable
resources must be used sustainably. This must be linked to a humane, proactive population
policy, which seeks to stabilize the population. We must also recognize the special role of
Bahamian youth and that the need for their empowerment is integral to success in attaining
sustainable development. In order to keep growth within the nation's carrying capacity, the
following are required:

National physical development and planning policies must address in a realistic way the
need to stabilize population growth, reduce poverty, promote equal access to all national
services and engender sustainable tourism. An ecological approach to human settlements
planning must be implemented in order to make our settlements, towns and cities clean
and safe. Strategies and plans must also be introduced to use land and water optimally.
Resource conservation, waste minimization and recycling must be promoted as a way of
life. Economic incentives, environmental taxes and use of environmentally-preferred
products and services must become an accepted part of our environmental management
strategy.
Family planning services must be strengthened and linked to improved care and
education for mothers and children.
Change Personal Attitudes and Practices

If the ethic for sustainable development is to be widely adopted, people must re-examine their
values and alter their behaviour. Information must be widely disseminated through formal and
informal education campaigns so that stewardship of the environment and the required actions
are widely understood.

-Environmental education for children and adults must be integrated in education at all levels.
Extension services must also be available to help farmers, fishermen, contractors/builders,
artisans, the urban and rural populations and other groups to use natural resources more
productively and sustainably.

Empower Communities to care for their own Environments

Local communities, non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations
provide the easiest channels for people to express their concerns and take action to create
sustainable societies. However, such groups need the power to act. Communities should be
given, an opportunity to share in managing their local resources and; the right-to-participate in
decisions. Local government bodies, communities, businesses, non-governmental and
community-based organizations and other interest groups should become partners with the
Government of The Bahamas and its agents in decisions about policies, plans, programs and
projects that affect them, their environment, and the resources on which they depend.

A national forum for Government, business and the environmental movement to have ongoing
dialogue in achieving environmental sustainability will help build confidence by discussion of
objectives, processes and practices and the open disclosure of the results of monitoring. It will
be adaptive, continually re-directing its course in response to experience and to new needs.

Written comments are to be forwarded to the offices of the Commission by 30 June 2005.
BEST Commission
Nassaut Court, P.O. Box N 3730
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: 242-326-3509 E-mail: smoultrie@best.bs or bestnbs@hotmail.com


' I I I --


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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Friday, May 20th & Saturday, May 21st

10am 5pm 12noon 6pm


Bristol Wines & Spirits NEW Location! Gladstone Road


On Sale Items Include:-

Gloria Ferrer Sparkling Wine Quinta de Noval fine Port


Hpnotiq Nassau Royale Brugal Rums Appleton


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Collectors Item Rums (specially priced)


Wide selection of wines by Robert Mondavi, Berringer, Louis Latour, Bolla,


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M OGALE, Nigeria

HUNDREDS of youths
stormed a police station and
set fire to cars in southeast-
ern Nigeria on Tuesday after
a protester was fatally shot by
a police rifle, officials said,
according to Associated Press.
The youths began protest-
ing Tuesday morning over
demands that a local oil refin-
ery and petrochemical plant
employ more people from the
area, said police chief Samuel
Adetuyi.
They set fire to part of a
police station in the Niger
delta village of Ogale and
burned an SUV in its court-
yard. One protester was killed
when he tried to grab a rifle
from a police officer,and the
gun accidentally went off, he
said.
Police fired tear gas to,dis-
perse the other protesters,
who were demonstrating out-
side the oil plants, Adetuyi
said.
A police official said
around 400 protesters then
carried the dead body to the
police station before smash-
ing and burning cars. The
local police commander
ordered his men not to open
fire "because many lives
would have been lost,V said
official, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity.


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THE'TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 23


TiIURSDAY EVENING MAY 19, 2005

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THE'TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 23











Bahamian chef cooks up



a storm for Red Lobster


AT THE most recent
Red Lobster Summit held
in Orlando, Florida during
April, Bahamian Master
Chef Charles Missick was
invited to share some of
the unique ways that
Bahamians prepare sea
food. Chef Missick took to
the summit a wealth of
experience as a restaurant
chef and a private caterer.
Specialist
Working with a team of
three other chefs and a
food purchasing specialist,
Chef Missick created appe-
tisers and entrees that will
be tested among Red Lob-
ster's frequent customers.
Meals that receive a


thumbs up in testing will
be added to Red Lobster's
menus for all of their
restaurants.
Focus
In addition, Red Lobster
places great focus on the
quality ingredients that
they use for their dishes
and as a result they have
purchased Bahamian lob-
ster from Paradise Fish-
eries Ltd. for several
years.
The quality and consis-
tent product that Paradise
Fisheries offers and the
unique flavour of lobster
caught throughout the
Bahamas is one of the keys
to Red Lobster's success.


* LOBSTER SUMMIT Chef Charles Missick (centre) recently represented Paradise Fisheries at
a consortium of chefs from around the United States and Canada to create new menu ideas for Red
Lobster Restaurant. Paradise Fisheries Ltd is a major supplier of lobster to Darden Rf '*aurants Incor-
porated, the owners of Red Lobster, The Olive Gardens, Seasons 52, Bahama Bre -d Smokey
Bones BBQ and Sports Bars. Pictured left to right: Rick Marino, Harbour Seafood' 'ork; Mike
Powers, Director of Seafood Procurement, Darden Group of Restaurants; Phil M .y, Executive
Hospitality Chef, Korbel California Champagne, Wines & Brandy and Jack Core' Aary Specialist,
Marzetti Company, Columbus, Ohio.


i

LUt


Fuel up and Fly out

Fly to Las Vegas with Esso


Win weekend packages for two at The Pelican
Bay Hotel, Freeport -10 winners, 2 each week.
Win a trip for two to Las Vegas Airfare and
Accommodation FREE, along with US$1000 spending
money! One Grand Prize winner!

It's easy to play! Get an entry-form with the purchase of
$15 or more in fuels at participating Esso Stations.

Fill out the entry-form and drop it into the box provided to
be eligible for the grand prize draw of a trip for two to Las
Vegas.
Also, weekly draws will be held for weekend packages
for two to The Pelican Bay Hotel, Freeport.
Drive into Esso today, and fly out a winner!


C)


We're drivers too.


-100


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


announces,







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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


Travel companies discover Atlantis


KERZNER gave more than 20
travel wholesalers an exclusive
hard-hat tour of the much antici-
pated Marina Village at Atlantis
development on Paradise Island
at the recent Ninth Annual
International Travel Partners
Conference (ITPC).
ITPC is the most comprehen-
sive marketplace of tourism
products for the Bahamas, build-
ing dialogue between Bahamian
suppliers and travel wholesalers
from leading travel companies.
This year's conference held on
Cable Beach saw participation
from more than 126 Bahamian
suppliers from branded hotels
to local tour operators and trav-
el wholesalers from leading trav-
el companies from the United
States, Canada, Latin America
and Europe.
Atlantis resort executives took
the opportunity to strengthen ties
with the travel wholesalers and
familiarise them with new devel-
opments at the resort.
The famed Caf6 Martinique
and popular Carmine's restau-
rants were among the many sites
the group visited.
Stephen Sawyer, senior vice-
president and general manager,
Coral and Beach Towers said, "It
is a pleasure to be able to host
our key travel partners and to
showcase some of the exciting
things that are taking place here
at Atlantis. It was great being
able to show the agents firsthand
the new Marina Village, which is
nearing completion."


Ted Adderley, Director of
Sales and Marketing, for Kerzner
International said, "It's a great
honour to be able to show the
travel wholesalers the many new
touristic attractions and develop-
ments which are emerging on
Paradise Island as Kerzner
International embarks on
Atlantis Phase III."
The tour provided the travel
wholesalers with an opportunity
to see what their customers will
experience when they visit
Atlantis, said Scott Zimmerman,
Kerzner International's national
sales manager for leisure sales.
"It's great to have the group in
house. All of these travel whole-
salers are our most valuable
clients from all over the world,
and what we are trying to do is
show them the features of
Marina Village and what it will
mean to Atlantis and The
Bahamas."
Kevin Matier of Travel
Impressions, which has offices in
New York and Pennsylvania said
that Marina Village would offer
repeat visitors something "fresh
and new to enjoy every time."
The conference's final gala din-
ner, held at Atlantis, allowed the
travel wholesalers to enjoy the
Bahamas' culture and fine native
cuisine.
This year's ITPC was sponsored
by the Ministry of Tourism,
Nassau Paradise Island Promotion
Board, Grand Bahama. Island
Tourism Board and The Bahama
Out Islands Promotion Board.


* TED Adderley, director of sales and marketing for Kerzner, Nina Schectman, national sales manager, leisure sales for
Kerzner; Mark Photiades of MLT Vacations Inc; Trish Korzeniowski, Expedia.com; Andrea J Conway, Market Travel
Corporation; Wayne Noseworthy, MyTravel North America; Karen Cargill, sales manager, Kerzner; and Scott Zimmerman,
national sales manager, leisure sales for Kerzner


rr protiS marre i % oK *aoe"C











opyrighted Material



SSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers'


f









THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 27
E TRIBUNE "


Christian opposition leader visits



ormer foe Samir Geagea in prison


LEBANON
Beirut
In a sign of the big changes
n a Lebanon free of Syrian
-ontrol, Christian opposition
leader Michel Aoun yesterday
visited his one-time arch-foe, a
.jailed former Christian war-
lord, and called for his imme-
diate release, according to
Associated Press.
The first encounter in more
than 15 years between the two
anti-Syrian leaders,. Aoun and
Samir Geagea, comes about 10
days before crucial parliamen-
tary elections races opposi-
tion politicians hope to sweep.
"The page of the past cannot
be partially turned. Either it is
fully turned or it is not," Aoun
said after the hour-long meet-
ing, which he described as
emotional.
Aoun, a former army com-
mander and interim prime
minister in 1988-89, and
Geagea, leader of the now
defunct Lebanese Forces mili-
tia, fought a savage war for
control of the Christian heart-
land in the final days of the
1975-90 civil war in which
some 800 people were killed.
Aoun, who returned from 14
years of exile in Paris this
month, said the meeting with
Geagea symbolized a new
beginning.
The meeting highlights the
substantial changes in
Lebanon's politics since the
"February 14 assassination of'
former Prime Minister Rafik


return on May 7.
Aoun and army units under
his command waged a futile
"war of liberation" against the
Syrian army in Lebanon in
1989 before he sought refuge
in France.
Geagea's imprisonment and
Aoun's exile have been open
wounds for the country's
Christian minority since the
1990 end of the civil war and a
barrier on the way of a nation-
al reconciliation. Since the
Syrian troop pullout last
month, calls for Geagea's
release have increased and the
opposition has presented a
motion to parliament to free
him. But the motion is yet to
be put to a vote.
"Keeping him in prison is an
injustice... I declare my solidar-
ity with him until he is
released," Aoun told reporters
following the meeting at the
Lebanese Defense Ministry
building where Geagea has
been held for 11 years, mostly in
solitary in an underground cell.
The two leaders last met in
December 1989. A month later,
their forces fought vicious
street and mountain battles, but
no victor emerged. Instead,
Christians were severely weak-
ened by the infighting.
"The visit lays the founda-
tions for a new relationship
within the democratic process
we are witnessing today, and
within the framework of let-
ting go of the past which is now
part of history," Aoun said at a
press conference yesterday.


E ART students paint on fabric covering a 5-meter-high wall of sandbags, surrounding the United Nations offices in Beirut,
Lebanon, Wednesday, May 18, 2005 (AP Photo / Hussein Malla)
(AP Photo /Hussein. Malla)


.Hlatiri and 20 others in a mas- He described the meeting
s bombing in Beirut. with Geagea as "cheerful" and Aoun denied that his visit Free Patriotic Movement. and Cabinet ministers. bombing but convicted on
The slaying was the catalyst posith Geagea as heerful" t had t do with forging alliances Geagea is the only promi- Geagea's supporters consider other charges. He is serving
:orthe Syrian troop withdrawal fcus on politics. Aoun said before the elections but a rec- nent former warlord serving him a political prisoner, three life sentences for the
forthe Syrian troop withdrawal focus on politics Aoun sa beforethe electionsbutart ex-militia Geagea was arrested in assassinating of political ivalsr
from Lebanon, ending a 29-year Geagea was in good health, and onciliation between the two jail time other ex-militia Geagea was arrested in acludssassination of political rivals,
military presence in the country. that he found him "psychologi- anti-Syrian leaders could be leaders benefited from a 1991 April 1994and his Lebanese including the bombing of a hel-
The withdrawal improved the cally very sound". He said they translated in alliances on the general amnesty for crimes Forces outlawed after a bomb- icopter in 1987 that killed
chances of Geagea's release and spoke freely in a meeting room, ground between Geagea's committed during the civil war ing at a church killtted of then-Prime Minister Rashid
cleared the way for Aoun's without supervision. Lebanese Forces and Aoun's and some are now lawmakers ple. He was acquitted of the Karami.



SIsraelis' first air strike since February tuce



,after Hamas militants fire mortars in Gaza


GAZA STRIP
S Gaza City
A SERIOUS flare-up of violence on
Wednesday a dead Palestinian militant,
-im than 20 shells falling in Gaza Jewish set-
-f._eents and an Israeli air strike threatened
^tQ ollapse a four-month truce and derail
-'fforts to restart Middle East peace talks.
B--':.Both Israel and Hamas warned of punish-
ig .responses that could degenerate into a
restmption of attacks, counterattacks, inva-
r -ioiis and bombings. At nightfall, Palestinian
pjoice moved in to try to quell the outbreak.
The ceasefire, declared at a summit meet-
ing between Palestinian leader Mahmoud
Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel
.gs Sharon on February 8 in Egypt, has greatly
tr reduced violence. Flare-ups like
es. i Wednesday's have been rare.
s The trouble started just after midnight,
of when Israeli soldiers shot and killed a
84 Hamas militant on the Gaza-Egypt border.
The Israeli military said Palestinians fired
uns rifles and anti-tank grenades at soldiers, who
nts returned the fire.
Sa In apparent retaliation, Palestinians
launched mortar shells at Jewish settle-
ments, and for the first time since the truce
be was declared, Israeli helicopters flew into
Palestinian territory and fired a missile, say-
ing the target was "a terrorist cell about to


launch further mortars", wounding two
Palestinians, one critically.
Israeli official David Baker said Israel
contacted Palestinian officials and demand-
ed that they halt the barrages.
If they did not, he warned, "Israel will
take all steps necessary to stop it, whatever
that may entail", implying a return to fre-
quent pre-truce tank and infantry invasions.
That would inevitably lead to .renewed
attempts by Palestinian militants to send sui-
cide bombers into Israel.
At nightfall, Palestinian police moved into
the area in an attempt to stop the rocket and
mortar fire, and witnesses saw clashes
between police and militants.
The Palestinian Interior Ministry charged
that Hamas militants used civilians as
shields, and three officers were hurt by
rocks. "This cannot be accepted and this
serious violation will not pass (unan-
swered)," a ministry statement said.
So far the truce has survived a suicide
bombing in Tel Aviv in February and a bar-
rage of more than 90 rockets and mortars at
Gaza settlements on a single day in April
after Israeli troops killed three teenagers.
The truce is seen as a key part of a chain
of events that international mediators hope
will lead to resumption of Israeli-Palestinian
peace talks, frozen during more than four
years of bloodshed.


* THE sun sets behind an Israeli army watchtower on the edge of the Jewish settlement of Morag, on the
southern Gaza Strip yesterday (AP Photo/Baz Ratner)
(AP Photo/Baz Ratner)


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


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The Tiumbiup


THURSDAY, MAY 19,2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


n Bahamas
S Business Solultions ld.
* Digital B&W Copiers
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Small businesses call



for venture capital



fund expansion to $5m


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Tribune Reporter

THE Small Business Associ-
ation of the Bahamas yesterday
called for the Government-
backed $1 million Venture Cap-
ital Fund that is set for launch
on June 1 to have an expanded
capital base of $5 million mini-
mum, further easeing the pres-
sure faced by start-ups in search
of financing.
The Association is also push-
ing for the creation of one-time
customs duty exemptions for
start-up companies that are
importing hard inventory, plus
legislation that will provide for
the merger of the Bahamas
Development Bank and the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC).
It said this would provide
additional support for a
. Bahamian small business sec-
'tor that continues to struggle to
gain a foothold in a globalised
environment.
Johnny Outten, president of
the Small Business Association
(SBA), said that while the Ven-
ture Capital Fund, whose pri-


Association urges Development

Bank and BAIC merger, plus

less red-tape and more duty

exemptions for start-ups


mary purpose is to provide
long-term equity support to
start-ups and growing business-
es, fills a void in the Bahamian
market, the Association is call-
ing upon the Government and
private sector institutions to
look again at the issue of credit
for small and medium-sized
businesses. Many, he said, are
starved of working capital and
are unable to put their busi-
nesses in a place where they can
take off.
Mr Outten said: "While the
Venture Capital Fund will help,
as a country and led by the
Government, we must be more
creative and eager to provide
creditworthy business ideas and
projects. We therefore call upon
the Government to recognise


Court 'declines to

dismiss' Guana Cay

injunction motion
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FRED SMITH, attorney for
the Save Guana Cay Reef
Association, said the Supreme
Court yesterday "declined to
dismiss" his client's motion to
halt the $175 million Baker's
Bay Golf & Ocean Club devel-
opment despite requests from
the developers and the Gov-
ernment to do so.
Mr Smith said, though, that
Justice Stephen Isaacs
reserved his judgement in the
case, and indicated he would
publish his ruling on the
motion for an injunction to
prevent the developers from
proceeding with works permit- DR LIVINGSTONE
ted under the Heads of Agree- MARSHALL, the Prime
ment in about seven days. Minister's chief consultant
Mr Smith said the Attorney on scientific and
General's Office, which was environmental issues.
representing the Government respondents, and Michael Barnett
of Graham, Thompson & Co, who was representing the Dis-
covery Land Company developers, had sought to argue that the
SEE page four



Kerzner share target


rise to $71 to bolster


investor confidence


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A WALL STREET invest-
ment bank has given further
encouragement to Bahamian
investors who bought into
Kerzner International's BDR
offering last year by upgrading
the Atlantis owner to 'Sector
Outperform' and raising the
firm's 2006 share price target
to $71 from $66.
CIBC World Markets ana-
lysts William Schmitt and
David Katz, in a research note
to investors, said: "We believe
the shares of Kerzner Inter-
national offer strong long-
term growth and should be a
core holding for growth
investors exposed to this
space."
The duo said Kerzner Inter-
national's shares had dipped
below their February 7, 2005,
high of $67.21, "when it


appeared the stock was a bit
ahead .of fundamentals",
adding: "In our view, the fun-
damentals have caught-up
with the share price and
believe current levels offer a
good entry point for investors.
Our price target of $71 is
based on forecasts for fiscal
year 2006."

Stock
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz
said Kerzner International's
stock had "three distinct dri-
vers", with the next six-12
months or "short term" rely-
ing on "the continued strong
fundamental strength at
Atlantis".
In the medium-term 12-18
month range, growth would
come from the roll-out of the
Phase III expansion on Par-
SEE page three


that all of its intentions to
empower Bahamians economi-
cally will be undermined if we
cannot get the capital in the
hands of those who are pre-
pared to start or.grow their.
businesses."
Looking at other measures to
support the ability of small busi-
nesses and entrepreneurial ven-
tures to access capital, Mr Out-
ten said the Association was
also advocating the creation of
micro-credit institutions that
would make small loans rang-
ing from $1,000 to $20,000 to'
entrepreneurs.

Successful
He added that these micro-
credit institutions have been
very successful in difficult eco-
nomic environments through-
out Latin America.
The Association is also asking
the Government to consider
providing tax and other conces-
sions to banks and private sec-
tor entities that actively support
small and micro-businesses.
In a move to reduce public
sector inefficiencies and bureau-
cratic slowdown, the Associa-
tion is calling for the introduc-
tion of legislation to facilitate
the merger of the Bahamas
Development Bank and BAIC
into a single entity called the
Bahamas Small Business
Administration (BSBA).
This new organisation would
have an expanded mandate to

SEE page nine




























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Collins Ave. & 7th Terrace
P. 0. Box N-4950
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-9250
Fax: (242) 323-3581
www.bbsl.com


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE purported chairman of
a Bahamas-based company
played a key role in a deal to
supply Saddam HIussein's
regime with "hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars in cluster
bombs and other weapons" for
use in Iraq's war with Iran in
the 1980s, a Senate report has
alleged.
A report issued this week by
the minority staff of the Sen-
ate's Permanent Subcommit-
tee on Investigations alleged
that Augusto Giangrandi, a
Florida resident who signed a
September 9, 1999, letter to
the Iraqi Oil Ministry's mar-
keting arm, SOMO, as chair-
man of Nassau-based Bayoil
Supply & Trading, played a
key role in supplying cluster
bomb components to a "noto-
rious Chilean arms manufac-
turer".
According to the Senate
report, Giangrandi "falsely
stated" to the US Commerce
Department that the materials
would be used for mining
explosives in Chile, and then
brought Bayoil into the action
to help Iraq pay for the bombs
through an oil-forearms deal.
Bayoil would sell Iraqi oil and
pay the Hussein regime only a
portion of the proceeds;. using
the remainder to satisfy the
cluster bombs debt.
The allegations against
Giangrandi are part of the Sen-
ate Subcommittee's wider
investigation into corruption
in the United Nations' Oil-for-
Food programme.
Its latest report has focused
on the role played by Bayoil
Supply & Trading, which "is
incorporated in the Bahamas,
based in Nassau and owned by
[David] Chalmers as the com-
pany's sold shareholder", and


Allegation in


Senate report


the firm's Houston and Swiss-
based affiliates.
All of Mr Chalmers, Bayoil
Supply & Trading and its affil-
iates have been indicted in
New York's Southern District
Court in relation to the oil-for-
food programme, on charges
of violating US restrictions on
doing business with Iraq, con-
spiracy to commit wire fraud
and wire fraud.

Letter
The Subcommittee appears
to have considered the Sep-
tember 9, 1999, letter written
by Giangrandi, a national of
Italy and Chile, to be especial-
ly incriminating, as it forms the
centrepiece to their allegation
that Bayoil Supply & Trading
and its affiliates participated
in an Iraqi boycott of Israel in
violation of US laws.
The Senate report said: "On
September 9,1999, Augusto
Giangrandi, on behalf of Bay-
oil, wrote to the Iraqi Oil Min-
istry and' SOMO to confirm
Bayoil's interest in purchasing
'a minimum of 10 million bar-
rels of light crude oil' during
the sixth phase of the oil-for-
food programme.
"He also expressed Bayoil's
interest in purchasing '20-30
million barrels minimum every
six months'. On the same date,
again acting as 'chairman, for
and on behalf of Bayoil Supply
& Trading Limited (BOTCO,
Bahamas)', Mr Giangrandi


wrote the following note,
which he. signed and
notarised."
The note allegedly read: "To
whom it may concern: We
herewith confirm never to have
sold directly or indirectly to
Israel and further confirm that
this policy will remain perma-
nently in force during the
entire validity of our contract."
The Senate subcommittee
report added: "Although Gian-
grandi's signature block states
he is writing the letter for and
on behalf of Bayoil Bahamas,
the letter blurs any distinction
bhween the affiliated Bayoil
.entities..
"The letter states: 'We are
prepar~idto contract with you
throug= iur Bahamian. com-
pany o0~ny of our affiliates'."
The Wjenate- report alleged
that the BahamianBayoil enti-
ty and its affiliates paid "at
least" $37 million in illegal sur-
charges and kickbacks to the
Hussein regime in return for
the oil it purchased.
The Bayoil group was said
to have been the largest
provider of Iraqi oil imports
into the US during the "kick-
back period", importing at
least 200 million barrels, and
at one point accounted for 20
per cent of all Iraqi oil bought
under the UN oil-for-food pro-
gramme.
Bayoil Supply & Trading,
the Bahamian entity, was
SEE page four


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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STEP chairperson defends Foundations


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Society of Trust and
Estate Practitioners (STEP)
chairperson said yesterday
that the Foundations legisla-
tion was a calculated response
to the needs of clients, and was
not a measure created hap-
hazardly in the hopes of
increasing the jurisdiction's
level of business.
In an interview with The
Tribune, Alyson Yule said that
with an increasingly competi-
tive financial services envi-
ronment, clients are becoming
more sophisticated and are
looking for jurisdictions where


they can maximise their invest-
ments and minimse taxation
on their returns, while remain-
ing compliant with home
country tax laws.

Clients
She said that Foundations,
a civil law structure, was
brought to the Bahamas, a
common law jurisdiction,
because Bahamas-based insti-
tutions were looking to attract
business from clients in civil
law areas such as Europe,
Latin America and Asia.
"They found it difficult to
accept trusts and asked for
structures like Foundations.
That's why it will benefit the


FROM page one

adise Island, with the longer term dominated
by the additions of the Atlantis, The Palm
resort in Dubai and the Morocco hotel/casino.
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz said develop-
ments in Dubai and Morocco, and possi-
bly Singapore, would "help diversify the
company's revenue stream that relies
heavily on Atlantis, Paradise Island, in
the Bahamas".
The CIBC World Markets pair, in a
note to investors, wrote: "Paradise Island,
the company's core asset, remains the
key to the company's overall perfor-
mance in the short-term. In fact, the
property has continued to improve its
average daily room rate and occupancy
percentage despite getting larger over
the past few years.
"This, we believe, speaks to the fact
that demand remains particularly strong
for the product. In addition, we believe
management's pursuit of additional low-
er fare flight options into the Bahamas,
which it has pursued for several quarters
now, should directly lead to additional


Bahamas. We filled a need
that was there before and it
will benefit us to have this new
piece of legislation," the STEP
chair said.
Ms Yule added that it was
important for the Bahamas to
know what products were
available in other jurisdictions
so that the financial services
industry, along with the Gov-
ernment and other stakehold-
ers, could determine what
products were needed in order
for the jurisdiction to compete
effectively and satisfy the
demands of a diverse clientele.
She said that instead of sim-
ply trying to create a product
and then selling it to the client,
what was necessary was to


demand for the property."
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz estimated that
the net present value of the Phase III
expansion on Paradise Island was some
$6 per share.
They added: "Overall, we remain pos-
itive on the future for Kerzner Interna-
tional, as the company continues to
strategically grow Paradise Island and
the One & Only brand, while selectively
pursuing international growth opportu-
nities.......
"Kerzner has an enviable position in
Paradise Island, in our view. It is partners
with the Bahamian government and has a
long-term exclusive arrangement to oper-
ate and grow its operations."
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz said they were
maintaining their Kerzner International
2005 second quarter, 2005 fully year and
2006 full year earnings per share (EPS)
estimates of $0.97, $2.82 and $3.13
respectively.
They are doing the same with operating
income forecasts for the same period of
$59 million, $207.1 million and $217.7
million. .


hear what clients were saying
about their needs and then to
respond by finding a solution
that would service them ade-
quately.

Comments
Responding to comments
made by David Sussman, chief
executive of Franklyn Tem-
pleton Fiduciary Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) during the week-
long seminar hosted by the
Bahamas Institute of Finan-
cial Services, that "the intro-
duction of a civil law animal
into a common law jungle
could result in a Jurassic
Park", Ms Yule said to the
extent that the Bahamas is the
only common law jurisdiction
that offers a civil law product,
this nation is on the right
track.
She pointed to another com-
mon law jurisdiction, Jersey,
that is also looking to enact
similar Foundations legisla-
tion, as evidence that the
Bahamas has made the right
decision in creating a Founda-
tions product for clients.


BAHAMAS L MEDICAL
MALPRACTICE
COMPANY LTD.


The Bahamas Medical Malpractice Company Ltd
Continuing Medical Education Seminar


Nassau, Bahamas
Saturday May 21st 2005, 10:00am 2pm (On time,!)
MAB House 6th Street/Madeira


Freeport, Grand Bahama
Monday May 23rd 2005, 5:00pm 9pm (On time!) '
Best Western Hotel Castaways Resort and Suites
Conference Room


Continuing Medical Education Seminar

The Practice of Medicine in the Bahamas,
Session 1: Making Safe Diagnoses
Session 2: Protective Communication

Please Print Clearly Attending Seminar in: Nassau. [ or Freeport Grand Bahama [ ]


Last Name First Name M.I.
Mailing Address *
City State Country
Phone: Fax:
Email (Important):
* The mailing address is where all correspondence will be sent.
Are you insured with Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. (Providence Channel SP2003B): YES [] NO [ ]
Do you plan to join Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. Ltd.: YES [ ] NO [ ]
If yes indicate anticipated date:

Payment is required at the time of registration
Please Make Cheques Payable to Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. Ltd.
Seminar Registration fees = Free for Current Members. $200.00 for all others.
Pledging New Members: No Charge: Post dated cheque required
[ ] Cheque is enclosed [ ] Will Register at Venue

Contact us at
Bahamas Medical Malpractice Co. Ltd.
(An Affiliate Company of Physician Alliance Ltd)
Grosvenor Close #3, PO Box EE17022
Ph:326-4460/1
Fax: 326-8874
May 21st CME Seminar


BERKELEY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED


COMMODITIES / DERIVATIVES


Do you have any experience in trading or sales
in commodities and / or derivatives ?

Our company is seeking a suitable candidate
for immediate employment.

Please send or fax resume to:

P O Box N-3927


394-6841


REGULATED BY THE SECURITIES COMMISSION OF
THE BAHAMAS


Kerzner share target



rise to $71 to bolster



investor confidence


Bank of The Bahamas
L I M I T E D

"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
ASSISTANT MANAGER, CORPORATE CREDIT

Core responsibilities:

* Analyze and investigate financial and non-financial information with a
view to assessing the viability of business proposals. Assess loan
applications and interview potential candidates.

* Prepare credit proposals for existing and potential clients.

* Manage effectively, a portfolio of corporate relationships and act as
'Relationship Managerfor assigned accounts.

* Increase consistently, the value of accounts through personal marketing efforts.

* Conduct consistent follow-up o n delinquent accounts and institute measures
for the collection of bad accounts.

* Conduct field inspections.

* Assess the local industries and make recommendations for areas of exploration
bythe corporate Credit Division.

* Recommend annual performance objectives and action plans that will help
to increase the Bank's profitability. (Ability to successfully implement plans
to completion is critical.)

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

* Bachelors Degree in Economics/Finance/Business Administration

* Three to five years experience in the Financial Services Industry

* Strong analytical and organizational skills

* Being a team player is essential; must have excellent interpersonal and
communication skills.

Benefits include: Competitive compensation (commensurate with qualifications);
group medical, vision, and life insurance; attractive package and a pension scheme.

Send resume to:
The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


FROM page one


injunction motion be dismissed
because there was "no serious
issue to be tried".
However, Mr Smith sub-
mitted that a "500 million
development impacting the
environment, heritage and
culture of Great Guana Cay is
of prima facie importance to
all landowners and residents
of Great Guana Cay".
Mr Smith said the Attorney
General's Office and Discov-
ery Land Company's attorney
also sought to have the injunc-


Court 'declines to dismiss' Guana Cay injunction motion


tion dismissed on the grounds
that the Save Great Guana
Cay Reef Association did not
exist, as did not properly rep-
resent the island's residents.
However, Mr Smith coun-
tered by saying that the Asso-
ciation's shares were "held in
trust" on behalf of the
landowners and residents who
signed the petition opposing
the Baker's Bay project.


He added that both the
Attorney General's Office
and Mr Barnett also attempt-
ed to have excluded from the
proceedings affidavits filed on
behalf of the Save Great Gua-
na Cay Reef Association by
Troy Albury and Erin Lowe.
Mr Smith said the Supreme
Court refused to do this.
A team of three attorneys
from the Attorney General's


Office, headed by Leif Far-
quharson, were representing
respondents Wendell Major,
in his capacity as secretary to
the National Economic Coun-
cil (NEC), Perry Christie as
the minister responsible for
Crown Lands, and the Trea-
surer of the Bahamas.
Meanwhile, it was
announced yesterday that Dr
Livingstone Marshall, the


Prime Minister's chief con-
sultant on scientific and envi-
ronmental issues, has left his
post to become senior-vice
president of community and
environmental affairs at the
controversial Great Guana
Cay development.
The appointment, unveiled
by Steve Adelson, a partner in
Discovery Land Company,
the developer behind the $175
million Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club, will see Dr Mar-
shall become responsible for
ensuring the project's envi-
ronmental compliance.

Projects
He will also chair the pro-
ject's Foundation, which will
govern the 66-acre nature pre-
serve, plus projects related to
community and public affairs.
Mr Adelson said: "Being
able to attract someone of his
calibre, a Bahamian who has
extensive experience with
Environmental Impact
Assessments and understand-
ing the Government's process,
speaks volumes."
Mr Smith yesterday said he
had been "pleasantly sur-
prised" to see Dr Marshall
attend the Supreme Court
hearing in Freeport, adding
that he would "complement"
Discovery Land Company
"on an astute public relations
exercise".
However, he "welcomed"
Dr Marshall's involvement
with Great Guana Cay, and
said his "motives and sinceri-
ty" were beyond reproach.
Describing him as having
"tremendous credentials', Mr
Smith said: "Dr Marshall is
someone who deserves the
greatest respect of people in
the Bahamas."
He added, though, that the
Bahamas' greatest weakness
in environmental protection
was that there was "no legis-
lation to give teeth to promis-
es to respect the environ-
ment".
Prior to accepting this posi-
tion, Dr Marshall was consul-
tant and science adviser in the
Office of the Prime Minister,
where he provided scientific
advice on a range,,of marine


and environmental science,
education and policy initia-
tives.
Dr Marshall also
briefly served as Executive
Director of the Marine and
Environmental Studies
Institute (MESI) of the
Bahamas.
Dr Marshall said that while
studying the Baker's Bay busi-
ness model, he found that,
"preserving and enhancing
the environment is key to the
company's success, and that
is something that I feel very
strongly about and of which
I am glad to be a part".
Dr Marshall was embroiled
in controversy surrounding
the proposed $20 million
aquaculture project, Ocean
Fish Farms of the Bahamas,
when investor George Lock-
wood accused him of "hostile
duplicity" and of being the
main person responsible for
holding up approval of the
project, forcing him to look
elsewhere.
Dr Marshall, though,
denied all Mr Lockwood's
allegations and counter-
attacked by saying that the
investor had failed to satisfy
all environmental concerns
through not producing and
Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA).




Chairman

FROM page one

alleged to have set up a rev-
enue sharing scheme on
Iraqi oil purchases with Ital-
tech, an Italian company
also controlled by Mr Gian-
grandi.
The Senate report quot-
ed a December 27, 2000,
'revenue sharing agreement'
document from Bayoil
which was signed by
Chalmers acting on behalf
of Bayoil Supply & Trading,
where Italtech was to
receive commission pay-
ments not to exceed $0.20
per barrel.


2004/2005 BSFA Officers & Directors
President
Warren A. Davis, CFA
PO Box N-8883
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: cocorunks@hotmail.com

Vice-President
Magali Granges, CFA
Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
PO Box N-4837
Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 2217
Fax: (242) 327 6610
Email: mgranges@pictet.com

Treasurer
David Slatter, CFA
Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust
PO Box CB-12337, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 356 7764
Email:
david. slatter@fidelitybahamas.com

Secretary
Kristina M. Fox, CFA
Templeton Global Advisors Ltd.
PO Box N 7759, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 4600
Fax: (242) 362 4308
Email: kfox@templeton.com

Membership/University Liaison
Christopher Dorsett
First Caribbean International Bank
PO Box N 3221, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 325 7384
Fax: (242) 323 1087
Emil:-. .-
Christopher.dorsett@firstcaribbeanba
nk.com

Pamela Q. Musgrove
Colina Financial Advisors Ltd.
PO Box Cb-12407, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7032
Fax: (242) 356 3677
Email: pmusgrove@colinafinancial.com

Education
David Ramirez, CFA'
Banco Atlantico
PO Box SS-6289
Nassau Bahamas'
Ph: (242) 393 1081
Fax: (242) 328 4680
Email: dramirez@batlantico.com.bs

Past President
Kevin A. Burrows, CFA
Oceanic Investment Management Ltd.
PO Box AP-59213, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 8834
Fax: (242) 502 8840
Email: kevin@oceanic.bs


Topic:



Date:

Time:




Location:

Speaker:




Cost:


Enterprise Risk Management -
From Compliance to Value

Friday, May 20th, 2005

12:00 noon General Meeting
12:30 pm Lunch and Speaker's Address
Please arrive promptly!

Buena Vista Restaurant

Prakash A. Shimpi, FSA, CFA
Towers Perrin
Practice Leader, Enterprise Risk Management

$20 for members; $25 for non-members


Reservations:
PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED by May 18th
Kristina Fox, CFA, Templeton Global Advisors Ltd.
kfox@templeton.com
Magali Granges, CFA, Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.
Telephone: 302-2217


Inevitably, the initial stages of enterprise risk management
(ERM) have mostly focused on compliance and corporate
governance. Banks and insurers have led the way but now
ERM affects all companies.

New rules and responsibilities have been imposed, resulting.
in higher costs, resource constraints and many questions
about whether these new regulations are really the answer.
But we are entering a new era, where leading companies
are finding ways to harness ERM as a strategic tool that
can help them increase shareholder value.

Mr. Shimpi has worked across academic disciplines and
professional associations to develop both the theory and
practice of ERM. He was editor and principal author of
"Integrating Corporate Risk Management," which is
recognized as a practitioner's reference book on the
convergence of insurance and capital markets.

Mr. Shimpi earned a first-class honors B.Sc. degree in
Economics and Statistics and a distinction in the M.Sc. in
Operational Research from the London School of Economics
and Political Science, and an MBA in Finance & International
Business from the University of Chicago. He is a Fellow
of the Society of Actuaries, holds a certificate in Actuarial
Techniques from the Institute of Actuaries (UK) and is a
CFA charterholder.


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
18 May 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE YIeld
1.20 0.95 Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.208 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.50 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.50 8.50 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.4 3.76%
6.32 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.32 6.32 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.6 5.23%
0.85 0.82 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.187 0.000 4-5 0.00%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.122 0.000 12.3 0.00%
1.05 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.05 1.05 0.00 0.007 0.040 14.2 3.81%
8.32 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.32 8.32 0.00 0.589 0.240 14.1 2.88%
2.20 1.52 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
8.49 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.49 8.49 0.00 0.673 0.410 12.6 4.83%
1.79 0.36 Doctor's Hospital 1.79 1.79 0.00 0.452 0.000 4.0 0.00%
4.02 3.13 Famguard 4.02 4.02 0.00 0.406 0.240 9.9 5.97%
10.46 8.39 Finco 10.46 10.46 0.00 200 0.662 0.490 15.8 4.68%
8.46 6.60 FirstCaribbean 8.46 8.46 0.00 0.591 0.330 14.3 3.90%
8.60 8.31 Focol 8.35 8.35 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.7 5.99%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
10.38 9.50 ICD Utilities- 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.7 4.20%
8.25 8.10 J.S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.561 0.550 14.7 6.81%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.86 6.08 0.22 0.184 0.000 31.8 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.979 0.350 5.1 3.50%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAY YTD% Last 12 Months DIv$ Yield %
1.2164 1.1609 Colina Money Market Fund 1.216402"
2.2420 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.2420 ***
10.3539 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3539*****
2.2214 2.0941 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.221401**
1.0931 1.0320 Colina Bond Fund 1.093141***
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelit)
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to da EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ **** AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
* AS AT MAR. 24, 2005/ *** AS AT APR. 30, 2005/ ** AS AT APR. 30, 2005
.|. . . . . . ........... ........... W


Bahamas Society of Financial Analysts


MONTHLY LUNCHEON MEETING


Receptionist /Typist

Professional Office has an immediate Opening for a
Receptionist and Typist. The ideal candidate must
have a minimum of Two (2) Year Office experience
with excellent communications & Computer Skills.
The applicant must possess exceptional telephone
etiquette, good attitude and be capable of working
independently and/or as a team member; should have
a minimum typewriting skills of 50 wpm; must possess
exceptional telephone etiquette, good attitude; and
proficient in use of Windows XP or 2000
environment; and particularly w/ software such as
M.S. Word Excel and Quickbooks.

Bahamias and/ or Foreign Nationals are invited
to apply

Please Fax Resume to 394-4458
e-mail: wwb@coralwave.com


Broker Dealer and Financial Services Provider require the
above to manage their office located in Nassau.

The successful candidate should have at least 5 years industry
experience at management level and hold a professional
degree. They must have a demonstrative working knowledge
of the corporate service and securities industries with a
strong customer service background. A high level of proficiency
will be required in the following areas:

KYC, Anti-Money Laundering, Compliance, Company formations
and maintenance, Working knowledge of QOickbooks accounting
software, Corporate invoicing, Treasuiy monitoring, Personnel,
preparation of budgets, monthly management of client custody
accounts, cash flow forecasts, consolidation of financial
statements and client accounting matters.

Applicants can appty by faxing
a current resume to

242-356-3969.


r USIES


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








T TBTR Y A 90 PE


South Riding Point



revenues off $1.81m


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Grand Bahama-based
South Riding Point storage and
terminal facility saw its rev-
enues fall by $1.811 million
during the 2005 first quarter,
something its parent company
blaj d on "non-recurring
ga i at boosted year-before
co atives.
In a message to sharehold-
ers, Bruce Calvin, World Point
Terminals' president, said the
sale of product inventory in
2004 was a key factor behind
the dip in South Riding point's
revenues for the three months
to March 31, 2005.


'The volume of product
throughput at the facility
[South Riding Point] has
remained relatively consistent
between first quarter
2005 and 2004," Mr Calvin
wrote.
Activity
But he warned: "When com-
pared to the activity levels over
the last several years, this activ-
ity remains at a high level. With
current volatile market condi-
tions there is no certainty that
this trend will continue
throughout the remainder of
the year."
Insurance payment advances


for hurricane repair work at
South Riding Point helped
increase World Point Termi-
nals' first quarter cash flows
from operations to $6.011 mil-
lion, compared to $2.858 mil-
lion the year before.
Mr Calvin said World Point
Terminals had completed the
$1.65 million cash sale of a 50
per cent stake in its Freepoint
business, which operates a fleet
of tugboats of Grand Bahama,
during the first quarter to a US
company.
Since World Point Terminals
now only consolidates a 50 per
cent share of Freepoint's rev-
enues, first quarter 2005 rev-
enues had fallen by $1 million


compared to last year when
the business wasa wholly-
owned.


ncreased revenues
and gross margins on
Bahamas-based con-
struction contracts
enabled Devcon
International. Corporation's
construction division to boost
operating income by 66.7 per
cent in the 2005 first quarter.
Devcon said the construc-
tion division's operating
income for the three months
to March 31, 2005, was a
major improvement on the
previous year's $0.7 million,
and the firm had gained an
additional $2.4 million worth
of Caribbean-based construc-
tion contracts since the quar-
ter ended.
.In a release, Devcon said
the improvement in its con-
- struction division's 2005 first.
quarter results compared to


the year-before period was
"primarily attributable to sub-
stantially increased revenue
and corresponding gross mar-
gin on construction contracts
in the Bahamas..........."
The Nasdaq-listed compa-
ny, operates three divisions
involved in construction,
materials and security, in addi-


tion to holding an 80 per cent
stake in a firm that runs water
treatment plants.
Its construction division is
concentrated primarily in the
Bahamas, where it dredges
harbours, builds marine facil-
ities and golf courses, and pre-
pares residential, commercial
and industrial sites.


POSITIONS AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY
VICE PRINCIPAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Kingsway Academy invites applicants from qualified and experienced candidates for a
position in the Administration Department at the Elementary School. The successful
candidate should meet the following criteria:
Be a committed Christian
Be able to assist with all aspects of the Administration mainly for Kindergarten
through grades six.
Have an appreciation for the integration of Christian principle with learning
Be capable of working in an environment with persons from diverse
cultural backgrounds
Have a special aptitude for school improvements, curriculum,
administration, staff and student development from a Biblical perspective, etc.
Have a Bachelor's Degree or above plus professional teaching qualifications
from approved institutions
Have a minimum of ten years teaching experience; three (3) of which must be
at the Primary level
Have at least two (2) years Administrative experience either as Team Leader,
Grade Level or Department Head.
Possess excellent organizational, inter-personal anc, communication skills
Be Knowledgeable and capable of utilizing current trends and techniques
which promote professional and academic development of teachers
Possess integrity and initiative
Information Required:
1. A letter of application
2. A full curriculum vitae with supporting documents of qualifications
3. A personal statement detailing your educational philosophy
4. References from three persons, (one must come from your Church Pastor)
TEMPORARY TEACHING POSITION
Kingsway Academy High School is in need of a qualified teacher for a period of twelve
weeks beginning in September 2005 for the following subjects:
Religious Studies
Christian Values
Successful applicants must:
Be born again Christians, with minimum qualifications of a Bachelor's Degree
in the appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teacher's Certificate
Be familiar with the B.J.C. and B.G.C.S.E. Syllabus (H.S.)
Have excellent communication skills
Have high standards of morality
Have a love for children and learning
Be willing to participate in extra curricular activities
Letters of application together with a recent color photograph and detailed Curriculum
Vitae (including the names and address of at least three references, one being the name
of one's church minister) are required
All information should be submitted to:
Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau
Deadline for the above applications is Friday, May 20, 2005.


NOTICE
Will anyone having information about a Hector Tinker,
born in or about the Year 1948 in the City of New York,
New York, U.S.A. to the late Herman Tinker formerly
of the City of New York aforesaid but since 1964 a
resident of Hospital Lane in the City of Nassau,
Bahamas until his death in 1992, please contact the
undersigned at Tel. 322-1490, fax: 322-3364 or P.O.Box
N-4206.


Firm's building division


enjoys 66.7% income


boost from Bahamas


IMPORTANT

NOTICE


From 6 pm on Friday 20th May to
12 midnight on Saturday

21st May, 2005, the Automated
Banking Machine (ABM) at our
Abaco, Marsh Harbour Branch will
not be available while we conduct

routine maintenance of our system
network.


Please plan your weekend finances
accordingly. We apologise for any

inconvenience caused.
www.firstcaribbeanbank.com



FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


NURSING CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Plastic Surgery office is seeking a full time
REGISTERED NURSE
with Operating Room experience.
Great benefits including assistance in funding for specialized training.
Interested persons please fax resume to 328-6479


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Public Notice

It has been evident since the latter part of 2004 and particularly
during the past few months, that the incidence of illegal indiscriminate
dumping of solid waste in New Providence is once again on the
increase. This unhealthy bad habit of unscrupulous individuals is a
poor reflection on residents of New Providence, and unfortunately,
on The Bahamas as a premier tourist destination in the region.

Only recently in January of 2003, the Department of Environmental
Health Services and the Royal Bahamas Police Force initiated a
surveillance programme in New Providence in an effort to discourage
and control the problem, but this unwarranted/despicable behavior
has one again become a matter of grave concern for the department
and the Ministry of Health as a whole.

It is regrettable therefore that we resume, at great expense, a
surveillance exercise aimed at controlling and or preventing illegal
dumping and pollution of the environment.

This notice is given to provide fair warning to all who dump waste
matter illegally and indiscriminately, in contravention of
Environmental Health Legislation that the full weight of the law
will be brought to bear without exception.

While we are not anxious to take criminal prosecution against
anyone, we must however, remain committed to safeguarding and
promoting public and environmental health and is therefore
determined to carry out our law enforcement mandate under
environmental health legislations.

The public is hereby reminded that a person convicted under
provisions of the Environmental Health Law, faces a fine of up to
five thousand ($5,000.00) dollars and one (1) year imprisonment.

We hereby admonish all persons who engage in the habit of illegal
indiscriminate dumping to discontinue the practice and to ensure
that their waste is properly disposed of at a recognized disposal site
at all times.


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 5B


^^ABM SERVICEDSUTIO









PAGEIN S T


Hotel reaps 'the



fruits of training'


he Orchard Hotel
has become the
first small hotel
on New Provi-
dence to see its
employees complete the Amer-
ican Hotel and Lodging Asso-
ciation's (AH&LA) certifica-
tion programme, as part of
moves to propel the property
towards international standards.
Five Orchard Hotel employ-
ees underwent training for the
certification, which AH & LA's
Educational Institute operates.


Four line staff employees and
one manager were certified as
guestroom attendants, and
received certificates and official
lapel pins from Jacqueline
Ramsey, the Ministry of Touris-
m's manager of small hotels.
The training was administered
by Clarise McQuay, assistant
manager for the Ministry of
Tourism's small hotels unit.
The certification programme
administered by the Ministry is
an extension of the Small
Tourism Enterprise Programme
(STEP) developed in conjunc-


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
2005/CLE/QUI/00300
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division
IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising Eleven and Fifty-four hundredths (11.54) acres
more or less originally granted to John Cash by Crown Grant
B-219 which said John Cash Grant is stuate on the Southern
edges of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island of Great
Abaco one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and runs from the Sea on the East Westwards between the
Northern edge of the Nathan Key Grant (Grant K-145) on the
South and a Road Reservation to the North and bounded
westwardly by a Road Reservation sometimes called "Pole
Line Road" or "Nathan Key Drive"
AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Roy Carlisle Newbold,
Sr.

NOTICE
The Petition of ROY CARLISLE NEWBOLD Sr. of Stede
Bonnett Road in the Township of Marsh Harbour in the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas in respect of:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or part of a tract of land comprising
Eleven and Fifty-four hundredths (11.54) acres originally
granted to John Cash (Grant B-219) which said John Cash
Grant is situate on the Southern edges of the Township of
Marsh Harbour and runs from the Sea on the East Westwards
between the Northern edge of the Nathan Key Grant (Grant
K-145) and a Road Reservation to the'N6 th and boutnidd
Westwardly by a Road' Reseratif6n'sbmetiires called "Pole&,
Line Rod" or "Nathan, eIyriye" and generally having the
position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as shown for
Grant B-219 on Bahamas Registred Plan 436 ABACO and*
which said hereditaments is bounded ON THE WEST by the
said Road Reservation sometimes called "Pole Line Road" or
"Nathan Key Drive and running thereon Four hundred and
Thirty-three and Five hundredths (433.05') feet more or less,
ON THE SOUTH by the aforementioned Nathan Key Grant
(Grant K-145 and running thereon One thousand Sevenhiindred
and Forty-four and Three hundredths (1744.03) feet more or
less ON THE NORTH by the aformentioned Road Reservation
to the North and running thereon One Thousand Seven hundred
and Fourteen and sixty-one hundredths (1714.61) feet more or
less AND ON THE EAST by the High Water Mark of the Sea
and running thereon by straight transect One hundred and Fifty
and Eighy-three hundredths (150.83) feet but following the
configurations of the 6oast running thereon one hundred and
Seventy and Ninety two hundredths (170.92) feet more or
less and which said piece parcel or part of a tract of land has
the position shape boundaries and dimensions as are shown on
plan filed in the above Action and thereon coloured Pink.
Roy Carlisle Newbold Sr. claims to be the owner in fee simple
in possession of the said land free from encumbrances and has
made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
or The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to granted by the Court in accordance with the said
Act. A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
business hours at the following places:-
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building,
East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
2. The Office of Administrator, Local Government, Central
Abaco District, Dove Plaza, Don Mackay Boulevard, Marsh
Harbour, Abaco.
3. The Chambers of the Petitioner's attorneys, Messrs. Maillis
and Maillis, Chambers, Fort Nassau House, Marlborough
Street, Nassau, Bahamas
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or right of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 31st day of July A.D. 2005
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit and other prescribed papers to be filed
therewith. Failure of any person to file and serve a Statement
of his claim within the prescribed time operate as a bar to such
claim.
DATED the 26th day of April, A.D. 2005
MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers
Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the petitioner


tion with the Organisation of
American States (OAS) in
1998. Both Ms Ramsey and Ms
McQuay are certified hospitali-
ty trainers and have so far com-
pleted AH&LA training in four
small hotels on Nassau/Paradise
Island and the Family Islands.
John Knowles, proprietor of
the Orchard Hotel, thanked the
Ministry of Tourism for its assis-
tance in training his staff. "It's
comforting to know we are not
here by ourselves and that the
government is assisting us in
keeping up to standard," he
said. "We now want courses for
management as well."
The Orchard Hotel consists
of more than 30 villas located
just off Village Road.


. "Copyrighted Material am

Syndicated Content x

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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LEGAL NOTICE


LOWNDES
MANAGEMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of April, 2005. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., of P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SANDY PIERRE OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of MAY, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



'NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES BERNADIN, 1649 S.W.
8TH STREET, HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA, 33030, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19TH day of MAY, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CHINICA FERTIL OF FAITH
AVENUE SOUTH OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 12TH day of MAY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


BUSINESS
LIMITED

looking/for a i

CAREER CHANGE?



The recently established Tourism Development Company (TDC), with responsibility
for the development of all aspects of the Tourism Sector of Trinidad and Tobago
including marketing, product development and tourism investment promotion, invites
applications from interested candidates for the following key position:

Director of Tourism
The job:
Overall responsibility for tourism development, management, marketing and
promotion
Builds relationships with all tourism stakeholders in Trinidad and Tobago
Develops strong ties with all relevant components in the international market place
Identifies appropriate representatives in all key markets
Ensures that standards for tourism products are established and enforced
Negotiates with international airlines for expanded service in existing and new
source markets
Sources the highest quality of Advertising and Public Relations Agencies
The Director of Tourism reports to the company's President

Requirements:
A minimum of a Master's Degree in a relevant discipline
A minimum of 15 years experience in the tourism industry, 10 of which must be at a
senior level
Knowledge of and experience in financial management, project management and
implementation is key

Interested applicants should send a detailed up-to-date rdsumd/CV with all contact
,information to:


Nicole Blanc Senior Manager, HR Services
Aegis Business Solutions Limited
P.O. Box 1543, 11-13 Victoria Avenue
Port-of-Spain
Tel: (868) 625-6473 Fax: (868) 625-4484
E-mail: nicole.blanc@aegistt.com
Website: www.aegistt.com

Closing date for all applications is 23th May 2005.


V Paradise 9s... "For Safe or r nf!

NEW WEBSITE
Featuring the largest portfolio of
Paradise Island real estate and select
S properties throughout The Bahamas.
Great slildeshows and local information
www.ParadiseSalesAndRentals.com

1ALS NEW PHONE NUMBERS
Phone: 363-4000
Faxi:'363-4002,`::%


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 7B


iTHE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MARSHALL ROAD (NASSAU)

Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry
building with eight inch concrete block walls. The
anASK,. front 2 units are 95% complete.
Appraisal: $256,233.00

Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the
intersection'of Cowpen and Blue Hill Road, turn
right onto Marshall Road (Adventure Learning Center
Road), follow road to the final curve before the
beach. The subject property is about 100 feet on
the right side, grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.


house is second on your right with garage.


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main
entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then
take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right,


GOLDEN GATES #2 (NASSAU)

Lot #1490, section 2 with a 25 year old single family
residence 2,480 sq. ft. consisting of five bedrooms,
two bathrooms, seperate living and dining room with
a spacious kitchen, lot size is 6,000 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $120,000.00
Property is at grade and level with adequate drainage,
house situated on road khowns as "Donahue Road"
which is on the southern side of Carmicheal Road.
Last painted green trimmed white. Enclosed on one side with 5 ft., chain link fencing and at
the front with a low cement block wall with two driveways and. a walkway.

VALENTINES EXTENSION (NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex
with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey
section consist of a master bedroom, bathroom and
sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms, one bath,
living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs.
The single storey consist of one two bedroom, one
bath apartment and two efficency apartments, land
size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning on flat land
and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: .$347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extenrision Road, just over one
hundred feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road,
turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first
right into Johnson Terrace, go t 61T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second
building on right, white trimmed brown.


EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE (ELEUTHERA),
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera
Heights, size 11,200 sq. ft., contains incomplete
3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen
and tv room.
Appraisal: $141,716.40


house which is painted white trim with


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years
the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town
Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete
block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and
L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26
ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior
walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock
and the floors of vinyl tiles.
Appraisal: $220,500.00


BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA)
Duplex in lot #6625, Bahama Sound #8, East
Exuma, trapezium shaped lot 35 ft above sea
level, 10,000 sq. ft., single storey, 10 year old
duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living
room and porch area. Property is landscaped.


Appraisal: $170,047.50


GLENISTON GARDENS
SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

30 Year old single story house with floor area of
1,800 sq. ft., Lot #28 land size 14,475 ft., consist
of 4 bed, 3 bath, living, dining, kitchen, utility
room and carport.

Appraisal: $211,050.00

Driving east 'on Prince Charles, take the corner
before the shopping centre on the right side,
Follow the road around the curve to the subject
blue with a drive way up to the carport.



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft.,
6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below
road level and would flood in a severe hurricane
the duplex has dimensions of 60;ft by 30 ft
parIly of. wood and partly of cement blocks
with on es etion 'i .ly'fin shd and occupied
with blocks up to window level and floor ready
to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1 x6 pine and
the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work
is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the
structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.


Appraisal: $80,498.00

'HAMILTON'S (LONG ISLAND)
Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft.,
dwelling house of solid concrete floors,
foundation column and belt course with finished
plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is
1,237 sq. ft., utilities available are electricity,
water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)
Crown Allotment #70, singe storey wood and
concree commercial building approximately
758 sq. ft., about 20 years old.


Appraisal: $71,946.00


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill
overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one downstairs.
Each comprising one bedroom one bathroom,
front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 -6 feet wide on the upper
level secured with a wooden handrail. The garage
area has been converted into a efficiency
apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be
rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 per month.


Appraisal: $308,402.00
NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The
concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $43,968.75

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly.of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.


BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated and should not flood
under normal conditions.

Appraisal: $8,236.00

The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.


DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO), Crown Alotment #21- Vacant land 10,810 sq. ft. off
S.C. Bottle Drive.


BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on
elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence.
Appraisal: $26,250.00
Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.


INVESMENTOPPORUNIT


Mug
HE np a
rkffmx




14








PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


P.O. Box N- 0144
Ansbacher House. East Street
Nassau. Bahamas
Telephone: (2421 325-6591
Fax: (2421 325-6592


REPORT OF THE AUDITORSTO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF
HABIB BANKING CORPORATION LIMITED


We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Habib Banking Corporation Limited as at
31 December 2004. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the management of Habib
Banking Corporation Limited. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet
based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those
standhrds require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
'wlther the balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a
test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also
includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our
audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the balance sheet present fairly in all'iaterial respects, the fmancial position of
Habib Banking Corporation Limited as at 31 December 2004 in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards.




BDO Mann Judd

Chartered Accountants
Nassau Bahamas
29 April 2005

HABIB BANKING CORPORATION LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2004
(Expressed in US Dollars)


Note


ASSETS
Cash at banks and other financial institutions.
Investments
Bonds
Loans, advances and overdrafts
Prepayments and other receivables
Fixed assets


2004
$


18,585,206
250,000
6,183,199
25,316,083
448,010
.27,300


2003
$


19,986,570
250,000
3,619,250
21,805,257
158,222
36,900


$50,809,798 $45,856,199


LIABILITIES
Demand deposits
Time deposits
Creditors and accrued expenses


643,180
8 45,007,359
512,626


1,719,970
40,568,056
389,094


45,703,165 42,677,120


EQUITY
Share capital
Reserves
Retained earnings


9 3,750,000
1,250,000
S 106633


1,750,000

17429,079

3,179,079


$50,809,798 $45,856,199


The balance sheet was approved by the board of directors and authorised for issue on
29 April 2005, and are signed on its beha by:


Salman H Habib
Director


Imran AHabib
Diector


The notes form an integral part of the balance sheet.
HABIB BANKING CORPORATION LIMITED

NOTES TO THE FINANCIALSTATEMENTS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31DECEMBER2004
1. INCORPORATION AND ACTIVITIF

Habib Banking Corporation Limited ('The Bank') is incorporated.in The Commonwealth of
the Bahamas and carries on banking and trust business in accordance with a licence issued by
the Ministry of Finance on 23 March 1987. The Bank's main place of business is Suite 202,
Saffrey Square, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


2. BASIS OF PREPARATION

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis and in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.


3. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Fixed assets

Fixed assets comprising of furniture and fixtures are stated at cost less accumulated
deprecation. Depreciation is recorded on the straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives
of the assets which is five years.

Foreign currencies

Transactions in currencies other than United States dollars have been translated at the rates of
exchange prevailing on the transaction dates,

Investments

Investments are classified as available-for-sale and are measured at fair value.

Bonds

Bonds are classified as held-to-maturity investments, and are stated at amortised cost, using the
effective interest rate method. Such investments are subject to review for impairment.

Loans, advances and overdrafts

Loans, advances and overdrafts are classified as loans and receivables originated by the
enterprise and not held for trading, are measured at cost or amortised cost, and are subject to
review for impairment.

4. CASH AT BANKS AND OTHERFINANCIALINSTITTJIONS

The maturity of cash at banks and other institutions is noted below:


Due within 30 days
Due after 30 days but within a year


5,715,718
12,869,488

$18,585,206


2003
$

7,203,421
12,783,149

$19,986,570


The maturity of bonds is noted below:


2004



4,183199


3 months or less
More than 6 months


$6,183,199


2003
$.


3.619.250

$3,619,250


6. LOANS, ADVANCES AND OVERDRAFTS

The maturity of loans, advances and overdrafts is noted below:


3 months or less
More than 6 months


2004


6,414,924
18.901.159

$25,316,083


7. FIXED ASSETS


COST
1 January 2004
and 31 December 2004

DEPRECIATION
1 January 2004
Charge for the year

31 December 2004

NET BOOK VALUE
31 December 2004

31 December 2003



8. TIME DEPOSITS


The maturity of time deposits is noted below:


3 months of less
More than 6 months


9. SHARE CAPITAL


Authorised
5,000,000 .rdinaryshares of$1 (2003: 1,000
ordinary shares of $1,000 each)


3,750,000 issued and fully paid ordinary shares
of $1 each (2003: 1,000 issued and fully paid
ordinary shares of $1,000 each)

Shares approved by The Central Bank of
the Bahamas but not issued


2004
$


19,999,000
25,008,359

$45,007,359




2004
$


5,000,000




3,750,000


$3,750,000


s

7,040,527
14.764.730

$21,805,257




Furniture
and
fxtures
S


56.100


19,200
9.600

28.800


$27,300

$36,900


2003
$

19,030,092
21.537.964

$40,568,056




2003
$


1,000,000




1,000,000


750,000

$1,750,000


10. CONCENTRATION OFASSETS AND LIABILITIES

The concentration ofassets and liabilities by industry and geographical region is noted below:

Assets 2004 2003
..: '\? : i*.* *'*.** :^ *:. :* :' % ; *: %


Financial sector,
Trading
Individuals


50.0
37.0
13.0

100.0


GeographicalRe "io
Europe .:
North America
Asia .
Africa


Liabilities


Financial Sector
Individuals



Geographical Region
Europe

Asia
MAfica


100.0




40.0
60.0

100.0


40.0

51.0


100.0


52.0
39.0


100.0


55.7
0.4
33.4
10.5

100.0




36.0
64.0

100.0


46.9
1.3
32:6
19.2

100.0


1. COMMITMENTS

The bank had outstanding guarantees at the year-end totalling $742,000 (2003: $742,000).


12. INTEREST RATE RISK

Cash at banks and other financial institutions accrue interest at a rate of approximately 1.20
to 4.30% (2003: 1'03%to 3.80% p.a.).

Bonds accrue interest at rates of approximately 9.87% to 11.37% p.a. (2003: 9.50% to
11.50% p.a.)

Loans, advance and accrue interest at rates of approximately 4.50% to 6.50% p.a.
(2003: 400% to 6.00% p.a.).

Customer time deposits accrue interest at rates of approximately 0.70% to 5.75% p.a. (2003:
0.50% to 5.50% p.a.).

None of the Bank's other financial assets or liabilities carry a significant exposure to interest
rate risk.


13. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

Loans of $671,835 (2003: $750,000) were outstanding at the year end to the General Manager
of the Bank, against an undertaking to create a charge against property valued at $700,000.


l4. COMPARATIVE FIGURES

Certain prior year comparative figures have been reclassified to conform with the current year
presentation.


BDO Mann lidd
Chartered Accountants


I U


5. BONDS


;


5,106.633


* . .- :.,"


IBDO







THETRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 9B


'FROM page one

support all legitimate small business activity, and
would be managed by a fully independent and
suitably-qualified Board.
Outside of access to capital, another challenge faced by
Bahamian small businesses, Mr Outten said, is the col-
lective failure of successive governments to improve,
streamline and bring efficiencies to the processes that
entrepreneurs and businesses must endure if they want to
comply with the law.
He said that too often, these processes end up obstruct-
ing and discouraging persons from getting into business,
when they should be encouraging and facilitating them.
Mr Outten said that similarly, as the Government has
heard and responded to the concerns of the foreign
investors, who complain about how hard it is to get an
investment started in the Bahamas, by creating a 'One
Stop Shop' through the Registrar General's Department
and creation of the Ministry of Financial Services and
Investments, the Bahamian business person is looking for
the same level of support.
"While successive governments have paid lip service to
the notion of support for Bahamian small businesses,
none of them have looked seriously at the pain and
anguish and excessive time that the small entrepreneur
must endure to get a licence or get an approval for archi-
tectural drawings or a work permit. None of them have
thought to see how the processes can be improved and
streamlined," Mr Outten said.
To improve the enabling environment for small busi-
nesses, the Association is calling on the Government to
undertake a number of initiatives,.including streamlining
customs clearing proceedings, expanding the duty exemp-
tion and reduction, and creating a 'One-Stop Shop' for
Bahamian investors.
The creation of a 'One-Stop Shop' would mean that
persons looking to open a business would be able to go
to one place for all information. or to complete the nec-
essary transactions needed to open a company. The facil-
ity could house staff members from the various related
government agencies, or maintain real-time online con-
nections. The new agency would also look to have the
licensing processes on-line.
Mr Outten said that in 2005 there should be documents
that the ordinary business person could complete by
themselves. He added that simplifying the process might
also involve the ability to pay with cheques or credit
cards, and that the Bahamas Customs Department might
look to implement an online facility to complete the
documents.
Looking at the question of duty exemptions, Mr Out-
ten said that like Kerzner International's Phase III pro-
ject or the Baha Mar Development Company's Cable
Beach initiative, where both developers are expected


Bahamas company

supplies software

to Panama firm
INTERNATIONAL Private
Banking Systems (IPBS), the
!Bahamas-based specialist
provider of wealth management
software for the private banking
sector, yesterday announced that
Panamanian financial institution
Shad gone live with its IPBS fully-
integrated client portfolio man-.
agement, Know Your Customer
and compliance solution.
Mundial Asset Management
had needed a completely inte-
grated system to ensure it met the
stringent Panamanian regulatory
requirements for KYC and Anti-
Money Laundering.
IPBS will implement three key
products from its specialised port-
folio to meet the demands of
Mundial, namely IPBS/Inrvest-
ments, IPBS/Compliance Man-
ager and IPBS/Remote Client
Access. The combination of the
products creates a streamlined,
automated process with full STP
(Straight Through Processing)
capabilities.
Key capabilities of the solution
include:
multi-lingual/multi-curren-
cy portfolio management
front office order booking,
portfolio modelling, forecasting
access to full range of invest-
ment instruments
compliance management
secure 128 bit encryption of
all information
seamless interface with
WorldCompliance (AML data-
base)
sophisticated multi-level
client relationship management
web-based direct client access
enabling trading, with payment,
deposit and funds transfer capa-
bilities
high level secure access at all
entry points
Gabriel E. Fabrega, chief exe-
cutuive of Mundial Asset Man-
agement, said: "Mundial Asset
Management is a new company,
established in a very dynamic
market with many clients to ser-
vice across a wide geography. We
needed to identify a proven
wealth management software
company who could meet our IT.
challenges with innovative tech-
nology and for a realistic invest-
ment. We are pleased to be
working with the team at IPBS
who have been recommended to
us as specialists in the industry."
Bruce Raine, founder and
managing director of IPBS, said:
"The proximity of Panama to the
international financial markets is
quite unique. Mundial was faced
with a number of challenges to
enable its IT systems to support
the breadth of services offered to
clients who include both global
investments and specialist Cen-
tral and South American invest-
ment instruments.
Our partner, Gustavo Garcia
de Paredes, has been a key part-
ner in the relationship, working
with both Mundial and IPBS to
ensure delivery of the very best
solution possible. We look for-
ward to a long association with
Mundial Asset Management and
towards helping them achieve
success in their market".


Small businesses
to get millions of dollars in exemptions in return for a
tremendous investment in the economy through jobs,
infrastructure and taxes, the Government should provide
for Bahamian businesses who, as a group, also make a sig-
nificant contribution to the economy.
Mr Outten said the Government should expand the
duty exemption and reduction regime by providing a
tax exemption on all new businesses that bring in start-up
equipment, supplies and inventory.
Government procurement was another area of concern
for the Association, with Mr Outten calling for a greater
level of transparency.
He suggested that the Government list all the goods
and services it needs over a given period and set aside a
fixed portion of these goods for small businesses. He
added that they could publish the summary details of all
the contracts awarded for goods and services to demon-
strate that the process is fair and equitable.
Mr Outten said the Government might also consider
abolishing the Shop Licensing Board. Calling it "a relic
of a by-gone era", he said the antiquated process had no
place in a modern Bahamas and that all Bahamians
should be allowed to set up a legitimate business in any
place so zoned for that type of business, provided they
meet the requisite health, safety and infrastructure
requirements.
Mr Outten said it was commonly suggested that the
small business segment of the market was risky and
unprofitable for those who extend credit. Based on
research, however, small businesses that are able to
access the right expertise and approach pose a much
smaller risk to creditors and, in many cased, were prof-
itable.
Joining Mr Outten at the press conference held at
the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, were Clayton
Gardiner, assistant treasurer; Troy Sampson, corporate
secretary; Jade Major, corporate assistant secretary, and
Marion Johnson, vice-president.
Looking forward, Mr Outten said the Association is
seeking to expand its membership base and increase the
number of services it offers members.
He said the SBA was looking at creating a purchasing
network to allow small businesses to buy in bulk and
increase operational efficiencies. He added that it would
look to introduce group discounts on any number of
services, including insurance, pension plans, legal ser-
vices and accounting services.
The SBA is working on creating a website that will
allow members to advertise their products, and is also
looking at organising a Bahamian small business expo for
small businesses to showcase their products and ser-
vices.


1,390 Sq.Ft (additional 800 sq. ft optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island
3 Parking Spaces incl. In rental
Turnkey Fit-out Office Suite
24 Hr. Automatic Standby generator
Two elevators (wired for Modern Communications needs)
Separate Staff and Secured Client parking
Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
24 Hr Security Guards
24 hr Surveillance System (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed
$5,400.00 Monthly


"TOeh M, 0 LOt 7hy S'...P.lm 119:31
Invites applications from experienced qualified Christian Candidates
for the following teaching positions at the High School level (grades
7-12) for the school year 2005/2006.
Journalism/Literature (Gr. 10-12)
2 Religious Knowledge/Bible (Gr. 7-12)
3 Math (Gr. 7-12)
Physics (Gr. 10-12)
Technical Drawing/ Math (Gr. 7-9)
Accounts/ Commerce/ Economics (Gr. 10-12)
Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
2 Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)
Geography/History (Gr. 10-12)
Health Science/Agriculture Science (Gr. 7-9)
2 -Computer Science (Gr. 7-12)
Music (Gr. 7-12)
Biology/ Chemistry (Gr. 10-12)
Art & Design/Craft (Gr. 7-12)
2 -English/ Literature (Gr. 7-9)
Clothing & Construction (Gr. 10-12)
Applicants must:
A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to subscribe
to the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian Schools.
B. Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or diploma.
D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the relevant
subject area with excellent communication skills.
E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare students for all
examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
E Be willing to participate in the high school's extra curricular
programmes.
Application must be picked up at the high school office on Shirley
Street be returned by May 27th, 2005 with afull curriculum vitae,
recent colored photograph, Church affiliation, Pastor's name
and three references to:
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


Investment officer



passes Canadian



Securities Course


AN investment
officer at Pearl
Investment
Management
has completed
the Canadian
Securities Course
after studying with
the Nassau-based
Securities Training
Institute (STI).
Czarina Mcintyre
(pictured above)
said the STI's
classes greatly
increased her
understanding
of the course
concepts.


S GRADUATES DINNER

& AWARDS CEREMONY


Friday, May 27, 2005
Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort
Cocktails 6:30 pm
Dinner 7:30 pm

COB will honour graduates for stellar performances in
academics, college life and Civic involvement.

Come and celebrate with our rduates!.
Enjoy fine people, fine food and fine music!



$55.00 (Graduates) $6500 (Guests)
BOx Offic
COB's BuslhIss Office

To secure your tickets, call:
Cheryl Carey 302-4368
Claire Patton 302-4381
...................................................... ................ ...... ........ ....







Deadline: June 20, 2005

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The normal entrance qualification for the UWI LL.B DEGREE is the basic UWI
Matriculation standards of:

(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at "A" Level and the remainder
at CXC general or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education);

(b) ASSOCIATE OR BACHELOR'S degree with a CUMULATIVE GPA OF 2.5
OR HIGHER. There are no special subject requirements in addition to those
necessary for Matriculation at the UWI. The competition for places in the
programme is very high "A" Level grades and very high averages in undergraduate
degrees (AT LEAST 3.0) are required for an application to stand a reasonable
chance of gaining admission.

The College of The Bahamas is prepared to consider a limited number of
applications from persons who do not strictly satisfy Matriculation standards
but who have equivalent academic qualifications. In particular, MATURE
APPLICANTS OVER 30 WHO HAVE SHOWN EVIDENCE OF ACADEMIC AND
PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT CAN BE CONSIDERED. This is an
opportunity to read for a law degree for those who have already been associated
with the practice of law in some way. A resume must be submitted with your
COB and UWI applications. Please note that the programme is only offered on
a full-time basis.

All LLB applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam. The date of this
exam will be communicated to you, but is expected to take place during
third week in June. An application must be in the Office of Admissions in
order to be allowed to sit the exam.

Both COB and UWI applications must be completed and are available in the
Office of Admissions, COB.

The completed applications, original certificates (which will be returned to the
applicant), copies of these original certificates, transcripts sent directly from
universities or colleges previously attended to the Director of Admissions at
COB, and proof of payment of the forty-dollar application fee (paid at the
BUSINESS OFFICE AT COB), must be submitted by the deadline, June 20,
2005.


. .


THE COLE GE Ofr
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


BUSINESS







PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


Case for the





defence of





boxing titles


FIRST Class Promotions
is gearing up for another
first class production on Friday
night at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort & Crystal Palace Casino.
It's a showdown between 'Mar-
vellous' Marvin Smith and Jer-
maine 'Chu-Chu' Mackey for the
Bahamas super middleweight
title.
Five years ago Smith won the
title and that same year he came
back and successfully defended
it both times against Kenny
'Lightning' Minus.
Since then, Smith has gone
through some hardships after
being knocked out in his last bout
in the United States. The New
York Boxing Commission placed
him on a 90-day suspension.
He was supposed to have had a
medical report submitted to the
New York State Boxing Com-
mission, clearing him to fight
again, but he didn't until last year.

Showdown
Now he's eligible to fight again
and he's eagerly preparing for the
showdown with Mackey on Fri-
day night before he heads back to
the United States.
There's no reason why he
should have had to wait five years
to defend his Bahamian title.
The Bahamas Boxing Com-
mission should make it manda-
tory that Smith and all the other
title holders defend them on a
regular basis or have them
stripped.
Renaldo 'the Terminator'
Minus must have had hold of the
Bahamas heavyweight title for
ever. I wonder if the commission
can remember the last time he
defended it.
It's good that the commission
has lobbied, for FEDECARIBE
champion Sherman 't&e Tank'
Williams to get a shot at the
British Commonwealth champi-
onship fight.
But what about the Bahamas
heavyweight title? Are they going


STUBBS


OPINION


to just allow Renaldo 'the Ter-
minator' Minus to continue to
hold onto the crown and not
allow Williams to get a shot at it?
When the new executive board
took office a couple years ago,
there was a lot of talk about
implementing a ranking system
for all of the divisions, which
would have ensured that the
fighters would get the opportu-
nity to fight on a timely basis.
But so far, there's been no
ranking published, even though
there have been quite a few
shows over the last two years put
on by First Class Promotions.
And'over the last tjwo years,
there's been an influx -of fighters
who have turned professional.
So let's get the rankings out
there and where there are titles
dormant, let's make sure that they
are defended, or have the princi-
pals stripped.


We shouldn't have to wait until
five years before another title
fight is made.

THE New Providence Soft-
ball Association made an error
last week Thursday, but they
were quick to correct it the next
day.
The much anticipated men's
feature contest between the
defending champions TBS
Truckers and the Electro Tele-
com Dorcy Park Boyz never
materialised because of the asso-
ciation's decision to implement a
new rule on the use of illegal bats.
League commissioner Burkett
Dorsett said that the list
of banned bats was not released
by the International Softball Fed-
eration, of which they are affili-
ated.

Issued
Instead, it was issued by the
Amateur Softball Association of
America, with which they have
no affiliation.
That meant that only the
Miken bats which are banned by
the ISF.
The NPSA seems to have been
concerned about protecting the'
integrity of the game by applying
the bat ban.
But, as many have indicated,
the ban should not have been
slapped on the teams once the
season had already started. At
least not 2-3 days before such a
big game.
Now, tonight, the NPSA will
try to correct their mistake by
replaying the game. But for what
it's worth, the excitement just
might not be there.
Both teams were definitely
stacked from top to bottom in
their line-up in what many felt
could be a preview of the cham-
pionship later this year.
With the issue over the illegal
bats corrected, we will have to
wait and see how the teams
respond to the decision to replay
the game.


THE CAC fundraising committee pose with one of their major prizes.


CAC raffle puts fans


in the driving seat


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Central American and Caribbean
(CAC) games committee are counting the days
before the biggest showdown in the Bahamas.
Just 50 days before the hosting of the most
momentous regional games, the committee
met yesterday to announce their second
fundraising event and the members that make
up the committee.
According to the committee members, the
second fundraiser will top the first, which was a
boat cruise hosted a month ago.
This time around the CAC fundraising com-
mittee will raffle off a brand new Chevy Optra,
thanks to the Nassau Motor Company.
The car tops the list of surprises on the cata-
logue for the committee, and for chairperson
Godfrey Burnside the goal is to sell all 1,500
books.
Burnside said: "We are grateful to Don
Clarke and the Nassau Motors Company for
their generous donation to the championships.
We are trying to go out there and sell at least
1,500 books, so we are asking the general pub-
lic to assist us in this venture.
"We are also trying to involve the Family
Islands and we are asking the administrators to
contact us, so we can be able to send some
booklets down to you."


Other prizes includes a two night, three day
stay at the Sandals in the Bahamas or Jamaica,
a digital camera and three round trip tickets to
the Family Islands.
The draw for the car is expected to take
place on July 11th.
Several weeks ago, the committee adver-
tised for volunteers wishing to assist with the
games. Yesterday, the CAC committee chair-
head, Bernard Nottage pleaded for persons to
step forward to assist with the transportation of
teams.

Planned
He said: "We are hoping that persons step
forward to assist in all the events the CAC
committee has planned. We would wish to
encourage the public to go out and purchase the
raffle tickets, there are 1,500 booklets out there
and we are hoping to sell all of them before or
on the date.
"The committee is also looking for persons to
assist in the transportation of the athletes, so we
are making a cry to persons with buses and
cars to step forward."
Nottage confirmed that the persons volun-
teering will be given stipends for gas, with oth-
er compensations being negotiable. These vol-
unteers will also be given access to all activities
being put on by the committee.


BBF hosts





basketball


official


M By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation (BBF) will kick
off its annual international
clinic for basketball officials
today at the Sir Kendal
Isaacs gymnasium.
The clinic will be con-
ducted by Fred Horgan,
International Basketball
Federation of Americas
(FIBA America) inter-
preter.
This will serve as the sec-
ond clinic for the region,
which will be attended by
more than five Caribbean
countries and representa-
tives from Canada.

Jamaica
These countries include
the Cayman Islands,
Jamaica, Antigua, British
Virgin Islands and Canada.
For Larry Wilson, vice
president of the BBF, the
need to certify local bas-
ketball officials is great.
Wilson revealed that the
Bahamas is obligated to
take two FIBA certified
officials to all international
tournaments they partici-
pate in.
As of late, the require-
ment was fulfilled by the
BBF, but in the past the
BBF sought assistance from


neighbouring Car
Islands.
"We have certified
cials, but after the C
games that passed,
constant upgrading
rules, all official
asked to be re-cer
said Wilson.

Region
"Discussions wer
in the BBF as to ho
would happen with 1
tifications not be co
we decided to host t
ic. This is the secon
for the region but al
Caribbean Islands
able to participate
first.
"So our clinic is o
all the interested p
Our aim is to mak
that all of our offici
updated with thi
change."
The clinic will beu
update the local
about the changes m
the FIBA ruling. It w
enhance the FIBA p
phy of basketball.
Since the Olympic
the FIBA associati
modified its ri
moving away fro
NCAA rulings the
used.
Under the FIBA
the team is only gi
seconds to shoot, wl


clinic


ibbean NCAA allows 30 seconds.
Both rulings play ten
ed offi- minute quarters, with the
)lympic FIBA ruling having two
and the minutes between regulation
of the time and extra periods.
s were Wilson said: "We are
tified," expecting a great turnout to
every session.
"We are pleased to
| announce that there will be
female referee, from the
e made Bahamas seeking to be cer-
ow this tified.
the cer- "She is no stranger to the
)stly, so sport, and she has officiated
he cdin- several games in the Hugh
d clinic Campbell tournament. I
1 of the haven't been in contact with
weren't her in a long time, but I
in the have received word that she
will be attending the
)pen to clinic.
)arties.
e sure Teams
ials are
e rule "We are happy to
announce that the teams
used to will have certified officials
media accompanying them this
nade in time around."
vill also With the Bahamas being
'hiloso- able to certify a female offi-
cial, it will avoid the BBF
games, seeking assistance from the
on has Caribbean Islands for a
rulings, female.
m the The BBF is looking for-
y once ward to sending two teams
to the Caribbean Basketball
rulings Tournament, set for
ven 24 Trinidad and Tobago, this
while the July.


::::::;::,::::i,;:;::-::: .:?:. :: : : : :: : : : :::


--- --------------i---------II---~-


TRIBUNE SPORTS


'MARV O
and Jermaine'hCh M kewi
fight for the Ba m u ri

....................................................................... y........................................................................ ........................................... ..................



























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The


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005

SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


C-


illiams:


'm


in


0


Boxer prepares for

Commonwealth

heavyweight bout


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SHERMAN 'TANK'
WILLIAMS says he is in the best
shape of his life and is ready to
claim a title he has been yearning
for since his professional debut.
Williams, who is in Germany
preparing for the September bout
against Shane Cameron for the
Commonwealth heavyweight
title, says the training at the Uni-
versal Stadium there is the best he
has undergone.
According to Williams, the
facility is equipped so that his
blood pressure is taken after he
puts in a few rounds on the
punching bags.
Fights
He added that this state of the
art facility will not only equip him
for his fights but assist with clinics
he is hoping to host in the
future.
He said: "I am in shape, and I
will go on record to say that I am
in the best shape of my life. I am
doing things I never knew were
possible, hitting the bags and gym
at least three times a day.
"The workouts and treatments
I receive here are great. It not
only prepares you physically, but
mentally as well.
"I am mentally ready to take
on anyone. I feel stronger, lighter


and my arm speed is getting
faster."
Williams has scheduled a fight
within next three weeks just out-
side of Germany.
This fight will serve as prepa-
ration for Williams, who will
hit the gym immediately after-
wards.
"I am not too sure who I will
be fighting, my agents are still in
discussions with the fighters and
their agents," said Williams.
"We are hoping to get that in
so I can go into the fight with at
least one fight under my belt.
"I am not too sure if we are
going to schedule other fights,
this might be the case if this fight
doesn't come off. I am hoping it
does so I can see where am at,
and hopeful put in another fight
before the big one comes
around."
While in Germany training,
Williams stepped into the ring
with Riesa Uzbekian, three weeks
ago.
But he lost in an unanimous
decision over eight rounds. The
fight was the co-main event at the
Erdgas Arena of Riesa, in Ger-
many.
Although Williams wasn't
awarded the win, he was able to
stop the seven match knock-out
streak of Uzbekian.
Nonetheless, the loss dropped
Williams' win-loss record to 25-
10-1 with 15 knockouts.


,Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


commercial News Providers"


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


the


INSIDE

Bahamas
Basketball
Federation
hold official
I clinic
*Page I10


l-^l^&ra








THURSDAY, MAY 19,2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes


Page 2C


Christians


Feast


celebrate


o Pentecost


* By CLEMENT J
"WHEN the time
cost was fulfilled, th
in one place togethe
denly there came fro
noise like a strong i
filled the entire hou
they were. Then aj
them tongues as of
parted and came a
each one of them.
were filled with the
and began to speak
tongues, as the Spi
them to Proclaim."


OHNSON his past weekend
the Christian
for Pente- Church celebrat-
iey were all ed the Feast of
r. And sud- .Pentecost. It was
)m the sky a on this day that the Holy Spir-
wind, and it it descended on the disciples. It
se in which is also seen as the birthday of
appeared to the Christian Church.
fire, which At the weekend masses at
7nd rest on Sacred Heart Catholic Church
And they on Shirley Street, parishioners
Holy Spirit were asked to reflect on the
in different true meaning of the feast by
rit enabled Fr. Thomas Brislin. He
expounded on the event, on
(Acts 2:1.) told how the disciples were


gathered in the upper room.
They were in the room, with
the doors locked, because they
were afraid that how the Mas-
ter (Jesus) was killed, it could
happen to them.
"On the day of Pentecost the
Holy Spirit came as tongues of
fire and rested on each of them
who were in the room. The dis-
ciples opened the doors and
went into the streets and they
proclaimed the messages of
Jesus," said Fr. Tom.
He said that on that day
thousands of people joined the
church, and today there are


more than one billion members
in the church- quite a big
change from back in the those
days.
The day of Pentecost was
already a feast day on the Jew-
ish calendar, and they were cel-
ebrating the feast of thanks-
giving.
Commnitted
In his sermon Fr. Tom
encouraged the congregation
to become more committed to
building up Christ and his
church.


Call for end to



poverty in world


"The Church is Christ walk-
ing through human history."
This, he said, was one of his
favourite definitions the
church.
"More than 100 years ago
the history of Catholicism
began in the Bahamas when
the Charity nuns came from.
Mt. St. Vincent, New York,
and they met some people liv-
ing in the Bahamas who were
Catholics.
About a year later the-Bene-
dictine priests and brothers
came. Today St. Augustine's
Monastery is closed. The nuns
and the priests and the thou-
sands of lay people in this
country worked together, giv-
ing up their time and talents to
build up the Church in the
Bahamas."
Pentecost, he said, reminds
us that we all must go out and


6 =


p* *yrid M- *


pyrighted MaterialE


proclaim the Good News of
Christ. We do this in the little
Pentecosts that come our way.
The Holy Spirit informs us that
we are all a part of the min-
istry of the Church. Our little
Pentecost comes when we are
able to forgive, when we realize
that we have been carrying
around this baggage for too
long.
Forgiveness
So make that phone call
today asking for forgiveness.
Go and visit that sick person,
share your talent and time with
them. Donate time around the
church, become a teacher of
the faith, and stand up for one's
Catholic faith.
This Sunday the Christian
community will celebrate the
feast of the Most Holy Trinity.







bmo


ndicated Content. --2 .-.---


i Commercial News Providers"
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Bible Bok&4ift Shop



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The Tribune


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PAGE 20,S TH : URS:DAYMAY19,2005THETRIB


Yjj-


HOLY CROSS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church at Highbury
Park, off Soldier Road, is pre-
senting A Family Life Semi-
nar under the theme, "Bring-
ing joy back into the family".
The seminar, sponsored by
Holy Cross Christian Achiev-
ers, began at 7:30 pm on
Wednesday and is being held
until Saturday.
Thursday, May 19, 7:30
pm (Women only)
Saturday, May 21 Prayer
Breakfast
(Facilitator: Rev Dr Wayne
Thompson)
For further information, call
393-6163.

CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold
worship services at 7 am, 9 am
and 11 am on Sunday, May
22.
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-
day Praise and Deliverance
Service, 7:45 pm Men's Fel-
lowship Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI
Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Bishop V G Clarke is the
senior pastor.


SUMMER
SCHOOL



Job Openings:

* Accepting resumes for
elementary & high
school teachers


CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH.
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
May 22, 9:15 am Church
School, 10 am Divine Wor-
ship Service with Pastor
Charles Lewis, 7 pm Divine
Evening Service with the men
'First Monday of each
month, 7:30 pm Men's Min-
istry, Second & Fourth Mon-
day, 7:30 pm Women's Min-
istry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry


tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice, 7
pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

EAST STREET
GOSPEL


ST BARNABAS CHAPEL


ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
May 22, 7 am Sung Mass,
10 am Sunday School and
Adult Bible Classes, 11 am -
Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Even-
song and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-


JUNE 20-
JULY 15, 2005

Math
Science
English
Art
History
Reading
Writing
Bible
Games
and More


$50.00 per week
Report card issued at end of 4 weeks.


Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy
#27 Palmdale Ave.
TEL: 325-6570 OR 325-6571


THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is spe-
cial", is scheduled to hold the
following services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand
Bells Choir Practice, 8 pm -
Men's Fellowship Meeting
(Every 4th Thursday), 7:45 pm
- Women's Fellowship Meet-
ing (Every 4th Thursday)


- ~-
o a -
~w ~- ___
0

- ~ -


Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship
Meeting
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings
to be held at the church on
All Saints Way, South Beach,
for the week of May 22-28:
Sunday, 9 am Family
Eucharist, 6:30 pm Mass
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's,
Anglican Church Women
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm -
Anglican Church Men, Prayer
Group Meeting
Wednesday, 6 am Mass
and Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice, 7:30 pm Senior
Choir Practice '
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 7 pm Parish
Dinner and A.G.M (Commu-
nity Centre)
Saturday, 6 am Interces-
sory Prayer Meeting, noon to
6 pm ACW Steak-Out, 2 pm
- Acolytes Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebast-
ian Campbell)

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE
MOST HOLY
TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity


Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The.
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website: www.holytrinityba-
hamas.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK
YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from
the Central Bank. Parking is
available immediately behind
the Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting


Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm
- SALT Ministry (Single
Adults Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service

UNITED
FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT.
THE church in the Summer
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road,
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 8 am Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,
10:30 am Divine Worship
Service (Live broadcast at 11
am on More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer
meeting every Wednesday
and Saturday at 5 am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm -
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
For further information, e-
mail: ufm@bahama.net.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949


- .. .
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Bahamas Anglican Cursillos


In Christianity

Presents





















ULTREYA




An Evening of Music, Sharing & Fellowship
Holy Cross Parish


Saturday, May 21st

7:00 pm


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE j


J


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


I qmb_


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I i-I TRIUNE I~1U~OUMTIVIRELIGIONv~


'I have


the Spirit'


* By Rev Angela C Bosfield
Palacious
"To each is given the manifestation
of the spirit for the common good"
(1Cor 12:7 NRSV)
n our baptismal service, we
are reminded that: "By the
power of the Holy Spirit Ho
[Christ] brought into being a
people for His own posses-
sion, which people we are. By the
power of the Holy Spirit we are unit-
ed with Christ in Holy Baptism, shar-
ing not only in His death but also in
his resurrection, becoming God's chil-
dren by adoption and grace, thus
changing our nature so deeply that
Holy Scripture says that in baptism
we are born again." (BCP).
As we grow in grace from child-
hood, or whenever we are baptised,


we are becoming more and more like
Christ if we respond positively to
Christian influences around us. Our
Christian Formation needs to be a pri-
ority in our homes, schools, youth
groups and in every aspect of church
life.
Spiritual
Spiritual discipline is our intention-
al effort to have a personal encounter
with our Living Lord by welcoming
the Holy Spirit to draw us into com-
munion with the blessed Trinity. Our
relationship with the three persons of
the Trinity is enhanced by our con-
scious and deliberate attempt to be
available to God at all times and in all
places. The intent of our hearts is what
God sees along with our putting into
practice those things that will remind
us that we are the temple of God


MEDITATION


* REV ANGELA PALACIOUS


where the Spirit of God resides.
The relevant questions to ask are:
Am I living as if I am filled with the
Holy Spirit? Am I building on the
foundation of my baptism?
Manifestation
The manifestation of the Spirit on
the Day of Pentecost was tongues of
fire and a rushing wind in the room,
and the speaking in languages and
dialects unknown to the speakers but
recognised by persons in the crowd.
Bold preaching, fervent prayer, heal-
ing of the sick and the courageous
challenging of religious authorities
when confronted, were further dis-
plays of the Holy Spirit's presence in
the lives of persons who were once
timid and even terrified.
The work of the Holy Spirit is to
be visible in the fruit of Christ-like


character and the spiritual gifts of min-
istry in the church and community.
Our life of prayer and the study of
Scripture assist with true worship,
enthusiastic witness, and devoted
work for the Lord.
Each person is blessed by the pres-
ence of God the Holy Spirit and we all
benefit from this arrangement. It is
the "common good" that God has at
heart and so we help each other by
caring and celebrating, reaching out to
those beyond our church family, evan-
gelising those who are still in dark-
ness, emphasising the special roles of
our children and youth in the overall
plan of God, communicating infor-
mation to reach the widest audience,
and teaching our faith in order to form
Christian character.
When love is our motive and min-
istry our method, the Holy Spirit glo-
rifies God through us.


Rev Lowery played


major role in civil


rights struggles


THE Rev Joseph Lowery,
who helped found the Southern
Christian Leadership Confer-
ence with Martin Luther King
in 1957 and led the organisa-
tion for 20 years, recently spent
several relaxing days at San-
dals Royal. Bahamian Spa
Resort & Offshore Island.
Role
Rev Lowery played a major
role in many of the pivotal civ-
il rights struggles of the 1950s
and 60s and has remained
active.
In 1965, Dr. King named
Lowery to deliver the demands
of a planned Selma-to-Mont-
gomery march for voting rights
to then Alabama Governor


George Wallace. Past president
of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference from
1977 to 1997, Lowery also co-
founded the Black Leadership
Forum, a consortium of nation-
al black advocacy organisa-
tions, and served as third pres-
ident following Vernon Jordan
and Benjamin Hooks. After
retiring from the Southern
Christian Leadership Confer-
ence in January 1998, Lowery
helped African American
farmers secure a federal court
decree valued at $2 billion
against the Department of
Agriculture for discrimination.
Rev and Mrs Lowery are
pictured (at right) with Sandals
Executive Assistant Manager,
Ali Bain (centre).


St. Agnes has come a long way in 160 years,

but now we're preparing to head back in time with an
old-fashioned bazaar on


- ; -.~ibj'-'. *1


Remember the
grab bag,
speaker's
corner, record
hop, hoopla,
food, court,
suppers, cotton
candy, and
pony rides?


Well, we're


bringing

them BACK!


So if bazaars are
something you've
-oinly heard about,
o".or if you actually
m remember the
good old days,
come out and
bring the family!
.i.


For more information please contact
Jesus Christ of The Heart Deliverance Ministry
P.O.Box FH-14155, Nassau, Bahamas Tel. (242) 394-8060


I I


1-I -t TRIBUNE


1 urlIUnoU T, IVIMaT I ,"UO, r-r .- vw





PAG 40, THURSDAY MAY 19, 200 TH


SHOP WISE
WHERE SAVINGS
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PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


THE TF


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THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 5C


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Carnation Evaporated Milk........... 2/$.1.19
Niagara Spray Starch 22-oz ........ $1.69
Generic Bleach I gallon .......... $1.69
Ariel Detergent 500-g .............. .99


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WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM 6QUALITYSTMPCARDS
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GALAXY SLICED 18 OZ
SANDWICH CHEESE... 99

WHITEWAVE 32 OZ
PLAIN/VANILLA/CHOCOLATE
SOY MILK ...... $3.19


TAMPICO


FRUIT PUNCHES


ISLAND QUEEN
FRENCH FRIES

FROSTY ACRE
MIXED
VEGETABLES


4.5 LB BAG'
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16- OZ


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CAKES .............. $3 .59
L ^* _________________________ __ _________. __


)SCAR MAYER OSCAR MAYER
BEEF WIENERS
BUN LENG
S259 *, $59
15-09Z 1 -$
DEL


WHOLE ROTISSERIE
CHICKENS $79AH

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PER-LB 991, 3/994
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SWEET RED SWEET RED GREEN OR RIPE
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THROW PILLOW COVERS
COLOR TONES BED SKIRTS
BEACH TOWELS


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rmtut 6C, 1 HUHSDAY, MAY 19, 2005


.. MOUNT TABOR

FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Wilow Tree Ave., Pinewood Gardens P.0. Bo N-9705 Tel: (242) 392-2322 Fac: f242) 392-4343
Website: www.rmountiabororg wwEeie!se!lreinistries.com Email: mtabor@baelnetb


STATION IDINTIFIAVIUN "S

Sense of the presence of God; resulted in yet another
destiny defining, life changing encounter with God that
will bless the thousands of believers that packed the
sanctuary nightly for years to come.
With another successful local undertaking under
their belt, Mount Tabor now turns its attention to their
International Walking In Victory Conference being held
May 31st June 3rd in Greensboro, North Carolina.
TO GOD BE THE GLORY!


BISHOP ELLIS TEACHES.
'Though it was an abbreviated version of this
powerful annual gathering, Mount Tabor's Station
Identification 2005 was not short of anything. Spirits
were high! The atmosphere was super charged! And the
saints were not going to be disappointed. Everything,
from the Preaching to the Praise and Worship to the min-
istry of the choir and dance was powerful, prophetic,
soul stirring, anointed and rich! In short it was another
awesome encounter with the Lord that Mount Taborites
will long cherish, remember and be blessed by.
World renowned preacher, Bishop Eddie L.
Long, Senior Pastor of New Birth Cathedral in Lithonia
Georgia, was the special Guest speaker for the two day
event, which
n was held in
the sanctu-
Sary. of
Tabor,
Monday
May 2nd
Tu esd a y
May 3rd
2005. In
two dynam-
ic, prophetic
messages,
Bishop Long
declared to
the saints
gathered;
very strate-
gic time in
their lives.
The world
he said, is
BISHOP EDDIE L. LONG PREACHES. coming into
an hour when
mankind will be awaken to the might and power of God
like never before! He further declared that this mani-
festation would be revealed through the church, as God
is calling the Body of Christ to do some unprecedented


things. He then went on to prophetically declare to
Mount Tabor that because they have been faithful, they'
are no longer getting ready for a mighty move of God -
they are ready! Ready for God to reward them for their
faithfulness and to bless them with grace and favor to
such an extent that He will be able to put them on dis-
play for his glory and his name sake.
Additionally,
each evening at
7:00pm, prior
to the worship
experience,
Bishop Neil C.
Ellis, Senior
Pastor of
Mount Tabor
presented a
powerful lec-
ture on the
"Power of the
Blood". In
'these sessions, o
Bishop Ellis
dealt with the
incredible sig-
nificance of
each time and
place that Jesus
shed his blood
and the practi- PRAISE.
cal implications
that they have for all believers, even thousands of years
later.
For so many of the saints attending Station
Identification '05; their level of confidence, assurance
and hope for the days and months ahead went to anoth-
er level, as they now know that; IT'S A NEW DAY,
IT'S PAY DAY, IT'S SHOWTIME & THEY ARE
COVERED IN THE BLOOD!
The combination of both speakers' powerful pre-
sentations, along with all of the other elements of the
services and an undeniable, at times overwhelming


THE WORD. WORSHIP.


n
E


K


I
S


T
E

R
K

11


. ... .. . . . I .. ...... ... ... ... . ... .. .. ...... . .. .. ...


..... ..... IIIIII li- -


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ii S






BThe Adventists bahamasconferenceorg
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists www.bahamasconference.org
Adetit Main ADifeene inIIII e' Ive


Parkgate Adventist Church
Celebrates 15th Anniversary
On Saturday, May 15, 2005, members and
guests of Parkgate Seventh-day Adventist
Church gathered at the church on Parkgate
Road to celebrate their 15th Anniversary. Beginning
with Sabbath School at 9:15 a.m., the programme was
inspirational, informative and entertaining.
Under the theme, "Still Holding On To His
Hands," this energetic
congregation (formerly
called Ephesus) recounted
the successes and chal-
lenges they experienced
during the fifteen years of
their existence. For the
first thirteen years of their
development, they were
Pastor Paul Scavella, the pastor of the housed on the second
Parkgate Seventh-day Adventist Church. floor of a building on the
corner of Jerome Avenue and Chesapeake. With hard
work and much faith and determination, they moved
into the Fellowship Hall of their own church building
on Parkgate Road.
During the Divine Worship, the host Pastor,
Paul A. Scavella gave a dynamic message, "Despising
Our Birthright," that captivated the attention of the
worshippers. He admonished them not to be like Esau
who gave up his birthright for a meal. We must not
give up Christ, our only hope of salvation, for any-
thing. We should accept Him as Lord and Saviour at
the earliest opportunity.
One of the special features of this service of
thanksgiving was a time for reflection. During this
time the contribution of the various pastors and local
leaders were recognized. Among these were the char-
ter members Brother and Sister Alfred Brennen,
Brother Stanley and Dr. -Ruby Major, and Pastor
Danny Major..
In spite of many changes in pastoral leadership
over the years, the church is still holding on and the
members are determined to continue to stand firmly on
Christ the solid Rock.
At the end of the service, everyone was invited
to a delicious meal prepared by members of the
church.







Every day Bernadine Archer goes somewhere
most of us would not willingly go. She enters a
'-E compound enclosed by three 12-foot chain link
fences topped with coiled razor-ribbon wire, an elec-
tronic detection system and two gun towers.
Archer, the only credentialed female prison
chaplain endorsed by the Seventh-day Adventist
church, has been ministering to 1,200 male inmates at
the Macomb Correctional Facility in New Haven,
Michigan since 1994.
As a correctional facility chaplain, Archer rep-
resents one of 30 Adventist chaplains working in pris-
ons in the United States, Canada, the Czech Republic
arid Latvia, says Martin Feldbush director of Adventist
Chaplaincy Ministries (ACM), the official organiza-
tion that endorses Seventh-day Adventist chaplains.
The first Adventist correctional chaplain was endorsed
in 1980. Prison chaplains are not only focused on lead-
ing a convict to Christ but are a key part of the reha-
bilitative effort.
.*. Archer says the system is very controlled and
regimented. She wears a silent alarm, the men have to
be escorted when they go through the building and
there's a wall-mounted alarm in the office.
How did a woman who planned on being a
teacher end up working with convicted criminals?
Archer was in her last year at Michigan State
University studying to become a teacher when she
became an Adventist. She went on to teach for six
years.
"I've never, ever asked anybody 'may I preach
at your church?' People just asked me. I learned later
on that that is an objective call from God."
"I believe that the Holy Spirit is no respecter of
persons," Archer says. "It's not the person that matters
-- it is the message. He can use females as well as
males. He spoke through a donkey. I don't think that it
matters with God."
Still, Archer understands it can be difficult for


new converts to stay on the right path after leaving I


Chr~istian 1 ulS ingingenE [To Vis1it From Jma~uic[a


. More than seventy Adventist Singing Men from the
Kencot Seventh-day Adventist Church, Jamaica, will
be in Nassau, Friday, May 20 to Sunday May 22, at
the Living Faith Seventh-day Adventist Church.
Come and be blessed with great singing and inspira-
tional messages beginning Friday night at 7:30 p.m.,


prison. Often this is because when they leave they go
back into the same environment that got them incar-
cerated in the first place. She says the main thing they
need is the support of a church home and the self-dis-
cipline to leave their bad habits behind.
She encourages the men to read a lot of spiri-
tual literature. She remembers one man who had been
reading the Desire of Ages, a book written by Ellen G.
White, one of the founders of the Adventist church. He
came to her one day and said "I've been reading about
Seventh-day Adventists and I've decided to become
one. Do you know anything about Adventists?"
She says she is happy just to plant the seeds of
faith and has been amazed by some of the men who
have developed a passion for Christ. One man in par-
ticular preached in her place one Sunday when she
was not feeling well. As she listened to him she real-
ized that he knew what he was talking about. He has
now spoken twice in her place.
Outside the prison she is working on getting a
grant to build an evangelism center and a community
center to help the homeless.
Archer says she is happy and truly enjoys her
work at Macomb. "I don't decide what I'm going to
do," she says. "I always pray and ask God what His
will is. If God says 'let's move on' He will help me to
obey."


Watch Adventist
Spotlight
Tuesdays 8:00 P.M.
Channel 12


Listen Up TV
Program
First Sunday Monthly
6:00 P.M ZNS


Bahamas Academy Old Trail Road

Early Learning Center
Now Registering Children Ages 2 to 5 Years
Call 393 8898


Saturday morning at y:i3, and Saturday afternoon at
6:00 p.m.. You will be truly blessed by the great testi-
monies, spirit-filled singing and powerful preaching.
The weekend is being sponsored by Adventist Men
Ministries of the Bahamas Conference.


BOOKS THAT CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE
For many decades, the Home Health Education
Services has been producing been producing and
promoting materials on health, education and charac-
ter-building for families. As the exclusive agent for
these book and magazine in the Bahamas, the
Adventist Book and Nutrition Center is please to
invite the public to stop by its store on Harrold Road
to view what is available. The Encyclopedia of
Heath and Education (photo on left) should be of
interest to every Bahamian family. Get this
Education and Health Library for your family. If
you are unable to come our store, a trained salesper-
son can come to your home or office and deliver the
books for you. Just call 341 2429 and ask for the
book salesperson.


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2005, PAGE 7C





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