Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00099
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: May 2, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00099
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"TRY OURE i
COOKIES .
FOR CANCER" iov',m
HIGH 82F
LOW 71F

SUN WITH
T-STORMS


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.131


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


PRICE 500


S S j 'A I


U


Teenager in


serious condition'


after attack by

masked gunmen


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE continue an
intense manhunt for two
masked gunmen who forced
their way into the home of a
sixteen-year-old girl and shot
her execution-style.
According to police the inci-
dent happened in the pre-
dawn hours of Saturday morn-
ing when the two men, one
armed with a shotgun, kicked
their way into the Prison Lane
home and asked: "Where is
the girl who goes to CR Walk-
er School?"
Police say the girl made an
attempt to run outside, but
one of the men turned the gun
on her, shooting her in the
back before fleeing the scene.
She was rushed to Princess
Margaret Hospital, where she
remains in serious condition.
Last October, the young girl
was shot by a gunman who
also fatally shot her mother as
the two got off a jitney.
Police, who are following
some leads in the incident,
have asked the press not to
release the young girl's iden-
tity as she is a minor.
Police are also investigat-
ing two armed robberies and
stabbings which occurred near


Columbus Primary. They
believe the two robberies -
within two hours6Aeh-h oth-
er might have been com-
mitted by the same two men.
The first incident happened
shortly after 4pm on Friday.
Phiscnor Franqois, a resident
of Wulff Road told police that
he had just stepped off a jitney
when he was approached by
two men, one armed with a
knife who held him up and
robbed him of $300 cash and
other personal items. They
stabbed Mr Franqois in the
stomach before fleeing the
scene. He was rushed to hos-
pital where he is listed in sta-
ble condition.
The second incident hap-
pened around 6 pm. Soniel
Thervel, a resident of Sunlight
Cottage reported that he was
walking near Columbus Pri-
mary school when he was also
approached by two men, one
armed with a knife who
robbed him of his cell phone
and hand chain before flee-
ing.
Mr Thervel was cut across
the left hand with the knife.
He was treated at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and dis-
charged.
Police investigations con-
tinue.


THE SIGNS ARE GOOD: This youngster was one of many who went on
parade yesterday for the National Youth Month Rally and March.
The annual event began at Clifford Park and made its way into the downtown area
before heading back to the starting point.


By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A HEATED argument
on Saturday between a
senior executive of the Four
Seasons Resort in Emerald
Bay, Exuma and Youth,
Sports and Culture Minister
Neville Wisdom, resulted in
a warning from the minister
that the foreign executive
will be fired and sent home
within a week, according to
reports reaching The Tri-
bune.,
Two eye-witnesses to an
altercation between Mr Wis-
dom and Four Season's Golf
Director Kipp Bates said
they are astonished by the
SEE page 11


Rocket fuel

booster behind

'crash' reports
E By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT The report
of a plane crash off Walker's
Cay Friday evening was not a
crash, but a falling fuel booster
from a Titan rocket launched
from the Kennedy Space Cen-
tre, Cape Canaveral, Florida.
Grand Cay residents reported
hearing the sound of a plane
flying over the island around
8pm. Soon after they saw an
explosion in the sky and smoke
in the area off Walker's Cay,
located just north of Grand
Bahama.
Concerned residents believed
it was a plane crash and
launched their boats in search of
the wreck. The Tribune tried to
contact the police press officer
to confirm the reports, but no
one could be reached up to
.press time late Friday evening.
When The Tribune contact-
ed Air Traffic Control at Grand
Bahama International Airport
inquiring about reports of a pos-
SEE page 11


RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
dedicated to Helping You Succeed
If you are a practising professional, or studying to become one, RBC Royal Bank of
Canada can help you with the financing you need to achieve.your goals. We offer
, operating loans, term loans and cash management services for your business. If you're still in
university we can provide an educational loan to help you with the last two years at school. 2
For more information


visit your
tRBC Royal Bank
ada branch.


www.rbcoyalbank.com/caribbean


* Reglsteed trade-malk of Royal Rank of Canada" The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC
are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


RBC
Royal Bank,
of Canada


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


Bhe AMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


II
Andrew Allen's.^

Perspecive


~I I i


shot


0













Emergency services crews




go through a testing time


* LIEUTENANT Nicole Van Meter of the 0 ALEX Acosta, of the Miami-Dade Fire Rescue
Miami-Dade Fire Rescue team simulates team, is pictured treating a teenager with gashes to
emergency treatment to Bahamian volunteer his chest and acting disoriented
Demario Barton


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
SOME of the best para-
medics from New York and
South Florida were in New
Providence over the weekend
to compete in an international
Advanced Life Support pro-
gramme that tested their skills
in a simulated emergency,
requiring them to treat five
tsunami victims.
Six teams, composed of fire-
fighters and paramedics, faced
the difficult task of properly
treating all of the victims strewn
about Arawak Cay Beach in a
12-minute timeframe, relying
only on basic medical equip-
ment and pre-existing medical
charts to assist them with their
mission.
In the scenario, a tsunami
wave had hit Nassau and three
days later a search and rescue


FLIGHT SCHEDULE: 1995.2005
DAYS: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday,Thursday & Friday

Providenciales to Nassau Nassau to Providenciales
Flight # RU401 departs I10:00am Flight # RU400 departs 12:30pm
Arrives in Nassau I :I;30am Arrives in Providenciales 2:00pm



3-day advance purchase return tickets as low as 2 3
TAXES NOT INCLUDED
Call your local travel professional for reservations and ticketing




SSKYKING
The way to fly in the TO and beyond


_team was dispatched to the
beach
The mock patients, two of
whom were Bahamian volun-
teers, included a 78-year-old
man who had been floating; two
teenagers, one with a fractured
arm, the other disoriented with
gashes to his chest; a woman
with cardiac problems; and the
most critical, a woman lying on
a stretcher underneath the
makeshift tent, accompanied by
a respiratory therapist.
The two ambulances with
medical equipment were donat-
ed by Doctors Hospital.

Scrutiny

Twelve judges closely moni-
tored the medics, who arrived
by ambulance at the scene. The
judges evaluated them on their
ability to quickly adapt to the
overwhelming situation, which
tested each team member indi-
vidually as well as the team's
ability to work together.
"You never know what to
expect," said Lieutenant Dean



ilOPI'.


Meadows, a firefighter from
Broward County. "We were
relieving another team and had
all these patients around and
medical records we were not
familiar with. Sometimes that
is how it works, you see some
pretty horrible things on this
job and you have to be able to
react instantly. You just start at
zero and do everything you are
trained to do in order to pre-
vent someone from dying. It's
tough, but I think we handled
ourselves well. It's all about
teamwork."
Dr Caroline Brunette, Med-
ical Director of the Princess
Margaret Hospital's Accident
and Emergency Department,
said people's lives often
depended on the quick reaction
and competent care of emer-
gency medical technicians and
paramedics, and teamwork is
an essential part of that care.
"It is so exciting that we have
the opportunity, in Nassau to
watch and learn how they work
together," said Dr Brunette.
"These are the best of the best
and they take this competition
very seriously. We always com-
plain of staff shortages, over-
crowding, and other problems,
but from watching these teams
at work, we are able to see how
well-trained medics can work
together to overcome obstacles,
we can learn a lot from them."


w^^Hrm^T^-----J


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


Ii iL. i nDUNit-









THE RIBUE MODAY MAY2,205, PGE


Third anniversary of 2002 election victory



Party chairman Rigby: PLP is 'still



connected to Bahamian people'


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
DESPITE the challenges the
PLP has faced in the last 36
months, the party has remained
focused on its agenda and is still
connected to the Bahamian
people, said party chairman
Raynard Rigby.
Today "'marks the third
anniversary of the party's May
2, 2002 general election victory


when it became the govern-
ment. Mr Rigby spoke with The
Tribune after a church service at
Faith United Missionary Bap-
tist Church to commemorate
the occasion yesterday. He
acknowledged that the party
has had its scandals over the
past year, which have included a
rape accusation against Cabi-
net Minister Bradley Roberts,
which was later dropped, and
the Sidney Stubbs bankruptcy


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
CHRISTIAN Council President William Thompson, at a church
service to celebrate the third anniversary of the PLP governmen-
t's May 2,2002 election victory, warned party leaders not to forget
that it was God who brought them this far.
In a hard-hitting sermon, Rev Thompson warned government
officials that those called to lead must lead.
"Some of you believe that since you are in office you don't have
to pull up your socks," he said, "but the Prime Minister has had
three years... he should know who's working, so if you wake up and
see yourself in the Punch don't be surprised ... it ain' long now."
Rev Thompson told the group that the only way they will be able
to be successful is to allow God to lead their every action. He
reminded Mr Christie that on the night he was elected, he told the
crowd at Clifford Park, that it would not be about him, it would be
about God and the people. Rev Thompson said that if Mr Christie
follows that advice, the country will be blessed with investments and
tourism.
"The journey is not about you. God will do things for the
Bahamas, but he needs praying folks. If you are anchored in God
you will be successful. God will bless you and put things in your
path."
Rev Thompson warned the PLP that once they are satisfied
that they are doing the Lord's work, they should not allow their
detractors to distract them. He said that when people are threatened
they tend to react in three ways: they retreat, they get angry, and
they attack, either directly or indirectly.
"They will call it town meetings and rallies but never allow the
enemy to get you down. Truth is deception's anecdote."
Rev Thompson told them to be like Nehemiah who worked
quietly in the night and while the enemy sleeps, "the hotels will
spring up out west."
The.gervice, held at Faith United Missionary Baptist Church, was
attended by Prime Minister Perry Christie who told the corngrega-
tion.that the party continues to work for the Bahamian people'to
ensure that no Bahamian has to live in sub-standard conditions and
to lift up the disadvantaged: It was also attended by the deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt, cabinet ministers and MPs, senators,
party officials and party stalwarts.


I he Nlall-at-Marathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM Y


MN: SIAIE OF THE UNION NEW 1:10 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:25 10:50
XXX: STATE OF THE UNION NEW 2:10 N/A 4:40 N/A 8:10 10:30
THE HITCHHICKERS NEW 1:05 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:45
KING'S RANSOM T 1:15 3:20 N/A 6:10 8:15 10:45
A LOT LIKE LOVE T 1:30 N/A 4:50 7:20 N/A 10:40
THE INTERPERTER C 1:00 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:25 10:45
KUNG FU HUSTLE CF 110 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:15 10:50
AMITYVILLE HORROR T 1:35 3:35 N/A 6:20 8:25 10:50
BEAUTY SHOP T 1:05 3:35 N/A, 6:05 8:20 10:55
GUESS WO?: T 1:15 3:20 N/A 6:05 8:30 10:55
SIN ClITYl :;' C N/A N/A N/A 7:30 N/A 10:25
ROB B 1:15 3:45 N/A N/A N/A N/A
AL 6RIVE
X t THE UNION NEW 1:15 3:50 6:30 8:30 10:30
KING'SRANSOM T 1:20 3:40 6:20 8:25 10:25
KUNG FU HUSTLE C 1:00 3:30 6:00. 8:10 10:15
AMITYVILLE HUSTLE C 1:25 3:25 6:30 8:30 10:35
BEAUTY SHOP T 1:10 3:35 6:15 8:20 10:25


6:20 N/A


USE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE TICKETS AT 380-3549 OR WWW.GALLERIACINEMAS.COM


declaration, which was later
annulled.
"In all political parties, one
understands that when one is
in government the attacks and
scandals and naysayers continue
to press on. But when you look
at the record there is compelling
argument that notwithstanding
the political challenges, we have
been focused to the agenda and
maintained the visibility in our
respective communities and
constituency branches and
remained connected to the
Bahamian people. We have
done a significant job in ensur-
ing that we continue to build
our membership and grow from
strength to strength."
Mr Rigby said Bahamians
only have to look around to see
the progress the PLP govern-
ment has made since assuming
office.
"When we look at where we
are today, given the fact that.
tourism numbers continue to
climb and $4 billion of foreign
direct investments have poured
into the country since May 2,
2002 and when you look at the
developments that will trans-
form the island communities of
Mayaguana, Crooked Island,


Grand Bahama, Exuma and
throughout the Bahamas and
when one looks at the strength
of the external reserves now
standing at $720 million, the
highest ever, the record is com-
pelling."

Repairs
Mr Rigby also pointed to the
number of low cost carriers
which now fly into the country,
the repairs to Nassau Interna-
tional Airport's main runway,
construction of homes and clin-
ics throughout the country and
the restoration of confidence in
the country abroad as further
proof of what government has
achieved.
Looking ahead to the next
year in office, Mr Rigby said
Bahamians can expect to see at
least 10,000 new jobs created as
a result of the Kernzer Interna-
tional expansion, the Cable
Beach re-development and oth-
er developments in the works
on the family islands.
On education, he said the
country can be proud because
Education Minister Alfred
SEE page 11


25% OFF NOW UNTIL
MOTHER'S DAY on entire stock
of these FABRICS


ROBOTS


(MANC 1 N/A N/A' N/A


TIFFANY&CO.








Tiffany Signature earrings and necklace in eighteen karat white gold with diamonds.
NASSAU 284 BAY STREET
PARADISE ISLAND CRYSTAl. COURT AT ATLANTIS
ABACO MARSH HARBOR
HARBOUR ISI.AND oUNMORE TOWN EXUMA EMERALI) BAY
242.302 2800

., If 7
*~ ~ ~ *;a ,: ll
.t* **, *'*** ***: .'


B~Plmn~RRr~mmn


IP
I--T-SA" -'PR- -29TH, 2005


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


Sa^


I oT m r I LI-


-., I I


";-~~


I


I


I


I









PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY2,2005TTHEHTRIBUNE


AS a small country with limited resources
the Bahamas does not have a lot to offer its
visitors. These visitors are the tourists who
come here looking for an idyllic holiday away
from the noise and bustle of life in their home
countries. Their view of our islands is impor-
tant to the future of our tourism industry and
so in this column today we are offering a few
pointers as to how visitors' first impressions
can be improved without having to spend
enormous sums of money.
First: cleanliness. It's said that cleanliness is
next to godliness, but if that is so the Bahamas
gets poor marks.
Visitors who come here love the sun, sea
and sand but usually wish they could better
enjoy their time at clean beaches clean not
only from such refuse as dirty lunch boxes
and bottles, but also from annoying beach
vendors who try to sell them anything from
hair braiding to a ride on their jet skis. There
should be little difficulty in controlling this
menace if government were more serious
about the welfare of our visitors. Tourism is
the engine that drives our economy. It should,
therefore, be protected from anything or any-
one who damages it by anti-social behaviour.
While hundreds of millions of dollars are
spent by some of our large developers to lure
visitors to the Bahamas, enough is not being
done to maintain the island's infrastructure in
an acceptable state of cleanliness and satis-
factory repair.
A constant complaint by visitors to down-
town Nassau is that there are no public
restrooms anywhere for their use. They usu-
ally end up having to ask shopkeepers to use
their facilities. This may seem like a small
matter, but if the Bahamas is to hold itself out
as something other than third world, then
suitable public conveniences for the thou-
sands of visitors to these islands should be
provided.
The same complaint is made about the
restrooms at the airport. And although some
improvements have been made in that area,
often there are problems that are not attend-
ed to and only some of the facilities are in
proper working order. The airport facilities
are also woefully short for the number of
passengers passing through, especially on
weekends.
While huge sums of money are being spent
to improve the international airport, little
seems to be done to improve the existing
facilities already there. Many complain about


the lack of variety or choices at the only
restaurant at the airport and incidentally,
the ridiculously high prices charged. Although
there was pizza on the menu one day, none
was available because the pizza machine had
broken down. How long it remained broken
we don't know.
And while we are on the subject of the air-
port, let's hope government will eventually
have two eyesores removed from the view
of visitors as they start their drive from Nas-
sau International to their luxury hotels. The
broken down and rusted remains of the old
osmosis plant has been an eyesore for sever-
al years. And just opposite that is another
building in a sad state of neglect the run-
down and abandoned gas station with its bat-
tered pumps looking like something left over
from an Iraqi battle scene.
Surely there's someone in government who
can get someone off their duffs to do some-
thing about this.
Then there are the government buildings -
or some of them at least. Inside, many could
do with a good spring clean. The lifts are
dirty and smelly in some offices. All that's
needed is a good air purifier. And outside a
coat of paint could hide the city's grime.
We don't know if government owns what
used to be the old Adderley building down-
town. But it has been abandoned or unused
for sometime and needs a good bit of restora-
tion. Part of its roof, which was damaged by
the hurricanes last year, is still badly in need
of repair.
In the old days, the little parks in down-
town Nassau were beautifully tended by the
Public Works Department. Gardeners lov-
ingly tended their plants and flowers to beau-
tify the grounds around the courthouse and
government buildings in Rawson Square, the
Public Library and Garden of Remembrance.
Years ago The Tribune published "Magic
Nassau", a daily column written by Alice
Russell, an American writer who retired to
the Bahamas. Hardly a week passed without
Mrs Russell recording a chat with these gar-
deners and extolling the magic they produced
in their gardens. Today, little if anything
seems to be done to keep our city looking
beautiful, although the Tourism Board must
be congratulated for their recent addition of
some plants and planters along the down-
town sidewalks. Let's hope this is just the
beginning of a revival to keep our Bahama-
land clean and beautiful.


Discussion





about CSME


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Keeping our Bahamaland clean


HARBOUR BAY t
(242) 394 5767
MALL AT MARATHON ,t
(242) 393 6073
ABACO (242) 367 5792
AE97


EDITOR, The Tribune

I should be grateful if you
would grant me the space to
make the following comment.
A public debate appears to
have developed around the
issue of the desirability of The
Bahamas' participation in the
Caricom Single Market and
Economy (CSME), and that is a
good thing.
I hope these thoughts add to
that emerging debate. It would
have been a great pity if The
Bahamas had slipped into an
economic arrangement with the
implications of the CSME with-
out the benefit of a debate,
which, hopefully, might help to
inform the government's ulti-
mate decision.
In point of fact, the econom-
ic argument for CSME mem-
bership has not yet been made.
The benefits now being put for-
ward as arising from the CSME
are not persuasive or especially
credible.
The presumption that CSME
membership will somehow ben-
efit the Bahamas' application
process for membership in the
World Trade Organization
(WTO) is overreach. To justify
CSME membership on the basis
that it is something of a "way-
station" toward WTO mem-
bership is extravagant.
CSME has challenges and
implications for the Bahamian
economy quite different from
anything presented by WTO.
CSME must stand on its own
merit. And only after it passes
that test would any dubious
benefit to the WTO member-
ship application process enter
into consideration.
The justification that CSME
membership creates additional
leverage for the Bahamas in
international affairs is worthy
of some consideration. There is
clearly an advantage to be
gained by the countries of,Cari-
com if they are able to speak as
one in matters of international
affairs.
This has clearly got to be
preferable to a disparate, unco-
ordinated effort from each of
them. But there is no logical rea-
son why this cooperation can-
not emanate from Caricom as
it now exists. There is absolute-
ly no reason whatsoever for this
international cooperation to
require the economic integra-
tion anticipated by the CSME.
The benefit arising from an
expansion of the capital mar-
ket is clearly a desirable objec-
tive. It is difficult to argue
against it. But this does not
require CSME membership. All
that is required is relaxation of
the controls on the Capital
Account in the Exchange Con-
trol Regulations on outward
investment, and a modification
of public policy on inward
investment.
This, of course, would not


limit the expansion to Caricom
countries, but everyone would
likely agree that such a limita-
tion would make no sense at
all.
The Bahamas could now ben-
efit from a phased relaxation of
the controls on the Capital
Account of the Balance of Pay-
ments. Presumably the author-
ities are presently considering
this.
There is no reason, however,
to connect this to CSME
membership. What prevents
Trinidadian insurance compa-
nies from freely entering the
Bahamas or Bahamian compa-
nies from freely entering
Trinidad are exchange control
regulations and public policy
which could both be changed
without signing on to CSME.
So even where the benefits
which are presumed to arise
from CSME membership are
themselves desirable objectives,
there is absolutely no basis in
logic to necessarily associate
their achievement with CSME
membership. The rationale for
imposition of the economic
overlay on what already exists
in Caricom has certainly not
been made from a Bahamian
perspective.
To begin with, the rationale
for economic integration needs
to be made on the basis of eco-
nomic trade or the potential for
economic trade.
As a practical matter this
basis does not exist. Unless the
pattern of trade has changed
fundamentally in the last three
years, less than 1 per cent of
legitimate imports to the
Bahamas comes from Caricom
countries and less than 1 per
cent of exports goes to, such
.countries. It,would be more..
than an exaggeration 'to
attribute economic significance'
to an economic union based on
this. And CSME is an econom-
ic union.
Until quite recently the devel-
opment model of the Bahamas
differed considerably from that
of the other Caricom countries.
It is still different from the
development model followed
by most of them.
Although impending devel-
opments such as WTO acces-
sion for the Bahamas may


We must face Haitian situation


EDITOR, The Tribune

JEFFREY Cooper is not
alone in his view of the Hait-
ian problem. There is also a
large growing population of
Haitians in Nassau, creating
the same third world condi-
tions he sees in Abaco.s
It is not the same as it was
years ago, they are becoming
increasingly aggressive and I
think we need to clear all the
islands of them, not just Aba-
co. After having a number of
experiences of being cussed
by them and being told that
our government cannot do
anything about them, I feel
like a second-class citizen in
my own country.
We pay the taxes that pro-
vide the medical care and
schools which they benefit
from and yet they have an atti-
tude towards Bahamians.
Enough is enough. We as
Bahamians, black and white,


need to stand up against this
or there will be nothing left of
our beautiful country for our
children.
Do not let them fool you.
They are not as peaceful as
everyone thinks, just look at
the news where they tried to
barricade our police from per-
forming their duty. That is not
the Bahamian way of doing
things; that happens in Haiti. I
would like to know how they
are screened when they arrive
here. Do we really know how
many of them have criminal
records or military back-
grounds?
If their numbers continue
to increase we may have a
serious problem on our hands,
we may indeed have to fight
for our rights as Bahamians
and our country.

J SMITH
Nassau,
April 19 2005


June August 2005 3 Locations
INCLUDES

> Airfare Nassau/Havana return, meeting at airport, transfers
to Camp.
> Airconditioned dormitory accommodation, dining room
offering 3 main meals per day plus morning and afternoon
snacks
> Excursions to nearby places of interest
> Close supervision (1 Monitor to 10 Campers); Nurse on
duty at all times
> Special rates for parents at nearby hotels

Cost of 2 week stay: $625 under 12 years;
12 years plus $725

HAVE A GREAT VACATIONI!
Call ILR Grosvenor Academy Bahamaas
Tel: 323-2078 Fax: 323-6914 E-Mail: ilr@batelnet.bs


enhance the prospects for eco-
nomic convergence, there is still
sufficient divergence in eco-
nomic circumstances between
the Bahamas and the rest of
Caricom that it is generally
accepted that CSME member-
ship for the Bahamas is only
feasible with The Bahamas
exclusion from certain key pro-
visions of the CSME.
This is itself an acknowledg-
ment of the need for greater
economic convergence to occur
in order to add integrity to the
notion of economic integration.
Why The Bahamas' participa-
tion in CSME should precede
this greater convergence is
unclear.
Furthermore these exclusions
(or exemptions if you prefer)
reinforce the perception that
the initiative is driven by fac-
tors other than economics. Why
an economic arrangement
should be pursued so vigorous-
ly for other than economic con-
siderations is also unclear.
It may therefore be more
than coincidental that the
nascent debate is so far being
driven by the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs with no obvious
assistance from ministries and
public institutions more direct-
ly concerned with economics
and finance.
If now we are overwhelmed
by this idea of CSME regardless
of its" economic insignificance,
and if we are moved to sign on
to it, then there is nothing more
to say than that we should be
certain that we, and only we,
decide when our exemptions
from the troublesome provisions
of CSME fall away.
Clearly they must remain as
long as there is such significant
divergence between our eco-
nomic circumstance and that of
the rest of Caricom. Only then it
may be tolerable for us to enter
into an arrangement which has
no intrinsic value for us, but
-whose potential disadvantages
'we hopetobe' able to manage.
It is the right conclusion, how-
ever, that for the Bahamas there
is no obvious benefit arising
from CSME membership which
could not otherwise be
achieved. Since the potential
risk is so worrisome, it is diffi-
cult to understand why the right
decision on CSME membership
should be difficult to make.

WILLIAM C ALLEN
Nassau
April 26 2005


Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978


DON STAINTON
(PROTECTION) LTD.
HILLSIDE PLAZA THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 2,2005, PAGE 5


LNG


plants:


why


not?


TODAY, many Bahami-
ans have a conditioned
hostile response to any foreign-
originated initiative that is
expressed as an acronym. The
current debates over whether to
join CSME and whether to
approve LNG projects in The
Bahamas are no exceptions, with
public opinion mutely sceptical
in both cases.
In the case of the proposed
LNG facilities, what stands out
first and foremost in the public
mind is the spectre of either a cat-
astrophic accident or ongoing
environmental degradation.
These are serious considerations
and ones which seem, in part at
least, to have influenced policy-
makers in nearby Florida not to
approve such facilities in their
waters.
Of course, nobody knows as
yet the exact impact that a leak or
explosion would have on our


PERSPECTIVES


ANDR EW

many of the most stable regions
of the world.
For all these reasons, natural
gas in its liquefied form is now
the fastest growing component of
primary energy consumption in
the world. This has naturally led
to a boom in many developing
countries that are fortunate
enough to have discovered large
reserves in their territory.
Trinidad, which has long led
this region in the production of
crude oil and petrochemicals, only
seriously began exploitation of its
natural gas fields in the mid-
1990's. Today, it is the number
one provider of natural gas to the
United States market, and has


"Natural gas in its liquefied
form is now the fastest growing
component of primary energy
consumption in the world. This
has naturally led to a boom in
many developing countries that
are fortunate enough to have


discovered large
their territory."


marine environment. And
nobody knows for sure whether
hosting such a facility would
indeed attract the attentions of
those intent on harming the Unit-
ed States by disrupting its econo-
my (although the latter argument
is somewhat self-defeating, since
presumably any successful
transnational enterprise in The
Bahamas would raise such a risk).
Clearly, however, there is a risk.
But we also know.that natural
gas is increasingly the preferred
new energy source among gov-
ernments and consumers in the
most advanced countries. We also
know that, of all the fossil fuels, it
is considered the cleanest, safest
and least destructive to the envi-
ronment. And, unlike oil, the geo-
graphic distribution of'it occur-
rence does not seem to have been
planned by a warmonger. In fact,
it exists in large quantities in



TV 13SHDL


6:30
7:30
11:00
12noon
12:03
12:30
12:58
1:00
1:30
1:58
2:00
2:30
3:00
4:00
4:30
4:58 & 30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:25
6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30
8:45
9:00
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
1:30


MONDAY
MAY 2
Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
Community Page 1540AM
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update Live
Caribbean Today News Update
Immediate Response
Caribbean Today News Update
Health For The Nation
News Makers
Caribbean Today News Update
Mr. Ballooney B.
Treasure Attic
Gospel Video Countdown
Lisa Knight & The Roundtable
Cybernet
ZNS News Update LIVE
Caribbean Newsline
Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
AES OCEAN LNG Special
Life Line
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
You & Your Money
Island Live Destinations
Contact Magazine
Legends From Whence We
Came: Al Jarrett
Sports Lifestyles: Sammy Sosa
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Comm. Page 1540AM


reserves in


reached out to regional countries,
such as Jamaica, for the con-
struction of pipelines to new mar-
kets nearer to home.
While in our case, the propos-
als being considered would make
us a transshipment point, rather
than a producer, many of the
same benefits would accrue. And
it is to Minister Leslie Miller's
credit that he, unlike so many
Bahamian businessmen and
politicians, sees in this energy
source not merely an opportunity
to generate jobs and revenues,
but also to transform our own
primeval energy generation
arrangements.
These proposals give The
Bahamas an opportunity to sub-
stantially diversify its econorfiic
base, to raise revenues and to
upgrade its own energy market
by ending its reliance on petrole-
um generators, with their filthy
emissions and vulnerability to oil
price fluctuations. (It is in this
regard laughable that the envi-
ronmental lobby seems to sug-
gest that the status quo is health-
ier for the environment than a
move to LNG).
Successive governments have
"talked up" the idea of diversi-
fying the national economy, and
have seemed as if they really
meant it. Now that a good oppor-
tunity to do so has at last arrived,
it would be truly foolhardy to let
it go without exhausting every
possible means of making the
proposals safe.
It is therefore fitting that we
approach the matter of LNG
plants in The Bahamas with the
inclination to approve them, so
long as we can do so on our
terms. If there are possible risks,
then let us know them, so that we
can decide for ourselves how to
handle or contain them (by, for
instance, passing first class legis-
lation to regulate LNG facilities,
and subjecting them to regular
inspections by trained Bahamian
inspectors).

FO N AN.EVC
Fetlie,Fniie


ALLEN

What many of us need to
understand is that this is a world
in which risk and opportunity
tend to be different sides of the
same currency.
No progress was ever made
without risk. Someone, for
instance, took a particularly large
risk when they decided to move
away from the safe but slow cer-
tainty of donkey power and to
electricity.
Likewise, the mentality that
just shrugs and says "if the great
USA can't handle the risk enough
to allow such plants in Florida"
then we shouldn't touch it, may
pride itself on its certainty of
avoiding risk, but must take cred-
it too for the sad record of colo-
nial mediocrity that straddled this
country for so many centuries.
So why is Florida not confi-
dent enough of its ability to han-
dle such plants in its own waters?
Who knows?
But you only have to look at
the difference between the dam-
age done to homes in The
Bahamas and Florida by the same
hurricane to know that some risks
are managed better on this side of
the straits.
CSME: WHY?

W hile Leslie Miller con-
tinues to make the
case for the LNG plants, our oth-
er lobbyist/Minister Fred Mitchell
takes an increasingly eager posi-
tion on our joining the Caribbean
Single Market and Economy.
However, the case this minister
makes is in no way convincing to
manly thinking Bahamians.
The first thing that we need


to ask when deciding on the desir-
ability of joining the CSME is
"how would it involve anything
different from our current Cari-
corn membership?" To date, what
we have heard from Minister
Mitchell and his colleagues in
government is that, on account
of certain exceptions that our gov-
ernment would insist on, our
membership of CSME would
involve no substantial changes to
the areas that are of most con-
cern to Bahamians.
These areas include immigra-
tion, the right of establishment
and the prospect of an eventual
single currency.


As for issues of the trade in
goods and services, this trade cur-
rently accounts for so small a per-
centage of the Bahamian total
that any benefit that may accrue
would be marginal.

All of this leads the
thinking observer to
wonder what motivation we could
possibly have to change the pre-
sent status quo in favour of a clos-
er theoretical union that is basi-
cally denuded of all its meaningful
content.
Could there be pressure from
the other members to either join


the CSME or forfeit our mem-
bership of Caricom? This seems
unlikely.
Clearly, Minister Mitchell has
a lot more talking to do to if he is
to make a coherent (much less a
convincing) case for our joining a
nominally economic union on
terms that would spare us the
application of its most important
provisions.
Fortunately for the cause of
CSME (and for all our edifica-
tion), we have in Mr. Mitchell a
minister who seems to like one
thing even more than the
prospect of CSME membership:
the sound of his own voice.


NOE ZNS-TV 13 reserves1P7
th.rgt o ae.as int


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre ( "h
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


C


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 2,2005 THE TRIBUNE


Up to 95% financing
Terms up to 35 years
Interest rate as low as 7.75% for
mortgage and 8.25% for lots
Reduced commitment fees
Pre-approved credit card for
approved applicants
Refinancing of existing mortgages
Equity financing
Interest only for first three months
of mortgage if desired by client
Financing available for closing
costs and legal fees
Financing available for purchase
of furniture


up to
0%/ Fast Loan
Approval

S* Fast
Closings

SNo
Application
Fees






www.combankltd.comrn
"Leader in Personal Banking Services"


Man jailed after


fifing pistol shots


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A 35-year-old
Freeport man was sentenced to
a year at Fox Hill Prison for
firearm possession.
Kevin Wilkinson, of 83
Explorer's Way, appeared
before Magistrate Subu Swain-
Lasalle on Friday. He pleaded
guilty to possession of an unli-
censed .380 semi-automatic pis-
tol.
According to reports, at
2.15pm on April 27 police
received reports from several
residents of Fawcett Lane and
Grenfell Avenue that a man
was standing in the street firing
shots in the air from a handgun.
Police were dispatched to
Fawcett Lane, where they spot-


ted a man fitting the descrip-
tion given by residents. An
unloaded .380 firearm was
retrieved by police.
Wanted
Police are still searching for
22-year-old Damian Stuart, who
is wanted for questioning in
connection with the murder of
Terrance Bowles of Pinder's
Point.
Bowles was shot and killed
at Garden Villas on April 26.
Stuart, a resident of 4 Grenfell
Avenue, is considered armed
and extremely dangerous.
It is believed that money may
have been the motive for the
shooting.
Police have launched an


intense search for Stuart, who
has a dark brown complexion
and short, black hair worn in
the Rasta style. He is about 5ft
9in tall, of medium build and
weighs about 195 pounds.
Persons are asked to contact
the police in Grand Bahama at
350-3106, 352-9774/5, or 911 or
Crime Tipsters at 352-1919. In
Nassau at 328-8477, or 322-2561,
or 919.


-am
-

-~ *
--- **


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


..-.-.




-do- d *
-- qb NO- ,
A-WNW low
*,


-


"Voted The brand-new Subaru WRX is now
on display only at TyreFlex.
Motor Week The WRX is a super sport car with
2004 a 227 hp high boost turbo
boxer engine.
Driver's All-wheel drive with vented disc
Choice brakes. This car moves!
All Subaru models are backed by a
Award" 2 year 24,000 mile warranty.





Our parts department is fully stocked, with every component to ensure
that your Subaru runs trouble free. Trained technicians on duty.


Your car.


Your trust.


Our responsibility


Brake Service Suspension Aillgnment Ehaus

Oil, Lube I Fller "OODYER TM ES"


*American I Imorted Cars Light Trucks Vans a SUV's
Complete Inspeclion I Estimates before we start the work
2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE TO-----

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941

Open: Monday Saturday
8am.5pm

Fax 326-4865 P. 0. Box SS-6166 Nassau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS *

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


C 0 MM 0 NW E AL T H B A NK I Mrtgag Loan


PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE'


lgl












Jamaican PM deserves much praise



KA .00uht a.


- U


0 w .0-


- -,g -


4U
- U~ --..
- -q -


V--..ME
4w
w.


- -~ -


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Ono-
.0. 4.

-O O
0


- -~ -


Phone: 323-3460
Montrose Avenue & Oxford Street 2 Doors North Of Multi Discount Furniture
Children's Clothing, Shoes, Socks, -lair
J-ccessories, lUndergarments, Toys, etc




COME HELP US CELEBRATE!!


Saw I STORE WIDE


APRIL 29th


- MAY 7th


S -


t


-.5 -
- U--
- S -


- -- S
U


-- .5


C -


-


- -


-e -


- a


Looking for


Japanese used


cars?


Check out our SUV's


Check our prices



Before Buying


at


Bahamas Bus & Truck


We have various makes

call:


1I'b

- -
S *


- anu


- -a-
C U
~

* C


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 7


f o


o


- Ab









PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 2,2005 THE TRIBUNE


Ike Mother 's Day Extra Special

With a gift from Lowe's Pharmacy


J family Pflamacy
HARBOUR AY TOWN CENTRE SOLDIER ROA PAMW DALE
0 J393.81 1O5-648 394.6 12 32248594
I e am:0pm fOA=p 8am-8rm BiamS;30pm r
Ive care .ibout I/our 3aft& h


Discipline must


* By DION A. FOULKES
Former Minister of
Education, Youth
and Sports
THE goals of educating our
youth, decreasing school violence
and developing the Bahamas in
an orderly manner will remain a
distant illusion if we do not main-
tain discipline in our schools.
Our approach to discipline
must be comprehensive, balanced
and assertive. Simplistic respons-
es or vague intuitions do not pro-
vide us with the arsenal of ideas,
programmes and initiatives need-
ed to make our children safe, our
schools secure and our streets
crime-free.
A comprehensive approach
requires us to ask a crucial ques-
tion: what is the purpose of disci-
pline? Discipline is not an end in
itself. We don't seek to cultivate
discipline just for the sake of dis-
cipline. Discipline is always a
means, an instrument, or a way of
achieving other goals or ends.
Students who excel in the
National Spelling Bee discipline
themselves in order to improve
their language skills and compete
with other spellers. Athletes
endure long hours of discipline
to harness their bodies and
become golden girls and boys
whether or not they achieve
Olympic glory.
A student who spends months
mastering masonry skills does so
in order to become an accom-
plished artisan.
A ninth-grader who abstains
from sexual intercourse in order
to graduate has a larger vision of
her life beyond high school. An
11th grader who refuses to use
drugs may see a long distance
goal of becoming a master
mechanic some day and owning a
garage.
And a 12th grader about to
graduate and attend COB may
refuse to carry a weapon but find
other means of resolving conflicts


Former minister on helping


our youth achieve goals


with his peers. His goal is to grad-
uate from college and serve his
country as a Defence Force offi-
cer.
We will never reduce violence
and cultivate discipline in our
schools if we do not help our
youth create larger visions and
purposes for their lives. We must
not only help show them how to
make a living; we must help show
them how to make a life worth
living.
A programme of strong disci-
pline must be built on a compre-
hensive vision for education. In
essence we must insist on disci-
pline so our youth can achieve
the goals of competence, charac-
ter, and citizenship.

Competence
To be competent in today's
world, students must have the
academic, technical, vocational
and associated skills which will
allow them to pursue careers and
vocations which provide them
.with personal fulfilment and a
means of enhancing our national
life.


Madeir
322-7
Robinso
322-3


But these skills will only be
passed on if classrooms, labs and
workshops are really places of
learning and not day care cen-
tres. The only way our youth will
become competent entrepre-
neurs, professionals, workers or
public servants is through learn-
ing. And they will only learn well
if there is discipline in the class-
room.
Classrooms are centres of
learning when students and teach-
ers agree on a contract of mutual
preparation: teachers must be
prepared to teach and students'
must be prepared to learn.
Schools with unprepared and
lax teachers and administrators
are danger zones. In classrooms
where teachers are firm and
where challenging lessons are
planned, discipline problems are
at a minimum. Alternatively, dis-
cipline breaks down very quickly
when students do not feel
engaged by the class material
and/or the teachers.
But no matter how well pre-
pared a teachers is, a student must
also be prepared to learn.
Research shows that many.stu-


Bay
23
Mall
46


Starting Monday 25th April.
All Locations

~I 10% OFF,~~~
THE SKETCHER'S ATHLETIC LINE
MEN'S WORK BOOTS.
20% OFF
SMEN'S, LADIES AND CHILDREN'S DRESS
& CASUAL SHOES & SANDALS
ALL LADIES BAGS & SCHOOL BAGS.
50% OFF
SELECTED SHOES I
Proudly Serving the Bahamian People since 1974.


* 1 Courier


1 Sales Executive/Business
Development Manager


Please Fax Your Resume To 393-4570
Or Drop Off At Global United's
Claridge Road Office


a Plaza Harbour
7647 393-69
inRoad Marathon
3213 393-414

Shoes and Clothing for the Entire Family.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 9


be maintained in our schools


dents are unprepared to learn
because they lack the basic liter-
acy necessary for the learning
process to occur.
A great deal of indiscipline or
students acting up in class is
because they lack basic reading,.
writing and comprehension skills.
Additionally, our students also
require basic skills in math.
In essence we will dramatical-
ly reduce indiscipline and increase
learning by pursuing two ambi-
tious goals. We must rethink our
teacher training and retraining
programmes to help teachers with
the content they will teach and
the methods they use to teach.
Our first line of offence and
defence must be capable, engaged
and creative teachers who teach
so well that many discipline prob-
lems never come up in the first
place.
Secondly, we must launch the
most ambitious literacy and
numeracy programmes in our
nation's history. We will never
get a handle on discipline if stu-
dents cannot take part in the most
basic activities which occur in the
classroom.
Our literacy programme must
be multi-faceted and must take
place in every subject matter. In
every class, from science to his-
tory, a premium must be placed
on ensuring that our children
become literate.
While we pursue these long-


term goals, we cannot ignore the
need for short and medium term
responses to discipline and school
violence, including, but not limit-
ed to, character formation and
development

Character

Our educational system must
also be a place where we help to
form the character of our young
people. It is not enough for our
children to be technically or aca-
demically competent.
Character formation gives
them a sense of how to use wise-
ly the knowledge they have
gained.
Learning how to make money
is necessary, but learning how to
use wealth wisely is a matter of
character. Being a good mechan-
ic is good for the country, but
being a thorough and honest
mechanic is even better.
Character formation is about
pursuing basic values and virtues
which should guide our lives.
Character is about basic ethics
and personal development; it is
about individual responsibility. It
is about the kind of people we
want our children to become.
Schools help to develop char-
acter in collaboration with par-
ents, the church and other groups
and institutions in society.
A central tool for character


development is a school's formal
discipline policy and code of con-
duct. We must ensure that these
are uniform throughout the
school system and that they are
enforced with consistency.
We must emphasise the
rewards which come with good
discipline while enforcing the
penalties which come with bad
behaviour. Our suspension and
expulsion policies must be
strengthened and applied with
vigour when and where neces-
sary.
We must also review the effec-
tiveness of our programme
SURE. I think it is an excellent
programme that should be reor-
ganised, properly funded and
expanded. We must be careful
not to duplicate the efforts and
mandate of this programme with
that of other programmes in the
Ministry of Youth and Sports.
Although the Andros youth
programme is to be praised, a co-
ordinated and comprehensive
approach should be formulated.
The amalgamation of YEAST,
Programme SURE and the
Andros Project would produce
better results. We must boost the
literacy and learning component
of these programmes while
reviewing its character education
component. Further, similar pro-
grammes for girls must be
designed.
Now is the time to develop a


more comprehensive character
education programme for all
schools which will take the best
practices from various youth pro-
grammes such as church-based
programmes, the Governor Gen-
eral's youth programme and oth-
er initiatives which have been
demonstrated to work.
Our national character educa-
tion programme should be inte-
grated into every aspect of our
schools from athletics to the class-
room.
Character education pro-
grammes include everything from
school clubs to family life educa-
tion to exciting youth develop-
ment activities, including the use
of the performing arts in the
learning process.
Such programmes may provide
alternatives to violence, drug and
alcohol use and early sexual activ-
ity; boost a young person's sense
of self worth; and instil life-long
virtues and values.
We must also work to enhance
school safety and security.
Attacks on teachers, administra-
tors, staff, and fellow students
must be met with the strongest
of responses. Adequate monitor-
ing of school premises is also a
priority.
The placement of armed
policemen in our schools is a step
in the wrong direction. Schools
should always be a place of learn-
ing and hot an armed fortress.


What do the police intend to do
with their guns? The regular secu-
rity guards who are trained in
dealing with students are the
proper enforcement agents.
There is a shortage of security
guards in all of our schools. The
ratio of security guards to stu-
dents is far too low. More trained
security guards must be hired now
if we are going to reduce school
violence in the short term.
Additionally, school adminis-
trators should continue to be
mandated to spend a larger part


of their time out of their offices
and on the campus. This will help
in maintaining order in schools.
While character development
is about individual responsibili-
ty, citizenship formation is about
social responsibility. The ques-
tion here is an age-old one: Not
what we can do for our young
people, but what they can do for
their country.
While community service pro-
grammes have been launched in

SEE page 10


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THE MOST THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB IS FREE!
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.
Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.
Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone
Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
Restoration & Care

Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS ROHM SYSTM (m)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
wwmv.prochemsystem.com www.stonetethpro.comn www.iicrc.org
*psp@coralwave.com









PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005 THE TRIBUNE

*LOANEBB


FROM page nine

our schools, they need to be deep-
ened and broadened. Communi-
ty service and service-learning
(ensuring that community service
has an academic component)
must be a requirement in order to
graduate.
We must launch the most
ambitious community service pro-
gramme in our nation's history.
While I applaud the National
Youth Service Programme for
some of our youth, it must be
expanded. Accordingly, I propose
a comprehensive community ser-
vice programme for all students.
Community service must not
be seen as something just for stu-
dents at risk or young men in
trouble. This tends to give a neg-
ative focus to the concept of ser-
vice. Service is not something you
should be doing because you're in
trouble at school. Rather, it
should be done because it is noble
and idealistic.
We must give all of our youth
an opportunity to have genuine
self-esteem by doing something
good for their country.
A young woman who has just
worked for four hours on a clean-
up campaign will stop her friends
from littering that beach. A young
man who has stayed behind after
school to build toys for children in
need, doesn't have time to fight
on the way home from school. A
group of young people who regu-
larly visit an old age home will
be less inclined to harass the
elderly.
Community service pro-,
grammes reduce indiscipline and,
violence by not simply providing
alternatives, but by giving young
people a broader vision of life
and how they can transform their
community and themselves by'
taking positive action.
Young people are naturally
idealistic. Creative avenues:
through which they can serve and'
contribute should be made avail-
able to them.
Sometimes the best discipline
a human being can have is the:
discipline of helping others. If:
you're busy building up our soci-
ety, you have neither the time nor
inclination to tear it down.

Conclusion

These are just a few thoughts,
for a general framework in which'
we can respond to the need for
better discipline in our schools.,
They are not exhaustive, but they,
may assist in areas which we can
help our youth to develop. I hope,
they help to foster continued dis-
cussion.
Though we made considerable,
progress during the FNM's time!
in government, we know there is
much more work to be done. I
will continue to applaud the pre-
sent government on advances
they make.
Likewise, I will call their atten-
tion to areas in which reform is
lacking or has been stalled. Let
us continue to work together to
cultivate our students so they may
become more competent citizens
of character.








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 11


LOCANW


FROM page one

"harsh and unfair" treatment
that Mr Wisdom received.
However, up to press time
neither Mr Wisdom nor Mr
Bates could be contacted for
comment.
Four Seasons' General Man-
ager Antoine Chahwan,
although declining to comment
on the incident, said the Four
Seasons is dedicated to its mot-
to, which is to treat all persons
in a manner to which they them-
selves would want to be treated.
"We try to exceed their expec-
tations," said Mr Chahwan, "our
hospitality is the best in the
world; it is not just courteous,
but it exceeds the standard of
courtesy that one would nor-
mally expect."
He said Four Seasons, which
has been in business for 40
years, built its reputation on
hospitality, and there was no
reason to change. "Hospitality is
our business," he said.
Mr Chahwan said that
Bahamians are frequent and
welcome visitors to the resort.
People come, not only from the
Bahamas, but from all over the
world, and they are all treated
equally with a great deal of
respect whether they be guests,
managers, staff or whatever
position they hold, he said. He
said that anything that fell below
Four Season's Hospitality stan-
dards would be dealt with.
According to sources Mr Wis-
dom and his wife were in Exu-
ma for the George Town Regat-
ta. They were with other digni-
taries, including the Prime Min-
ister, attending a function held
at Four Seasons.
One of the sources confirmed
that Mr Wisdom and his wife
were interested in playing a
round of golf before going to



Rigby

FROM page three

Sears has put an end to, the
practice of social promotion.
He added that the Govern-
ment Scholarship pro-
gramme is now showing a
profit of $1 million despite
it being bankrupt when the
PLP government took office.
He added that the Minister's
book club has generated
tremendous literacy aware-
ness as the government con-
tinues its efforts to prepare
young people for the coun-
try's future.


Wisdom warning after row


the George Town Regatta with
the rest of the group.
A Four Seasons employee
confirmed that the rate for 18-
holes for a non-resort guest is
$135, or a late afternoon twi-
light rate of $105. The employee
confirmed that the resort
accepts walk-ins and the only
restriction imposed for non-
guests is that they are not
allowed to use the practice
range unless they have paid for
a game of golf.
According to one of the
sources, Mr Wisdom and his
wife introduced themselves to
the golf attendant in the Golf
Shop, and inquired about a dis-
count.
The attendant said she had to
check with her boss, who in turn
asked General Manager
Antoine Chahwan, who agreed
to the discount.
"When Mr Bates heard about
what was going on he personal-
ly came into the golf shop and
told the attendant not to give
Mr Wisdom any discount," the
eyewitness claimed. "Mr Wis-
dom was calm at first and said
'Don't you know who I am, I
am the Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture, the Hon-
ourable Neville Wisdom, I don't
normally have to pay at all on
any golf course in the country'."
The eye-witness said Mr
Bates response was: "I don't
care who you are, you still have
to pay the full price."


Booster

FROM page one

sible crash, officials were not
aware of any crash taking
place.
On Saturday morning
Supt Basil Rahming made
some inquiries into the mat-
ter.
He was informed by offi-
cials at Miami Control Cen-
tre that a rocket had been
launched from their base
around the same time resi-
dents reported seeing a
plane crash.
A spokeswoman believes
that residents may have seen
the booster's debris fall from
the rocket.
She also explained that
flames are often seen dur-
ing the booster fall off
sequence.


Both sources said that an
argument between the two men
became very heated.
According to the sources the
Minister had been willing to pay
the full rate, but said he felt
extremely insulted by the way
he and his wife had been treat-
ed.
They claimed that when Mr
Bates cursed, the Minister said:
"Look man, you are in my coun-
try and you are going to row
with me a minister of the
Bahamian government. Young
man, you have one week to pack
your stuff."
The eyewitnesses said that


although the argument did not
become a physical fight, it came
very close, and continued
between the two men even after
Mr Wisdom had left the golf
shop.
The source claims Mr Wis-
dom then told Mr Bates: "I am
going to look into this matter
expeditiously. We have golf pros
here, I don't even know what
you are still doing here.",
The Minister soon left the
property, but before leaving the
eyewitnesses reported that he
told the Director of golf that the
complaints government had
heard about mistreatment by


the resort's foreign executives
against Bahamians would seem
to be true as he and his wife had
just experienced it first hand.
"The entire resort is talking
about it, something needs to be
done," said an employee. "We
are Bahamians, we deserve to
be treated with respect, espe-
cially someone of Mr Wisdom's
status."
Last year The Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union claimed that racial ten-
sions existed at the Emerald
Bay resort.
The union issued a press
release, which claimed that


Bahamian workers were
subjected to "apartheid" condi-
tions.
Former general manager
Ramesh Sadhwani denied these
charges. In a statement, issued
at the time, he said:
"We would not be in busi-
ness very long if we treated
employees unfairly. And we are
not about to undermine a $320
million investment by operating
in a manner other than what is
unexpected of us."
The 183-room Four Seasons
resort with 487 employees, rep-
resents the largest investment
in the Exumas.


WALKER'S INDUSTRIES LTD.

#26Es S.'I


Mother's Day is Sunday, May 8th


GET MORE FOR LESS


no membership required

C R D I C R S C C P E D IF* A R S V IL B L


I,)


P11-41full'IES -14 P S

MOTHER 'S DAY PHONE SALE

10% OFFALL PHONES OVER $200








THE TRIBUNE
.^..Y,..- ............ ... ... .,..,. .. . ,.-. ............. "I.--. ,. ., ............. ....,.... ^.,. ^ ., ^


PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005






SMore


Important



Facts

You Should Know About


I 0 F b OA4 Ci 'V


5.ljow willii dea6 4OC;- h Mangroves and
'bon s' I
Contrary to prevalent rumors, Joe's Creek, the mangroves and the
mo : meray:ybnefish flats will: qj_ t altered by devel-
opment. The Joe's Creek area is the centerpiece of a 70-acre preserve
which will be set aside by the developer. The preserve will be establisheI
to forever maintain the land in its current natural state. The general
public will continue to have access to this preserve area for crabbing
and other uses consistent with the environmental sensitivity of the area. A
developer-funded interpretive center, public trail system and 5-acre
public beach p9rk'ill provide restroo fsRI P Iplic dock for
small crafthl'h preserve will be governed by an independent foundation
madqefrepresentatives from the College of the Bahamas, Bahama
W WIustand the University of Miami. .


uana Cay, T*..
Ba r's Bay Golf and Ocean Club, l6dated on the north|
end of Great Guana Cay in the Abd654Hlflcompris r
ex Jisite residential community of 585 stunning beachfo
a oceanview acres, 248 custormtlrer.sitend84-hi
en Jsingle-family developer resideKe6r6ie^J lhler
als includes a 28 villa hotel, private golf club, 18-hole To
Fa i designed private golf course and a 33-acre marina
vill A e with a180.-slip marina. In addition 70 acres of envir
m tal Preserve will be administered by the Bahamas lNa
tio I Trust and a 5 acre beach park with r strooms, gaze
an public dock for small wate r4.ia.ill, y and the
be ches will remain open to alf6hamia

1. s the developer, Discovery Land Company, had any previous
ex rience developing on an island or other environmentally sensitive,
ar ?
Di >very Land.Company's commitment to environmentally sensitive
d /lopment is best highlighted by our existing projects. Whether d
op ng along North Carolina mountain trout streams or the Hawaii c
lin iscovery Land Company projects have consistently beep am, o
thl ost environmentally aware and conscious.


2. \w is the silt and turbidity being handled during the constriof
th marina?
Be t anagement practices will be employed during constru6Eton of
m ri a to guard against adverse environmental impacts. Constructis
pr ices will include sediment control during excavations and cle
av iJance of discharges to water bodies, use of excavated soils to
on se wherever practicable, and use of turbidity barrierssuch asc t
cu trins and containment barriers. Further, floating turbidity barrie rA
b E nployed during all dredging and marine construction. The pr
ha aken the additional precaution of committing to a water qua
m n toring plan. During construction, water quality measurements wil b
tal twice daily and, if any problem arises, work will cease immedia l
un il e problem is corrected.


3. %, you keep the marina from becoming dirty and endangering th

It is vitally important that the Baker's Bay Marina is constructed and operated
to the highest possible environmental standards. To that effect, the develop-
ers have committed to United States' EPA standards for marina flushing.
Individual boat docks will be fitted with sewer pump stations to connect
sewage to the main treatment facility. Fuel operations will be situated outside
the marina at the primary logistics dock. The Baker's Bay Marina will be the
first in The Bahamas to be certified as a "Blue Flag" operation, which is a new
set of criteria recently adopted by the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism. The
award of a Blue Flag marina is based on compliance with 22 criteria covering
the aspects of (i) water quality, (ii) environmental education and information,
(iii) environmental management and (iv) safety

4. How will development efforts at Baker's Bay ensure protection of the
reef from golf course chemicals and run off?
The developers of the Baker's Bay Club are fully aware of the impor-
tance of protecting and preserving the reef. The golf course highlights
this commitment, both to the reef and overall environment. The course
will be grassed with Seashore Paspalum, a grass variety requiring little or
no fertilizer and more tolerant to brackish and re-use water. The design
intent is to limit the amount of irrigated turfgrass in favor of non-irrigated
native plants. Further, the golf course grading plans are designed to
slope into the island's interior into lined man-made wetlands, which act
as a natural water filtration system. The drainage water is then re-
circulated into the irrigation system, as opposed to running off into the
ocean. A secondary safeguard is an area of native vegetation between
the golf course and the ocean..


and sewerage i~,isthin the


:^p lI rage treatment facilities will be of the highest quality and tech
ob .....available and will include the treatment and production of efflu r
for reuse on he oeeurselend landscape irrigation. SoliodwasteW1
\ a Vr by separating out recyclable materials such as green
n,"t ,-Metal and glass. The solid waste facilities will be made
m i, e itsaf-el'uaG n settlement. The remaining.
Swillbe rffirred to app8r'dJfff if~'or otherwise managed in a
Sh utio rize,,bhBa Iofbm vrret. All infrastructure for te
on eent1,wllrhave a modl&i'S'~'didwill be expandable to
If trovide service for the settlement of Guana Cay, including
egb etctp e tial road access.

6 'trea t some of the native plantlife on the island?
The t will make usbe of many nativyplant- by preserving them in tthe
atu r ironment,andin some cases, transplanting them for use as
comm it r golf landscaping. The projects landscaping plan primaril.
consists n ypaots gout. the community and golf course. Ea h
ntisc ntlybeingued for preservation, transplant or study


\ turtles be, feed in the natural habitat?
e lIopment is preserving more than 6 miles of the natural sho te
line.In rtto better roect the shoreline, individual home sites will
not beialowed private aocs and a natural planting buffer will be estal-
lished between the beach and each residence.

*^S 9. Who will be watching development efforts to ensure the promises made
initheHeads of Agreement are being fulfilled.
SE Environmental Management Team from the University of Miami anc
teInstitute for Regional Conservation are tasked with observing the
- elopment progress. These groups will submit regular reports to the BI
... m mission.

10. Who will be measuring the effects of the development on the enviro
ment, both on the water and land?


r ne insnuTTe ror Regionarl onseXp, 04-- ,,gW,, I V ,
development progress arid su mjsgsres to the BEST I nisj
sion. Progress reports will be ba on o paring fie d reports to pr ve|-
opment data and proposing solutions to any problems that may be
encountered.


.9i .l' .. -


------ ~J---
.- w


IuiI1lL.....|l. -l lll.l ll.M l---Ul..-----J---lIllli. l.U!L.!lL


- IL,fii.l-nis.~wwt


-. --.. -




: S 1:.; ':f,i '*^*i g''...


;``







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 2,2005, PAGE 13


r /7


*


6'


nuMS


LNG


Safe and Beneficial to The Bahamas

SlThe apprtoimately4ktlomeer pipeline will b co ucted of a A Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) storage facility will be
steel pipe and installed on the afloor constructed on Ocean Cay, Bahamas. At this facility, LNG
SNatural gas will be tnsported by the Ocon Cay Pipeine will be converted to natural gas (liquid to vapor conversion).
fromOcean lay to the EEZ odaay [ The LNG facility at Ocean Cay will be designed in
At: lthe EZ boundary, the Ocean Fl .press Pipeline will accordance with applicable Bahamian, State
S ..elIve nltwls fkm the Ocean of Florida, and U.S. federal standards.
Pipeline and deliver that gas
to south Floida.









QA : The Bahamas Gets: RNMENT


More than $20 million revenue
to the Public Treasury per year.

$9 Million License Fee

High paying technical jobs

400 construction jobs


0 AMS prepared an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) for
the AES pipelines and
LNG facility that evaluates
potential impacts to the
environment and natural
resourcesand identifies
measures to avoid or minimize
those impacts.
0 The EIA is based on applicable
Bahamian, World Bank. Florida
and U.S.guidelines and regulations.
o In September 2002, AMS
submitted the EIA for review to
The Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology
Commission (BEST).
0 The BEST Commission
completed its review and
approved the AES project
in early 2004.


BB~i^BB~iUBB~n5LOCAL NEWSBUBUB


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 13


R04DMS
fb G-O 0,1






PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 2,2005 THE TRIBUNE



OF CHICAGO

MOTHER'S DAY

BRUNCH
11:30am 3:30pm Sunday, May 8th 2005
$38.00 pp
plis 15%gratuity
mn am m Menu m m ow
Appetizer & Salad Buffet
Assorted Salads Platters Italian Sausage Arancine di Riso
Italian Meatballs in Pomodoro Sauce and much more!
Choice of a la Carte Entree
Fresh Nassau Grouper Siciliano .


I LCALNEW


W Minced L'Aragosta "Diavolo"|
Clay Pot Chicken Veal Marsala
Stuffed Roasted Loin of Pork Last
Dessert Buffet
Chocolate Rum Raisinh readtPudding *Tiramis
Triple Chocolate Celebration Cake
Guava Duff with Rum Sauce antimuchimore.,

^ OverlookXhIB


For 'eservatjons Please.Z1F


Available or Privateame'
.

A /;'"KK*tJKs


DR MARCUS
BETHEL, Minister of
Health and Environmen-
tal Services (right), in
discussion with Mr
Dwight Lauderdale, tele-
vision anchorman with
Miami's WPLG Channel
10 News, during a cock-
tail reception held by the
Kingdor National Parkin-
son Foundation at the
Atlantis Resort Paradise
Island on Friday, April
22. The reception was
held to welcome Mr
Lauderdale and his wife,
Minnie, to the Bahamas.
(BIS photo:
Raymond A Bethel)


The Government of The Bahamas issues AESS an Agreement in
Principle to construct a Lquefied Natural Gas plant on Ocean
Cay In The Bahamas,
AES and BEST meet to discuss the project review process
With participation from BEST staff, AES commences field
surveys, including geophysical, geotechnical, hydrographic,
biological and archaeological surveys,
AES submits Draft EIA scope outline to BEST,
MBEST staff submits comments on EIA draft scoping document to
AES,
AES responds to BEST comments on draft EIA scope,


AES submits EIA draft sections to BEST staff for review and
comment,
BEST staff provide comments on draft EIA sections to AES
AES submits completed EIA document to BEST staff,
AES makes presentation of EIA to Ministry of Health, the BEST
Commission, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Department of
Fisheries,
The BEST Commission engages ICF to support the EIA review
process,
BEST staff reviews EIA, section by section, and submit questions to
AES,
AES responds to BEST staff questions and attend multiple working
group meetings to clarify responses and amendments to the EIA,
Minister of Health and the Environment, Dr, Marcus Bethel holds
national press conference to announce public participation
process, including EIA comment period and schedule for Town
Meetings,


The Bahamas Gets,
* More than $20 million revenue
to the Public Treasury per year.
* $9 Million License Fee
* High paying technical jobs
* 400 construction jobs w.l,


THE RENTAL
SOLUTIONS YOU NEED
Rental-sometimes it just makes better business sense.
At M&E we rent you the solutions that your business
requires. Come in today and we'll put together a rental
package that makes sense for your business. M&E, your
Authorized Caterpillar Dealer, rents Cat equipment.


I

I


II~PIII~L-~a-P---a~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


IS M.






- - - -








THE ~ ~~ OCL TRBNNMNAEAW,20,PAE1


* THIS young girl had fun hanging around at SAC-A-RAMA on Saturday. There was a
whole host of fun games for children to get involved in during the event at St Augustine's College.
?-- --(Photo.- Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)
.. - .. J


NISSAN B13 SENTRA



NISSAN




SANPIN MOTORS LTD. FINANCING WITH INSUC
Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947 = 1 RBC
Tel: 326-6377, 326-6464/5, 326-0013/4, 326-6382. Fax: 326-6315 Royal Bank
Email: sanpin.vehicles@coralwave.com of Canada"


BEST PRICES, BEST SELECTION, BEST SERVICE, EVERYDAY, EVERY TIME


1John S. George
Here to help you i t.ry step of the way.


Main Branch Palmdale Shopping Plaza, Madiera Street
PO. Box SS 6330 Nassau., The Bahamas
Phone 242-322-8421 I Fax 242-328-2067
E-mail: infor@jsgco.com I Web: www.jsgco.coni
Independence Shopping Center, Baillou Hill & Harok Rds | 2-12-3'41 -8527
Lyfbrd Cay Shopping Center, Lyford Cay [ 242-362-5289
Cable Beach Shopping Center. West Bay Street I 24'2-327-77.10
Harbour Bay Shopping Center. East Bay Street | 242-393-8761
RCA Rosetta Street 1 242-322-4001
Wholesale I 242-322-8421 ext 288
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


.fRT MONDAY APRIL 24, 2005 fu MONDAY MAY 2, 2005


HP Photosmart 435 Digital Camera
With (FREE) 64MB SD Card
$190.00


#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts, Palmdale (Next to City Market) P.O. Box N-10620 Nassau, Bahamas Email: a s@als .9tpa.c

Tel: 242-328-0048 Fax: 242-328-0049


OAL


TAKING care of mother earth: Our photo shows from left to right young guests Julia Low,
Sam Greer, Savannah Schechter and Matthew Low with members of Atlantis' Guest Activities
team.



Young guests do their



bit to keep Earth clean


WITH beautiful clear skies
above them, four young guests
of the One&Only Ocean Club
recently armed themselves
with shovels and a water hose
and in an expression of their
appreciation for mother earth,
bored into the ground remov-
ing heaps of soil which they
replaced with a beautiful
plant.
The youngsters Sam Greer,
12, of Massachusetts; Savan-
nah Schechter, 11, of New Jer-
sey and Matthew Low, 12, of
New York and his younger
sister Julia Low, just wanted
to do their part to keep the
earth beautiful on "Earth
Day".
Amanda Felts, Vice Presi-
dent of Guest Activities at


Kerzner International and her
team spearheaded the tree
planting ceremony. Ms Felts
said, "In honour of Earth Day
today, what we are going to
do is have you guys be celebri-
ties and plant a tree here at
the One&Only Ocean Club."
She informed them that the
next time that they come to
visit the resort two special
treats the beautiful plant as
well as a "kidsOnly Club" will
await them. Ms Felts said that
the new innovative "kidsOnly
Club" will be launched at the
end of May.
' The youngsters were all
thrilled about their work. "It
was awesome and it was great
to participate and celebrate
Earth Day," beamed


Savannah.
"It was lots of fun digging
dirt out of the ground and
putting in the tree," said
Matthew. When asked if the
tree planting ceremony will
encourage him to take care of
the environment he nodded in
agreement stating that he
hopes to get started by not
polluting the earth.
His sister Julia echoed sim-
ilar sentiments. "It was excit-
ing planting the tree, water-
ing it and I am happy that I
had a chance to help with this
today," she said.
All of the children were giv-
en a special kidsOnly back-
pack for a keepsake until their
next visit to the One&Only
Ocean Club.


National Education Conference
Transforming Bahamian Education for the 21st Century

CALL FOR PAPERS
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 13 JUNE, 2005

CONFERENCE BACKGROUND
As part of the commitment of the Government of The Bahamas to affirm each individual's inalienable right to
education, and to meet the challenges currently facing our education system, the Ministry of Education, in
conjunction with educational stakeholders, will convene the 18th National Education Conference from 3-7 July 2005.
The goal of the Conference is to begin an examination of the existing education system with a view to developing
realistic and meaningful dialogue that addresses existing weaknesses and yields working solutions for strengthening
the education system.

THEME
Transforming Bahamian Education for the 21st Century

INVITATION
Citizens at home and abroad, residents of The Bahamas, researchers, educators, and all who are interested in the
development of a Bahamian education system of enhanced quality and relevance are invited to submit papers for
publication for the Conference.

SCOPE
The scope of the Conference is the role of education and its relevance to the development of Bahamians and The
Bahamas. Because of the extensive impact of education on the development of any country, the scope of papers
solicited for this conference is almost limitless; however, the following are some broad sub-fields for authors to
consider:
Business, Culture, Labour, Health & Environment, Socialization, Identity, School Safety, Globalization, Economic
Growth, Communication, Gender Trends and Anomalies, Diversity, Learning Disabilities and Educational Leadership.

THE ABSTRACT
In not more than 150 words, describe the issue your paper addresses and outline steps for a possible solution.
Papers will be either:
1) Conceptually Based: qualitative analysis that develops a fuller understanding of
Education by building on existing knowledge OR
2) Empirically Based: innovative quantitative research that tests or develops a theory or makes a new contri-
bution to the knowledge base of the field
Abstracts must state the following:
Issue/problem; background context; background of paper or study; significance of the issue; implications for policy
formulation or implementation in The Bahamas.
Empirically based papers must also include methodology and findings.
Please ensure that you include your name, telephone contacts, mailing address and/or e-mail address on the first
sheet of the abstract. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Friday, 13 May, 2005.
All submissions must be original works. Authors of successful abstracts will be contacted by Wednesday, 18 May,
2005. The review committee reserves the right to reject any and all submissions.

FINAL PAPER
Authors of successful abstracts will be asked to prepare a full-length paper based on their introductory outline.
The deadline for submission of the final paper is Monday, 13 June, 2005.

AWARDS
Prizes will be awarded to the authors of the best empirically based paper and the best conceptually based paper.
Other accepted papers will be recognised for their efforts at the Conference. The authors of the best papers will be
asked to make an oral presentation of their work at the conference. All accepted papers become the property of
the Ministry of Education and the National Education Conference.


- -- '1-


DATES TO REMEMBER


13 May, 2005

18 May, 2005

13 June, 2005

3 July, 2005


Deadline for submission of abstracts

Notification of successful applicants

Deadline for final paper submission

Conference begins


CONTACT INFORMATION
Please direct all enquiries to:


The Counsellors Ltd
First Terrace, Centreville
Nassau, BAHAMAS
Tel: (242) 322-7505/6
Fax: (242) 325--2482 P 0 Box N-3220
Email: adagency@thecounsellorsltd.com














Commonwealth Breweries raise a





glass to 'outstanding' performance


COMMONWEALTH Brew-
ery Limited marked a progres-
sive and outstanding record of
performance in 2004, and
according to managing director
LeRoy Archer, "we aim to con-
tinue this trend in 2005 and
beyond."
Indeed the year 2005 began a
successful upbeat trend as early
as February, when CBL
unveiled the company's attrac-
tive new packaging for its Kalik
products Kalik regular, Kalik
Light, and Kalik Gold, at which
time Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Leslie Miller commended
the company for its productive
initiatives.
During 2004, Commonwealth
Brewery, which also produces
Heineken, Guinness, and Vita
Malt, re-issued a mission state-
ment and leadership vision as
a reminder to employees that
the company was working
toward a goal with a clear pur-
pose, at the same time intro-
ducing a new productivity
bonus scheme.
In 2004, the Brewery
achieved another Monde de
Selecion Gold Medal Award,
for Kalik Gold, which has
proven to be an outstanding
success in the Bahamas as well
as internationally with a select
panel of taste testers.
Also in 2004 the company
hosted the First Brewers' Con-
ference for the Caribbean and
Latin American region in New
Providence, continuing CBL's
pace-setting record as the Num-
ber One brewery in the region.
In August of 2004, the com-
pany's introduction of the new
Guinness "Gucci" bottle was
another landmark achievement,
making The Bahamas the first
country in the western hemi-
sphere to take such a revolu-
tionary step in the industry.

Upgraded
During the year the Brewery
refurbished its plant facilities
and upgraded equipment, con-
sequently efficiencies have been
improved, thus enhancing pro-
ductivity considerably beyond
CBL's capabilities only a few
years ago. The brewery is
presently capable of producing
approximately 14,00 cases of
product in one day.
Meanwhile the company's
Human Resources Manager
established an industry group,
partnering with others such as
Bacardi, Shell Bahamas, Aqua-
pure, BEC, Pepsi, and the
Burns House Group of Com-
panies.
At the end of 2004, the Brew-
ery honoured various staff
members with awards in sever-
al categories.
Four persons received awards
for Perfect Attendance: Marlo
Gardiner (Assistant Supervisor,
Packaging Department), John
Bain (Packaging Supervisor,
Packaging Department),
Eldridge Davis (Utilities Oper-
ator, Engineering/Utilities), and
Edbert Beneby (Engineering
Manager, Engineering Depart-
ment).
Six persons were also added
to the company's Honour Roll
listing. These included Collette
Saunders (Quality Assurance
Department), Ian James (Pack-
aging Department), Bernado
Clarke (Packaging Depart-
ment) Tomeko Lee (Ware-
house Department), Garvin
Stubbs (Administration), and
Lawrence Moore (Engineer-
ing/Utilities Department).
Additionally, and for the first
time in company history, CBL
named two staff members as
Mr Popularity and Miss Popu-
larity for 2004. These were,
respectively, Garvin Stubbs (IT
Dept), and Alisa Gibson
(Human Resources Dept).
In 2004, Mr Laus Boots was
welcomed into the company as
the new Group Financial Man-
ager, and Guillaume Duverdier
as Group Commercial Manag-
er. Added to the staff were
Janeiro Turnquest as finance
management trainee, Dwayne
Cooper to Utilities, and George
Rolle to Packaging.
Noting that since its incep-
tion Commonwealth Brewery
has grown in many ways, Man-
aging Director LeRoy Archer
noted that the company has
come from "confusion and
chaos", with 12-hour shifts and
ballooning employee numbers
to its present position of a well-
managed and professionally-
operated machine turning out
quality products which


speak well for The Bahamas
at home and around the
world.


BREWERY AWARD WINNERS. At the end of a successful 2004, Commonwealth Brewery honoured various staff mem-
bers with awards in several categories. Pictured above, from left, are Ian James (Packaging), LeRoy Archer (CBL Managing Direc-
tor), Alanna McCartney (Human Resources Manager), Bernard Clarke (Packaging), Hans Belleskes (CBL Technical Manager),
Colette Saunders (Quality Assurance), Garvin Stubbs (Administration), Alcinor Bonamy (Brewhouse), and Tomeko Lee
(Warehouse). Missing from photo is Lawrence Moore (Engineering).


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"





-*








-


TO ALL DIABETICS PATIENTS

NEW PRECISION XTRA with luminous features...IT'S HERE FOR YOU!


Have an old and outdated glucose meter?
Exchange it for a Precision Xtra glucose meter
that you can get free with the purchase of a
box of 50 Precision Xtra glucose strips.

Do not have a glucose meter?
7 Receive a free Precision Xtra glucose
meter with the purchase of two boxes
of 50 Precision Xtra glucose strips.
-> ------ -

ae io

Precsion

rn, es. n


(iMediSense
E ABBOTT


vc nded by
Recomme
tBeahamlas

DiabetcS


PiWN(r1
:. .- .. :: !

Ei a : :-,"/':. ::;'
1
C,


Precision


............ ......... ...


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 18, MONDAY, MAY 2,2005 THE TRIB^^ UNE


A chance to


'esca


to


the Bahamas


*low
















00 S 0 .,,0 I
















FINANCIAL RECOVERY OFFICER


PROFILE:
Nastac Series 7 or the Canadian Securities Course and must
be familiar ith investment products
Four years commercial banking experience, two of which must
haveabeen in collections
Excellent communication skills, including written and oral and
human relations
Excellent attitude, punctuality and attendance records
Associate degree in Business Administration or a related field

RESPONSIBILITIES
INCLUDE:

Performing administrative functions to assist with the recovery
process in accordance with the Bank's policies and
procedures
Making field calls and contacting delinquent customers for the
recovery of funds
Providing financial guidance to delinquent customers
Preparing reports and court documents to assist with
the recovery process
Attending court on behalf of the bank

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited offers an excellent remuneration
S and benefits package including performance-based incentives,
medical insurance, life and long tern disability insurances and
pension plan.

Send resume no later than Friday 13th May 2005 to:

Human Resources Department
4 Re: Financial Recovery Officer
Head Office, Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-7502
Nassau
Fax 327.5175


I


STRESSED, overworked
soccer moms, graduate stu-
dents suffocating under moun-
tains of term papers, cancer
survivors and even war
heroes: These are just some
of the people longing for an
Islands of The Bahamas vaca-
tion.
These overwhelmed Amer-
icans are so desperate to trade
in their everyday life for blue
skies and white sand beaches
that they have willingly bared
their desperation for the world
to see. By doing so, they hope
to win the "Escape from
Everyday Life" sweepstakes
currently being offered by The
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism.
An extension of the
"Escape from Everyday Life"
ad campaign, which debuted
in January, the sweepstakes
offers one American resident,
the chance to win a six night
island hopping vacation for
two.
Winner
The lucky winner will get
the chance to spend two nights
each on Paradise Island,
Grand Bahama and Exuma.
Participants enter by log-
ging on to the official promo-
tional website of the islands-
bahamas.com and com-
pleting an online entry form.
They are also given the option
of explaining in 50 words or
less why they should win an
escape from their everyday
life.
"The response to the sweep-
stakes has been overwhelm-
ing," Stephanie Toote, gener-


al manager of advertising at
the Ministry said. "Some of
the stories we are getting from
people are so amazing that we


and an audacious "total dom-
ination" of Grand Central Sta-
tion in mid-town Manhattan
along with the trains that serve


"The response to the
sweepstakes has been
overwhelming. Some of the
stories we are getting from
people are so amazing
that we are posting them
on bahamas.com."9

Stephanie Toote, general manager
of advertising at the ministry


are posting them on
bahamas.com."
The sweepstakes began on
April 15, 2005 and will con-
tinue until mid-May when a
winner will be selected at ran-
dom. The dream vacation,
which includes air transfers, is
valued at U.S. $4,500.
The Ministry launched the
"Escape from Everyday Life"
campaign in the dead of win-
ter to entice potential visitors
from the country's major mar-
kets. In stark contrast to the
monotony and dullness of the
cold months, warm and invit-
ing images of the Islands Of
The Bahamas are used to tan-
talise the consumer.
The campaign inchiuded fold
out ads in major magazines,


it. Over 700,000 travellers dai-
ly will be exposed to the ads in
Grand Central.
In the midst of all this, the
"Island Hopping" television
ad campaign continues to
entice viewers on cable chan-
nels like Bravo, VH1 and
Food Network.
Online campaigns on web-
sites like Travelocity,
ESPN.com and E! Online also
urge consumers to indulge in
an Islands Of The Bahamas
vacation.
According to Ms Toote,
"The Islands Of The Bahamas
has taken an aggressive
approach to distinguish itself
from competitors through
effectively showcasing its cul-
ture and diversity."


e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


von' R.m





MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 19


SUPER
VALUE
J NOWACC'TING
o SUNCARD
UAM.fGHTS ANM PWCES RESSIERVED
SPEC ^IASGOOD:
MAY 2N MA 4H 00


CHICKEN
WINGS
PER LB
990


[!a- MEA S~ IAViINGS 0 1


CORNISH

HENS
TWIN PACK

$799


TURKEY
WINGS
PER LB

!99


Table Cloths Irons
Throw Pillows Lamps
Comforter Sets Blenders
Bath Scales Rugs
Shower Curtains Towels
Bathroom Accessories Sheet Sets


Figurines
Bakewares
Wall Clocks
Wall Pictures


Picture Frames
Flatware Sets
Cookware Sets
Glassware Sets
Dinnierware Sets


Located: Harbour Bay ShQpping Center


GALA BAHAMIAN "'SWEET DELICIOUS
GROWN
APPLES TOMATOES SMWERRIIS
$ w9PAINT
2 _tPBBA 99 B $189
SWEET SWEET RED L
GLOBE
MANGOES GRAPES Ph A
$ 69. $'89 2/L q
EACH PER-LB 9


t I


SMACK RAMEN

NOODLES


ki ll


SUPER VALUE
HAND
TOWEL


PEELLENC


PAR-EXCELLENCE
PARBOILED
RICE
5 LBS
$229


Ph: 3934440 0r 393hh4448 ___


MOTHER'S DAY SALE
&XYf44// c .d____


I Space Savers Mattress Pads
Blinds Cord Craft Flowers
' Blow Dryers Comforters
Conair Curling Irons Wall Pictures
Priana Therapy Gift Toasters
S Packs Draperies
Dinnerware Sets Throw Pillows
Glass Sets Flatware Sets
Sheet Sets Cutlery Se
' Towels er
, Rugs

Pay Less at Discount Mart


I l -I I


@t4e^%'p


gaya y4


PICNIC
HAMS
PER LB
$wJ39.
SLICES
PER LB $1.4


CORNED
BEEF


J


S WH*OLE


HICB^^ KEtNS]F~


THE TRIBUNE


T


I







PAE 0,MODYMA 2205TH TIBN


CARIBBANEW


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION

CAREER OPPORTUNITY




The Water and Sewerage Corporation is interested in securing the services of
a qualified experienced individual to fill the post of Senior Technician in the
Geographics Information System Technology Department of the Special
Projects Division.
Responsibilities include, but are not limited to the following:
Editing and maintenance of the Corporation's G I S layers
Field collection of data for the G I S system.
Design and output of maps as it relates to G I S.
Provide technical support for Q I S procedures.
Required qualifications:
The successful candidate should possess a minimum of the following
qualifications and experience.
An Associate Degree in Geography, Pre-Engineering or Computer
Science from an accredited College or University.
Plus three (3) years post graduate experience in Geographics
Information System (GIS).
Must demonstrate prior experience in Environmental Systems Research
Institute (ESRI) software. prefer additional experience in Global
Positioning System (GPS).
Required skills:
Ability to work under pressure.
P C literacy including familiarity with Microsoft Word and Excel
software packages.
Must have excellent organizational, communication (both oral and
written) and research skills.
Must be detail oriented, prepared to work long hours when necessary,
enthusiastic and prepared to use initiative.
Must believe in and promote the fact of customer care and service
as first priority.
Starting salary will be commensurate with qualification and experience.
Intersted person may obtain applications forms the Personnel Department, at
#87 Thompson Boulevard, P.O. Box N-3905, Nassau, Bahamas, and should
be returned together with a detailed. resume, ,not later than May 6th, 2005.
.* :. *; -^^ :^ 2 : '.V .'' 8 ; .^ ~ -' ^ ^ :;'^ ,: .____


* -
* ~ .
* _____ *
* ~ 0
~
-.~


Wednesday, 4th May (6-9pm)
CREVII Art Show C
"Featuring Prominent Women Artists"


Thursday, 5th May (7-10pm)
A Taste of Cuba with
Soy Caribe Band
Dinner, Cuban Drinks & Cigars
Drinks Compliments of Butler & Sands
Funds in aid of The Nature Conservancy
Tickets: $50.00

Friday, 6th May (7-10pm)
Wine & Hor d'oeuvres & Pneuma Band I
Featuring: Cafe Matisse, Provence, Money
Penney, The Oyster Bar,
Bakers Treats Patties Bakery
Wine Compliments of Butler & Sands
Funds in aid of The Aids Foundation
Tickets: $60.00



Saturday, 7th May (10am-6pm)
ONELOVE Festival (Music, Cultural
Food Stalls, Arts, Crafts,
Community Groups,Kids Corner & Much More
Admission: Free
One Love Movie (11 am & 1 pm)
Admission: $7.00







- re l PattiesB aki.y, Th ste:r [Bar-&'Gill Old I Tor. Ton .. ei c tions


A


"Copyrighted Material

A fSyndicated Contentw v
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ::: i


PAGE 20, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







SAVA.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
<7 > ^ f a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
HARBOUR BAY ONLY


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


JBI
MACKERAL BRINE/
TOMATO SAUCE
s15 OZ
.89


LIL DEBBIE
RASIN CREME
PIES
9.6 OZ
189O


LIBBYS
VIENNA SAUSAGE
REGULAR & CHX
200 OR
.99


THRIFTY MAID
CATSUP SQUEEZE
BOTTLE
24 OZ
;;1 69


LIBBY'S
CREAM STYLE CORN,
WK CORN, SLICED &
CUT BEETS
15S OZ



W/D
VANILLA WAFERS &
COCONUT BARS
12 OZ
i ml 99


FLORIDA NATURAL
APPLE JUICE
COCKTAIL
2 OZ
2/.99


KOUNTRY

MIST SODAS
2 LTr
*-I. "B


MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACARONI
1 6 OZ



WINN DIXIE
FOIL HEAVY
DUTY
37. 5 FT
is AME


...


RED APPLES
3-LB BAG
EACH

GOLD & RED APPLES,
BOSCH & DANJOU PEARS
EACH


STRAWBERRIES
$ A49


WINN DIXIE
SPREAD
$367
WINN DIXIE
JUMBO CRESCENT ROL
A 15.5 OZ


STRAIGHT CUT CUT GREEN BEANS,
POTATOES SWEET CORN, MIX
VEGETABLES, CUT
$ -, 7 OKRA & BROCCOLI
PRESTIGE 6-EAR
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS PILLSBuRYCOB
$64 9- CORN ON THE COB


'il F'i


PLAYTEX


TAMPONS 16-CT ...................$2.99
RADOX
ASSORTED SCENTS soo ML....$4.49
SOFT
SOAP BODYWASH 12-0oz...........$4.79
SUAVE
SHAMPOO &
CONDITIONER 15- oz ............2/$2.99
JERGEN'S
LOTION 10- oz..........................$2.89
COLGATE
TOOTHPASTE -
TOTAL & MAX oz................$3.59
S&B
BOTANICAL RELAXER 24-oz......$7.69
F&G


MOUTHWASH 5- oz..................$2.49
DIAL SOAP
ASSORTED
SCENTS 4.50Z 3a-AK..............$2.39


TURKEY
WINGS OR
DRUMSTICKS

.990


i


MISCUT
CHICKEN
WINGS

.99


PORK LOIN


END CUT
CHOPS


$


79
LB


PRESTIGE CHOICE N.Z. GWALTNEY
BOTTOM LAMBSHOULDER SUPER TRIM
WHOLE OR 1/2
ROUNDROAST CHOPS SMOKEDHAM
LBS LB
LB S 19 39
.PRESTIGE W. D FRESH
CHOW INEINN,1, BOLOGA REG OR GROUND
STROiSTEAKS THICKSLICEILB BEEF
IS 99 s 59 s 99
*S LB 1 EACH 1 LB


HORMEL WHOLE
COOKED HAM ROTISSERIE CHICKEN
LB fLB
99 $799
ALL VARIETY PUDDING
WHITE & YELLOW CREAM
AMERICAN CHEESE CAKES
$39 943EoCH


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK
LITE TUNA
(WATER)
6 OZ
3/$1-99


KELLOGS

CORN FLAKES
43 OZ
$749

MISTIC
JUICES ASSORTED
(NASSAU ONLY)
16 OZ
S.0194Q


LIBBYS
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ



RENUZIT
AIR
FRESHNERS
9- OZ
2/$S28

DISTINCTION
EVAPORATED
MILK
410 GRM
2/$1 39


MAHATMA
RICE LONG
GRAIN &
PARBOILED
5 LBS



DIET
7.UPOR7.UP
FREE (CASE $975)
6 PAK
S249


CAMPBELL'S
SPAGHETTIO'S
ASSORTED
15 OZ
$ 109


RUTH

DETERGENT
1 KG
2/$289

HUNTS
BBQ SACUES
ALL
FLAVOURS
18 OZ
2/$300


BOOST
VANILLA
SUPLIMENT
(ONLY)
6 PAK
$ 1068


CAMPBELLS

VEGETABLE SOUP
10 OZ
M89

GAIN
FABRIC
SOFTENER
64 OZ
$559

HUGGIES
ULTRA TRIM,
CONV. DIAPERS
24,28,34,40
$Q99


SPRAY. -N-WASH
REGULAR
& LEMON
22 OZ


AQUAPURE

WATER
(NASSAU ONLY)
1 -GAL
.99

BURTON
RICH TEA
BISCUITS
300 G
&1 99


STORE
HOURS:


CARROTS 2.LB
EACH
s1 39
CABBAGE
GREEN
EACH

POTATOES
WHITE 10.LB
EACH
4% 99


W/D
SLICED CHEESE

WINN DIXIE
LE ORANGE
JUICE
,geo n


I


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 21








PAGE 22, ONDAYIMAE2,2005OTELTRIBUN


wesv "An & *WS


4 orf T S(A


Leading fitness centre
is in search of a


Fitness/Aerobic
Instructor

The ideal applicant must

Possess a Bachelor's degree from an accredited
university in physical education or exercise science
Possess CPR & First Aid certification, ACE
or similar Fitness qualifications to include aerobic
& Personal Training certificate
Have a minimum of two (2) years experience
as a personal trainer, yoga trainer and step aerobic
instructor & broad experience with fitness testing,
nutrition assessments & dietary guidelines
Be knowledgeable in cardiovascular machines,
weights & body fat testing

Applicants must also be
highly energetic with passion for fitness,
able to effectively & pleasantly communicate
with high-end clientele & staff
& willing to maintain strict grooming
standards set by centre

Please e-mail resume to
dpaoffice@coralwave.com


M An A -


An & a


u kw p t.. d. *i. a*

Sp bk "Copyrighted Material"


Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Provi


a-eb. -..N f m hu s0
om m qdJe


O** es th
* p e*
*
*i ** ws e Me N

M 40**D 04
amom- -amoe0 4001

40 dum 0 do Gmm


a* o. .,- -_ v
ftBh m, @a 0
at gmh run'


~ ~low



wltE. 064
= ft a


The Assistant Vice-President for Patient Financial Services (PFS) will be directly
responsible for overseeing patient account services including patient access
(pre-registration, registration, insurance verification, and upfront cash collections),
V billing and collection of revenue generated by the Hospital's clinical departments
from patients, insurance companies and other third party payors.
This leader will be responsible for collaborative development of action plans for
monitoring and evaluating all PFS functions. Current initiatives include: a
comprehensive revenue cycle review, implementation of new PFS fully integrated
software, and an extensive chargemaster (pricing) analysis and overhaul.
This leader should have a proven track record of providing innovative ideas and
approaches to achieving and maintaining best practices at an operational and
financial level. The AVP position is a direct successor to the VP for Patient
Financial Services, and requires a highly refined management and supervisory
style and communication skills that will facilitate timely resolution of sensitive
customer service and collection issues within an environment of favourable public
relations.
This executive will be responsible for driving change with a high degree of
integrity and energy and, therefore, must be self-directed and able to translate
strategic objectives into operational goals. Consensus building among teams and
embracing DH's core values will be essential.
The ideal candidate will have a BS/BA degree in finance, business management or
accounting from a reputable educational institution and have at least seven years
progressive experience in customer service/accounting operations in a
management role. The successful candidate must have demonstrated knowledge
and ability to effectively lead and motivate a staff of professional and clerical
positions. The position requires very strong leadership, problem solving, customer
service, teamwork, quantitative, analytical, and computer skills. Healthcare
experience and familiarity with the MEDITECH patient billing and accounting
systems would be an asset.


ii


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
has a vacancy for the position of
PERSONAL BANKING OFFICER (CREDIT)

PROFILE:
Associate degree in Business Administration, Finance or
a related field
Nastac Series 7 Course or the Canadian Securities Course
(preferred, but not essential, as training will be available as
required)
Four years commercial banking experience with a minimum of 2
years credit experience
* Experience managing diverse loan portfolios and assessing
loan quality
* Detailed knowledge of retail/commercial lending practices and
credit analysis (to ensure the integrity of the portfolio)
* Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
* Excellent leadership skills
* Strong interpersonal skills (to work effectively with staff
and customers)
Strong PC skills
RESPONSIBILITIES
INCLUDE:
* Solicitation of new customers and managing sales activities
(to enhance the profitability of the unit)
* Effectively leadership and support to achieve corporate objectives
* Reviewing and implementing new customer, mortgage and
commercial lending activities and organizational strategies
* Managing loan portfolios and assessing loan quality
* Promoting excellent Service Quality
* Adjudicating credit lines within the delegated authority
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited offers an excellent remuneration
and benefits package including performance-based incentives,
medical insurance, life and long tern disability insurances and
pension plan.
Send resume no later than Friday 13th May 2005 to:

Human Resources Department
Re: Personal Banking Officer (Credit)
Head Office, Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-7502
Nassau
Fax 327.5175
e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


_F_


PAGE 22, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 23


INERATIOALNW


No Kofes


- -- --" -WI

- '- a'''' S=
-- -. --
m






__-' "Copyrighted.aterialm
:----- - -ydc-- t m
4w ob



---- - -U
-- -- m ._A=
*--- "-- ""-
--~ ---
.--opyrigtedMaterial


--- -Svnalc t~ontenm


Available from Commercial Nem


a ..do
w- -t




ON- Ifiow 0-ip am 40"
wft- n 0P- *



0 -w B4 wow*a -OM w ft
.- u p- M .w --o f- a.M 8a
O- OM 0-00 - U
we - &.4
9OW ---- *-*-.

*490 ft- 4


8N .' A


test fifed


m -q


x~mm" mom "w
* on


- S bma nw -





of ft MINW u b
46_112- 10 0 -


The Nassa Msic Society
presents

QUARTET BONJOUR
Featuring
........ ...... .. ... ..... .. ...- .. ..-... ..

Catherina Jirjahike First Violin
Theres Saunders Second Violin


RjP& Jfckie Peterson- kViola
... ,. l,.,lanAil -n C a ., .C


MARIA KLONA IlWIL
Soprano
S.Accompanied on he Piano by William Eyk


Friday M 6 2005


GOVERNMENT HOUSE BALLR


Box Office: A.D. Hanna & Co: 322-8306
N~ .. sa Music Society: 3~, 7 68
: .t insurance: 393-5,..,,

Tickets: Members: $25, Non-Members: $35, Students: $5
Interpreting Music by Handel Hayden Putcll-bDebussy McCartney Donaldson
And Songs by Vivaldfi.vot a -p luSIA Chausson Gershwin
www.nalsaumnsisociety.com


Fuel up and Fly out

Fly to Las Vegas with Esso

Win weekend packages for two at The Pelican
Bay Hotel, Freeport 10 winners, 2 each week.
Win a trip for two to Las Vegas Airfare and
Accommodation FREE, along with US$1000
spending money! One Grand Prize winner!

It's easy to play! Get an entry-form with the pur-
chase of $15 or more in fuels at participating Esso
Stations.

Fill out the entry-form and drop it into the box pro-
vided to be eligible for the grand prize draw of a trip
for two to Las Vegas.

Also, weekly draws will be held for weekend pack-
ages for two to The Pelican Bay Hotel, Freeport.

Drive into Esso today, and fly out a winner!


' We're drivers too.


0IN


P








Easter celebrations for Russian
and Ukrainian Orthodox Chds













MO RE Than A Mortgage




WHEN YOU PAY
YOUR MORTGAGE

IT PAYS YOU BACK!
You get an automatic monthly refund
of a portion of your interest payment
"Copyrighted Material that you can use for savings,
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers" investment, insurance and more...
i investment, insurance and more...


7'You have a chance to win one o~f
'two prizes of afully furnished room fro



upJI to a vlue fUS$ 50
Promotion valid from May 1st to August 31st, 2005.
Offer applicable to new lending only.
www.firstcaribbeanbank.com
AL 4' d


FIR.STCARIBBEAN
Te kle
Banking.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


PAGE 24, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Mortgages I Home Equi ty Finance I Insurance I Credit Cards I Financial Advice









MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


MARKET

WRAP


Attorney wins




cases over $lm




fee for Oracle




Fund defence


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A PROMINENT Bahamian
attorney has won two appeal
. cases against a group of former
.Fortis Fund Services (Bahamas)
executives which stemmed from
,a dispute over $1.2 million in
legal fees relating to the insol-
vent $260 million Oracle Fund.
The Court of Appeal, in an
April 19 written ruling, permit-
ted Lionel Levine's appeal
against an injunction granted to
'Anthony Inder-Reiden, Rhon-
* da McDeigan-Eldridge and
Dorothea Thompson by the
Supreme Court, which had pre-
vented the attorney from
revealing details of "highly con-
fidential indemnities" that For-
tis had given the trio in relation
to lawsuits over the Oracle
Fund.
In the same ruling, the Court
of Appeal also turned down the
Fortis trio's appeal against
Supreme Court Justice John
Lyons's dismissal of a motion
to commit Mr Levine for
alleged contempt of court.


The ruling on the two cases
detailed how the dispute
between Mr Levine and the
Fortis executives became
increasingly bitter and personal,
after they claimed damages and
an injunction to restrain the
attorney "from disclosing the
fact or terms of the respective
indemnities" given to them by
Fortis Fund Services (Bahamas)
on October 25, 2001.

Lawsuits
They began their action on
June 17, 2002, but Mr Levine
himself also initiated a Supreme
Court action that year, which
claimed "fees and disburse-
ments" from Fortis Fund Ser-
vices (Bahamas) for represent-
ing them in lawsuits filed over
the collapsed Oracle Fund.
Fortis Fund Services
(Bahamas) and the three
executives had been sued by
shareholders in the mutual
fund in three separate lawsuits
"arising out of the insolvency"
of the Oracle Fund. Mr
Levine had.been hired to rep-


resent the defendants.
The Court of Appeal ruling,
delivered by Justice Churaman,
said: "At the heart of this con-
troversy is the issue of quantum
fees properly due to the defen-
dant, whether by Fortis or the
plaintiff.
"The issue arose when the
defendant's [Mr Levine] retain-
er in the Oracle cases was ter-
minated some time between
March and June 2002 while the
Oracle actions were still pend-
ing.
"The defendant sought some
$1.2 million (subsequently min-
imally reduced) or fees due to
him for professional services
rendered to him to Fortis and/pr
the plaintiffs. The plaintiffs
and/or Fortis unsuccessfully
sought of the defendant a prop-
erly particularised bill in respect
of the fees claimed by him."
Mr Levine reduced his claim
against Fortis to $959,445 for
10 months' work when he began
proceedings on October 22,
2002, seeking an order that the
SEE page four


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TOTAL tourism industry
losses resulting from Hurri-
canes Frances and Jeanne
totalled more than $100 mil-
lion, according to the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB), with that figure
matched by damage' to social
and physical infrastructure.
In its proposal for the $17
million hurricane relief loan,
which was formally signed off
last week by James Smith,
minister of state for finance,
the IDB said damage to the
tourism industry was of "criti-
cal importance" given that it
contributed more than 10 per
cent of the government's total
tax base.
Drawing on damage assess-
ments and related cost esti-
mates made by the United
Nations' Economic Commis-
sion for Latin America and
the Caribbean (ECLAC), the
IDB said direct damage to
tourism assets was estimated
at $21 million, with indirect
losses at $81 million.
The agriculture sector sus-
tained $10.65 million in direct
damage from the September
2004 storms, with indirect loss-
es rising to $34.35 million.
The IDB report said: "The
hurricanes causd 'd ''11- to


* JAMES Smith, minister of state for finance, who signed the
agreement for a $17m hurricane relief loan from IDB


food crops, ornamentals, live-
stock and agricultural supplies,
as well as to related infra-
structure.
"Damage was also sustained
in the fisheries sector through
the loss/damage of boats, dis-
placement of lobster traps and
fish pots and physical damage
to seafood processing plants
in a few of the islands."
Meanwhile, the number of
homes estimated to have been


damaged by Hurricane
Frances and Jeanne was 6,682,
with 671 of these completely
destroyed and 1851 houses in
need of major repair.
The IDB said: "The dam-
age to the housing sector with-
in the affected islands ranges
from total destruction to
minor damage as a result of
collapsed walls, roofs, loss of
SEE page three


More than 15%


of land parcels


'in dispute'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
MORE than 15 per cent of
all land parcels in the Bahamas
are currently "in dispute" in the
courts, the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) has
reported, acknowledging that


its "estimate is probably low"
due to the absence of a
comprehensive land mapping
system.
In its proposal document for
the $3.5 million loan it is mak-
ing to the government for
SEE page seven


RN Isubidar wnsOu

F Isand S.book~irng d~e al I


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Bahamas Out Island
Promotion Board has con-
tracted TicketXpress,.a sub-
sidiary of RND Holdings, to
act as a reservations and book-
ing agent for its member
hotels.


Jeff Birch, president of the
Promotion Board, said this
weekend that TicketXpress
was expected to service all
requests for Out Island hotel
reservations, via a call centre,
which currently come into the
Ministry of Tourism's toll-free
line.
SEE page seven


BTC claims existence is

threatened by cable system


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company has inten-
sified its opposition to
Caribbean Crossings' applica-
tion for a $45 million fibre optic
telecommunications system


linking the Bahamas with
Jarrntica, claiming that permit-
ting the development "would
have an extremely adverse
effect on BTC's economic sus-
tainability".
In its second letter to the
SEE page four'


www.micronet.bs From desktop to departmental workhorse, in brilliant color,
Since 1983 Toshiba copiers have more features, more functions,

" SeRaIC opies more technology.
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
*Sales Rentals supplies Services 4-Ie'^M^ KK'-? ^Na


Coippl'Sliajs. 08 -
u ,!l. WWI


MICronet
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Don't copy. Lead.
emoal: infomicronet.bs
56 Maderia Street Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas
Tel: (242) 328-3040
Fax: (242) 328-3043


___


II I


I-


1- -- -L-_ll IIPL I~--- I~-------~~I~-~-------- I ll~s I~-I -113 ---1111111~- I


~8~sa~aaarrssaana~8a8Ell~i&~ 4111 ~pls g


I es]cos



'T










PAGE B, MO DAYMAY 22005THEITNBUN


last week, with just over 13,000
shares changing hands. Half of
that was traded on Friday.
The market saw eight out of
its 19 listed stocks trade, of which


KINGSWAY ACADEMY

P.O. Box N-4378

NASSAU, BAHAMAS


VACANCIES FOR SEPTEMBER, 2005

TEACHERS

Kingsway Academy invites applicants from qualified and experienced
candidates for the following teaching positions at the High School level
(grade 7 through 12).

Information Technology
Auto Mechanics (Grades 10 12) and Woodwork (Grades 7 9)
Physical Education/Track and Field Coach
Spanish/French (Grades 7 12)
Mathematics/Physics (Grades 10 12).

The successful candidates should have the following:

An Academic Degree in the area of specialization
A Teaching Certificate
Excellent Communication Skills
A love for children and learning
High standards of morality
A born again and practicing Christian.

Letters of application together with a recent color photograph and detailed"
Curriculum Vita (including the names and address of at least three
references, one being the name of one's church minister) should be
submitted by Monday, May 6th, 2005.

LIBRARIAN/MEDIA CENTRE SUPERVISOR

Experience in Library Science with Learning/Research Media Technology

SECURITY GUARD

Kingsway Academy is seeking the service of a trained Security Guard.
Only qualified persons should apply. Deadline for applications is Thursday,
May 12, 2005.

All information for the above positions should be sent to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road


-'Nj

Pricing Information As Of:
29 Anril 2005


1.ZU
8.40
6.26
0.85
1.80
1.04
8,32
2.20
8.35
1.64
4.02
10.40
8.01
8.60
1.99
10.38
8.25
6.69
10.00
52wk-HI 5;
13.00
10.14
0.60


16.00
0.60
52wk-HI 5


1..2164
2.2268
10.3112
2.2214
1.0931


0.95
8.00
5.55
0.82
1.40
0.87
6.76
1.52
6.75
0.36
3.13
8.39
6.60
8.31
1.27
9.50
8.10
4.36
10.00


Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate


41.00
13.00
0.29


M A!KETRi'li


43.00
14.00
0.54


41.00
13.00
0.35


two advanced, one declined and
five were unchanged. Volume
leader for the week was Colina
Holdings (CHL), with 3,539
shares changing hands and
accounting for 27 per cent of the
total shares traded.
The big advancer for the
week was ICD Utilities Limited
(ICD), whose share price rose
by $0.10 to close at $9.60.

COMPANY NEWS
Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange (BISX) -
Officials from BISX have
announced that they have
moved to new premises. Previ-
ously located in the British
Colonial Hilton's Centre of
Commerce, Bay Street, BISX
will now be operating from
No.8 Village Gardens, located
on the corner of Village
Road and Village Gardens.
Keith Davies, BISX's chief
executive, said that the new
accommodations were a good
fit, as they met all the
exchange's security, filing and
technology requirements.

Investors Tip of the Week:
investing education savings
One of the most simple and
effective ways to invest your
money is through a diversified
managed fund using a savings
plan.


FOR SALE OR RENT


Fully Furnished Executive Office Suites
'plus Utilities Global Maritime Center
(Formerly Tanja)
2nd Floor, 2,500 sq ft
Internet Ready, Computer & Network Support
State Of The Art Phone & Voice Mail Systems
Dedicated Phone Lines
Conference Facilities
Professional Work Space

Office Space Unfurnished
1,250 sq ft

Global Maritime Centre
Queens Highway, Freeport, Bahamas

Contact 351-9026 or 351-1601 For Viewing
Or Additional Information.
Global United Formerly TANJA is
moving it's operation to the
Former United Shipping Building at the Harbour


Colinan
W Financial Advisors Ltd.


0.95 0.95 0.0o
8.00 8.00 0.00
6.26 6.26 0.00
0.85 0.85 0.00
1.45 1.45 0.00
1.04 1.04 0.00
8.32 8.32 0.00
2.20 2.20 0.00
8.34 8.34 0.00
1.64 1.64 0.00
4.02 4.02 0.00
10.40 10.40 0.00
8.01 8.01 0.00
8.35 8.35 0.00
1.27 1.27 0.00
9.50 9.60 0.10
8.22 8.22 0.00
5.57 5.50 -0.07
10.00 10.00 0.00


Symbol Bid $ Ask


12.50 Bahamas SupermarKets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.40 RND Holdinga


,. U. I VU*00
... ... ... ......v .. ..... u v o V.UU NMI U
a nVaresLam masra'
20.00ADL'A


28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings


1.1609
1.9423
10.0000
2.0941
1.0320


uColina Money iMarket Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund


12.25
10.00
0 29


13.25
10.35
0.54


-0.219
1.328
500 0.152
-0.057
0.122
0.007
0.556
3,539 0.259
0.673
0.258
0.406
0.662
0.591
0.710
0.082
2,000 0.818
0.785
0.201
1.979


1st Price
11.00
10.00


u.uuu
0.320
0.330
0.000
0.000
0.040
0.240
0.060
0.410
0.000
0.230
0.490
0.330
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.550
0.000
0.350


1.488 0.960
0.000 0.800
.0 103 000


0.00%
4.00%
5.27%
0.00%
0.00%
3.85%
2.88%
2.73%
4.92%
0.00%
5.72%
4.71%
4.12%
5.99%
0.00%
4.20%
6.81%
0.00%
3.50%


/ $ PIE Yield


2.220 0.000 19.4
1.105 0.810 14.6
-0.103 0.000 N/M


7.25"%
7.80%
a anro/


0.00%
6.93A
fl nn/


1.2164U02
2.2268 ***
10.3112*****
2.221401**
1.093141****


BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change Change in closing price from day to da%
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
*- AS AT MAR. 24, 20051 AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/ *** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005


YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidellt
Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV Net Asset Value
NIM Not Meaningful
FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


'*I'"~2* gI I ivtfliui fstr"f7'i' :'


Diversified managed funds,
such as Fidelity's Educational
Investment Account, is a great
way to maximise your invest-
ment returns while minimising
the risk to your portfolio.
The savings plan will allow
you to make small, regular
investments over time. You can
start with as little as $500 and an
additional $100 per month. If
you elect to use a managed fund
for education savings, make the
investment in your name, rather
than your child's.
Most fund managers will not
accept investments from peo-
ple under the age of 18 years.
Also, before investing in a fund,
ensure it is licensed and regu-
lated by the appropriate regu-
latory bodies.
Other viable investment vehi-
cles include fixed income funds
and annuities, particularly those
that "guarantee" the principal
or the amount invested into the
plan.
Finally, for those who may
not be in the position to pay for
their child/children to attend
private school/college, there are
many grants/scholarships (both
private and government spon-
sored) out there for the acade-
mically inclined or gifted child.
A good place to start is the
Ministry of Education or the
College of the Bahamas.


* By FIDELITY CAPITAL
MARKETS

There were tepid trading vol-
umes in the Bahamian market


BAHAMAS DENTAL COUNCIL
P.O. Box N-3345
Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE



The Bahamas Dental Council wishes to notify the
persons who are now or are planning to study
dentistry, that as of January 2005, graduates of
all "Dental Schools" will have to possess proof of
passing a Dental Board Examination approved by
the Bahamas Dental Council in order to be eligible
for full, temporary, provisional or special
registration. Further information can be obtained
from the office of the Bahamas Dental Council,
P.O. Box N-3345, Nassau, Bahamas.


Signed
Dr. Anthony Davis
Registrar
Bahamas Dental Council


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.95 $- 0 -13.64%
BAB $1.04 $- 0 8.33%
BBL $0.85 $- 0 0.00%
BOB $6.26 $- 500 8.87%
BPF $8.00 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -5.77%
BWL $1.45 $- 500 -19.44%
CAB $8.32 $- 0 17.18%
CBL $8.34 $0.01 3229 17.46%
CHL $2.20 $ 3539 0.00%
CIB $8.01 $- 0 6.94%
DHS $1.64 $- 0 9.33%
FAM $4.02 $- 1650 1.52%
FCC $1.27 $- 0 -36.18%
FCL $8.35 $- 0 4.38%
FIN $10.40 $- 700 7.22%
ICD $9.60 $0.10 2250 -2.93%
JSJ $8.22 $- 0 0.00%
KZLB $5.50 $-0.40 850 -8.09%
PRE $10.00 $ 0 0.00%


DIVIDENDIAGM NOTES:
FCL has declared a dividend of $0.11 per share payable on
May 13, 2005, to all common shareholders as at record date
April 29, 2005.
ICD has declared a dividend of $0.135 per share payable on
May 19,2005, to all common shareholders as at record date May
5,2005.
CBL will hold its Annual General Meeting on May 18,
2005, at 5pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay Street, Cable
Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.
DHS will hold its Annual General Meeting on May 19,
2005, at 5.30 pm at Doctors Hospital, No.1 Collins Avenue &
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
CHL will hold an Extraordinary General Meeting on May
20,2005 at 9am at J. Whitney Pinder Building, Colina Insurance
Company, Head Office, Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas.
BWL will hold its Annual General Meeting on May 24,
2005, at 6pm at The National Tennis Centre, Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas.
CAB will hold its Annual General Meeting on May 26,
2005, at 6pm at Nassau Beach Hotel, West Bay Street, Cable
Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.





BAHAMASJ



P.O. Box N-4827 Nassau, Bahamas




DIVIDEND


.NOTICE


TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS


The Board of Directors of

Bahamas Waste Limited has

declared a Dividend for Ordinary

Shares, to all shareholders of

record as at May 13th, 2005 of

60 per share.


The payment will be made on

May 18th, 2005 by Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd., the

Registrar & Transfer Agent, in the

usual Manner.



David B. Donald
Corporate Secretary



F l~ * ^^**l^IlU*M I* ^ i


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change
CAD$ 1.2590 1.98
GBP 1.9079 -0.32
EUR 1.2866 -1.50

Commodities
Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $49.72 -10.24
Gold $436.10 0.11


International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change
DJIA 10,192.51 0.34
S & P 500 1,156.85 0.41
NASDAQ 1,921.65 -0.54
Nikkei 11,008.90 -0.34


FAMGUARD



The Board of Directors
of
FamGuard Corporation Limited
is pleased to advise that
the first quarterly dividend
for 2005
of 6 cents per share
has been declared
to be paid on
May 13,2005
to Shareholders of record
as at May 6,2005



FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED
The parent holding company of
Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHlalth Inurance Broken & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limited


)FaiiDLITY


L4 71 -


- -~-'


~""~-~"1~-~~11~'~"~~-"~""'


NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div$ Yield a


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


I=


19 _R


V{


Im"


C'.1i.. M-- M.,k.f


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUNEMONDA, MA 2, 205,IPGES3


Institution with links to



Bahamas unveils China




managing director


A FINANCIAL services
institution with a Bahamas
office has announced the
appointment of Charles Deng
as managing director of its Chi-
na-based operations.
As a member of StarCapital
Corporation's senior manage-
ment team, Mr Deng will be
based in StarCapital's Beijing
office and oversee all of its
operations in Asia. He will
report directly to Jan Beck,
president of StarCapital,, which
continues to strengthen its posi-
tion in the Bahamas.
James Zenga, chairman and
chief executive of StarCapital,
said: "Mr Deng joins StarCapi-
tal as part of its continuing strat-
egy to develop Chinese part-
nerships for business in China
and around the world.
"We have invested substan-
tial resources over the past 11
years in China and Mr Deng
will continue expanding our
relationships and helping us


realize our vision."
Mr Deng has served as vice-
president of Beijing Enterprise
Holdings in Hong Kong since
2001, and was responsible for
project development, corporate
finance, legal and corporate
communication.
He also served as managing
director of China Securities
(International) from 1996 to
2001.
Previously, he served in
senior executive positions with
Yoshiya International, Hong
Kong, ING Bank, Indosuez
Asia, Banque Indosuez and in
CITIC Group's head office and
its subsidiary in Hong Kong.
Mr Beck said: "Mr Deng has
had significant experience in the
business sectors StarCapital
serves, and with many of the
organisations with whom Star-
Capital enjoys or seeks to devel-
op relationships. He will be a
valuable addition to our diverse
global management team."


$100m cost of hurricanes

to the tourist industry


FROM page one
shingles and other such dam-,
age from the storm surges.
"The estimated cost of
materials for housing repairs
and reconstruction was esti-
mated by ECLAC to reach
$31.2 million."
Total damages to schools
was placed at more than $20
million, including structural
damages and losses to equip-
ment, furniture and sports
facilities.
Some $2.9 million in dam-
ages was also said to have
been incurred by the health
sector, including repairs to
hospitals and clinics, and the
replenishment of supplies.
Total damage to the
Bahamas' transportation
infrastructure was placed at
$44.45 million by ECLAC,
including $10 million in vehi-
cle losses. Some 62 per cent
of the total infrastructure
damage was attributed to
Marsh Harbour and Freeport
International airports.
The IDB said: "Damages in
the transport sector were sub-
stantial in Abaco, Grand
Bahama and several of the
Family Islands. Fishing docks,
roads and seawalls are among
the structures that sustained
the most damage.... Docks
were destroyed as decks were
blown away and foundations
eroded."
Direct damages to the
water and sewerage system
resulting from Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne were esti- .


mated to be $0.54 million,
with indirect losses totalling
$2.77 million.
In addition, the IDB said
ECLAC had estimated that a
"minimum" of $21.6 million
was needed to clean-up and
waste disposal resulting from
the hurricanes.

Waivers
Meanwhile, the IDB pro-
posal requested two waivers
or departures from the Bank's
normal procurement policy
over the selection of WSP
International Management
Consulting as the project man-
agement firm, and the selec-
tion of Deloitte & Touche as
the project's auditor.
WSP was to be selected
without competitive bidding,
and paid $700,000, due to the
need to initiate works "as
soon as possible". The gov-
ernment would be responsi-
ble for its hiring.
The government itself had
asked for the waiver in regard
to Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas), which will be paid
$500,000 for its work.
The government said its
choice was based on the fact
that the company had provid-
ed audit services to donors'
contributions for emergency
relief from the two hurricanes,
and efficiencies would be
gained through consolidating
cost controls and utilising
Deloitle and Touche's expe-
rience.


* ,w..,.. *~**~f~ -'


I I


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

has a vacancy for the position of

BRANCH MANAGER

PROFILE:
Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Finance or a
related field
* Series 7 or the Canadian Securities and must be familiar
with investment products
* 10 years commercial banking experience with a minimum of
3 years managerial experience
* Experience managing diverse loan portfolios and
assessing loan quality
* Detailed knowledge of retail/commercial lending practices
and credit analysis to ensure the integrity of the portfolio
* Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
* Excellent leadership and coaching skills
* Strong interpersonal skills to work effectively with staff and
customers
* Strong PC skills


RESPONSIBILITIES
INCLUDE:
* Promoting excellent service quality
* Solicitation of new customers and managing sales
activities to enhance the profitability of the unit
* Effectively leading, supporting and coaching personnel
to achieve corporate objectives
* Reviewing and implementing new customer, mortgage
and commercial lending activities and organizational
strategies
* Managing loan portfolios and assessing loan quality
* Managing credit lines within the delegated authority

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited offers an excellent remuneration
and benefits package including performance-based incentives,
medical insurance, life and long tern disability insurances and
pension plan.
Send resume no later than Monday 9th May 2005 to:
Human Resources Department
Re: Branch Manager
Head Office, Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-7502
Nassau
Fax 327.5175


e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


I' I


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228
beautifully
appointed Junior Suites
and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.

Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
just steps away.

In-room amenities
include: king size or
double double beds,
sitting area
with sofa bed,
cable tv, refrigerator,
in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer,
complimentary deluxe
continental breakfast
served daily,
Pool with swim-up bar,
Crusoe's garden
restaurant serving
breakfast and lunch,
Bamboo cocktail bar.

Ask about our local
corporate, group and
wedding rates.

Contact our
management team
for a site inspection.


RRADISE ISLAND
BAHAMAS


1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT -
FINANCIAL CONTROL
The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, Nassau Branch,
is seeking the services of an Assistant Vice President in its Financial
Control Department. The Successful candidate will carry out the
following duties:
Daily monitoring of Branch and Subsidiaries Balance
Sheets and reviewing daily exception reports.
Implement new accounting standards and regulatory
requirements in the Financial Control Department.
Assist in the monitoring of large exposures, interest
rate, foreign exchange rate and various credit risk limits.
Assist in the Asset and Liability management process.
Assist in the documentation and testing on controls
surrounding the financial reporting of certain accounts
in accordance with the Sarbanes-Oxley requirements.
Assist in the external, internal and Central Bank audit
processes by ensuring that financial records and financial
statements are provided during the exercise.
Complete regulatory and Group financial returns in
accordance with regulatory guidelines and Group
policies and standards.
Assist in the preparation of annual financial plans and
budgets.
Supervise daily bank and securities reconciliation
Qualifications/Experience:
A professional accounting qualification (CPA, CAA,
ACA, etc).
At least five (5) years of post qualification work
experience in an accounting firm or financial institution,
including 3 years in a supervisory or managerial role
building/leading small teams to achieve results within
tight deadlines.
Additional Skills:
A high level of interpersonal skills and the ability to
deal with management at all levels locally and
internationally.
Excellent communication skills (both verbal and written).
Ability to foster a positive team environment.
Ability to embrace change in a dynamic organization.
Proficient in Microsoft Windows based applications,
especially Excel and Word.
Applications should be addressed and submitted to:
Manager Human Resources
HSBC
P.O. Box N-4917
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 502-2566
Application Deadline: Wednesday, 11 May 2005


Bahamas Supermarkets Limited, operators of City Markets, Nassau has
openings for the position of Management Trainee.
The successful applicant will have at least 2 years experience in retail
management and 2 years experience in merchandising, buying or marketing.
The applicant will have strong inter-personal skills, is a self-motivator and.
has effective supervisory skills. The completion of secondary school with
a minimum of 3 BGCSE and some computer literacy is required. The position
requires the ability to work a flexible schedule including weekends and
holidays.
Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience and qualifications.
Please send a covering letter and resume together with references from past
employers, a picture and police background check to the Human Resources
Manager, P.O. Box N-3738, Nassau, Bahamas.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE
Only qualified applicants will be contacted.


Ii


I










pp
44(



Ii



II


: i: --


I


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 3B








PAGE B, MODAYMAY 22005THEITNBUN


on
WINDING BAY

REAL ESTATE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 2 years sales experience with a track record of success.
Real estate license is preferred. Successful candidate
must have exceptional communication skills, both verbal
and written. Must be personable, professional and willing
to commute or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's
estate lots range from $875,00 to over $4 million. A
handsome package is available. Please email cover letter
and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn.: Sales & Marketing.


Lawyer wins appeal cases


FROM page one
matter be referred to the
Supreme Court Registrar for
taxation. This was refused by
Justice Lyons, who also refused
Mr Levine leave to appeal.
However, due to his retainer
by Fortis, Me Levine knew that
the trio of executives had each
been given two indemnities by
the fund administrator, which
they claimed were "highly con-
fidential, and disclosure of its
details would be highly preju-
dicial to their interest in the
Oracle actions".
In the meantime, Mr Levine
had sought the Court of
Appeal's leave to appeal Jus-
tice Lyons's earlier decision on
January 28 2003. His bid had


NOTICE

TENDER FOR GROUP LIFE &

MEDICAL INSURANCE

The National Insurance Board invites proposals from eligible
insurance companies and/ or brokers for the coverage of its Life
and Medical Insurance Plan for the employees of the National
Insurance Board.

The new policy will be for a year, commencing on July 1, 2005,
following the selection of the successful tender.

Parties interested in submitting a proposal may collect an
information package from the Director's Office of the National
Insurance Board Headquarters, Baillou Hill Road.

All proposals should be sealed, marked "Proposals for Life
and Medical Insurance" and must be delivered no later than
4:30p.m. on Friday, May 6, 2005, to:

The Director
THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD
Headquarters Building
Nassau, Bahamas






Sueen' s College
N. n Baam 1i 89f



A VACANCY EXISTS FOR A

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

To work in an extremely progressive
and goal oriented school.

The Position will become effective August 1, 2005

The successful applicant will be familiar with:

Be familiarly with Microsoft Server 2003 based networks and all Windows
Operating Systems, Cisco firewall switches and network security

Be familiar with Microsoft computer applications, mainly Word, Excel,
PowerPoint, Access and Publisher (XP and 2003 versions)

Computer repair and troubleshooting

The successful applicant will be able to:

Maintain networks that employ Ethernet, wireless and fibre-optic connectivity

Maintain and upgrade the school's website

Manage and maintain the day to day operations of the computers and printers
on the campus, including the student laboratories and administration offices

Multi-task

Initiate effective and efficient procedures to complement the school's vision

The preferred applicant will have experience in a school based environment.

The person offered an appointment will be expected to make a commitment to
work in harmony with Christian principles and to support the emphases of the
Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church of which the school is a part.

Queen's College was established in Nassau in 1890 by the Methodist Church
and is a member of the International Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges
and Universities (IAMSCU).

The completed application together with a covering letter must be sent to:

The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N-7127
Nassau, Bahamas
or faxed to 242 393 3248 or emailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com
so as to arrive by May 20, 2005.


relied upon an affidavit of the
same date that referred to the
indemnities.
The Court of Appeal ruling
recorded: "The relationship
between the plaintiffs and For-
tis on the one hand, and the
defendant on the other, clearly
continued to simmer, during
which the defendant, it is con-
tended by the plaintiffs, contin-
ued to threaten disclosure of
confidential and privileged com-
munication between themselves
and himself."
The three Fortis executives
thus began their June 2002 legal
action, but were unsuccessful in
obtaining an interim injunction
from Justice Lyons, although
he subsequently ordered that
all documents filed with the
Supreme Court Registry be
placed under seal.
However, relations between
Mr Levine and the three exec-
utives and their employer "pro-
gressively worsened", with the
attorney filing separate sum-


monses in each of the three
Oracle shareholder fund law-
suits seeking taxation of his
fees. He again relied on the Jan-
uary 28 2003 affidavit.
As a result, the Fortis trio
applied for an injunction from
Justice Lyons to prevent Mr
Levine from using "confiden-
tial information" and relying on
the January 28 2003, affidavit
that detailed the indemnities.
The injunction was granted on
February 24 2003, and this is
what Mr Levine appealed.

Allegations
Then, on May 30 2003, Mr
Levine filed a further affidavit
in the three Oracle cases that
again mentioned the existence
and terms of the indemnities,
but he argued this "was essen-
tial to launch a challenge on the
credibility of McDeigan-
Eldridge, who had herself in an
earlier affidavit (not before us
or Justice Lyons) made adverse


comments and allegations
against the defendant".
This prompted the three For-
tis executives to seek Mr
Levine's committal for alleged
contempt in refusing to comply
with the February 17 2003
injunction. Justice Lyons reject-
ed this, a move that became the
subject of the second case.
The Court of Appeal said
that Justice Lyons, "on a more
mature and reflective consid-
eration" at the time of the com-
mittal hearing on September 3,
realised "grave doubts and mis-
givings" about the injunction.
In backing Justice Lyon's rul-
ing, the Court of Appeal gave
an order "formally discharging"
the February 17 2003 injunc-
tion, awarding Mr Levine costs
for both that court and the
Supreme Court.
The Fortis trio's appeal against
the contempt motion's dismissal
was also dismissed with the order
that they pay the defendant his
costs in both courts.


BTC's concern for its future


FROM page one
Public Utilities Commission
(PUC), the telecommunications
sector regulator, for the public
consultation on proposed niod-
ifications to Caribbean Cross-
ings' licence that would allow
it to implement the Jamaica
Bahamas Cable System (JBCS),
BTC alleged that the proposal
would further undermine its
value in any potential privati-
sation exercise.
The second BTC letter was
prompted by Caribbean Cross-
ings requesting an additional
modification to its licence at the
end of the first consultation
period.
Caribbean Crossings, which
is wholly owned by Cable
Bahamas, had asked the PUC to
alter the wording of its proposed
licence modification to allow the
cable system to offer transmis-
sion capacity to any operator
for the carrying of voice and
data traffic "between Jamaica
and/or any other foreign coun-
try" through the Bahamas.
This, Caribbean Crossings


has said, would allow it to "take
advantage of a number of ini-
tiatives" that would allow the
Bahamas to become a "true
telecommunications hub" and
boosting its "commercial cre-
ativeness and entrepreneurial
efforts".
However, in its latest letter
signed by Felicity Johnson, vice-
president of legal and regula-
tory affairs, BTC urged that the
additional Caribbean Crossings
request "be stricken and not
considered", especially as it was
submitted late in the first round
of consultation.
This, though, omits that BTC
sent in its letter on the last day
of the second-round consulta-
tion, April 25.
BTC said "in the strongest
possible language" that
Caribbean Crossings' late
request was "procedurally
improper and out of order".
BTC's letter seemingly
ignored the presence of IndiGo
Networks, the Systems Resource
Group (SRG) subsidiary, as its
first legal competitor in the
fixed-line voice market.


It claimed that by approving
the proposed Caribbean Cross-
ings network, BTC's "exclusive
right" to carry voice traffic
would be damaged.
"The sole purpose of the pro-
posed modification is to permit
the carriage of voice traffic. The
laws of physics and a cursory
understanding of the telecom-
munications sector prove that
such voice traffic would likely
find its way into commerce in
the Bahamas," BTC said in its
letter.
It also urged the PUC to
determine how it would protect
BTC through monitoring the
termination of voice traffic in
the Bahamas.
BTC also argued that
Caribbean Crossings was
requesting that the PUC fully
liberalise the Bahamian
telecommunications sector,
something it claimed the regu-
lator was not empowered to do.
It added that there had been
no findings produced to show
the Bahamas was ready for
another entrant to the telecoms
market.


The Bridge Authority




NOTICE TO ALL CONTRACTORS
PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS




It has some to the attention of the Bridge

Authority that over weight and over sized

vehicles are utilizing the Old Bridge (Eastern

Side) after hours, without the consent of said

Authority. The lawful capacity of the Eastern

Bridge is (15) fifteen tons and the capacity

of the New Western Bridge is (25) twenty

five tons. Use of these bridges exceeding

the lawful capacity without the consent of

said Authority will be considered a breach

of the Law and violators will be prosecuted

forthwith. Checks will be made of all vehicles

utilizing both bridges for compliance.



Edward P. Fitzgerald
Chariman
The Bridge Authority


:PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE
















Realtor unveils its new website


* Buyers can find the latest
developments in Paradise Island real
estate, where construction is now
underway at Ocean Place on the
Harbour and the Ocean Club
Residences in Ocean Club Estates, at
www.paradisesalesandrentals.com


REAL estate agent Paradise
Sales and Rentals has this
month launched a new website,
www.ParadiseSalesAnd-
Rentals.com
"New developments like the
Ocean Club Residences (now
underway) and the billion dollar
Phase Three expansion by
Kerzner are drawing interna-
tional attention, giving the real
estate market on Paradise
Island another major boost,"
reports Andrea Brownrigg, bro-
ker and president of Paradise
Sales and Rentals.
"Our informative and up-to-
date new website is a valuable
tool for both local investors and


international second home buy-
ers."
"The website's design and
content are completely new,"
Mrs Brownrigg added,
"although the address is still the
same. At www.ParadiseSales-
AndRentals.com you'll find
photo slideshows for most list-
ings, detailed Paradise Island
information and an in-depth
investor guide.
"Few things frustrate clients
and real estate agents more
than out-of-date information.
One major reason for develop-
ing a completely new website
was to create an online admin-
istration centre. Our agents can


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, WALTER HARRIS-
FERGUSON, of Yamacraw Shores, P.O.Box EE-15342,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to WALTER
HARRIS-HARVEY. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the. Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty:(30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.










Telecommunications & Computer Network Design
& Infrastructure Specialist
Homes Offices Subdivisions
Call Us Today!
Tel: 393-7733





ANNOUNCEMENT
BAHAMAS PLASTIC SURGERY
Gregory C. Neil, M.D.
Board certified
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon
Surgery of the Hand
The regularly scheduled Plastic Surgery Clinic will be held in FREEPORT
on Saturday May 21st, 2005, 9:00am until 11:00am
at Quantum-Physicians Plus
West Atlantic & Poinciana Dr.
12:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m.
Sunrise Medical Center
East Sunrise Highway.
Please Call (242) 356-3189 or (242) 322-5766 to schedule
or confirm appointmentss.


HOUSE FOR RENT


5 Bedroom, 4 bathroom, split level,
partly furnished.
Nassau East Blvd.,
$2,500.00 per month
($2,000.00 down)
Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 364-0753


now post and edit their own list-
ings, change information and


upload photos in just seconds,
from anywhere in the world."
New listings are posted
almost daily, and property
slideshows feature photos for
most listings.
"The slideshows are my
favourite feature," says Mrs
Brownrigg. "Many listings have
10 or more photos, enabling
clients to get a true sense of the
property and quickly narrow
their search."
She added: "In the first quar-
ter of 2005, investors scooped
up most listings on Paradise
Island priced under $400,000,
so as you search our website
you'll find the sales inventory
minimal in the lower price
brackets. Both sales and rentals
for Paradise Island properties


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ROSALIN TARICIA
BRAYNEN, of Yamacraw Beach, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to THERESA ROSALIN
BRAYNEN If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.




ERECT A HIGH WALL AROUND YOUR HOME

Al so roofing and painting.
:L- Call.
I HOME
MAINTENANCE
tAL7 g -- TEL: 325-8841 TODAY


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, PERRY NORMAN
PANZA, of Perth Street, off Kemp Road on Strachan
Alley, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
PERRY NORMAN KEMP. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.




NOTICE


Pilot House Management Company offers for sale by
virtue of liens registered against the hereafter described
Condominium Units and the power of sales vested in the
Condominium Association pursuant to the provisions
contained in the Law of Property and Conveyancing
(Condominium) Act 1965.

Unit No 102 2 bedrooms/2 bathrooms
Unit No 307 2 bedrooms/2 bathrooms
Unit No 405 1 bedroom/1 bathroom

All offers should be in writing and tendered in sealed
envelopes by Friday May 14, 2005 to James Thompson,
P.O. Box SS-19934, Nassau, Bahamas

These sales are subject to a reserved price, and the right
is reserved to reject any or all offers.




New Office Space for Rent


4,800 sq. ft. at $6,000 per month or
2,400 sq. ft. at $3,000 per month

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 364-0753


have dramatically increased. We
are seeing many signs of a sig-
nificant market upswing.
"Even if you have lived here
your entire life, you will discov-
er something new and useful in
the Paradise Island section,"
said Chandra Parker, market-
ing director for Paradise Sales
and Rentals.
Along with the largest port-
folio of Paradise Island proper-
ties, the website's more unex-
pected features include:
property descriptions for
every Paradise Island resi-


dential development;
an overview of all the new
projects on Paradise Island;
emergency and utility ser-
vice phone numbers;
a dining guide with phone
numbers for every restaurant
on the island;
and links and contact infor-
mation for most Paradise Island
activities.
Coinciding with the new look
for Paradise Sales and Rentals '
are new numbers phone-363-
4000 and fax-363-4002. The old
numbers will be phased out.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
2005/CLE/QUI/00300
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division
IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising Eleven and Fifty-four hundredths (11.54) acres
more or less originally granted to John Cash by Crown Grant
B-219 which said John Cash Grant is stuate on the Southern
edges of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island of Great
Abaco one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and runs from the Sea on the East Westwards between the
Northern edge of the Nathan Key Grant (Grant K-145) on the
South and a Road Reservation to the North and bounded
westwardly by a Road Reservation sometimes called "Pole
Line Road" or "Nathan Key Drive"

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Roy Carlisle Newbold, n
Sr. !

NOTICE
TBihePetition df ROY CARLISLE NEWBOLD Sr. of Stede
Bonnett Road in the Township of Marsh Harbour in the Island
of Great Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of


The Bahamas in respect of:- -
ALL THAT piece parcel or part of a tract of land comprising
Eleven and Fifty-four hundredths (11.54) acres originally
granted to John Cash (Grant B-219) which said John Cash
Grant is situate on the Southern edges of the Township of
Marsh Harbour and runs from the Sea on the East Westwards
between the Northern edge of the Nathan Key Grant (Grant
K-145) and a Road Reservation to the Northorth and bounded
Westwardly by a Road Reservation sometimes called "Pole
Line Road" or "Nathan Key Drive" and generally having the
position shape boundaries marks and dimensions as shown for
Grant B-219 on Bahamas Registred Plan 436 ABACO and
which said hereditaments is bounded ON THE WEST by the
said Road Reservation sometimes called "Pole Line Road" or
"Nathan Key Drive and running thereon Four hundred and
Thirty-three and Five hundredths (433.05') feet more or less,
ON THE SOUTH by the aforementioned Nathan Key Grant
(Grant K-145 and running thereon One thousand Sevenhundred
and Forty-four and Three hundredths (1744.03) feet more or
less ON THE NORTH by the aformentioned Road Reservation
to the North and running thereon One Thousand Seven hundred 1
and Fourteen and sixty-one hundredths (1714.61) feet more or
less AND ON THE EAST by the High Water Mark of the Sea
and running thereon by straight transect One hundred and Fifty
and Eighy-three hundredths (150.83) feet but following the
configurations of the coast running thereon one hundred and
Seventy and Ninety two hundredths (1.70.92) feet more or
less and which said piece parcel or part of a tract of land has
the position shape boundaries and dimensions as are shown on
plan filed in the above Action and thereon coloured Pink.
Roy Carlisle Newbold Sr. claims to be the owner in fee simple
in possession of the said land free from encumbrances and has.
made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
or The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act,
1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to granted by the Court in accordance with the said.
Act. A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
business hours at the following places:-
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building,
East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
2. The Office of Administrator, Local Government, Central
Abaco District, Dove Plaza, Don Mackay Boulevard, Marsh
Harbour, Abaco.
3. The Chambers of the Petitioner's attorneys, Messrs. Maillis
and Maillis, Chambers, Fort Nassau House, Marlborough
Street, Nassau, Bahamas
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or right of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 31st day of July A.D. 2005
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit and other prescribed papers to be filed
therewith. Failure of any person to file and serve a Statement
of his claim within the prescribed time operate as a bar to such
claim.
DATED the 26th day of April, A.D. 2005
MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers
Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the petitioner


E.


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 5B


I








PAGE6B, ONDA, MA 2,205 TE TIBN


ADVERTISING

Production


Long-established communications agency
needs a versatile production assistant to
help withprint and audio work, event
coordination and client contact.

Must be computer literate (Macintosh
preferred). Experience with digital audio
production an asset (Pro Tools). On the job
training for the right candidate.

Must be outgoing, energetic and willing.
Good English skills required.

Company-paid medical. Excellent working
conditions. Top clients.

Salary based on experience and
qualifications.

Apply to:
Manager
Media Enterprises
Fax: 325-8065
Email: info@bahamasmedia.com
www.bahamasmedia.com



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

2004/CLE/qui/01568
IN THE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land being Numbered Lot No. 511 situate in
the Subdivision called and known as "Garden Hills
Estates Number 2" situate on the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas which said piece parcel or lot of
land is bound on the North by Lot Number 512 now
or formerly the property of Eurina Beneby and running
thereon One hundred and Thirteen and Nine
hundredths (113.09) feet on the East by Lady Slipper
Avenue and running thereon Thirty-two and Eighty-
nine hundredths (32.89) feet ending clockwise in a
curve for Forty-four and Eighty-four hundredths
(44.89) feet to point number 12 on the South by
Alocasia Avenue and running thereon Eighty-five
and Twelve hundredths (85.12) feet and on the West
by Lot Number 543 now or formerly the property of
Reno Williams and running thereon Fifty-five and
Seventy-one hundredths (55.71) feet which said piece
parcel or lot of land has such positions shapes
boundaries marks and dimensions as are shown on
a plan filed herein and thereon colourec pink.

AND IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles
Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER OF The Petition of Edward
Rolle and Carolyn Rolle

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Edward and Carolyn Rolle of Nassau,
Bahamas: ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being
Numbered Lot No. 511 situate in the Subdivision called and
known as "Garden Hills Estates Number 2" situate on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said piece parcel or
lot of land is bounded on the North by Lot Number 512 now
or formerly the property of Eurina Beneby and running thereon
One hundred and Thirteen and Nine hundredths (113.09) feet
on the East by Lady Slipper Avenue and running Thirty-two
and Eighty-nine hundredths (32.89) feet ending clockwise in
a curve for Forty-four and Eighty-four hundredths (44.89) feet
to point number 12 on the South by Alocasia Avenue and
running thereon Eighty-five and Twelve hundredths (85.12)
feet and on the West by Lots Number 543 now or formerly
the property of Reno Williams and running thereon fifty-five
and Seventy-one hundredths (55.71) feet.
Edward and Carolyn Rolle claim to be the owners of
the fee simple estate in. possession of the tract of land
hereinbefore described free from incumberances.
AND the Petition have made an application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have their title
to the said tract of land investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of the
said Act.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons
having Dower or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a
claim not recognized in the petition shall on or before Monday,
the 13th day of June A.D., 2005 file in the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a statement of his
claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be
filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve
a statement of his claim on or before Monday the 13th day of
June A.D., 2005 will operate as a bar to such claim.
Copies of the Filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court; and

2. The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys
for the Petitioners, Sassoon House, Shirley Street &
Victoria Avenue, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.


Dated the 13th day of April A.D., 2005
GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas,
Attorneys for the Petitiilersi


* CARLA Shirine Tayor, a mutual fund accountant at Deltec



Accountant



passes exam


A MUTUAL fund accoun-
tant at Deltec Bank and Trust
has passed the Series Seven
examination in Fort Lauderdale
after studying with the Nassau-
based Securities Training Insti-
tute (STI).


Carla Shirine Taylor (pic-
tured above) said: "Taking the
Series Seven course at STI
allowed me to expand my
knowledge in the securities
industry, and become more pro-
ficient and effective on my job."


g UBS
UBS is the leading global wealth manager. UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
our subsidiary in Nassau, has an opening for the position of a

Manager
Information Technology Services
The IT Services Team provides smooth daily processing of all IT
and telecommunication systems to UBS in the Bahamas. Our main
technological environment consists of a W2K Network with about
130 users, Netscreen Firewalls, MS-Exchange, Meridian PBX,
Sybase, MS SQL and Oracle database systems, IBM WebSphere
and Veritas NetBackup.
In this challenging position you will be responsible for:
Leading the local IT Team (five professionals);
Ensuring an ongoing high quality of all Information Technology
services provided;
Budgeting, planning and coordinating all changes to the existing
IT environment;
Reporting to local and global Management on a regular basis;
Coordinating with local, regional and global Providers all
planned changes;
Participating in local Management and Risk Committees
The successful candidate meets the following requirements:
Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or Information Technology;
At least 5 years of work experience in a similar position and
environment (proven track record);
Expert knowledge of most of the above mentioned technologies;
. Several years of experience in managing a team of IT professionals;
* Strong Project Management, Leadership and Communication
skills;
* Banking knowledge desirable.
Interested candidates who meet the above criteria are asked to
apply in writing, enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O.Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas






IndiGO
N E T W O R K S




Senior LAN/Windows

Technician
Indigo Networks has an exciting opportunity for an
experienced LAN/Windows technician in its Technical
Services department.
Applications are invited from motivated individuals who
possess a current Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
qualification and have a minimum of 5 years in a
technical support role with experience in the following:
Installation, configuration and troubleshooting of
Wintel based networked PC server & client
hardware
Installation and configuration of
Microsoft Windows products including
Windows NT server, 2000, 2003, Active
Directory, Exchange server and MS
Office suite
Installation and troubleshooting of local
area networks to include layer 2/3
switches and Cisco routers
Experience with Cisco networking
equipment; CCNA would be an
advantage
VolP
Good oral and written skills
A competitive salary commensurate with
experience is offered along with product training,
medical, pension and car allowance after a
qualifying period.
Interested candidates should submit their
resumes in writing to Indigo Networks P.O
.BOX N-3920 for the attention of the Technical
Services Manager by May 13th 2005.


CUSTOMER NOTICE















JOHN BULL, 284 Bay Street & Atlantis
CARTIER, Bay Street & Atlantis,
GUCCI, Bay Street & Atlantis
BVLGARI, Atlantis






















PALMDALE
HARBOUR BAY Shopping Centre
MALL AT MARATHON
FREEPORT, Grand Bahama
EMERALD BAY, Exumai
GUESS, Mall at Marathon
LA PARFUMERIE, Atlantis









Management regrets any inconvenience caused.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


I BUSINESS












More than 15% of land disputed in the courts


FROM page one
development of a land use pol-
icy and administration in the
Bahamas, the IDB said security
of land tenure was impacted by
four key factors.
These were "overlapping
claims and rights" resulting
from property disputes and the
lack of parcel-based maps; own-
ership uncertainty resulting
from the "non-mandatory
nature" of real property rights
and "the questionable reliabili-
ty" of Registry information; an
"outdated" policy for Crown
Land divestment and adminis-
tration that promotes ineffi-
ciency; and the existence of gen-
erational land.


The IDB hopes its project
funding will help generate a 40
per cent increase in revenues
from Crown Land, driving these
from $1 million to $1.4 million,
and a 20 per cent increase in
the number of properties on the
tax roll from 70,000 to 84,000.
Another goal is to generate
information on land value, own-
ership and location for 75 per
cent of all land parcels in New
Providence and Grand Bahama,
going from zero to 70,000 land
parcels.
In its assessment of the pro-
ject's economic viability, the IDB
said the improved land adminis-
tration and land management
systems it would create would
reduce the time taken by the


Registrar General's Department
to record documents and deeds
in the Deeds Registry from nine
months to two months.
The time for the Department
of Lands and Surveys to pro-
vide recommendations on
Crown Land applications is pro-
jected to also shrink from three
months to one.
Assuming that only 50 per
cent of the target reduction
times for both agencies would
be attained, the IDB said the
economic gains from the pro-
ject would be $5.3 million, dis-
counted at 12 per cent over 10
years, resulting in a benefit/cost
ratio of 1.32 and a 15 per cent
rate of return.
In addition, the IDB said the


fiscal benefits to the government
would be an increase in real
property taxes of $4.7 million
annually, representing just over
10 per cent of the real property
taxes collected in 2003-2004.
The bank said this would
come from an increase in land
parcels, added to the tax rolls
and increased efficiency in col-
lection of Crown Land rents
and leases.
It estimated that 20 per cent
of the land parcels some 2,800
- would pay real property taxes
for a period of five year from
the end of the project, as taxes
are only payable when the own-
ers present a declaration.
The IDB said the implemen-
tation of an "equitable" real


property tax system had been
hindered by passive collection
of taxes owed, incomplete tax
rolls and the undervaluation of
many properties.
Real property tax revenues
collected during 2002-2003
were $37 million, a figure that
was estimated to have risen to
$45 million the following year.
The IDB said: "This gap
between actual collection and
estimated potential tax revenue
highlights that collection per-
formance could be improved,
while a 2000 study put arrears of
past due .taxes and penalties at
$156.5 million."
Due to the passivee" nature
of real property tax collection,
the government attempted to


capture lost revenue when
properties were sold through a
high transfer tax, which ranged
from between 0.75 per cent to 8
per cent of a property's value.
The IDB added: "High trans-
fer taxes, combined with the
non-mandatory nature of the
land registry, provide strong
incentives to not record prop-
erty transfers or to obscure true
sales prices, thereby reducing
the reliability of land informa-
tion and affecting revenue col-
lection."
The IDB added that "much
of the government decision-
making regarding land devel-
opment is done in a vacuum
without a real understanding...
of the affected area".


Out Island

booking

deal won

FROM page one
TicketXpress will also facili-
tate all air-inclusive packages
that now come though the
board's toll-free line. The com-
pany will also be able to accept
credit card payments for book-
ings. Based on the contract,
TicketXpress will receive a
commission of 5 to 12 per cent
of each sale.
Reservations and bookings
for the Out Island Promotion
Board were previously handled
by Expedia.com, through a pri-
vate agreement the company
had with the Ministry of
Tourism. The board's intention,
Mr Birch said, is to continue to
use Expedia as the private label
booking engine solution for its
member hotels on
www.Bahamas.com and
www.OutIslands.Bahamas.com,
and other member online sites.
With the call centre staffed
by four persons, TicketXpress is
expected to begin taking calls
at the end of July. The start date
will allow the company to train
its agents and familiarise them
with various aspects of a Fami-
ly Island vacation before the
onset of one of the busiest peri-
ods of the year.
The new bookings system
was sought because member
hotels felt Expedia's agents,
who also work on a commission
basis, lacked incentives to pro-
mote the non-branded, smaller
properties and experiences, and
the lesser known islands of the
Bahamas.
There was also the belief that
Expedia's agents, who were
likely not to have travelled to
the destinations they were sell-
ing, lacked sufficient product
knowledge to portray a realistic
picture of the Family Islands
for potential visitors. The ease
of selling a branded vacation at
a Four Seasons or a Westin also
made it much more difficult for
smaller properties to get the
attention they needed.
After a review of several US
and Canadian companies, Tick-
etXpress was chosen as the call
centre partner. To qualify, Tick-
etXpress had to be able to book
international airline stock and
ticket international travellers
who had a non-domestic
address. It also had to be able to
confirm international air book-
ing confirmations via e-tickets,
use the Sabre reservation sys-
tem for international air book-
ings, and participate in whole-
sale bulk arrangements and
agreements with major US car-
riers.
The successful partner also
had to house seat inventory for
commuter airlines, such as
Western Airlines and Sky
Unlimited, on their own reser-
vation system without liability
to the hotel owners as it relates
to the commuter airline reser-
vation system, and offer all
member hotels customised
booking solutions at an afford-
able commission structure.
What distinguished Tick-
etXpress from the others, Mr
Birch said, was the company's
commitment to hire and train
qualified Bahamians to service
calls. TicketXpress' Nassau
offices on John F Kennedy Dri-
member hotels, which is criti-
cal for on-going product train-
ing.
Ken Donathon, RND Hold-
ings' managing director, said
that well-trained professional
Bahamians will be answering
both the 1-800.Bahamas and 1-
800- Out Island telephone num-
bers.
TicketXpress has also con-
tracted with the Promotion
Board to provide member prop-
erties with an Internet-based
integrated hotel reservation and
front desk system, at no initial
cost to member properties.


A BNT seeks PUBLIC



COMMENT on Draft



Management Plan for



Exuma ays Land & Sea Park


Please send comments by Schedule of Stakeholder Meetings


Tu esday, May 3Iai

to Bahamas National Trust,Fam

P.O. Box N-4105, Nassau,
Bahamas or by email: \\
ecarey@batelnet.bs I


Tel: 242-393-1317
Fax: 242-393-4978






The plan was developed through
the "Parks Partnership" funded
by the Bacardi Family
Foundation, in a joint initiative
with The Nature Conservancy.


Wednesday, May I I: New Providence,
7pm The Retreat,Village Road




I^THESE
S 115 OU
^^^^^ j'^NAT^v~ ^^fsIONAL

PARKS! WE WAN


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


.,.P
[ n


- r -ll


-1l4


% 4


' Row 41


Slp o
s a d


-a ow ~
p .. a ~ a



Ia?.
a.



m -


~,04
tomb*


a.


BIob


e*-41m -


Ooolp a WD0 am


-a -
a


I


S .f --


e. me
--IIa
-a =




^ *

aa,. ~ *


a -


410


a


0


S' ",Gqopyrig hted Material


--- Syndicated Content -



. Available from Commercial News Providers"







S*- a Y I
a -


A a *-o ..





.^4


~? a
-


I I


*
*
*


*


- a


* -
0

00*
f
* a ~
-

0





l*
a a
* 4- e am

a* ve *
0

em* 0e
-- a e

S m age*
-n


* a

a
a.


map
* *



411101 qb
qa, 0
* 0a a *
* me*
* e -,a *
* **

m
* a a
* *
* *0

* 40 w*
* We eaa*
S* *
* a *

* a *
* a a ~a*e
* a
* ae*
4 do o-




0 0
* -@ *
* in -
S -n, , -D


*

* a
"0 * "
-NN


in. ~0

- a al o
a. 40NO


a.,
-


- -,


0
a
a a
-0
a
*
a
*
* 0




*
*
* 0


n


'a"'


I


- a


ap



du 0-Sm404t


* B
a
B
*1 A
z
45


- -




- 4. 0-0mo


a
a


I -


_ I -, -- --_


404m~inm-D


.


4ma 4


.


%W


0 *


I 0 i


__ _


OTP


t7I )







MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 9B


.THIE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY EVENING MAY 2, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow "Portland" American Experience "Victory in the Pacific' The Battle of Okinawa in-
*8 WPBT show FYI Per- Hawaiian koa wood bowl; 1904 dog cluded the largest amphibian invasion. (N) /1 (CC)
t 7 sian tapestry. show trophy. (N) (CC)
The Insider (N) Still Standing Everybody Everybody Two and a Half CSI: Miami "Recoil" (iTV) (N) A
WFOR n (CC) Judy's Mother's Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Men (N) ,1 (CC) (CC)
Day tradition. C1 (CC) (N) A (CC)
Access Holly- Fear Factor "Best Friends" Four Las Vegas Mike agrees to help a Medium "In the Rough" Allison finds
i Q WTVJ wood (N) (CC) pairs of best friends play a game of guest find his wedding ring. (N) information that could result in a
"Fear Factor chicken." (N) (CC) murderer being set free. (N)
WSVN Deco Drive Nanny 911 Jim and Tammy 24 "Day 4: 2:00AM-3:OOAM"Agent News (CC)
WSVN Lawrence deal with their sons' fear Bauer sets his si hts on a new lead.
of being left alone. (N) ,1 (CC) (N) 1 (PA) (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition: The Bachelor The final three con- Superanny "Christiansen Family"
WPLG (CC) How'd They Do That? "Dolan Fam- testants arrive in Aruba. (N) ti The Christiansens learn to commu-
ily" (N) 1 (CC) (CC) nicate without shouting.

:00) Cold Case Airline Elderly Airline DJ Rap- Knievel's Wild Ride Robbie pre- Knievel's Wild Ride Tucson, Ariz.,
A&E Files (CC) passenger's ail- ture drowns his pares to leap over seven planes on is home to a known Knievel sabo-
ments act up. sorrows. (N) an aircraft carrier. (CC) teur. (CC)
Hardtalk BBC World World Business BBC World Click Online BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News Report News News
T BETcom Count- Movie Club Comic View
BET down
Coronation WHISKEY ECHO (2005, War) (Part 2 of 2) Joanne Kelly. Premiere. Relief The National (CC)
BC Street (CC) workers help victims of civil war in Sudan. (CC) (DVS)
b Late Night With The Contender 1 (CC) Dennis Miller The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan 'Brien Neve Campbell. (N)
CNN 00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
:CNN cooper360 (CC)
Reno 911! Dan- Reno9111 Dys- Reno 911! (CC) Reno 911!Gar- South Park Blue Collar TV Comedy Central
COM gle's ex-wife vis- functional sher- cia's strip club Stan's mutant "Fighting" f Presents Steve
i ts. (CC) iffs department. celebration twin. (CC) (CC) McGrew.
COURIT Cops n (CC) Safet Challenge "Safe Behind the Forensic Files North Mission Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
OU RT wheel" Road & Justice
That's So Raven * THE PRINCESS DIARIES (2001, Comedy) Julie Andrews, Anne (:10) Kim Possi- The Suite Life of
DISN "Royal Treat- Hathaway, Hector Elizondo. An awkward teenager leams that she has ble Truth Hurts" Zack & Cody
ment"r(CC) royal blood.'G' (CC)l (CC) Beauty pageant.
This Old House Weekend Deco- Fresh Coat (N) Scrapbooking Embellish This! Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty
DIY n (CC) rating Ib(N) ______
DW Euromaxx Journal: In Faith Matters Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth Tagestema Depth
The Michael Paula Abdul: The E! True Holly- American Idol: The E! True Holly- Dr. 90210 Career opportunities.
.____ Jackson Trial wood Story 1 (CC) wood Story A (CC)
'ESPN :00) MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at New York Mets. From Shea Stadium in Rush- Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
, A CbHN ing, N.Y. (Live)(CC)
E NiI Fuera de Juego Goles de Es- Goles de Italia Beach Soccer (Taped) 2004 World Series of Poker From
SPNI (N) pana(N) (N) Las Vegas.
WTN Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
"F'IT V r :00) Ultimate FitTV's Housecalls "Jacqueline W.; FitTV's Housecalls "Heather; In- The Extremists The Extremists
I V oals 1 Pre and Post-Natal Exercise" crease in Energy & Tone" (CC) n (CC) 1 (CC)
FOX-NCv Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
O-NC Shepard Smith ____________ Susteren (ULive) (CC)
SNFL Tournament (Live) (CC) Sports Show
'GOLFL (:31) Golf Channel Academy Live (:43)Golf Channel Academy Dave (:25) Golf Fit- (08) Champions Tour Learning
Live) 4Pelz. ness(N) Center (N)
i -. (NC:00) Greed (iTV) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire Weakest Link (iTV) (CC) Celebrity Blackjack (iTV) (CC)
L(CG N (IV) [I (CC)
G4Tech (:00) Attack of X-Play Cheat Icons "Mortal Judgment Day Filter Role-play- Judgment Day
G4Tech he Show (N) Kombat." ing games. (N)
(:00) Walker, Touched by an Angel "Reasonable Judging Amy Amy makes a life-al- Judging Amy Vincent tries to forge
h HALL Texas Ranger Doubt" Monica is called for jury duty tearing decision about the future of family peace after Amy moves out of
(CC) on a capital case. (CC) her family. A (CC) their mom's house.
Holmes on Rooms That Design U Room Debbie Travis' Facelift "Karen's Holmes on Homes "Honeymoon
HGTV Homes "All Rock Family in the basement. Kitchen" A (CC) Ensuite" A (CC)
Decked Out r n room.1 1 A
I Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W.Scham- This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Love a Child
(CC) bach (CC)' (CC) day
Yu-Gi-Ohl 1 Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends The Will & Grace Everybody Everybody
KTLA (CC) Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air gang enjoys an Leo's ex has a Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
"Free Sabrina" 1 (CC) old home video. past with Will. Marie sculpts. "The Letter /A
L CHASING SECRETS (1999, Drama) Della THE ONLY WITNESS (2003, Suspense) Kristy Swanson, Vincent Spano,
LIFE Reese, Ossie Davis. A black couple provide a haven Daveigh Chase. Premiere. A girl sees a murder that may be part of a con-
for a neglected white child. (CC) spiracy. (CC)
MSNBC Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Abrams Report Scarborough Country
IMSNBC cC mann_
Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Drake & Josh Full House 1A Full House A Fresh Prince of The Cosby
Boy Genius SquarePants A "Mindy's Back" (CC) (CC) Bel-Air Show A (CC)
Still Standing Fear Factor "Best Friends" (N) 1 Las Vegas Mike agrees to help a News ,1 (CC) News
(N) A( (CC) (CC) guest find his wedding ring. (N)
(:00) Killer In- Avalanche DogsE-Force Mysterious En- Outdoor Out- U.S. Army Rangers: The Best of
OLN stinct counters takes the Best
PEED 00)NASCAR Inside Nextel Cup (N) NBS 24-7 (N) NASCAR Nation
Nation(N)
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Everybody Everybody Friends Chan- Friends "The Seinfeld George Seinfeld "The
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond dler's mother vis- One With the leams Kramer's Doll" ) (CC)
l:, "No Thanks" A (CC) Marie sculpts. its New York. Baby Shower' first name. (CC)
(:00) In a Fix Amazing Medical Stories Man, 28, Untold Stories of the E.R. A doctor Extreme Plastic Surgery (CC)
TLC Worlking on a lives on borrowed time because of a tries to save shooting victims while
r garage. (CC) rare genetic illness, being threatened. (N)
I' (:00) Law & Or- NBA Basketball Playoffs Teams TBA. (Live) (CC) NBA Basketball:
'TNT der "Helpless" First Round
n (CC) (DVS)
Tnn Ed, Edd n Eddy Ozzy & Drix ( Mucha Lucha Codename: Kids Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) Teen Titans Dragonball GT
I (cc) TA (CC) Next Door I
TV5 Des racines et des ailes Coeurs TV5 Le Journal
batailleurs (SC)-
STWC (6:00) PM Edi- Storm Stories Storm Stories Evening Edition (CC)
___ aon (CC) (CC) (CC)
UNIV 00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Cristina

S(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit MURDER AT THE PRESIDIO (2005, Mystery) Lou Diamond Phillips, Vic-
,USA der: Special Vic- Tutuola's friend's daughter becomes toria Pratt, Jason Priestley. Premiere. An investigator probes the killing of
timsUnit n a victim of rape. (CC) a Marine's wife. (CC)
VH1 The Surreal Life F (CC) The Surreal Life More Awesome Celebrity Beefs Fabulous Life Fabulous Life
Vt (CC) n( Of...Ft Of... ,
|,,, Home Improve- ** MERMAIDS (1990, Comedy) Cher, Winona Ryder, Bob Hoskins. WGN News at Nine n (CC)
O < GN ment "Ploys for A teen deals with her first love and an unconventional mom.
-" __Tots" n (CC)________
Everybody 7th Heaven Zoe thinks Ruthie be- Everwood "Acceptance" Jake's vis- WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond trayed her confidence when Martin iting brother says he sees no future Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"_The Letter" n ends their relationship. (N) n for Jake and Nina. (N) (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Cuts "The Hook Girlfriends Lynn Half & Half Mona Dr. Phil Bad influences. (N)
WSBK (CC) "Glug, Glug" (N) Up" Kevin buys has feelings for is offered a differ-
n(CC) new spa oils. herbandmate. entjob.
(6:30) * THE ** MEN IN BLACK (1997, Science Fiction) Tom- (:45) Monster-in- ** WARM SPRINGS (2005,
HBO-E MEDALLION my Lee Jones. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial Law: HBO First Docudrama) Kenneth Branagh, Cyn-
(2003) 'PG-13' activity on Earth. 'PG-13' (CC) Look (CC) thia Nixon. n 'NR' (CC)


(:00)**** THE UNTOUCHABLES (1987, Drama) Deadwood "Childish Things" Nuttall Deadwood "Amalgamation and
HBO-P Kevin Costner, Sean Connery. Incorruptible govern- unveils his new bicycle. (I (CC) Capital" Wolcott interrupts the inter-
ment agents move against AlCapone. A 'R' (CC) rogation of Mose. ,\ (CC)
(:00) * STEAL BIG, STEAL LITTLE (1995, Comedy-Drama) Andy THE MEDALLION (2003, Action) Jackie Chan,
%HBO-W Garcia, Alan Arkin, Rachel Ticotin. An unscrupulous man forces his twin Lee Evans, Claire Forlani. A Hong Kong detective has
_brother off his land. 1) 'PG-13' (CC) supernatural abilities. (f 'PG-13 (CC)
H O 15) *** SINGLES (1992, Comedy) Bridget Fonda, *** EMMA (1996, Comedy) Gwyneth Paltrow, Jeremy Northam, Toni
BO-S mpbell Scott. Romantic crises abound for young Collette. A young woman's romantic meddlings prove disastrous. 1 'PG'
adults in Seattle. I 'PG-13'(CC)
(6:30)** * ALONG CAME POLLY (2004, Romance-Come- Fueling the Fire *x BROKEN UZARD'S CLUB
MAX-E OUTFORJUS- dy) Ben Stiller. A jilted newlywed finds solace with an- People witness a DREAD (2004, Comedy) Bill Pax-
TICE (1991) 'R' other woman. Ft 'PG-13' (CC) robbery. (CC) ton, Kevin Heffeman. A 'R' (CC)
(:00) ***, BOYZ N THE HOOD (1991, Drama) ** STUCK ON YOU (2003, Comedy) Matt Damon, Greg Kinnear, Eva
MOMAX Cuba Gooding Jr., Ice Cube. Black youths come of age Mendes. Conjoined twins star on a TV show with Cher. n 'PG-13' (CC)
in L.A.'s crime-infested streets. F 'R' (CC)
(:00) *** THE ITALIAN JOB (2003, Suspense) The L Word "Loud and'Proud" (iTV) Penn & Teller: Penn & Teller:
SHOW Mark Wahlberg. ilV. Athief and his crew plan to steal Secrets are revealed. n (CC) Bulls...! (iTV) (N) Bulls...! Hypno-
back their gold. I 'PG-13' (CC) FA (CC) tism. (CC)
TMc i:15) ** BUL- * CITIZEN RUTH (1996, Comedy-Drama) Laura (:45) *** SEX, LIES, AND VIDEOTAPE (1989,
LETPROF Dem. Premiere. Both sides of the abortion debate rama) James Spader, Andie MacDowell. A fend
MONK (2003) make a mom-to-be a pawn. A 'R' (CC) brings a couple's sexual insecurities to light. f1 'R'


S T I

Time: Second Floor of
Doors open 11I pm


Admission:
$7 w/ Movie Tickets
$16 without
Movie Pass Giveawaysf


L~


*








PAGElOBMONDY, MY 2,2005TRIBNEOSORT


Wreckers




get a shock




in first of




playoff series


U By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Real Deal Shockers
stunned the Y-Cares Wreckers
on Saturday night, winning the
first game in their best of three
playoff series.
Shockers, the five team cham-
pions in the Division II league,
defeated the Wreckers 93-82 for
the win.
The Wreckers club suffered
defeat on the night in the Divi-
sion I league as well with a 106-
96 loss to Abaco Market Wolver-
ines.
In the Division II game,
Shockers got off to a slow start
but rallied back in the final min-
utes of the first quarter ending it
on a 9-2 run.
Heading into the second quar-
ter the score board read 14-9 in
favour of the Shockers, but the
Wolverines Edward Corey took
charge bringing his team within
two points heading into the half
time break.
Surged
Carey surged to 11 second
quarter points, opening the quar-
ter with a big three pointer. His
team scored 27 points in the
quarter to the Shockers' 24.
He ended the game with 18
points and six boards, his team-
S'mates Jermaine Johnson and
Tony Simon chipped in with 15
and 13 points respectively.
However, things went down-
hill for the Wolverines in the
third quarter, they allowed the
Shockers to outscore them 25-
14.
Picking up the pace for the
Shockers was Tony Ferguson,
scoring 17 points in the third -
Ferguson was the game's top
scorer with 21 points, nine assists
and three rebounds.


He was unstoppable even
when the Wolverines sent two
defensive players at him.
Scrambling back into their 2-3
defensive stand, the Wreckers
tried to clog the lane forcing the
Shockers to rely on their outside
shot.
This wasn't a big problem for
Ferguson, who launched five
three pointers, hitting two.
The Shockers' guards were just
too quick for the Wolverines,
who opted to put their big men
on the court.
Switching the defensive stand
was also a bad idea for the
Wolverines.
Foul
Ferguson slashed through the
middle making Minus commit his
third personal foul.
With Minus out of the way and
the Wolverines players deep in
foul trouble the Shockers had an
easy path to the basket.
Also coming alive for the
Shockers were their point guards
Cory Williams, scoring 17 points,
with Sidney Hillary and Anwar
Ferguson among the four Shock-
ers players to end up in double
figures. Both players scored 12
points for the win.
With two minutes remaining
in the fourth Wolverines'
Edward Carey picked up his fifth
.pprsQisal tll, sen~i~ Williams
Williims, who bile to hit
both' shots, lingered around the
free throw-line to snatch the
Wolverines' inbound pass.
A quick cut to the basket and
Williams was back on the free
throw line trying to complete a
three point.
The conversion sealed the deal
for the Shockers who will be
looking to put away the Wolver-
ines on Tuesday night.


Jiuk pon sir( hchca (A LMA


I1


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS






MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 11B


"Copyrighted Material.


Syndicated Content'

Available from Commercial NewA Providers"


56


S.


W 0o
.- 40-4


West Indies


hitting back


*. ~
~
0
S a -


- ~.-


- -a 0.


S.- 0. - -


w
- - 0 ~
- - -
0. -

- 0. -


U


- -


- - ~- S ~ -


- a


The Bahamas takes the

bronze at Penn Relays
FROM page one
for a sixth place finishing.
The winning time was 42.68 seconds ran by the USA Red
team, USA's Blue team ran 43.15 seconds for a second,
with the 2004 Olympic gold medallist finishing in the third
spot in a time of 43.50 seconds:
The team of Jamaal Rolle, Osbourne Moxey, Everette
Frazier and Michael Reckley ran 40.45 seconds in the 4xl00m
also for sixth.
The gold in the men's 4xl00m was won by the USA Red
team in a time of 38.58 seconds, the USA Blue team ran
38.60 seconds. Jamaica finished up in third place with 39.38
seconds.
The sprint medley team also finished up in the sixth spot
in a time of 3:24.88. Running on this team were Rolle, Fra-
zier, Von Wilson and Oneil Williams.
Wilson ran the 400m leg with Williams taking the 800m.
The race was won by the USA Red team in 3:12.10 seconds
with South Africa coming in second with 3:13.64 seconds and
USA Blue team rounding of the top third spot in 3:14.01 sec-
onds.
The BAAA is expecting to field a team to participate in at
least five relays before competing in the CAC games, which
are set for July 7th-llth.
Last year, the Bahamas competed in the Olympic games
without practising. The women's team finished just out of the
medal count, coming in fourth behind Jamaica, Russia and
France.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


* 0


-- q I -- a W -o--


Am








MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005

SECTION


B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Coppyg htedI


;IrSyndicated C


Available from Commercia
-m=


News providers"
0


as


W


-m.....- -aft.e-"b--


Bahamas takes bronze





in Penn Relays 4x400m


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
TEAM Bahamas captured
a bronze medal in the men's
4x400 metre relay over the
weekend, as they competed
for the first time this year at
the Penn Relays.
The team had a gold medal
in sight, but the bad exchange
between Olympian Chris
Brown and Alexis Roberts:
dropped them back into fifth
spot.
The team ran a time of
3:03.11 seconds for the bronze
with the Jamaican squad cap-
turing the gold medal in a time
off 3:02.63 seconds.
The bad exchange came as a
result of Brown and USA's-
Red team member Tyree
Washington tripping up at the
exch. ge line, the trip record-


ed to set them back 10 sec-
onds in the race.
The USA's Blue team was
able to pull of a second place
finishing in 3:03.38 seconds
despite the Red team not
being able to complete the
race.
Recovered
Avard Moncur, who has ful-
ly recovered from his injuries
last year ran the lead off leg in
45.80 seconds. Moncur handed
off to Brown, who ran the
fastest split of the quartet
44:80 seconds.
The time lost between
Brown and Roberts affected
Roberts' time in the event,
pushing him to 46 seconds and
forcing Tim Munnings to run a
low 44 seconds in order to
recapture the gold.


Munnings was only able to
split 45.70 seconds, the second
fastest split recorded by all of
the anchormen.
The bronze medal was the
best performance by the team


selected by the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Asso-
ciation (BAAA), with all the
other squads finishing in the
sixth spot.
The BAAA still opted to


field a team to part take in the
relays despite not having
members of the Olympic team
competing.
The women's 4xl00m team,
which consisted of Philipa


Arnette-Willie, Nivea Smith,
Tamika Clarke, and Lisa Mor-
timer ran a time of 45.47 sec-
onds. This was good enough
SEE page 11B


I WiliamUsI helps (teamUtoU a silver medal


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
BAHAMIAN college athletes were also in
action this weekend at the Penn Relays.
. Nathanial McKinney and Andre Williams
went head-to-head for their schools in the
4X400m, with Williams' Texas Tech getting
the edge.
Williams, who ran the third leg for Texas
Tech helped his team capture a silver medal in
a time of 3:03.43 seconds. Florida University
won the event in 3:03.34 seconds.
McKinney, who attends the St Augustine's
College (Falcons) team was seventh in 3:08.99
seconds.


Shandria Brown was the only Bahamian to
run represent her college at the Drakes Relays,
which were held in Drake University, Des
Moines, Iowa.
Brown's team finished up in sixth place in a
time of 45.26 seconds.
Competing for the first time this year was
Christine Amertil in the Martinique Grand
Prix.
Amertil ran to claim a gold medal in her
first 200m in a time of 22.88 seconds.,
Coming in second was Laverne Jones from
the US Virgin Islands in 23.17 seconds -USA's
Wyllesheia Myricks coming in third with 23.30
seconds.
Amertil opted not to compete in the 400m,


waiting another two weeks before opening up
her season.
Jackie Edwards also travelled to Martinique
to compete in the long jump at the Grand Prix
championships.
Edwards' jump of 6.42 metres slated in the
fourth spot with USA's Rose Richmond win-
ning the event with a leap of 6.73m and Cuba's
Yargeris Savigne coming in second with 6.58m.
Marion Jones posted her fastest time over
the weekend at the same meet, winning the
100m in 11.28 seconds.
The win by Jones sealed the USA sweep
with Myricks and Melissa Barber both finish-
ing in a time of 11.35 for second place. Syl-
viane Felix of France was fourth in 11.36.


-- -- 'I -


Unit
The Tdb


I









MONDAY, MAY 2,2005


The stories behind the news


With the Bahamas' latest homicide stemming from a
domestic dispute, police have expressed concern about the
inability of some Bahamians to end relationships without vio-
lence.
Floyd Johnson, 32, of Hospital Lane No 97, was murdered
last week, pushing this year's murder count to 14. Mr John-
son was stabbed to death during an altercation with two
men which was the result of an argument over a woman
known to all parties, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna told The Tri-
bune.
Police have reportedly questioned a 15-year-old juvenile'in
connection with the murder...


I -PLACES I


PANIC-STRICKEr
passengers leapt from
jitney last week as a
gunman opened fire
inside the bus after
demanding money from
the driver.
The daylight robbery
of $18 occurred in the
Blue Hill Road area
last Sunday afternoon.


A /G4
........U


The Tribune last week learned that residents of Cat
Cay a private island in the Bimini chain owe the
Bahamas treasury more than $1.8 million in back tax-
es. And they now have less than 60 days to pay. Min-
ister of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller said the res-
idents have until July 1 to clear the debt, which includes
real property taxes and unpaid customs duties. The
disclosure came as Mr Miller was refuting claims made
by Manuel Diaz, president of the Cat Cay Yacht Club,
during a heated March meeting. In a vicious slanging
match, Mr Diaz called Mr Miller an idiot and accused
him of childish behaviour. Diaz later apologised...


Why the Bahamas will continue



to be seen as the promised land


* By JOHN MARQUIS
ovelist Graham
Greene, in the
introduction to
his book The
Comedians,
about the tyranny of Papa Doc
in Haiti, said it was "impossible
to deepen that night" in describ-
ing the horrors of the regime.
Nothing, in his view, could be
worse than the gratuitous vio-
lence inflicted on the people by
President Francois Duvalier's
sadistic ogres, the Tontons
Macoute, as they killed and
maimed at will in the festering
streets of Port-au-Prince.
For nearly three decades, the
Duvalier family power-crazed,
greedy and ruthless slaughtered
their enemies, terrorised the
people and plundered the trea-
sury. But they also offered some-
thing resembling stability, a long
period when the people knew
for sure who was occupying the
presidential palace and who was
pulling the levers of power.
Today, wicked as they were,
their regime is seen in retrospect
almost as a period of compara-
tive calm, a time when the few
tourists Haiti attracted to its
shores were pretty sure they
would emerge alive.
If he were around today, Mr
Greene might feel the need to
revisit his statement about the
excesses of the Duvaliers
because Haiti in 2005 is probably
more of a horror story than at
any time in its 200 years of
bloodlust and butchery. Nights
in Port-au-Prince are darker and
deeper now than they ever were.
According to those who know
the country best, life is far worse
than during even the grimmest
days of the Duvalier family's 29-,
year reign. Bad as Papa Doc and
his fat playboy son Jean-Claude
were, their torture and intimi-
dation were nothing alongside
what's happening now. In their
day, there was a sinister but real
sense of order in this tradition-
ally chaotic country. Today, the
chaos is almost total, with few
redeeming features. Haiti is
among the world's true
tragedies, a perilous place where
bullets fly day and night.
The most recent Bahamas
Immigration and Defence Force
crackdown on illegal immigrants,
with 249 rounded up in one day


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


dpfo w Gooft a40


alone last week, is wholly under-
standable from the Bahamas'
viewpoint as the country tries to
protect itself from invasion from
the south.
But, as Australian human


rights attorney Rebecca Smith
has pointed out to INSIGHT,
the hazardous voyages to free-
dom being undertaken by hun-
dreds of Haitians in overloaded
sloops are the result of a social


catastrophe which it is difficult
for any Bahamian to compre-
hend. And it's time, she said,
that the international communi-
ty, including the Bahamas,
acknowledged the human rights


calamity now in progress there
and react accordingly.
She said most Haitians flee-
ing their country in sloops are
genuine refugees, not necessari-
ly from poverty though that's


very real but more likely from
the violence and mayhem caused
by the abysmal political situa-
tion.
Yet she says the Bahamas is
ignoring international law by
repatriating them without due
process, paying no regard to the
human tragedy behind their des-
peration.
"Terrible things are happen-
ing in Haiti," said one observer
in Port-au-Prince, "Most people
outside of Haiti can only imagine
what it's like, but even then
they'd fall short of picturing the
real horror."
It seems incredible that, only
60 miles or so from the south-
ernmost tip of the Bahamas
chain, there lies a nation so off
its head that innocents are. being
slaughtered in the streets as
United Nations peacekeepers
try desperately but unsuccess-
fully to live up to their name.
Armed gangs now rule the
grisly city slums and the poor
are, as usual, on the receiving
end of the violence as political
factions fight for ascendancy in a
country whose future now looks
even bleaker than its past.
Always erratic, always insane,
Haiti has now somehow sunk
even deeper than before into a
morass of its own making, with
the prospect of death a daily
reality for the poor people of
the Port-au-Prince shanty dis-
tricts of Cite Soleil and Bel Air.
While most international eyes
are concentrated on Baghdad,
and the horrors of the Iraq war,
the United States media seems
to be studiously ignoring the car-
nage now occurring 300 miles
south of Nassau in a country
which has known little or no
peace since it grasped indepen-
dence from the French in 1804.
Since the removal of President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide last year,
and the installation of a seem-
ingly ineffectual interim govern-
ment, Haiti has lurched into an
ever-quickening downward slide.
Rightly or wrongly, President
Bush is being held at least part-
ly to blame for the current deba-
cle, and Aristide's clumsily han-
dled exile has been laid at his
door.
Where the truth lies in Haiti's
tangled politics is difficult to dis-

See HAITI, Page 3C


pl







ii Me


The Arawa Group Arawak Avenue P.O. Box SS 5698 Nassau, Bahamas Tel242.394.3192 Fax: 242.394.4224


i:


I Ill~l~~lar.~~__--IllsL-IIIICI - *---l~n~~ ~Lli~--`_----- -I-----~--~--~~ ---_


I .4


ju hjTiun|


i


-.














New era for isle that time forgot


Movie man talks of his


little piece of paradise


S 'Copyrighted Materinal
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"



I


LIZ clalborne


HARBOUR BAY


SHOPPING PLAZA


THE PLAZA,
MACKEY STREET


2004 F()RD EXPLORERS


With an additional $1500.00 Customer Cash Back ", ;
2 year or 30000 Mile Warranty
License And Inspection To Birthday, Floor Mats, Full Tank Of Gas,
2 Year Road Side Assistance, First 5 Services To 12,000 Miles Free
See The Full Line Of All Your Favourite Fords At




THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


N By JOHN MARQUIS


I n 1958, a Crooked
Islander acquired a
kerosene-powered
fridge and sold ice-
cubes to the locals at a
penny a time "because they
wanted to know what cold felt
like."
The people, whose entire
lives had been spent on a 28-
mile long rock in the tropics,
had no idea what cold meant.
Hot and sometimes hellishly
hot was all they knew. A sea
breeze was the nearest they
ever got to cool and cool, as
northerners often told them,
was absolutely nothing com-
pared to ice-cold as they knew
it.
Holding the melting cubes
in their hands, the islanders
expressed genuine amazement
at this totally alien sensation.
Then, shaking their hands dry,
they would spend more pen-
nies on'more cubes so that
they could enjoy the experi-
ence all over again.
This quaint but true tale
captures perfectly the kind of
place Crooked Island was in j
those distant immediate post-
war days.
It was backward and beauti-
ful, naive and natural, unspoilt
and unsophisticated, an island
still clinging to 19th century
ways, even though the 20th
century was already more than
half way through.
At a time when man was
readying himself for a moon
shot, when television was
beginning to rule everyone's
lives, and cars were making
life a misery in the big cities,
Crooked Island was seeing its
first fridge.
Its roads were bumpy tracks,
its lamps were oil-fired, its .
men walked miles on dusty
pathways with packs on their
heads, and life was lived at the
most frugal level. The most
noise anyone ever heard, apart
from claps of thunder during
the summer storms, was the
crowing of cockerels on scat-
tered homesteads.
The people, blissfully free
of stress, hauled fish from the
sea and coaxed plants from the
land. Every day was another
brilliant burst of sunshine
wrapped in eggshell blue.
Last week's announcement
of a $35 million hotel and
marina development at
Pittstown marked the first-
ever significant investment in
Crooked Island. Until now,
no-one has considered it worth
the bother.
Centuries
For centuries since Christo-
pher Columbus is alleged to
have eaten crocodile meat
there on his first New World
voyage in_ 1492, the island has
slumbered in the heat with lit-
tle or no reference to the mod-
ern world.
"For many years, there was
nothing for people to get out
of bed for," an observer noted.
"Every day was just another
goddammed Bahamian day,
with the sun beating down and
the sea a shimmering green."
Now things could change,
and it remains to be seen
whether they will be for the
better. However, Crooked
Islanders themselves are ready
to embrace the new era, and at
least one long-time foreign res-
ident is pleased they are to get
their chance at relative pros-


It used to be called The
Forgotten Isle, but Crooked
Island emerged from the
shadows last week with
the announcement of a $35
million hotel and marina
development at Pittstown.
INSIGHT reports on how
life in a Bahamian backwater
could change forever...


perity.
"Places like this are the real
Bahamas," said Canadian Mr
Donald McMillan of Landrail
Point, "The beaches here are
like powder and you can drop
a. quarter in 30 feet of water
and still see whether it shows
heads or tails."
Mr McMillan, 74, a former
movie, producer who first
arrived in Crooked Islander to
make a promotional film in
the 1960s, has lived there since
1969, having decided that
there could be nowhere else
on earth quite so fantastic.
He and his wife June, 73,
bought eight acres of property,
including a 400-feet stretch of
beachfront, and settled into a
way of life as different as they
could imagine from the First
World strains and stresses of
Canada.
Imagine
"We both love it here," he
said, "and we can't imagine
ever being anywhere else. It
has become our home and we
live here all year round. Dur-
ing the winter months our chil-
dren, all grown-up now, come
to see us and they love it, too."
In the early days, a Canadi-
an community grew up in the
immediate vicinity, but Amer-
icans now form the biggest
expatriate .grouping, with one
Dutchman also flying in at fre-
quent intervals.
Mr McMillan finds plenty to
occupy him, in spite of the all-
enveloping quietness. At first
he chewed happily on his cigar
and watched the sun go down,
but he said retirement palled
after about a year, so he decid-
ed to open a hardware store.
In fact, he claims it is the
smallest hardware store in the
world an emporium of nails,
screws, hammers and pliers in
a 45-foot truck trailer. "The
locals love it," he said.
Meanwhile, his wife keeps
busy outside, potting plants,
tidying the garden, enjoying
the simple island life in the
sunf.
"When we first came here,
everything came in on the
mailboat. If you didn't have
something, you had to knock
on someone's door and hope
they had it. So I opened by lit-
tle store.
"Of course, I don't make
any money from it. With only
400 people on the island,
including old people and chil-
dren, my customer base is only
about 200 residents, so I'm
never going to make a fortune.
"But I enjoy doing it and the
locals say the store is the best
thing that could ever have hap-
pened to them. Even after all
these years I suppose I am still


an outsider, but the fact that I
am now called Brother Mac
means I am almost Bahami-
an."
Mrs McMillan grows toma-
toes and other vegetables,
makes delicious soups, and
often gives foodstuffs away to
elderly Bahamian folk. In
return, the couple are seen as
real treasures on the island,
foreigners who stayed because
they had found their own per-
sonal paradise.
When they first settled on
Crooked Island, Mr and Mrs
McMillan had to drive 17 miles
to make a phone call to their
daughter. In the evenings, he
would pump up his kerosene
lamp.
With no electricity, he then
used windpower, and later
solar power, to light his home.
Now the island's infrastructure
has improved to the point
where a large hotel develop-
ment is to become a reality.
The wonderful ice-cube sto-
ry related by Mr McMillan
originated from "Mama"
Blanche Ferguson, one of
Crooked Island's two 94-year-
old matriarchs. She and
Eunice Deleveaux date back
to an age when Crooked
Island was desperately poor,
but blissfully in harmony with
nature.
"When she told me about it,
I found it so charming. It was
so far removed from anything
people 'from the First World
can imagine," said Mr McMil-
lan.
"I can also remember a Mr
Taylor I never knew his first
name telling me he used to
walk four miles from Thomp-
son settlement to Landrail
Point to meet the boat. Then
he would carry produce on his
head all the way back home
because there was no other
form of transport at the time."
Over the years, Crooked
Island's population has dwin-
dled because with no invest-
ment on the island there was
nothing to detain the younger
generation.
With no jobs, no money, no
entertainment and no prospect
of anything better, they head-
ed north-west to Nassau,
where 200,000 people are
crammed into an area smaller
than Crooked Island itself.
Fishing
Those left behind enjoy
good fishing around the island,
catching grouper, tuna, mack-
erel and muttonfish, to name
but a few of the species to be
found in abundance in local
waters. Mr McMillan joins
them in hoisting fresh food
from the gin-clear sea.
"Here it's possible to live
without much money," he said,
"You never have to pay for
heating, and if you have food
in your stomach and a roof
over your head, what else do
you need?
"We have more and more
people coming back to
Crooked Island from Nassau,
retired people who find their
pensions go much further
down here. Except when I go
back to Canada on a visit, I.
leave my doors unlocked and
never give a thought to securi-
ty. In all these years, I can't
remember a single thing being
taken from my property."
As he chatted, Mr McMil-
lan was contemplating the.
departure of the last winter
resident. From the end of
April onwards, Crooked
Island is left to the native pop-
ulation and fully integrated
foreigners like himself. It will
be next fall before the expa-
triate home-owners return.
"There is something nice
about this time of the year,
when we have the island to
ourselves," he said. For Mr
McMillan, there is such a thing
as paradise on earth, and he
is lucky enough to own part of
it.


PORTRAIT PAINTING


by:Mr Elvin Neely


Tel: 323.7642

Cell; 45647819




A painting of
Mother Pratt


IDls~a -- I- I I Ir I -


sl~B~Bllll~er I;- -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 3C


I AM writing a legal paper
about the Bahamian legal
response to Haitians. I became
interested in this issue when I
first came here in. February
and noticed the similarity in
media reports about 'illegal
immigrants' in the Bahamas to
media reports on 'illegal immi-
grants' in Australia.
Australia and the Bahamas
are both signatories to the 1951
Refugee Convention, and both
have breached international
law and their own domestic
laws to deny people (Middle
Eastern people coming to Aus-
tralia, and Haitians coming to
the Bahamas) the right to free-
dom from persecution.
In order to write my paper I
have been doing much
research upon the history of
Haiti and the history of 'floods'
of refugees from Haiti to other
countries all coinciding with
massive violence in their
homeland rather than simple
poverty.
I have spoken with many
Bahamians from all walks of
life in order to understand the
hostility to another group of
people, and have collected all
newspaper articles pertaining
to this, so believe I have an
understanding of the issue
from both sides.
In your article you state that
it is "difficult to find anyone
ready to speak out on the
immigrants' behalf." I am
more than willing to do so, and
can back up all of my con-
tentions with law as well as


morality.
I would like to have the
opportunity to speak to you or
'e-mail you the basic laws relat-
ing to this issue so that your
readers have an opportunity
to see another side.

Rebecca Smith

INSIGHT note: It is hoped
that Ms Smith's views will
appear in a future INSIGHT
article.


REGARDING your article
on Harbour Island, I under-
stand that a council member
told some people that a resort
is underway toward the north
end of the island, funded again
by foreigners.
The town council has
approved the half of the pro-
ject that is on the ocean side
and they are still considering
the half on the bay side. Is this
true?
If this is true, how can some-
thing of this size get started
and get. to this point without
the community knowing about
it?


In the same light, how could
the Valentine's condo project
likewise have gotten approvals
without the town council mak-
ing members of the communi-
ty aware of it?
How could the Romora Bay
project be approved only by
the council (seven members)
and never be brought up to the
community for input and dis-
cussion?
When the Bo Hengy was
first conceived, the then town
council had the good intelli-
gence to have a town meeting
and accept input from mem-
bers of the community.
It seems that recently all of
this stuff gets done without any
community knowledge or
input. Seven people are decid-
ing the future of hundreds.
How can approvals be grant-
ed by the local board for a
major project without them
first requesting comment and
input from government agen-
cies such as the Ministries of
Work, Environment, Tourism
and so on?

Maddie Dugan
681 W. Edgecote Lane
Lake Forest, IL 60045


847-234-4667
847-234-0647 fax


FEEDP., C
in igl .. ht

L-A


Haiti (From page 1C)


cern. Aristide is unquestionably
seen by the poor masses as their
champion the first Haitian
president elected democratically
but his enemies accuse him of
corruption and deep involve-
ment in the Caribbean drug
trade. He is also alleged to have
adopted Duvalierist tactics in
engaging brutal gangs to sup-
press rival factions.
In recent weeks, Aristide has
expressed a desire, from his
South African retreat, to return
to Haiti to complete his second
presidential term. That, howev-
er, seems an unlikely scenario
and, with a third term impossible
under the Haitian constitution,
it's much more likely that he will
eventually return, if at all, in his
-role as priest to help sustaiin
order under an entirely new
regime.
Amazingly, as Nassau attor-
ney Eliezer Regnier told
INSIGHT, there is at least an
outside chance that Jean-Claude
Duvalier Baby Doc will try
to involve himself in a Haitian
presidential election, if it is pos-
sible to hold one later this year.
The ex-president has already
reportedly shown an interest in a
return to politics, and is on
record as saying things have
gone downhill since his day.
Even more amazingly, the
prospect of a new Duvalierist
regime is seemingly to some
people's taste, in spite of the
young dictator's liking for the
fast life, and his suspected plun-
dering of the national treasury
before his hasty departure in
1986.
For nearly two decades now,
Baby Doc has been living in
exile in Paris. Reports suggest
that most of his money, ill-gotten
and otherwise, has now gone.
He has also suffered the incon-
venience of a costly divorce. If
nothing else, he is a more mature
and somewhat chastened figure
compared with the portly rogue
of the past.
Said Mr Regnier: "He can't
be ruled out and the talk in Hait-
ian social circles is that he could
be on the way back. Maybe
exposure to European politics
in France would make him a bet-
ter prospect than he was in the
past."
Candidate

Also seen as a possible presi-
dential candidate is another
.priest, Gerard Jean-Juste, who
was released last November
after serving seven weeks in
prison under the interim gov-
ernment. No arrest warrant was
ever issued, nor was he linked
with any crime. But, as a pro-
Aristide activist who runs a
scheme to feed the poor, he is
seen as dangerously left of cen-
tre by the country's business
class.
All told, up to 50 names could
be in the hat for the presidential
hotseat, a position which in the
two centuries since Haiti gained
its independence has always
been somewhat precarious. Yet
there has never been a shortage
of contenders.
What most people now accept
is that, if Haiti is to progress and
prosper, there must be a strong
hand on the tiller. Democracy
or not, Haitians like maximum
leaders, said Mr Regnier, and it
was time for someone to take
Haiti in hand.
It's probably a throwback to
African tribalism, when one man


ruled the pack, but Haitians evi-
dently prefer being told what to
do by someone who takes no
nonsense from unruly elements
in society and governs by force if
need beElection


At the moment, it's hard to
envisage conditions ever being
right for an election to be held.
Large sections of the population,
mostly the very poor, are con-
fined to certain neighbourhoods
by random gang violence. Unless
there is a significant improve-
ment in security, it's unlikely
these people would ever get to
the polls.
Pro-Aristide factions fre-
quently exchange fire with
police, and the morgues have
been kept busy stacking,cgrpses,,
sometimes in the most grisly,
unhygienic conditions. Add to
this the scattered irresponsible
gunfire of young "brigands" -
Mr Regnier's word and you
sense that Port-au-Prince is
unlikely to become a popular
tourist destination anytime soon.
If things are grim on the
streets, it's no better behind the
scenes. The jails are now con-
gested hell-holes where resent-
ment runs deep, with many pris-
oners held without trial. Hun-
dreds have not even been before
a judge.
Trigger-happy police are
aggravating an already volatile
situation by shooting innocents,
sometimes children. And ele-
ments of the disbanded army are
now back with a vengeance, pro-
viding security for the bour-
geoisie.
American lawyer Thomas
Griffin, who carried out a.human
rights survey in Haiti last year,
said there is a strong impression
that interim president Gerard
Latortue is doing little or noth-
ing to get the situation under
control.
Big business interests in Haiti,
all vehemently anti-Aristide,
expected Latortue to be firmer
in suppressing the former presi-
dent's supporters.
Instead, there is widespread
disorder, with Baghdad-style
beheadings of police officers
now an uncomfortable reality
and shootings of peaceful
demonstrators commonplace.
Mr Griffin, in an interview last
December, spoke of the piles of
corpses that were accumulating
in the morgues and the streets,
and the police's efforts to bypass
the morgues and dump remains
into secret mass graves.
His survey shocked even those
who claim to know Haiti well.
Whole neighbourhoods, he said,
were cut off from the outside
world, and "nightmarish fear" -
his term afflicted Haiti's poor
in their struggle to survive in
destitution.
With the security and justice
system deteriorating daily, fright-
ened police are seeing poor
neighbourhoods as enemy terri-
tory, said Mr Griffin, with poten-
tial assassins in every alleyway.
Summary executions and total
abandonment of constitutional
rights in the imprisonment of
dissidents are adding to the
atmosphere of bitterness, resent-
ment, confusion and disorder.
So determined are members
of Haiti's "elite" to keep the
Aristide movement at bay that
gangs are being paid to kill
Lavalas party members, the
group most vocal in promoting


Aristide's cause, claimed Mr
Griffin.
To make things even worse,
the UN peacekeepers are a mix
of nationalities, none of whom
speak Creole and few of whom
have even a rudimentary under-
standing of Haiti's problems.
Hence liaison between UN
troops and the local police is not
everything it needs to be.
As a result, the UN units tend
to fall in line with police aggres-
sion and impose order by force,
with innocent residents falling
victim to what Mr Griffin calls
their "heavy handed" interven-
tion.
"The injured prefer to die at
home untreated rather than risk
arrest at the hospital," he said
after completing his study.
"Those whlodo not reach the
hospital soakl m puddles of their
own blood, ignored by doctors.
Not even death ends the tragedy:
bodies pile in the morgue, quick-
ly devoured out of recognition
by maggots."
Some Haitians feel the only
realistic way to restore order in
the short-term is for the United
States to intervene again, rekin-
dling not entirely happy memo-
ries of the occupation years.
The US, it is felt, possesses
the strength and the will to make
things happen its way. The UN,
by contrast, errs on the side of
restraint until forced to do oth-
erwise. The poor, meanwhile,
see them as foreign helpers of
police killers.

Dangerous

Mr Regnier, who visits Haiti
regularly on legal business,
admits that Port-au-Prince is
now a dangerous place to be. In
middle-class hillside communi-
ties like Petionville, where the
rich can afford tight security, life
is tolerable if uneasy. But in the
city itself, sporadic gunfire is now
commonplace, and it's not
unusual to see crowds fleeing for
their lives.
"At first you think it's fire-
crackers going off, but then you
realise that's not the case," he
said. "The UN seems unable to


bring these violators of the peace
under control.
"I know some of these soldiers
have died at the hands of the
brigands, but it is their duty to
pursue them," he added.
The latest official report from
Haiti, by a human rights dele-
gation from the Organisation of
American States, paints an
intensely bleak picture.
Guns are everywhere, with the
worst elements of Haitian soci-
ety now running loose. As civil
disorder worsens, kidnappers,
carjackers and rapists are has-
tening the process. Invariably,
it's the poorest who suffer most,
thousands of defenceless fami-
lies trapped in a.madhouse
where irrational forces exert
power without mercy.
Moreover, Haiti's crumbling
judicial system offers no answers
to the mounting problems.
Judges live in fear of reprisals
and courts in some of the more
dangerous areas have been
forced to close. The rule of law is
virtually non-existent. The
aggrieved and suffering ly.e no
redress.
It's easy to sympathis' with
those in Abaco and Nass.i who
feel threatened by ithe ,Litian
invasion and the unisigbly rash
of settlements springiri.-up on
disused land. It's even.easier to
sympathise with. those who
believe the dreadful lack of san-
itation in the Port-au-Prince
slums is being replicated in the
Haitian shanty communities in
the Bahamas.
However, the influx is entire-
ly due to the failed state to the
south and its inability to rule
itself in anything resembling an
orderly manner. As the mayhem
and bloodletting continue, more
and more Haitians will seek
peace and quiet in a promised
land, wherever that happens to
be.
The Bahamas, which Haitians
see as a yellowbrick road to safe-
ty and sanity, looks destined to
suffer the immigrant onslaught
for a long time to come.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmarquis@tri-
buinemedia.net


The Affordable Solution A
to Worn-Out Bathtubs TH UB

Bathtub Liners are designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
*Wall Surrounds to cover existing bath walls: Insimulated Tile and Marble
Shower Base Liners to go over existing Shower bases
Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks
Great Shower Door selection
Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities





REBATHmas Only One-day BAHAMAS
S.. ."Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler"
10->


Telephone
(242) 393-8501 "Authorized Dealer"
Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street


of Internet scams is one every-
one needs to take to heart.
Theft of one's identity is no
laughing matter, as a member
of my own family discovered
when she began receiving big
bills for goods and services she
had not received.
The world today is full of
thoroughly dishonest people
and it was inevitable that the
Internet would be used as a
tool for nefarious activity soon-
er or later. My own response to
this situation is never to com-


****

REFERRING to your item
on the Abaco Haitian prob-
lem, I feel Mr Cooper's atti-
tude is not helpful and that
Mrs Key is right in saying that
the black-white issue should
be set aside while discussing
this very important matter.
If Abaconians are not pre-
pared to present a united front
on something that has such
major implications for the
island, what hope is there for a
solution? I personally fear that
the sanitary problems will
cause a deterioration in health
on Abaco.
While India is trying to build
latrines all over its countryside
to cut down disease, we appear
to be encouraging the reverse
process, with people defecat-
ing everywhere, with no regard
for the environment and the
water table.
Please note that, worldwide,
some 6,000 children a day die
from diseases related directly
to poor sanitation. Do we real-
ly want such a Third World
scenario here in the Bahamas,
where we are trying to take
society to a higher level?

JBL
Nassau
*Se

INSIGHT'S amusing report


mit my credit card numbers or
bank details to anyone over
the net because I am unsure
of the security.

Wary surfer
Nassau

INSIGHT note: The Tri-
bune staff member who wrote
last week's article has been
offered another $7 million this
week by Internet scammers in
West Africa in an attempt to
steal his identity.


Minister of Trade and Indus-
try Leslie Miller said the resi-
dents have until July 1 to clear
the debt, which includes real
property taxes and unpaid cus-
toms duties.
The disclosure came as Mr
Miller was refuting claims made
by Manuel Diaz, president of
the Cat Cay Yacht Club, dur-
ing a heated March meeting. In
a vicious slanging match, Mr
Diaz called Mr Miller an idiot
and accused him of childish
behaviour. Diaz later apolo-
gised.
Mr Diaz also said island con-
tributed $10 million to the
Bahamian economy each year.
But Mr Miller said that, after
an investigation, he had learned
their true contribution was less
than $2 million a year.
S...
'PANIC-STRICKEN passen-
gers leapt from a jitney last
week as a gunman opened fire
inside the bus after demanding
money from the driver. The
daylight robbery of $18
occurred in the Blue Hill Road
area last Sunday afternoon.


ith the
Bahamas'
latest homi-
cide stem-
ming from a
domestic dispute, police have
expressed concern about the
inability of some Bahamians to
end relationships without vio-
lence.
Floyd Johnson, 32, of Hospi-
tal Lane No 97, was murdered
last week, pushing this year's
murder count to 14. Mr Johnson
was stabbed to death during an
altercation with two men which
was the result of an argument
over a woman known to all par-
ties, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
told The Tribune.
Police have reportedly ques-
tioned a 15-year-old juvenile in
connection with the murder.

THE Tribune last week
learned that residents of Cat
Cay a private island in the
Bimini chain owe the
Bahamas treasury more than
$1.8 million in back taxes. And
they now have less than 60 days
to pay.


THE LEATHER CORNER



























SPECIAL MOTHER'S DAY DISCOUNT
handbags, wallets, shoes and much more.


British Colonial Hilton opposite McDonalds
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 242-326-4344


INSIGHT,


_ I_______IO_~___mr___~~mll___X_l___ I~


Y


I WEEK IN REVIE





PAGE 4C. MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


Caribbean


Liv


This title basically hits the Caribbean
Style of Architecture and Cuisine


NASSAU:


A~s ina ep


City Markets Lyford Cay
City Markets Harbour Bay
Super Value CableBeach


Super Saver Stores
Lowes Pharmacy
United Book Stores
Island Merchant Stores
News Cafe


Special Price:

$950


FREEPORT:
Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug


rHE TRIBUN|



















. i.. *. *..


I








MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005, PAGE 5C


'THE TRIBUNE



CENTI




'1


I


Date: 26 May 2005
Tuition: $170.00


Time: 9:30am 4:30pm Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses
on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Date: 2 June 2005


Time: 9:30am 4:30pm Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $160.00


WEB PAGE DESIGN
Will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy using computers and would like to.
create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms
and Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date: Thursday, 12 May & Friday May, 2005
Tuition: $550.00


Time: 9:30am 4:30pm Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human
Resources professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices
in today's workplace.


Date: June 9th & 10th 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre


Tuition: $350.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All
fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide
copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course
Schedule and Course Materials


COURSE
NO.
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900
ACCA901
BUSINESS
BUSI900
CUST900
COMPUTERS
COMP901
COMP901
COMP902
COMP903
COMP 941
COMP953
COMP960
COMP930


SEC COURSE
NO. DESCRIPTION


'DAY START
DATE


01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II


01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I
01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S


COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE
COSM807 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN


DECORATING
DEC0800
FLOR800
FLOR801
FLOR802
ENGLISH
ENG 900
ESL 900


HEALTH & FITNESS
MASG900 01
MASG901 01
LANGUAGES
CRE 900 01
CRE 901 01
SPA 900 01
SPA 901 01
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01
MGMT901 01
MGMT902 01
SEW 800 01
SEW 805 01


INTERIOR DECORATING I
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN III


01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE


MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I
DRAPERY MAKING I


6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 9-May
6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 9-May


10 weeks $250
10 weeks $275


6:00-9:00pm Tue 10-May 8 weeks $225
9:30am-4:30pm Thur 26-May 1 day $170


6:00-9:30pm
10am-1:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
6:00-8:00pm
9:30am-4:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm

6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm

6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:oo00pm


Mon
Sat
Thur
Wed
Tue
Tue
Thur
Thur/Fri


9-May
7-May
5-May
4-May
10-May
10-May
2-Jun
9-Jun


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
6 weeks
10 weeks
1 day
2 days


9-May 8 weeks
9-May 8 weeks
9-May 6 weeks


10-May
12-May
10-May
9-May


8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


6:00-9:00pm Tue/Thur 3-May 8 weeks $225
6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 9-May 8 weeks $250

6:00-9:00pm Mon 9-May 10 weeks $465
6:00-9:00pm Thur 12-May 10 weeks $620


6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm


6:00-9:30pmr
6:00-9:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pmn


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tueffhur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fri
Thur
Tue


9-May 10 weeks
10-May .10 weeks
9-May 10 weeks
10-May 10 weeks


5-May
9-May
9 June
12-May
10-May


10 weeks
10 weeks
2 days
10 weeks
10 weeks


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714/ (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES
reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.


STAFF VACANCY

The College of The Bahamas seeks a new DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS to meet the challenge
of building a new and exciting athletics program within the Bahamas.


RE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

& EXTENSION SERVICES

Computer Offerings Summer 2005


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand
how it works. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software
using: (1) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database
Management.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Monday, 9 May 2005 6:00pm 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 7 May 2005 10:00am 1:30pm Section 02 (CEES)
Duration: 10 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Tuition: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: Covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using:
(I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I Begins:Thursday, 5 May 2005 Time: 6:00pm 9:30pm
Duration: 10 week Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It
focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Thursday, 2 June 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $160.00
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: Covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following
areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email
Proficiency.
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Wednesday, 4 May 2005 Time:6:00pm 9:30pm
Duration: 10 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees: $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: A hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course
will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Tuesday, 10 May 2005 Time: 6:00pm 8:00pm
Tuesdays and Thursdays Duration: 9 weeks Venue:BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00
QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: Designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) to
organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up
company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre-requisite: None Begins:Tuesday, 10 May 2005 Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: Targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages. Will cover Web page creation,
Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables
and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins: May 12th & 13th, 2005 Time:9:30am 4:30pm Duration:2 days
Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$550.00
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All eesare included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course
Content, Course Schedule and Course


Personal Development Workshops
Summer Semester -2005
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It
focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.


Facsimile: (242) 302-4539


GRADUATION 2005


THEME:
"Overcoming Obstacle, Rising to the Challenge"

The public's participation is invited during The College's week of graduation
activities.

DATE TIME VENUE EVENT CONTACT

Sunday, May 22 3:00 pm Eastern Grounds, !Nursig Pinning Ceremony Dr. Shane
Oakes Field Campus | Theme: "Blazing new trails through Neely-Smith
knowledge and commitment" 325-5551

Tuesday, May 24 10:00am Eastern Grounds, Honours Convocation Camille Smith
Oakes Field Campus Theme: "Striving for Excellence, 302-4309
Detenmined to Succeed" Karen Lockhart
; ^ < 302-4424

Thursday, May 26 7:00 pm Bahamas Faith Baccalaureate Service Lionel Johnson
Ministries Int'l 3024333

Friday, May.27 6:30 pm Sandals Royal Graduation Dinner & Cheryl Carey
Bahamiai Resort Award Ceriemony 302-4368
Graduates $55.00. Claire Patton
Guests $ 65.00 302-4381

Saturday, May 28 8:00 pm: Courtyard, School of' Alumni Reuruii Kimberley Rolle
Hospitality & Tourism 302-4365/6
Studies

Sunday, May 29 3:00 pm Eastern Grounds, ,. -raduation Exercise Colyn Major
Oakes Field Campputs~' 302-4342


Other Graduation Notes:


* May 11 @ 6:00 pm Graduation meeting in the Student Union Building
* May 25 @ 6:30 pm Graduation Rehearsal and final meeting, Eastern Grounds, Oakes Field Campus

All persons participating in the graduation exercise must attend the meetings and rehearsal. Please call
Student Activities at 302-4525/4591 concerning any graduation matters.


TH COL Ls--EG (OF THn


EDUCAD


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


I. General Functions


* In consultation with the Vice President Student Affairs, direct and administer the
activities of The College of the Bahamas Athletics Department, according to the terms
of reference provided below.
Create, organize, schedule, promote and supervise athletics activities as are consistent
with the philosophy and goals of The College of The Bahamas.
Interface with the administration and faculty to coordinate Athletics and Recreation
Department affairs with other College activities and to resolve problems as required.
Plan, organize, and schedule programmes such as classes, clinics, workshops and
community special events.
Instruct, coach, and interpret rules of particular athletic or recreational area as required,
and direct the work of other officers performing related duties.
* Act as a resource to the Office of Academic Affairs for the development the Physical
Education Programme.
* Attend recreational classes and events as required to ensure smooth operation.
* Identify, requisition, issue, receive, and oversee the proper care of athletic and recreational
facilities and oversee, direct and assist in planning facilities.
* In conjunction with the relevant College departments, plan and direct promotion and
publicity for College athletic programmes.
* Maintain excellent communications and intra- and extramural public relations with public
and private groups as necessary to further the goals of the Athletics Department.
Coordinate activities with schools, leagues, and other agencies as required.
* Prepare correspondence and communications pertaining to Thie College's athletic
programs consistent with the standards of an institution of higher education.
* Devise and supervise the budget and expenditure of the Athletics Department.
* Provide supervision of assigned staff, and recommend to the VP Student Affairs various
personnel actions, including, but not limited to, hiring, merit recommendations, performance
evaluations, promotions, transfers, vacation schedules and disciplinary actions. Maintain
relevant records.

II. Specific Responsibilities for Building the Athletics Programme at The College of
The Bahamas

* Establish a written set of aims, goals, objectives and values for the Athletics Programme
at The College of The Bahamas in consultation with President and the Vice President,
Student Affairs with an update and review each year.
* Facilitate the process of student-athlete admission by assisting the personnel of the
Offices of Admissions and Financial Aid in evaluating applications, helping prioritize
admissions needs, and determine the most efficient use of scholarships.
* Monitor the performance of student-athletes including normal progress and degree
completion requirements.
* Supervise the relationship between the various local and international sports bodies
and The College of the Bahamas Department of Athletics, and monitor interpretation
of and compliance with their constitutions, bylaws, regulations and rules, as they relate
to the students and programmes of The College.
* Manage, motivate and lead the athletics teams of The College of the Bahamas in a
manner that is consistent with the mission and values of the institution, promoting a
sense of pride and leadership among student athletes.

II. Qualifications and Required Knowledge and Skills

* Master's degree required, Doctorate degree preferred.
* Minimum of five (5) years coaching experience at the Division II or III level preferred.
* Proven organizational skills with the ability to handle multiple tasks.
* Demonstrated skills in oral and written.communication.
" Computer skills including familiarity with Word and Excel.
* Intercollegiate sport experience preferred.
* Knowledge of rules and regulations governing collegiate and intercollegiate athletics.
* Strong interpersonal and communication skills and ability to work effectively with a
range of constituencies in a diverse community.

A detailed curriculum vitae with a cover letter of interest, giving full particulars of qualifications
and experience should be sent with five references no later than May 13, 2005 to:

Mail: .; ..
Theb Direcd -1
Huiman'Resou ds
The College of The Bahamas
P. 0. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Email:hrapply@cob.edu.bs


........... ..................................................................................................................................................................................











I


ISSUES DEA

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


. w Iart











- -G "m-w
- e


---0 4-Wddoomo W o4b
,- dbm -













-40o 40M e
a
-* e -
** epe
___ 0



491 0am 4*m







o d mo
Lee m
-

e -
e *
mso o


- W -s


~~mo.- mndom pnD am 4
G.-Glmwow 4ow on

40vailaI
- mul f w-


-Availabl


I








m




p


"Copyrighted Material"


Syndicated Content


le


')i


from Commercial News'Providers"


-* *


- 0 *0

o 0aJ0


I






go m

em'. -







" ..-qD M OND pnm
-a a

4=0
omm e


~a ~e *
- . .
- *
~
00. o m 0.
- 0.
- C 0. W *


4 0 g.
. ..
- --am
or a .0


-0-a


40- - -. 4 1na
",wpm 41b - t0OMNSD
0 00 4W w fw .4 m- ~


O ..Nolmm mm,-
mmilm =


-n,, 0 0 ,* B 0
400m.-O


-am 4b newaflo


Sao" oo-4** 4


40 an- -


4 m


% frw% ,i fA v i i e 9 a i r r ti tA /n auF


41 4m 0









-Nmm- amow 4
emm


0 -da


..0 0o0-,1no 40M
mu -om to040 0.m
ow. -Q s-mgo

qm 4 4 0 -dw V

W.'"- o0d


dgm m doom
-- 4110.


- 0 0qb *-
qll- --Wmf -
-.. '%MEO dft mob- b -

Gu 4 -V


4 00 0mp4




0.0
-.6-10


4,.


0 o


0 ,0


0 _
- 0


a -4 II~LFII~AII~I~ ~--CB~~sa~.~


mmm


--wO"D **&.


O 90M O -


o 4 0








7C SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION ISSUES & IDEAS THE MIAMI HERALD








Cousin s life could've ben mine


* -
. -*- a.
S *4 b

S-a a-. a 0 ab



* a -

am a-- --No
41M.- a.. a. -




aw a. -e4W


aw o *



4w 40-I
a -5 a.





*. o
amd-a Go o 4W














mo a--b
-.a . a






















so a O w
"'A v ei4 a"*
- Aeem *









an
-a a ft"0



a- a



















dome
Omm .' 0, m
a.-.






























Availa
a.a.w


Sa. .mm* a.










mNw m-m 4
=mm*a. -b
- -IMP ~ a


0 o -


- a.


qU -.4@10GN

a. 4w a.- -o 40
@o- a-, a4 0


a a w ao
* a ma
490-a a.a a


-a a
a. -


-A a. aW
a.Q a.


a i a
m -go -1 4111111D
411. a.- go. a.
4b -- a -
I a..a.01b-40-


a. s a a. a.. -
-o a. a.. a
a. a.e a. a
4b WAO 4. ee



a.- *4a
4b mb __ 0 400 a.
%l-h a. a. 0 aw- a.

W- *
P eP









a a .a~a



-. n ic
Sag
4w a 1 a. n nd


OEM a. a.' D4wMO. =


a.-a.








--ow
0.- a.


b G a.
* a.a



* 0
* a-a


A





m.^


.... oa -
*-ol 40h, a

_ _ a 4o -a 4m-
a. a.


a.OW-m-a-an WD"oo-at.
4w 4b4w f- vaw 4-~
"Nowa a


aba - -a-.
as - -
a a4o w 4b-


a. a o .
a. .a a *
U a.a
a. a. 6 ow
- G0

4o 4.- a. a. b-




aml. -.00a. q-
410 -U. m-a. oaba
0- -a .a
qb -.a -a-.a


- asp4.4

a. w--al a -dm
a 4-, 4


4b.- - q a.m
a -do a. -i
em..q



a. -. a


o -


hted Material :


cited Content-


ble from Commercial News Prov


duo- .. .f


Ia





a. o S O
o oa. a


al,-I.. *b a. o


--.m -mm.-




41.
a. --

a .-. a.-
a.b a4=. --
4b mm-a


. 4b aa


l, .ow 'uw T j&Nt oo f ne


&qw Mw- osft- O ao-
qb40O uaam, 0a. Mow a


4bs-a ma -Mvp a a. a.
a.Mow-0 .bw,-Mom

-ft a. a. fta. a.




MosiI& m ab 4 -h

.0 amow am- 4b go
4w .1g a m- No a
a. -onswism-
401b EWI .MORfa.--
GIP mona 40-b-da .am% ft. a. .-
a.460M- m w-m 6 go
0 4b 00o.- --M Mwn


m- la . a

-mu *a ul. Aww Mo --dm
40 a. OW40 -q -- Mo- -
40001040M 40 41lowll
GA. 4bno- -Ma Mw a. ~ fa. .go

amsmoomar-amm-a -asinwwm. 4at. a.a
doqb 0 amm- 'm.wmmmm 4
ME, OO W *MN a. om --* a.oo


4 .0a. - aM m -aomo a
. f- o o w
a. a. a a .I, o


Vb - b


a --Mlw --ma a
ON o %MG a.- a.dmo

~ -q 0-a a.4 a --

4b. qao-- "m- 4b- 4w -
a. 4ba -4a -a.

a. 4- a-a


a a.a . -.-of IN


* 0 a. -


-a= a -


MOW a


a- a-9,
a.- a410. a a. .
a.t
--Iwo a. a
a ~ ~ ~ u 4w.- a


400- -Aq. mq


41b-.m mb ba.
a-maf -o a.- -=10



Amo. . a a





WA -- M

41M.-a4wa.





am






-9 1




so --IVAN.


4b, q -
a. - ow- GNP

am. ~ 4w-ad-a.u
4b am am. no




miM- 41.- 41a.

go- mam



0 --

dabs
410m_ tv. a b-- -ft_
410- 41 4 -O - a

41Ma.n,- am a.
4ba.msm- union qm* a

410.0 w-1110q.- 40a
4004110M .- a
a. a.D -1M


41b d- 4,qWP VR 1b4


a41b d a


S. D am a




oa.,qD a. o a.
o b oo a
u am amp
a Aamo.ow. am. a. m

*lb m a








w 1o wO











I a
ob a. a. a .






















id s a" a
*.- a
S.. a e a.
a. a0 a. 1 agw

.. a.



idersa' aa














a, .
dommb aml -u


4b am emgwa- bma




a- ft-o a. 4b
OW ft. 4b a. 4-

a. -M o
a. pl o- f a f

a-am am0-a ftmo


a. aNMoneam a *





iders":i





4 ap 4w f
me 4 a.

om- Om





- *g o aao
mom 4M- 0a t"a.






qu.a.00 a.- a al @al


mo mmi


a- *6a.


a. MOI


- .w


aO 0 -


ma *


, p


tmeI


-mm
190011
a 4b a


a.



*


aI








- a. O


I-c-- --11-----~-- -_~as~ --~-LI '


r


--q








WWW.HERALD.COM INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005 8C



OPINION


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


ALBERTO IBARGOEN, PUBUSHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JAMES L KNIGHT 0909-1991)


WORLD WAR II


Opting for




truth over


Search to the end


BY ANNE APPLEBLAUM
applebaumanne@yahoo.com

p ry, if you can, to picture
I the scene. A vast crowd
in Red Square: Lenin's tomb
and Stalin's memorial in the
background. Soldiers march
in goose step behind rolling
tanks, and the air echoes
with martial music, occa-
sionally drowned out by the
whine of fighter jets. On the
reviewing stand, statesmen
are gathered: Kim Jong II,
the dictator of North Korea;
Alexander Lukashenko, the
dictator of Belarus; Gen.
Wojciech Jaruzelski, the for-
mer dictator of Poland -
and President Bush.
That description
may sound fanciful
or improbable. It is
neither. On the con-
trary, that is more or
less what will
appear on your tele-
vision screen May 9, APPLEBA
when the 60th anniversary
of the end of World War II
is celebrated in Moscow. I
have exaggerated only one
detail: Although Kim has
been invited, his attendance
has not yet been confirmed.
But Jaruzelski is definitely
coming, as are Lukashenko,
Bush and several dozen
other heads of state. Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin of Rus-
sia will preside.
REFUSED liD -N

Not rop
country will be represented,
however, because not
everybody feels quite the
same way about this partic-
ular date. In the Baltic
states, for example, May
1945 marked the end of the
war but also the beginning
of nearly a half-century of
Soviet occupation, during
which one in 10 Baits were
murdered or deported to
concentration camps and
exile villages. The thought
of applauding the same Red
Army veterans who helped
"pacify" their countries
after 1945 was too much for
the Estonian and Lithuanian
presidents, who have,
refused to attend. Although
the Latvian president will
attend the Moscow festivi-
ties, she's had to declare
that she will use her trip to
talk about the Soviet occu-
pation.
The president of Poland
also has spent much of the
past month justifying his
decision to celebrate this
particular anniversary in
Moscow. By May 1945, after
all, the leaders of what had
been the Polish anti-Nazi
resistance were already
imprisoned in the Lubyanka,
the KGB's most notorious
Moscow prison.
The Russian president
hasn't made anyone's trip
easier. Recently he told a
radio interviewer that the
Soviet Union was justified
in signing the Nazi-Soviet
pact of 1939, in which the
two totalitarian powers
agreed to divide Poland and
cede the Baltic states to the
USSR.
The Soviet Union, Putin
said, was within its rights to
protect the "security of its
Western borders," as if
annexing other countries
were a legitimate form of
border patrol. This week
Putin went on to describe
the collapse of the Soviet
Union which resulted in
the liberation of Eastern


Europe -- as the "greatest
geopolitical catastrophe" of
the 20th century, presum-
ably ranking it higher than
the war itself.
His countrymen, in sym-
bolic agreement, have com-
missioned a host of new Sta-
lin statues around the
country to commemorate
the end of the war.
To its credit, the White
House is trying to mitigate
the impact of what is, at the
very least, an extraordi-
narily bad photo opportu-
nity and is,nicely blossom-
ing into a full-fledged
controversy as well. Bush
will go to Latvia before
Moscow, to meet
with the Baltic lead-
ers all now mem-
bers of NATO and
therefore U.S. allies
and afterward
will visit the Geor-
gian Republic,
AUM where a democrati-
cally elected president has
recently taken power in the
teeth of Russian opposition.
But if we are to avoid'
turning the anniversary of
the end of World War II
into a celebration of the tri-
umph of Stalinism, more
should be done. To begin
with, Congress should vote
on a resolution proposed
this month by Rep. John
Shimkus, R-Ill., which calls
on Russia to condemn the-
Nazi-Soviet pact as well as
the illegal annexation of the
Baltic states.
"The truth is a powerful
weapon for healing, forgiv-
ing and reconciliation," the
resolution states, in a burst
of unusual congressional
eloquence, "but its absence
breeds distrust, fear and
hostility."
A NEW TRADITION
Bush, too, should show
that he understands what
really happened in 1945.
Every recent U.S. president
has visited Auschwitz, and
many have visited concen-
tration camps in Germany,
too. Perhaps it's time for
American presidents to
start a new tradition and
pay their respects to the vic-
tims of Stalin.
This is made difficult by
the dearth of monuments in
Moscow, but it isn't impos-
sible. The president could,
for example, lay a wreath at
the stone that was brought
from the Solovetsky Islands,
the Soviet Union's first
political prison camp, and
placed just across from the
Lubyanka itself. Or he could
visit one of the mass-execu-
tion sites outside of town.
THE WRONG MESSAGE
Of course these would be
nothing more than purely
symbolic gestures. But a
war anniversary is a purely
symbolic event. Each com-
memoration helps all of us
remember what happened
and why it happened, and
each commemoration helps
us draw relevant lessons for
the future. To falsify the
record to commemorate
the triumph of totalitarian-
ism rather than its defeat --
sends the wrong message to
new and would-be democ-
racies in Europe, the former
Soviet Union and the rest of
the world..

Anne Applebaum is a
member of The Washington
Post's editorial page staff.


Not every European country will be
represented in Moscow on May 9 during the.
60th anniversary of the end of World War
IL Not everybody feels quite the same way
about this particular date.


- 4- b- -
a
** A *

w e 4


qm -e-




a_ abM_ ,
-- - --"mI o
m 0 -
-




--m *-'--* 0--


-0- 9~1-b





S - *
mm










.- ii d0
- yndcatedContent
~mw 0 w 4mmmb 410
Ab *0 sa**m *
*40M **



a0mb
fp a* -
wm 0um qume a-
wasOPO 40uan* 4bmmmb

o p* rgt Mat

v- le w

-*Syndicated Content


I


j


Available from Commercial News Providers
lo *I- -


* -S --
-4w -
-W d -41 m *mm4
a w -- 4 .4

b M M - -



S- y* ~
** *
& a,_ 10 -M M-i

5 Me
aw -
w o**N* -
mmf .* 0..q..a
.990110M MON.- .41

'R sp m e *- amMN


-- -

-*

-a -,

a- .w
- -. -


a 4 *M
S m e e
e awme f* e
0' bMIND
-_ .M- w fi
-m g m
- ,. o C e *m
o. a. .I -
I a.- 0 oao0 m *
- ,% m o
S-- U E 0 Sb
*U e *esa
-* Cm
S. U em


(' .1 hiAding gbh driainm'


S. -
WE- S **
*
y -- -..-
4nm o
*** S. U


40 0
- 4
a


-90- f~ t.
-

-- S --
S. S- -**
- - a
* 0 -
S... -- a
Se a. a S.
.- -* -
-- *
m - --*
***. -a-
'0* *. a. a -a.
-- .S a. -
am~







U a .. ... .
.4 0 4b q




S.. S. .-


* S ~ -
S.


4 u 'w--- a4w
- *4 41b *
M..a .-O-ak. -m m _m_
* a0 as oa
- -. - S S. ...p
-m . m 9' ** -
-n - e-- ____ *.
** S a -
- 5'0 __ --
S -* -
a M m


e- we C

p .- ease
41bmme b =WN



* meb



F Z4mepw


. -- e '
S C *
- C mp
S- a *-
- - a. m* -e
a. .. m e
- e b p = e m"
4 w .



a.

S n- m -m
a .

0 4 wCb
S- S a S. em

--- -- ** S. -m


a -a.
- U a
a S. a
a. -
- - S


.= -
- --
e .. .- -
- 40


- a- a. -

a- -a. a

-


a- -


a.. a.- 0'
-5
S.- ~ a. a.- a
S. 'a. a- -a.
S a.-


as~s~B~---~ar rrs I ~p- ---- -r ---- --- -gp


1


- o.


- .






e.g


I ; ,',~


~* it **** 6s.,
0 0** g*9@ @61.09


S* I


o :


I I,


9 I i


SI I I


* .0
* *. eli


* I
~ ii*


* '.0
gOgS S
S ***


I


0
*6g9,,
* 6
g


d


6
I 9*I * g el
0
1? 1'.0
g.ggq**. *1


I...
. 0


9009
. 6
0.




I
S


Av'ail


.t1


<5000


t
'I


14


A4


01


t.


I


I


I'l


"Copyrighte


q a
ble
I


Syndicated
from Commerc
,4 f*





I.


J Material /

Content A
;ial News Providers


:," **:**** AB
;.; .,..
"l I ,."3i S I
* '11 ll


0
I
*@ 1311' ". ti ntltf?:! Ia l"'*tle*f*!t'sl.*,*o.I;'i; l*Ot.lloltat?!l


*g'~'g,.* g 'ge'


O e l'** g* O


*lt'' : 40' tg1


* 0 C .50
* . 6


P ':"t'*
~ *gS* 9OgO.


ft :';wa~*.t:e*'.s',t;'''tI'9,'t'; *t33i?~
~*** *****@. g 9gfgee9*g9gg,..~g 09
,. 696 *9*
0 . .


6* ** ** *
6 ..*t I
looo*oll'*


54


1


* * *


*











THE BAHAMAS ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMISSION


(BEST Commission)


Will Be Holding A Town Meeting On Liquified Natural Gas (LNG)


Featuring LNG Consultants:


Mr. Andrew Byers, Black and Beatch Co., Mr Fred Bernard,


Senes, And Mr Paul Schutt, ICF Consulting

THURSDAY, 5TH MAY, 2005 AT BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON,
TIME 8:00PM HOST: DARROLD MILLER "COME AND HEAR ALL THE FACTS"


What is Liquefied Natural Gas? (LNG)


* LNG is natural gas that has been cooled enough (-160C) for it to condense back into a liquid state. LNG is not compressed.
* LNG has been used in North America for nearly 40 years, with 113 of the worlds 200 LNG facilities already in the US and 3 more
located in Canada. North america's first LNG plant was built in 1912.
* Global annual LNG supply reached 6600 bcf in 2003, 57% of which can be competitively delivered to the east coast of North America
at current natural gas prices.
* Twelve countries imported LNG for domestic, use, and fourteen exported LNG.
* There are 17 LNG export (liquefaction) facilities worldwide and 40 LNG import (regasification) facilities.
* There are 151 LNG tanker ships operating worldwide.,... These ships pass through Bahamian waters on a daily basis.
* The safety aspects of LNG are very well understood.... In some respects LNG is a safer form of natural gas since LNG is not a
compresssed gas, just a super cooled liquid.
* LNG will not ignite when exposed to fire.... To burn, LNG must first return to a gaseous state.
* The few accidents that have involved LNG over its 40 year history in North America have occured when LNG was allowed to revert
to a gas form without proper controls. MO


Overview Of Ocean Cay, Bahamas (Arthistic Rendering)
View From 30 Feet M.S.O., North Of Island


Overviw Of Ocean Cay, Bahamas (Arthistic Rendering) Plan View


* Electricity production at combined cycle gas-fired power plants
* Cooking and home heating
* As an alternative fuel source for motor vehicles.


LNG is simply natural gas. In this regard all of the safety aspects of
LNG are very well understood. As a gas it is the same fuel that is
transported by pipeline across the continent, stored in numerous
storage facilities, and used daily by individual throughout Europe,
North America, Japan, Puerto Rico, Domician Republic, etc. All of this
activity is done under well established safety precautions and protocols
that have made natural gas one of Europe and North America preferred
energy sources. There has been no loss of life at an LNG regasification
facility during the past forty years.


LNG is shipped in double-hulled tankers built using technology that
has been proven for over forty years. They are insulated to keep the
gas at -160 Celsius so that it remains a liquid. This allows LNG to
be transported at very close to atmospheric pressure. There has
been no loss of life on an LNG Ship in its history.


It is a deep water port used to berth and unload LNG tankers. A
terminal has holding tanks specially designed to keep the LNG at
-1600 Celsius. LNG terminals also have equipment to return the LNG
to its gaseous state prior to it being distributed through the existing
natural gas pipeline transportation and distribution network.
What areIthe IIIJ.irementofanLNGlTermi.nIBal Site?,


* Deep Water Port
* Thermal Exclusion Zone of 1-3/4 miles
* Land Availability (-100 acres...plus)


North America
* Boston, Massachusetts Operational
* Cove Point, Maryland Operational & Expanding
* Elba Island, Georgia Operational & Expanding
* Lake Charles, Louisiana Operational & Expanding
The Caribbean
* Guayanilla, Puerto Rico Operational
* Andres, Dominican Republic Operational
* Trinidad and Tobago Operational


North America
* Freeport, Texas Under Construction
* Sabine, Louisiana Under Construction
* Hackberry, Louisiana Under Construction
* Corpus Christi, Texas Approved
Mexico
* Altimira, Mexico Under Construction
* Baha, Mexico Under Construction


* Japan -15 operating terminals
* Spain- 4 operating terminals
* South Korea-3 operating terminals

* France 2 operating Terminals
* Italy 1 operating terminal
* Portugal 1 operating terminal
* Greece 1 operating terminal
* Belgium -1 operating terminal
* Turkey -1 operating terminal
* Taiwan -1 operating terminal
* Trinidad and Tobago 4 operating terminals
* China
* India
* Australia


Projected Revenue To The Public Treasury Is Estimated
At $1.2 Billion to $1.5 Billion Over A Twenty-Five Year Period


FERC


Existing, Proposed and
Potential North American
LNG Terminals

i '/ / I \ '-'


O- fcwmeofoEnergy Pro
Office of Energy Projects


--


-.i


PAGE 10C, MONDAY, MAY 2, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








action

ssin

or
aa
rat a


1


I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs