Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00093
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: April 25, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00093
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text








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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.125


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


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I.
I N


Youth in cuS o afer pmurper


Man stabbed in


domestic dispute

* By KARIN HERIG failed relationships seem to fea-
Tribune Staff Reporter ture very prominently in
incidents of domestic
... WITH-the- country's latest violefice
homicide stemming from a "We seem in this country to
domestic dispute, police have have some problems with infi-
expressed concern with the delity, anger management and
inability of some Bahamians to lack of trust as well as letting
end relationships in an non- go of old gripes," he said.
violent way. A further concern of
Yesterday morning the stab- the police, he said, is the
bing death of 32-year-old Floyd increase in incidents involving
Johnson of Hospital Lane No knives.
97 brought the number of mur- ?"Whereas we have been for-
ders for the year to 14. tunate this year so far, as there
Preliminary investigations have not been many armed
indicate that Mr Johnson was robberies or other crimes
stabbed to death during an against property, we have had
altercation with two men which several incidents of stabbing
had resulted from an argument where people suffer serious
over a woman known to all injuries or are outright mur-
parties, Chief Supt Hulan Han- dered," he said.
na told The Tribune. Mr Hanna said that police
Police have a 15-year-old are planning to once again
juvenile in custody for ques- launch an anti-knife campaign,
tioning in connection with the which has proven successful in
murder and are seeking a sec- the past.
ond man to help them with "Our community relations
their enquiries. department is already out
Mr Hanna said that police there, talking to the communi-
are concerned that some peo- ty, educating people," he
ple have difficulties "cutting said.
loose and moving on aft.er..a ,-...M-Hanna -pointed out the
telaiionshipf ends." Urban Renewal Programme
According to police reports, has also significantly con-
Mr Johnson was visiting a tributed to improving the rela-
female friend, a resident of tionship between the commu-
Wellington Street No 12, when nities and police, but added
he got into an argument with that in order to see a decrease
two other men. of crimes involving juveniles,
The argument escalated out- the programme needs to be
side the woman's home and extended into schools.
resulted in Mr Johnson being "Thanks to the Urban
stabbed on the left side of his Renewal Programme we have
chest. direct access to the communi-
A private vehicle immedi- ties, the response time is better,
ately took him to Princess Mar- but now to save our youth, to
garet Hospital, where he was stop the violence and see a sig-
pronounced dead at 9.30pm. nificant downturn in crime, we
Addressing the nature of the must go into the schools," he
crime, Mr Hanna said that said.


Medical team
member denies
payment confusion
delayed patient's
treatment
ONE of the medical team
who fought desperately to save
the life of 33-year-old Stanton
Chea, severely injured in an
accident at his Abaco trucking
company, denied that confusion
over payment delayed the
patient's emergency treatment.
Members of his family agree
that the medical team. at Doc-
tors-I Hospital and National
Insurance, which was responsi-
ble for his medical bills under
the workers' compensation
clause, did everything possible
to save Mr Chea's life and expe-
dite his transfer to a trauma unit
in Florida.
However, the delay came


* STANTON CHEA


* TRAVELLERS form lines outside of the airport yesterday.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


Sityya'Ir5-J Ild monastery 1tJ'Ao clo[se


ABBOT John Klassem of St John's Bene-
dictine Abbey in Collegeville, Minnesota, is in
Nassau to complete the final break with what
started 113 years ago as a mission to build the
Catholic church in the Bahamas.
At the end of the morning mass in St
Augustine's Monastery's chapel Sunday, Abbot
Klassem announced that the 60-year-old
monastery, which will be transferred to the
Bahamas Archdiocese under Archbishop
Patrick Pinder, will close on June 29.
Father Fintan Bromenschenkel, 87, the


chapel's last priest, will return to St John's
Abbey, Minnesota, on that date and "we will no
longer be able to have Sunday Eucharist here,"
the Abbot announced.
He said that the details of the transfer of
the monastery its lands and buildings to
the Archdiocese was still being worked out. He
expected the transfer to take between three
and six months to complete.
Father George Wolf, 89, who has spent all of
SEE page 12


when no hospital bed could be
found for him in a critical care
unit in Florida before Friday
morning- almost 56 hours
after the accident.
The accident occurred at
10.30 Wednesday morning
when a steel rim, which Mr
Chea was removing from a
giant truck tyre at his Sunshine
Trucking company, flew off, hit-
ting him in his chest and stom-
ach and causing massive inter-
nal injuries. He was airlifted
from Marsh Harbour to Doc-
tors Hospital that day, arriving
in Nassau about 5pm. Some of
his family-and friends in Abaco
still believe that it took too long
to transfer him from Marsh
Harbour to Nassau.
He was then airlifted to Bap-
tist Hospital in Miami on Fri-
day afternoon, arriving in Mia-
mi early that evening. There
SEE page 13


I Nassau an d Baham aIldsLe6n ws


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


Ehe iami EeIralt
BAHAMAS EDITION


re
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P erso ec
. . . .................. * s it f







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


Campaign against Guana Cay is



'a demonstration of democracy'


,M By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
RESIDENTS protesting
Against developments proposed


for their communities show that
the Bahamas has a "strong and
vibrant democracy," the Minis-
ter of Financial Services and
Investments told The Tribune.


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With the judicial review trial,
which will examine govern-
ment's authority to enter into
the Heads of Agreement of the
Baker's Bay, Guana Cay devel-


opment, scheduled to be heard
before the Supreme Court
tomorrow, Allyson Maynard-
Gibson said she sees "no down-
side" to people expressing their


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These recent achievements bring
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opposing views and making use
of the judicial avenues open to
them.
"It only shows that the
Bahamas supports a strong and
vibrant democracy, this is some-
thing that is very important and
ensures investors," she said.
Minister Maynard Gibson
added that because several of
the Guana Cay residents
protesting the development are
non-Bahamians, "it shows for-
eign investors that even if
they're not Bahamian they can
go before the court and have
their rights preserved."

Review

Following months of contro-
versy surrounding the Baker's
Bay development on Great
Guana Cay, Justice Stephen
Isaacs earlier this month grant-
ed the application of the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association
(SGCRA) to apply for a judicial
review, in which Prime Minister
Perry Christie, as the minister
responsible for Crown Lands,
and Wendal Major, as Secre-
tary to the National Economic


Council, are named as the
respondents.
It is the first judicial review in
the history of the Bahamas to
be granted on environmental
grounds, legal counsel for the
SGCRA Fred Smith said.
The association is asking for a
declaration that the National
Economic Council did not have
"the power or authority to
enter into Heads of Agreement
and/or bind the government or
any part thereof under the
terms of Heads of Agreement
and that the Heads of Agree-
ment is a nullity and void."
The Guana Cay development
has been the topic of heated dis-
cussion for the past few months.
In addition to filing legal action
against the government, resi-
dents of small islands also
staged protests in Abaco and
Nassau.
Residents fear that project,
which will include a 250-slip
marina, an 18-hole-golf course,
a 75-room luxury villa style
hotel and 350 residential lots,
will cause irreparable damage
to the environment and signifi-
cantly lower the quality of life
on the quaint island.


Bahamas 'already

committed to

joining CSME'

0 By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE cabinet has already
agreed to the Bahamas joining
the Caribbean Single Market
and Economy and has not prop-
erly informed Bahamians of
that decision, former cabinet
minister Zhivargo Laing
claimed yesterday.
Mr Laing made the statement
as a guest of Island FM's talk
show, Parliament Street.
He said that, on December
21 last year, the Cabinet agreed
N ZHIVARGO Laing in principle to sign on to the
CSME in July this year when
Heads meet, provided they get
the exemptions they want. The
government is now to circulate
a white paper on the subject.
However, he admitted that
Mr Mitchell, did not expressly
say this, but "I confirmed this in
the way I could confirm this."
"I have this concern, typical-
ly you would have a green
paper prepared, which is a draft
on your position on a matter,
then you would send it out to
get some comments and based
on those comments you would
prepare a white paper based on
the comments you get and that'
is what the Cabinet would make
Live outstanding a decision on.
heir achievement "We now have a decision
er (CLU) designation, with a white paper circulating
and I dare 100 Bahamians to
tell me that they knew the gov-
ns in the ernment of the Bahamas had
reprLU designation agreed to sign onto the
ssionalism, Caribbean Single Market and
Economy," said Mr Laing.
ndards. He said he is concerned about
the fact that a decision has been
the number made and Bahamians were not
rdian to 8 informed about it.
In the House of Assembly
Compaof Forny last week Mr Mitchell had the
representatives following to say about the
"I will not engage in any
public rows over thission thmatter of
CSME. This is not a matter
over which there needs to be a
fight. It is not a political issue.
There is only one question to
be decided and that is whether
thisdec is in the best interest of
Bahamians.
of Foreign Affairs under my
watch is to smooth the way for
Bahamians (as they move)
around the world. It is in pur-
suance of that mission that we
have been speaking about the
CSME to explain what it is and
what it is not.
"The fact of this Cabinet
- -decision was announced in the
House. It has been explained
by way of radio. It has been
spoken of in the news. There is
no secret about it and there is
nothing to fear from it. There is
4L no drama in it. There are no
life and death issues in it. This
minister is not on a frolic of his
k'RME AKi own.


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LOCALyoEWS
~ 44 i Ishare your news


Lester Mortimer


FAMILY and friends pay their final farewells to
Lester James Mortimer Sr, at the graveside in the St
Mary's Church cemetary.
Canon Warren Rolle officiated at the funeral of
the well-respected businessman held at the Christ
Church Cathedral on Friday.
(Photo by Franklyn G Ferguson)


Off-duty police



officer is stabbed


M By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff
Reporter
A POLICE officer sus-
tained serious injuries
when he was stabbed on
the road side over the
weekend.
At around 6pm on Satur-
day, off-duty police officer
Gregory Smith, 31, was dri-
ving on Carmichael Road
in his private vehicle when
he saw two men trying to
cross the street.
As he was passing them,.
near the Texaco service


mF"


station on Carmichael
Road, one of the men
touched the rear of Mr
Johnson's car, Supt Hulan
Hanna told The Tribune.
Vehicle
Mr Hanna said that at
this point the officer got
out of his vehicle to ask
why the man had tapped
on his car.
The situation, however,
turned hostile and the men
begantto argue. ,,
The argument resulted in
one of the men reaching


I


for an unidentified object
and stabbing the police
officer with it.
"He was stabbed to the
left side of his face, to his
right arm and to his lower
back," Mr Hanna said.
A patrol car took Officer


Johnson to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, where he
remains in serious, but sta-
ble condition.
Police are searching for
the two men involved in
the incident as investiga-
tions continue.


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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
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good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


`":i"':':'~::""I:::"':i`"""':::;::"""""


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 4, MONDAYAPRIL25,20 TH RIB


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398




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Tourist survey





findings are a





cause for concern


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IF WE are going to be seri-
ous and hopefully all the politi-
cians and alleged hoteliers
(really managers in the hotel
business) and the NGO groups,
Bahamas Hotel Association
and The Nassau Development
and Promotion Board, should
be shuddering in their shoes as
to the findings of the ongoing
survey of departing tourists, as
exposed by Director General
of Tourism, Vanderpool Wal-
lace.
A drop of 6 percent in the
percentages of those who
would recommend The
Bahamas, is nothing to sneeze
at, as we all know surveys have
a 3-4 per cent margin either
way, so this dissatisfaction per-
centage could be 3-4 per cent
higher, or real 10 per cent dis-
satisfaction!
What has the industry done
over the past 20 years to
improve the product called
Bahamian Tourism?
They have postured, talked a
lot and talked and blamed
everyone except themselves.
I read in the article appear-
ing Friday, April 15, 2005, com-
ments from Earle Bethell, Pres-
ident of BHA and Frank
Coniito, VP Nassau Develop-
ment and Promotion Board,
and Michael Hooper, Manager
of The British Colonial Hilton,
and I wonder.
Clearly whatever these per-
sons think and they obviously
support whatever their associ-
ations have tried to do to
improve the product, I sin-
cerely hope that they realize
now that it was inadequate as
the dissatisfaction level is on
the increase.
If I was in an executive posi-
tion of any resort in The
Bahamas and read that a sur-
vey is returning results which
indicate the following as a sam-
ple: "This should have been a
great trip. Instead, I felt as
though I was being cheated.
Food was terrible at hotel and
over-priced." Another com-
ment: "I was very disappointed
in the resort that we stayed at.
Brochures and travel agents
were not honest about the facil-
ities".
Vincent Vanderpool Wallace
certainly controlled his emo-
tions and the lack of reaction
from the Prime Minister, Min-
ister of Financial Services and
Investment and Tourism cer-
tainly creates the obvious, will
we react to what obviously is a
very, very serious perceived
state of our tourism product by


our customers?
With a higher and higher
percentage of bookings being
made through the internet,
what is written and how the
resort is described is obviously
now a very serious matter, and
certainly some official gover-
nance and watch I suggest
should be in place, as dishon-
esty in the description of a
resort and its facilities will
cause such negative damaging
comments. How many "hits"
does a web site get?
I wonder whether anyone at
any of our hotels surf the net
on those Tourism Comment
sites, and I read some of the
comments from the consumers,
our visitors, on whom we rely
to support Bahamian tourism
and do anything about them
other than we pontificate and
in my estimate do so little?
We know the financial per-
formance of Atlantis, but if the
truth were told about the other
alleged 4-star and 3-star hotels
- what is the truth about
them? Broke but still pretend-
ing? I suspect that is the real
truth of the matter.
It is time we called a spade a
spade, unless hotel investments
make a return to the investors,
who are going to invest and
solve our unemployment prob-
lems? I would really like to ask
Phil Ruffin! How much did you
make over 11 plus years in The'
Bahamas, of course after pay-
ing all his debts?
The unions have over the
past months become more and
more militant the practice
of the BCPOU, like a spoilt
child, not getting their way
withdraws labour on the small-
est of excuses and what doesn't
the Minister of Labour do?
The alleged required 15 per
cent gratuity should be abol-
ished employees need to
learn the hard things of life-
give good service and you will
be handsomely compensated.
I recall back in the 1970 when
the 15 per cent was not part of
the union-hotel/restaurant
agreement that the average
waitress in the 4-star restau-
rants on Bay Street, yes we had
them, now all closed owing to
the hoteliers introduction of
"all inclusive" went home
nightly with $200-$300 plus in
their pockets if not more and
the service was friendly and
good. At least the bus boy did-


n't stretch across the table and
the waitress knew you served
from the left (The Dunes,
Graycliff and others please
acknowledge).
We pander and refuse to tell
it as it has to be if our
tourism product is bad, some-
one in authority had better be
telling someone before it
becomes a matter of turning
off the lights.
The how to resolve, this is
going to hurt, with the hurt will
come an improved product and
more and more visitors will
perceive they received value
for money.
How many hotel employees
know how much it costs for a
couple with two children to
stay at their hotel?
$1,800...$2,800... $3,500 or more
for a 3-day stay?
What does the hotel charge
for the use of BTC telephone
service to make a local call let
alone an overseas call? What
does BTC do about that?
Nothing, but they chase down
Bahamians who use "call-
back".
Valet parking? At Ocean
Club it is $10...the parking lot is
within three minutes walk-
ing...for the $10 do I get back a
washed car? Windshield
washed?
Presentation? Some alleged
5+star restaurants present you
with a dirty, stained menu if
you smell the menu hard
enough you get a good idea of
what entree is best! Do they
care?
5+star restaurants with all
kinds of alleged international
awards present entrees on
"cold". not even warmed
plates...imagine when you eat
fish and the airconiditioning is
piping?
Question with these new
beverage systems are you actu-
ally receiving the drink of your
choice, or the first drink is what
you ordered, and from then on
they substitute some inferior
brand, including even beers?
Editor check around, this hap-
pens, and at the prices we are
asked to pay, no wonder the
visitors scream.
When last did you not hear a
Cabinet Minister really tell the
truth, and not all that hyper-.
bole about everything getting
better we are world class,
etc, etc?
From what Vincent Vander-
pool Wallace says: It just ain't
so!
MARSHALL FORBES
Nassau,
April 16, 2005.


As a mark of respect on the


passing of


Mr. Buck Johnson,


one of our founders,

JBR Building Supplies,

Tops Lumber & Plumbing,


& Standard Hardware


will close at 1:00 p.m. on


Monday, April 25, 2005.


We appreciate your


understanding.


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


- mb 0


THE TRIBUNE














The history behind the




crocodile findings in Abaco


J IE authors of The
S'ribune's interesting
feature on the crocodile
remains found in Abaco touch
on an interesting aspect of our
natural history. Just how
recently, they ask, could croc-
odiles have lived in The
Bahamas? They also seek
information from anyone who
may have historical or anec-
dotal accounts to support the
Abaco finds.
In fact, the authors needed
only to consult some of the
considerable historical litera-
ture on the subject, which con-
firms not only that crocodil-
ians did once inhabit The
Bahamas, but that their pres-
ence here stretched well into
modem times.
Columbus famously (and
perhaps hyperbolically)
describes a confrontation with
one of the beasts on his
stopover in Acklins/Crooked
Island, during his first (1492)
journey. And over three hun-
dred years later, Daniel McK-
innon;, a travel writer, also
observed what he described
as "alligators" on the same-
two islands.
Some have dismissed
Columbus' account as reflect-
ing his limited exposure to
tropical species. For instance,
since in 1492 no European
had ever set eyes upon a New
World iguana, it is possible
that he could have invoked
the name of the closest-look-
ing known creature ("coco-
drilo" in Spanish) to describe
an encounter with the former.

|lf however, it is alto-
l-:("iigether more diffit- v
cult to!dismiss the accounts of
specialists in the field of zool-
ogy, several of whom have.
attested to the existence of
crocodilians in The Bahamas
until quite recent times. For
instance, in the early 18th
Century, noted naturalist
Mark Catesby described what
he calls "alligators" in the
mangrove swamps of Andros.
Later, Peter Henry Bruce,
the military engineer who was


APRIL 25
6:30 Bahamas @.Sunrise Live
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11:00 I' mmediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News Update
12:30 Imrirediate Response .
12:58 Caribbean Today News Update
1:00 Health For The Nation
1:30 Ray More Than A Movie
1:58 Caribbean Today News Update
2:00 Mr.:Ballooney B.
2:30 Treasure Attic
3:00 ospel Video Countdown
4:00 Lisa'Knight'&The Roundtable
4:30 Ciberne',
4:58 &.30 ZNS News Update LIVE
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
6:00 Holy Hip Hop.
6:25 Life Line .
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money.
8:30 Island Live Destinations
8:45 Contact Magazine
9:00 Legends From Whence We
Came: Cleophas Ferguson
10:00 Sports Lifestyles: Marion Jones
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1640AM
NOE N -V 3rsre
therihttomak lstmiut


PERSPECTIVES


ANDREW

sent here to design Fort Mon-
tague, described two.distinct
kinds of crocodilians that he
observed while in The
Bahamas.

While Bruce, unlike
Catesby, was no
naturalist, the distinction he
makes between Bahamian
"alligators" and "crocodiles"
actually adds to the credibility
of his account. For we must
assume that he was basing this
distinction between the two
species on either his own
observation or the observa-
tions of locals.
In light of this, the discov-
eries in Abaco would seem to
confirm that there existed not
one, but two species of croco-
dilian in The Bahamas well
into historical times. While the
saltwater-resistant American
Crocodile (crocodylus acutus),
which inhabits nearby Flori-
da and Hispaniola, would
ordinarily be the prime sus-
pect of any sighting in T,he


A L L E N

Bahamas, the Abaco remains
point to a local subspecies of
the Cuban freshwater croco-
dile (c.rhombifer)
Today, the habitat of the
Cuban freshwater crocodile
has shrunk to one swamp in
Oriente Province, eastern
Cuba and another on the Isle
of Pines, just south of the
main island.
Just hanging on in Cuba, it
is unlikely to have lasted very
long in The Bahamas, where
fresh water habitats became
markedly scarcer with the dis-
appearance of the primary
forests.
All in all, it is likely that, of
the two crocodilians that for-
merly inhabited these islands,
it is the American crocodile
that survived longest. Inter-
estingly, it was a representa-
tive of this species that was
found in a golf course pond
in the Berry Islands four years
ago. While the assumption
was that that individual was
brought in by some mischief
maker, it is not too hard to


believe that this creature
(which exists in large popula-
tions just across the straits,
and which is capable of mak-
ing long ocean voyages) still
today has a vagrant occur-
rence in The Bahamas.


those of Man-o-War Cay
extraction will have noted the
passing last week of a repre-
sentative of that most rare
species: the Bahamian com-
munity historian. While Haziel
Albury doubtlessly con-
tributed in all kinds of ways


All in all, it is likely that,
of the two crocodilians that
formerly inhabited these islands,
it is the American crocodile that
survived longest. Interestingly,
it was a representative of this
species that was found in a
golf course pond in the Berry
Islands four years ago."


* HAZIEL ALBURY DIES
Last week's Tribune fea-
ture offers yet more proof
that, of all Bahamians, the
Abaconians have consistent-
ly demonstrated the highest
degree of curiosity and dili-
gence in recording and under-
standing their history and
environment.
Few Bahamians apart from


134 undocumented


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter


DEFENCE Force officers apprehended
134 undocumented Haitians attempting to
land in the Bahamas in two separate inci-
dents last Saturday.
In a press release issued yesterday, the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
reported that the first incident occurred at
about 9.14am on Saturday and led to the cap-
ture of 62 Haitian migrants.

Preserve
Marine officers assigned to the Land and
Sea Park preserve in the Exumas, sighted a
sailboat carrying illegal immigrants about
four miles west of Waderick Wells Cays.
The Haitian vessel was then towed to one
of the nearby Cays, to await a Defence Force
craft, which had been diverted to take the
immigrants to New Providence.
While on its way to pick up the migrants,


HMBS P-43 intercepted and boarded a sec-
ond Haitian freighter, some two miles west of
Elbow Cay.
Onboard they discovered a group of 72
Haitian migrants.

Vessel
The immigrants were removed from their
vessel and taken to the Defence Force's Coral
Harbour Base, where they arrived at 5.45pm
on Saturday.
A second patrol craft was dispatched to
pick up the first group of undocumented
migrants and returned to the base at 2am on
Sunday.
The Haitian immigrants were turned over
to the authorities for processing and deten-
tion.
Defence Force officials are optimistic that
these recent apprehensions are not an
indication of things to come,,acknow-
ledging that it has been reasonably quiet late-
ly.


to the people of Man-o-War
(he was a teacher, civil ser-
vant and community histori-
an), it was in the publication
of "Man-o-War: My Island
Home" that he contributed
most admirably to Bahamians
as a whole.
In the wider Bahamas,.
there are simply too few


examples of those who docu-
ment the lives of their com-
munities for the education and
enlightenment of future gen-
erations.
In fact, those with a thirst
for any such materials are well
acquainted with the few that
exist, and of these "Man-o-
War" is a good example
(another being Cleveland
Eneas, "Bain Town").
Like "Bain Town", Man-
o-War, depicts the life of a
Bahamian settlement through
the eyes not of a dispassionate
observer, but of one who
springs from and belongs to
that community. Yet, at the
same time, it manages to grasp
what is historically relevant
and cast it within a context of
historical change.
Books like these are impor-
tant to a modern Bahamas not
only in that they record his-
torical facts or figures, but
because they do it in a way
(and with a voice) that res-
onates with readers, even
those who have no personal
acquaintance of the commu-
nities they describe.
Therein lies the difference
between merely "telling" the
history of a place and "evok-
ing" it.


IBEDl1


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Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


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TH R9UNE.


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 5


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- b.


PAGE 6, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


t


o


- --]










THE TIBUNEMONDA, APRL 25,2005,PAGE


PM hails Cove


resort opening as





'historic occasion'


* By LINDSAY
THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services
GREGORY TOWN, North
Eleuthera Prime Minister Perry
Christie predicted that a new
beginning of economic prosperity
will be ushered in with the grand
opening of The Cove resort, which
was unveiled to the public on Fri-
day.
Now the only resort on the
mainland since the closure of Club
Med and Club Eleuthera, Mr
Christie vowed to personally see
that the refurbishment of
Eleuthera, 'freedom' in Greek,
would lead to the island fulfilling
the promise of its name.
The Prime Minister said: "I am
demonstrating my commitment
and my seriousness to the promise
I made that I will personally see
the revival and restoration of this
island as one of the jewels of our
country.
"It will be driven by major
investments yet to be announced
but are in the process of evolving
between those who will invest and
the Government," he said.
Mr Christie deemed the open-
ing of the Cove resort a historic
occasion, as it "represents restora-
tion, reopening and a new begin-
ning."

Impact
According to Mr Christie, this is
not just an isolated investment for
the benefit of owners, as it will
positively impact the community,
the island and the reputation of
the country.
He noted that work is already
underway in different parts of the
island, specifically at Governor's
Harbour where construction is to,
start within three months on a;
major investment replete with a
spa and other recreational facili-
ties.
"The Cove has now set the
pace. There are priceless contri-
butions. You can't measure what
you gain from being able to
demonstrate that this is a safe and
secure place for people to come
and to just get off and be
themselves," the prime minister
said.
Located just south of Spanish
Wells and Harbour Island, The
Cove was originally built in 1969
and named Pineapple Cove. The
new co-owners are Scott and
Leslie Bumpas and Ann and
George Hartley of Dallas, Texas
and Seaside, Florida.
The long-time friends, while
vacationing at the resort in sum-
mer 2004 decided to purchase the
property from the original own-
ers.
And during the last part of 2004,
The Cove embarked on an
extreme makeover process of its


10 deluxe suites and 12 standard
rooms.
So far, The Cove's 10 deluxe
suites have been renovated giving
off a mixture of island charm and
sophistication with stainless steel
fixtures, handcrafted, island-
colourful furnishings, tiled floors
and soft lighting.
Additionally, the 28 acres of
landscaped grounds lead to a num-
ber of on-site facilities, amenities,
services that meet the needs of
guests.
Noting the romantic ambience
of the resort, the Prime Minister
suggested that it could be
marketed as a wedding destina-
tion.
On the importance of the
investment, he said that about a
year ago, his government acquired
the services of world leading plan-
ning firm EDAW, to design a mas-
ter for Eleuthera to prevent ad
hoc developments.

Excitement
"Very clearly, this burgeoning
developing sense of excitement
about what's happening in
Eleuthera. The importance of the
Master Plan is that it will help to
preserve and protect your invest-
ment. It will ensure that those who
come into invest would know by
what we have planned this island
to be, that it is a five star destina-
tion and that every effort will be
made through integrating not just
the.produce, the citrus and pineap-
ples but all the sites that are his-
torical and a part of our cultural
heritage," Mr Christie said.
At Preacher's Cave, he said a
lot has been done to preserve the
historical spot where early settlers
sought refuge after being shipped
wrecked off Devil's Backbone.
The prime minister said further
.south, Governor's Harbour is
replete with history where wood
was exported to the United States
for the expansion of Harvard Uni-
versity. In turn, provisions were
shipped back-to the island.
"There is therefore a real con-
nection with Harvard University.
Our country has not yet taken
advantage of, to remind those at
Harvard and our own people of
the historical connection," Mr
Christie said.
"The government of the
Bahamas will stand behind this
investment, will ensure as best we
can of its success," he added.
In this vein, he said, it is of
tremendous importance that the
owners partnership with the Min-
istry of Tourism in making the
resort work and maintaining its
exclusivity.
Holding up his gifts a crystal
and gold pineapple paperweight
and a plaque to memorialise the
grand opening the prime minister
told the owners: "You could not
have chosen a better gift for me,


because you have an investment in
the area of Eleuthera that is know
for producing the pineapples. The
rolling hills of Gregory Town, the
soil in this part of Eleuthera has
historically produced succulent
pineapples and the sugar loaf. I
hope therefore that the symbol of
The Cove, remains the pineap-
ple."

Freedom
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said he was pleased
to participate in the renaissance
of the island, which is synonymous
with adventure and freedom.
"This new day will bring new
opportunities. It's a part of what
we've been working on in our gov-
ernment to ensure that we are pro-
viding opportunities for Bahami-
ans in Inagua, Crooked Island,
Bimini, Grand Bahama in the cap-
ital city, and here in Eleuthera, all
over The Bahamas," he said.
Mr Wilchcombe noted that the


PRIME Minister Perry Christie on an official tour of the newly renovated The Cove, an upscale
resort in Gregory Town, Eleuthera. Out front are Prime Minister Christie, co-owners Leslie and Scott
Bumpas, and at rear, Ann and George Hartley. The Grand Opening was held on Friday.
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)


Prime Minister's programmes and
policies have been socially driven,
to ensure that people are more
important than things and men
are more important than
machines."
Co-owner Scott Bumpas said:
"It's been wonderful working with
our government and getting
through the process. This is our


first time to do it and everyone
we worked with was fantastic to
deal with in Nassau and here local-
ly."
He also highly praised the staff
headed by Caribbean resort pro-
fessional general manager William
Rossbach.
"We inherited the finest staff in
all the islands. We couldn't have


done any of this without the staff,"
Mr Bumpas said.
His partner George Hartley also
expressed this sentiment.
Also present were Alvin Smith,
Member of Parliament for North
Eleuthera, Oswald Ingraham, MP
for South Eleuthera, Family Island
administrators and other govern-
ment officials.


Intensify the experience!
Inside the Town Centre Mall
(Next to Furniture Plus)
Tel:(242) 394-2607 Today
Fax: (242) 394-2612
eMail: info@autoplusltd.com


I


I


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE













Roman Catholics hold mass in



honour of Pope Benedict XVI


Our Exuma Branch
The Bahamas

Manager
Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in banking (or related field)
At least 10 years banking experience
Experience in credit operations preferred
Responsibilities:
Overall management to achieve sales goals,
and maintain a high standard of customer
care for optimal business retention, profitable
growth and productivity
Balancing business objectives against the risk
of loss to the customer, employee or
shareholder by adhering to corporate
compliance policies

Manager, Customer Service
Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in banking or related field,
or ABIFS/AICB diploma
At least 10 years banking experience
Experience in customer service, operations
and supervision preferred
Responsibilities:
Overall management to achieve team sales
goals and maintain a high standard of customer
care for optimal business retention, profitable
growth and productivity
Act as a resource for operational issues,
including UFC checks & balances, cash &
custody controls, revenue and expense
controls, -negotiation of items and fraud

Personal Financial
Services Officer
Qualifications:
Associate degree in banking or related field or
ABIFS/AICB Diploma
At least five years banking experience
Experience in portfolio and liability
administration preferred
Responsibilities:
Helping to set and achieve team sales goals
and to maintain a high standard of customer
care for optimal business retention,
profitable growth and productivity
Developing relationships with service partners
fo ensure customer satisfaction and operational
efficiency

Central Teller
Qualifications:
Associate degree in banking or related field or
ABIFS/AICB Diploma
At least three years banking experience
Experience in cash operations preferred
Responsibilities:
Providing professional, attentive and accurate
transactional banking services to business and
personal customers
Efficient management of cash requirements

Customer Service
Representative
Qualifications:
At least four BGCSE's with "C" or above passes
(including Maths and English)
At least two years banking experience
Previous experience in customer service
preferred
Responsibilities:
Providing professional, attentive and accurate
transactional banking services to customers
Responding to customers by identifying needs,
offering value-added advice, spotting
opportunities and resolving customer concerns
Please apply before May 5, 2005 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549
Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email:bahcayjp@rbc.com


RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada-


THE Roman Cat-
holic Church in the
Bahamas took time
to recognise the new
head of the Catholic
church, Pope Bene-
dict XVI on Sunday
at St Francis Xavier
cathedral.
A mass was held
in the honour of the
new pontiff, who
was elected to to
position last Mon-
day by cardinals at
the Vatican.
Meanwhile, the
former Joseph Rat-
zinger appealed for
Christian unity at
his inauguration
mass in St Peter's
Square in Rome,


and said that the
Jewish people
shared a heritage
with Christians.
"Like a wave
gathering force, my
thoughts go out to
all men and women
of today, to believ-
ers and non-believ-
ers alike," he said.
"And your pray-
ers, my dear friends,
your indulgence,
your love, your faith
and your hope
accompany me," he
said.
The Pope was
presented with the
papal ring and the
pallium, a white
stole.


Available from Commercial News Providers"
.- _




* -
dwqw- --
- - -
b "Copyrighted Material







d a- w -

-GE N .

-0m


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa
Invites applicants for the position of

DIVE PHOTOGRAPHER/ INSTRUCTOR
OPERATIONS MANAGER
TERRANAKI TRAINING MANAGER
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
JAPANESE AMBASSADOR

Applicant must be experienced in their field, excellent
communication skills, both written and oral; Team building
and management skills; Dive Photographer must be Certified
Drive Instructor and Underwater Photographer proof of
certifications a must. The position offers attractive
compensation packages competitive with relevant experience.

Director of Human Resources
P.O.Box CB 13005
Email cmajor@srb.sandals.com


PUBLIC NOTICE


TENDER FOR CAFETERIA SERVICES



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased
to invite qualified companies to submit a tender for Cafeteria
Services.


Interested companies may pick up a specification document
from BTC's administration building, John E Kennedy Drive,
between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday to Friday.


Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender for
Cafeteria Services" and delivered to the attention of: -


Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administration office by
5:00 p.m. on Monday, April 25, 2005.


Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid
opening on Wednesday May 4th, 2005 at 3:00 pm. at BTC's
John F. Kennedy Drive location.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean
* RegKt "d .ad"m.rk of Royal Bank of Canada
n Th ULon & Glob. ybol and RBC are trdemarks of Royal Bank of Canad.


111 1 111


""~~"~""~""""""~"" ~~"...........~~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005






TH TIBUEMNAARL2,20,PG


"r7"Ln5ALT T ..


S.Your car.

Your trust.


Our responsibility

rake Service Suspension i Alignment Exhaust
Oil, Lube I Filler "0OODYEAR TYRES"

American I Imported Cars Light Trucks Vans I SUV's
Complete inspection Estimates Defore we start the work
LOCATIONS TO SERVE YO-----
MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941
Open: Monday Saturday
8am.5pm

Fax 326-4865 P. 0. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas
AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS t

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


I I








2WD REGULAR CAB


5] Imiurmmv
FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
has a vacancy for the position of
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE


PROFILE:
* Associate degree
* Minimum of 5 (five) Bahamas General Certificate of
education (BGCSE) with grades "C" or higher, including
1 Math and English
* Computer Skills
* Priority will be given to mature & experienced applicants

PERSONAL
QUALITIES:
* Good interpersonal communications skills
* Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance records

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited offers an excellent remuneration
and benefits package including performance-based incentives,
medical insurance, life and long tern disability insurances and
pension plan.


Send resume no later than Friday 29th April 2005 to:


Human Resources Department
Re: Customer Service Representative
Head Office, Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-7502
Nassau
Fax 327.5175
e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE













-Inspection




selection


MORTGAGE CAMPAIGNI


IMAGINE you've found a
great new home and made
your Offer To Purchase.
What sort of guarantee do
you have that what you see is
what you'll get? These days,
most real estate contracts
allow inclusion of satisfacto-
ry professional inspections as
a requirement for complet-
ing the purchase.
You wouldn't select a doc-
tor by opening the Yellow
Pages and blindly pointing to
a listing, and you shouldn't
be uninformed in your choice
of home inspector, either.
After all, this is a huge pur-
chase, and you shouldn't
place your trust in just any-
body's hands.
The real estate agent will
be able to recommend reli-
able local inspectors, but
you're still faced with making
the choice.


B a
esat today


What are some questions
to ask?
Ask about the inspector's
experience in construction or
building maintenance as it
relates to his or her qualifi-
cations.
Report
Don't be afraid to request
a sample report, so you can
judge if the job will be done
in a thorough and detailed
fashion. Also ask for refer-
ences and call them! This is
an excellent method of veri-
fying the quality you can


expect,.
Finally, understand that
even the best inspectors
experience oversights,
so kindly ask about their
policy in such cases, and
to what degree they are
liable.
Remember that no home
is perfect, but be 'sure that
you don't get any nasty sur-
prises after you've completed
your purchase!


S The aiily 1= lthelate
WINIFRED BOWEN-
LIGHTBOURNE
would like to express their gratitude
for the outpourng of sympathy
through prayers, flower cards aand
kind words on the passing of our
dear mothteir
She has been an inspiration to
S many and will remain in our
hearts forever. Spedal thanksa is
extended to the care-givers who
made her last year on earth as
S. J comfortable as possible.


".'iMMWE WL rimSS Yourp
MAY YOU REST EIfiAPCI _


BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


Share
your


The Tjune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area oitave won an
If sao us on 322-1986
and si#e your story.


TENDER FOR GSM CONTENT SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is seeking suitably
qualified companies to submit tenders to provide the company with GSM
Content Services.

Please note that companies must fully meet all pre-qualification specifications
prior to obtaining the actual tender document. The pre-qualification
specifications are listed below:

1) Company profile of tenderer (overview of company, company
background, number of years in operation, listing of present and
past clients including contact information).
2) Company must be 100% Bahamian owned.
3) Company ownership (listing of principal/beneficial owners,
directors and operators of company. If a joint venture, specify
participants and terms of joint venture).
4) Full liability insurance of $1, 000,000.00.
5) A copy of valid business license.
6) Copy of National Insurance certificate.
7) Total number of employees.
8) Three written references from persons/businesses for which
similar contracts were successfully completed within the last
three years and the Company must provide references from
current clients utilizing their content services.
9) Bank reference showing financial viability.
10) Copies of financial statements (audited/unaudited) for last three
years of operation.
11) Company must have provided Content services for a period of
3 to 5 years.
12) Company must be able to provide local and international (North
America, Caribbean and the U.K) content.

Pre-qualification items must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked"
PRE-QUALIFICATION INFORMATION FOR GSM CONTENT
SERVICES ", and delivered on or before 4:00 pm. on April 28, 2005 to
the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas


~I


. I


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


/.......













Residents in



training are a



picture of health Ge.r
SPC Gerard Miller


THIRTEEN Harbour Island
residents have graduated with
top honours in the Ministry of
Health's medical first respon-
ders' project.
The residents, including two
police officers, were taught how
to apply the emergency med-
ical services system initial
assessments of patients, body
examination, CPR, the nature
of various illnesses and injuries,
and child birthing
"This training represents
another positive step in achiev-
ing our national goal of having
a minimum of 40 trained med-
ical first responders in every
Family Island community, 'id
Minister of Health Dr M us
Bethel. '
"It was excellent," said vale-
dictorian Douglas Lorey. "The
course was great. It is nice to
see a lot of people who can per-
form CPR and help people who
are in trouble on Harbour
Island.
"This first responder'
gramme is extremely imp .
It needs to happen in 6,. y
community in the Baha as.
People everywhere get health
problems. Thirteen medical first
responders on this little island
can make a huge difference."
The first responders pro-
gramme began six years ago as
a result of the limited amount
of doctors and nurses in the
islands.
"We wanted to find a way to
augment those services," said
Paul Newbold, field director of
National Emergency Medical
Services. "Since most of the
islands are so long, we wanted
to train about two persons per
settlement, totalling about 40
for each island.
"Harbour Island is smaller,
but we still trained 13 persons
so that if a nurse is not readily
available there should be some-
one nearby who could adminis-
ter advance first aid until the
nurse or doctor arrives. Our
main goal is to make sure there
are acceptable quality medical
services throughout the
islands."
The programme will go out
to Spanish Wells in May and
North Eleuthera in June.
The passing out ceremony on
the lawn of Administrator
Alexander Flowers' colonial


style residence in Dunmore
Town on Friday drew scores of
well-wishers who were enter-
tained by the Harbour Island
Youth Band.
Graduates were Flossiemae
Bain, Lashay Bullard, Cathy


Ross, Karen Catalyn, Woman
PC Tamika Clarke, Nadia
Bullard, Cheryl Johnson, Kayla
Davis, Shanna Johnson, Ian
Ross, Jefferson Johnson, Dou-
glas Lorey, and PC Gerard
Miller.


Bahamas Office and School Supplies
Chesapeake Rd Ph: 394-5705 Fax: 393-5044


I -


I I


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 1, MONAY, ARIL 2, 200CTHE RIBUN


Long lines extend



outside of airport


GLUCOSE MONITOR FREESTYLE FLASHTM
NOW AVAILABLE AT LOWE'S PHARMACIES

MONTEHIEDRA Abbott Laboratories Puerto Rico, Inc.
announced today the distribution of its blood glucose meter
FreeStyle FlashM in Lowe's Pharmacies throughout the Island.

FreeStyle Flashm is the world's smallest glucose meter. It uses
a single blood sample of 0.3mL (micro liters), which is 50 to
90% less than most meters.

FreeStyle FlashTM tests for blood glucose in 7 second or less.
This product offers diabetes patients the ability to test in
different, less painful areas of the body, such as the palms of
their hands, forearms, thighs, or calves. The monitor also has 4
alarms to remind them when it is time to test.

"FreeStyle FlashTM simplifies diabetes control. Its compact size
and easy use make the monitor ideal to handle diabetes,"
indicated David Freeman, Associated Business Manager Abbott
Diabetes Care. "As a special introductory offer in Lowe's
Pharmacies, clients who purchase a pack of 50 Freestyle Test
Strips will receive the FreeStyle FlashTM meter free" during the
month of May. This supply will be available at Lowe's
Pharmacies located at Soldier Road 394-6312, Harbour Bay
393-4813, Town Centre 325-6482 and Palmdale 322-8594. Blood
glucose clinics will also be held, along with demonstrations of
the product throughout the month of May in local pharmacies.

Abbott Laboratories also manufactures Glucerna, and
Glucerna, WeightLoss products, nutritional supplements for
people with diabetes. Abbott is a proud sponsor of the Bahamas
Diabetes Association (BDA).


of airlifts to the Bahamas to
maintain the vibrancy of the
country's main industry, one
airport official said that any
expansion and improvements
to the current facility would
be welcomed.
The Airport Authority ear-
lier this month acknowledged
that significant delays have
been encountered during
peak hours by passengers
travelling to the United
States. The Authority apolo-


gised for the delays, due
mainly to work being carried
out on main runway 1432. It
advised that work will shortly
be undertaken to install addi-
tional checkpoints fdr quicker
processing through the termi-
nal and to the departure
lounge. The Ministries of
Tourism and Works and Util-
ities along with commercial
air carriers will collaborate
with the Authority on these
new time-saving checkpoints.


The daily commute is now more an adventure in comfort.
The Suzuki Grand Vitaras come packed with these features:
* Sturdy full-ladder-type frame
* High tensile steel body
* Power steering, windows, loks
* Drive Select 4x4
* Air conditioning
* Radio/CD /
* Alarm system


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FINANCING
wlh Commonwealth Bank

*SUZUKI
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Price includes licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel
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QUALITY .o
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 OR 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Qualft Auto Sales (Fepoar Ltd for slmixar deas, Queens Hghway, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Maul, Dor Mackay Blvd, 367-2916


FROM page one
the current terminal was unable
to accommodate the number of
people departing yesterday.
While it was said that a
large number of departures
on Saturday and Sunday are
not unusual, yesterday's vol-
ume highlighted the need for
expanded airport facilities.
"The staff is trying to
process persons as quickly as
possible but the terminal is
just too small and that is why
you see the lines snaking out-
side," said one airport offi-
cial.
He pointed out that when
the airport was designed it
was built to facilitate four air-
lines at one time. Now there
are 12, some with four flights
per a day.
"The problem is not the
processing, we have been
doing a good job with that the
issue is that our facilities have
not caught up with the
demand.
Airport officials estimated
that only a quarter of those
departing from NIA yester-
day were able to be facilitated
in the terminal.
"Things are moving as fast
as they can. We are just trying
to maintain the safety of those
outside making sure they are
comfortable," said one secu-
rity official.
With more arrivals coming
into NIA and Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
highlighting the importance


Monastery to close
FROM page one
his priestly life of 61 years in the Bahamas and became a
Bahamian citizen, will remain in the Bahamas. The monastery's
present prior, Father Mel Taylor, will also remain in the
Bahamas.
St John's Abbey has sent missionaries to the Bahamas for 113
years. In that time more than 100 Benedictine missionary monks
have served in these islands.
"This monastery," said Prior Klassem, "was founded approx-
imately 60 years ago and for a time it flourished. But then came
the changes, both in the Church and in the country, and the
monastery suffered a loss of membership from which it has
tried to recover, but ultimately didn't. This is part of a much larg-
er trend throughout North America and many other parts of the
Church."
He said that the monastery in Collegeville, which provides the
priests to serve in the Bahamas, itself only had about 165 monks
and the "demographics are running against us."
"The role of the religious life in the Church is changing," he
told parishioners on Sunday, "and will continue to change going
forward. Over the past five years we have had to make the
painful, but necessary decision to close this monastery."
Last year St Augustine's College, which also came under the
auspices of St John's, was turned over to a Board of Directors
within the Bahamas Archdiocese.


TENDER NOTICE



COURIER SERVICE


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is
pleased to invite suitably qualified companies to tender
for Courier Services.


Interested companies can pick up a specification
document from BTC's administration building on John
F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00am to
5pm Monday through Friday.


Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender
for Courier Services" and delivered to the attention
of:-


Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd
P.O.Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas


Bids should reach th company's administrative office
on John F. Kenedy Drive by 5pm on Wednesday, April
27, 2005.


BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 12, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE.











TERBA ARIL


FROM page one


was no trauma unit available to
accommodate him before then.
Mr Chea died shortly after
being admitted to Baptist.
In The Tribune's Satur-
day report of the accident, it
was stated that it had. been
decided that Mr Chea
should be airlifted from
Nassau to Florida for anoth-
er emergency operation.
"But, according to Abaco
sources, there was confusion
over who should pay for
what. As a result, the flight
was delayed for more than a
full day".
The Tribune also report-
ed that "Mr Chea died in an
ambulance as it dashed to
the Baptist Memorial Hos-
pital .in Miami".
Dr Barrett McCartney,
director of the Intensive
Care unit, and chairman of
the Department of
Anaethesiology at Doctor's
Hospital, denied both these
reports.
"We knew what was com-
ing at us well before he
arrived," said Dr McCart-
ney. He said Doctors Hos-
pital's emergency room
received a call that a poly-
traumatic patient a
patient with multiple
injuries who was in shock
was on his way to the hos-
pital.
"The Air Ambulance Ser-
vice advised us well in
advance on Wednesday that
they were flying a patient in
from Marsh Harbour. In
flight they phoned the
emergency room again to
update us on the condition
of the patient."
Air Ambulance arrived
at Million Air in Nassau
about 5pm Wednesday, and
the patient was at Doctors
shortly afterwards.
"Once we got the call,"
said Dr McCartney, "we
knew what to expect. We
made certain that an oper-
ating room was equipped
and ready, a surgeon was
standing by as was an anae-
thetist.
"The Intensive Care unit
was also staffed and ready.,
"We made cert'ainl.thata
sufficient blood would be.
available from the Blood
Bank. Meanwhile, the fam-
ily did a tremendous job in
getting blood donors. How-
ever, because of the tests
that donated blood has to
undergo it would, not have
been ready in time for the
operation and so we had to
make sure that there was
sufficient blood available
from thelBlood,. Bank. The
Blood Bank w'as ready to
deal with an acute situation
and h:ad ein ugh blood on
hand to d la' inih ediately
with his needs," said Dr
McCartney.
Mrs Sonja Chea, one of
Mr Chea's aunts, said that
by 11 o'clock that night 47
pints of blood had been
donated.
"And donors kept coming
in," she said. "They put an
appeal on the radio and the
friends in Abaco put a
request for blood and
prayers on the internet."
Dr McCartney said that
as soon as the patient
arrived by ambulance he
was taken to the operating
theatre. "The surgery was
successful and the bleeding
was controlled," the doctor
said.
Dr.McCartney said that
Mr Chea had a ruptured liv-
er and a ruptured kidney
with massive amounts of
internal haemorrhaging.
"His blood volume had to
be replaced twofold during
surgery 20 pints of
blood," said Dr McCartney.
The doctor said it was
realised that further-surgery -
would be needed, because
just what is needed in a
blunt instrument injury is
not apparent during the first
operation.
"He was stabilised and
taken to the Intensive Care
Unit (ICU)," said Dr
McCartney. "However, we
felt that he should be trans-
ferred to a critical care unit


Medical team member


in Florida to be put on a
more sophisticated life sup-
port system.
"During Wednesday
night he required more
blood and blood products,
which were provided."
On Thursday morning his
physicians Dr.
Williamson Chea (no rela-
tion), Dr Reginald Ney-
mour, and Dr McCartney -
conferred. "We decided,"
said Dr McCartney, "that in
the light of him having a
complicated recovery period
it was recommended to the
family that he be trans-
ferred to a major critical
care unit for major support.
"The family agreed to
allow us to transfer him to
Florida.
"To make certain that
there would be no prob-
lems," said Dr McCartney,
"I notified the Director of
National Insurance, who is
my brother, because the
patient was on National
Insurance and because his
injuries came under work-
man's compensation, the
NIB was responsible for 100
per cent of the cost.
S"I contacted my brother
to facilitate the process to
make certain that there
would be no delay when
arrangements had been


completed to move him.
"Nurse Cheryl Charlow,
NIB's Utilisation Nurse,
took the report on the tele-
phone and came to Doctors
Hospital in person to facili-
tate the transfer and ensure
a proper and efficient
process occurred to get him
over there as soon as possi-
ble."
Mrs Sonja Chea said that
Mr Chea's wife, Shelley,
who is three months preg-
nant with their child, told
her that Mrs Charlow gave
her a National Insurance
card to admit her husband
to Jackson Memorial. "She
was told that when she got
to Jackson she was to call
that number and they would
assist her."
"The doctors and the
Intensive Care Unit of Doc-
tors Hospital, and National
Insurance did everything
possible, not only to save
his life, but to help transfer
him to Florida for further
help, and the family is
grateful," said Mrs Chea.
The Air Ambulance was
due to leave at 6pm for Mia-
mi. However, in the mean-,
time Jackson Memorial.
called to say that another
emergency had arisen and
that they could not accom-
modate Mr Chea.


Dr McCartney said that
"the process then began to
find a critical care bed in a
major hospital in the US.
Between 2pm and llpm
Thursday we had gone
through every facility in
Florida about 15 hospi-
tals and not one had a
bed to get him into."
One of Mr Chea's family
said that a member of Doc-
tors' administrative staff
told them during the night
that "Doctors had tele-
phoned 26 hospitals in
Florida, including one in
Tampa, but nothing was
available."
. "We then recontacted the
Blood Bank to determine
what quantity of blood they
had on hand available to
him," said Dr McCartney.
"Once that was determined
-.about 8 pints we met
with the family for permis-
sion for the second opera-
tion because he was becom-
ing-unstable- .w Wanted
to go in again to further
evaluate the situation. After
about a 45-minute discus-
sion, the family agreed to
the operation."
Mr Chea was wheeled
back into the operating the-
atre. "There was no signifi-
cant haemorrhaging at that
time," said Dr McCartney,


"but there were segments of
intestine that were not
viable because of the initial
trauma and that was dealt
with. He tolerated the
surgery well.
He regained stability and
was taken back to ICU
where he remained stable
during the course of Thurs-
day night."
Dr McCartney said it was
made clear to the family
that despite the second
surgery "our recommenda-
tion still was that he go
abroad because of the elab-
orate support that he would
need for some time."
The following morning -
Friday Doctors received
a call from Baptist Memor-
ial Hospital in Miami
"informing us that we could
effect a transfer," said Dr
McCartney.
The transfer by Air
Ambulance, under the
direction of Dr Caroline
Burnett, the flight physi-
cian, and Mr Warren Grant,
Chief paramedic, was com-
pleted without incident. Mr
Chea's wife was with him on
the flight.
"He remained stable
throughout the flight. On
arrival at Miami Interna-
tional Airport an ambulance
took him and his medical
team to Baptist Hospital
where he was admitted. On
their return to Nassau, Dr
Burnett reported that the
flight was successful and


uneventful and the patient
remained stable throughout
the flight and ground ambu-
lance trip.
"They turned him over to
Baptist Intensive Care Unit
in stable condition," said Dr
McCartney.
"We have yet to get a
report of what happened,"
he said on Saturday, "but
we subsequently learned
that he died."
Mr Chea's brother,
Stephen, and Abaco's first
woman fire chief, Beverly
Sands, flew to Miami on
Thursday to be available to
donate a kidney should it
be required.
Stephen Chea told his
aunt, Sonja, that they were
sit-ting in an adjourning
room at Baptist Hospital
when the loudspeaker
announced: "Code Blue!
Code Blue!" He heard
someone say "Oh, that's the
guy from Nassau!" Doctors
from all over the hospital
rushed into the room.
They worked on him for
about half an hour, but all
efforts at resuscitation
failed.
Mr Chea is survived by
his wife, Shelley, two chil-
dren, Vincente and Tapi-
anna, his mother, Mrs Iris
Pinder of Abaco, his step-
father, Philip Pinder, his
brother, Stephen Chea,
and sister, Sonja
Pinder, and many other rel-
atives.


FLORAL CORSAGES
T $35 ORCHID PLANTS

R TEA BALLOONS

ea & Flowers
a lovely tray i jLai 4i


THE,TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 13





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


h ALU


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THE

GRILL_


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Home Sale .


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Towels
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Throw Pillows
Comforter Sets
Bath Scales
Shower Curtains
Bathroom Accessories


r"GU


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Glassware Sets
Dinnerware Sets


Irons
Lamps
Blenders
Figurines
Bakcwares
Wall Clocks
Wall Pictures
Picture Frames
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US lawman receives special


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4 A


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ,
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 15














St Andrew's School 'Building for the





Future' campaign reaches $3m mark


ST ANDREW'S School
announced that over $3 million
has been raised in its "Building
for the Future" Capital Cam-
paign.
The announcement was
made by Robin Brownrigg,
Chairman of the St Andrew's
Board of Directors, and Robert
Lotmore and Peter.AIndrews,;
SChairma-taffclund Raising
Chair respectively of the St
Andrew's School Foundation,
the engine for the school's fund
raising operations.
"We are very excited to be
able to announce that we have
successfully realised the signif-
icant milestone of $3 million,"
said an enthusiastic Peter
Andrews. This accomplishment
puts the Capital Fund Raising
Campaign nearly one-third of
the way to its ultimate goal of
$10 million.
"People have responded to
our campaign warmly, posi-
tively and at extremely gener-
ous levels," Mr. Andrews said.
"They have repeatedly
expressed how they understand
and appreciate the great ser-
vice that is being carried out
by St Andrew's School for the
wider Bahamian community
and they are excited to become
involved through their sup-
port."
"Reaching this milestone
combined with the positive
responses from our donors has
ignited an extraordinary excite-
ment and momentum within
the campaign itself. This is
amazing and personally very
rewarding to see and to feel."
..Donors

Mr. Andrews added, "Sev-
eral rooms have already been
named, and there are still
opportunities for donors to
name buildings, classrooms,
labs, as well as programmes,
such as scholarships and
teacher professional develop-
ment."
Robin Brownrigg empha-
sised the school's great acade-
mic stature, saying, "St
Andrew's School has come a
very long way in the last
decade. It is the top-ranked and
accredited school in The
Bahamas. Our graduates are
attending more than 50 of the
premier colleges and universi-
ties around the world includ-
ing Harvard, Yale, George-
town, McGill, McMaster, Dal-
housie, Rutgers, Amherst,
Tufts, and Southampton.
Because of the high academic


level St Andrew's has attained,
students no longer have to go
away to boarding school for a
first-class secondary educa-
tion."
St Andrew's is an indepen-
dent, co-educational, non-
denominational, international
day school with an enrolment
of-806-students. Robert Lot-
more, who formerly served as
Chairman of the St Andrew's
Board, spoke about another
aspect that makes the school
so special.
"Its culturally diverse student
body reflects the mixed inter-
national, cultural, ethnic and
racial backgrounds of the peo-
ple who live on New Provi-
dence," he said. "Many of
tomorrow's leaders in all walks
of Bahamian life are attending
St Andrew's together today.
They are learning together,
socializing together, growing
together and building bonds
that will benefit this country's
future ... together."
Proud
"Building for the Future"
officials are very proud of the
fact that the campaign will pro-
vide funds not only for neces-
sary facilities but also for Stu-
dent Scholarship, Student
Hardship and Teacher Profes-
sional Development. St
Andrew's began its Scholarship
Programme over 20 years ago
for deserving, young Bahami-
ans who lacked the financial
means to attend the school.
Since then, more than 200
young Bahamians have attend-
ed St Andrew's on scholarship.
There are 22 scholarship stu-
dents currently enrolled at the
school today. One alumnus
who attended St Andrew's on
such a scholarship is Debbie
Ferguson, one of the "Golden
Girls" of track and field, who
credits St Andrew's for
enabling her to be where she is
today.
In early March of this year,
the newly constructed Library
and Information Technology
Centre was formally opened by
Governor General Dame Ivy
Dumont. These state-of-the-art
buildings, funded by the Foun-
dation, are ultra-modern facil-
ities, capable of supporting the
school's high-powered educa-
tional programmes, which, with
the recent introduction of the
International Baccalaureate
(IB) Diploma Programme, now
extend to first-year university
level.


at home, atwrrkTo .n the road...


there's only ONE number

you need to remember.


I


PAGE 16, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE TR B NIM N ANP II5, 2 0,NA E 1
I -A 3- - -- ,


Minister

presents

Letters of

Appointment
: FRED Mitchell, Minister
of Foreign Affairs and the
Public Service, presented
Keva Hylton with her Let-
ters of Appointment as the
pew Honorary Consul of the
Bahamas to Jamaica during a
courtesy call on Wednesday,
April 21, at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs. At right is
Rhoda Jackson, first assis-
tant secretary in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs.
(BIS photo:
Derek W Smith)


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE












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PAGE 20, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
Established 1950
P.O. Box N-1222, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas




oHAZIEL L.
ALBURY

of Man -0- War Cay,
Abaco went home to
be with his Lord on
Saturday, 9th of April,
2005.

He is survived by his
wife, Mary.Four
daughters and their
husbands Minerva
and Billy Lowe, Denise and Wallace McDonald,
Walter and Winnie Sweeting and Martha and
Richard Roberts.
Thirteen grandchildren ~ Bruce, Paul, Jeff,
Valerie and Dee Dee Lowe, Patti Mikhael,
Charmaine and Madeline Albury, Haziel
McDonald, Fred and Junea Sweeting and Rich
and Peter Roberts. Ten grandchildren in law ~
Eve, Shann, Heather and Dita Lowe, Dr. Sam
Mikhael, Glenn and Dave-Albury, Cheryl
McDonald, and Netica and Rebekah Roberts.
Thirteen great grandchildren Sheila, Andrew,
Sarah, Wayne, Alyssa, and Tommy Lowe, Annie
Mikhael, Cassie and Micah Albury, Shauna
McDonald, Makayla, Felicia and Aaliyah
Roberts. One sister ~ Florrie Albury
Three brothers in law Ritchie and Hilland
Albury and Harcourt Thompson
Seven sisters in law ~ Lois, Sarah, Patricia,
Sylvia, Kathryn, and Elizabeth Albury and Vashti
Thompson and many other relatives and
friends.

Funeral services were held at the Man -0- War
Gospel, Chapel on Monday, 11th April, 2005.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to
The Haven P.O. Box SS 6106 Nassau,
Bahamas.


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9 Breakfast, 5 Lunches & 4 Dinners
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*THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, APRIL 25,2005, PAGE 21


cl M"M INTERNATIONAL NEW


00 4 -


.. Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433,326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


J. PETER
LORANDOS,
41


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S. of Blair Estates, will
Sbe h e I d on
Wednesday, April 27,
i! 2005 at 3:00pmr at
Calvary Bible Church,
Collins Avenue.
Officiating will be Pastors Allan R. Lee and
Lyall Bethel. Interment will follow at
Ebenezer Methodist Church Cemetery East
Shirley St.
Peter passed away peacefully at his home,
surrounded by his family, on Wednesday
evening April 20, 2005, ending his valiant
fight with a terminal illness which was
discovered on August 11, 2000.
Peter was well known and loved by countless
friends and family. His love was felt by many
whose lives he touched. A well known
entrepreneur in local telecommunications
and computer industries he was also well
respected and received for his achievements.
Peter will forever live in the hearts of his
wife Dawn Catherine; daughter Jennifer
Lian Cherry [9 yrs old]; son Devon Peter [7
yrs old; mother Georgia; sister Nicolette
Sughrue, brother Jason Philip; Nicolette's
husband Phillip and their daughter Angela;
uncle Connie Bacil of Chicago, family of
deceased cousin ['uncle'] Philip
Lorandos: his wife Linda; their children
Angie and Steven; Philip Lorandos' eldest
daughter Darnell Darville and her husband
Robert [Bobby] and their daughters Krystal
and Kimberly, aunt Mae Carey of Rock
Sound Eleuthera and her family, as well as
other relatives and a host of friends.
Peter is now with his Father: Jerry Peter
Lorandos deceased 1969 and his cousin
['Uncle'] Philip Lorandos deceased 2001.
It was Peter's wish that family and friends
attending his farewell, reflect in their attire,
a happy celebration of his life and going
home, rather than a dark mourning of his
passing.
Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau St. On
Tuesday between the hours of 1:00 pm and
6:00 pm. and at the church on Wednesday
April 27, 2005, prior to the service.
Peter was the inspiration for the founding of
the 'Make a Wish' Fund of the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas. In lieu of flowers,
appreciation would be given for Peter's
continued support with this cause.
Contributions can be made to the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas in memory of Peter
Lorandos.


*' m


anastacia stubbs, katle longley, charles johnson, elgin hepburn
stacy campbell, eric hall, rachela tirelli, sandra eneas


airing on BAHAMAS

tuesday, april 26
at 8:00 pm

also airs on cable 12
after the news update.


kerzners

TODAY


bringing you the latest news and events
from, and about the people at


PARADISE ISLAND


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MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


ARlffsiD








PAGE 22, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


4 THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY EVENING APRIL 25, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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B WPBT show FYI Per- Bronze Japanese altar; German ducer Pop" Country music of the Sagon" Vietnam War. (N) A (CC)
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,Room" (N) (C) 1 (CC) Igency room. A (CC)
S Access Holly- Fear Factor Contestants battle an Las Vegas "Hide and Sneak" (N) Medium Investigators build a case
WTVJ wood (N) (CC) underwater rotisserie. (N) A (CC) 1) (CC) against an airline pilot suspected of
____ murdering his wife. (N)
Deco Drive Marriage911 (N) n (PA) (CC) 24 Jack's interrogation techniques News (CC)
WSVN are questioned; CTU operatives
close in on Marwan. (N)
SJeoardy! (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition: The Bachelor Charlie visits the Supernanny Wischmeyer Family"
SWPLG ( ryCC) How'd They Do That? "Harvey bachelorettes' parents and home- A hard-working couple get help with
Family" (N) (CC) towns. (N) A (CC) their children., (CC)

A O(:00) Cold Case Airline A teen Airline A flight to Growing Up Growing Up rowingUp Growing Up
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BBCW News Report News News
BET BETcom Count- ** PRISON SONG (2001, Drama) Mary J. Blige, Q-Tip, Fat Joe. A Club Comic View
BET down young man follows his stepfather to prison.
BC Coronation ** GONE WITH THE WIND (1939) (Part 2 of 2) Clark Gable, The National (CC)
C i Street (CC) Vivien Leigh. The Civil War forces a Southern belle to face reality. (CC)
C D Late Niht With The Contender A (CC) Dennis Miller The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan 'Brien
CNN 00)Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
cooper 360 (CC)
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COM Miller. A mullet-headed janitor relates his personal tale of woe. (CC) "Kids" n(CC) telethon; Larry
Cologne.
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(CC) his new pals reunite an all-bear band. 'G' (CC) with Roger. (CC)
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HALL Texas Ranger off the family fortune learns what's when her ex-husband plans a big on the fitness of a mother. A (CC)
Lazarus" (CC) important in life. A (CC) birthday bash for Lauren. u (CC)
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1 (CC) (CC) against a temp. sea. A(CC) "Boob Job" n Who's Next" .
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LIFE Girls "Transplant Princess (N) Princess (N) Walker. Premiere. A woman uncovers secrets about her dead husband.
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NTV Still Standing Fear Factor Contestants battle an Las Vegas "Hide and Sneak" (N) News n (CC) News
Cv (CC) underwater rotisserie. (N) C (CC) (CC)
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v,-i stinct ,Icounters takes the Best
SPEED1 (0)NASCAR Inside Nextel Cup (N) NBS 24-7 (N) NASCAR Nation
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"Traffic School" the wedding. n kiss. A (CC) birthday. C (CC) bank robbery.
(:00) In a Fix Super Surgery "160 Pound Tumor" Untold Stories of the E.R. "A Day David Blaine: Magic Man n (CC)
TLC Safe at Home" A doctor removes a large tumor. From Hell" A 6-year-old's illness has
no discernible cause.
(:00) NBA Basketball Eastern Conference First Round Game 2 -- Indi- NBA Basketball Western Conference First Round
TNT ana Pacers at Boston Celtics. From the FleetCenter in Boston. (Live) Game 2 Houston Rockets at Dallas Mavericks. From
(CC) American Airlines Center in Dallas. (CC)
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USA Service" A (CC) "Care" The detectives investigate Voight, Emmanuelle Beart. A botched mission puts a spy on the run from
Sthe murder of a 5-year-old. his employers. (CC)
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v friends.. and Wives "Hour 2" n n (CC) Of...n Of... n n
,*s t THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, Adventure) Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Charles Bron- WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WGN son. Convicts undertake a deadly mission in Nazi Germany. (CC)
Everybody 7th Heaven Annie and Ruthie find Everwood "Fallout" Ephram consid- WB11 News at Ten With Kalty
WPIX Loves Raymond themselves at odds over a special ers his options in the wake of Madi- Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Who's Next" family dinner. (N) n (CC) son's revelation. (N) n (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Cuts Salon open- Girlfriends Half & Half Dee Dr. Phil
WSBK (cC) "Contract High" ing is threatened. Jabari runs away. Dee turns down
A (CC) (CC) (N) ( (CC) Mona. (N) (CC)

(:00) Real Sports **s CHARLIE'S ANGELS: FULL THROTTLE (2003, Action) Cameron *A STARSKY & HUTCH (2004)
HBO-E U (CC) Diaz, Drew Barnymore, Lucy Liu. Private detectives try to retrieve cryptic Ben Stiller. Two detectives investi-
information. C 'PG-13' (CC) gate a cocaine dealer. (CC)
H (:00.) ** s ALIEN RESURRECTION (1997, Science Deadwood "E.B. Was Left Out" Tol- Deadwood "Childish Things" Nuttall '
SBO- Fiction Sigoumey Weaver. Ripley's clone and merce- liver enlists Lee to clean up Wol- unveils his new bicycle. n (CC)
naries battle escaped aliens. n 'R' (CC) cott's mess. C (CC)


S(:15) **s PHENOMENON **x SINBAD: LEGEND OF THE SEVEN SEAS Real Sports Revisiting dramatic
H BO-W 996, Drama) John Travolta, Kyra (2003) Voices of Brad Pitt. Animated. The sailor and a and poignant moments from 10
Sedgwick. C 'PG' (CC) stowaway must save a prince. Cu 'PG' (CC) years of the series. C (CC)
(:15) *** EVERYDAY PEOPLE (2004, Drama) Jor- **** THE DOCTOR (1991, Drama) William Hurt, Christine Lahti, Eliza-
HlBO-S dan Gelber. Customers and staff react to an eaterys beth Perkins. An emotionally cold doctor learns a lesson in compassion.
imminent closing. n 'NR' (CC) IC 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:00) ; ** *s SECRET WINDOW (2004, Suspense) Johnny (:45) El Delivery ** BAD BOYS II(2003) Martin
MAX-E STUCK ON YOU Depp, John Turturro. A stranger accuses a troubled au- u(CC) Lawrence. Two detectives battle a
(2003) 'PG-13' thor of plagiarism. C 'PG-13' (CC) Idrug kingpin in Miami. 'R' (CC)
(6:30) **** GOODFELLAS (1990, Drama) Robert THE WHOLE TEN YARDS (2004, Comedy) Bruce (:40) GENIE IN A
MOMAX De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An account of a hood's Willis, Matthew Perry. A mobster pursues a retired hit STRING BIKINI
tenure in a mob crime family. C 'R' (CC) man and a dentist. u 'PG-13' (CC) (2004) 'NR'
(:25) ** s BEREFT (2004, Drama) Vinessa Shaw, The L Word "Land Ahoy" (TV) Cu Penn & Teller: Penn & Teller:
SHOW Tim Blake Nelson, Tim Daly. iTV. A woman has trouble (CC) Bulls...! (N) (CC) Bulls...I A UFO
coping with her husband's death. f 'R' convention.
T C 6:00) **A * LARA CROFT TOMB RAIDER: THE CRADLE OF LIFE (2003, Ac- WELCOME TO THE DOLL-
TMC BASQUIAT tion) Angelina Jolie, Gerard Butler, Ciaran Hinds. The globe-trotter battles HOUSE (1995, Comedy-Drama)
(1996) 'R' (CC) a scientist for Pandora's box. C 'PG-13' (CC) Heather Matarazzo. Cu 'R'


Time: Second
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Special Priee:


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Meet the FirstCaribbean team of Home Finance Specialists


Owning a home is perhaps the biggest investment
you'll ever make. Our team of experienced Home
Finance Specialists will make home ownership a
totally satisfying experience for you.


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www.firstcaribbeanbank.com


FIRSTCARISBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
Caribbean'Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bahrk PLC and CIB.,


o aIrtgage Sm E u y na ce 1 n ra*e,.et


PAGE 24, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


MARKT.1!T


WRAPT^

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pae hpeeiM^


Spending on




$4.5bn resort



toExchange lohit 2mwers,
to hit $20m overheads and

improves trading
service as it moves
by year-end new Village
Rnidl hnmo


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
INVESTORS behind the $4.5
billion MOON Bahamas resort
project will have spent "up to $20
million" by the time they submit
their planned December 2005
report to the Government on the
project's feasibility.
Michael Henderson, chairman
of RJH Holdings and the man
who dreamt up the massive
resort, planned for man-made
islands off Grand Bahama's
northern shore, said "millions and
millions and millions" had been
spent on the $4.5 billion project
over a five-year period. This
included costs incurred in search-
ing for the best location.


J lk l:

-hni
4 *


* MINISTER of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell.
* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
FRED MITCHELL, min-
ister of foreign affairs, said a
national referendum on
whether the Bahamas
.should join the Caribbean
Single Market & Economy
(CSME) was "more unlike-
ly than likely".
Going forward, Ministry
officials are expected to
complete a white paper
shortly, which will detail
what the Government's
position is and, should it
decide to join, what the
terms of the Bahamas'
CSME membership will be.
Once the paper is complet-
ed, it will be circulated f6r
feedback from the public
and private sector stake-
holders.
Mr Mitchell has promoted
the position that the
Bahamas should join the
CSME, albeit with four spe-
cial reservations exemp-
tion from the Caribbean
Court of Justice, the free
movement of labour and the
common currency, plus a
period of adjustment to
allow this nation to bring its
SEE page eight


Mr Henderson said: "It's been
a very expensive exercise, but
that's the way these things go.
You can't take short cuts. It's an
extensive undertaking, but you
know that going in so you have to
be prepared for it."
Describing MOON Bahamas
as "the biggest project in the
world", Mr Henderson said the
project was "exactly on time" to
complete its pre-feasibility study
by July 2005, with the detailed
study set to be submitted to the
Government in December 2005.

Schedule
He added: "For now, it's look-
ing just fine. At this point every-
thing's going perfectly, and we're
exactly on time and where we
want to be. We're on schedule
and everything's in good shape."
Mr Henderson said the devel-
opers would shortly set up an
office in Grand Bahama, possi-.
bly as soon as three months' time,


Firm faces

.Nasdaq

delisting

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
CONSOLIDATED
Water, the company that has
won the $22 million Blue
Hills reverse osmosis plant
contract, is facing the possi-
ble delisting of its shares
from New York's Nasdaq
stock exchange.
The possible suspension
relates to the company's fail-
ure to file its Form 10-K for
its financial year that ended
on December 31, 2004, with
the US capital markets reg-
ulator, the Securities and
Exchange Commission
(SEC).
As a result, Consolidated
Water, which also owns the
Waterfields reverse osmosis
facility in New Providence,
has received a note from the
US stock exchange saying it
is not in compliance with
Nasdaq Marketplace Rules
and its ordinary shares are
therefore subject to delist-
ing.
Responding to the Nas-
daq move, Consolidated
Water last week said it
would request a hearing
before the exchange's List-
ing Qualifications Panel to
review the non-compliance
determination, adding that
it aimed to file the form 10-
K with the SEC no later
than April 30.
However, Consolidated
Water said: "There can be
no assurance that such pan-
el will grant the company's
request for continued list-
ing."
SEE page 11


as they would need to be there
"a lot more" once dredging
equipment was brought in and
soil samples taken.
He added that "work is going
on in different countries all over
the world", including South
Africa, with the developers not
needing to be in Grand Bahama
all the time currently, as they pos-
sessed "all the maps, plans and
satellite images we need".
Critics, including investment
bank Bear Steams, have alleged
that the MOON Bahamas pro-
ject, which will comprise five
man-made islands off Grand
Bahama, is 'too good to be true'
and will never happen due to the
development's enormous size.
MOON Bahamas, scheduled
to be completed by 2010, will
have the world's largest casino,
largest and tallest hotel with
12,000 suites, 10 cruise ship ter-
minals, 50 restaurants, and a
. shpping plaza,with a 10-screen
multiplex there.
The plans also include 22,000
condominiums, 1,000 timeshare
ocean villas four PGA golf cours-
es and a 'Moonrail' train system.
SEE page three


THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange (BISX)
has lowered its costs "while
improving quality of service"
in relation to trading through a
technology upgrade, having
completed its move from
downtown Nassau to new
offices on Village Road.
Keith Davies, BISX's chief
executive, told The Tribune
that the exchange had been


N BISX's chief executive Keith Davies


"fully operational" at its new
head office for between one-


SEE page 11


EGM set to oust Colina president


JAMES CAMPBELL, Colina Insurance Com-
pany's embattled president, is set to be ousted
from the firm by his former colleagues at an
Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) sched-
uled for May 20.
The EGM of shareholders in Colina Holdings
(Bahamas), the holding company for Colina
Insurance Company, has been called by the Col-
ina Financial Group (CFG), the former's major-
ity shareholder.
A Notice sent to Colina Holdings shareholders


on Friday, April 22, said the EGM was being
called to "consider, and if seen fit", authorise Mr
Campbell's removal from the company's Board of
Directors.
Shareholders were also asked to decide whether
to remove Ravi Jesubatham, who is the Colina
Financial Group's chief financial officer, from
the Colina Holdings Board.
SEE page eight


Financial.Group* company. /.


www.micronet.bs From desktop to departmental workhorse, in brilliant color,
Since 1983 Toshiba copiers have more features, more functions,
Slcronet more technology.

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
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TOSHIBA
Conkt oopy, Lead.
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56 Maderia Street Palmddle
P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, N:P. Bahamas '
TFe (242) 328-3040
Fax; (3E42) 328--3A43


-- --


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005 I HL I NIL3UNE


We're giving away Big Bucks!

Have $10,000 or $7,500 of your mortgage balance Fbrgisvenr
Or be one of 20 lucky customers to have $250 of a mortgage payment Forgptts,1
Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign runs until May 13, 2005

Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to 'Forgive & Forget'




Lif6. M6neyv'Baiarie.b..th
* ,aieud o an tta ,Tdmaitend aho df ThneeBamns. w N


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At the Bank's annual Staff Christmas Party, the winners of the Employee of the Year Awards were announced. The winners were
chosen from the list of employees named Employee of the Quarter in 2004.

The overall winner was MR RODNEY GRANT a Customer Service Representative at Shirley Street, Main Branch. Mr Grant received
an all expense paid cruise for two as his prize.

The second place went to MRS WETTE JOHNSON, Administrative Assistant to the Deputy Managing Director, Operations at the
Head Office, Claughton House, Shirley & Charlotte Streets. Mrs Johnson received a trip for two to Florida.

The third place went to MRS PANDORA KNOWLES, Human Resource Assistant, Head Office, Claughton House, Shirley & Charlotte
Streets. Mrs Knowles received a trip for two to any family island.


The Employee of the Quarter awards will continue in 2005 culminating in an overall winner being announced again in
2005. The awards are granted to employees who go beyond the call of duty in the performance of


Congratulations are extended to the winners for 2004!


M E T M


December
their jobs.


To buy or to build
By Michael A. Munnings,
Senior Manager, Sales & Marketing, Scotlabank
You're ready to become a home owner, but haven't decided whether to buy an existing home
or build one from scratch. Each has its benefits but only you can decide which route to take.
To ensure you make the decision that's right for you, it pays to become as well informed as
possible about each option. Here are some key points to consider when making the 'buy' or
'build' decision.
Location can influence decision
For most people, the first home search priority is location, whether you're searching for an
existing home or a lot on which to build. In choosing a location, start by looking at your indi-
vidual or family's needs. If you have young children, for instance, you'll likely want a neigh-
borhood with parks, decent schools, recreation facilities, and a community feel, with other
likeminded families. You may find these kinds of amenities come at a premium. Other loca-
tions may not have these family amenities, but will have proximity to restaurants, cultural
spots, a business district and shops, and appeal to homeowners with no or grown children.
Once you've examined your location needs and have identified potential neighborhoods, you
have to look at availability of lots and homes in these areas. Economic conditions often deter-
mine how many homes there are to choose from. And land in the location you prefer may be
beyond reach or scarce, although new parcels of land are sometimes made available for
development, presenting new building opportunities.
Location is definitely a key priority to consider, and what you find or don't find in your area
of choice can often influence or even dictate your buy or build decision.
Factor in costs and timing for both options
Cost is usually another major consideration in your decision to buy or build. Depending on
their age and how well they've been maintained, existing homes can sometimes require cost-
ly updates and repairs, beyond their purchase price.
Similarly, when you build, and are financing your lot and construction, you'll need to factor in
the additional costs of short-term construction financing. Scotiabank, for one, offers a Lot
Loan to help you out with the initial purchase. Once building begins, you can cover the costs
with interest-only payments through a Home Builder Loan. Then, when your home is finished,
you can roll this financing into a Residential Mortgage.
While you often get precisely what you want when you build your own home, vendors of exist-
ing homes can be anxious to sell. If it's a buyer's market, you can secure great value through
an existing home purchase. So from a pure cost perspective, you'll need to do your home-
work and keep your options open to make the right choice.
Of course, cost is not everything. Other factors to consider include timing. When you buy an
existing home, you can usually move in as soon as the deal closes, typically within a few
months of your offer being accepted. Anyone who's built a home, however, will tell you
patience and flexibility are key. Count on up to four to six months to build a home, depending
on the availability of reputable contractors, builders and architects. So, if you need to move
in sooner rather than later, buying an existing home is probably the more suitable option for
you.
At the end of the day, it's usually more straightforward to buy an existing home than it is to
build one, if only because you're dealing with fewer parties and a shorter timeframe. For
some, though, the excitement of building a home that perfectly meets their tastes and spec-
ifications makes the wait well worthwhile. Either way, you end up with a place of your own
and all the benefits of home ownership.

Introductory paragraph for series of home ownership articles:
Thle following is the first in a five-part series of articles on home ownership, courtesy of Scotiabank. If you're thinking
about making the leapto home ownership, or have already done so and want to learn more, this series provides help-
ful information on everything from whether to buy or build, financing your home, determining what you can afford and
protecting your assets. PAID ADVERTISEMENT


r-I


~r7k N


N *(


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


I H IHTRIBUNE


MRS YVETTE JOHNSON


MR RODNEY GRANT






HE TRIBUNE N SS


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE':


I.





Si4
'-:, |


S Pre-requisite: NonI
K Duration: 10 weeks

SCourse Dscri'n: A hands--on ir
I will cover the following topics
F Pre-requisite: N one
F uesdrsvs r Thi rs!da'
! Fees: $500.00
QUICKBOOKS
Course Desc'r.ipin: Designed to
organize and manage their accour
company files, chart of accounts, b
Pre-requisite: None
Duration: 6 weeks
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: Targets person
VVWebsite management, and HTML.
and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: Participants liust bec
Begins: May 12th & 13th, 2005
Venue:CEES Computer Lab
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordina
I Tfees are included with the except:
kindly provide copies of the first fou
Content, Course Schedule and Coi
.--- ..------ -- -. --- ---




SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide
focuses on customer value, retention
l Date: 26 May 2005 Time: 9:31
Tuition: $170.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESET
This workshop is designed to provide
on developing effective and dynamic
Date: 2 June 2005 Time: 9:3(


Begins: Wednesday, 4 May 2005 Time:6:00pm 9:30pm
Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees: $450.00

introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course
s: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Begins: Tuesday, 10 May 2005 Time: 6:00pm 8:00pm
Duration: 9 weeks Venue:BHTC Computer Lab


train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) to
nting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up
budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Begins:Tuesday, 10 May 2005 Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00

ns who would like to create their personal web pages. Will cover Web page creation,
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables

computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Time:9:30am 4:30pm Duration:2 days
Fees:$550.00
tor at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
option of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application,
r pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course
irse



Development Workshops
ummer Semester -2005

participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It
and relationship building and employee motivation.
0am 4:30pm Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre

ENTATIONS
participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses
PowerPoint presentations.
)am 4:30pm VenueAEES.Computer,Lab,,. sM~asd...,,,,,Ttippo:$1,9.9Q.,,,


WEB PAGE DESIGN . ...
Will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management.and HTML. Persons who enjoy using computers and would like.t,
create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms
and Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date: Thursday, 12 May & Friday May, 2005
Tuition: $550.00


Time: 9:30am 4:30pm Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human
Resources professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices
in today's workplace.


Date: June 9th & 10th 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre


Tuition: $350.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All
fees arehcluded with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide
copies of the first iour pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course
Schedule and Cou M i''aerial


COURSEi
NO.
ACCOUNTINGJf
ACCA900
ACCA901
BUSINESS
BUSI900
CUST900
COMPUTERS
COMP901
COMP901
COMP902
COMP903
COMP 941'
COMP953
COMP960
COMP930


SEC COURSE
NO. DESCRIPTION

01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II

01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I
01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMAL ION TECHNOLOGY I
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S


COSMETOLOGY
I COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE
COSM807 NAILARTTECHNICIAN
DEC,ORATiNG
DEC0800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III
ENGLiSH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
HEALTH & FITNESS
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
LANGUAGES
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
SPA 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I
*MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II
MGMT902 01 HUMANRESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I
SEW805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I


DAY START
DATE


6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 9-May 10 weeks $250
6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 9-May 10 weeks $275

6:00-9:00pm Tue 10-May 8 weeks $225
9:30am-4:30pm Thur 26-May 1 day $170


6:00-9:30pm
10am-1:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
6:00-8:00pm
9:30am-4:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm

6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm

6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm


Mon
Sat
Thur
Wed
Tue
Tue
Thur
Thur/Fri

Mon
Mon
Mon

Tue
Thur
Tue
Mon


9-May
7-May
5-May
4-May
10-May
10-May
2-Jun
9-Jun


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
6 weeks
10 weeks
1 day
2 days


9-May 8 weeks
9-May 8 weeks
9-May 6 weeks


.10-May
12-May
10-May
9-May


6:00-9:00pm Tue/Thur 3-May
6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 9-May


8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


8 weeks $225
8 weeks $250


6:00-9:00pm Mon 9-May 10 weeks $465
6:00-9:00pm Thur 12-May 10 weeks $620


6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm

6:00-9:30pm
6:00-9:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pmn


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fri
Thur
Tue


9-May
10-May
9-May
10-May

5-May
9-May
9 June
12-May
10-May


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10weeks

10 weeks
10 weeks
2 days
10 weeks
10 weeks


ENQUIRIES: Contal tlh Co-ordinalt(a' Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs All fees are included with the
exception ol the app w he, of .4.0.O0 '(one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES
reserves the ri gho change T uiion, -ees,'Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.


SNUINGEDUCATION


.. SERVICES

Ipter Offerings Summer 2005

COMPUTE'Ri .iPL..CA707ONS i
Course oes,'rip.ti:: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand
how it works. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software
using: (1) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database
Management.
Pre-reauisite: None
Begins: vonday, 9 May 2005 6:00pm 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 7 May 2005 10:00am 1:30pm Section 02 (CEES)
Duration: 10 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Tuition: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: Covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using:
(I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I Begins:Thursday, 5 May 2005 Time: 6:00pm 9:30pm
Duration: 10 week Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It
focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Thursday, 2 June 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $160.00
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description- Covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following
areas; Basic Hardware Proliciency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email
Proficiency.


Business Cards $25.00


Quarter Page $40.00


Half Page $60.00


Full Page $100.00



Covers


Inside Front (Full Colour)


Inside Back (Full Colour)


Back Cover (Full Colour)


$500.00


$500.00


$500.00


V


COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR, DAYS TIME TUITION & FEE
(ADDITIONAL $40
APP FEE FOR NEW
STUDENTS)
1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 May26 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00

2. GounnetCooking I COOK 823 May23 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00

3. Gourmet Cooking II COOK 824 .May23 6weeks Mon, .6:00-9:00pmn $225.00


4. Asian Cooking

5. FrenchCooking


COOK800 May24 6weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00

COOK 820 May25 6weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00


6. Heath Conscious Cooking COOK 827


May 25 6weeks Wed,


6:00-9:00pm $200.00


7. Vegetarian Cooking COOK 831 May26 6weeks .Thurs, 6:00-9:00pm $200.00


8. Cake & Pasty Making I COOK 813

9. Cake &PastiyMakingll COOK814


10. Bread Making


May24 10weeks Tues,

May24 10weeks Tues.


6:00-9:00pm $225.00

6:00.9:00pmn $250.00


COOK810 May 26 6weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00


11. Cake Decoraing I COOK 817 May 25 10weeks Wed, 6:00-9:00pn $225.00

12. Cake Decoraion II COOK818 May25 10 weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00


RESOURCE
MATERIALS


Venue Max
Enrol.


$10 -$12per week SHTSMain 15
Kitchen
$20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
$20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
$20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
$20 perweek SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
$20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
$20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
$10-$15perweek SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
$10-$15perweek SHTSPasl y 15
Kitchen
$5-10 per week SHTSI.arder 15
Kitchen
$10-$15perweek STSILardr 15
Kitchen
$10-$15perweek SHTSPasiy 15
Kitchen


For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175







The Centre for Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES) Department of The College
of The Bahamas will observe adult education awareness week, April 24-28, 2005. The activities
are as follows:

April 24 @ 11:00 am Church service at Evangelistic Temple


April 25


Newspaper Supplement


April 28 @ 10:00 am Official opening of the craft exhibition at the Mall at Marathon

(The exhibit features a variety of programmes that adult learners may take advantage of.
The exhibit is open from April 22-29)


June 2 @ 12noon -
(Post adult education week activity)


Distinguished Lecture Luncheon, British Colonial Hilton.
Topic "Philosophical and Sociological Aspects of Ethics in Business
and Religion and its Effect on Globalization."


1 '"s'


flU 8.' '\ ~~T'-~


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


*'w) rfinwrrf~ .'-' ~~lslBail8~weiE~


Parents, guardians, siblings, friends and well wishers of graduates
are urged to secure congratulatory advertisements in this year's
memory book. The rates are as follows:


Advertisements and payments should be brought into Student
Activities Department. Cheques should be made payable to
'Memory Book.' The deadline for all advertisements and payment
is Thursday, 28th April. For more information please call 302-
4525/4591.


Graduation Meeting


All July and December 2004 and prospective April 2005 graduates
are urged to attend a graduation meeting on Thursday, 28th April
at 6:00 p.m. in the Student Union Building. Important matters
pertaining to graduation will be discussed. For more information
please call 302-4525/4591.



School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES

SEMESTER 022005 (SUMMER)


'I I ~eg~ II IIC B~I$R~aP~I~S~)~M~tW~~~~


I----~---






THE TRIBUNE


AY, APRIL 25, 2005


Finance industry has $203m ayrol


THE Minister of Financial
Services and Investments has
announced that the Bahamian
financial services sector con-
tributes an annual $203 million
payroll to the Bahamian econ-
omy.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson
gave an overview of the
Bahamas' financial services
industry and plans for the future
during an address to the Royal
Bank of Canada..
"In the world of financial ser-
vices, the Bahamas is truly an
exciting jurisdiction," she said.
"We are an exciting jurisdiction
not only because of our climate
but also because ofour legisla-
tion, political stability and long
history of democracy. Our judi-
cial system is well-established
and well-understood; we are
close to the world's largest mar-
ket and, most importantly, we
have some great people."
The Tinister said that growth
of the, financial service sector
worldwide would have impor-
tant and positive results for the
Bahamas. The local sector gen-
erates more than $15.5 million
annually and accounts for more
than' 15 per cent of the gross
domestic product. The annual
payroll of the sector is approxi-
mately $203 million.
:.;' .'. \ ^ ^ '- ., .


"In the Bahamas,A are
committed to improving con-
stantly, the competitiviless of
our financial services sector and
its attractiveness to domestic
and international investors,"
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said.
"The reasons for our success-
ful track record are many: They
include the commitment by suc-
cessive administrations tg,,a tax
neutral platform, and a com-
mitment to personal privacy."

Protection

She noted that the Bahamas
has a strong anti-money laun-
dering regime and anti-terrorist
financing stance, having signed
eight of the 12 United Nations
.Conventions against terrorism,
including the Convention for
Prevention of the Financming of
Terrorism.
Furthermore, she said, the
Bahamas has a modern legal
framework based on common
law, ready access to interna-
tional talent, good communica-
tions and excellent and strong
public/private sector collabora-
tion and cooperation.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that although the Bahamas
gained independence idlf973,
,,Ajv, I


the country has been in the
financial services business since
the 1930s.
"We have become a leader
in this sector as the result of
having no income tax, capital
gains, inheritance and payroll
taxes," the Minister said. "Some
would consider the Bahamas a
financial paradise solely on this
basis. International persons who
choose to do business or live in
the Bahamas receive the same
benefits as Bahamians. There
is no ring-fencing in our tax
regime."
She cautioned that the
Bahamas' protection of priva-
cy is not to be confused with
protection of illicit activity.
"We co-operate with our
friends in making every effort to


eliminate money laundering
from our banking systems, and
the Bahamas was one of the
first international financial cen-
tres to criminalise money laun-
dering," the Minister said.
She said the establishment of
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments was the
first step in executing the gov-
ernment's plan to reposition the
financial services industry for
growth.
The minister said the ministry
recognised that financial ser-
vices had many beneficial
effects on the economy, and
continued to provide substan-
tial opportunities for inward'
investment and employment.
"We have a strong desire and
commitment to remain among


the top financial centres in the
world," Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said. "The quality of our cen-
tre is demonstrated by our com-
mitment to strong regulatory
and supervisory infrastructure."

Legislation

She said the government has
concentrated on ensuring that
laws are in place to stabilise and
encourage continued growth,
and that the industry is poised
for even greater expansion, with
the Investment Funds Act 2003,
the Purpose Trust Act 2004, the
Amendments to the Perpetu-
ities Act, the International Busi-
ness Companies Act and Regu-
lations, three pieces of'E-Com-


merce legislation and, most
recently, the Foundations and
Segregated Accounts Compa-
nies Acts.
The minister said the govern-
ment was working on a Private
Trusts Companies Bill and
mechanisms to establish the
Bahamas as an international
arbitration centre for the speedy
resolution of disputes.
"We recognise that there is
always room for further
improvement," she said. "Our
focus will remain a call to action
to improve The Bahamas' deliv-
ery of global financial services.
Legislation will continue to be
one focus, as well as a public
and private sector partnership
that remains responsive to the
needs of quality clients."


Telecommunications & Computer Network Design
& Infrastructure Specialist
Homes Offices Subdivisions
Call Us Today!

Tel: 393-7733


VDo
UBS is the leading globweal wealth manager. UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
our subsidiary in Nassau, has an opening for the position of a

I: Manager
:Information Technology Services
This IT Services Team provides smooth daily processing of all IT
and telecommunication systems to UBS in the Bahamas: Our main
technological environment consists of a W2K Network with about
130 users, Netscreen Firewalls, MS-Exchange, Meridian PBX,
Sybase, MS SQL and Oracle database systems, IBM WebSphete
andVeritas NetBackup.
In this challenging position you will be responsible for:
* Leading the local IT Team (five professionals);
*Ensuring an ongoing high quality of all information Technology
services provided;
Budgeting, planning and coordinating all changes to the existing
IT environment;
Reporting to local and global Management on a regular basis;
Coordinating with.4ocalMegonathgdiahl Peiderel M .;,
planned changes;

The" successful candidate meets the following requirements:
eor's degree in Computer Science or information Technology;
At least 5years of work experience in a similar position and .,
environment (proven track record); .
* Expert knowledge of most of the above mentioned technologies;-
*S several year of experience in managing a team of IT professionals;
wrong Projt Management, Leadership and Comm'unicatik.

tanigknowlededesirable. ;.

Interested candidates who meet the above criteria are asked to
ap in writing, enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:

uB(Bahames)Ltd.
ra .
RQ0Bax N.f7ff


In TTDO


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, SOLOMON GREEN,
in the Settlement of Mangrove Cay, Andros, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to JOHN SOLOMON GREEN.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



POSITION AVAILABLE
LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL GARDENS & MAUSOLEUM

Requires: Customer Care Representative

Qualifications:

The successful candidate should have at
least three (3) years experience in customer
service and sales.
Must have good written and oral
communication skills
Must possess good leadership and
interpersonal skills
Must be self-motivated and energetic

Attractive benefits package.
Please send resume to:

Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausoleum
P.O.Box CB 13773
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Fax: 323-7329

I. --""" -- "-------~"' --- ^^^ at

professional i
SUCCESS accredited
0 CS W Certificate
IN 2005 ;or Diploma,:
or Award.
IN 2005!
Invest in accredited qualifications and skills tol
secure a bright future; aim for a good career and high,
pay. Everything YOU need for success is provided;-
Training Materials, Guidance, Support, Exams, Award:
International Diplomas (130 or US$260)
*Accounting, Hotels, Tourism/Travel, Computers, English
I Business, Management, Stores, Personnel, Marketing i
I*Advertising, Insurance, Secretary, Purchasing, Office I
lAdvanced, Honours & Graduate Diplomas and MBAs |
I* Business, Account, Marketing, Finance, Personnel
I For a FREE Prospectus/information book contact:
ICAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE
PO Box 53, Southampton, S014 GYP, Britain
S{ Fax: +44 2380 337200
1 email: info@cambridgetraining.corn
/. .Web: ww.cambridgecollege.co.uk


\'\ \:.,














Government




urged to ban




management




trade unions


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Nassau Institute has
urged the Government to ban
management unions on the
grounds that managers would
be "compromised" if required
to vote on a strike or walk-out.
In a commentary on labour
relations and the trade unions,
the economic think -tank said:
"Management teams owe alle-
giance to owners and share-
holders. They are given access
to confidential and proprietary
information of the company.
Their privileged position is
compromised if they are
required to vote on a strike or
'a walkout."
Among the management
unions in existence today is the
Bahamas Hotel Managerial
Association (BHMA), which
was successful in securing an
industrial agreement for its
members with the Hotel Cor-
poration at the Radisson Cable
Beach Resort, now sold to the
Baha Mar Development Com-
pany.
A middle managers union at
Bahamasair, the national flag
carrier, has also been pushing
for recognition by the Ministry
of Labour.
The Nassau Institute said a
friend had also suggested that
the establishment of a union
by non-management employ-
ees should require a majority
vote, with affidavits confirm-
ing the voting record lodged
with the Minister of Labour.

Owners
The Nassau Institute
newsletter said: "The Govern-
ment requires both business
owners and workers to accept
unions under certain condi-
tions, and for owners to deal
in 'good faith' or face fines and
restrictions. In practice, 'good
faith' means compliance with
the demands of union bosses
and government bureaucrats.
"The Agency Shop is an
example of monopoly power.
It is a collective agreement that
requires employers to deduct a
fee from the wages of non-
union workers who, in theory,
share the benefits of the
union's bargaining efforts. Nev-
ertheless, the non-union
employee is forced to pay for
something not of his own
choosing."
The Nassau Institute said its
friend had suggested that union
Collective Bargaining Agree-
ments be limited to a term of
three years. Six years before
an agreement expired, a secret
ballot should be taken to
ensure members were still in
favour of the deal.
Further suggestions were
that non-union members not
be required to pay union dues,
as they could not be forced into
agreements against their will.
And "if a vote to renew a


Share
your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Collective Agreement is not
held prior to the expiration
date, the Agreement is auto-
matically cancelled. The union
then can re-institute proce-
dures to obtain a new Collec-
tive Agreement".
Other ideas promoted by the
Nassau Institute and its friend
were that unions be made
responsible for collecting mem-
bership fees, not employers,
the publication of all union
annual statements by indepen-
dent auditors to employers and
members, and the circulation
of independent audits of all
mutual aid, pension and other
funds to contributors.
The Nassau Institute added:
"Laws governing protests must
be respected and enforced.
Demonstrations on private
property without permission
of property owners violate
property rights and laws pro-
tecting private property must
be enforced.
"Disputes must be registered
with the Department of


Labour for 14 days before any
strike or work to rule action.
Wildcat strikes are illegal and
therefore strikers are respon-
sible for damages consequen-
tial to their illegal action."
In addition, the Nassau Insti-
tute criticised the Government
for "double standards" in rela-
tion to labour issues.

Labour
It said: "The Bahamas gov-
ernment is the largest employ-
er of unionised labour. Gov-
ernment employees are treated
differently than employees in
the private sector. This
creates a double standard,
mocking the Constitutional
principle of equality before the
law.
"Unions promise votes to
politicians sympathetic to
union demands.
"Through this relationship,
the unions are able to exert
monopolistic power in the
labour markets."


THE ANNUAL

GENERAL MEETING

of

Bahamasair Employees'

Provident Fund

will be held on
Tuesday, May 24th, 2005
at
Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied
Worker's Complex, Harrold Road
"WORKER'S HOUSE"
at
7:30pm

Important matters, including the
Trustees' Report & the 2004
External Auditor's Report will be discussed.
All Members Are Urged To Attend






Junior Network Engineer


A local networking consulting firm seeks highly
energetic, motivated and qualified Junior Network
Engineer, with the right attitude towards customer
service.

The ideal candidate should have a minimum of two
years experience in the IT field.

Responsibilities/Skills:

* Working knowledge of Windows 2000
Professional & Server Environments
* Install new PCs including loading software and
configuring network settings
* Upgrade PCs hardware and operating systems
* Provide basic level support of personal computer
hardware, software and operating systems
* Must have good PC troubleshooting skills
* Previous PC support experience is required
* Excellent interpersonal skills
* Ability to work in a team environment
* Self-motivated
* Requires A+, MCP or better.

Customer service will be a key focus of the successful
candidate.

Interested applicants please e-mail resumes to
itbahamas@hotmail.com at latest by April 30th,
2005.


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 'B


* (1) Food Mixer
*(1) 20gal Electric Water Heater
S(1) Digital Scale
S(1) Chrome Juice Filler
* (1) Multi Fruit Juicer
* (1) 200 gal Water Tank (Black)
* (1) Chrome Mixer
S(1) 18,000 BTU Air Condition Unit
SEWING MACHINES
* (1) Fleet Wood Sewing Machine
* (1) New Home Sewing Mahdhe

TABLES
* (3) Green Patio Tables (Round)
* (2) Wood Tables (Round)
* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)
* (2) Cocktail Tables

COOLERS/FREEZERS
* (1) Silver Chest Freezer
* (2) White Chest Freezers
* (1) Double Door Cooler Br/Wh
* (1) 3 Door Freezers
GLASSES
* (9) Cases of Water Globlets
* (9) Cases of Wine Glasses


I i .




fl)28 'Ah
... 1).*24'. 4ri t w
*, 1j1Fenhils





THE TRIBUNE


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West ay S street P.O. Box N-3034
Nassaum Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-578W327-5193-6
SF Pax: (242) 3275M 47,327-1258..
www.bahamasdevelopmnetbank.com





1. Lot #39 (2,500 sq. ft.) with house 1 .04 sq.ft.4 bedrom1 hroom-geronSubdvision
(Appraised Value $70,000.00 .
2. Lot #65 (7,300 sq. ft.) with house 2,078 sq. ft. t ve and Gibson Ave, Yamacraw Beach
Eastates (Appraised Value $1d0000M00
3. Lot #214 (5,000 sq. ft.) with 3 bedrooms, 2 b- roouin house d upholstery shop Roosevelt
Ave., Pyfrom Subdivision. (Appraised Vale 8,7 ..-
4. Lot #14, BIk #7 with sports bar along with t p nt Key WMet St. & Balfour Ave.,
Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised a r
5. Lot #171 (100'x100') with two story bilig ast Stet ppeaux Street. (Appraised
Value $320,000.00)
6. Lot #785 (5,000 sq. ft.) with house 4 bedroomsss, 2 bathiooms a a bedroom efficiency Bay
Geranium Ave. & Cascarilla St., Pinewood Ga denIs. (A0111aie r1 130,00.00)
7. Lot #210 (7,225 sq. ft.) with house- pYamacrawe Etater dvepss the Fox Hill Prison, turn
left onto Yamacraw Hill Rd., take first corner on the right Yamacraw Beech Drive then the fourth
corner on th right Current Rd., then third comer on the let corner property with house #18, pink
trim white. (Appraised Value m$10000.00)
8. Vacant Lot #35 (5,000 sq. ft.)- Strachan Bld., Solder Ro, StrachinSubdivision. (Appraise
Value $25,000.00)
9. Lot #27A (55'x90') with incomplete house Bosun HI PWOialaee $ 70,000.00)
10. Lot #176 (40' x 113') with 3 bedrooms,1 batronhus(8O q. t.) Old CedarStreet, Yellow
Elder Gardens (Appraise ,Value w. .0)
11. Lot #104 (4,090 sq. ft.) with 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom hue12sq.ft)- UghtbourneStreet,
Yellow Elder Gardens (Appralsed Vu .e 7M010 : "
12. Lot #13, Block #84(50' x 120') with bulings Easttreet dbuidgon theleft after passing
Cordeaux Ave., heading North on east two buildings dtwn rm Christine & Johnny's Dept. Store
(Appraise Value $84,000.00) 1
13. Lot #109 (60' x 70') with house, 4 bedrooms, Craven Seet, d andPark (Appraise
Value $80,000.00)
14. Lot #28, BIk #18 with building East Ave Cilnterve Aatele- es,0.00


15. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 q. ft.) in thesettment of Fresh Cree Central
Andros.(Appraise ValMuo MO : ':
16. Property with restaurant and cottages in the settlten of iners. Mangrove Cay, South Andros.
(Appraise Value $350,000.00 -,
17. Beach front property with building n the settlement ofiers, M gr Ca South Andros.
18. Vacant property 100' x 150' in thesettdmet of Pinders, Magro Cay, South Andros.
(Appraise Value $22,500.00)00


19. Lot #9 with hosue (3) Bedrooms (1) Bathroom and aino e lit level extension west Pinedale
Road, Pinedale, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama. ( slle $ ,000.00)


20. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with tripexlfoundation in Murphy i ac.. l 1.00)
21. Lot #51 (15,600 sq. ft.) with stone house Cown mnt, Mphy wn, b (pp
Value $104,960.00) 6 , *
22. Lot #55 (6,900 sq. ft.) with stone house Owm Alloents, Mur, Abaco. (Appraised
Value $87,350.00)
23. Property (9,300 sq. ft.) with Bonefish Lodge floor e ea of (4,300 sq. ft.) North Point, Sandy
Point, Abaco, Bahamas. (AppreiseVl-ue j MU


24. Propert 31'x111' with house Lord Strt in nt of T ay, Eluthera. (Appraised
Value $45,000.00) ..... .: : ..


25. Property 151' x 145'x 150'x123' with Hardware Buiding ,640 sq. ft.) situated 0.4 miles south of
The Bight Airport, New Bight, Cat Island. (Appraied tll1M ,000.00)


26. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story buildng416 apatment upstairs and shop downstairs,
George Town, Exuma. (AppraisedVal"e h :'


27. Lot #43 (40'x100') with house Matthew Town, naua,Rus Set $120,000.00)
ELETRONIC EQUIPMENTr .. .
*CD Mixer (1)TeciCatah Mostir
. (1) Microwave *(1)C. mpaqPws"' computer Montor &Tower
MACHINERY. -"..... ...


(:.






THE TRIBUNE',


FROM page one

import tariffs in line with the
CSME's Common External
Tariff (CET).
Addressing a luncheon meet-
ing hosted by the Bahamas Life
Underwriters Association, Mr
Mitchell said that what must
also be considered is the possi-
ble effect the Bahamas' mem-
bership in the CSME might
have on the insurance industry.
The Bahamian financial ser-
vices sector was managed and
controlled to some extent out
of Barbados, he said, adding
that although there was noth-
ing wrong with that, the
Bahamas had missed out on
opportunities to become the
centre of business for the
Caribbean by standing apart
from the processes of economic
and regional integration. Bar-
bados, in contrast, had long
embraced this.
"There has been a market
concentration recently in the
insurance industry," Mr
Mitchell said. "The result is that
other insurance providers here


Referendum

are arguing that in order for
them to compete in this mar-
ket, there is a need for an infu-
sion of outside capital.
"Under the present regime,
in order to approve this the
Government will have to make
special exceptions. Under the
CSME arrangements, there will
be free movement of capital,
and you will simply be able to
go to Barbados or Trinidad and
Tobago and get the capital you
need to inject into your busi-
ness. That helps to create jobs;
that helps to protect jobs."
The Foreign Minister is like-
ly to have been referring to the
proposed strategic alliance
between Family Guardian and
the Barbados-based financial
services conglomerate, Sagicor,
which aims to see the latter take
a 20 per cent stake in the
Bahamian firm's parent, Fam-
Guard Corporation.
Meanwhile, Mr Mitchell told
The Tribune that he, along with
Leonard Archer, the Bahamas


KPMG Klynvald Peat Marwick Goerdeler SA
Audit Financial Services
aaenersurasse 172 P 0 Box
. CH-8004 Zurich CH-8026 Zurich


Ambassador to CARICOM,
will travel to a number of Fam-
ily Islands, including Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Andros,
Eleuthera and Exuma, to speak
with the business communities
there and get their opinion on
CSME membership. The town
meetings are expected to take
place over the next few weeks.
The two are also scheduled
to meet with the government-
appointed Trade Commission
next week to help establish the
Bahamas' position on CSME
membership.
Mr Mitchell said the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs had taken
the lead on CSME negotiations
and promotion, rather than the
Ministry of Trade and Industry,
because it was a CARICOM-
related initiative. While trade
negotiations, particularly inter-
nal matters, are handled by the
Ministry of Trade and Industry,
due of the involvement of
CARICOM, which the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs has respon-
sibility for, the Prime Minister,
who is able to decide which
ministry should be charged with


Telephone +41 44 249 31 31
Fax +41 44 249 23 19
Internet www.lkpmg.ch


Report of the Group Auditors to the General Meeting of
Credit Suisse First Boston, Zurich

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Credit Suisse First Boston
and subsidiaries ("the Company") as of 31 December 2004 and 2003, and the related
consolidated statements of income, changes in shareholder's equity, and cash flows for each of
the years in the two-year period ended 31 December 2004. These consolidated financial
statements are the responsibility of the Board of Directors. Our responsibility is to express an
opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We confirm that we
meet the legal requirements concerning professional qualification and independence.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the auditing standards generally accepted in the
United States of America and auditing standards promulgated by the Swiss profession. Those
standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes
consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit
procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an
opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting.
Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis,
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also
includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that
our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all
material respects, the financial position of the Company as of 31 December 2004 and 2003, and
the results of its operations and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended
31 December 2004, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United
States of America, and comply with Swiss law.
In accordance with Swiss law, we recommend that the consolidated financial statements
submitted to you be approved.
As discussed in Notes I and 2 to the consolidated financial statements, in 2004 the Company
changed its method of accounting for certain variable interest entities and in 2003 the Company
changed its methods of accounting for variable interest entities and share-based compensation.

KPMG Klynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeler SA


Brendan R Nelson
Chartered Accountiant
Auditors in charge


Stephen Bryans
Chartered Accountant


Zurich, Switzerland 24 March 2005


26


CREDIT FIRST
SUISSE BOSTON


CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON NASSAU BRANCH
The Bahamas Financial Center Telephone (242) 356 8100
Shirley & Charlotte Streets Fax (242) 356 8162
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas


CONSOLIDATED US GAAP FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


Consolidated balance sheets


cembt,31,inCHF ,in R-t.oleic itoi, s mi2004 2003
Assets
Cash and due from banks 21,314 20,240
Interest-bearing deposits with banks 3,836 4,837
Central bank funds sold, securities purchased under resale agreements
and securities borrowing transactions 9 255,261 247,486
Securities received as collateral 20,016 14,827
Trading assets (of which CHF 96,020 m and CHF 95,309 m encumbered) 7 306,736 264,484
Investment securities available-tfo-sale 10 635 2,137
Other investments 11 6,371 2.534
Real estate held for investment 12 116 260
Loans, net of allowance for loan losses of CHF 533 m and CHF 1,383 m 13 22.827 26,164
Premises and equipment 14 3,873 4,071
Goodwill 15 8,823 9,558
Intangible assets 16 434 526
Other assets (of which CHF 4,785 m and CHF 2,644 m encumbered) 17 71,111 56,102
Total assets 721,152 652,226
Liabilities and shareholder's equity
Deposits 19 153,715 126,648
Central bank funds purchased, securities sold under repurchase agreements
and securities lending transactions. 9 221,359 220,706
Obligation to return securities received as collateral 20,016 14,827
Trading liabilities 7 143.250 148,765
Short-term borrowings 19.852 16,199
Long-term debt 20 82.433 68,143
Other liabilities 21 61,329 42,279
Preferred securities 0 154
Minority interests 7,086 1,969
Total liabilities 709,040 639,690
Common shares 4,400 4.400
Addibonal paid-in capital 14.251 14.957
Accumulated deficit (158) (1.812)
Treasury shares, at cost (3,131) (2,431)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss 22 (3,250) (2,578)
Total shareholder's equity 12,112 12,536
Total liabilities and shareholder's equity 721,152 652,226
Conainntanis and contingencies refer to notes 28 and 35.


an issue when it falls under the
realm of more than one min-
istry, gave the nod to Foreign
Affairs.
Asked when the Government
was likely to make a decision
on whether the Bahamas should
join the CSME, Mr Mitchell
said: "We will see how it goes
over the next few months." He
added that he was for "easy
deadlines", and was not advo-
cating a hard and fast timetable
in regard to membership.
Mr Mitchell declined to com-
ment on remarks by Dr Gilbert
Morris, who advocated that the
Bahamas would be better off
outside the CSME. He did say,
however, that people were using
discussions on the CSME to
play on the fears of the Bahami-
an public, and to whip up a lev-
el of anxiety.
The Foreign Minister added
that Bahamians should not be
overly concerned about possi-
ble membership in the CSME, a
move that was completely
innocuous, but political oppo-
nents looking to score points
and impact upcoming elections
were seeking to make the mat-
ter as threatening as possible.
"The danger of the present
analysis by many, who simply
say 'no' to the concept, is that
they will reinforce the present
anti-competitive nature of so
many sectors of our economy,"
Mr Mitchell said. "What has to
be overcome is a fear. It is not a
significant fear. It is that same
fear of using the Automatic
Bank Machines for the first
time, or the fear of not having a
bank passbook."
Clearly, he said, if the peo-
ple of the Bahamas did not
want to join the CSME, the
Government will not do so. Mr
Mitchell added that although
there has been some negative
feedback on the Bahamas'
potential participation, none of
the arguments brought out had
identified new objections.
In an address to a con-
stituency meeting held by
Carmichael MP John Carey, Dr


Morris said he had not been
"convinced of the intellectual,
economic or trade-related case"
for the Bahamas to join the
CSME, World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO) and Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA).
Arguing that "trade agree-
ments make no sense" for this
nation, which has the potential
to become the Switzerland of
the Caribbean without joining
CSME, Dr Morris said no one
had looked at the possibilities of
the Bahamas 'going it alone',
as Switzerland had done in
Europe by remaining outside
the European Union (EU).
"To put it simply: We may be
able to do what we do, as
Switzerland did what it did. We
do what is in the capacity of the
Bahamas, as Switzerland did
what was in its capacity," Dr
Morris said.
Mr Mitchell also told the lun-
cheon that the US had refused
permission for Puerto Rico to
join the CSME. However, UK
officials had granted permission
to both Bermuda and the Cay-
man Islands.
Life Underwriters Associa-
tion members were also told
that a decision to join the
CSME would position the
Bahamas economy for the
future, and usher the country
into a system of rules-based
trading one that was not
predatory, and will enhance the
value of Bahamian trade and
create opportunities for
Bahamian businessmen.
Mr Mitchell added: "You
should not be surprised that the
people who most argue against
trade liberalisation regimes are
those who presently sit pretty
in an economy that is protected
with walls around it. They have
the capital, and it is the story
of the rich getting richer, but
the pie not growing any bigger."
Looking at both the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) and
negotiations surrounding the
Free Trade Area of the Ameri-
cas (FTAA), Mr Mitchell said
the Bahamas' application to the


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE

REFERENCE INVESTMENTS MARKETING, LTD.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars thereof to
the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-7507, Nassau, Bahamas on
or before 10th June, A.D., 2005. In default thereof they will
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the
Liquidator.

Dated the 22nd day of April, A.D., 2005.

Claudio Mello
LIQUIDATOR
SHIRLEY HOUSE
50 SHIRLEY STREET
NASSAU, BAHAMAS




LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

REERENCE INVESTMENTS MARKETING, LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) REFERENCE INVESTMENTS MARKETING, LTD. is in
dissolution under the provisions of the international Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 21st
April, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Claudio Mello, of Shirley
House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 22nd day of April, A.D., 2005.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO., LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company



LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE


MARCUS BAKER INVESTMENTS LTD.


NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(6) of the International Business Companies
Act of 2000(No. 45 of 2000) MARCUS BAKER
INVESTMENTS LTD. is in Dissolution. The date
of commencement of dissolution was the 21st day of
April, 2005. Anita M. Bain, of Nassau, Bahamas is
the Liquidator of MARCUS BAKER
INVESTMENTS LTD.


Anita Bain
Liquidator


WTO was close to being ready.
While the FTAA is stalled
because of disagreements
between Brazil and the US, he
said that as part of the
Caribbean Regional Negotiat-
ing Machinery (CRNM), which
will negotiate membership in
the FTAA for members, the
Bahamas was also likely to join
this trade arrangement at some
point.


Colina

FROM page one

Mr Jesubatham's inclu-
sion on the EGM agenda
has set tongues wagging in
the capital markets, for it
would not be necessary to
ask for shareholders' autho-
risation to remove him if he
was stepping down willingly.
It is also likely to raise spec-
ulation about his future at
the Colina Financial Group.
The third and final item
on the EGM agenda, which
was signed by the Colina
Financial Group's chairman,
Emanuel Alexiou, is for
shareholders to approve
three new directors for Col-
ina Holdings Board.
It confirmed The Tri-
bune's revelation of the
three nominees identities' in
an April 7 story. They are
Ednol Farquharson, former
FNM MP and minister of
economic development
Zhivargo Laing, and retired
Deloitte & Touche partner,
MacGregor Robertson.
-The EGM Notice said the
three directors' appoint-
ments were subject to regu-
latory approval, even if
agreed by shareholders, as
among the 21 conditions
imposed upon Colina Insur-
ance Company in return for
approving its Imperial Life
Financial (Bahamas)
acquisition are strict
corporate governance stip-
ulations.
Colina has to ensure that
one of Mr Alexiou, fellow
principal Tony Ferguson
and Mr Campbell is
removed from the Boards
of Colina Holdings, Colina
Insurance Company and
Colina Financial Advisors,
something it is doing here
by forcing out Mr Campbell.
All three companies have
to have boards and audit
committees staffed
by a majority of indepen-
dent, non-executive direc-
tors.
However, The Tribune
previously revealed that Mr
Robertson and Mr Laing
were respectively personal
friends of Mr Alexiou and
Mr Laing, while Mr Far-
quharson is Mr Ferguson's
uncle, raising questions over
the independence of the
three nominees.
It remains to be seen what
attitude the regulators adopt
to this.
The Tribune had previ-
ously suggested that the
falling out of "major league
proportions" between Mr
Campbell on one side and
Mr Alexiou and Mr Fergu-
son on the other might have
to be sorted out at an EGM,
but the fact one is being
called is likely to surprise
observers, since it risks Col-
ina's divisions being aired in
public.
Mr Campbell will be
unable to resist his removal,
as Mr Alexiou and Mr Fer-
guson hold the whip hand
through the Colina Finan-
cial Group's 67 per cent
stake in Colina Holdings. A
straight majority is all that is
required to remove Mr
Campbell.
Still, it appears as nothing
is being left to chance, as the
EGM has been called for
9am in the morning on a Fri-
day, a time when many of
the minority shareholders
who have a combined 31 per
cent stake in Colina Hold-
ings, will be at work and
unable to attend.
Mr Campbell and his
allies have alleged that the
dispute centres around dif-
ferences over how to han-
dle the Board appointments
and corporate governance
issues imposed on Colina,
but the reasons are under-


stood to go much deeper
than that.
The two parties are
understood to have dis-
agreed over strategy and
decisions relating to the
Imperial Life integration fol-
lowing its $22-$25 million
acquisition.
It is unclear who is run-
ning Colina Insurance Com-
pany at the moment,
although sources have sug-
gested that there were
moves afoot to appoint for-
mer Imperial Life executive
Keith Major as chief oper-
ating officer.


4VI,"m








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, APRIL 25, 20
, .I* I


10. Securities borrowed, options written and swaps

2004 2003

Stocks $ 110,665 58,259
Government bonds 52.711 81,806
Corporate bonds 6,326 8,939
Credit linked notes 49,286 16,890
Options 6,235 213
Options on government bonds 4,868 2,538
Swap transactions 131,422 81,066
$ 361,513 249,711

11. Certificates of deposits, time deposits and promissory notes

2004 2003

Certificates of deposit $ 145,375 43,313
Time deposits 40,003 53,412
Promissory notes 1,504 1,192
$ 186,882 97,917

Certificates of deposit comprise amounts payable under the Bank's Euro-Certificate of
Deposit and Global Commercial Paper Program, which were issued at a discount to face value
with annual fixed interest rates ranging from 1.20% to 3.10% (2003: 1.25% to 2.50%), per
annum for each class of investor. As of December 31, 2004, the face value of securities issued
under this program was $146,024 (2003: $43,402).

Time deposits issued by the Bank bear interest at 2.50% (2003: 1.00%), per annum and mature
within less than one month of the balance sheet date.

Promissory notes comprise tailored notes substantially denominated in Brazilian reais and
include accrued interest.

12. Payable to customers, brokers and dealers

The amounts payable to customers, brokers and dealers pertain to the purchase of investments
which were settled at the beginning January 2005 (2003: January 2004).

13. Share capital

Share capital comprises 5,000,000 shares divided into 2,000,000 ordinary shares and
3,000,000 preference shares (1,350,720 preference shares in treasury) with a par value of
US$1.00 (one dollar) each, all of which are fully subscribed and paid.

Ordinary shares rank pari passu with each other and the holders thereof are entitled to
dividends when declared and to one vote per share at general meetings of the Bank.
Preference shares rank pari passu with each other and are preferred over the ordinary shares
for return of capital on liquidation of the Bank and rank equally with the ordinary shares for
.payment of dividends. They are not entitled to any voting rights. At any timr the Bank may
give notice to the holders of preferred shares of its intention to redeem them at fair value. On
June 30, 2004 the Bank paid dividends in the amount of $100,000 (September 29, 2003:
$35,000).

14, Commitments

As of December 31, 2004 the Bank had guarantees granted, primarily comprising letters of
credit, amounting to $5,014 (2003 $7,194). As of the balance sheet date, there were no
amounts drawn in connection with such guarantees. The Bank's exposure under these
transactions is fully secured by liquid assets.

15. Derivative financial instruments

The Bank usually engages in a variety of transactions with financial instruments in connection
with its management of market risk and proprietary trading activities. The notional amount of
financial instruments is not recorded in the balance sheet and may indicate only the Bank's
degree of use of derivatives. Premiums paid and received are recorded in the balance sheet in
investments and options written, respectively, and adjusted to fair value, in accordance with
note 2.2. The Bank's open positions are summarised as follows:

December 31, 2004
Settlement Notional Fair
Type of instrument currency amount Premium value


Equity contracts
Equity futures contracts:
Futures contracts bought
Futures contracts bought
Futures contracts sold
Options bought
Options written

Government bond contracts
OTC options bought
OTC options written


US$ 1,214
Real 754
US$ 15,353
US$ 132,195
US$ 207,736

US$ 177,350
US$ 177,350


Foreign exchange option contracts
Options bought US$
Optiors1 s US$ (*)


807
(1,703)


1,090
(3,113)


5,319 4,867
(5,251) (4,868)


34,714 671 965.
131,932 (2,675) (,22)" '


Long/Short Notional
Type of instrument currency amount

Foreign exchange contracts.
Foreign exchange futures
contracts:
Futures contracts bought US$/Real 908,773
Futures contracts bought US$/Euro 427,536
Futures contracts sold Real/US$ 578,413
Futures contracts sold Euro/USS 177,369
Futures contracts sold JPY/US$ 2,694
Futures contracts sold C$/US$ 2,497
Futures contracts sold CHF/US$ 220

Foreign exchange contracts
Foreign exchange forward
contracts:
Buy US$/sell Real US$/Real 470,347
Buy US$/sell JPY US$/JPY 1,174
Buy US$/sell MXN US$/MXN 1,404
Buy USS/sell RBR US$/RBR 40,041
Buy US/sell THB US$/THB 1,995
Buy US$/sell TWD US$/TWD 2,988
Buy Real/sell US$ Real/US$ 251,101
Buy RBR/sell US$ RBR/US$ 71,146
Buy THB/sell US$ THBA/USS 6,000
Buy TWD/sell US$ TWD/US$ 11,000
Buy JPY/sell US$ JPY/US$ 200
Interest rate contracts
Interest rate futures contracts:
Futures contracts sold US$ 81,872
Futures contracts bought Real 363,869
Futures contracts sold Real 86,102
Futures contracts bought US$ ) 203,776

Commodity contracts
Commodity futures contracts:
Futures contracts sold US$'(*) 8,152

Settlement Notional Fair
Type of instrument currency amount value


Swap transactions
Swaps '


US$ 349,224


131,422


The fair values of futures and foreign exchange contracts are included in deposits with brokers
and clearing houses or payable to customers, brokers and dealers in the balance sheet.

Real Brazilian Real; CHF Swiss Franc; JPY Japanese Yen; THB Thailand Baht; TWD
Taiwan Dollar; RBR Russian Ruble; MXN Mexican Peso; Euro European Currency;
C$ Canadian Dollar
(*) Indicates the settlement currency of contracts

The Bank has minimal exposure to the volatility of the prices of the bonds relating to its open
positions of government bond options as the long and short positions are substantially
matched.
16. Related party balances

The Bank entered into various transactions with the Parent Company and related parties. The
balance sheet includes the following related party balances.
2004 2003

Assets
Receivable from customers, brokers and dealers S 51,152 17,584
Investments 35,624 10,883
Securities purchased under agreements to resell 171,499 181,232
Loans 83,639 9.406

LlabilIties
Demand deposits 204,602 40,628
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 2,177 284
Certificates of deposit, time deposits and promissory notes 133,044 -
Payable to customers, brokers and dealers 1,823


17. Maturities of assets and liabilities

The scheduled maturities of the Bank's assets and liabilities as of December 31, 2004 andl
December 31, 2003 based bon the contractual maturity dates are as follows. Investments in
stocks have been classified in the "less than one month" category because the Bank can sell
them at any time in active markets.

2004 2003
Assets Liabilities Assets Liabilities

Less than one month S 1,761,523 1,559,304 1,541,094 1,381,611
One to three months 168,025 149,834 114,376 5,023
Three months to one year 282,073 19,286 187,315 3,636
One to five years 126,365 173,736 83,003 105,773
Over five years 24,750 18,729 29,482 66,038

S 2,362,736 1,920,889 1,955,270 1,562,081

The classification above, except for investments in stocks and shares of investment funds,
reflects the contractual maturity dates of the Bank's assets and liabilities and does not
represent the liquidity level of the Bank because certain instruments can be negotiated in the
market before their maturity dates.


18. Exposure to interest risk

Cash and cash equivalents, money market deposits, fixed income securities, loans, deposits,
securities borrowed and securities purchased/sold under agreements to resell/repurchase have
the following weighted average interest rates:

p o I month,
includingg opm From I moni to 3 From 3 moths Fo IM yar M5
-d., I-tY -a. o amsy.
Ia.-t I, LC w hlssI tan I a
i S =a S M W i m Wte r t S M


Assets
Cash and cshb quivalcls (I)
Money mrkes, deposits (4)
Corpoae bonds (2)
Gov-mmni bonds (2)
Govemmet bonds Other
Credil Linked Nots
Securities purchased under
agreements to resell
Loans recvable
Liabilities
Deoaad deposit
Scuriti borrowed (3)
CD & Promsorynod s (5)
C,,dit LiAnd Notes
Tim de&posi,
Securities sold under greemen
omrepurdthse

2003
Assets
Ch, ond c.sh eqivalt (t)
CorpomT bonds (2)
Government bonds (2)
Secuities purched under
.reemc-u to rslcIll
Loans recivble
Liabilities
Dmand deposits -
Securides borrowed (3)
CD & Promissory notes (5)
Secpdurs sold under agre-nuems
o rep-uchasc


131.236 .23%
3.536 7.50%
620 14.005 1.372


10.23% 32.148 7.22% 76.5S 6.89% 7.504 9.0
1.071 14.00% 29,621 14.13% 8 635 8.53%


S- 09 1.07% 8927 taIIM%
S- 13154 5.30%
406,330 1.2% -
9.497 6.35% 2,707 4.48%


504.523 2.00%


40.003 2.5%
567,173 1.13%


18.OS2 857%


133,154 239%


1t1,068 I. .. -. .
3,263 9.49% 5,704 B.90% 62,032 9.16% 49.201 631% 20946 7.23%
11004 t11.51% ,3 9S
517.450 1.73% .
3,933 9.78% 14544 3.81% .

312.320 0.75% -
16,890 11.46% 24.,707 3.19% 66,035 7.79%
90,747 130% 4,026 2.28% 1,952 3.75% -
540,031 1.30%


(1) Excludes non-interest bearing deposits
(2) Excludes zero coupon instruments.
(3) Excludes stocks, options and swap transactions.
(4) Included in Receivable from customers, brokers and dealers in the balance sheet
Excludes promissory notes with variable interest rates.

19. Foreign currency exposure

As of the balance sheet date, the Bank's assets and liabilities were denominated in United
States dollars, except for the following, which were either denominated or linked to other
currencies as follows:

Assets 2004 2003
Cash and cash equivalents
Euro S 10,623 4,911
Japanese yen 211 623
Britishyound 450 750
Swiss franc 5
Deposits with brokers and clearing houses
Euro 5,128 29
Swiss franc 1,316
British pound 2 0
Japanese yen 1,039.

Receivable from customers, brokers and dealers
Brazilian real 14,413 3,974
Euro 1,404 721
Thai baht 439

Investments
Brazilian real 424,483 211,350
Euro 550 4,117
Japanese yen 5,337 5,179
Swiss franc 1,021 -
Canadian dollar 11,045
Mexican peso 2,899 133
Turkish lira 4,273 2,290
Thailand baht 2,355
Singapore dollar 673
Korean won 181
Indonesean rupia 351
Hong Kong dollar 1,263 -
British pound 259
Australian Dollar 366 -
Czech Kroner 1,949

Securities purchased under agreements to resell
Euro 5,996 79,971
Brazilian real 6.887 6,405
British pound. 325
Japanese yen 1,328

Total 502252 1 324,774

Liabilities 2004 2003

Demand Deposit
Euro $ 21,464

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase
Swiss franc 679
Euro 5,349 83,295
Japanese yen 13,253 5,924

Securities borrowed, options written and swaps
Brazilian real 42,471 13,219
Euro 23,055 698
Mexican peso 1,078

Certificates of deposit and promissory notes
Brazilian real 1,504 1,192

Payable to customers, brokers and dealers
Brazilian real 2,367
Euro 56 307
Japanese yen 25

Total : $ 108,934 107,002

Net exposure:
Euro $ (26,223) 45,449
Brazilian real 401,809 204,951
Mexican peso 1,821 133
Japanese yen (7,730) 2,245
Canadian dollar 11,045
British pound 1,036 750
Swiss franc 1,658 5
Thai baht 2,794 -
Turkish lira 4,273 2,290
Singapore dollar 673
Korean won 181
Indonesian rupia 351 -
Hong Kong dollar 1,263 -
Australian dollar 366
Czech kroner 1,949


.20. Risk management

Market Risk.

Market risk is related to possible losses arising from fluctuations in the prices and rates of
assets. The Bank uses value-at-risk and stress testing to measure its risk; the methodology
used is based on techniques of historical simulation and scenarios construction. The Bank's
value-at-risk is calculated on a daily basis, covering all of its assets. Risk is assessed at three
levels: per asset, per asset category and per portfolio. The historical scenarios used allow the
correlation between assets and asset classes to be preserved, which enables the structuring of
hedging strategies. The stress tests are calculated based on both historical and hypothetical
scenarios.




Credit Risk

Credit/counterparty risk of any entity doing business with the Bank is systematically analysed.
Aspects of a qualitative nature, such as strategic orientation, management quality, business
sector, areas of specialisation, efficiency and market share, are added to a comprehensive
financial analysis, focusing on cash flow, asset quality, indebtedness, interest coverage nd
working capital. Credit limits for each of the Bank's counterparties are established by the
Directors, and reviewed regularly. The measurement and assessment of the Bank's otal
exposure to credit risk covers all financial instruments involving any counterpart risk,
considering the total amount of guarantees given and derivative operations. In order to
monitor exposure to credit risk in derivatives, risk factors are applied to the financial value of
the contracts.





Liquidity Risk

lTh.e Bank manages liquidity risk by concentrating on high quality and very liquid assets, and
using fuimding obtained from first class sources at extremely competitive rates. The Bank
maintains a strong capital structure and a low degree of leverage. In addition, differences in
tenor between assets and liabilities are monitored considering the impact of extreme market
conditions, in order to assess its capacity to realize assets.


I1C r -------g - dl~I CI I I a _--=--- -- ~IL~ 'I


.' ;>-* 1.


~iril








PAGE H, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


KMQ Tlshonm 242m= 2007
PO Box N 423 Fm 22317IM
Montalue' StCeCntrae Imhn' O MK -Nc
East Bay Street
NasaU Bahamas












AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDERS


We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of POBT Bank and Trust Limited (the "Bank") as of
December 31, 2004. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank's management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing as promnlgaed by the
International Federation of Accountants. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit
to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the balance sheet is free of material mitatement An
audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in he
balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant
estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We
believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of dhe
Bank as of December 31, 2004 in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board.




Chartered Accountants


Nassau, Bahamas
March 15, 2005



POBT BANK Ai'D TRUST LIMITED
Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004 with corresponding figures for 2003
(Expressed in thousands of United States dollars)

Notes 2004 2003

Assets
Cash and cash equivalents S 205,777 198,442
Money market funds 3 52,695 6,694
Deposits with brokers and clearing houses 4 266,217 147,821
Receivable from customers, brokers and dealers 5 & 16 324,195 319,354
Investments 6 & 16 1,015,235 746,790
Securities purchased under agreements to resell 7 & 16 406,330 517,450
Loans 8 & 16 92,204 18,477
Fixed assets 83 242
S 2,362,736 1,955,270

Liabilities
Demand deposits 9 & 16 $ 504,523 312,320
Securitiessold under agreements to repurchase 7 & 16 567,173 540,031
Securities borrowed, options written and swaps 10 361,513 249,711
Certificates of deposit, time deposits and
promissory notes 11 & 16 186,882 97,917
1,920,889 1,562,081
Shareholders' equity
Share capital 13 5,000 5,000
Contributed surplus 95,000 95,000
Retained earnings 464,456 415,798
Treasury shares 13 (122,609) (122,609)
441,847 393,189

Commitments 14& 15
2;,32.73(j a1,955,270
See-accompanying notes to balance sheet

This balance sheet was approved on behalf of the Board of Directors on March 15, 2005 by the
following:


Andrd Santos Esteves Director


Gilberto Savaoda Slva Director


Notes to Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004, with corresponding figures for 2003
(Expressed in thousands of United States dollars)



1. Incorporation and background information
POBT Bank and Trust Limited (the "Bank") was incorporated on October 13, 1992 under
the laws of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas ("The Bahamas") and is licensed to carry
out banking and trust business from within The Bahamas. The Bank is a wholly-owned
subsidiary of POBT Holdings Limited ("Parent Company") which owns all of the ordinary
shares of the Bank. The preference shares are owned by POBT Securities Limited. Both
of these companies are incorporated under the laws of The Bahamas and are closely held.
Since its inception, the Bank has been engaged principally in the trading and brokerage of
securities and provision of investment advisory services.
The registered office of the Bank is located at Fort Nassau Centre 2" floor, suite 202,
Marlborough Street, Nassau, Bahamas. As of December 31, 2004, the Bank had eight
employees (2003 four employees).
2. Summary of significant accounting policies
+1 Basis ofpreparation
The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards ("IFRS") an4 interpretations adopted by the International Accounting Standards
Board.
The balance sheet is prepared on a fair value basis for derivative financial instruments,
financial assets and liabilities held for trading, and available-for-sale assets, except those
for which a reliable measure of fair value is not available. Other financial assets and
liabilities and non-financial assets and liabilities are stated at amortised cost or historical
cost.
The accounting policies have been consistently applied and consistent with those used in
the previous year.
2.2 Financial instruments
(i) Classification
Held for trading instruments are those that the Bank principally holds for the purpose
of short-term profit taking. These include investments, derivative contracts and
liabilities from short sales of financial instruments. All trading derivatives in a net
receivable position (positive fair value), as well as options purchased, are reported as
"investments". All trading derivatives in a net payable position (negative fair value),
as well as options written, are reported as "securities borrowed, options written and
swaps".

Available-for-sale securities are securities that are not held for trading purposes or held to
maturity. Available-for-sale instruments include shares of investment funds.
Originated loans and receivables were created by the Bank by providing money to a
debtor other tOan those created with the intention of short-term profit taking. Originated
loans and receivables comprise loans and advances to bank and customers.
(ii) Recognition
Financial instruments are measured initially at cost on the trade date, including transaction
costs.
(iii) Measurement
Subsequent to initial recognition, all trading instruments and all available-for-sale assets
are measured at fair value.
Non-trading financial instruments include deposits with brokers and clearing houses,
receivables from customers, brokers and dealers, securities purchased under agreements to
resell, loans, demand deposits, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, certificates
of deposit and promissory notes, and payable to customers, brokers and dealers. They are
measured at cost plus accrued interest as of the balance sheet date, where applicable.
(iv) Fair value measurement principles
The fair value oflfiiiincial instruments is based on their last closing execution prices and
in the event of no trades as of the balance sheet date, then the quoted bid price at the
balance sheet date without any deduction for transaction costs. If a quoted market price is
not available, the fair value of the instrument is estimated using pricing models or
discounted cash flow techniques.
(v) Specific instruments -


Loans
Loans are originated by the Bank and are not held for trading. They are carried t
disbursement amounts plus accrued interest as of the balance sheet date, net of provisions
for loan losses, if any. The provisions for loan losses are based on an analysis by
management of the outstanding loan portfolio, in order to determine the amount sufficient
to cover estimated losses. The Bank takes into account specific and general risks
components of its loan portfolio. Such approach considers the financial strength of each
customer as well as the political and economic environment and the specific and general
portfolio risks of the countries where customers are located.

Derivative financial Instruments
Derivative financial instruments, including futures, forwards, swaps and options, are
measured in accofllance with the accounting policy for trading instruments. The Bank's
positions in futures contracts are recorded in off-balance sheet accounts.
Securities purchased under agreements to resell and securities soldM auder
agreements to repurchase
The Bank enters into purchases (sales) of investments (primarily government bonds)
under agreements to resell (repurchase). These balances represent short-term
collateralised financing transactions. The amounts paid are recognised in "Securities
purchased under agreements to resell" and the underlying assets are recorded in off-
balance sheet accounts. These amounts are collateralised by the underlying security.
Investments sold under repurchase agreements continue to be recognised in the balance
sheet. The proceeds from the sale of the investments are reported as liabilities under
"Securities sold under agreements to repurchase". Such transactions are entered usually
on an open basis and may be terminated by both parties upon demand.
Securities borrowed, options written and swaps
As a result of trading strategies, the Bank may sell securities for which it has no
possession. In order to execute such transactions the Bank may either borrow securities
through broker-dealers or use securities obtained as collateral in the transaction recorded
as securities purchased under agreements to resell. The obligation of the Bank to return
securities is adjusted on a daily basis to the fair value of such securities. Options written
are adjusted on a daily basis to their fair value as reported by the applicable stock
exchange. Swap agreements are adjusted to fair value in accordance with the valuation
criteria of the underlying assets, which is in accordance with the criteria described for the
assets owned by the Bank as of the balance sheet date.
2.3 Foreign currency
The Bank conducts the majority of its operations in United States dollars, the measurement
and reporting currency of the Bank. Transactions in foreign currencies are translated to
United Sates dollars at the closing foreign exchange rate at the date of the transaction.
Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are
translated to United States dollars at the closing foreign exchange rate at that date.

2.4 Treasury shares
When share capital recognised as equity is repurchased, the amount of the consideration paid,
including directly attributable costs, is recognised as a change in equity. Repurchased shares
are classified as treasury shares and presented as a deduction from total equity.
2.5 DIvidends
Dividends are recognised as a liability on the date in which they are declared. On the balance
sheet date there were no dividends pending payment
26 Preference shares
Preference shares have priority in the repayment of capital and are redeemable at the option of
the Bank. Any dividends are discretionary at the option of the Directors.
2.7 Fired assets
Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is calculated on a
straight-line basis over the useful lives.
2.8 Use of estimates
The preparation of the balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires management to mike
estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and
disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the balance sheet Actual results
could differ from those estimates.
3. Money market funds
Money market funds represent shares in investment funds where investments are largely
concentrated in highly liquid US money market instruments.
4. Deposits with brokers and clearing houses .
Deposits with brokers and clearing houses represent deposits with selected brokers dealers as
a result of settlement and margin requirements resulting from ordinary trading activity of the
Bank. Credit exposure to brokers and clearing houses is subject to daily review by the Bank.
5. Receivable from customers, brokers and dealers
S Receivable from custQmars, brokers and dealers represent amounts of sale transactions whicH
weat settled at the beginning of January 2005 (2003: January 2004). Such transactions are
settled on a delivery/receipt versus payment basis in the main clearing systems where the
applicable securities are deposited..

6. Investments
The balances under this caption comprise:

2004 2003

Securities available-for-sale
Shares of investment funds:
Funds of investment funds (a) $ 35,624 10,883
Hedge funds (b) 192,488 189,673
Other funds 79
Total securities available-for-sale 228,112 200,635

Securities held for trading
Private sector:
Stocks 482,092 314,581
Options 2,122 1,613
Corporate bonds 186,260 151,199
Credit linked notes 13,154 16,494
Public sector.
Government bonds-Brazil 38,927 19,299
Government bonds-United States 48,752 40,755
Government bonds-Other Countries 11,018
Options on bonds-Brazil 4,798 2,214
Total securities held for trading 787,123 546,155

Total investments -1,015,235 746,790


(a) Represents investments in different funds that achieve diversification through acquisition
of several hedge funds or through acquisition of other investment funds with investments
concentrated in hedge funds. In both cases the hedge funds have the investment approach
described in item (b) below.
(b) Represents funds whose investment objective is to provide absolute returns with small or
lm: correlation to general equity and fixed income markets with high concentration in 0-7
securities and markets.
Certain securities with a fair value of $145,217 (2003: $106,601) serve as collateral for
securities sold under agreements to repurchase.

The Parent Company holds investments on behalf of the Bank on a fiduciary basis. As of
December 31, 2004, these investments represent primarily securities issued by Brazilian
corporations and the Brazilian Government denominated in Brazilian reais and having a fair
value of $424,318 (2003: $211,172) which are included in Investments as securities held-for-
trading.
7. Securities purchased under agreements to resell and securities sold under agreements to
repurchase
Securities purchased under agreements to resell represent securities (primarily government
bonds) acquired by the Bank subject to obligations of the seller to repurchase and the Bank to
resell the securities onw demand by buyer or seller. The agreements earn interest at rates
varying from 0.07% to 5.25% (2003: 0.25% to 4.0%) per annum. Certain securities
purchased under agreements to resell were sold by the Bank and are included in securities
borrowed as described in note 10. The Bank received securities with a fair value of $647,132
as collateral for securities purchased under agreements to resell.
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase represent securities (primarily government
bonds) sold by the Bank with a commitment to repurchase them on demand by buyer or seller.
These agreements bear interest at rates varying from 0.20% to 2.70% (2003: 0.25% to 2.35%
%) per annum. The Bank pledged securities with a fair value of $668,424 ($145,217 owned by
the Bank as'disclosed in note 6 as collateral for securities sold under agreements to repurchase
represent.

8. Loans
Loans represent short-term and long-term credits offered by the Bank to customers., Their
maturity periods range up to 60 months (2003: up to 12 months) and they eam interest up to
7.5% per annum (2003: up to 9.78% per annum). During 2004 and 2003 the Bank recorded no
losses resulting from non-payment of interest or principal.

9. Demand deposits ....
The balances under this caption represent money market deposits. The average interest paid to
the Bank's depositors as of December 31, 2004 was 2% (2003: 1,75%) per annum.


S. S


I -! ~











21. Concentration of assets and liabilites
As of December 31, 2004 and December 31, 2003, the assets and liabilities of the Bank listed
below were distributed in the following geographic areas:
2004:
The
Caribban and Noth South
Central America Europe America America Asia Total
Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents 51,006 32,085 122,686 - 205,777
Money market funds 78 9 52.608 52695
Deposit with brokers
and clearing houses 31,837 234,380 266,217
Investments (1) 230,408 28,867 106,985 637,485 11,490 1.015,235
Securities purchased under
agreements to resell 324,297 58,989 ,6,993 16,039 12 406,330
Loans 84,582 7,622 92,204
Total 690,371 151.787 523,652 661,146 11,502 2,038,458
Liabilities:
Demand deposits 456,913 5,196 2,084 40,220 110 504,523
Securities sold imder
agreements to repurchase 27,498 238,090 301585 - 567,173
Securities borrowed, options
written and swavp 148,159 24,813 18,736 163,732 6,073 361,513
Cetificatesof deposit and
promissory notes 142,795 44,087 186,882
Total 775,365 268,099 322,405 248,039 6.183 1,620.091
2003:
The
Caribbean and North South
Central America Europe America America Asia Total
Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents 35,001 28560 134,881 - 198,442
Money market funds 6,694 6,694
Deposit with broken
and clearing houses 10,603 137,218 147,821
Investments (1) 203,093 15,244 105,845 422,608 746,790
Securities purchased under
agreements to resell 356,167 8,070 95,270 55,273 2,670 517,450
Loans 18,237 240 18.477
rotal 612,498 62,477 480,148 477,881 2,670 1,635,674
Liabilities:
Demand deposits 248,705 4,628 2,813 56,136 38 312,320
Securities sold under
agreement to repurchase 76,020 208,875 253,541 1,595 540,031
Securities borrowed, options
writtenandswaps. 90,430 5,783 39,607 113,891 249,711
Certificate of deposit and
promissory notes 76.770 17,352 1,952 1,843 97,917
Total 491,925 236,638 297,913 173,465 38 1.199,979

(1) Includes investments in hedge funds, incorporated in The Caribbean, with a fair value of
$189,767 (2003 $189,672). These funds invest in assets issued by corporations and other
issuers incorporated in G-7 countries.
22. Fair value of financial instruments
Substantially all of the .Bank's assets and liabilities are carried at fair value or amounts that
approximate fair value.
23. Corresponding figures
Certain corresponding figures have been reclassified to conform with the presentation adopted
for the currentyear.


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Investment Opportunity

MUST SELL
t Lot No. "K", containing 6,750 sq. ft., St. Vincent Close Subdivision situate on the southern side of
X St. Vincent Road, about one mile west of Blue Hill Road, comprising a triplex apartment and a two-
I storey apartment block.


For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Work Out Unit
at: 356-1686, 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas


Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Work Out Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before May 20, 2005
Financing available for the qualified purchaser
Serious enquiries only!!!





Employment Opportunity


HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL


Progressive Christian organization is seeking a dynamic, results
oriented go-getter to lead a high school administrative team and
inspire a growing student population.


Responsibilities include the overall administration, supervision and
organization of the high school.


Applicants must be committed to the goals of Christian education, have
the necessary vision to ensure the future development of the high
school, and be able to lead and work effectively in a team environment.

Qualification: Masters Degree in Education preferred but persons with
less qualification but a proven record of successful leadership
may be considered.


We offer an attractive compensation and benefits package to the
successful applicant. Detailed information and application forms may
be collected from Evangelistic Temple,
CdCoins Avenue at fourth terrace west, Centreville.


Application deadline May 6', 2005.


SS WW ,


BISX reduces




costs through




an IT upgrade


FROM page one

and-a-half and two weeks, with no interrup-
tions in trading.
He added that a technology upgrade had
enabled BISX's three broker/dealer meitnbers -
Fidelity Capital Markets, First Bahamas Capi-
tal (Colina Financial) and SG Hambros Bank &
Trust (Bahama) meant that trading in stocks
listed on the exchange can be conducted
through Virtual Private,Networks on the Inter-
net, rather than over networks that are com-
pletely private, as before.
Mr Davies said: "We have upgraded the
nature of our communications such that we are
now trading via the Internet. Before, it was
over completely private networks.
"Right now we use our own Interiet con-
nectivity, but to maintain the level of security we
require we have put in specialist software and
hardware that allows us to establish Virtual Pri-
vate Networks with any of our members. Our
overheads are a little less, and we have good
connectivity at lower costs."
Mr Davies added that the new technology
would allow interested parties, who. were not
trading members and could not conduct trades
in BISX-listed stocks, to link in and monitor
what was happening in the market.
The exchange was now able to establish a
feed to these third parties, that would allow
them to monitor electronic trading on BISX. Mr
Davies said: "We've identified in-house two or
three entities that might be interested in such a
link, and we will do it on a trial basis with them
to see how things go.
"With this upgrade in technology, we have
lowered our costs of operating, reduced our
overheads yet again while improving service."
BISX itself has moved from the British Colo-
nial Hilton's Centre of Commerce, located on


downtown Bay Street, to offices located at No.
8 Village Road, on the junction with Village
Gardens and immediately north of Best Buy
and Master Technicians.
The exchange is sharing a one-storey complex
with Fast Track Construction, a business run by
Tony Joudi, one of BISX's 45 shareholders.
The complex is the corporate head office for
Fast Track, and now also houses BISX's Board-
room, computer and technology room and an
office for Mr Davies.
The BISX chief executive said: "It's a very
nice location, comparable to the type of envi-
ronment you'd find downtown. We've moved in
here, and it's totally suitable. We are fully oper-
ational and everything is running."
Mr Davies added that BISX had moved a
year earlier than planned, a reference to the
fact it was forced to depart the Hilton's Centre
of Commerce due to the fact that fund admin-
istrator Cardinal International, from whom it
was subletting, was winding itself up.
Meanwhile, the BISX chief executive said he
was "very optimistic" about the exchange's
future, especially as the Government now pos-
sessed the report on implementing 14 recom-
mendations seen as vital to its future. He sug-
gested that the report should be viewed as one
on the wider capital markets, and not just BISX.
"I've always said the quicker we can move on
the recommendations, particularly those that
address how we can grow and expand the mar-
ket, the better off the Bahamas will be," Mr
Davies said.
"My goal now is to educate people and
empower people to support BISX."
He added that the latter aim would be
achieved by giving Bahamians in their 20s
"knowledge and understanding" about how
equities, and stock market-linked savings and
investments, could help them attain their finan-
cial goals and prepare for retirement.


FROM page one
The Nasdaq affair is the
latest headache for Consoli-
dated Water, which still
faces the possibility that its
$22 million Blue Hills con-
tract and its financing


through $10 million in
Bahamian Depository
Receipts (BDRs) could
come to a halt if the
Supreme Court grants an
injunction to the application
made by runner-up bidder,
BiwatefdInternational.
Consolidated Water had


previously said its Form 10-
K filing with the SEC would
be delayed because the com-
pany and its auditors,
KPMG, had decided that the
first annual report on the fir-
m's internal controls on
financial reporting would
not he cnmnlpteld in timo


Verizon set to





raise MCI bid





against Qwest


a_ Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content .

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Firm faces



Nasdaq delisting


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE%


THE TRIBUNE








--IB.I 1 'MONDAY, APRIL 22, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


KPMG
PO Box 0 123
Motagu Sltoiling Contro
East Bay Strelt
lassau. ahamasni'


Telephone 242 393 2607
* Fax 242 393 1772
Internet www kpng coin bs


AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SIIARElHOLDER


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Credit Suisse Wealth Management
Limited ("the Bank") as of December 31, 2004. ''This consolidated balance sheet is the responsibility of
the Bank's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this consolidated balance sheet
based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing as promulgated by the
International Federation of Accountants. Those Standards require that we plan and perform the audit to
obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the consolidated balance sheet is free of material
inisstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and
disclosures in the consolidated balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting
principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall.
balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our ppinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated bahunce sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, tire financial
position of the Bank as of December 31, 2004 in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards as promulgated by thie International Accounting Standards Board.





Chartered Accountants


Nassau, Bahamas
March 10, 2005




CREDIT SUISSE WEALTH MANAGEMENT LIMITED
Consolidated Balance Sheet

December 31, 2064
(Expressed in United States dollars)

Note 2004


Assets


Cash and cash equivalents
Deposits with banks
Accrued interest rmcei n ibil
Receivables ftidr'r c"ist'mers
Securities pirn-]ei:io.'t .er agreements to resell
Loans and atvl'r.:.', i ioni ;tonsiers
Other assets
Total Assets


Liabilities ., *

Deposits from banks
Deposits from customers
Accrued interest payable
Fees received in advance-from customers
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase
investment management fee payable .
Other liabilities
Total Liabilities,


3& 10
3 & 10
10

8&10
4


$ 1,260,199,933
4,850,000
278,519
512,801
92,879,884
3,939,533
98,872


$ 1,362,759,542


5 & 10
6
10

8& 10

10


$ 2,146,453
1,206,698,980
224,014
202,678
109,869,344-
1,874,4147
4,036,865
1,325,052,781


Shareholder's Equity
Share capital:
Authorized, issued and fully paid:
5,000,000 shares of$1 .00 each 5,000,000
Additional paid in capital 27,500,000
Retained earnings __ 5,206,761
Total Shareholder's Equity 37,706,761


Commitment
Total Liabilities and Shareholder's Equity


$ 1,362,759,542


See accompanying notes to consolidated balance sheet.

This consolidated balance sheet was approved on behalf of the Board of Directors on March 10, 2005 by
the following:


Michiae A. Ransons


Director


Martin Sutter Director


Notes to Consolidated Balance Sheet

December 31, 2004
(Expressed in United States dollars)



1. General information
Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited ("the Bank") was incorporated on September 5, 2003
under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under the Banks and Trust
Companies Regulation Act, 2000 to conduct intentational banking and trust services. The Bank is a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited ("the "Parent") whose office is
located in the Bahamas. Thie ultimate parent company is thie Credit Suisse Group whose
headquarters is located in Zurich, Switzerland.
The Bank commenced operations on January 2, 2004. The Batik's business activities consist of
banking, securities trading, trust,.corporate and other financial services involving a large number of
clients with substantial assets under administration.
Tlic registered office of the Bank is located in Tihe Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley and Charlotte
Streets .Nassau, Bahamas. At December 31, 2004 the Bank employed 7 persons.
2. Summary of significant..accounting policies
(a) Statement f coomnpliance
The Bank's consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards ("IFRS") as promulgated by the Internationalr Accounting
Standards Board.
(b) Basis, ofpreparation
This consolidated balance sheet has been prepared under the historical cost convention and the
accounting policies have been consistently applied.
(c) Basis ofcpnsolidtjon
The consolidated balance sheet includes the accounts of the .Bank and its wholly-owned
subsidiaries, Vialink Nominees Limited and .UTC Management Limited, all of which were
incorporated under the laws of The Commonwealth of The IBahamas. The activities of both
subsidiaries are limited to the trust and corporate management services offered by the Bank.


(d) Use of estimates
The preparation of tihe consolidated balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires
management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported iln the
consolidated balance sheet imd accompanying notes. 'Cese estimates are based on relevant
information available at the balance sheet date and as such, actual results could differ from
those estunates.

(e) Foreign currency Eraislation
The reporting currency of the Bank is United States dollars, as the Bank's share capital is
denominated in United States dollars, a significant amount of the Bank's transactions are
conducted in United States dollars and the s ority of the Bank's assets are also held in this
currency. I
Assets and liabilities maintained in foreign currencies are translated into United States dollars
at the rates of exchange prevailing at the balabee sheet date.
(f) Financial instrumeInts
Classification
Originated loans and advances are loans and advances created by the 1Bink providing money to
its customers other than thuse created with the intention of short term profit taking. Originated
loans and advances comprise loans and advances to customers oilier than purchased loans.


I, W..a I/


predetermined rate. The securities sold under agreements to repurchase are commonly used as a
tool for short-term financing of interest-bearing assets, depending on the prevailing interest rates.
At December 31, 2004 assets sold/pledged under agreements to repurchase were as follows:


Carrying
Fair value amount of
of underlying corresponding
assets liabilities


Government bills and bonils e $ 101,192,577 109,869,344


Securities sold under agreements to repurchase bore iILerest at annual rates ranging from 0.85% to
3.45% at December 31, 2004.1.


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-- . .


Held-to-maturity financial instruments are financial assets and liabilities with fixed or
determinable payments and fixed maturity that the Bank has the intent and ability to hold to
maturity. These include cash and cash equivalents (except deposits on demand), deposits with
banks, deposits from banks, deposits from customers, securities purchased under agreements to
resell and securities sold under agreements to repurchase..
Recognition
The Bank recognizes held-to-maturity assets and liabilities and originated loans and advances
on the day that funds are disbursed or received as applicable.
Measurement 0
Financial instruments ate measured initially at cost, including transaction cost.
Subsequent to initial recognition all non-trading financial liabilities, originated loans and
advances and held-to-maturity assets and liabilities are measured at amortized cost less
impairment losses. Amortized cost is calculated on the effective interest rate method.
Derecognition
A financial asset is derecognized when the Bank loses control over the contractual rights that
comprise that asset. This occurs when the rights are realized, expired or are surrendered. A
financial liability is derecognizedlihen it is extinguished.

(g) Assets under management
The Bank is engaged in the provision of asset management services involving a large number
of clients with substantial funds under administration.
Property held by the Bank in a fiduciary or agency capacity for its customers has not been
included in the consolidated balance sheet since such items are not assets of the Bank.
(h) Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash and due from banks and interest bearing deposits with
banks that have maturities of less than three months.
(i) Accounts receivable
Accounts receivable primarily comprise fees billed to clients. The Company's policy is not to
make a general provision for bad debts, however all amounts receivable are written-off after a
defined period of time has elapsed.

(6) Securities financing arrangements
The Bank enters into purchases (sales) of investments under agreements to resell (repurchase)
substantially identical investments at a certain date in the future at a fixed price. Investments
purchased subject to commitments to resell them at future dates are not recognized. The Bank,
under the terms of these agreements, has the right t pledge or sell the assets received. The
amounts paid are recognized in securities purchased under agreements to resell. The receivables
are shown as collateralized by the underlying security. Investments sold under repurchase
agreements continue to be recognized in the balance sheet and are measured in accordance with
the accounting policy for either assets held for trading or available-for-sale as appropriate. The
proceeds from the sale of the investments are reported as liabilities to either banks or
customers.
The Bank may pledge securities received as collateral to secure borrowings under repurchase
agreements. As these securities received and subsequently repledged are not owned or sold
short by the Batik, these securities are not recognized.
(k) Loans and advances to customers
Loans and advances originated by the Bank are classified as originated loans and advances.
Loans and advances are reported net of allowances to reflect the estimated recoverable
tanounts.
(1) hnpairment losses
Financial assets are reviewed at each balance sheet date to determine whether there is objective
evidence of impairment. If any such indication exists, the assets recoverable amount is
estimated and the impairment loss is recognized.

3. Cash and cash equivalents and deposits with banks
Cash and cash equivalents earned interest at annual rates ranging from 1% to 2.25% at December
31, 2004.
Deposits with banks earned interest at annual rates ranging from 1.75% to 2.53% at December 31,
2004.
4. Loans and advances to customers
Loans and advances represent short-term advances provided by the Bank to customers. Their
maturity periods range up to 12 mouths and they earn interest up to 2.53% per annum. During the
period the Bank recorded no losses resulting from non-payment of interest or principal.
5. Deposits from banks
2004

Payable ont amand 146,453
Termi depos ___________________________________ 2,000,00
$ 2,146,453


Interest was paid on deposits frorp banks at annual rates ranging from 1.41% to 1.53% at December
31,2004.




6. Deposits from customers


2004

Payable on demand $ 1,201,172,272
Term deposits 5,526,708
$ 1,206,698,980


Interest was paid on deposits from customers at annual rates ranging from 1% to 2.3% at December
31, 2004.
7. Financial instruments
Interest rate, liquidity and currency risks
The Bank manages its exposure to interest rate changes, liquidity and currency risk related to its
portfolio of asset and liability deposits by maintaining a matched book of assets and liabilities by
currency and maturity. Its objective is to manage the impact of interest rate changes on earnings.
The notional amount of financial instruments is used by the Bank to manage interest rate and
currency risk for clients' accounts.

Fair value
Management estimates that thie total fair value of financial assets and liabilities do not differ'
materially from their canrying vnalunes given that average effective interest rates approximate the
current interest rates available to the Bank for placements and offered by the Bank for deposit
liabilities with similar maturities and due to their short term maturities.
8. Securn ities rinanicing arrangements
The Bank ;urchases financial instruments under agreements to resell them at future dates. The
seller conumnits to repurchase the same or similar instrumneirs at an agreed future date. The securities
purchased under agreements to resell are entcr ed into as a facility to provide funds to customers. At
December 31, 2004 securities purchased under agrrenients to resell were as follows:

Fair value of Carrying
assets held as amounts of
collateral rcceivahle

Government bills and bonds $ 117,103,562 92,796,824

Corporate bonds 983,628 83,060

$ 118,087,190 92,879,884


The Bank has pledged securities with a ftir value of $101,192,577 froiom those received as collateral
for repurchase agreements with a flr value of $118,087,190 as noted below.
Securities purchased under agreemiuts to resell earned interest at annual rates ranging from 0.55%
to 2.35% at December 31, 2004.
Thlie Bank also raises funds by selling or pledging financial instruments under agreements to repay
the funds by repurchasing the instruniicits at lfture dates at the same price plus interest at a















9 Commitment
In 2003 the Bank entered into an agreement with the Parent to sub-lease office space for its
operations. The Parent has a lease agreement with The Bahamas Financial Centre Limited. The
lease commenced November 1, 2003 for a term of three years. The Bank has the option to renew
the sub-lease until June 30, 2008. The monthly lease rental cost (allocated based on a square feet
basis) during the period was $4,041 excluding service charges. The minimum future annual rental
commitment excluding service charges is as follows:


year to
December 31, 2005


Commitment
$48,492


.10. Related party balances
The Bank entered into various transactions with the Parent and other parties related by virtue of
common control. Transactions with related parties are entered into on commercial terms except as
noted below.
The financial statements include the following related party balances:
2004


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Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Deposits with banks
Accrued interest receivable
Securities purchased under agreements to resell

Liabilities
Deposits from banks
Accrued interest payable
Securities sold under agreement to repurchase
Investment management fee payable
Other liabilities


$ 1,259,147,287
4,850,000
229,919
54,303,317


2,103,057-
30,490
20,358,700
1,874,447
3,805,333


The Bank has a compensation arrangement in place for all its employees whereas a substantial part
is dependent on.the performance of the business. The performance accrual for the period forms a
substantial part of other liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet

Effective January 1, 2004, the Bank bought the private client business from Credit Suisse First
Boston Bahamas Limited ("CSFBBL"). Under the sales and purchase agreement entered into
between the Bank and CSFBBL, private client assets and liabilities as of close of business on
December 31, 2003 were transferred at book values.
11. Asset management activities
The Bank provides asset mar' gement services for a large number of clients to include individuals,
corporations, trusts and other institutions involving substantial funds, whereby it holds and manages
assets or invests funds received in various financial instruments at the discretion of the customer.
Assets under management are not assets of the Bank and are not recognized in the consolidated
balance sheet. The Bank is not exposed to any credit risk relating to such placements, as it does not
guarantee these investments.
12. Regulatory matters
The Bank is required to meet certain regulatory capital levels and to comply with prudential norms
issued by The Central.Bank of The Bahamas ("CBB") with respect to capital adequacy and other
matters. The CBB has confirmed that the Bank was in compliance at December 31, 2004.
The Bank's actual capital amount at December 31, 2004, as well as CBB's minimum requirements,
is presented in the following tables:

Minimum
Actual requirement

At December 31, 2004
Capital $ 37,706,761 5,000,000


When complying with the prudential norms CBB considers the Bank and the Parent together on a
consolidated basis.
13. Taxation
Under the laws of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, there are presently no income, withholding
or capital gains taxes payable by the Bank.

14. Concentration of assets and liabilities
The following is a geographical analysis of assets and liabilities:


ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents 25,734,015 1,229,228,662 45,844 5,191.412 1,260,199,933
Deposits with banks 2,200,000 2,650.000 4.850,000
Accrued interest receivable 3,897 207,586 59,732 6,747 557 278,519
Receivables from customers 512,801 512,801
Securities purchased under
agreement to resell 11.478,239 42,825,078 3.437,488 22,079,922 13,059,157 92,879,884
Loans and advances to customers 53.906 3,835,997 49,630 3,939.533
Other assets 98,872 98,872
37,216,151 1,274,515,232 10,640734 27,278,081 13,109,344 1,362,759,542

LIABILITIES
Deposilsfrom banks 47 2,067,017 79,389 2,146,453
Deposits from customers 5,951,385 2,953,659 1,002,598,883 39,166,400 156,028,653 1.206,698,980
Accruedinterest payable 6,321 23,654 161,682 32,357 224,014
Fees paid in advance from cussmers - 2,250 200,428 202,678
Securities sold under agreements to
repurchase 19,368,100 84,828,808 5,672,436 109,869,344
Investment management fee payable 1,874,447 1.874.447
Other liabilities 4,036.865 4.036.865
25.325,853 6,918.777 1,091,707,877 39.166.400 161,933,874 1,325.052,781


15. Foreign currency exposure
As of balance sheet date, the Bank's assets and liabilities were denominated in United States
dollars, except for the following, which were either denominated or linked to other currencies as
follows:

Asets 2004
USS equivalent
Cash and cash equivalents
Brazilian real 528,904
British pound 388,451
Euro 16,667,468
Japanese yen 12.525,699
Swiss fanc 817,599
Other 77,207
Accrued interest receivable
Euro 4,300
Swiss franc 86
Loans and advances to customers
British pound 33,665
Euro 116,296
Swiss franc 2,393
Other 23

Liabilities 2004
Deposits with banks
Canadian dollar 67,006
Other 35
Deposits with customers
Brazilian real 528,014
British pound 419,906
Euro 16,736,843
Japanese yen 12,495,467
Swiss franc 827,967
Other 707
Accrued interest payable
Other 3,368
Fees received in advance from customers
Brazilian real 630

Net exposure 2004
Brazilian real 260
British pound 2,210
Canadian dollar (67,006)
Euro 51,221
Japaneseyen 30,232
Swiss franc (7,889)
Other 73,120




16. Maturities of Assets and Liabilities
The following is a maturity analysis of selected assets and liabilities:

On demand Up to I year Total
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents 1,260,199.933 1,260.199,933
Deposits with banks -4,850,000 4,850,000
Securities purchased under agreements to resell 92.879,884 92879.884
Loans and advances to customers 1.939,533 2,000,000 3,939.533
1.355,019,350 6,850,000 1,361.869.350

LIABILITIES
Deposits from banks 146,453 2,000,000 2,146,453
Deposits from customers 1,201,172,272 5,526,708 1,206,698,980
Securitic nold under agreements to repurchase 109,869,344 109,869,344
Other abilities 4,036,865 4,036,865
1,315,224,934 7,526,708 1,322,751,642


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PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, KENEISHA SADE
BROWN, of #10 Andros Cresent, Yamacraw Beach, intend
to change my name to KENEISHA SADE DELANCY. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.




LEGAL NOTICE




NOTICE




VIR DRAGON HOLDINGS LIMITED



Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (8) of the International
Business Act, 2000 notice is hereby given, that:

The dissolution of VIR DRAGON HOLDINGS
LIMITED has been completed.

A Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




Cornell Rolle
Liquidator


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**







PAGE&, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


TRANSAMERICA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in United States Dollars)


ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents
Available for sale investments
Loans -Net
Sundry receivables and interest
Held to maturity investments
Fixed assets Net
Other assets Net
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
LIABILITIES:
Demand deposits
Time deposits
Payable to banks
Loans payable
Interest, commissions, and other accounts payable
Total liabilities
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital
Increase in fair value of available for sale
investments
Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL
CONTINGENCIES

See notes to balance sheet


Notes 2004

2b, 3 US$ 33,562,900
2c, 4 21,750,551
2d, 5 286,468,206
2,780,415
2e, 7 17,229,731
2f, 6 103,829
8 9,220,789


9 US$ 41,610,761
10 245,838,439
12 35,961,594
11 4,204,651
13 7,569.335
335,184,780

14 30,000,000

(265,757)
6,197,398
35,931,641
ISS371.116.421


2003

US$ 32,229,087
27,259,304
287,536,600
3,468,121
17,760,486
27,074
9.937,820


US$ 40,857,897
232,930,621
56,245,902
1,998,835
8.764,243
340.797.498

29,000,000

78,504
8,342.490
37,420,994
USS378,218.492


16 16 US11635.829


This balance sheet was approved on behalf of the Board and authorized for i
2005, on its behalf by:


S Bdluar+ Madriz Pink
Director P


TRANSAMERICA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

NOTES TO THE BALANCE SHEET
DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in United States dollars)

1. BUSINESS ACTIVITY AND GROUP STRUCTURE

The Bank was incorporated in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas on October 6, 1987 and
was granted a license under The Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1965, (as
amended) on November 24, 1987, to carry on banking and trust business. The principal
activity of the Bank is the provision of short-term financing to assist international trade in
Central America. The registered office of the Bank is British American Building suite 203
in Nassau, Bahamas.

The number of employees of the Bank as of December 31, 2004 was 40 (2003: 40).
2. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reponu.e,
Standards. The preparation of balance sheet in conformity with International Financial
Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect
the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the balance sheet and the reported amounts of income and expenses
during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Significant accounting policies adopted are as follows:

a. Consolidation for the Year Ended December 31, 2003 The consolidated financial
statements include the financial statements of the Bank and its wholly-owned
subsidiary, Corporaci6n Finter, S.A., a company domiciled in the Republic of
PanamA. As of May 31, 2003, Corporaci6n Finter, S.A. was liquidated. Total net
assetsat liquidation were US$265,378. The results of Corporaci6n Finter, S.A. for
the period up to May 31, 2003, have been included in the consolidated statement of
income. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated
on consolidation.

b. Cash and Cash Equivalents The Bank considers all debt instruments with maturities
of three months or less from date of inception as cash and cash equivalents.

c. Available for Sale Investments Available for sale investments are initially recorded
at cost. At subsequent reporting dates, the investments are measured at fair value
based on quoted or indicative market prices at the balance sheet date. Unrealized
gains or'losses are included in shareholders' equity.

d. Loans Loans are stated at the outstanding principal amount, less allowance for loan
losses. The allowance for loan losses is determined on an account by account basis
after consideration of management's and legal advisor's opinion as regards to the
possibility of collection.

e. Held to Maturity Investments Held to maturity investments are recorded at
amortized cost. Premiums and discounts are amortized during the period remaining
until maturity, using the straight-line method. An allowance for loss is made to reflect
a permanent decrease in value.

f. Fixed Assets Fixed assets are stated' at cost less accumulated depreciation.
Depreciation is charged so as to write off the cost of assets over the estimated useful
life using the straight-line method, on the following basis:


Furniture and equipment
Vehicles
Computer equipment


5 years
10 years
5 years


At each balance sheet date, the Bank reviews the carrying amounts of its fixed assets
to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have suffered an
impairment loss. If any such indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset is
estimated in order to determine the extent of the impairment loss (if any).

g. Translation of Foreign Currencies Assets and liabilities in currencies other than
United States dollars are translated at the exchange rates prevailing at year-end.
Income and expense items in currencies other than the United States dollars are
translated at the exchange rates prevailing at the end of the month in which the income
or expense items are recognized. Gains and losses arising on translation are carried to
the statement of income.

h. Assets under Administration Time deposits and other assets held in a fiduciary
capacity for clients either as custodian or trustee are excluded from the financial
statements as they are not assets of the Bank.


i. Related Parties All balances and transactions with the shareholder or with
companies in which the shareholder has a participation of more than 20% are
described as being with related parties.

j. Impairment of Assets Assets are reviewed for impairment; based on discounted cash
flows, whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount
of such assets may not be recoverable. If this review indicates that the carrying
amount of the asset is not recoverable, the Company will recognize an impairment
loss, measured by the future discounted cash flow method or market appraisals.
3. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash and cash equivalents are detailed as follows:


Cash on hand and due from banks
Overnight deposits at varying interest rates
Certificates of deposit with varying interest rates
between 2.15% and 2.39% (2003: 1% to 1.1%)
Other short-term investments, interest rate between
1.65% and 2.07% (2003: 0.95%)
Total


2004
US$ 1,440,676
14,114,000

14,500,000

3,508,224


2003
US$ 5,815,130
12,355,000

11,000,000

3,058,957


US33.52 US$32.22.82


2004


US$12,758,471

990,811

6,776,841
1.224.428


Us298.218 USS Q) US(261434)


2003


US$11,192,96.

2,923,133

12,297,221
845.982


4. AVAILABLE FOR SALE INVESTMENTS

Available for sale investments are detailed as follows:


Bonds Government of Costa Rica and Central Bank
of Costa Rica with varying interest rates between
5.59% and 9.34% (2003: 5.3% to 8.50%)
Bond Foreign government with interest rate 2.28%
(2003: 5.25% to 7.25%)
Time deposits with varying interest rates between
0.31% and 7.71% (2003: 1.37% to 6.08%)
Other investments
Total


Investments of US$12.7 million (2003: US$14.1 million) have a maturity of one year or
more. The Bank's management intends to sell them in the short-term.
Restricted investments as of December 31, are:


Investments pledged in support of time operations
Investments pledged under letters of credit
Total


5. LOANS NET

Loans consist of the following:


Agriculture
Cattle
Industry
Construction
Commerce
Services
Personal
Housing
Tourism
Transport
Total
Less: Allowance for loan losses


2004


2003


US$3,078,187 US$5,628,877
200,000 217,500
U 3.278.187 USSS.846.377


2004
US$ 17,308,513
490,910
54,151,715
2,902,080
105,780,798
91,680,730
7,790,469
7,091
11,757,125
762,799


2003
US$ 18,479,161
372,253
56,626,235
9,604,820
111,075,433
77,992,504
7,497,213
14,348
10,810,876


292,632,230 292,472,843
(6,164.,024) (4,936,243)
S286.4L29806 US&287.536,600


As of December 31, 2004, the loan portfolio with a maturity of more than one year was
US$114,689,511 (2003: US$128,211,805). As of December 31, 2004, the loan portfolio
was secured as follows: 6% by mortgage guarantee, 7% by chattel-mortgage guarantee, and
43% by U.S. dollar cash collateral and others. The Bank has received personal guarantees
from individuals connected with the borrowers in support of the remaining 44% of the
loans. Undrawn lines of credit as of that date amounted to US$115,930,267 (2003:
US$99,508,920).

As of December 31, 2004, the Bank had loans of US$41,481,369 (2003: US$50,687,461)
which originated from the factoring of leases with a related company, which are guaranteed
by the irrevocable cessation of economic rights or benefits in favor of the Bank and its
respective trust. The leasing contracts are administered by a related company.

Movement in the allowance for loan losses is as follows:


2004


Balance at beginning of year
Allowance for loan losses
Loans written-off
Balance at end of year


2003


US$4,936,243 US$ 4,960,965
1,297,000 1,296,000
(69.219) (1,320.722)
USS6.164.024 USS4.936.243


6. FIXED ASSETS NET

The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:


Beginning
Balance


COST:
Furniture and equipment
Vehicles
Computer equipment
Total cost



ACCUMULATED
DEPRECIATION:
Furniture and equipment
Vehicles
Computer equipment
TOTAL
NET MOVEMENT:
AT DECEMBER 31,2004
AT DECEMBER 31,2003


US$ 2,938

45,560


2004


Ending
Additions Disposals Balance


US$52,165
15,000
23,324


$ 48.498 US90.4892 U


Beginning Depreciation
Balance Charge


US$ 1,389

20.035


US$ 2,309
625
10 800


US$ 55,103
15,000
68.884
USS138.987


Ending
Disposals Balance


US$ 3,698
625
30,835


USS 27.074


7. HELD TO MATURITY INVESTMENTS

Held to maturity investments are detailed as follows:


Securities private sector entities abroad
Securities public sector entities abroad
Allowance for investments held to maturity
Total


2004
US$ 6,868,611
11,371,489
(1.010.369)


2003
US$ 9,885,619
9,095,699
(1.220.832)
USS17.760.486


Held to maturity investments consist of US$8,647,189 (2003: US$7,703,949) cash
management accounts with U.S. brokers, which are principally invested in Latin American
government and corporate bonds. Management intends to hold these investments until
maturity and is of the opinion that there has been no permanent decrease of value.
Movement in allowance for investments held to maturity is as follows:


Balance at beginning of year
Allowance for investment losses
Investments written-off
Balance at end of year
8. OTHER ASSETS NET

Other assets consist of the following:


Assets available for sale, acquired in credit
recoverability
Allowance for other assets
Others
Total


2004
US$1,220,832
600,000
(810,463)
US$l.010.369


2004


US$10,087,818
(1,204,261)
337.232
USS2~20^8


2003
US$1,210,150
480,000
(469,318)
USS1.22U.832
(Concluded)


2003

US$10,215,911
(784,046)
505L955


During 2004 the company sold assets available for sale for an amount of US$2,053,034
(2003: US$2,976,703). The book value of these assets is similar to their market value. The
Company's intention is to sell the remaining assets in the short-term.

Movement in allowance for other assets is as follows:


Balance at beginning of year
Allowance for other assets
Other assets written-off
Balance at end of year
9. DEMAN DEr'oSI IS


2004
US$ 784,046
900,000(
(479,785)


2003
US$ 42,000
1,331,300
(589,254)
98m.m,2M


The Bank has entered into a contract for the administration of its clients' demand deposits
under the laws of the State of Florida, U.S.A., with International Bank of Miami (I.B.M.),
where I.B.M. acts as the "paying bank" for the Bank.


USS 21424 I U USS 35,58

US$_27.04 II 627 UL USS103.829


USS21.75.55 US27259.3


1








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


__-___........________,___________-____--____....e ...'........- 8.


MONDAY, APRIL 25 2


10. TIME DEPOSITS

As of December 31, 2004, substantially all time certificates of deposit are for a period of
less than one year, with interest rates between 2.00% and 9.65% yearly (2003: 2.65% and
9.65%).


11. LOANS PAYABLE

Lbans payable as or December 31, 2004 and 2003 consist of other loans of US$4,204,651,
with interest rates between 3.39% and 3.65%, maturing in March 2005; and US$1,998,835,
with interest rates between 3.03% and 3.07%, maturing in January 2004, respectively.


12. PAYABLE TO BANKS
Payable to banks consist of the following:


2004


Securities from financial entities abroad, interest
rates between 2.46% and 4.20%, maturing between
March 2005 and September 2005 (2003: 1.84% and
4.00%, maturing between January 2004 and February
2005)
Securities from the country's financial entities, interest
rates 6.25%, maturing in April 2005 (2003: 5.50%
maturing in January 2004)
Total


2003


US$30,961,594 US$50,345,902


5,000,000 5,900,000
US_3961594 US$56.245.902


13. INTEREST, COMMISSIONS AND OTHER ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

Interest, commissions and other accounts payable consist of the following:

2004


Interest
Letters of credit
Dividends
Others
Total
14. SHARE CAPITAL


US$4,311,219
2,401,969
359,000
497,147
US$7,569,335


2003
US$3,766,002
4,289,810

708,431
US$8.764.243


As of December 31, 2004, the authorized, .issued and fully paid share capital was
US$30,000,000 (2003: US$29,000,000) represented by 30,000,000 (2003: 29,000,000)
shares of U$S1 each.

At their meeting, held on.April 20, 2004, the Board of Directors resolved to increase the
Bank's authorized share capital by US$1,000,000, represented by I million shares,
resulting from accumulated profits as of December 31, 2004 and it was approved by the
-Central Bank of The Bahamas. The Board of Directors resolved to pay a dividend of
US$7,175,000.

At a meeting held on March 10, 2003, the Board of Directors resolved to increase the
Bank's authorized share capital by US$2,000,000, represented by 2 million shares, resulting
from accumulated profits as of December 31, 2002. This was approved by the Central
Bank of The Bahamas.

At a meeting held on December 4, 2003, the Board of Directors resolved to pay cash
dividends of US$1,750,000.

(Concluded)


15. BALANCES AND TRANSACTIONS WITH RELATED PARTIES

a. Trade transactions have been carried out with institutions or persons that are
considered to be related parties. The following balances exist at year-end with such
parties.


2004
Loans Net US$ 4.079.329
Sundry receivables and interests US$ 20686
Demand deposits US$Z Q2D083O
Time deposits ULS$19,.33107
Interest, commission and other accounts payable US$...9.616


2003
US$ 3.457.584
US$ 379.914

US$ 0.A7
US$__150.477


b. In accordance with an agreement entered into with a related party, the related party
manages the loan portfolio of the Bank.


16. CONTINGENCIES

As of December 31, 2004, the Bank granted letters of credit for US$6,621,843 (2003:
US$5,478,329) and guaranties for US$1,629,437 (2003: Nil). It is not anticipated that any
loss will arise from these guarantees. The Bank also issued stand-by letters of credit
totaling US$5,350,000 (2003: US$6,157,500).


17. ASSETS UNDER ADMINISTRATION

Total assets under administration for clients in the Bank's fiduciary capacity as at
December 31, 2004 is US$347.2 million (2003: US$292.5 million).



18. MATURITIES OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Banking assets and liabilities is classified based on the period remaining to maturity, from
the balance sheet to maturity date, as follows:


Less than From 1 to 3 Frorn 3Months From 1to 5
1 Month Months to 1 Year Years


Assets:
Cash and cash
equivalents
Investments
available for sale
Loans
Sundry
receivables,
Interest and other
assets
Held to maturity
investments
Total assets
Liabilities:
Demand deposits
Time deposits
Payable to banks
Loans payable
Other accounts
payable
Total liabilities
Guarantees issued


US$33,562,900

1,224,429
35,237,109 USS51,437,370


1,734,613 556,157


More Than 5
Years


USS 7,767,651 US$ 12,758,471
91,268,240 103,625,376 US$11,064,135


245,107 9,569,156


_______ ___00 ____4 o_00 3(000
.USS1.259.051 USSL923,522 IUSS 99i611,98 US.z6253AQ.


US$41,610,761
40,960,227 US$56,333,711
12,350,000
4,204,651

1,926,147 1.860.389

USt4.97.135 USiA.74.S 1


US$ i30,341,669 US$ 18,202,832
23,611,594 -


3 373376 409,423

US .!,93. 32 USS.i5_ .


Total


USS 33,562,900

21,750,551
292,632,230


12,105,033


17539,100 1___ 240,100
US28,603,35 us31jsjaaM

USS 41,610,761
245,838,439
35,961,594
4,204,651


115L~


7.56.335
DULS3JtS,26
U= .13.,6.2.al


19. GEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES


2004
Assets Liabilities


Central America
USA
Other


US$303,556,342
41,743,236
25,816;843
ULSM371.11fi421


US$270,601,482
37,461,356
S 27,121942
UIS$335,J tZ48T


2003
Assets Liabilities


US$307,803,956
47,480,539
22.9339972
IM _M-9$ .AV2


US$249,200,770
49,976,937
41,619,791
US$34A0,229L4_


10. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Financial instruments utilized by the Bank include registered assets and liabilities. Most of
the Bank's financial instruments are either short-term in nature or have interest rates that
automatically reprice to market on a periodical basis. Accordingly, the estimated fair value
is not significantly different from the carrying value for each major category of the Bank's
registered assets and liabilities, except for held lo maturity investments which are carried at
amortized cost.



21. RISK MANAGEMENT

Credit Risk Credit risk arises from the failure of a counter party to perform according to
the terms of the contract. The Bank's significant exposure to credit risk is primarily
concentrated in cash and current accounts with banks, investments and loans. The deposits
and investments have been placed with high quality international institutions and
corporations. The collectibility of loans are continuously monitored by the Bank's
management in order to minimize credit risk.

Interest Rate Risk Interes't rate risk results primarily from differences in the maturities or
re-pricing dates of assets and liabilities. Interest rate risk exposures are carefully monitored
and the holding of interest sensitive assets and liabilities are adjusted accordingly with
changing market conditions.


Deloitte & Touche
Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultanlts
2nd Terrace, Cent'eville
P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www.deloitte.com.bs




INDEPENDENT AIUN TORS' RTrPORT


To tlh Shareholders of
Transamerica Banx and Trust Cornpax.v Limite'l:

We have audited the above balance shee of "! ransamerica Bank and Trust Company Limited (the
"Bank") as of December 31, 2NCO4. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank's
management. Our tesponsibi1'I i to e -pr.ss an opinion on the balance sheet based on our
audits.

We conducted our audit in accoidarice with hitemational Standards on Auditing. Those
Standards require that we plan ;nd perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the balance sheet ih free of nialceial misstatements. An audit includes examining, on a
test basis, evidence supporting fhe amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also
includes assessing lhe accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
mnanagemncit as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our
audit provide i, reasonable hasici for oir opi")n

In our opinion, the balance sheet referred topibove presents fairly, in all, material respects, the
financial position of the Bank as of December 31, 2004, in accordance with the International
Financial Reporting Standards.




January 31, 2005


A member firm of
DeloitteTouche Tohimatsu


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SEvery Thursday



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)AGE rB, MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


RURAL INTERNATIONAL BANK LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in United States dollars)


Notes 2004


ASSETS
Cash and due from banks
Time deposits banks
Loans o customers
Investments
O ixed assets


L!ABI!UTiES AJND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
1AB ILITIES:
Deposits
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Share capital:
Authorized, issued and fully paid:
2,000,000 shares of US$ 1 each
Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL


8
3 and 8
4
5


$ 83,249,431
68,698,699
8,815,325
2,670,337
43,223
8,662
$ 163,485,677


2003


$ 82,628,380
39,435,429
3,112,986
2,308,667
2,470
9,990
$ 127,497,922


6and 8 $ 135,193,899 $103,333,611


2,000,000
26,291,778
28,291,778


2,000,000
22,164,311
24,164,311


$ 163,485,677 $ 127,497,922


See notes to balance sheet.

This balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on February 25, 2005, and is signed
on its behalf by: .


lose Ro6erto Saladbo
Vice President
RURAL INTERNATIONAL BANK LIMITED


Vinicius Samarane
Director


NOTES TO BALANCE SHEET
DECEMBER 31, 2004


1. GENERAL

Rural International Bank Limited (the "Bank") was incorporated under the laws of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The parent company is Banco Rural S.A. The Bank is
licensed under the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act of 2000 to carry on banking
and trust business. The Bank was effectively opened for business in January 1996, and its
main activities consist of the acceptance of deposits and placement of loans, investing in
securities, engaging in fiduciary services and currency trading. The registered office of the
Bank is located at Montague Sterling Centre, West Bay Street.

The Bank employed 3 persons during the year.


2. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The. Bank's balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial
.eporting Standards. The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International
Financial Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that
affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the balance sheet.

The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies:

a. Foreign currency translation The functional currency of the Bank is the United States
Dollar. Assets and liabilities in currencies other than the United States dollars have
been translated at exchange rates prevailing at December 31, 2003.

b. Provision for loan losses In view of the quality of the loan portfolio and
management's experience no provision for loan losses was deemed necessary.

Investments Investments in securities represent bonds issued by Brazilian financial
institutions 'for trading in the European Markets and are intended to be held until
maturity. These securities are carried at cost plus accrued interest.

d. Taxation The Bank is not subject to income tax in The Bahamas.

e. Related parties Related parties consist primarily of banks with common directors and
shareholders.

3. TIME DEPOSITS BANKS

Maturity analysis of time deposits is as follows:


L ess than one month
From one month to one year
More than one year
Total principal
Add: interest receivable

Total time deposits and loans to customers

4. LOANS TO CUSTOMERS
Maturity analysis of loans to customers is as follows:


Le6U man one month
From one month to one year
Total principal
Add: interest receivable

Total time deposits and loans to customers


2004

$ 1,073,877
62,885,177
2,657,232
66,616,286
2,082,413


2003

$
33,851,449
2,472,926
36,324,375
3,111,054


$ 68,698,699 $ 39,435,429


2004

$. 3,318,264
5,443,137
8,761,401
53,924


2003

$
3,095,805
3,095,805
17,181


$ 8,815,325 $ 3.112,986


5. INVESTMENTS

Investments are as follows:


2004


Securities


2003


$ 2,670,337 $ 2,308,667


This caption comprises corporate bonds US$ 1,600,00)0 par value, with an annual coupon of
10% and maturity on December 20, 2005.

Its carrying value consists of the cost of purchase plus accrued interest up to April 2002
totaling US$ 1,897,875. Its fair value as at December 31, 2003 as quoted by its banking
custodians is US$600,000.

In order to mitigate credit risks arising from holding a long position in said securities, the Bank
secured a guarantee instrument from a third party whereby the latter undertook to stand for the
full amount in case of default by the issuer. Management is of the opinion that no provision is
necessary at this time.


6. DEPOSITS

Maturity analysis of deposits is as follows:


2004


DEMAND:

Banking sector
Non-Banking sector
Total demand

TIME:
Less than one month
From one month to one year
More than one year
Total principal
Add: Interest payable

Total- time

Total deposits


2003


$ 447,552 $ 500,577
29,264,600 18,106,044
29,712,152 18,606,621


8,473,033
76,086,942
17,467,215
102,027,190
3,454,557


13,208,772
56,460,785
11,015,975
80,685,532
4,041,458


105,481,747 84,726,990

$ 135,193,899 $ 103,333,611


7 CONCENTRATION OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

ASSETS:

By Country
Bra7l
Uruguay
Other

TOTAL
By Industry
Cash and banks Banking
Investments Banking
Loans to customers Banking
Loans to customers Non-Banking

TOTAL
LIABILITIES:

By Country
Brazil
Uruguay
British Virgin Islands
Other

TOTAL
By Industry
Deposits- Banking
Deposits Non-Banking

TOTAL


2004 2003
11.00% 77.00%
70.00% 7.00%
19.00% 16.00%
100.00% 100.00%


63.00%
4.00%
26.00%


79.00%
2.00%
12.00%


7.00% 7.00%
100.00% 100.00%


63.00%
26.00%
4.00%
7.00%


70.00%
11.00%
15.00%
4.00%


100.00% 100.00%


3.00% 8.00%
97.00% 92.00%
100.00% 100.00%


Concentration of risks are based on the country of domicile of the client

8. RELATED PARTY BALANCES

Related Darty balances are as follows:
2004
Assets


Cash and time deposits banks

Time deposits banks
Liabilities
Deposits


2003


$ 82,254,690 $ 91,028,888

$ 56,698,834 $ 36,790,893


$ 536,442 $ 2,481,437


9. OFF BALANCE SHEET ITEMS

Participation Agreement

The Bank has entered into participation agreements whereby it advances funds to Brazilian
companies, and on the other side, it sells the related financial instruments without recourse to
third parties. Under the terms of the agreements, the Bank is responsible for the custody and
safekeeping of the financial instruments, however, it assumes no responsibility for any loss,
liability or expense arising from default of the obligator, currency controls or taxation arising
in the country where the obligator is domiciled.

Issuing and Paying Agent Agreement

The Bank has been appointed both placement and paying agent in connection with the
issuance of Notes issued by a Brazilian company. The issuer has agreed to hold harmless the
Bank against any losses or claims which may be made against it in connection with the above
services.

As a result of the above agreements as of December 31, 2004, there were participation
agreements outstanding for an aggregate amount of $14,599,378 (22,418,162 in 2003).
10. FOREIGN EXCHANGE POSITION

The Bank had the following foreign currency asset and liability positions at December 31,
2004:


Assets


Liabilities


Net Position Long


2004
Amount in
Foreign US Dollar
Currency Equivalent .
R$ ~ 45,344,099 17,087,767 R$
E 3,289,574 4,486,048

GBP 3,060 3,060 GBP

R$ (44,356,325) (16,715,528) R$
(3,275416) (4,466,740)
394,607


R$ 372,239
E 14,158
GBP 3,060


2003
Amount in
Foreign US Dollar
Currency Equivalent
43,990,512 15,230,063
2,746,227 3,448,993

21,559 38,373

(42,998,367) (14,886,569)
(2,743,802) (3,445,949)
384,911

343,494
2,425
21,559


11. RISK MANAGEMENT

In doing business the Bank incurs different types of risks:

Credit risk
Price risk

Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of counterparty to perform according to the terms of the
contract. From this perspective, the Bank's significant exposure to credit risk is primarily
concentrated in cash and current accounts with correspondent banks, investments and loans.
The deposits and investment transactions have been placed basically with the parent bank and
high quality institutions and corporations.

Price risk

Price risk is comprised of:


Currency risk
Interest rate risk
Market risk


Currency risk stems from the possibility that the value of a financial instrument may fluctuate
significantly as a result of changes in foreign currency rates. The Bank minimizes its risk by
monitoring its position in foreign currencies particularly in those susceptible to substantial
volatility.

Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrumental may fluctuate significantly
as a result of changes in market interest rates. The Bank's exposure to this is minimal as the
relevant financial instruments are usually short terms and set at fixed rates and are therefore
re-priced on maturity.

Market risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate as a result of
changes in market prices. In order to mitigate risks arising from holding a long position in
certain securities, the Bank secured a guarantee instrument from a third party whereby the
latter undertook to stand for the full amount in case of default by the issuer.

elo e Oeloitte & Touche
t Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centrevllle
P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT


Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www.deloltte.com.bs


To the Shareholders of
Rural International Bank Limited:

We have audited the above balance sheet of Rural International Bank Limited (the "Bank") as of
December 31, 2004. This balance sheet is the. responsibility of the Bank's management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. T hose Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance
sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the
overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our
opinion.
In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Bank as of December 31, 2004, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.


oM^ ^ u


February 25, 2005


A member firm of
DelotteTht,- he Thhmatsu


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TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE 19B
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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005, PAGE.19B


- ^ -










MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Maik-sportff1Ojamnz.com


Th Ti


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


N By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter
JEREMY Barr turned
down the opportunity to
play in the state where he
shined during his high
school tenure to play under
the bright lights of Los
Angeles to play for the Uni-
versity of Southern Califor-
nia.
He will be the first
Bahamian since Rick Fox to
jump from high school to a
major division one college
programme.
Barr has enjoyed a star-
tling two-year high school
career at Westbury High
Christian Acadenmy;-and will
make the'jump to the colle-
giate scene after signing his
letter of intent on Wednes-
day.
After he graduates with
honours both on and off the
court on May 27, Barr is
expected to return to the'
Bahamas where he will offi-
cially sign a contract to play
for USC, coached by Tim
Floyd, the former Chicago
Bulls head coach, who
helped to groom a number
of players in the National
Basketball Association
(NBA).
Frustrating
"I feel better now that
I've made my final deci-
sion," said Barr, who many
were hoping would settle for
Texas Tech, coached by
Bobby Knight. "A few
weeks before I decided, it
was kind of frustrating, try-
ing to decide b.etween-the'
two-schoolI. "Both of them
are good schools, but USC
was offering me a little bit
more than Texas Tech. So
that was why I made that
choice."
Full details of the four-
year scholarship were not
released, but Barr said ,he
was assured by-Floyd that
when he come into the pro-
gramme in August, he will
be the starting center and
the team will be built
around him.
What more can the 17-
year-old 6ft 9in native of
Andros expect?
Before he left the
Bahamas, the only potential
Frank Rutherford saw in
him was his height. He was
raw, having never played


Baha







on rai


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
LAVERNE Eve, taking
advantage of a meet near her
residence, opened her 2005
track and field season with a
bang at the 28th annual Spec
Town Invitational in Athens,
Georgia.
Also at the meet, long jumper
Osbourne Moxey, who is train-
ing at home, and University of
Georgia standout Antonio
Saunders, won their respective
events in the long and triple
jumps.
There were a number of oth-
er Bahamians who competed
over the weekend in other
meets around the United States.
But in Athens, Georgia, Eve
said she was pleased with her
performance a throw of 186-
feet, 11-inches to win the
women's javelin.
"I only did five steps. It was
very windy. We had a lot of
head wind. It was hard to do
five crossovers," said Eve of the
technique required to throw the
javelin.
Despite not throwing from
full strength, Eve beat out her
nearest rival by more than 20
feet.
Eve is now preparing to com-
petein.three meets in Germany
next month.
Preparations
After that, she will be making
her final preparations to come
home for the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associations'
Senior National Championships
in June at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium and the Senior Central
American and Caribbean
Championship in July.
But as she looks to the future,
Eve said she was a bit shocked
when she heard about the duel
resignation by Desmond Ban-
nister as a member of the Free
National Movement in the Sen-
ate and as president of the
BAAA.
"It's ready sad to that he
resigned because he worked so
hard for the federation," Eve
stressed. "A lot of times when
he said something is going to
happen, he tried hard to make
sure that it is done. He will be
missed."
However, Eve said she's con-
fident that his replacement,
Mike Sands, will be able to car-
ry on because "he's been
around the sport for a while.
He knows the ins and outs of
the sport."
For Moxey, it was an in and
"out trip to Georgia where he
went head to head with Leevan
'Superman' Sands in the men's
long jump. In the end, Moxey
came out on top with a leap of
26-2 3/4. Sands had to settle for
third with 25-0 1/2.
Saunders, who didn't get to
compete against Sands in the
triple jump, easily won that


l'an athletes








Sfop success


Copyngithted'Materi


Sy nd icatedConte t

Available from Commercial NewsP


4m -


event with a leap of 50-4 3/4.
The second place jump was 48-
3 1/2.
Also at the meet, Dominic
Demeritte got third in the men's
100 metres in a time of 10.49
seconds, beating out a field that
saw Jamail Rolle come in fifth
in 10.55 and Everette Fraser
12th in 10.68. Demeritte's train-
ing partner, Marc Burns of
Trinidad & Tobago won with
10.12.
Demeritte didn't compete in
his speciality in the 200 that saw
Rolle finish fourth in 21.05.
Rolle also ran the second leg


on an unattached team that won
the men's 4 x 100 relay in 40.09.
Saunders opened the Universi-
ty of Georgia's team that was
second in 40.79.
Elsewhere over the weekend,
Grafton Ifill III, a sophomore at
the University of Pennsylvania,
won the men's 200 in 21.20 at
the Larry Ellis Memorial Invi-
tational at the William Weaver
Stadium in Princeton.
Ifill III also ran the second
leg on their 4 x 100 relay team
that came in second in 41.98.
At the Dewey Allgood Invi-
tational at the University of


Missouri, Charmaine Williams
of Lindenwood University,
came in 10th in the women's
800 in 2:37.37.
The winning time was
2:18.87.
And Deno Campbell, also of
Lindenwood, had the fastest
qualifying time of 11.06 in the
men's 100, but was second in
the final in 10.89 behind James
Walton of Truman State, who
won the race in 10.87.
At the Kansas Relay at the
University of Kansas, Grand
Bahamian Bianca Stuart com-
peted in the women's 800 invi-


tational race. She was sixth in a
time of 2:18.81. The winning
time was 2:13.31.
Also at the meet, Donnavette
Martin of Southwest Missouri,
was 14th in the women's
long jump with a leap of 5.54
metres.
And Shantel Newbold, a
junior at Central Missouri,
clocked 58.85 seconds for 12th
in the women's 400. She didn't
advance to the final.
Newbold also ran the anchor
leg on Central Missouri's 4 x
400 relay that finished ninth in
4:00.10.


- .. -


Bar opts for]

University f d

Southern









MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2005


~mh Trgibiune'


The stories behind the news


Catholics in the Bahamas rejoiced last
week, along with more than a billion
people around the world as German
Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was intro-
duced to the world as Benedict XVI, the
new Supreme Pontiff of the Roman
Catholic Church.
The successor to Pope John Paul II,
chosen after two days of deliberations by
the College of Cardinals sequestered at
St Peter's Basilica in Rome, described
himself as a "simple and humble work-
her-in"e vineyard of the Lord"...


PLACESA


Government will use $24 million
of treasury funds to buy the Clifton
Heritage property, Prime Minister
Perry Christie (right) announced last
week. He introduced a resolution in
the House of Assembly last
Wednesday to raise or borrow funds
to repay the treasury. Mr Christie
said the closure of the long saga
represented a day of tremendous
satisfaction and great meaning for
the country ...


'Divided


Prime Minister Perry Christie last week strongly objected
to a Tribune article that reported that one of two LNG com-
panies vying for approval from his government had changed
lawyers, hiring Mr Christie's brother-in-law to represent
them. Speaking in the House of Assembly last Wednesday,
Mr Christie took exception to the "negative implications" in
the report in Wednesday's Tribune that the LNG company
Tractabel had replaced Freeport lawyer Fred Smith with
Dr Earl Cash, his brother-in-law. Dr Cash, Mr Christie said,
as a partner of Higgs and Johnson, appeared before gov-
ernment as an attorney with others ftom Higgs and Johnson
for a company "called El Paso who had applied for a licence
for LNG plants at the South Riding facility" ...


we


stand'


Abaconians at odds over Haitian problem


Last week's article The
Lone Crusader, about
anti-Haitian campaigner
Jeffery Cooper, brought
showers of congratula-
tions for the Abaco entrepreneur.
For several days, his phone hardly
stopped ringing as fellow Bahamians
offered their moral support in his dri-
ve to halt what he calls "a Haitian
takeover" of the island.
The fuss even sparked renewed
action from seasoned protester Mrs
Yvonne Key, who tried three years
go-gto prompt the government-into
taking action against The Mud and
....Pigeon-Pea,.the -Haitian shanty colm-`
munities in Marsh Harbour.
On the face of it, then, there
appeared to be the makings of a
movement in Abaco against a prob-
lem both Mr Cooper and Mrs Key see
as potentially disastrous.
On several points, they are in solid
agreement. Both fear Bahamian cul-
ture will be "creolised" by an ever-
growing immigrant community. Both
believe the government is terrified of
a voodoo backlash if it takes measures
against the settlers. Both think the
Haitian slums pose an enormous
health risk. And both feel law enforce-
ment on the island has been lax in
bringing illegal Haitian house-builders
to heel.
When Mrs Key said a placard
demonstration was being planned out-
side the commissioner's office to show
public disquiet, it seemed inevitable
that Mr Cooper would throw his
weight behind her. Not so.
"I am not joining in any Conchy
Joe demonstration," he told
INSIGHT categorically, "they were
responsible for bringing the.JJaitians-..
..ierei-Eiifierst place. I am going to do
it my way."
Hence, there is more to the Haitian
problem in Abaco, and the utter fail-
ure to tackle it over many years, than
meets the eye.
Mr Cooper's dismissive attitude
towards Mrs Key's protest epitomises
a continuing belief among many black
Bahamians, that the whites are the
culprits. It also reveals a deep fissure
in the Bahamian community, even in
tackling a situation which has serious
implications for them all.
While disquiet about the Haitian
problem is widespread, there are
seemingly unbridgeable divisions
between whites and blacks on the
issue which could make it nigh impos-
sible to present a solid front.
In fact, there are even differences
between the whites themselves, as Mrs
Key admitted when she first
announced her protest plans.


* WHEN Haitians first arrived in Abaco, they were timorous refugees from the appalling Duvalier regime. As
early as the late 1950s and into the 1960s, they fled in leaky sloops to find a new life among the Bahama isles,
coming ashore with haunted faces and suspicious eyes.
(The Tribune archive photo)


"I don't expect all of them will turn
out to support the demonstration,"
she said, "The truth is some of them
want the Haitians here because they
need their labour. Not all white Aba-
conians feel the same way on this
issue."
With blacks suspicious of the whites,
and whites divided among themselves,
there is clear evidence of serious frag-
mentation in the anti-Haitian cause.
And that's without taking into account
the views of the Haitian-Bahamians,
the progeny of the early Haitian set-
tlers.
As Ms Memose Daniels, a Bahami-
an citizen of Haitian parentage, said
last week, Bahamians in Abaco had
themselves to blame for the problems
that now exist. It was them, she said,
who encouraged the immigrants to
come in the first place. And it was
them, it has to be said, who turned a
blind eye for 30 years while the Marsh
Harbour settlements mushroomed
into the huge, unsightly blots on the
landscape they have become today.
When Haitians first arrived in Aba-
co, they were timorous refugees from
the appalling Duvalier regime. As ear-
ly as the late 1950s and into the 1960s,
they fled in leaky sloops to find a new
life among the Bahama isles, coming
ashore with haunted faces and suspi-
cious eyes.
They were desperate to escape the
gratuitous violence of Papa Doc's
thugs, the Tontons Macoute, and the
festering poverty the bespectacled dic-
tator had foisted on his people.
In the Bahamas, they were treated
with contempt, but that was nothing
compared to the routinely brutal han-
dling they had received at the hands of
their own ruler and his cohorts.
Driven by despair, and all too eager
to please, the Haitians settled in at
the very bottom of the Bahamian
economy as labourers, cleaners and
general menials. They took on work
Bahamians sniffed at and gradually
established themselves as an essen-
tial, if lowly, element in local society.
In Abaco, many whites seriously
attribute a large measure of the
island's economic success to the
invaders from the south. Without
them, they say, it would have been
impossible to create modern Abaco
and its vibrant business environment.
Even now, as Mr Cooper and Mrs
Key seek to alert the island commu-
nity to the dangers of continued immi-
gration, many business people are
reluctant to stand behind them.
As a result, the Haitians' confidence

See HAITIAN, Page 3C


The Arawak Group Arawak Avenue P.O. Box SS 5698 Nassau, Bahamas Tef 242.394.3192 Far 242.39L4224


I


---- --r~L1Lt~


ILI1~llbl~rs-dC..-_.____ I- I _~ __ ___ IIC I -Is I I- I._L, I _


-














How


I


turned


my


back


on


$20


million


... but saved my own identity


* By Tribune Staff Writer
t's been quite a year
for me financially. In
fact, during the first
four months of 2005,1
have netted well over
$20 million all courtesy of a
succession of Internet wind-
falls.
To say "netted" is perhaps
misleading. I actually turned
my back on every red cent of it.
For someone who practically
lives from hand-to-mouth, dri-
ves around in a 1989 Chevy,
and regards Wendy's as the
headquarters of haute cuisine,
that's quite a sacrifice.
But I happen to know that
every tempting dollar on offer,
either as lottery winnings or as
part of ambitious business pro-
posals, was actually an attempt
to steal my ID.
Theft
Identity theft is now big busi-
ness for Internet bandits. They
have become quite sophisticat-
ed in luring even switched-on
web fans into their snares. The
consequences for victims can
be pretty devastating. And
costly.
My latest bonanza arrived
this week two in one after-
noon, as a matter of fact from
one Graham Omona.
He is supposedly senior man-
ager of a Nigerian government
ministry in Lagos and his dear-
est wish in life, it seems, is to
transfer a huge sum of money
into my bank account.
All I have to do is act as mid-
dleman in a transfer of funds
arising from over-invoicing of


contract bills in the petroleum
business.
Once I have co-operated in
the movement of this swag, I
am entitled to a cut of the pro-
ceeds plus five per cent as reim-
bursement of costs and other
incidentals.
As one who has spent half a
lifetime hand-scrabbling every
cent I have from the hard,
unrelenting rockface of life,
there is a certain allure in get-
ting a tidy sum for doing noth-
ing.
Questions
For the seventh or eighth
time this year I felt like a
lawyer must feel when his IQ
of 95 somehow translates into
$600 an hour, no questions
asked.
In the media business, mon-
ey for old rope is neither grant-
ed nor expected. Most practi-
tioners die in harness to coin-
cide with the final mortgage
payment. To actually get a
huge sum for doing sweet B-
all is a novel concept worth
savouring.
As if Mr Omona's largesse
was not enough in itself, I
received the same day greet-
ings from dear old Fred Egob-
ia, branch manager of the
"National Bank for Africa
PLC", also in Lagos.
"Hello friend!" his e-mail
began, creating the impression
that he and I have been nigh
inseparable soulmates for the
best part of 40 years.
Then he makes "a very
urgent and profitable" business
proposal which amounts to out-
right fraud.


FEEDBACK


REGARDING your arti-
cle on Harbour Island, the
long-time winter residents,
although they have their idio-
syncrasies, are not a big prob-
lem.
But the isle has been invad-
ed by 'new money', the
coarse, brash, uncouth mil-
lionaires who look at the
island only from the stand-
point of an investment.
These persons ride
roughshod over all conven-
tions. What they can't get by
bully tactics or buying, they,
get by influencing persons
who can help them. Mean-
while, the personae indigini
have a capacity for talking out
of both sides of their mouths
at the same time.
The closure of the road
leading to the southern end
of the island has been a bore
of contention for many
moons. There has been no
clean-cut answer from any-
one who can say if this is
legal. There is a lot of yap-
yap but nothing is ever done:
Island Source
Harbour Island
YOUR fascinating article
about the Haitian problem on
Abaco will highlight divisions,
not just between Haitians and
Bahamians, but between


black Bahamians and Conchy
Joes.
The truth is that Conchy
Joes have encouraged
Haitians to come to Abaco
for many years because they
provided cheap labour and
were more "workish" than
their Bahamian counterparts.
The large influx of immi-
grants, legal and illegal, can
therefore be laid at the door
of the local whites.
Even now, with so many
Haitians on the island, and
with the obvious social and
health problems they are
causing, there is tremendous
reluctance by white business
people to clamp down and say
enough is enough.
In fact, they think if the
Haitians go, so will Abaco's
prosperity. There is, there-
fore, a marked difference of
approach between black and
white Bahamians in this mat-
ter. It will be interesting to
see how many whites turn out
for Mrs Key's placard protest.
She might find the whites will
boycott it for business rea-
sons, while blacks might boy-
cott it because she is seen as a
Conchy Joe.
I also believe the witchcraft
angle is valid. I think blacks
are scared of what they imag-
ine to be Haitians' hidden


powers.
Troubled
Marsh Harbour
MR COOPER, the lone
crusader of Abaco, is right in
practically everything he says,
but I fear his will be a voice in
the wilderness, crying out for
help with no response.
I don't think it is the inten-
tion of Haitians to degrade
Abaco to Third World status,
but the truth is they know no
better, and if Bahamians want
them to aspire to higher stan-
dards, they must ensure their
own laws are adhered to with-
out exception.
The local government in
Abaco is either unable or
unwilling to take action
against the illegal house-
building going on there. What
is happening is quite clearly
against the law, but no-one is
raising a finger to stop it.
This being the case, it is not
surprising that Haitians inter-
pret this lack of action as tac-
it approval of what they're
doing. It is only human nature
that they should do so.
If the government is seri-
ous about tackling this prob-
lem, they should show that
they're serious.
J Bannister
Nassau


Internet users in the Bahamas are being targeted

by on-line bandits who use a variety of ploys to trick

them out of their money. Here, INSIGHT highlights

some of the scams you need to look out for...


He wants me to front as the
relative of a dead man whose
account containing $15.5 mil-
lion appears to have been over-
looked by his family. Fred
admits that he and two of his
bank colleagues have been try-
ing to keep the account quiet
for some time. Now, they've
decided, it's time to milk it dry.
By posing as a claimant, and
helping in the scam, I can earn
myself 25 per cent of the lolly,
plus 10 per cent to cover
expenses.
The entire procedure will be
over in five days, at the end of
which I will be in a position to
slide $3 million or more into
my current account without
even breaking sweat.
Dishonest
For the dishonest among us,
there is something deeply irre-
sistible about this kind of pro-
posal. Three million equals an
entire lifetime of hard labour
with a few hundred thousand
shekels thrown in.
However, Fred and Graham
are nothing if not shrewd when
it comes to getting something
for nothing.
Before handing over a nick-
el, they want my bank account


numbers, niy credit card data,


my social security details, and
every pin number I possess.
Then, one assumes, they will
settle down to a bottle of
Bollinger while they siphon
money from my Visa cards and
bank accounts to their hearts'
content. Instead of being three
million up, I will be precisely
$3,456 down, leaving me with
the binbag full of one-cent
coins I keep behind my tum-
ble-drier. Millionaire's Row to
Skid Row with the click of a
computer mouse.
Business proposals from
Nigeria are just one element of
the Internet ID theft racket:
I've also won six major lotteries
since Christmas.
The loot acquired from these
draws is phenomenal, and the
means of conveying to me news
of my good fortune appallingly
seductive.
Address
"Congratulations! Your per-
sonal draw number (1-234-
6849-7160), matched against
your e-mail address as part .of
the Cavendish Grosvenor Har-
vard Scholarship Fund lottery,
under the distinguished patron-
age of the Duke of Shepton
Mallet, has featured in the lat-
est draw, which took place in
the Presidential Suite at the
Paris Hilton on April 4,2005. It
is our sincere pleasure to
inform you that you have won
$5.2 million, which you need
to claim within fifteen days of
the above date. Please click
here for details of how to have
your winnings transferred into
your bank account. Once again,
hearty congratulations from the
management and staff etc, etc."
The dunderheads among us
immediately click as instruct-


ed and unload all these people
need to know about us into
their database. The rest, as they
say, is history. Especially our
life's savings.
If dodgy deals and lottery
hand-outs are not enough in
themselves to lure us into a life
of penury, there is also a whole
raft of scams using world-
renowned brand names.
Brand
The name "Ebay" is but one
brand used fraudulently by the
villains to sucker you into part-
ing with money, usually with
reference to Internet auctions
in which you are supposed to
have taken part. There are also
banks telling you they are reg-
ularising their records and need
your account information to
help in the process. And insur-
ance firms with complicated
but fascinating information
about unclaimed policy pay-,
ments.
Even a leading American
television commentator admits
he was nearly caught by the
bank scam. "I was about to fill
in the on-screen blanks when I
thought: 'Wait a minute, I don't
actually have an account with
these guys!'"
Experts are now working on
technology to cut the risk of
Internet scams and rip-offs in-
the next few years. But for the
time being, going on-line can
prove extremely costly for the
gullible and unwary among us,
especially if we find it hard to
turn down unsolicited offers of
mega-bucks. And who does-
n't?
A fraud detection expert
said: "These people trade on
your greed and on the fact that
you are probably confused by


your own financial arrange-
ments.
"They feel if they make
something sound official and
respectable, often using tried
and trusted household names, a
good many people will be tak-
en in, especially the young and
the old.
"But their sole aim is to cap-
ture your ID in their own com-
puters so that they can use it to
steal from you, either through
bank accounts or credit cards.
Don't. be tempted to follow
their instructions, or you could
find yourself with real prob-
lems on your hands."
Affairs
Some people have spent lit-
erally months trying to unravel
their affairs after the Internet
scammers have struck. Bills out
of the blue, threats of court
action, lawyers' letters, maxed-
out credit cards...all of these
can result from an ID theft.
And establishing your own
integrity in making your case
isn't easy in the modern world,
where everyone is assumed to
be dishonest until proved oth-
erwise.
. Do yourself a favour. If Fred
or Graham offer you a cut in
their latest e-mail racket, click
'delete' and walk away. You'll
be glad you did.


Have you become the vic-
tim of an Internet scam? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


* INTERNET users (posed by model) in the Bahamas are being targeted by on-line
bandits who use a variety of ploys to trick them out of their money.


r-/jc- e.\, I iVll^l/Ml ri- 11 .uuj .....


"--------- --


M -- -









THE RIBUE MUVAYAl-'-IIL2t~,20INSIGHT 3


WEEK I REVIE


Catholics in the
Bahamas
rejoiced last
week, along with
more than a bil-
lion people around the world as
German Cardinal Joseph
Ratzinger was introduced to
the world as Benedict XVI, the
new Supreme Pontiff of the
Roman Catholic Church.
The successor to Pope John
Paul II, chosen after two days
of deliberations by the College
of Cardinals sequestered at St
Peter's Basilica in Rome,
described himself as a "simple
and humble worker in the vine-
yard of the Lord."
Archbishop of the Archdio-
cese of Nassau, Patrick Pinder
told The Tribune last week that
local Catholics are being called
to have faith in this change.
This was one of the fastest
papal elections in the past cen-
tury: Pope Pius XII was elected
in 1939 in three ballots over two
days, while Pope John Paul I
was elected in 1978 in four bal-
lots in one day. The new Pope
was elected after approximately
four ballots over two days.
Benedict XVI, the first Ger-
man pope since the 11th centu-
ry, and only the second non-Ital-
ian Pope in six centuries
emerged onto the balcony of St
Peter's Basilica, where he waved
to a wildly cheering crowd of
tens of thousands and gave his
first blessing as pope.
Pope Benedict XVI is consid-
ered by some a conservative and
as a cardinal worked very close-
ly with Pope John Paul II. He
was brought to Rome by the for-
mer Pope to head the Congre-
gation of the Doctrine of the
Faith, one of the more influen-
tial of the Vatican's congrega-
tions .


PRIME Minister Perry
Christie last week strongly
objected to a Tribune article
that reported that one of two
LNG companies vying for
approval from his government
had changed lawyers, hiring Mr
Christie's brother-in-law to rep-
resent them.


Speaking in the House of
Assembly last Wednesday, Mr
Christie took exception to the
"negative implications" in the
report in Wednesday's Tribune
that the LNG company
Tractabel 'had replaced
Freeport lawyer Fred Smith
with Dr Earl Cash, his brother-
in-law.
Dr Cash, Mr Christie said,
as a partner of Higgs and John-
son, appeared before govern-
ment as an attorney with others
from Higgs and Johnson for a
company "called El Paso who
had applied for a licence for
LNG plants at the South Rid-
ing facility".
He said he received a com-
munication from the company
telling him they were changing
lawyers and they were going to
another prestigious law firm
whose name was not called at
the time and at some stage they
would indicate who their coop-
erate attorneys were.


Dwight Cash, 28, of Fergu-
son Street, Bain Town was shot
dead last week, bringing to 13
the number of murders in the
country so far for the year.
Mr Cash's body was discov-
ered in the streets of Kemp
Road last Tuesday evening fol-
lowing a shooting incident
around 9 o'clock.
Witnesses claimed that short-
ly after hearing gunshots they
saw a man running from the
Virgo Car Rental lot, heading
in an easterly direction.
They claimed that the man
collapsed when he arrived at
the thoroughfare of Kemp
Road.
*** *

GOVERNMENT will use
$24 million of treasury funds
to buy the Clifton Heritage
property, Prime Minister Perry
Christie announced last week.
He introduced a resolution
in the House of Assembly last
Wednesday to raise or borrow
funds to repay the treasury.
Mr Christie said the closure
of the long saga represented a


* M 1


"Copyrighted Material



Available fromyndicatommerd Content
Available from Commercial News Povrs"


day of tremendous satisfaction
and great meaning for the
country. He described it as "the
defining moment in his own
political life".
Mr Christie said that in his
approach to purchase the 204
acres of land on the southwest-
ern side of the island, he adopt-
ed a committee to advise him
on creative ways to afford the
purchase.
The committee, The Clifton
Heritage Authority, chaired by


former Attorney General Sean
McWeeney, said in a report that
it was dismayed by the grossly
excessive amount of time -14
years that had elapsed since
the compulsory acquisition of
the land.


CROCODILES and tor-
toises once roamed the


Bahamas and there are
skeletons to prove it.
Divers in a blue hole in
Abaco have discovered the
bones of creatures which
probably lived in these islands
tens of thousands of years ago,
it was reported last week.
The discovery, revealed last
Monday, is thought by experts
to be one of the most signifi-
cant archaeological finds in


this country.
The exact location of the
blue hole where the discovery
was made is being kept secret
because other remains could
be down there.
But it is known to be in
south Abaco, and the skele-
tons came to light during
an expedition by cave:
divers, according to island
sources.


Haitian (From page 1C)


has grown over the years. They
are no longer timorous and
deferential. With their roots
now sunk deep in Bahamian
soil, they have become quite
assertive. Or, as Mr Cooper
alleges, "downright biggety".
It's probably the bold-as-
brass attitudes now being dis-
played by the immigrants
which make some Bahamians.
feel somewhat cowed.
However, the redoubtable
Mrs Key is not deterred.
Whether she gets 10, 20 or 100
demonstrators on to the streets
for her placard protest, she
feels the point will have been
made.
When told that Mr Cooper
would not be joining her
demonstration, she expressed
surprise and called for unity.
"This is not a white and
black situation," she said, "this
is a Bahamian situation. It's
true Bahamian whites brought
the Haitians here. Yes, we are
to blame. But that doesn't
mean we have to live with the
problem for evermore."
Haitians first appeared on
the Abaco labour scene when
Owens-Illinois ran its timber
plant on the island. Along with
Turks Islanders, they provid-
ed the muscle power for the
company's pulpwood opera-
tion.
When the business closed,
white Bahamian businessmen
stepped in to offer the Haitians
farming jobs, recognising their
general diligence and eager-
ness to work.
The Key and Sawyer farms
were among local employers
who moved in to utilise this
new source of labour. It was
about this time, too, that
Pigeon Pea began to take
shape, with a shack or two
springing up on spare land in
the middle of Marsh Harbour.
Later, Haitians moved on to
the site of a former pond which
was filled with slurry during
harbour dredging operations.
This became known locally as
The Mud, a damp desolate plot
on which the Haitians eventu-
ally built their ramshackle
homes.
Together, the settlements
have now expanded relentless-
ly into a congested conglomer-
ation of shacks, with hardly a
metre to spare between them.
Outsiders who have penetrated
the inner reaches of these com-
munities emerge with looks of
disbelief.


Somehow, hundreds of fam-
ilies manage to exist in these
slums with no proper sanita-
tion the kind of conditions,
in fact, which Indians and
Africans are now desperately
trying to combat in their con-
tinuing campaigns against dis-
ease.
Mr Cooper and Mrs Key
believe and it's hard to argue
with them that, left to devel-
op, these communities will cre-
ate massive health and social
problems in the years ahead.
When large concentrations of
people pour their waste into
holes in the ground, it's only a
matter of time before their
health deteriorates.


be another Port-de-Paix in 20
years."
If Mr Cooper and Mrs Key
seem agitated by the situation,
their words are nothing com-
pared with what is being said
by some.Bahamians behind
their hands.
The quiet majority see
Pigeon Pea, The Mud, the
growing Sandbanks settlements
and the scattering of shacks
among Abaco's pine barrens
as a social disaster in the mak-
ing.
One described it as "a pow-
er-keg ready to blow a poten-
tial calamity for Abaco and its
people."
As controversy rages, the


"This is not a white

and black situation ...

this is a Bahamian

situation. It's true

Bahamian whites

brought the Haitians

here. Yes, we are to

blame. But that doesn't

mean we have to live

with the problem for

evermore."
Mrs Yvonne Key


Mrs Key told INSIGHT:
"When I mentioned my plac-
ard protest, and asked people
to join, some said they were
scared. I said 'if we are scared
now, what is it going to be like
in five years?'
"People must realise that we
are in a truly serious situation.
It's true that local whites start-
ed it all, but once Pigeon Pea
was underway, immigrants kept
slipping in.
"Now we have to do some-
thing. We have to clear the set-
tlements, provide proper hous-
ing for those we want to stay
and get rid of the illegals. Then
we need to stop the influx of
Haitians. If we don't, this will


Haitians themselves maintain
what seems to be a calculated
silence. "
Apart from Ms Daniels, a
Haitian-Bahamian who dis-
agreed with Mr Cooper's
aggressive stance against the
Haitian community, it is diffi-
cult to find anyone ready to
speak out on the immigrants'
behalf. It's as if a low-profile
approach is considered the best
policy.
Even the Haitian ambas-
sador in Nassau was reluctant
to come to the phone when he
heard The Tribune was asking
questions about the Abaco set-
tlements.
First his secretary said he was


Quotes Of the Week


"Dear brothers and sisters,
after the great Pope John Paul
II, the cardinals have elected
me -a simple, humble work-
er in the vineyard of the Lord..
"The fact that the Lord can
work and act even with insuf-
ficient means consoles me,
and above all I entrust myself
to your prayers."
German Cardinal
Joseph Ratzinger's first pub-
lic words as Pope Benedict
XVI. He was speaking to the
tens of thousands of persons
at St Peter's last Tuesday.

"The whole adventure of
living the Gospel and follow-
ing Christ is an adventure of
heart and mind, of the whole
life. If we open our hearts and
minds to it we will be chal-
lenged but in the long term we
won't be disappointed.
"Adventuring with this new
Holy Father into this new pon-
tificate is an invitation to pull
out into the deep once again.
We should offer our prayers
for the new Holy Father and
just as the Cardinal electors
were inspired by the Holy Spir-
it to elect him to the Chair of


in his office. Then, when she
had passed on word about who
was calling, and what they
wanted to talk about, he mirac-
ulously vanished.
"I'm sorry, he's not in," she
said only seconds after saying
that he was. She said he would
call back. But, of course, he
never did.
With Haitians maintaining a
dogged silence, the Bahamian
government characteristically
inert, and the Abaconians at
odds with each other, it seems
likely that the status quo will be
allowed to prevail. And that's
disturbing.
One Marsh Harbour resident
told INSIGHT: "This problem
will eventually lead to violence.
All it takes are two or three
drunks with mischief on their
minds.
"They will do something
drastic and all hell will break
loose. Then the Bahamas will
have a real problem on its
hands. Mark. my words, that's
the way it will go somewhere
down the line."

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


Peter let's see exactly how this
inspi rtion will continue
throu ?e" ^ "
-- .ArcIishop Patrick Pin-
der respol to the announce-
ment of thi hew Pope.

"Clifton is the one spot in
our entire country which we
have the opportunity to recap-
ture and present to our people
the experience of five eras of
people which passed through
this country."
Prime Minister Perry
Christie on government's
move to use $24 million of
treasury funds to purchase
more than 200 acres of land
at Clifton Cay for a Heritage
Park.

"Sometimes I believe that
because it is difficult to insin-
uate, import or ground nega-
tive findings about myself
there is an effort to touch
those around me with nega-
tive implications,"
"This did not even say my
brother-in-law is a partner in
the law firm of Higgs and
Johnson, the law firm that
handles the fundraisers for the


FNM, it didn't say that. It did-
n't say that my brother-in-law
was at the polls for the mem-
ber of Montagu (Brent
Symonette) in the last election.
They simply want to insinu-
ate, parachute him into my life
with some implication which
is simply incorrect."
Prime Minister Perry
Christie responds to .a Tri-
bune article headed: "LNG
firm changes lawyer Com-
pany hires PM's brother-in-
law".

"The crocodiles are said to
be of a type no longer
found in the western hemi-
sphere. And the tortoises are
apparently similar to those
found in the Galapagos
Islands.
"The fact that the remains
were apparently found deep
in the blue hole suggests the
creatures were alive when the
Bahama islands were higher
out of the water than they are
now."
A resident of Abaco
responds to the discovery of
historic remains on the
island.


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- I


THE TRIBUNE


MUNUAY, APHIL 2b, 200U, PAGE 3C;


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W W W .. H E R A L D .C O M IN T E R N A T IO N A L E D IT IO N S U N D A Y A P R IL 24 2 0 0 5 7...................................................................................................................................................................................................................



OPINION
JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981) ALBERTO IBARGOEN, PUBI SI 1 TOM REDLER, EXEOIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


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