Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00087
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: April 18, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00087
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"TRY OUR --
AWESOME i
TWOSOME" 9 "
HIGH 82F
LOW 65F

< PAIMY SUNNY,
oc STRAY SHOWER


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.119 MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005 PRICE 500




r rl '


Lester Mortimer


struck by car in


front of family


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Repoiter
THE man whose candy com-
pany was loved by generations
of Nassau children died in a
road accident over the week-
end in front of his wife and fam-
ily.
Mr Lester Mortimer, 71, own-
er of the popular Mortimer's
Candy Kitchen, was crossing the
road at Cable Beach when he
was struck by a car driven by
an off-duty policeman.
His wife, daughter and other
relatives witnessed the incident
and were visibly distraught.
More family members, includ-
ing grandchildren, rushed to the
scene to comfort them.
One woman bystander said:
"It is a shame that an elderly
man who has survived so much
had to die in such a way. Why
isn't more done to regulate traf-
fic on this road?"
Mr Mortimer, of Blue Hill
Road, was knocked down by a
Mitsubishi Lancer driven by
Terrance Thompson, an off-
duty officer.
He was trying to cross the
road in front of SuperClubs
Breezes when the tragedy
occurred. Yesterday, a bunch
of flowers had been left on the
kerb to mark the scene of the
crash.
Mr Mortimer's death is the
second traffic fatality in as many
days, and the third major acci-
dent in a week, causing police to
warn motorists and pedestrians
to use caution while on the
streets.


* 71-YEAR-OLD
Lester Mortimer


Chief Supt Hulan Hanna said
the incident occurred some time
before 9pm on Saturday when
Mr Mortimer was making his
way across the median to the
Breezes hotel.
Mr Thompson was travelling
east when his vehicle hit Mr
Mortimer, who died at the
scene before an ambulance
could arrive. Although Mr
Thompson's vehicle was exten-
sively damaged, he did not
receive any major injuries.
The accident was witnessed
by Mr Mortimer's wife, daugh-
ter and other family members
who were to accompany him
that evening.
One woman witness said:
"Until the government puts
some speed bumps on this road,
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Family remembers

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* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
LESTER MORTIMER,
the man knocked down and
killed on Cable Beach on
Saturday night, was
described by a family mem-
ber as a loving, giving and
hard-working person.
Yesterday The Tribune
visited the family home at
Blue Hill Estates. His eldest
daughter Denise Mortimer
said the family is coping the
best it can, and her mother
Gloria is "holding up well"
considering, she witnessed
the accident. She said her
mother is calm and appears
to be over the initial shock.
"Death is hard to cope
with under any circum-
stances. These circumstances
make it more difficult," she
said.
Cayle Mortimer, Mr Mor-
timer's grandson and the
first to arrive on the scene,


said he saw attempts being
made to resuscitate his
grandfather. His aunt was
very emotional and he tried
to comfort her.
Mr Mortimer said'he saw
"just a lifeless body."
The victim is well-known
for his business, Mortimer
Candy Kitchen, situated on
East Hill Street.
For years, the business has
supplied home-made can-
dies and the famous snow
cones.
Ms Mortimer said her
father had been in the candy
business from a child, and
every day for a few hours he
went to the store and acted
as consultant.
Currently, his son Cornel
and daughter-in-law Beverly
operate the candy store. Mrs
Mortimer said that her
father-in-law knew every-
thing about the candy busi-
SEE page 12


I a


Fire destroys

Lucayan


Medical centre


inFreeport

THE Lucayan Medical Cen-
tre in Freeport has been
destroyed by fire.
Dr Marcus Bethel, who
managed the clinic, told The
Tribune that the fire broke out
around dawn on Friday before
the clinic opened, which was
fortunate because no-one was
there.
He said that investigations
are continuing but the prelim-
inary report suggests the fire
was electrical. The clinic had
been opened in 1968 and was
expanded in 1983.


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THE TRIBUNE


, PAGE 2, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


ks ~ ~~~Oh al iJ.Ong



PM seeks to strengthen relations




with the Thrks and. Caicos Islands


-WAA WAAW -- J -IL, .1P.- a WwVW,%' X r-,W-..-A WV'F


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has pledged that the
Bahamas will foster deeper
relations with the Turks and
Caicos Islands.
His remarks came at the
official opening of the new
N.J.S. Francis legislative
chamber building of the Turks
and Caicos on Friday.
He also publicly thanked
the Turks and Caicos islands
for their prompt response and
financial contribution follow-
ing Hurricanes Jeanne and
Frances last year.
Mr Christie officially
opened the building with
Chief Minister of Turks and
Caicos Michael Misick.
"In the months ahead, we
will seek to concretise our
pledge to strengthen relations
by launching a number of ini-
tiatives, such as the reactiva-
tion of the annual consulta-
tion between our two govern-
ments on matters of mutual
interest," he said.


that you offer tertiary schol-
arships to all who make the
grade, but I caution you from
our own past experience to be
careful not to allow economic
growth to outpace the devel-
opment of your people.
"In like manner, our coun-
try, The Bahamas, is also
experiencing an unparalleled
level of growth. Despite the
effects of the two recent hur-
ricanes our tourism industry

"At a deeper
level, it is
symbolic of your
history, your
progress to
date and the
aspirations of the
people of the
Turks and Caicos
Islands. In truth,
it is the place
that defines your
democracy and
your progress as
a people."

Prime Minister
Perry Christie


is at the strongest level it has
enjoyed in many years., -
'"Our external reserves are
at their highest level ever and
the overall economic growth
rate will average around three
per cent per annum this year,"
he said.
He also used the opportu-
nity to thank the people of
Turks and Caicos for assisting
the Bahamas after last year's
hurricane season.
"The Chief Minister and his
delegation were the first for-
eign governmental delegation
to visit, touring the hardest hit
areas of Grand Bahama. You
not only visited but you were
the first, the very first, to con-
tribute to our relief and recov-
ery in the significant amount
of $200,000.
"Many other governments
and international organisa-
tions subsequently came for-
ward but the magnanimous
gesture by the people of these
islands will not soon be for-
gotten by our people, espe-
cially those worst affected,
many of whom live in Grand
Bahama and Abaco and many
of whom are of Turks Island
descent.
"This is the kind of co-oper-
ation to which I refer when I
say 'blood is thicker than
water'," he said.



TRPIA


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
IN PROMOTING "envi-
ronmental justice", mem-
bers of the New Providence
Community Church, along
with other environmentally
conscious citizens, flocked
to Orange Hill Beach on
Sunday to help restore it to
its natural beauty.
Carrying black garbage
bags, they went along the
coastal area cleaning the
ground.
Pastor of community
development Shaun Ingra-
ham told The Tribune there
are a lot of environmental
injustices, and the church is
trying to provide solutions.
He said members are
engaging in discussions sur-
rounding "environmental
justice" through clean-ups
and restoration of beaches.
"We are a part of one sys-
tem, one created order. In
John 3:16 it said: 'God so
loved the World'. So often
we interpret that world as
just people, but we believe
that it means the whole
world, including the envi-
ronment, and the beach.
"So we are to live in har-
mony, not just with each
other, but with our environ-
ment," said Mr Ingraham.

Phases
The project consists of
two phases, which include
the cleaning up of trash on
the beach and placement of
plants on the beach to help
anchor the sand, said Mr
Ingraham.
Other groups involved in
the initiative are the Ocean-
ic Bank, Caves Village, the
Ministry of Tourism and the
Ministry of Environment.
Ruth Thackray, a resident
of Orange. Hill, has com-
piled a "First Do No Harm"
proposal, which outlined the
current situation at Orange
Hill Beach.
She recommended solu-
tions such as garbage man-.
agement, sand dune restora-
tion and protection of the
dune from car parking.
In her proposal she not-
ed the need for a newly-built
beach dune, which would"
consist of a mixture of loose
beach fill, rocks, sand organ-
ic matter, dead seagrass and
soil.
She advised beachgoers;
"Every time you visit the
beach try not to stand on lit-
tle plants and try to stand
on stones to access the
shorelines. Try not to park
*cars on the beach and take
all garbage home.
"Do everything you can
to be a good citizen and
your children will respect
you, so that their children
can have something that
they will be able to go to in
the future,"
Chairman of the Coastal
Awareness Committee Earl-;
ston McPhee said the initia-
tive is a great example to
utilise and encourage other'
communities.
"I think it is the kind of
initiative we need in this
country, where persons
within the community take
more responsibility as stake-
holder," he said.


I










THE TRIBUNE M


Opponent of Haitian




illegal immigrants




'fears for his life'


hMr pacwiwnc


ingurrd a wave


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
-- a


- -"4- "OD
-- mib o w 4 0


be


A LONE campaigner agains
illegal Haitian immigration it
Abaco believes his life is i
danger.
Jeffrey Cooper claims he ha
been threatened by immigrant
who he accuses of imposing
Third World standards on the
island.
"I think my life is at risk," he
told The Tribune last night, "bu
I don't care because I know
what I'm doing is right.
"If the government does noi
act now, there is going to be a
Haitian takeover of Abaco and
we are going to be in real trou-
ble."
Mr Cooper, a photographer
and entrepreneur, has been out-
spoken in his condemnation of
illegal'Haitian immigration for
some time.
He regularly airs his views on
Radio Abaco, but is now trying
to force government action
through Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts.
He has written to Mr Roberts
to seek a meeting in Nassau.
As a result of his views, Mr
Cooper says he is threatened
by Haitians nearly every day.
"They challenge me and are
biggety with it," he said.
Mr Cooper, a father of two,
says rampant illegal house-
building and lack of proper
sanitation are two urgent con-
cerns arising from the Haitian
invasion.
He added that settlements
were now springing up in Aba-
co without planning approval
or proper waste disposal
arrangements.
"As a result people are get-
Stingssck,"'hesaid;": ,
S "There are people here now
with all kinds of mysterious ill-
nesses, stomach ailments anid
so on..
? "The Haitians are digging
holes as lavatories and throwing
dirty diapers on the ground.


st They even bury premature
n babies.
n "All this is affecting the water
table. Many Haitians here are
s diseased. If nothing is done, this
s is going to become a major
g problem for Abaco."
e Last week, Mr Cooper said
e
t "If the
t government
doesn't act
now, there is
going to be a
Haitian
takeover of
Abaco and we
are going to
be in real
trouble."

Jeffrey Cooper

many Bahamians would not
speak out because they feared
witchcraft.
Even pastors had told him to
"watch out" because of the
threat of obeah. "I keep being
told that my soul will end up in
Haiti," he said.
But he said he did not believe
in obeah and would not be
intimidated. "I think Bahami-
*. ans are now getting to the point
'Whgrer'tley re reprepa'red to
act," he said. -
If nothing i's'done, I think it
is going to be war eventually.
These Haitians are getting vio-
lent. They will curse you out.
They want their rights, even
though most of them are ille-


- -


* JEFFREY Cooper says he will not be intimidated


gal."
Mr Cooper said some
Haitians are now building
shacks not just for their own
use, but to go into the rental
business, with other immigrants
as-Ltfla'nts.'; ?" ',: *'r:, T*'no ": r
H'e" also c.iticise d-thei rbur-
ial metliods,i saying they.:wdre
ignoring-Abacb custom ;by
building tombs.
"They build tombs so they
can get back at the bodies for
obeah," he said. "But the cus-


tom in Abaco has always been
to bury bodies six feet under-
ground."
Mr Cooper is urging Abaco-
nians to put pressure on the
government so that the illegal
house-building is stopped.
"I want things to happen offi-
cially before people start to take
matters into their own hands,"
he said.
SEE today's INSIGHT
section for the ful story of Mr
Cooper's lone campaign


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MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAG .3


THE TRIBUNE


-', I -, I I "a f -


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i









PAGE 4, MONDAY, APRIT18, 2005 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


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Open letter




to Minister





of Education


EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE publish the fol-
lowing open letter to the
Minister of Education.
Hon Alfred M Sears, MP
Minister of Education,
Ministry of Education.
Dear Minister Sears,
THANK you for resolving
the emergency water supply
for Oakes Field Primary
School. However, we, the par-
ents of the school, remain
deeply distressed about the
continuing lack of attention
and resources the school
receives, especially since it
performs, if not the best,
among the best on GLAT
examinations year-in and
year-out!
The very caring and able
administrators and teachers
led by Mrs Beryl Gray, Prin-
cipal, are doing all they can
under the circumstances at
the school. It is past time for
.the Ministry to do more, a lot
more!
We have not had a music
teacher for the entire school
year, and only about eight
weeks remain. The children'
in the entire school have lost a
full year of music! Last year,
Sand in previous years we had
a very good music teacher in
Mr Whyte. When school
reopened, Mr Whyte did not
return. We were informed
that he was transferred to
another school or district.
You have spoken often
about the need for the chil-
dren to read and rightly so,
but music is also important.
Numerous surveys I ve found
that introducing music, and
specifically playing an instru-
ment and learning to read
music, causes the child to
develop cognitive skills, be
more focused in school, per-
form better academically and
improves behaviour, espe-
cially in the case of young
boys who tend to pose the
greatest challenges for our
teachers and administrators.
Given the above, Oakes Field
Primary School children have
unfortunately been at a sig-
nificant disadvantage this
school year.
A very critical person the
school does not have is a
Guidance Counsellor. Our
school, like many others, are
facing serious challenges with
young boys. The one place


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where professional interven-
tion can be of assistance is
through the school's guidance
counsellor. Not only Oakes
Field, 'but every primary
school, without exception,
ought to have a professional
guidance counsellor, so that
early intervention can be
achieved, thereby helping our
young boys who face many
challenges. Every day that
passes opportunities for early
intervention are missed and
while these opportunities are
missed the individual situa-
tions are worsening.
Some of the classes are
overcrowded. We have a 1st
grade class with almost 40 stu-
dents! How is it that the stu-
dents are to learn and get any
type of individualised atten-
tion? This also creates a very
difficult management job for
the teacher. Imagine, almost
40, five-to-seven year olds in
one class!
As much as you have made
about the need for our chil-
dren to read, the reality is that
there is no library at Oakes
Field, none! Where are the
children expected to be
exposed to the habit of read-
ing, other than at home, and if
they are not exposed at.
home? Nowhere. If you are
serious about the children
reading, and I.have no-doubt
you are, then facilities and
environs must be created to
encourage the children to
read. Ironically, it is primary
school, at an early age of a
child, where, if the child is
exposed to the joys of read-
ing, it will become a part of
the child's life forever.
We do not have a computer
laboratory at the school, com-
puter classes, computers for
the students to use in an infor-
mal setting, or to use for class
projects. In 2005! There is no
question that our children are
at a severe disadvantage not
learning computers when it is
being taught in probably.
every private primary school.
And, what about being
exposed to the internet!
Every child cannot afford a
computer or internet access
at home and public library use
is costly.
The physical condition of
the classroom floors are noth-
ing short of atrocious. The
floors are supposed to be
tiled, but you would be for-
tunate to see any tiles when
you enter the classrooms.
Mostly, you see bare concrete
floors! This is unsafe, unsani-
tary and certainly not condi-
tions that children and teach-
ers should have to endure.
Yet, our children are expected
to learn in that environment
and to do well!


As you may be aware, a lot
of children walk to school.
However, the walkway from
the entrance to the classroom
blocks are not covered there-
fore it is commonplace for the
children' to get wet and some-
times soaked when it rains.
The areas that are covered
are in such disrepair that they
present a health hazard for
the children.
When it rains, the slightest
rain causes flooding in the
entire area where parents
drop off and pick up their
children, we saw this several
weeks ago. The school is in
desperate need of painting
inside and out and the roofs
have been patched and
repatched. Perhaps a more
permanent solution can be
found. The school's electrical
supply is insufficient to meet
the demands.
The safety of our children is
a continuing challenge regard-
ing dropping off and picking
up the children. We are in
.desperate need of a separate
entrance and exit to the
school. I am certain you are
familiar with the very narrow
entrance to the school which
also serves as the only exit.
Children are exiting cars in
the street at times wherp twn
cars cannot safely pass. At a
recent PTA meeting the par-
ents expressed considerable
concern about the need for a
separate entrance and exit.
We understand that cover-
ing of the quadrangle where
assemblies are held has been
in the plans for some time but
nothing has happened in that ',
regard. Oakes Field Primary
School does not have an audi-
torium or large classroom to
hold the student population
which is almost 700 students.
The. only place to have an
assembly is the quadrangle
which is in the open air,
exposing the children to rain.
In fact, for the past two years
we have had to discontinue
the award ceremonies due to
rain.
As to sporting facilities,
except for the recently-built
basketball court, there are no
facilities. There is no track,
soccer field, volleyball area,
baseball or softball field.
There are hardly any sport-
ing facilities at the school.
How are the children expect-
ed to grow athletically and
healthy?
There are a lot of serious
issues that need to be
addressed. We look forward,
to the Ministry of Education
resolving them expeditiously.
This letter will be made avail-
able to the public.

MICHAEL A FOULKES
A Deeply Concerned
Oakes Field Primary
School Parent
Nassau,
April 13, 2005.


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Be willing to train abroad and to develop and
implement employee training programmes.

Strong supervisory and motivational skills are essential.

Applications may be sent to:

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P.O. Box F-2468, Freeport, Grand Bahama
or
P.O. Box N-4066, Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 4, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE















Time to make up our minds about




the future of Harbour Island


N the wake of last week's
explosive public meeting
in Harbour Island, local busi-
nessman Warren Grant opined
that the Romora Bay expansion
is something that is perceived
by native Brilanders to be in
their best interests, and that the
real motivation of the second
home owners in opposing the
project is their fear for the
rental market for private homes
once so many new hotel rooms
are built.
He suggests, too, that, while it
may suit the second home own-
ers to keep things just as they
are now, the local business com-
munity (of which he is a signif-
icant part) actually yearns for
more large hotel projects of the
kind promised by the Romora
Bay and Valentine's Yacht
Club expansions.
Right or wrong, his is a point
of view advanced by many
locals.
Like many Harbour Isl-
anders, Mr Grant has clearly
witnessed with mixed emotions
the steady growth in the island's
popularity as a second home
destination.
Tales abound of homes and
beachfront properties in Bri-
land quadrupling in price over
the last decade. In one instance,
a home that was listed for sale
in the summer of 1990 for
$80,000 was recently sold for
more than $1 million.

The huge second home
community has gener-
ated a level of economic activi-
ty unheard of in any communi-
ty of comparable size in The
Bahamas (except, perhaps,
Spanish Wells, which follows a
very different economic model
altogether). It has also stamped
an unusual character on the


local tourist industry, with sea-
sonal repeat visitors staying not
in large hotels, but in either
their own private homes or
rental units.

Where has all of this
left the locals? Cer-
tainly, it has left them with jobs.
Reliable estimates suggest that
Harbour Island has negative
unemployment of up to -10 per


nesses are there for anyone who
actually visits the island for any
length of time.
Firstly, it has signally failed
to create anything resembling
a middle class on the island.
This is in stark contrast to the
intensive tourist industry in
New Providence or Grand
Bahama, which continues to
sustain the growth of a profes-
sional and entrepreneurial mid-
dle class.


"Ghettoisation is now such a
pronounced trend on this little
island that it would probably
take many years to reverse -
even if we did have a govern-
ment up to the task."


cent. This means that the island
must augment its workforce by
bringing in many mainland
Eleutherans (some from as far
south as Rock Sound and
beyond) as day workers.
All this has also led to a
huge upsurge in the importa-
tion of consumer goods onto
the island.

Yet whatever the bene-
fits of the Harbour
Island economic model on
paper, certain glaring weak-


An Atlantis or Our Lucaya
creates such jobs simply
because it is an undertaking of
such magnitude and sophistica-
tion that it requires services of
all kinds.
By contrast, a tourism indus-
try of the nature of Briland's,
while it may indeed create
many jobs and bring in much
money, operates on a far nar-
rower employment base.
In fact, this base reflects
little more than the cumulative
employment arrangements
of the various homeowners -


PERSPECTIVES

ANDREW ALLEN


land's character to be responsi-
bly approved.
That will only be apparent
when and if the government
makes public the heads of
agreement it has signed with
the developer.
But the schism that is now
undoubtedly developing in Bri-
land points to matters much
deeper than one or two indi-
vidual projects. It suggests an
island suffering the effects
of the age-old Bahamian ten-
dency simply to grasp onto
good times without a thought
of planning for the future or


even influencing the present.:
Briland has done well by
default, with .no-one. ever
addressing seriously what kind
of community it should be:*a
second home community for
wealthy northerners, or a real
resort island characterised by
small and medium-sized hotels.
Thus far, all the elements at
play (locals, hoteliers, second
home owners) have simply co-
existed, since whatever diver-
gent visions for the island they
had had not reached the point
of overlap. Now it seems that
they have.


[r~s~oaUDM


largely consisting of domestic
requirements.
Such professional require-
ments as individual homeown-
ers may have are handled either
in Nassau or back home.
Further, the demand for local
real estate, and the attendant
perpetual escalation of proper-
ty prices, are clearly a mixed
blessing.
Every year, the percentage
of properties in the choice areas
of the island owned by local
Brilanders dwindles further, as
locals (many of whom are with-
out the exposure and education
to make self-serving decisions)
sell off ever more of their fam-
ily property and invest the pro-
ceeds in dead-end con-
sumerism.

W hereas intensive
hotel developments
by their nature concentrate vis-
itors to a limited physical area,
a model based on second home
ownership spreads this physical
occupation to the point that it
competes (generally successful-
ly) with locals for space. In a
place as compact and urbanised
as Harbour Island, the
inevitable result is a form of
segregation that eventually
feeds off itself.
Unsurprisingly, then, Ghet-
toisation is now such a pro-
nounced trend on this little
island that it would probably
take many years to reverse
-even if we did have a govern-
ment up to the task! Also
unsurprisingly, crime has come,
too.

It may very well be the
case that the Romora Bay
project is siruply too big, too
environmentally intrusive and
too out of keeping with Bri-


Bahamas on track to



implement passport



technology on time.


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell is hopeful the
Bahamas will have in place the
equipment needed for biomet-
ric passports this year ahead of
the October 2005 deadline.
Mr Mitchell said it was an
embarrassment that the matter,
which is a simple issue, has not
yet been done.
He explained that all that is
now needed is the special
machine to print the passports.
He said the delay had
occurred because the tender for
the machine went to bid and
because the ministry did not
want to invest in equipment
which did include the required
features.
However, he said he had
been assured by ministry offi-
cials that the new equipment
would be in place this year.

Changes

Mr Mitchell said once the
machine is in place, adjustments
in passports would be made as
persons came in to renew their
old passports.
However, he suspected that
once the technology was
in place, the passport office
would see a deluge of persons
wishing to convert their pass-
ports.
He said it was too early to
speculate on the cost of each
biometric passport.


US President George W
Bush has signed legislation
extending the deadline by.
which nationals of Visa Waiver
Program (VWP) countries must
provide biometric passports
upon entering the United
States.
The new deadline which has
been imposed by the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security
is October 25 2005, which is
also the date by which US
ports of entry must have the
equipment to read such pass-
ports.

Extension

Former Secretary of State
Colin Powell and former
Homeland Security Secretary
Tom Ridge had requested a
two-year extension to resolve
technical problems with the,
programme, as well as to deal
with privacy questions.
Biometric indicators are fea-
tures that can be definitively
linked to a given individual,
such as fingerprints.
Facial recognition technology
takes use of the standard photo
identification card to a new lev-
el of sophistication.
Rather than a border official
comparing a face to a passport
photo, a camera at the port of
entry captures the traveller's
image, then a computer vali-
dates the facial characteristics
of the individual presenting
the passport and the passport
itself.


UO."" ILWNSRVC
Friie, Fniie


6:30
7:30
11:00
12noon
12:03
12:30
12:58
1:00
1:30
1:58
2:00
2:30
3:00
4:00
4:30
4:58 & 30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:25
6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30
8:45
9:00


MONDAY
APRIL 18
Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
Community Page 1540AM
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update Live
Caribbean Today News Update
Immediate Response
Caribbean Today News Update
Health For The Nation
Gimmie A Beat II
Caribbean Today News Update
Mr. Ballooney B.
Treasure Attic
Gospel Video Countdown
Lisa Knight & The Roundtable
Cybernet
ZNS News Update LIVE
Caribbean Newsline
Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
Holy Hip Hop
Life Line
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
You & Your Money
Batelco Special
Contact Magazine
Legends From Whence We
Came: Father Mel Taylor &
Malcolm Adderley
Sports Lifestyles: Bo Jackson
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Comm. Page 1540AM


NOTE: ZN-TV1 esre


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Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 .


MONDAY; APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6. MONDAY. APRIL 18, 2005


I LOC~BALNW


Author recalls slave



child experiences


TENDER NOTICE



COURIER SERVICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is
pleased to invite suitably qualified companies to tender
for Courier Services.

Interested companies can pick up a specification
document from BTC's administration building on John
F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00am to
5pm Monday through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender
for Courier Services" and delivered to the attention
of:-

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd
P.O.Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas


Bids should reach th company's administrative office
on John F. Kenedy Drive by 5pm on Wednesday, April
27, 2005.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Haitian author
Jean Robert Cadet, whose book
Restavec draws attention to child
slavery in Haiti, has been telling
Bahamian students about his
own experiences as a slave child.
Mr Cadet, who seeks eradica-
tion of the problem through
international pressure, was the
special guest of honour at a lun-
cheon hosted by Mrs Frances
Singer Hayward on behalf of the
Ministry of Education's Book
Club for students of Jack Hay-
ward High School.
Mrs Hayward, the school's
patron, has teamed up with Min-
ister of Education Alfred Sears in
launching a nationwide Minis-
ter's Book Club to promote read-
ing among students throughout
schools in the country.
Mr Cadet was honoured that
his book was selected by the
Minister's Book-Club.
At the lunch, students of Hait-
ian heritage sang the Haitian
national anthem and performed
a musical selection in French for
Mr Cadet, who was very moved
by the performances.
Significant
Patricia Collins, deputy direc-
tor of the Ministry of Education,
spoke on behalf of Mr Sears. She
commended Mrs Hayward for
her significant financial contri-
bution to the Ministry's Book
Club.
Speaking at the luncheon, Mr
Cadet reported that 80 per cent
of the Haitian population is illit-
erate.
He noted that 400,000 children
in Haiti today are still denied an
education because they are sub-
jected to live as slaves under very
oppressive conditions.
Mr Cadet is leading a person-
al crusade of international aware-
ness of 'restavec' children in
Haiti.
He noted that children in the
Bahanias'are veil'f6rtiriate'.
"This is my third trip to the
Bahamas and I feel over-
whelmed each time I come here.


And when I listened to the
Bahamian young women singing
the Haitian national anthem in
French, it brought tears to the
eyes," said Mr Cadet.
He explained that as a
'restavec' child in Haiti he never
learned the Haitian national
anthem and was never allowed
to attend school on a regular
basis.
Despite his extraordinary
struggles, Mr Cadet made his
way to the United States where
he obtained a college education.
Over the past six years, he has
been travelling on speaking
engagements raising awareness
of the secret plight of children in
Haiti.
In addition to speaking at
many colleges and university, Mr
Cadet has also spoken to vari-
ous international organisations,
including the United Nations,
UNICEF, and Amnesty Inter-
national.
Although Article 32 of the
Haitian Constitution states that
school is mandatory for every
child at government expense, Mr


Cadet said it is not enforced.
"We have 300,000 to 400,000
children that are in slavery in
Haiti. They are abused, beaten,
mistreated and denied an edu-
cation.
Free
"This is why I have taken the
task of trying to free and elimi-
nate this restavec situation. I
hope that by exposing this to the
world, it would put enough pres-
sure on Haiti that the govern-
ment will say enough is enough
and stop the restavec situation
so every child can go to school,"
he said.
Mr Cadet stressed that Haiti
will never get off the ground as a
nation if its children are denied
their fundamental right to an
education.
"The roots of democracy will
not grow until you have an edu-
cated group of people to make
sure that it is going to happen.
Without an education you are,
not going to have a stable gov-
ernment," he said.


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MRS FRANCES SINGER-HAYWARD presents Haitian
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of Education's Book Club.
(Photo: Denise Maycock)


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MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


$700,000 in donations for Queen's





College campus development scheme
i"p


GENEROUS donations
from a group of old scholars
have got the Queen's Col-
lege campus development
scheme off to a $700,000
start.
Six "old boys" and one
former female student have
given $100,000,each to help
QC continue providing first-
class education through the
21st century.
The Queen's College
Foundation announced
$700,000 in donations from
seven distinguished old
scholars, launching QC's
Campus Development Cam-
paign.
"We are grateful to dis-
tinguished alumni of
Queen's College who have
come together to demon-
strate support of their
school and to launch the
Queen's College Campus
Development campaign
with a new Early Learning
Centre as part of Phase
One," said Mr Dion Stra-
chan, deputy chairman of
the Queen's College Foun-
dation.

Donor
Sir Durward Knowles
(Class of 1934) and chair-
man of the Queen's College
Foundation, himself a donor
of $100,000, introduced oth-
er former QC scholars who
have also each donated
$100,000.
They are Captain Geof-
frey Brown, (Class of 1945),
trustee of Queen's College,
member of the board of
governors, trustee, the
Queen's College Founda-
tion; Sir Geoffrey John-
stone, (Class of 1944),
trustee of the Queen's Col-
lege Foundation; Mr John
Morley,, (Class of 1947); Mr


PICTURED following the ceremony during which the donations were made to the Queen's College Foundation are: from
left Mr Dion Strachan, deputy chairman, QC Foundation; Sir Durward Knowles, Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, Mr Mark Munnings,
foundation treasurer, Miss Andrea Gibson, Queen's College principal.


(P.S. News/Features Photo By Keith Parker)


George Mosko, (Class of
1943); Mr Godfrey Kelly,
(Class of 1945). Mrs Betty
Kenning has made a similar
donation.
Mr Strachan added: "With
their help, we are creating
at Queen's College a sense
of place, a community of
learning for our aspiring
youth."
He added: "This is the


first step in the Campus
Development Campaign.
Queen's College has a leg-
endary past, but an even
more glorious future.
"The time has come to
renovate Queen's College
for the students of the 21st
Century."
Ms Andrea Gibson, prin-
cipal of Queen's College,
said: 'T4e Quden's CQllegeq


Foundation values the con-
tributions of old scholars
and friends of QC as they
continue to support the
vision of Queen's College.

Children
"These donations serve as
the first step towards the
building of the Early Learn-
ing Centre for children aged


three to five. We are look-
ing forward to a purpose-
built facility which will ben-
efit the littlest scholars," she
said.
Sir Durward, in a humor-
ous address, noted:
"Although I was no great
scholar, whatever education
I received can be credited
to Queen's College.
"My accomplishments as


an Olympic and world
champion sailor have made
my name well-known,
which is probably why I was
invited to chair this founda-
tion."
Sir Durward pledged: "As
Queen's College celebrates
its 115th year, these old
scholars recognise the role
that QC has played in
developing this nation.
"We are proud to invest
in its future.
"The Queen's College
Foundation welcomes all
old scholars and urges them
to play a part in the devel-
opment of Queen's Col-
lege's sound investment in
the future."

Contribute
In turn, other $100,000
donors spoke briefly and
reminisced about their stu-
dent days at Queen's Col-
lege. "This is why we want
to contribute to the founda-
tion, to ensure that the stu-
dents of today, in turn, will
achieve success and bring
credit to themselves, their
families, Queen's College
and the Bahamas," noted
Capt Geoffrey Brown.
Mrs Kenris Carey, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist
Church and chairman of the
Queen's College Board of
Governors, pronounced the
blessing and led a special
prayer for donor Mr John
Morley, who was unable to
be present due to illness.
Anyone, particularly old
scholars, wishing to make
donations, large or small,
are asked to note the appeal
slogan "Remember, Recon-
nect, Rebuild" and phone
394-6389 or visit the web-
site.


MORTGAGE CAMPAIGN


2005 Lecture Series
Schedule


May 26,2005
Senior Health

June 16, 2005
Men's Health

July 21, 2005
Arthritis
Hip & Knee Replacement

August 18,2005
Mental Health
Alzheimer's Disease

September 15,2005
Children's Health

October 20, 2005
Cancer Awareness Month

November 17, 2005
Diabetes Awareness Month

December 15, 2005
Managing Stress &
Depression


FREE Health Lecture April


Speaker: Dr. Judson Eneas, Nephrologist

Topic: Hypertension: The Silent Killer Exposed!


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6:00pm 7:30pm


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PAGE 8, MONDAYAPRIL18,2005TLOCALNEWSHETIBUE


By sea or by air


- crowds turn


out for yacht and jet show


POSITION: Development Construdtion Manager
REPORTS TO: Vice President of Development


ESSENTIAL FUNCTION:
Plans, directs, and coordinates activities of designated projects to ensure that goals and objectives of
the development are accomplished within prescribed time frame and funding parameters by perform-
ing the following duties personally or through subordinate supervisors. Manage the construction of
assigned project site improvements including amenities on-site and off-site infrastructure construction.
DUTIES & RESPONSIBLITIES:
El Manage and assist the design team in reviewing construction plans, suggesting cost and time
saving methods, and improving construction coordination and equipment utilization.
El Manage and assist the design team in expediting subdivision approvals and other permits.
BE Prepare field reports, status reports, incident reports, construction schedules and other information
requested.
El Assist in the bidding and negotiation of construction contracts with general contractors.
El Administer the construction contracts and changes thereto, protecting Project's interest at all times.
BE Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design team and general
contractors.
B Monitor civil construction costs during construction and suggest ways to avoid unnecessary costs.
E Provide construction quality control, through regular monitoring of construction.
El Participate in meetings with developer and design team as requested.
El Establish work plan for staff and contractors
El Direct and coordinate activities of project personnel contractors to ensure project progresses on
schedule and within prescribed budget.
0 Review status reports prepared by project contractors and modifies schedules or plans as required.
El Prepare project reports for owners, management, and others.
El Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other governmental
agencies.


Banamians onl lease send a lications and resumes b mail or email to: Port Li
DuaASiaSolomon's Mi
o Dveopenndiyoeyon

shim ndsoe rylandcS S Sandypor
Deadlie-for eceiptof Appicatins.sArl2,20


[- 4.


A COl socWli waIk classthe AID$ FoUntiation, tie Road Trafie Depatmet
and tho Public Transit Authority join Iforces to break down the stigma of
HIVIAIDS and promote safe sex. See p-te SC of tomorrow's Tribune.


" ""' """'~" `~~~~~~`~`~"'~""``~""~~" ~~`~~'~` ~~


:':::'


PAGE 8, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE,


Vo





MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


LC AL NEWS


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PAGE 10, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


'US passport requirements





will affect Caribbean tourism'


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a former
Caribbean diplomat, now cor-
porate executive, who publishes
widely on Small States in the
global community).

FOR years United States cit-
izens have travelled into and
out of the Caribbean with no
more identification documents
than a driver's licence. This will
change between now and Jan-
uary 1, 2008, and will have an
adverse impact on the regional
tourism industry.
It is the US government that
is making the change, requiring
all US citizens to have valid
passports to enter the US. Con-
sequently, they must have pass-
ports to travel out of the US.
Secure

On April 6th, the US
Departments of Homeland
Security and State announced
"The Western Hemisphere
Travel Initiative to secure and
expedite travel". Under the ini-
tiative all U.S. citizens, will be
required to have a passport or
"other accepted secure docu-
ment" to enter or re-enter
United States by January 1,
2008.
In the past, Caribbean
nationals have been irritated
by the US requirement that
they must have passports and
visas to enter the US, while US
nationals enter Caribbean
countries on driver's licences.
After 9/11, Caribbean and
other non-US travellers
became even more irritated
with travel into the US when
the US Department of Home-
land Security required visitors
to be fingerprinted and pho-
tographs taken of their eyeballs
at US ports of entry. Many
people saw this both as an
intrusion on their privacy and


as a humiliation.
This feeling was exacerbat-
ed by the fact that US citizens
were whisked through immi-
gration lines while visitors
endured lengthy periods wait-
ing in line to be interviewed by
immigration officers.
Caribbean nationals have
regarded the different treat-
ment accorded to them and to
US nationals as a double stan-
dard. They have recognized the
right of the US and any other
country to apply its own immi-
gration procedures, but they
have argued that these proce-
dures should be reciprocal.
In other words, if the US
required Caribbean nationals
to be in possession of passports
and visas to enter the US,
Caribbean countries should
equally require US nationals
to have passports and visas to
enter Caribbean countries.
But economic necessity won
the day over the personal
affront felt by Caribbean
nationals.
Caribbean tourism relies a
great deal on US tourists, and
since the vast majority of
Americans do not have a pass-
port and cannot be bothered
to get one, Caribbean govern-
ments were content to allow
them to enter their countries
on driver's licences.
Now, all of this has begun to
change.

Whisked

Anyone travelling into the
US recently would have
noticed that US citizens are no
longer being whisked through
immigration control at US
ports of entry. Now, US citi-
zens and residents are being
questioned as closely as for-
eigners although their finger-
prints are not yet being taken
nor are their eyeballs being
photographed.
The lines for US citizens and


* RONALD SANDERS


residents at US immigration
control are now as long as
those for foreigners.
All of this flows from the
extensive efforts by various
departments of the US gov-
ernment to strengthen home-
land security following the ter-
rorist atrocities of.9/11.
The Intelligence Reform and
Terrorism Prevention Act of
2004 (IRTPA, also known as
the 9/11 Intelligence Bill),
signed into law on December
17, 2004, mandated that the
Secretary of Homeland Secu-
rity, in consultation with the
Secretary of State, develop and
implement a plan to require
U.S. citizens and foreign
nationals to present a passport,
or other secure document when
entering the United States.
An official release from the
US Department for Homeland
Security quotes Acting Under
Secretary for Border and
Transportation Security, Randy


Beardsworth, as saying: "Our
goal is to strengthen border
security and expedite entry into
the United States for U.S. citi-
zens and legitimate foreign vis-
itors. By ensuring that trav-
ellers possess secure docu-
ments, such as the passport,
Homeland Security will be able
to conduct more effective and
efficient interviews at our bor-
ders."
The Department did say that
"additional documents are also
being examined to determine
their acceptability for
travel". However, such docu-
ments would have to "estab-
lish the citizenship and identity
of the bearer, enable electron-
ic data verification and check-
ing, and include significant
security features".
The point is that US citizens
and residents travelling on doc-
uments such as drivers' licences
is now fast becoming a thing
of the past, and the Caribbean
tourism industry will be affect-
ed by it.
In part, this is because the
vast majority of Americans do
not have passports, and they
have not needed one to travel
to the Caribbean. They have
simply hopped on planes know-
ing that their drivers' licence
or social security cards are
enough.

Assumption

There should not be an
assumption that US citizens
will now automatically apply
for passports.
The reality is that only a


comparative small number of
US citizens have passports, and
these are business people or
those with higher incomes who
travel on vacation to Europe,
Asia or countries outside of the
Western Hemisphere.
Under the new rules, a
Caribbean vacation cannot be
spontaneous. It will entail
Americans being in possession
of passports or similar docu-
ments.
This is a reality that the
tourism industry in the
Caribbean has to take account
of now.

Industry

The industry should not
expect the US public to know
about the requirement that
they have passports by Janu-
ary 1, 2008 even though this is a
stipulation of their own US
Department of Homeland
Security. It is surprising how
little public attention has been
given to this development by
mainstream media in the US.
A programme of education
should be launched in the US
with travel agents and tour
operators. And, national and
regional tourist offices based
in the US should each start ini-
tiatives of their own to educate
the US public about the
requirement for passports and
how to get them.
Undoubtedly, organisations
such as the Caribbean Hotels
Association (CHA) and the
Caribbean Tourism Organisa-
tion (CTO) are alert to the
necessity to launch such an
education initiative in the
US. But, money will have to be
invested in the initiative from
both the national and regional
levels, and allocations should
be made for such monies now
for the years 2006 and 2007.
Failure to do so will see Jan-
uary 1, 2008 arrive with a sig-
nificant reduction in-the num-


ber of US tourists visiting the
Caribbean.
The educational task will be
difficult, but it is not impossi-
bjarticularly if it is present-
.exactly what it is: a US
nitment requirement of its
itizens to strengthen the
srity arrangements of their
own country.
The problem is overcoming a
lifelong US habit of not need-
ing a passport to travel to the
Caribbean.
It may be argued that the US
government will educate its cit-
izens about the passport
requirements and there is no
need for the Caribbean to do
so. But, accepting this argu-
ment would be dangerously
short-sighted.
The financial implications for
the Caribbean tourism indus-
try of spontaneous vacations
not occurring, or holidays being
cancelled for lack of a passport,
are quite significant.

Reduction

There will be a reduction in
the numbers who visit the
region in the immediate period
after the new passport require-
ments are introduced on Janu-
ary 1, 2008; it will be worse if
the Caribbean does not launch
an educational programme of
its own in the US.
(responses to:ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com)

.0 It was reported in Satur-
day's Tribune that President
George Bush was surprised at
w US passport policy and
O dered a review of the
Speaking at the Ameri-
ociety of Newspaper Pub-
lishers on Thursday the Presi-
dent said: "If people have to
have a passport, it's going to
disrupt the honest flow of traf-
fic. I think there's some flexi-
bility in the law, and that's what
we're checking out right now."







MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE
"Your Bahmian Supermarkets"


SUPER
VALUE
gSUNCARD











MINI
SPARE
RIBS


CHICKEN
WINGS
PER LB


.I1:;P 'ICI


SPER LB 99
PINCPICNIC "
HAMH

R- SLIPCERS


FRES PRODUCE A"


BED BATH & HOME
Home Sale


Rugs Y
Towels
Sheet Sets
Table Cloths
Throw Pillows
Comforter Sets Cookware Sets
Bath Scales Cookware Sets
Shower Curtains Glassware Sets
Bathroom Accessories Dinnerware Sets


Irons
Lamps
Blenders
Figurines
Bakcwares
Wall Clocks
Wall Pictures
Picture Frames
Flatware Sets


I OFFE S GOD SMNDY, PRL:* TH- STUDAY ARIL23Dg00


Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


HOME SALE
'wa/~ ^^ixyt


RAINBOW
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ
990
PAR-EXELLENC


KRAFT
MACARONI
& CHEESE,,


1 2/$169
7.25- oz
A


I 1 I


PAR-EXCELLENCE'
PARBOILED

RICE

$229
--- 5 LBS


Car Mats
Ironing Board
Rug
Cord Craf Flowers
Toys
Coffeemakers

M%


Blinds
Table Cloths
Mattress Pads
Feather Beds


Electric Tea Kettles
Sheet Sets
Comforters
Throw Pillowers
Shower Curtains
Wall Pictures


PEPSI

SODAS
12-OZ 6 PK
$ 289


L TIME


Evercane Srag 4lbs ......................... $1.35
Niagara Spray Starch 22-oz............. $1.69
Armour Vienna Sausages 5-oz............ 2/$1.25
Festival All Purpose Cleaner 33.8fl.-oz..... $1.99
Joy Dish Liquid 12.6f7 oz.............. $1.79
Supervalue 4-pk Tissue .................. $1.29


Superalue Hand Towel..........................89
Starkist Tuna............................... 2/$1.25
Kool Aid Jammers 10 pk.................... $3.35
Sunchy Fruit Punch Juice ................ 2/99
Pine-Sol Lemon Fresh 1.12 gallon....... $11.59
Ruth Detergent 1-kg ....................... $1.09


.- ;- ,-.1 o il ;i-J ii !l ,;l


Pay


Less at Discount Mart


HOT
OFF
THE _CES
6RILL 'i



CHICKEN
LEG
QUARTERS
PER LB
$ 19 I nv.


' EVERCANE

SUGAR
4 LBS
$139
\__* 1 3 9


WE CCET AERCANEXPESSMATERVS N SUNCARD WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREETTO, FTE IL(e _. HOE 39331/9359


- 1- 3- 1


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1


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VTJ


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GROCERY SELECTIONS


V l


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P


(7)77


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r-


I


I















Government set to announce





major development in Mayaguana


TIME to sell your
home? You'll find there are
many considerations when
deciding on an asking price.
A real estate professional
provides you with informa-
tion regarding the current
market and what similar
homes are selling for (or not!)
in your area. However, the
agent won't decide your ask-
ing price the ultimate deter-
mination is yours.
Any responsible agent will
stress the importance of con-
dition it's an extremely sig-
nificant variable when buy-
ers compare your home
against others. Don't be
tempted by what looks like
an easy way out pricing
your home lower instead of
making repairs.
You've heard it before -
"image is everything." If your
home doesn't look as good as
- or preferably better than -
the competition, you're invit-
ing fewer or no offers. Buyers
look for the best value for
their money, and you need to
offer a home displaying
"pride of ownership."
Take time now before
you list to tend to the most
important repairs. Prioritise
your repairs to maximise your
payback. Take care of the big
stuff first and then focus on
minor cosmetics.
History shows that buyers
offer $2 less for every $1 in
needed repairs, so simply
lowering the price yourself
instead of making improve-
ments will ultimately result
in disaster either no offers
or offers so low you can't
accept them. Take a profes-
sional's advice fix it now or
pay big later.


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said the government
is set to announce a major
tourism and real estate devel-
opment on the island of Maya-
guna.
Mr Christie made the
announcement as he opened
the new Legislative Council
Chambers of the Turks and
Caicos Island on Friday and
pledged to foster stronger ties
between the countries.
He said the development is


part of his government's plan
to place a major development
on each of the Family
Islands.
"Indeed, just to the north-
west of these lovely islands,
on the island of Mayaguana,
we are shortly to announce a
major touristic and real estate
development which will be
environmentally friendly and
which will forge linkages to
the islands around it, no doubt
including the Turks and
Caicos Islands."
However, he said that no
matter what may be on the


FROM page one

people will keep getting killed."
Many in the crowd which gathered at the
scene echoed her sentiments.
Mr Hanna said: "On behalf of the Com-
missioner of Police, Paul Farquharson,
and the entire Royal Bahamas Police Force,
I would like to extend my sympathy to
the Mortimer family at this very difficult
time.
"The Mortimers are a Bahamian institu-
tion and we feel the pain the family is feel-
ing. I am hopeful that the investigation will
be concluded quickly."
Two persons remain in Princess Margaret
Hospital after a man, yet to be identified,
lost control of his vehicle on Sir Milo But-
ler Highway on Thursday and crashed into


developmental drawing board
"we, as a people, and espe-
cially those of us in positions
of public trust have a respon-
sibility to preserve and to pro-
tect our heritage for genera-
tions yet to come."
He said this was a sacred
trust he was always concious
of and he had accepted "as
my duty to include such things
as the preservation of our his-
tory and our culture, our envi-
ronment and those things
which make us the unique
people that we are."
Mr Christie travelled with


trees lining the road.
The driver's foot was severed in the acci-
dent. Police say speed was definitely a fac-
tor in that crash.
On Friday, 44-year-old Patricia Fox of
Mitchell Street, Adelaide Village, died
when she lost control of her pick-up truck
and crashed into a utility pole on
Carmichael Road.
Noting the carnage on New Providence
roads over the last week, Mr Hanna said:
"We have been sending out advisories
against speeding and operating in a manner
likely to be deemed dangerous to the pub-
lic.
"And we continue to advise pedestrians
to be careful when crossing the streets. As
the old caution goes, look right, then left,
then right again."


Obie Wilchcombe, Minister
of Tourism, Glenys Hanna-
Martin, Minister of Transport
and Aviation, and Fred
Mitchell, Minister of Foreign


Affairs, and Keod Smith, the
Ambassador for the Environ-
ment. Mr Wilchcombe and Mr
Smith both have Turks Island
roots.


Family remembers

FROM page one

ness and his presence at the store made a difference.
"Sometimes he would walk in the store and persons would
reminisce with him. He loved the candy business it was his life,"
she said.
His daughter told The Tribune that her fondest memories of
her father are of him playing with his grandchildren and taking
them on outings.
She also remembers him sitting around the table talking with
his lodge brothers, who usually came to their home every
Wednesday night.
Mr Mortimer is survived by his wife of 53 years, Gloria, eight
children and adopted daughters.


Candy store





owner killed


SANPIN MOTORS LTD.




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PAGE 12, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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DELMAR
FLAKE TUNA
IN WATER
6 OZ
2/.99e

THRIFTY MAID
RAMEN NOODLES
ASST'D FLAVOURS
a OZ
5/.990


THRIFTY MAID
CORNED
BEEF
I 2 OZ






26 OZ
2/.990


ECKRICH
CHICKEN VIENNA
SAUSAGE
5 OZ

2I.9941L




24 OZ
-990


JBI
COCONUT
MILK
113 OZ

099


TM
TM HAND
TOWELS
JUMBO
=99o


FLORIDA
NATURAL APPLE
JUICE COCKTAIL
1 1 .5 OZ
2/.99


LIBBY'S
CREAM STYLE CORN,
WK CORN, SLICED
& CUT BEETS
15 OZ
.99S


RED APPLES
3-LB BAG
EACH

PLUMS RED
AND BLACK
LB

RED SEEDLESS &
GLOBE GRAPES
$t 99


KERRY GOLD
BUTTER REG &
UNSALTED
2/s 69oz
NASSAU ONLY
TAMPICO ASSTD PUNCH
I 99A
^HH1 GAL


PEPPERIDGE
FARM LAYER
CAKES ASST
1929z
WINN DIXIE
ICE CREAM
SANDWICH


CAMPBELLS
CHICKEN NOODLE I
VEGETABLE SOUP
10 OZ
.89a

CADBURY


BOURNVITA
400 G



FESTIVAL
MULTI CLEANSER SEA
BREEZE,FLORAL,
LEMON, POTPOURI,
LAVENDAR
33 OZ
S1 99


TOMATOES LUCYAN
HOT HOUSE
EACH
s1j49
CABBAGE
GREEN
EACH

POTATOES
WHITE 5.LB
EACH
s-u 99


WINN DIXIE
SLICE CHEESE
8 OZ
PILLSBURY
CRESCENT
ES ROLLS 8CT
6 CT

GREEN GIANT
CORN ON THE COB
$--16 EAR
PILSBURY
TOASTER STRUDELS
CINAMON, STRAWBERRY,
BLUEBERRYAP, PLE & CHERRY
S11.5 OZ


HUGGIES
ULTRA TRIM,
CONV. DIAPERS
24,28,34,40



LYSOL
TOILET BOWL
CLEANER
24 OZ
5359


QUAKER
BAG
CEREALS
15 OZ
2/$500


~*' V


NABISCO


SNACKS
ASSORTED 1.75-oz .............3/$1.99
CHEF BOY ARDEE
SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALLS 15is oz ................ $1.39
KOOLAID
GELS 4-PAK ................... .... .....$1.69
WD
PIES ASSORTED 11i.s- oz..........$1.69
KOOLAID
JAMMERS VARIETY
JUICES 6.7 oz...........5..............$3.99
SUNCY
MALTS 6-PAK 7- oz................$2.99
HELLMANS
MAYONNAISE e4-oz.....................$6.99
LIBBYS
MIXED FRUITS & DICED
PEACHES 4PAK 4.,,- oz............$3.69


RUTH

DETERGENT
1 KG
2/$219


CLOROX

BLEACH
96 OZ



BURTON
RICH TEA
BISCUIT
300 0
NJ 00ee


MAHATMA
RICE LONG
GRAIN &
PARBOILED
5 LBS
S269


LYONS
ASSORTED
CREAMS
150 G
-990

PETER PAN
PEANUT
BUTTER
12-- OZ
$225


LB
.990


FRESH
GROUND
BEEF

LB


WINGS OR
DRUMSTICKS
.ILB
.990


_______________ I


PORK
LOIN END
CUT CHOPS
LB
's1" 79


TURKEY
FRANKS
120Z EACH
.990


GWALTNEY
liitllm
Tilml


$1


39
LB


NZ PRESTIGE TYSON
CUTUP BONE IN CHOICE BONELESS TWIN PACK
MUTTON CHUCKROAST GAMEHENS
s $9 3 $ 19 799
SLB LB EACH


NEW YORK WHITE & YELLOW
PRE MADE LIBERTY AMERICAN CHEESE
ASSORTED BAGELS
2/$OO s399
5A 6-PK
DELI WHOLE
ROTISSERIE
FOUR STAR ROAST BEEF CHICKEN
LB CHICKEN
$700"con


GOLDEN
FLAKES
ASSORTED CHIP
(NASSAU ONLY)
1 OZ
2/.78

CHARMIN
BATHROOM
TISSUE
WHITE
24 CT
$969

ALPO
HEARTY LOAF
CHICK DOG FOOD
13.2 OZ
2/s$ 89


DORITOS
CHIPS ASSORTED
(NASSAU ONLY)
7 -OZ
.99

GAIN
LIQUID
DETERGENT
100 OZ
$399

ENSUENO
FABRIC
SOFTNERS
ASSORTED
500 ML
2/$300


I --


m"I r"RIM I" I -,


- ---- II _ -Y ~.L -- ~-a-- C cB~--IIA


II







PAGE 14,MONDAY, PRILT18N2005OTHLTRIBUN


Representave hopes to pers


-
*


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uad


IaItiaIeae to ne to the U
.rhtedMaterial

Syndicated Content.
Avi labl frm Co mm eria % Prvd r .s

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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(Adjacent to Club Golden ilsles)
Tel: (242) 361-2597
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TENDER NOTICE


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.,
wishes to invite tenders for the construction of its
Customer Service Building in Simms, Long Island.

Interested companies may collect a tender specification
from the office of the Vice President/Planning &
Engineering in BTC's administrative building on John
F. Kennedy Drive or at BTC's office in Deadman's Cay,
Long Island, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00
pm, Monday through Friday.

Tenders are to be in a sealed envelope marked
"TENDER FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE BUILDING" and
delivered to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
Jo F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau' Bahamas

All tenders must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday,
May 2, 2005. Tenders received after this date will not
be considered.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 14, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


* 6


r


O 0






THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 15
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


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MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


College

of the

Bahamas

graduate

gives back

ONE of the greatest
moments in a college/univer-
sity student career is gradua-
tion. It signifies the success-
ful end to one journey and
anxious hopes for another.
However, for that
college/university, one of its
greatest moments is when
those graduates return to
their alma mater in an effort
to further enhance and
develop the institution.
Ken Coleby, a 1985 gradu-
ate of the College of the
Bahamas, is creating one of
those moments for the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. Today,
for the seventh consecutive
year, Mr Coleby and his col-
leagues are donating monies
that would assist young
musicians.

Concert
In 1997, the Friends of
COB's Music Department,
established a concert "An
Evening of Classical Music",
the funds of which are ear-
marked for the development
of a music student or the
music department at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. The
group has since expanded
and is now known as Artist
build International.
: A music teacher at Gov-
ernment High School, Mr
Coleby, launched the award
even years ago. As a former
student, Mr Coleby under-
stands the importance of
financial assistance to an
aspiring musician and the
continuous need for equip-
hment upgrade.
"When the idea of the con-
cert was conceived, it was
solely intended to raise funds
to assist students with pursu-
ing their degrees," said Mr
Coleby.

Music
"But we've since indicated
that if the music department
has a need for a piece of
equipment or instrument to
further enhance its pro-
gramme, then certainly we
want them to do that as
well."
This year's concert was
held on March 17th at Gov-
ernment House and featured
musical talents from the high
schools, the College of the
Bahamas and local profes-
sionals.
Head of COB's Music
Department Pauline Glasby
said that in addition to pro-
viding young persons with
opportunities to pursue ter-
tiary education and expose
their musical talents, the
group of musicians, headed
by Mr Coleby, ought to be
commended for their efforts.
"They too are young musi-
cians," noted Mrs Glasby.
"So for them to have the
foresight to produce a con-
tert with the benefactors
being young persons, who
want to pursue music as a
career, is highly commend-
able. We will certainly
endeavour to support them
with their undertakings."


Mercedes-Benz a brand from DaimlerChrysler.


A few of the accessories are not included in:the series-version.


C-Class. Dynamics as never before.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


lo On one hand, the C-Class' sporty
personality inspires movement. On the other,
it paralyzes you with its daring design. Sit in
front of the multifunctional leather steering
wheel and appreciate the incredible view.
This is the perfect place to contemplate the


car's modern interior. You will fall in love is nearest to you, please visit our website


with the sporty wheels, the bi-xenon
headlights, and with the performance of our
gasoline and diesel engines. The C-Class is
certainly the best option. You'll see how hard
it is to get out of it. To find out which dealer


at www.la.mercedes-benz.com


Mercedes-Benz


Csc-01
Tyreflex Star Motors, Ltd.
Nassau Tel. (242) 325-4961








PAGE 18, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
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there's only ONE number
you need to remember.





J :=. =; JJ Sj a^ S -- *t.. ... -.... ,-.
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OHIO-based radio station
MIX 96.7 WBVI recently
broadcasted live from the
pool deck at SuperClubs
Breezes Bahamas.
Tom and.Beth, the sta-
tion's morning show per-
sonalities, brought a group
of come-along group of 38
. persons, WBVI is one,of the
top hot-adult contemporary


(Hot AC) stations in the
Findley area and Tom Sum-
mers and Beth Wilson are
the hottest morning show
duo in their county and sur-
rounding counties. During
their broadcast, which pro-
moted the islands of the
Bahamas and the Super-
Clubs-brand, they inter-
viewed Verniice Walkine,


deputy director of tourism
for the islands of the
Bahamas; Kendal Major,
senior public relations man-
ager, Bahamas News
Bureau; and Jaton Johnson,
public relations coordina-
tor, SuperClubs Breezes
Bahamas. Pictured are
-Beth, Walkine, Tom and
Johnson.


"In this unique environment, Mr. Cooper has a challenge ahead of him.
He assumes operational responsibility for a strong company with roots
that go deeply into.the fabric of our Bahamian society. We expect to see
him take the company to new levels of success in the future." said Mr
Sweeting in releasing this announcement.

4.


IBRITISH
LAMERICAN
Established 1920
A strong link in your financial future


I. Chester Cooper
Senior Vice President & COO


a --"a =- _I -L. -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005














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St. George's An lican Church
Montrose venue
Tel: (242) 322-1139
Website: www.saintgeorgesbahamas.com
"Sharing The Gospel, Living The Ministry"


GOOD NEWS, SHARE IT


join St. George's Anglican Church Family
Celebrates its 56th Patronal Festival


Good News Service nightly at 7.00 pm
Tuesday 19th Thursday 21st, April, 2005
Missioner: Fr. Atma Budhu
Rector: St. Gregory's
Theme:
"Evangelism through
MISSION, LITURGY, MINISTRY"





Mass, Holy Eucharist
Sunday, 24th April, 2005 9:00 am
Guest Preacher:
Fr. Ernest Pratt, Rector
Companion Parish of St. Paul's,
Long Island


Famiy Eterainmnt ainh, Mdittios


OVERSEAS POSITIONS

Exciting opportunities to work in a fast growing Fund Administration Company in
Southern Europe. Gain Int'l experience and enjoy lifestyle of Spain and the
professional work ethic of England by working in Gibraltar.

Position: FINANCIAL/ FUND ACCOUNTANT

Experience in Fund Accounting/ Administration covering umbrella funds,
fund-of-funds, hedge funds, real estate funds etc.
Preparation of weekly Financial statements
Assist in setting up operational procedures and financial accts for new
funds and for future offices to open worldwide.
NAV calculations (daily, weekly, mthly) to include d6wnloading of trades,
price validation, liaising with brokers and custodians
Preparation of audit packs
Liaising with FSC on financial statements and FSC reports
Must be willing to relocate for a minimum period of two years
Ideal candidate will be professional, proactive, well organized, with ability
to manage other employees. Accounting qualifications req'd. Salary
commensurate with experience.

Position: CORPORATE LAWYER

Will work for an established law firm in growing offshore jurisdiction
At least three years experience in the Fund Industry
Must be willing to relocate for a minimum period of two years
Must be English Qualified
Salary commensurate with experience

All interested applicants please forward resume by e-mail to: accountsgib()vahoo.com

Resumes must be received by April 29th 2005


Service of Thanksgiving Procession,
Benediction & Fellowship
Sunday, 24th April, 2005 3:30 pm
Guest Preacher: Canon Harry Bain
Rector, Pro Cathedral,
Christ The King Parish
Freeport, Grand Bahama


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


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TENDER FOR GSM CONTENT SERVICES

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is seeking suitably
qualified companies to submit tenders to provide the company with GSM
Content Services.
Please note that companies must fully meet all pre-qualification specifications
prior to obtaining the actual tender document. The pre-qualification
specifications are listed below:
1) Company profile of tenderer (overview of company, company
background, number of years in operation, listing of present and
past clients including contact information).
2) Company must be 100% Bahamian owned.
3) Company ownership (listing of principal/beneficial owners,
directors and operators of company. If a joint venture, specify
participants and terms of joint venture).
4) Full liability insurance of $1, 000,000.00.
5) A copy of valid business license.
6) Copy of National Insurance certificate.
7) Total number of employees.
8) Three written references from persons/businesses for which
similar contracts were successfully completed within the last
three years and the Company must provide references from
current clients utilizing their content services.
9) Bank reference showing financial viability.
10) Copies of financial statements (audited/unaudited) for last three
years of operation.
11) Company must have provided Content services for a period of
3 to 5 years.
12) Company must be able to provide local and international (North
America, Caribbean and the U.K) content.
Pre-qualification items must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "
PRE-QUALIFICATION INFORMATION FOR GSM CONTENT
SERVICES ", and delivered on or before 4:00 pm. on April 28, 2005 to
the attention of:
Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas
BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


ANSBACHER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Ansbacher in The Bahamas invites applications from
qualified individuals for the position of:

INVESTMENT ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant will report to the Head of Investment Services and
will be expected to assist Trust Officers in fulfilling their fiduciary obligations
with regard to monitoring quoted investments and tracking their performance
against agreed benchmarks.
Essential Required Attributes:
' Strong analytical. skills
Understanding of basic investment management and capital markets
Good communication skills, verbal and written
Team player with proven ability to contribute to the overall success of
investment risk management
Computer literate in Microsoft Office; particularly in the use of Excel
spreadsheets, Bloomberg proficiency and database skills.
Primary Responsibilities:
Assist with the preparation of Trustee Investment Policy Statements and
the setting of appropriate performance benchmarks.
Undertake investment performance reviews by sourcing relevant information
from trustees, valuations, internal and external managers and comparing
the results to the agreed benchmark and providing the results of such
reviews to the Head of Investments and the Trust Officers.
Ensure receipt of and collate quarterly ,performance and transactional
documentation from 3rd party investment managers.
Update and maintain client ledgers to reflect transactions over 3rd party
investment accounts.
Ensure that all 3rd party investment business activities are monitored in
accordance with Group policies and procedures.
9..1 Keep abreast of entire Ansbacher service offering, and in conjunction with
the Head of Investments, give feedback and recommendations to Trust
Officers.
Series 7 certification and evidence of continued professional development
would be an advantage.
Contact:
Human Resource manager
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
P. 0. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524


PAGE 20, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Rassi~n


spie










APRIL 18, 2005


I


*** THE PREACHER'S WIFE (1996, Fantasy) Denzel Washington, (:45) ** MY HOUSE IN UMBRIA (2003, Drama)
HBO-W Whitney Houston, Courtney B. Vance. An angel becomes drawn toa pas- Magie Smith, Chris Cooper. Survivors of a terrorist at-
tor's dulcet-toned wife. C 'PG' (CC) tack bond at a novelist's home. C (CC)
(6:30) *** LOVE ACTUALLY (2003, Romance- ** SYLVIA (2003, Biography) Gwyneth Paltrow, Daniel Craig, Jared
HBO-S Comedy) Alan Rickman, Bill Nighy. Various people deal Harris. Writers Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes get married. l 'R (CC)
with relationships in London. 'R'(CC)
(6:30)* THE * ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (2004, Ro- ** CRADLE 2 THE GRAVE
MAX-E REPLACEMENT mance-Comedy) Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Kirsten Dunst. A couple erase (2003, Action) Jet Li, DMX, Anthony
KILLERS (1998) the memories of their relationship. C 'R' (CC) Anderson. C 'R' (CC)
JOHNNY ENGLISH (2003, Comedy) Rowan *'x WHAT A GIRL WANTS (2003, Comedy) Amanda Bynes, Colin Firth,
MOMAX Atkinson, John Malkovich. A bumbling agent tries to re- Kelly Preston. A plucky teenager goes to London to meet her father. Cl
cover stolen jewels.A C'PG'(CC) rPG'(CC)
(:15) *s DESPERATE MEASURES (1997, Suspense) The L Word Iate, Later, Latent" Fat Actress Penn & Teller:
SHOW ichael Keaton.iTV. A San Francisco cop looks to a (rV) Jenny leams the truth about Kirstie tries to get Bulls...! Prevent-
murderer to save his son. 1 'R'(CC) Burr. l (CC) a deal. (N) (CC) ing aging.
(6:00) 6 ***s **k KAUFORNIA (1993, Drama) Brad Pitt, Juliette Lewis, David ** NO GOOD DEED (2002, Sus-
TMC HOPEAND Duchowy. A writer becomes fascinated with man's homicidal urges. Cl pense) Samuel L Jackson, Milla
___GLORY (1987) 'R'(CC) Jovovich. n R' (CC)


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow Circa 1820 Soundtrack of the Century Rock American Experence Racial ten-
0 WPBTshow FYI Sunderand figurines; radio tran- and Roll combined blues, country, sons abound between Americans
w_ gm (CC) script of Pearr Harbor bombing. gospel and jazz. / (CC) and Hawaiians. (N) / (CC) (DVS)
The Insider (N) Still Standing Listen Up Everybody Two and a Half CSI: Miami "Killer Date' Horatio
0 WFOR n (CC) "Still Holding (N) "Ebony and Loves Raymond Men (N) 1 (CC) gets life-changing information about
1) (CC) Irony" (N) (CC) "Sister-in-Law his deceased brother. (N)
Access Holly- Fear Factor Four pairs compete in Las Vegas "Montecito Lancers' Medium "Suspicions and Certain-
* WTVJ wood (N) (CC) an explosive slide in an upside- (CC) ties" C (CC)
down car. /1 (CC)
Deco Drive Nanny 911 "King Family" Nanny 24 "Day 4:12 Midnight-1:OOAM" The News (CC)
* WSVN Stella aids a family of seven living in CTU apprehends the man who shot
cramped quarters. (N) /( (CC) Marwan s associate. (N)
Jeopardy! (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition: The Bachelor Charlie must elimi- Supemanny "Bumett Family" An
I WPLG (CC) How'd They Do That? "Ali Family" nate two women before starting the overwhelmed family with five chil-
n (CC) hometown dates. (N) (I (CC) dren gets much needed-structure.
(:00) Cold Case Airline "Fun and Airline "Live and Growing Up Growing Up Growing Up
A&E Files (CC) Games" (CC) Let Fly" (CC) Gotti "Profes- Gotti Radio con- Gotti "The God- Gotti "Paul in the
sional Help"(N) test; karate. mother" (CC) Famiy
Hardtalk BBC World World Business BBC World Click Online BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News Report News News
BET.com Count- * CLASS ACT (1992, Comedy) Christopher Reid, Christopher Martin. Club Comic View
BET down A nerd reluctantly swaps identities with a paroled felon.
Coronation SEX TRAFFIC (2004, Drama) Part 2 of 2) Anamaria Marince. Sisters be- The National (CC)
CBC Street (CC) come caught in an intemationa prostitution rng. (CC) (DVS)
C Late Night With The Contender 1 (CC) Dennis Miller The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC ConanO'Brien
:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) CNN Presents "Day of Terror. Re-
CNN Rooper 360 membering Oklahoma City" (N)
OUT COLD (2001, Comedy-Drama) Jason London, Lee Majors, Willie South Park Ms. Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV
COM Garson. A snowboarders' haven is turned into a yuppie retreat. (CC) Crabtree helps in. "Health" A (CC) You MightBe a
bus crash. Redneck. (CC)
COURT Cops ) (CC) The Investigators "Fatal Betrayal: Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files
COURT Beth Carpenter "Memories" "Head Games"
That's So Raven *K AIR BUD (1997, Comedy-Drama) Michael Jeter, Kevin Zegers, Sister, Sister Tia Even Stevens
DISN Corey shoplifts. Wendy Makkena. A lonely boy discovers a dog with a nose for basketball, and Tamera skip Twitty's ex likes
(CC) 'PG' (CC) an exam. Louis. (CC)
I This Old House Weekend Deco- 'Fresh Coat (N) Scrapbooking Embellish This! Jewelry Making Knitty Gritty
DIY Ti (CC) rating (N)
DVV Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth Tagestema Depth
E! The Michael Goldie & Kate: The E! True Hollywood Story Actresses Goldie Hawn Dr. 90210 Fighting the aging
Jackson Trial and Kate Hudson. n (CC) process with plastic surgery.
ESPN () MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati Reds. From Great American Ball Park in Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
CbPN 'Cincinnati. (Live) (CC)
ES NI Fuera de Juego Goles de Es- Goles de Italia Beach Soccer (N) Poker 2004 U.S. Championship.
ESPNI (N) pana(N) (N)
Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home (Live) Live From the Vatican, With Ray- Holy Mass.for the Electing of the
EWTN Lady mond Arroyo Supreme Pontiff
IT:00) Cardio FitTV's Housecalls "Michael A.; No Opportunity Wasted "Bull Rid- The Extremists The Extremists
FIT V last 1 Upper Body Strength" C (CC) er" 1 (CC) 1 (CC) I3_l
SFOX-N Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-N Shepard Smith ____________ Susteren (Live) (CC).
FL (:00) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at New York Yankees. From Yankee Stadium in Best Damn Sports Show Period
FSN FL he Bronx, N.Y. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC)
GOLF Golf Tavistock Cup--Day One. From Isleworth Country Club in Florida.
(:00) Weakest Who Wants to Be a Millionaire C Weakest Link C1 (CC) Celebrity Blackjack (CC)
GSN Link n (CC) (CC)
(:00) Attack of X Play Cheat Icons The story Judgment Day Filter Best Judgment Day
G4Tech the Show of "Tetris." "Comic Con" soundtrack. (N) (N)
(:00) Walker, Touched by an Angel "Mother's Judging Amy Amy and Maxine are Judging Amy Three young men
HALL Texas Ranger Day" The angels revisit a grieving surprised when their estranged rela- Amy assigned to community service
(CC) mother whose young son died. tive visits. Cl (CC) are killed while on the job.. (
Holmes on Rooms That Design U "Scotfs Debbie Travis' Facelift "Lawrence Holmes on Homes "Wash & Weep"
HGTV Homes "Cold Rock "Hillary Kitchen" l Kid's Room" Cl (CC) (CC) .., -
; -Feeft C (CC) Meets Paris ,
Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W. Scham- This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To; Love a Child
INSP (CC) bach (CC) (CC) day
The Batman Sabrina, the The Fresh Friends Monica Will & Grace Everybody Everybody
KTLA "The Cat and the Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air plans sexy Valen- Grace thinks Will Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
Baf (CC) n (CC) Cl (CC) ine's Day. ( has secrets. Ray can't sleep. Cl (CC)
MORE SEX & I Married a I Married a PERSONAL EFFECTS (2005, Suspense) Penelope Ann Miller, Casper
LIFE THE SINGLE Princess Cather- Princess Charity Van Dien. Premiere. An attorney investigates a disappearance and a
MOM (2005) ine Oxenberg. benefit. (N) stalker. (CC)
MSNB 00C Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- The Abrams Report Scarborough Country
MSN BC C) mann
The Fairly Odd- SpongeBob Drake & Josh Full House l Full House l Fresh Prince of TheCosby
NICK Parents Cl (CC) SquarePants 11l 1 (CC) (CC) F(CC) Bel-Air Show Ca (CC)
NTV Still Standing Fear Factor "Las Vegas Pairs Las Vegas "Montecito Lancers" A News Cl (CC) News
NTV "Still Holding Show" l (CC) (CC)
OLN (:00) Killer In- Boston Marathon (CC) Avalanche Dogs E-Force (CC)
OLN stinct
SPEED NASCAR Inside Nextel Cup (N) NBS 24-7 (N) NASCAR Nation
SPEED Nation (N)
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Houston Astros. From Minute Maid Park in Houston. (Live) (CC)
TBS Loves Raymond
S__ (CC)
(:00) In a Fix Alison's Baby Untold Stories of the E.R. "A Scary Extreme Surgery II (CC)
TLC The Big One" Feeling" An artist accidentally cuts
(CC) his hand off. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order Detectives probe the Law & Order "Formerly Famous" NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at
TNT ,de' Dazzled'" poisoning death of a con man pos- The detectives investigate the Phoenix Suns. From America West
(CC) (DVS) ng as a grief counselor. 1 shooting death of a singer's wife. Arena in Phoenix. (CC)
TOON Ed, Edd n Eddy Ozzy & Drix Krypto the Su- Codename: Kids Mucha Lucha Teen Titans Dragonball GT
T N "Sugar Shock" perdog Next Door t u (CC)
TV5 Double je (:45) Histoires Ombres etlu- Coeurs Cool classique TV5 Le Journal
TVOde chateaux mitres batailleurs (SC)
"TrW C Forecast Earth Storm Stories Storm Stories Evening Edition (CC)
(cc_ ________(C) (CC)
UNIV ,00) Inocente de Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra Cristina 0 tu familia o yo.

(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA der: Special Vic- A murdered woman's twin may have "Asunder" A police officer is accused A fired security guard may have
tims Unit C stolen her identity. (CC) of raping his wife. (CC) committed a murder. (CC)
VH1 Reality Secrets Breakups C Save the Music: A Concert to Benefit the VH1 Save the Music Foun-
VH____1 Revealed 2 C dation From the Beacon Theatre in New York City. C
Home Improve- *x KRIPPENDORF'S TRIBE (1998, Comedy) Richard Dreyfuss, Jenna WGN News at Nine C (CC)
WGN ment "Too Many EIfman, Natasha Lyonne. A desperate anthropologist creates a fictional
Cooks" tribe. C (CC) ______________
Everybody 7th Heaven When Simon's current Everwood On the morning of his WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond girlfriend confesses to him that she Juilliard audition, Ephram leams that Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
C (CC) has an STD, he panics. Madison was pregnant. (N) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Cuts Tiffany neg- Girlfriends Joan Half & Half C Dr. Phil
WSBK (CC) "Rock and a Hard lects the salon, and William's (CC)
Place" C C (CC) Valentine's Day.

HBO-E BRIA (2003, Drama) Maggie Smith, their families work toward recovery. (N) C (CC) becomes jealous of his wealthy
Chris Cooper. C (CC) ______________________ fend. C 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) ** DEAD AGAIN (1991, Suspense) Kenneth Deadwood Alma proposes forming Deadwood "E.B. Was Left Out" Tol-
HBO-P Branagh. An amnesiac maybe the reincarnation of a a bank; Bullock humiliates a claim liver enists Lee to clean up Wol-.
murdered pianist. C 'R' (CC) owner. C (CC) cot's mess. C (CC)


Brcing your children to the
McHiOppy Ho A ct McDonacld's in
Oaks Field every Thuksday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
moth of April 2005.


EnjoM Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun


i'm lovin' it


The

Show
and


-Thursdays





Uluc




Tirne: Second Floor of
Doors open 11pm


Admission:
$7 w/ Movie Tickets
$15 without
Movie Pass Glveawaysl


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY EVENING


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 21-


-------- - -- k


Let- Chalie tke
Bc3akamiain Puppe+t acid
kis sidekick Derek pLAt
some smiles on yoAur
kids's fcacess.
















Caribbean iv




This title basically hits the Caribbean
Style of Architecture and Cuisine


Special Priee:


t so


NAASSALJ U
A* City Markets Lyford Cay
City Markets Harbour Bay
Super Value Cable Beach


Super Saver Stores
Lowes Pharmacy
United Book Stores
Island Merchant Stores
News Cafe


FREEPORT:
Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug


~


- --- -- I'' II~-~---







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 23 '



It TN S curity CounciU

conchluds Halti vIsk




"Copyrighted Material .

qij Aj -Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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The Book that Stopped

a Killer

in his Tracks!


(not available In US)

prlseso" while supplies tot.
Iu II re M d
Ir o4Ne g..o Nla e,..lel.to


Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
Tel. 394-7040
e-mail: info@logosbahamas.com
www.logosbahamas.com


radio remotes hosted by the BACARDI Girls & get great
prizes, giveaways plus BACARDI drink samples!


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NOW OPEN
Blue Hill Road Store
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BAKER'S BAY GOLF AND OCEAN CLUB:


w NV $~ )N'I


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19 >''V' ~


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*'~ 31% ( V\< U ~1~$t~ j*7[~ ~ V


Bakert Bay Club on Great Guana Cay, The
Abao aims to be the most environment
tally sensitive development of its kind
ever undertaken in The Bahamas. Key
aspects of the project include:

1, The land plan for the project was developed with
input from key stake hiodets ineuding local gov-
efmment, the Member of Parlament, the former
Prime Ministerthe Outi slaiid Council and in coh-
sultation with Guana Cay residents through a Tbwn
Meeting on Guana Cay on August 20, 2004. Further
refinement will continue through additional dia-
logue on island and throughout The Abacos,

21The Bakers Bay Community is approprpltetly
sized with fewer than 400 residences on 585 acres
and over 50% of the property i open space, Other
developed areas of Guana, Elbow and Green Turtle
Cays have twice as many houses per acre; other
parts of The Bahamas have three times as many
houses per acre

l3Over 6 miles of shoreline are preserved with
residential structures set badckmore than 30 feet.
from the high water mark, providing open beach
access to all Bahamlans. IndMdual docks from
each homesite will not be permitted which will
preserve the appearance of th. shoreline.

4, The project will eliminate over 100 potential
dock structures and restore sand dunes thereby
increasing and preserving turtle habitats,

5:49%of all leased crown lands are being placed
into a Preserve for use by all B hamians and will be
managed by a foundation spearheaded by the.
Bahamas National Trust. *

6 The tropical links style golf course is being
designed to the highest international standards
with environmentally friendly grasses and a closed
drainage system, This system, along with native
shoreline buffers, will dramatically reduce fertilizer
deposits into the ocean and mangrove areas.


.The Baker f Bay Marina is designed to mtet or
exceed United States &vironmwnta Protection
Agency and Army Corps of tSnginer strict standards
antd operations under the s tigent tue Flag"
guidelineds
SThe. Project will add an average of $150 mili
dollars per year nto the Bahamian economy include
ing government revenues derived from taxes, ev-
enue sharing and national insurance ceontbtions
A large portion of this figure will be allocated by
central government to the local government on
Guana Cay to assist with community project.,

9, Baker's Bay will generate over 200 jobs during
construction and an additional 200 ongoing jobs
including jobs for accountants, lawyers, gardeners,
housekeepers, plumbers, electricians ad more. The,
project will create opportunities fo eteprepneurial
ventures ,sc luddlng resta utats, shops, car rental
companies and others.

10, Over ten years the project should cause more
than $85 million in new wages to be paid and is
projected to generate over $1 Billfon dollars of direct
and indirect goods and services for The Bahamas
including revenues for printing, publishing, enter-
tainment, transportation, food and beverage sup-
plies, sanitation services, chemicals, textiles, furniture
and equipment, landscaping and more.

11 All real estate commissions will be paid to Baha-
mian brokers and all private residences built will be,
subject to all taxes and duties,

12.State of the Art infrastructure systems will treat all
sewage from residences and boats in the Marina,
Water systems and a solid waste transfer station will
be built at developers'cost with potential access for
all residents of Guana Cay1

This project is being developed by Discovery land
Company, a company with an.extensive track record
of completing quality, envi ron mentally responsible
projects throughout North America.


For more information visit: www.discoverylandco.com


--I-----~'~"~I^"q"I~U~~p~~"~... ... -- li- C... ..... ...... e


THE TRIBUNE








MONDAY, APRIL 18,2005


SECTION -..


business@100jamz.com


Im U ITS m11


ss


investor




talks to


buy resort


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Hotel Corporation of
the Bahamas (BHC) is negoti-
ating with a US-based investor
for the sale of the Government-
owned Andros Lighthouse
Yacht Club and Marina, a
senior official told The Tribune
yesterday.
Dr Baltron Bethel, the Hotel
Corporation's managing direc-
tor and deputy chairman, said it


was in negotiations for the sale
of the Lighthouse Club, a prop-
erty located in Fresh Creek,
Andros, that is said to have
been on the market for two
years. Talks are expected to
reach a conclusion shortly.
Dr Bethel declined to iden-
tify a completion date or a pur-
chase price, saying it was possi-
ble that matters could arise that
have to be negotiated as the two
entities move forward. The
Hotel Corporation has under
its management some 18,000


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
DOCTORS Hospital Health System (DHHS) showed it has
almost completed a recovery to full corporate health by more
than quadrupling net income for fiscal 2005 to $2.568 million, a
record-breaking result for the company on its 50th anniver-
sary.
The Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX) list-
ed company's net income for the year ended on January 31,
2005, increased from $576,947 the previous year, driven large-
ly by a 10.5 per cent rise in total revenues.
DHHS said its full-year results reflected a "broad level of
increases in business volume". The company's average daily cen-
sus, which measures overall inpatient activity across depart-
ments, increased by 9 per cent upon fiscal 2004 the highest per-
centage growth for five years.
Total admissions, DHHS said, increased by 14.4 per cent in
fiscal 2005 compared to the previous year, bucking the decline
in admissions over the past two fiscal periods.
It added that the average daily census also reflected the high-
est levels of Intensive Care Unit and Intermediate Care Unit
patient days for five years.
DHHS financial performance will look even better once it
completes the final step in its turnaround phase the disposal of
SEE page eight


acres of land in the Fresh Creek
area.
Dr Bethel, though, said
potential buyer was not Fortune
Real Estate Development Cor-
poration, a US based company
that claimed to have signed a
'Letter of Intent' to acquire 100
per cent of an entity called
Andros Isle Development Ltd.
According to a release from
Fortune, Andros Isle reported-
ly holds the exclusive rights to
develop a $250 million luxury
residential and resort commu-
nity on a 247-acre tract of
beach-front property in Andros,
which has been appraised at a
value of $49 million.
"It is the intention of both
parties to move to close the
transaction expeditiously. We
are hopeful that we will be able
to close this transaction [Fri-
day], as the majority share-
holders in both companies have
reached an agreement to move
forward," Simon Sands, presi-
dent of Andros Isle Develop-
ment Ltd, said in a statement.
Andros Isle is also unrelated
to the tourism-based project
proposed for Morgan's Bluff,
North Andros, by Bahamian
businessmen Garret "Tiger"
Finlaysoi and Al Collie.
SEE page three


Brokers concerned

on capital and fees

in Bill regulations
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
THE Bahamas Insurance
Brokers Association
(BIBA) has expressed con-
cerns about the capital
requirements and fee struc-
ture proposed in the regu-
lations accompanying the
Domestic Insurance Bill,
fearing they may create bar-
riers to entry and impact
existing businesses because
the thresholds have been set
so high.
The Regulations for the
Bill, which is currently in the
Committee stage in the
House of Assembly, stipu-
late that the capitalisation
requirements for a Bahami-
an insurance broker be set
at $100,000. The capital
requirements for an agent
are $50,000 and, for a broker
and agent, the minimum is
$150,000.
Guilden Gilbert, BIBA's
SEE page two


RICHARD COULSON,
managing director of
RC Capital Markets.

Analyst challenges
environmentalists to
debate on LNG merits
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A LEADING Bahamian
financial analyst has challenged
the environmental organisation,
reearth, to a public debate on
the merits of liquefied natural
gas (LNG), claiming the argu-
ments against these projects are
"misleading".
Richard Coulson, managing
director of RC Capital Markets,
SEE page eight


www .micronetbs From desktop to departmental workhorse, in brilliant color,
....= "n19 .SSjL Toshiba copiers have more features, more functions,
Micu~ron more technology.
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY __ I
* Sales Rentals Supplies Services -


Micronet
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
TOSHIBA
Don't copy. Lead.
email: Info@microneibs
56 Maderia Street Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas
Tel: (242) 328-3040
Fax: (242) 328-3043


IIINSIDE[
RNO 'tupns down'
lapgest investop's
request fop EGM
e Page three


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


US




in


r- -r I I


Ill IL ~P -e e I 11-- 3 1


- ~----


I 'I--~ I ~-----~sr i a~ p~a


1 --*-~c Irll








PAGE B, MNDAYAPRI 18,2005UHEITIBUN


TRADING volumes
picked up again over the
past week as more than
22,000 shares changed hands
in the Bahamian market.
The market saw seven out
of its 19 listed stocks trade,
of which two advanced, one
declined and four remained
unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Kerzner Interna-
tional's BDR (KZLB) with
9,304 shares changing hands
and accounting for 42 per
cent of the total shares trad-
ed..
KZL ended the week at
$59.50 on the NYSE, which
is equivalent to $5.95 per
BDR. The big advancer for
the week was FINCO,
whose share price increased.
by $0.15 to close at a new
52-week high of $10.40.
* COMPANY NEWS
FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas) -
An excellent first quarter.
for FirstCaribbean, as the
bank posted net income of
$23.6 million, up $9.4 mil-
lion or 66 per cent over the
comparable period last year.
Net interest income rose
by $8.8 million or 40.8 per
cent to total $30.6 million,
while non-interest income
declined slightly to total
$10.3 million. Non-interest


expenses increased by $1.4
million to total $15.8 mil-
lion, compared to $14.3 mil-
lion in 2004.
The recent increases in
US interest rates have
allowed FirstCaribbean to
increase the spread it earns
on its US$ portfolio. Since
the bank's year-end on
October 31, 2004, the Fed-
eral Reserve has raised
interest rates by 50 basis
points, and US economists
have anticipated even fur-
ther rate hikes going for-
ward.
If this scenario plays out,
we can expect to see even
further growth in the levels
of CIB interest income.
* RND Holdings (RND) -
Officials of RND have
announced that the compa-
ny will be taking its Tick-
etXpress system to the
island of Andros. This Inter-
net-based automated system
allows customers to book
their flights on Western Air,
purchase movie tickets, and
QuickCell or GSM phone
cards.
RND's management is
optimistic that the revenue
generated from this segment
of its business, while mod-
est now, will have a greater
impact on its earnings in the
near future.
There is, however, one


major drawback to the Tick-
etXpress concept. Cus-
tomers cannot actually
"buy" online via a credit
card. They can only "book"
the product online and then
pay for it at another venue.
This issue will have to be
addressed if the concept is
to have any long-term sus-
tainable success.
* INVESTORS
TIP OF THE WEEK
Financial Planning for
your children
Saving for your child/chil-
dren's education -
Whether you choose pri-
vate or government educa-
tion, educating a child is one
of the largest expenses a
family faces.
What you can afford to
pay for education will obvi-
ously be a factor in your
choices of schools. In order
to give your child the best, it
is essential that you plan and
set money aside. Some star-
tling facts for you to consid-
er:
The average Bahamian
parent does not save or put
funds aside to educate their
children.
Many parents take out
loans or re-mortgage their
homes in order to pay for
their children's college
tuition. This course of action


H).AK WI h


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.95 $- 0 -13.64%
BAB $1.04 $- 500 8.33%
BBL $0.85 $- 0 0.00%
BOB $6.00 $- 0 4.35%
BPF $ 8.00 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -5.77%
BWL $1.45 $0.05 4200 -19.44%
CAB $8.23 $- 300 15.92%
CBL $8.35 $- 0 17.61%
CHL $2.20 $ 0 0.00%
CIB $7.75 $- 0 3.47%
DHS $1.50 $- 3415 0.00%
FAM $4.02 $ 2700 1.52%
FCC $1.27 $ 0 -36.18%
FCL $8.35 $- 0 4.38%
FIN $10.40 $0.15 1800 7.22%
ICD $9.50 $ 0 -3.94%
JSJ $8.22 $- 0 0.00%
KZLB $5.98 $-0.12 9304 -1.32%
PRE $10.00 $ 0 0.00%

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
CBL has declared an ExtraordinaryDividend of $0.05 per
share payable on April 29, 2005 to all common shareholders
as at record on April 22, 2005.


International Markets
FOREX Rates INTERNATIONAL
WEEKLY %CHANGE STOCK
CAD$ 1.2463 1.46 MARKET
GBP 1.8913 0.31 NDEXES:
EUR 1.2915 -0.12 WEEKLY %CHANGE
DJIA 10,087.51 -3.57
COMMODITIES S & P 500 1,142.62 -3.27
WEEKLY %CHANGE NASDAQ 1,908.15 -4.56
Crude Oil $50.49 -5.31 Nikkei 11,370.69 -4.24
Gold $426.50 -0.54

can result in the parents or have to be funded by par-
the child paying for these ents.
loans long after graduation.
The costs of private There is no disputing that
school and college education a college education can
are rising every year. immensely increase your
According to a 2001 US Col- child/children's chances of
lege Board report, the aver- getting a good job and earn-
age cost of a four-year col- ing a competitive salary.
lege education in a public Now that you have formu-
college is around $40,000, lated a savings plan for your
while in a private college, it child/children and know the
is close to $100,000. Even a benefits of saving for their
government school educa- education versus borrowing,
tion is getting expensive, as just how will these funds be
many of the required text- invested? We will answer
books and school supplies this question next week.


Legal Notice


NOTICE


BRANFORD INVESTMENT INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation



NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act. 2000,
BRANFORD INVESTMENT INC., is in dissolution as of
April 14th, 2005.

International Liquidator Services Inc., situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR











REAL ESTATE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco, is
seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTA TIVE. Candidates must have a minimum of
2 years sales experience with a track record of success. Real
estate license is preferred but not required. Successful candidate
must have exceptional communication skills, both verbal and
written. Must be personable, professional and willing to
commute or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's estate lots
range from $1.5 million to over $4 million. A handsome
commission package is offered. Please email cover letter and
resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-367-2930,
Attn.: Sales & Marketing.


\ Ii


Bank of The Bahamas

I 1 NTERNATIONA L
"A growing and dynamic Bahamian instution"


VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF

CREDIT OFFICER


Core responsibilities:

Prepare thorough credit proposal and maintain profitability
of assigned portfolio
Interview loan applicants and make considered decisions
based on investigations and assigned lending authority
Act as the "Relationship Manager" for assigned accounts by
ensuring that all of the customers needs are satisfied.
Ensure all loans are granted in compliance with the Bank's
lending policies and guidelines.
Monitor and control loan portfolios to avoid delinquency.
Perform constant follow-up on delinquent loan accounts.
Ensure loan and security files are completed and properly
maintained.
Constantly increase lending by marketing the Bank's products
and services.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

Associates Degree in relevant area (e.g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance)
Three to five years banking and lending experience
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
Strong negotiation, analytical and organizational skills
Computer literate Ability to use MS Word and Excel

Benefits include:

Competitive salary commensurate with experience and qualifications;
Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than April 22, 2005 to:


The Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas.


Brokers concerned

on capital and fees

in Bill regulations

FROM page one

president, said: "The biggest
concern for us is the capital
requirements.
"It's something we're in
discussions on now, but
it's definitely a barrier to
entry for new participants
and could have a negative
impact on existing bro-
kers, as most are small
businesses, and talk of
coming up with capital of
$100,000 or $150,000 is a
bit excessive.
While a small number
of BIBA members, J S
Johnson and Insurance
Management, employ sev-
eral hundred staff
between them and would
have no trouble finding
the capital currently
required by the proposed
regulations, Mr Gilbert,
said: "The majority of our
membership will have dif-
ficulty in meeting that."
In addition, BIBA is
also objecting to the
marked increase in fees.
proposed by the Regula-
tions. These have been set,
at $3,000 for a broker and
$3,000 for an agency busi-.
ness on their own. How-,
ever, a combined
broker/agent has to pay.
$6,0000 in fees to the
Insurance Commission,
compared to the current
$650.
Mr Gilbert said the :
insurance industry Work-'
ing Group, which played a
large role in developing'
the Insurance Bill, had
already had two meetings
on the Regulations.,The
Association was well-rep-
resented on the Working
Group through three
members. ,
Bruce Ferguson,
BIBA's vice-president,
said the Association was
not objecting to the capi-,
tal requirements, which
regulators wanted in place
as a policyholder safe-,,
guard in case something
went wrong. Instead, it
was that "the limit is
placed much too high".
Mr Ferguson added that
all Bahamian brokers '
were already required to'
purchase professional
indemnity insurance,
something designed to
protect policyholders, and
they did not assume the .
risk for paying out claims
something performed by
carriers.
He said: "There's really
no control over who can
set up as a broker and it
would be nice if that could
change, but equally we
don't want to put the
small man out of busi-
ness."
Mr Gilbert said: "There
has to be minimum stan-
dards that should be met
to enter the market as a
brokerage and/or agent
entity, and it's going to
take this association to
put forward recommenda-
tions along those lines."
The Domestic Insur-
ance Bill has been stuck at-
the House Committee
Stage for some time, as
the MPs who form it are
understood to be grap-
pling with its definition of.
a 'spouse'.
In the definition section of
the Bill, 'spouse' will include
the cohabiting of a single
man and woman as if they
were legally husband arid
wife for "a period of not less
than seven years".
During the Bill's Second
Reading, Ken Russell, FNM
MP for High Rock, was "
effectively giving legal status
to "shacking up", something
that apparently ran contrary
to this nation's Christian
principles.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE





RND 'turns down'





largest investor's





request for EGM


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor.
RND Holdings has
"refused" to permit the
Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM) requested
by its largest shareholder,
The Tribune has been
'told.
Brent Dean, RND Hold-
ings' former president and
chief executive, who holds
31.2 per cent of the com-
pany's issued ordinary
shares, had requested an
April 7 EGM of all share-
holders at the company's
February 28, 2005, annual
general meeting (AGM) to
discuss a variety of
corporate governance
issues.
Mr Dean said previously
;he was, calling for the
|AGM "due to a lack of
transparency and timely
information to sharehold-
ers prior tothe AGM"'.
But when contacted by
The Tribune on Friday, Mr
'Dean said RND Holdings
:had decided not to agree
,to his EGM call.
He said: "They refused
jto do it. They cited cost as
;a barrier, and the fact they
-had planned the regular
'annual general meeting in
June."

Developments
One capital markets
,source, when contacted
About developments,said
'of the company -s 40 sp"
inot to agree to the -E{M
request: '"It sounds like a
stalling tactic, but he [Mr
Dean] can still raise the
same issues at the AGM."
Mr Dean no longer sits
on RND Holdings' board.
The Board is chaired by
Jerome Fitzgerald, the
company's second largest
shareholder with a 30.96
per cent stake. He is
backed by fellow director,
Mark Finlayson, son of
well-known entrepreneur
Garet 'Tiger' Finlayson.
The Tribune attempted
to contact Ken Donathan,
tRND Holdings' chief oper-
ating officer, for comment
on the EGM situation, but
,was told he, was out of
.office and the message was
not returned.
Mr Fitzgerald said at the
AGM that the April 7
EGM date could be unre-
alistic, due to the closeness
of the June AGM for fis-
cal 2005 and the need to
send information and invi-
tations to all shareholders.
i It is unclear whether a
proxy battle could result
from Mr'Dean's calls for
an,EGM, as his motives are
currently unknown. He
may want the company to
disclose more information
rather than engage in a
full-scale battle for control,
especially since Mr Fitzger-
ald ,and his allies have a


"They refused to do it. They
cited cost as a barrier, and the
fact they had planned the regu-
lar annual general meeting in
June."

Brent Dean, RND Holdings'
former president and chief executiv


larger combined share-
holding.
Among the issues Mr
Dean wants discussed at an
EGM are giving sharehold-
ers "prompt access to criti-
cal information"; having
RND Holdings' chief exec-
utive vouch for timely dis-
closure and the accuracy of
financial statements
released to shareholders;
and for company directors
who have a direct or indi-
rect benefit in contracts


entered in to by RND
Holdings to recuse them-
selves from debates on
such deals.
The separation of the
Board from RND Hold-
ings' management was also
on Mr Dean's agenda.
He wanted persons nom-
inated by financial institu-
tions elected to the Board
so they could review all the
company's growth plans
and its 2005 financial state-
ments.


GRAHAM THOMPSON & CO.



Graham, Thompson & Co., continues to expand
and remains at the cutting edge of complex
commercial transactions within the financial
services, tourism and industrial sectors of The
Bahamas.

We ire seeking a talented and ambitious
commercial/corp rate!Wyer (With 5 to 7 years
post qualifications xpenence) t6join our Freeport
Office.

Candidates must possess demonstrated skills and
ability to work independently on varied complex
commercial/corporate transactions within a broad
range of business and industries and expertise in
the area of project development and finance.

Applicants should send detailed resumes to The
Managing Partner as follows:

P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, The Bahamas, or by
facsimile (242) 328-1069 or by email:
info@gtclaw.com.

No telephone calls will be accepted.






WANTED
Administrative Assistant

A leading pharmaceutical company
seeks to identify an ambitious and
dynamic individual for the position of
administrative assistant. Interested
persons should possess:

Diploma from a recognized secretarial
institution
S Strong communication skills (written
and verbal)
Thorough working knowledge of
Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint
Good organizational skills and the
ability to meet deadlines
Minimum of two years experience in a
similar position

Salary is negotiable according to
qualifications and experience.
Please submit application and
resume, by April 29, 2005.

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Lowe's Wholesale Drug Agencies Ltd
P.O. Box N-7504
Soldier Road
Nassau, Bahamas
i --


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 3B


Scotiabank's 'Forgive & Forget' Mortgage Campaign

We're giving away Big Bucks!
Have $10,000 or $7,500 of your mortgage balance Forgiven
Or be one of 20 lucky customers to have $250 of a mortgage payment Forgotten
Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign runs until May 13, 2005
Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to 'Forgive & Forget'


.5$


Life. Money. Balance both:


SScotiabank
No surprises prepare upfront for hidden home
ownership costs
By Michael A. Munnings
Senior Manager, Sales and Marketing Scotiabank
Whether you choose to buy an existing home or build from the ground up, there are certain
costs you can count on, above and beyond your monthly payments. It's important to be aware
of these so that you can come up with a realistic budget one that provides for the hidden
costs of home ownership that can catch you off-guard.
Once you've found your dream home, there will be certain expenses related to closing the
deal. These may include legal fees, the cost of an appraisal, a Quantity Surveyor's Report and
your real estate agent's commission. And, depending on when you take possession, you may
have to reimburse the vendor for any expenses incurred for the time period after your closing
date.
Include the costs of updates
Many people make their new home their own by painting, buying new furniture, or
renovating. While these upgrades can make you feel right at home, the cost of such extras
can quickly add to the purchase price.
Then there's the cost of the actual move. This can vary widely depending on whether you do
it yourself or hire professionals. Even with professional movers, the cost depends on who you
hire and how much help you want. They can simply move your belongings from the old
location to the new or do everything from supplying boxes, tape and packing materials to
packing and unpacking for you.
Factor in your fixed expenses
After the move, the fixed expenses of home ownership are often referred to as PITI, for
principal, interest, taxes and insurance. Generally, mortgage payments make up the biggest
expense followed by property tax, based on a percentage of your home's value. You'll
continue paying property taxes as long as you own the property.
Next is your property insurance, a must to obtaining financing from most banks and other
lending institutions. Your policy will cover most fire and theft-related damage to your
property, but be aware certain things may not be covered. Flood protection is usually not
included, so if there are risks where you live, look into obtaining the appropriate type of
coverage.
Your utilities are another regular home ownership expense you can count on. Electricity, gas,
phone, cable, internet and other utility bills will vary according to what you have in your
home and how much you use it.
Beyond the inevitable expenses, there are some you can't predict but should nonetheless
prepare for. They usually involve repairs and maintenance. While upgrades and renovations
may be optional, others, like repairs, may not be able to wait, depending on the nature of the
problem.
Expect the unexpected
Many home owners prepare for the unexpected by saving a small sum in a special account
each month. Some experts recommend setting aside at least 1% of your home's purchase
price each year for repairs and maintenance.
While you'll undoubtedly spend less some years and more others, it all boils down to being
prepared. Provided you embark on this adventure with your eyes open and a realistic budget,
home ownership will be a move you never regret.
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FROM page one
Mark Finlayson, Tiger's
son, told The Tribune the
developers continued to
await the outcome of a court
dispute between the Evans
family and the Government
over the real ownership of
the land upon which the
development is planned.
He confirmed, however,
that if the matter is resolved
satisfactorily the project will
continue.
Meanwhile, it was been
suggested that the Andros
Isle development may be a
private project located in
either the Nicholls Town or
Mastic Point area.


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PAGE B, MNDAYAPRI 18,2005UHEITIBUN


FOR


RENT



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MINISTRY OF EDUCATION


NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION
OF SCHOOL FURNITURE

1.0 The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids from persons to tender for the
provision of School Furniture (School Year 2005/06) for Government Schools in
New Providence and the Family Islands.

2.0 Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding documents from from the
Supplies Section of the Ministry of Education, Headquarters, Thompson Boulevard
from Tuesday 12th April, 2005.

3.0 Bids must be in England and should be enclosed in a sealed envelope bearing
no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject bided on (e.g. "School
Furniture".)

4.0 Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided at the address shown below,
on or before Friday 29th April, 2005 by 4:30p.m. (local time). Overseas companies
who may wish to tender can submit their bid by mail. Late bids will be rejected and
returned unopened.

5.0 Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or
their Representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00a.m. on Tuesdy 3rd May, 2005
at the address below.

The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
P.O.Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 327-1530


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Government is awaiting
the arrival within the next four
weeks of a programme director
for its proposed National Health
Insurance scheme, who will bring
to a completion ongoing studies
and gather any information nec-
essary to make a formal presen-
tation to the Government.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Dr Marcus Bethel, minister
of health, said said the National
Health Insurance scheme contin-
ued to be a work in progress, with
the programme director arriving
with experience in social health
insurance schemes. An interim
report on the plan is expected to
be completed within the next six
months.
With the government also
looking at strengthening the
national pension plan, Dr Bethel
said there were synergies that
relate to both the proposed health
insurance scheme and the opera-
tion of the National Insurance


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Board (NIB).
NIB already had the infra-
structure in place to facilitate
management of a public health
scheme, and officials are work-
ing closely in many aspects
regarding the evaluation, prepa-
ration and determination of cost-
ing involved in the creation of a
joint initiative.
Dr Bethel said the health insur-
ance proposal remains in the data
collection, analysis and costing
phase, all critical elements nec-
essary for the Government to
make an informed decision in
regard to the final look of such a
scheme.
The Health minister said fur-
ther public consultation would be
sought before the interim report
was submitted to the Govern-
ment, which will determine
whether to give the green light to
move to the implementation
phase.
In November, Dr Bethel said a
team had been identified to com-
plete the review by determining


what the real cost of a national
health insurance plan will be,
what percentage will be deducted
from employee salaries and what
percentage of the plan's costs, if
any, will be picked up by employ-
ers.
Actuarial studies were also
conducted as part of the analysis
process to ascertain the costs of
the various services that will be
available under the plan, and
what the premiums will be.
Dr Bethel said: "The cost of
the plan will be borne by the pub-
lic themselves through payroll
deductions. The only question is
how much contribution will the
government continue to make
and what the premiums are.
"The Government bears the
burden of the elderly, the dis-
abled and those children who
may not be covered by family
programmes. There was never
any question that the working
population would have to pay
premiums through a tax on pay-
roll."


- U


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JBXI olina f^i O
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of: Financial Advisors Ltd.
15April 2005
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.20 0.95 Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.219 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.40 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.00 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.00 6.00 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.0 5.50%
0.85 0.82 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.45 0.05 4,200 0.101 0.000 14.4 0.00%
1.04 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.04 1.04 0.00 0.007 0.040 14.1 3.85%
8.23 6.76 Cable Bahamas 8.23 8.23 0.00 0.556 0.240 14.8 2.92%
2.20 1.52 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
8.35 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 8.35 8.35 0.00 0.632 0.390 12.9 4.67%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.02 3.13 Famguard 4.02 4.02 0.00 2,700 0.406 0.230 9.9 5.72%
10.40 8.39 Flnco 10.40 10.40 0.00 0.662 0.490 15.7 4.71%
7.75 6.54 FlrstCaribbean 7.75 7.75 0.00 0.591 0.330 13.1 4.26%
8.60 8.31 Focol 8.35 8.35 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.7 5.99%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.082 0.000 15.5 0.00%
10.38 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.6 4.26%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.98 5.94 -0.04 0.201 0.000 29.8 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.979 0.350 5.1 3.50%
2wk-H 52wk-LowSymbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0 103 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %/
1.2164 1.1609 Collna Money Market Fund 1.216402*
2.2268 1.9423 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.2268 ***
10.3112 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.3112"**
2.2214 2.0941 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.221401**
1.0931 1.0320 Collna Bond Fund 1.093141***
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT MAR. 31, 20051 / AS AT FEB. 28, 2005
* AS AT MAR. 24, 20051/ AS AT MAR. 31, 2005/1 *** AS AT MAR. 31, 2005


onPai




* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
THE Parliamentary select committee on banking has met First-
Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) officials as part of its
inquiries into mortgage and lending practices, with hopes that a full
report can be submitted before year-end.
The committee is also expected to broaden its inquiries to include
insurance companies and non-financial entities that offer in-house
financing.
In an interview with The Tribune, High Rock MP Kenneth Rus-
sell, a member of the 6-person Parliamentary Committee on Bank-
ing, said during the meeting with FirstCaribbean, questions were
asked about the bank's mortgage and interest rate policies.
They included items on how lending officials arrive at mort-
gage terms, and how the interest rate is calculated on a maturing
loan.
Since its formation more than a year Igo, committee members
have been in the process of compiling information that could pro-
voke changes in legislation and banking policies on mortgage lend-
ing, and how consumers in default can be treated.
Mr Russell said: "Over the years, all of us have had complaints
from citizens about how they were treated unfairly and how they
lost their money. We're trying to get to the root of the matter.
"If we can find out concretely why it happened to the people who
complain, then in the future we will be able to advise potential buy-
ers what their rights are and how to go about getting those rights."
Committee officials are expected to meet in the next few weeks
to discuss the way forward. Along with meetings with the insurance
sector and the non-financial entities that offer in-house mortgages,
Mr Russell said the committee also hopes to hold town meetings in
Nassau, Bimini and Exuma.
Mr Russell said that if committee members can meet on a regu-
lar basis every two weeks from now to October, they would be able
to submit a report to the Government by the end of 2005.



Abaco Markets Limited
the leading food distribution company
is looking for a

Junior Accountant

to join our corporate team

Requirements:
Bachelors degree in accounting or finance;
At least 2 years of relevant experience;
Excellent PC skills;
Must be willing to travel.

Duties:
- General support for all areas with the Accounting
Department;
Preparation of month end journal entries, account
reconciliations,
expense report processing, and date entry;
Assisting with budget preparation and special
projects, as assigned.

To apply for this position, please e-mail your detailed
resume and cover letter to hr@abacomarkets.com or
fax to 356-7855.


National Health





Insurance plan





to get director


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


.MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 5B


MARSHALL ROAD (NASSAU)

;> Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry building with eight
inch concrete block walls. The front 2 units are 95% complete.

Appraisal: $256,233.00
Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the intersection of Cowpen
and Blue Hill Road, turn right onto Marshall Road (Adventure
Learning Center Road), follow road to the final curve before the
beach. The subject property is about 100 feet on the right side,
grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.


YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES (NASSAU)
Lot #63, house #19, Cat Island Avenue, a 6 year old single story
house with three bedrooms, one bathroom, living room, dining
room, kitchen and laundry room. Property is 70x100 single family
residential. This property is on flat terrain and fairly level with road
way. Living area 1,574 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $173,000.00

Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass the Prison Compound,
turn left onto Yamacraw then 1st right, follow the road to 1st left,
then first right. The road curves to your left, the house is #19 Cat Island Avenue, painted white. The grounds
are attractively landscape and well-kept access into the subject property is provided by a concrete paved
drive way along with the walkways of concrete flagstones.


FRELIA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #24, Land size 6,724 sq. ft. living area 1,223 sq. ft. consisting
of 4 year old three bed, two bath, living, dining, kitchen and utility
room.

Appraisal: $151,115.00

Driving west on Carmichael Road until you arrive at road by More
7- t FM, continue driving north thru a series of curves in the road until
you arrive to the double post sign on the right hand side of the road
turn right, house is 5th on right white trim yellow. Subject property is flat and slightly below the level of the
roadway. This is a single family residential zoning. The building is about 4 years old, with remedial work
required.

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry.and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the 1 st corner on the left then
1st right, house is second on your right with garage.


GOLDEN GATES #2 (NASSAU)

Lot #1490, section 2 with a 25 year old single family residence 2,480
sq. ft. consisting of five bedrooms, two bathrooms, seperate living
C and dining room with a spacious kitchen, lot size is 6,000 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $120,000.00
Property is at grade and level with adequate drainage, house situated
S on road knowns as "Donahue Road" which is on the southern side
of Carmicheal Road. Last painted green trimmed white. Enclosed
on one side with 5 ft., chain link fencing and at the front with a low cement block wall with two driveways
and a walkway.

VALENTINES EXTENSION (NASSAU)
Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex with a floor
area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section consist of a master
bedroom, bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms,
one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and
two efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning
on flat land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00
The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one hundred
feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley
Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to
T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.


the subject house which is paint


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)


0 x 9p ft., contains a 21 year old single
th, living, dining and kitchen. The lot
el with the roadway, residential single


Appraisal: $100,800.00


The subject property is located on the southern side of Soldier
rad about 200 ft., east of the intersection of Kennedy Subdivision
and Soldier Road. Painted blue trimmed white, a low concrete
wall and concrete gateposts are located at the front with a chainlink fencing enclosing the sides and the
back also walkway and driveway in the frontyard. Ground neatly maintained with basic landscaping in
place. Accommodation consist of three bedrooms, one bathroom, living and dining area and kitchen.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)
3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area
for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of
the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels, stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and
on the lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle
roof and L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus
50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks,
ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.
Appraisal: $220,500.00


BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA)
Duplex in lot #6625, Bahama Sound #8, East Exuma, trapezium
shaped lot 35 ft above sea level, 10,000 sq. ft., single storey,
10 year old duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath, kitchen, dining and living
room and porch area. Property is landscaped.


Appraisal: $170,047.50


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)
Crown Allotment #70, singe storey wood and concree
commercial building approximately 758 sq. ft., about 20 years
old.

Appraisal: $71,946.00


GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
30 Year old single story house with floor area of 1,800 sq. ft.,
Lot #28 land size 14,475 ft., consist of 4 bed, 3 bath, living,
dining, kitchen, utility room and carport.

Appraisal: $211,050.00
Driving east on Prince Charles, take the corner before the shopping
centre on the right side, Follow the road around the curve to
ed white trim with blue with a drive way up to the carport.


GOLDEN GATES #1 (NASSAU)

Lot #154, a single story duplex with floor area of 1,460 sq. ft.
Each apartment consist of 2 bed, 1 bath, living and dining area
and kitchen. Lot size is 5,200 sq. ft., 52 x 100

Appraisal: $168,504.00
Heading south on Blue Hill Road, take first left after traffic light
at Blue Hill Rad and Carmichael Road intersection. Take the
second right the subject property is the second on the right. Sisal
Road and Bamboo Court. Painted white, trimmed green.


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #00 with a structure; lot size 60x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
;iftLisiove sea level but below road level and would flood in a
s,.ever hurricane the duplex has dimensions of'60ft by 30 'ft
pa'tlof wood and partly of cement blocks with one section
vitiially finished and occupied with blocks up to window level
and floor ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1 x6 pine and the floor of ceramic
tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete.
Age: 10 years old.
Appraisal: $80,498.00



HAMILTON'S (LONG ISLAND)
Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house
of solid concrete floors, foundation column and belt course
with finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen,
dining, and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft., utilities
available are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill overlooking the
Mr Atlantic Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of two apartments.
One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom
one bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 6 feet wide on the upper level secured
with a wooden handrail. The garage area has'been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years
old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly
furnished. The efficiency rented at $400 ,per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00


EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200
sq. ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.
Appraisal: $141,716.40


NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a
single family zoning and 50 ft.,'above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured
as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $43,968.75

Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

BAHAMA CORAL ISLAND (ABACO), Lot #1, Block A, on Central Abaco. This property is vacant and is approximately 9,100 sq. ft. This property is elevated and should not flood under normal conditions.

Appraisal: $8,236.00
The property is in the southwestern portion of the Bahama Coral, Coral Island and bounded northwesterly by 60 ft. Wide Road.


BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately
15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence.
Appraisal: $26,250.00
Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town.


I^^^For condit^^Bl^ions ofsale a^nd oherinfomatonconac
Philip White @ 502-3077 eg^ ^mail ii |ht^ soib nkc mo
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Insurance brokers to hold conference


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Insurance
Brokers Association (BIBA)
will hold a two-day conference
this October to debate "every
aspect" of the sector, as the
group moves to raise the pro-
file of brokers with the general
public.
Guilden Gilbert, BIBA's
president, said the October 27-
28 event would be open to the
entire insurance industry. The
agenda, which will see the first


day devoted to life and health
insurance and the second to gen-
eral insurance, has already been
finalised and BIBA is now mov-
ing to firm up the speakers.

Members
In addition to Friday's t-shirt
day, in which every BIBA
member wore a t-shirt to pro-
mote the sector and Associa-
tion, which has 17 members,
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, min-
ister of financial services and
investments, will address a


Office Space for Rent


4,800 sq. ft. at $6,000 per month or
2,400 sq. ft. at $3,000 per month

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 364-0753



COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Brand New


BIBA luncheon on June 8 to
discuss the Domestic Insurance
Bill.
Mr Gilbert said: "The prima-
ry reason for the t-shirt day is to
bring awareness to the general
public of the importance of bro-
kers and the role they play in
the industry.
"We as brokers definitely add
value to the product, as we can
show clients what the market in
totality has to offer, and we also
bring about competition
between carriers."
Mr Gilbert said BIBA mem-
bers acted as advisers and con-
sultants to clients, advising them
what insurance product best met
their needs at the most afford-
able price possible. They also
helped insurance companies on
risk management.


He added: "I think we repre-
sent a significant portion of the
market, and so I think people
are more and more aware of the
role brokers play..
"The broker is completely
independent of the insurance
company. The broker has the
ability to shop the market and
we can assist with the claims
handling." .'
Bruce Ferguson, BIBA's vice-
president, said that brokers were
even able to become involved
in the claims process, helping to
reach an equitable settlement
for all concerned.
He added that the indepen-
dence of brokers was "very
important", as insurance com-
panies were not good on every
class of business. Tied agents,
though, had to place business


Telecommunications & Computer Network Design
& Infrastructure Specialist

Homes *Offices* Subdivisions
Call Us Today!

'Tel: 3935-7733



COMMERCIAL BUILDING


ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON,
minister of financial services and investments.


with just one carrier, which did
not always add value to the
client, Mr Ferguson said.
Mr Gilbert said the consoli-
dation experienced in the
Bahamian insurance industry in
recent years, particularly on the
life and health side through Col-
ina Insurance Company's pur-
chases, but also on the general
side via Bahamas First, "defi-


nitely limits" options for bro-
kers when selecting the right
policies for clients..
But Jeanine Laapkin,
BIBA's treasurer, said: "It
forces brokers to be more cre-
ative in meeting client needs.
This is where years of profes-
sionalism come in, putting some-
thing together in a limited mar-
ket that still meets client needs.''


S10,00 sq. ft. at$12.50
Parking Spaces


q. ft. '


Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 364-0753




NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for
the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot "132", Bel-
Air Estates Subdivision situated in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
Family Residence consisting of (5) Bedrooms, (3) Bathrooms.
Building Size: 2,150 sq. ft.
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited, Main
Branch, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 8003". All offers must be received by the close of
business 4:00 pm, Friday 22nd April, 2005.





NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 52, East Park
Estates Subdivision situated on one of islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence
consisting of (3) Three Bedrooms, (2) Two Bathrooms in each
unit.
Property Size: 6,495 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,273 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre,
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, P.O. Box
N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 1833". All offers
must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 22nd
April, 2005.


Retail & Warehouse Space
32,000 sq. ft. at $12.50 per sq. ft.,
50 plus parking spaces

Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 364-0753




NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot on Eastern Side
of Mongomery Street situated in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment consisting
of (2) 2 Bedrooms, (1) Bathrooms In each unit.
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,736 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre,
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, P.O. Box
N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 1871". All offers
must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 22nd
April, 2005.





NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for
the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 41, Malcolm
Allotment #72 Nassau Village. Situated in the Southeastern
District on one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas situated thereon is a Vacant Land

Property Size: 6,590 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited, Main
Branch, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 2756". All offers must be received by the close of
business 4:00 pm, Friday 22nd April, 2005.


5 Bedroom, 4 bathroom, split level,
partly furnished.
Nassau East Blvd.,
$2,500.00 per month


Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold Road
Phone: 424-3889 364-0753







INSURANCE BROKER Co. Ltd.


To All Our Valuable Clients,


Please be informed that Ms. Alicia T.
Culmer is no longer an employee of Andeaus
Insurance Broker Company Limited. Ms. Culmer
is not authorized to conduct any business for the
company. Please contact the office at 323-4545
for services. Thank you for your continued
patronage.


Management of
Andeaus Insurance Broker Company Limited




NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders for the
purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 2829, Sir
Lynden Pindling Estates situated in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence
consisting of (3) Bedrooms, (2) Bathrooms in each unit.
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,136 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery Centre,
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited, Main Branch, P.O. Box
N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "tender 2424'. All offers
must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 22nd
April, 2005.


I i_


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005






IHI- HIBUNE


FROM page one
Black said, were two and four-
door passenger cars; SUVs and
light trucks, cargo vans and
coaches/buses.
The letters are understood to
have been sparked by Mr Miller
receiving numerous complaints
from Bahamians who had found
that parts for used Japanese car
imports were excessively expen-
sive, making it difficult or cost
prohibitive to purchase them.
The two car dealer organisa-
tions and the BGIA were thus
-asked to submit their positions
on the subject of used Japan-
ese car imports to the Minister,
but the letter sent by Mr Black
is more wide-ranging.
In its letter, the BMDA said
the stringent licensing process
and prohibitive fees in Japan
had created an excess supply of
older vehicles in that nation,
forcing suppliers to seek new
markets in the Caribbean and
Pacific Rim regions for them.
While a number of used
JaDanese cars were very good
arci competitively priced, the
I4DA said consumers might
lrad it difficult to obtain replace-
'irent parts for models more
than five to six years old.
As car manufacturers con-
trolled which models were sold
where in the world, many used
Japanese vehicles in the
Bahamas were not the same as
those supplied by local dealers,
imeatiinglt could be difficult for
consumers to buy engine, trans-
mission and body parts.
This, the BMDA said, meant
that a vehicle classification sys-
fem was required. Its position
seems to be backed by the
insurance industry, which said in
its letter to Mr Miller that unless
the Government wanted to
placea general age limit on car
imports, "the only restrictions
that should be placed on such
vehicles is a requirement for the
slblers to advise the purchaser
of the possible problems that
can be experienced".
However, Mr Black wrote
that parts were available for
used Japanese car imports from
a variety of sources, including
Blessed Things Auto, Jap Auto
and One Stop Auto. These
establishments supplied used
aid after market parts, plus
original Equipment Mantfac-


Car dealers

at odds over

Japanese

car imports
ture (OEM) parts.
Mr Black wrote: "In many
instances, the cost of after-mar-
ket and used parts is generally
50 per cent less than its OEM
counterpart, which results in a
significant savings to the con-
sumer.
"It is interesting to note that
should a vehicle older than
three years be repaired using
OEM parts, the insurance com-
pany may ask the consumer to
pay a part of the cost of the
OEM parts (referred to as 'bet-
terment' in insurance terms)."
Mr Black added that the new
and used car dealers body was
at a disadvantage to the BMDA
on warranties, as the Price Con-
trol Act means that the latter
cannot be included in the selling
price and must be added at
additional costs. In addition, he
said new car dealer warranties
were backed by the manufac-
turer, whereas used cars were
not.
Mr Black said the Price Con-
trol Act allowed new cars to be
sold with a 25 per cent mark-
up, while used cars had a 15 per
cent mark-up, further benefiting
new car dealers.
He said his members would
have "no problem" supporting a
mandatory warranty on engine
and transmission parts for a
minimum of 30 days, provided
that the mark-up on used vehi-
cles is adjusted to 50 per cent.
On insurance, Mr Black said
insurance companies should be
"obligated" to pay the previ-
ously agreed value of a car, giv-
en that their own personnel
inspect and value them, "should
a total loss arise during the
ensuing" year without making
any deductions for wear and
tear.
Insurance companies will not
do this, though, for fear it will
lead to increased fraud.


POSITION AVAILABLE
LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL GARDENS & MAUSOLEUM
iRequires:~Customer Care Representative
Qualifications:
The successful candidate should have at
least three (3) years experience in customer
service and sales.
Must have good written and oral
communication skills
Must possess good leadership and
interpersonal skills
Must be self-motivated and energetic
Attractive benefits package.
Please send resume to:
Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausoleum
P.O.Box CB -13773
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Fax: 323-7329

GN 200




MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT

ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC SERVICE VEHICLES LICENSING
AND INSPECTION

In accordance with the Road Traffic Act, Chapter
220, Statute Laws of The Bahamas, the licensing and
inspection of Public Service Vehicles will be carried
out in New Providence and the Family Islands
beginning Monday, 2nd May through Tuesday, 31th
May, 2005.

Owners and operators of these vehicles must ensure
that the total number of vehicles covered by their
franchises is presented for licensing and inspection.
When an owner or operator present fewer vehicles
than covered by his/ her franchise, the Road Traffic
Authority, in the absence of proof, will assume that
he/she no longer requires the complete franchise.
The Authority, therefore, requires him/her to show
cause why the franchise may not be reduced on the
strength of section 89(1) of the Road Traffic Act.

Further, all franchise holders must produce
documentary proof to show that their franchises are
operational at the time of licensing and inspection.

Brensil Rolle
Signed Controller


GN-199


SUPREME

COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION


2005/PRO/npr/000181

Whereas BRADLEY W. CALLENDER of 19
Heron Circle in the City of Freeport Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney
by deed of Power of Attorney for Tracey Lee
Moral nee Shields, Eric Timothy Shields and
Michael Thomas Shields, the Lawful Children
has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the real and personal Estate of DR.
TIMOTHY JAMES SHIELDS late of 2817
Kutztown Road East Greenville, Philadelphia,
18041, U.S.A.,

deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


S......... THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION


2005/PRO/npr/000185

IN THE ESTATE OF SOTERO ABIBA
late of 1381 Dalsbury Lane in the City
of Virginia Beach in the State of Virginia,
U.S.A.,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its
Probate side by LYNN PYFROM
HOLOWESKO of West Bay Street, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorneys-at-law, is the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas, for the Resealed Grant of
Letters of Certificate letter of Qualification in
the above estate granted to NORMA A.
ABIBA, the Administratrix C.TA. by the Virginia
Beach Circuit Court Clerk's Office, Virginia
Beach, in the State of Virginia, U.S.A., on the
9th day of December, 2004.
Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION


2005/PRO/npr/000186

IN THE ESTATE OF LORETTA
BIDDULPH late of 26005 Butternut
Road in the County of Cuyahoga of the
City of North Olmstread in the State of
Ohio one of the United States of
America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date


hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its
Probate side by KEVIN M. RUSSELL of #14
Doubloon Drive in the City of Freeport on the
Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorneys-at-law, is the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas, for the Resealed Grant of
Letters of Testamentary in the above estate
granted to BONITA R. DELORENZO, the
Executrix by the Probate Cout in the County
of Cuyahoga of the City of Ohio, U.S.A., on
the 28th day of July, 1993.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION


2005/PRO/npr/000187

Whereas EDDINS TAYLOR of Winton Estates,
New Providence, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for letters of administration of the
real and personal estate of ROSALIND MARIE
TAYLOR late of Winton Estates, New
Providence, The Bahamas,

deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION


2005/PRO/npr/000188

Whereas HAZEL WILLIAMS of No. 21 Danita
Drive -Bamboo Town, New Providence, The
Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters
of administration with the will annexed of the
real and personal estate of MARION
EDGECOMBE late of, No. 21 Danita Drive,
Bamboo Town New Providence, The
Bahamas,

deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE DIVISION


2005/PRO/npr/000189

IN THE ESTATE OF ERIC WELLINGTON
WARD BAILEY, late of Chariton Abbots
Manor, Andoversford, Cheltenham,
Gloucestershire, United Kingdom,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, on its
Probate side by KARLA SHANTA MclNTOSH


of Woodstock Street Lane, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, The Bahamas, Attorneys-at-law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in
the above estate granted to PETER MAURICE
BARCLAY and DAVID MASTERS, the
Executors, by the High Court of Justice, The
Principal Registry of the Family Division, on
the 14th day of March, 1986.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


--I


IVIONUAY, AH-MIL 1I, 0UUO, VALtl- /b








PAGE 88, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


I HE TRIBUNE


Analyst challenges environmentalists






to debate on the merits of LNG


FROM page one

a financial advisory and corpo-
rate consultancy, has sent an e-
mail to reearth in response to
the launch of that organisation's
petition against the LNG pro-
jects proposed for this nation.
Mr Coulson wrote in his e-mail:
"Not only will I not sign your
petition, I will actively oppose it
and lend my voice against it.
"The five 'risks and dangers'
that you list are simplistic, mis-
leading and in certain respects
just plain wrong. I have studied
the history of LNG and the AES
report to government and BEST,
and am convinced that the LNG
projects will be in the best inter-
ests of the Bahamas.
"I would be delighted to
engage you in a public debate on
the subject."
Mr Coulson is a highly-respect-
ed member of the Bahamian
financial community, and has
written several articles previous-
ly published in The Tribune on
the subject of LNG.
reearth has claimed that siting
LNG facilities in the Bahamas
could make this nation a terrorist
target, alleging that this nation is
taking all the risks while the ener-
gy companies AES Corporation.
and the consortium of Florida
Power & Light Resources,
Tractebel and El Paso Corpora-
tion reap all the profits.


reearth is claiming that the
LNG companies can "never guar-
antee our safety", and claims that
if the projects were approved, the
Government would be gambling
with the environment, and
tourism and fisheries industries.
Only the first volume of the
five-volume Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) con-
ducted for AES' $550 millio LNG
terminal and pipeline, slated for
Ocean Cay, a man-made island
near Bimini, has been made pub-
lic on the BEST website. The
rival consortium is still seeking
approval of a Grand Bahama site
for its project.

Pipeline
The AES EIA said that apart
from the LNG facilities, the com-
pany would run a natural gas
pipeline from Ocean Cay to north
Bimini to "provide a cleaner
source of fuel and natural gas.....
for electricity energy production".
The EIA added: "The supply
of natural gas will be of sufficient
capacity to serve future econom-
ic development and expansion in
the Biminis."
Adding that 100 per cent of
electricity generation in the
Biminis and throughout the
Bahamas came from fuel oil, the
AES said: "The current condi-
tions regarding energy genera-
tion and supply in both the
Bahamas and south Florida war-


Deloitte


rants the development of a new
gas supply to augment the exist-
ing infrastructure."
The EIA also envisages AES
building a 500,000 gallons per day
desalination plant on Ocean Cay
for a potable and process water
supply, and a reverse osmosis
unit. Water will then be supplied
to north Bimini via a pipeline
from Ocean Cay, although
reearth has questioned why
another reverse osmosis plant was
needed when one already existed.
"In some of the Family Islands,
including the Biminis, the current
electricity supply is insufficient
and/or unreliable, presenting a
hindrance to economic develop-
ment and expansion, the AES
EIA said.
"The project plans to provide
natural gas directly to the Bimin-
is for conversion to electricity to
allow the supplement of current
supplies with reliable, reasonably-
priced electricity.
"Further, the initial develop-
ment and subsequent operation
of the energy facility, as well as
continued operation and expan-
sion of the aragonite mining oper-
ations, will spur job creation for
Bahamian nationals, particularly
those in the Biminis."
Apart from economic diversi-
fication and the 400 construction
and 25-35 permanent jobs that
will be created by the AES Ocean
Express project, the main benefits
will be felt by the Public Trea-


Deloitlt M &lbnd11 LIP
Two World Finantial Centr "
New York. NY 1112U1 1411I
USA
Tel: + 1 212436 2(100
FaK: +1 212 12 (i S(]1)
www.rieloitt.coma


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT


To the Board of Directors and Stockholder of
Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Trust Company and Subsidiaries
New York, New York

We iaviaidiidtheiaccoiMpanying consolidated balance sheets ofiBank o6Tok-Mits iii' '
Trust Company and Subsidiaries (the "Company") as of December 31, 2004 and 2003, and the
related consolidated statements of income, changes in stockholder's equity and cash flows for the
years then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the
Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated
financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United
States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain
reasonable assurance about whether the financial, statements are free of material misstatement.
An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in
the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement
presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the
financial position of the Company at December 31,;2004 and 2003, and the results of its
operations and its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles
generally accepted in the United States of America.


March 10, 2005


me.illse o|t
Deloitte Tuucrli, hol,,latsU


December31.
20M4 2003

$ 359,146 $ 282.434
1,172,107 1,625.707
278,11000 151.0110


2,036.431
182,437
600,012
1,632,866
8,318
6,398
11,175
4,210
32,0S7
S 6,32?,194


S 1,041,778
381,028
649.422
122,742
2,194,970
439,075
2,036,438
182,437
149,736
107,578
4,616
183,554
95,815
135.,430
5,.529,649



132,922
311,494
352,764
(3,63a)_
793,54,1
S 6,323,194


1.258.820
537.250
334.891
1,482,553
9.908
8.957
5.025
S 5,716.613


S 897.119
368,310
620,416
150.496
2,036.341
312.006
1,258,820
537,250
127.948
329,163
4.572
144,523
54..189
134.760
4,939.872



132,922
311.494
334,020
_____(1 95.
7776,.741
$ 5.716.613


ee noses to cnanidale financial aements

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited
Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-7788, West -ay Street, Nassau Bahamas.


sury and government finances.
Leslie Miller, minister of trade
and industry, has previously said
the Bahamas could receive up to
$1.2 billion over 25 years in fees
and licence payments of the AES
project is approved.
The licence the government
will issue to AES is $9 million,
and the seabed lease fee (which
allows the company to lay
pipelines on the seabed) is $6 mil-
lion a year for 25 years, with a
2.5 per cent increase every year.

Guaranteed
In addition, a "throughput fee"
that measis linked to the amount
of LNG pumped through to
Florida is guaranteed at a mini-
mum of $5 million a year for the
first four to five years. The com-
munity of Bimini will get $150,000
a year for 25 years to assist with
economic development.
The training programme to be
initiated by AES is between
$200,000 to $400,000 to train
Bahamians for 35 permanent,
"high-paying" jobs. A minimum
of $400,000 will go to BTVI, and
Mr Miller said that the Govern-
ment has received a guarantee.
from the parent company, AES
International, that if the company
ever goes bankrupt, there is a
fund of no less than $10 million
for compensation to the Bahami-
an workers.
In the first year of operation,
the public treasury is expected to
receive $13.5 million. By year
four, it goes up to $19 million a
year.
By year eight, revenue is
-expected to rise to $25 million a
year, and by year 12 it goes up
to $45 million a year.
Negotiations on the Heads of
Agreement for the AES project
are understood to have been con-
cluded, and all it needs is an
approval from Prime
Minister Perry Christie and his
Cabinet.


Doctors almost



at full health


FROM page one

its Western Medical Plaza facil-
ity on Blake Road, which is cur-
rently held for sale. A previous
$9.5 million deal, agreed with
the combination of Medlink
Financial Services and Bahamas
Public Services Union (BPSU),
fell through amid a long wait
for government approval.
Sources told The Tribune that
DHHS is currently exploring a
number of buyer options relat-
ing to Western Medical Plaza's
sale, and discussions with one
potential purchaser are under-
stood to be reasonably advanced.
In fiscal 2005, the $1.564 mil-
lion loss generated by DHHS'
discontinuing operations at West-
ern Medical Plaza were a major
drag on its $4.131 million operat-
ing earnings. Operating income
increased by almost a third or
30.89 per cent on last year's
$3.156 million.
The $.1564 million drag also
reduced earnings per share (EPS)
from the $0.41 generated by con-
tinuing operations to $0.26 net a
reduction of $0.15 or more than a
third. EPS from continuing oper-
ations was still 28.1 per cent
ahead of 2004's $0.32, while net
EPS jumped from last year's
$0.06.
Still, DHHS' figures showed it
had come a long way from the
position it found itself in as
recently as 2002-2003, when mar-
ket analysts were concerned over
its high levels of debt and
accounts receivables, in addition


to fearing it had expanded too
quickly with Western Medical
Plaza.
DHHS's share price now
stands at a 52-week high of $1.50,
having been a great investment
for shareholders who bought in
between now and its 52-week low
of $0.35. And Western Medical
Plaza's loss has fallen by 39.4 per
cent from last year's $2.579 rmil-
lion.
Joseph Krukowski, DHHS
chairman, said in a letter to share-
holders: "Earnings per share
jumped from $0.06 to $0.26,
reflecting a 10.5 per cent increase
in total revenues, continued pru-
dent management of expenses
and a significant reduction in
operating costs for discontinuing
operations. The record breaking
financial results reflect increas
in business volumes across,a
broad range of services."
Refocusing on its core C s
Avenue facility has brought quick
rewards, though, as "a significant
reduction in long-term-.debt"
ensured that DHHS's fiscal2005
year-end cash position increased
to $3.2 million from $593,000 the
year before. .
DHHS said cash from operat-
ing activities totalled $3.7 million,
compared to $0.5 million the year
before, a 1395 per cent increase.
Net receivables fell by 4.9 per
cent, while the number of-days
of revenue in accounts recdiyhble
(AR) decreased to 70 daysiom
82 the previous year, reflec"ng
more timely settlementsof claims
by insurance companies.,
Darron Cash, DHHS' chief
financial officer, said: "T'is has
been a challenging yet tremen-
dously rewarding year for every- /
one in our organisation. In some r
clinical!areas in particular, where
we experienced record numbers
of patients and procedures, ,our
Associates rose to the occasion
and performed magnificently. We
are all so proud of them."
DHHS' operating expenses
rose slightly in 2005 compared to
the previous year, growing by 8.8
per cent to $21.791 million, but
provisions for doubtful accounts
fell by .7.7 per cent $857,000 from
$928,000.
Total liabilities fell from
$17.132 million to $15.578 mil-
lion, while shareholder equity
rose from $8.169 million in 2004
to $10.737 million.
Barry Rassin, DHHS chief
executive, said: "We have been
successful in our ongoing efforts
to achieve excellence in quality
patient care. We have reached
new heights, and there is a posi-
tive momentum aimed at mak-
ing greater improvements in cus-
tomer satisfaction.
"Our Associates have been an
integral part of our plan to ensure
continued growth of the compa-
ny through excellent service to
customers and physicians; I
applaud them for the tremendous
work they do. I also thank our
physicians and the Bahamian
community for their continued
support."
DHHS has scheduled is onnu-
al general meeting, (AGM) for
May 19.


TRUST OFFICER

SCOTIATRUST invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of Trust Officer with a
strong background and technical knowledge in areas
of trust, company and agency management. The
applicant will be involved in the administration of a
medium to high complexity level of accounts of
trusts, companies and agencies. A good level of
accounting knowledge is required. The person
appointed should hold a four year University Degree
in a related subject along with professional
qualifications in the Society of Trust and Estate
Practitioners (STEP) or ACIB. The ideal candidate
should have a minimum of five years progressive
experience in the industry. Analytical and
communication skills as well as familiarity with PC
software are essential. Preference will be given to
applicants with language skills. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked Private
and Confidential to the Manager, Client Services,
P.O. Box N-3016, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications
should be received no later than Friday, 22nd April,
2005.


Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Trust Company and Subsidiaries

Consolidated-Balance Sheets


In 61-a&ns .eem,;inromri,

Cash and due from banks ............... ............. .........
Interest-bearing deposis. ............. ........


Federal funds sold and securities purchased under resale agreements.............
Securities received as collateral
(includes S2.036.438 in 2004 and $1.258,820 in 2003 pledged as collsteral)........................
Due from securities lending customers....................................................................................
Securities (includes $498,462 in 2004 and $218,665 in 2003 pledged as collateral)..................
Loans and lease finance receivables, net of reserve for loan and
lease losses of$413.435 in 2004 and $95.879 In 2003........................................................
Investm ent in operating leases................................................. ....................... . ...............
Loans held-lbr-sale.. .. ........... ............. ..
Accrued interest receivable......................... ..................................................................
Premises and equipment., net ofaccumulated dcpreciation
ofS6,866 in 2004 and $6.912 in 2003......................... .......................................................
Other assef-.. ................ ..... ....... ..................................................... ......
ToWl.e..........._............... .................. _
Liabilities and Stockhohder's Equity
Deposis:
Noninetersn-hearing indomestic offices (nonamialed)................................................
Intarens-baring in domestic offices (nonalfiliated),..............................................................
Ineress-bearing in overseas oces (nonaffiliaed).................................................................
Inmarcs-hearing in overseas offices (affiliated).....................................................................
Total deposis....................... ........... .......... ... ... .. ........ ..................
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under repurchase agreements ........................
Obligation to return securities received as collaeral.. ... . ...............
Obligation to return cash collateral................... ........................................ ........................
Bo owings from a iliates.... .... ................. ............................................ ......................................
Other borrowed funds. ..... .........................................................................
Accrued interest payable ................................................................
Defened taxes payable.......... ... ..................................... ...... ..
Accrued expenses and other liabilities (including the allowance for credit
losses of $27.072 in 2004 and $32.317 in 2003)...;........................................................
Subordinated debt............................................... ..............
Total liabilities.............................................................................................................. ..........


Stockholder's Equity
Preferred stock (par value $100); 1,000,000 shares authorized;
none ontstandimg.................................................
Common stock (par vqlue$100); 1,485.000 shares autlhorized;
1,329,219 shares issued and outslanding..................................
CpAt al mt-urlust


L pi ... ... | ...................................................................................................... ..................
Retained ea nmings................ .........................................................................................
Acm nulated other comiprchensive loss............ ....... ..................... ..................
Total stock old es equity...........................................................................................................
Total liabiltles and stockholder's equity...........................


Investment Opportunity

MUST SELL
Lot No. "K", containing 6,750 sq. ft., St. Vincent Close Subdivision situate on the southern side of
St. Vincent Road, about one mile west of Blue Hill Road, comprising a triplex apartment and a two-
storey apartment block.














For condition of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Work Out Unit
at: 356-1686, 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Work Out Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before May 20, 2005

Financing available for the qualified purchaser

Serious enquiries onlyy!!


PAE8,MNAARL1,20


I .. -- I


------------- -- -- ...


BUSINESS


.


:I







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 9B


Terror dmuabme Is cloed down


""- "Copyrighted Material


-- Syndicated Content .- ---

Available from Commercial News Providers"


-q


d -
4bl


















w 4w t .






- N
_._















o -














*




S *
l




--


Job Title:

SECURITY OFFICER
Core Function: Protect employees, visitors
and property
Education and Other Requirements:
Three (3) BGCSE/GCE passes with 'C' grades or
above or equivalent/high school diploma.
Good human relations skills
Knowledge of policing principles
Punctual reliable and energetic
Clean Police Record
Good character
Interested persons should submit copies of their academic
certificates along with three character references to:
The Human Resources Manager
DA 4121
c/o The Tribune
Nassau, Bahamas


Middle Income Home, Suffolk Unit 2, Block #51, Lot #3,
3 bed, 2.5 bath, central air, fully landscape, washer & dryer.
'iI I, I


I N T E R N A T 1 0 N A L F I N A N C I A L S E R V I C E S


BRADLEY & SEAN

CALLENDER.,


the Partners of the Finii ()I' Sctn 11.
Callender & Co., ti-c plctsccl to
announce the opeiifflg ()I' the \Iiico
Branch of their Law CIiaiiihci-,,,
at the Sea Star Bulldliig. Vtlitii Kc\
Drive, Marsh HarII()LII-. AhICO.


Telephone Nos: 242.367 0432-3
Telefax No: 242 367 0434
Email: sbcqI1endeif&bqIeIqeI.bs
Postal address: P.O.Bo\ [`-4401'(.
Freeport, Grand 13ilitnit


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that REEDEL SAINTIL, FIRE TRAIL
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 11TH day of APRIL,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


w BUSINESSES


Doctors Hospital Health System Limited


Year Ended January 31, 2005

Chairman's Report
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders
On behalf of the Board of Directors, I am pleased to present our Company's results for the year ended
January 31, 2005.
Net income for the year was $2.6 million, representing the highest net income in its history, a
significant improvement over the $0.6 million reported last year. Earnings per share jumped from
$0.06 to $0.26, reflecting a 10.5% increase in total revenues, continued prudent management of
expenses and a significant reduction in operating costs for discontinuing operations. The record
breaking financial results reflect increases in business volumes across a broad range of services.

Following a few challenging years, Doctors Hospital is now stronger and better positioned to
meet the emerging challenges of a dynamic healthcare environment. The cash position is
stronger, the leadership's focus is sharper, and the commitment to excellence in patient care
has never been greater.

The Board of Directors is pleased that the return to solid profitability and a stronger balance
sheet once again affords us the ability to reinvest in the future of our company-through
training our Associates, community service projects, and investments in facility upgrades,
equipment, and information technology. The Board attributes much of this success to the hard
work and dedication of Associates, strong physician support, and the continuing confidence
and patronage of thousands of Bahamians and visitors. The Annual General Meeting is
scheduled for May 19, 2005. at whicht~im w lwlLfurth elaborate. the,,year'asc s es.

Joe Krukowski
Chairman
March 14, 2005


NOTICE


To All Doctors Hospital Health System


Shareholders

The Board of Directors of Doctors Hospital Health System reports below summary financial results for
the year ended January 31, 2005.
Consolidated Statement of Income
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
Year ended January 31,
2005 2004
CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Revenues
Patient service revenue, net $ 28,840 $ 25,956
Other 199 330
Total revenues 29,039 26,286
Expenses
Operating 21,791 20,031
Depreciation 1,717 1,558
Provision for doubtful accounts 857 928
Total expenses 24,365 22,517
Income from continuing operations before interest 4,674 3,768
Interest expense (542) (612)
Income from continuing operations 4,131 3,156
DISCONTINUING OPERATIONS
Loss from operations of discontinuing businesses (1,474) (2,426)
Loss on disposal of discontinued businesses (89) (152)
Impairment of property plant and equipment
Loss from discontinuing operations (1,564) (2,579)

NET INCOME $ 2,568 $ 577

Earnings per common share:
From continuing operations $ 0.41 $ 0.32
Basic 0.26 0.06
Selected Balance Sheet Data
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

January 31,
2005 2004
Cash position at end of year $ 3,199 $ 593
Patient accounts receivable, net 939 797
Receivable from third party payors, net 4,628 5.056
Property, plant and equipment 15,474 16,449
Total current assets ..10,380 8,284
Total assets 26,315 26,301
Total current liabilities 4,213 3.412
Total liabilities te 15,578 17.132
Total shareholders' equity $ 10,737 $ 8,169











PAGE 10B, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


KPMG Auditores Independentes


Mail address
Caixa Postal 2467
01060-970 Sao Paulo. SP
Brazil


Office address
R. Dr. Renato Paes de Barros, 33
04530-904 SAo Paulo, SP
Brazil


Central Tel 55 (111 3067-3000
Fax National 55 (11) 3079-3752
Intertialioiarl 55 i11) 3079-2916
www.Iqmg.com.bl


Independent auditors' report



To
The Managers and Shareholders
Banco Fibra S.A.
SAo Paulo SP



We have examined the balance sheets of Banco Fibra S.A. and the consolidated balance sheets of
Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries as of December 31, 2004 and 2003 and the related
statements of income, changes in shareholders' equity, and changes in financial position for the
years then ended, which are the responsibility of its management. Our responsibility is to express
an opinion on these financial statements.

Our examinations were conducted in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in
Brazil and included: (a) planning of the audit work, considering the materiality of the balances,
the volume of transactions, and the accounting systems and internal accounting controls of the
Bank and its subsidiaries; (b) verification, on a test basis, of the evidence and records which
support the amounts and accounting information disclosed; and (c) evaluation of the most
significant accounting policies and estimates adopted by management of the Bank and its
subsidiaries, as well as the presentation of the financial statements taken as a whole.

In our opinion the aforementioned financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the
financial position of Banco Fibra S.A. and the consolidated financial position of Banco Fibra
S.A. and its subsidiaries as of December 31, 2004 and 2003, and the results of its operations, and
changes in its shareholders' equity and changes in its financial position for the years then ended,
in conformity with accounting practices adopted in Brazil.



January 28, 2005



KPMG Auditores..dependentes
CRC 2SP014428/O-6







anCRC 1P60769/0-0 ""M ""* -

Banco Fibra S.A.


Balance sheets

Years ended December 31, 2004 and 2003

Is I V.sS


e4m4 m I am mno


A ..m.45.4M39
17AML 6,823


lam-rbk ift apped (Noe n


S poimnkd epoin m



Subjmw wet to rp0u.., u..u ,
Dalvqodw0bd.clakte In

Interbeakt a (Ne l8)
C.allc.ion..i* .
cunpP-dM


0,6.94-
A30.Oa.I,0I-


rlna.
50.1. o-7pMMI. 16)


Ta "a&W (Hais)
Osal (Na 17.)







IAOOls..e.I.94

la &.6k .-,,ppipked ( M5)


sO.-No.ddwkri" 1h.deII..Uru5Na146)




3.... L m- u 4
Dlllnin~ Sfcadll unmaaa
LIt(NM >


..JL -l .90


,32.50 2.4% 77 .13.5M 1.. .43.77
4841.113 2046346 4041.113 2463,436
4A13 20.,41 4". 20.421
79143 79.41


U.3539 32362W94
932,146 1117.400
361431 741.810
278.382 18.399
112.378
12,100 14,407


0 6 .26 0
126
940


I1,61.490 22M77.7

643,439 635.667
361.$31 1337,404
424260 5I7,95
1.2.378
12.100 14,407


1.29
126
940


647,235 506A62 647X31 560692

3.631 7,634 3.631 7.634
656,6 513230 6$6.66 S13.2
(12.M6) (14.1721) (12.962) (14,171)

_______ ______ 317 17726
2.757 43 4.362 143
(21,77) (43) (2.045) (117)
4.1866 5P.927 463A32 201,473
36 -6
357.470 136.1157 3S7.470 136I
2,148 1,716 2,347 1.973
13305 3,443 20A49 11.196

.1949 9.773 519i 5 1,6A6
19,495 34.011 67,479 44,063
13.237) (2,93) (4.77 ) (4,41)


,792 1.409 10,75 9.090
(467) () (4. ) (4.0) ($.140)
4,135 4,921 3211 4.921


174.198 929.757


6-47 xI9.22


25D 250


43 720279

2.04
43 602,16
115,411
Io+ 1. i16.>*s.


2SO
43 19.7SO
2.06
43 7.417
10.325
103,_13 13 .4


11,120 15,40 11.120 11206
835,103 120331 15,193 120331


n77


S s577


* 4.03 4.08
S (31.6) (3,506)


69,79 70337


$9,363 7037


1302 -. 13012
329 1.347 329 1.347

$5,665 69,010 4.199 69.010
132 .1A 1633


I,013
1.013





. 8.272
6.26 6310



(6O77) (S.907)
3..67 .747

1,771 1309

7.055355 6,43.93


1.013

14.707 10.416

- W


64,96 64


10.24 8.979
(6310, ) (1,920)
3.167 747

1.771 2.30

6.314.0$5 5.723.07


Banco Fibra S.A.



Balance sheets

VYears eded December 31,2004 and 2003

Ilh.....46aS


lw 2m.aS. m ll. C.o.0di.
20 23 2044 1543


Depolii(Nu 13)


T0i-p d..o



Ow.ponfo po
Flrfm yponfolio


6.460,110 5032397


MU32 26614
1 4.73 1.7,417
0.313 5 772,62
37$

4531.34 1.701.212
123.41 1.31.1995
3,701,173 2.440,023
310.721
23.926 2.219

1.219
23.926
15,42 4.423


1.912.114 .049576

996,401 I10.950
20,77 216311
69374 31,910
06315 T.2,6S32
373

4315,34 3.754.41
3231.431 1.314,822
3.701.173 2.440.023
3110.723


2.219

I 42 4.423


1.54 4.423 1542 4.423


243151 16.976


243.SS 17624


243.)5 11.976 243.511 173,624


Goeres geacy for mahiucry .d quipmen 6..dcin (FINAME) (ote 15)
Darntifven nacIalU lurumeu (Note 6)
Dcivaivel aci insumm



FMca in-cy pnMli6o(M 16)
CwpoM tad -y
TS-u
Otkh,0rs


D.Idb NlW 13)

"Tn dwWu
66.86666u


Foreign borro-wo(aNoie 14)
lVp- bo.nowi.. nkmpubilp tor
Onmnt agecy for =chery and cquip me f cing (FINAME) (Note 15)
DWai.vl na.dal i.nt ume (Note 6)
De.iv.i e o.aci. 'u a
OR.or It.blUda

Olhcs -


Dcfe.ed income
Shlarehader' equity

Capital raavel
c.R n (retr-ve 1
Adju.,m-. Im .et value Seu4i.s and divuivie ,fi- d insnu $(Note 4e)
Iteiumod-tfunt,


62.154 22.751 62.154 22,75
42341 137.510 4 16m429
.341 137,0 40.,165 137.439


25,03 107,473


164109 98733
46.473] 01.763

718304
46.473 93.459


M75 1233S
108 125
2 ,1.7
33.739 3A
12.94 9I63
11=02 14A"7


46473 834.9

46.473 13.459


7.190 7.190
7.190 7.190


32,748 17,760 32,748 10.112
33,742 17,60 32,742 101112


60.407 120.09


61JI2 120,M


60.M6 120,809 61.23 120.809


106 22318
106 22.11


106 2231J


17.46S 24,876 23453 24.476

3269 13.042 7.959 13,042
14,196 11.834 15.,494 11.34

4.86 2,32 4.69 2,322
4,869 2,322 4.869 2.322


425.687 414.735
236.470 236.470
.,5190 4,031
23.229 23,427
(346) (956)
159.144 151,763


423.687 414.735

236.470 236.470
5.10 4.031
25,229 23,427
(346) 506)
IS9.144 11.763


7.055.35 6.436.980 614.053 5.28207

See o .xona paonyiq tnoo,.g 10 ihe 000oc66 Ultemai.











Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries





Notes to the financial statements


Years ended December 31, 2004 and 2003

(In thousands ofReais)







1 Operations

Banco Fibra S.A. is organized as a multiple service bank, and its operations involve commercial
banking, foreign exchange, investment, credit and financing transactions. The Bank also
operates, through its subsidiaries, in leasing, brokerage of securities, and management of
investment portfolios and investment funds.



2 Presentation of financial statements

The financial statements of the Banco Fibra S.A. ("Banco Fibra") include the balances of its
foreign branch (Note 12) and are presented together with the consolidated financial statements of
Banco Fibra and its subsidiaries ("Fibra Consolidated").



3 Consolidated financial statements

The consolidated financial statements of Banco Fibra include its foreign, branch and the
subsidiaries .'Fibra Leasing S:A. Aitrridamento Mercantil (99.99%), Fibra Distribuidora de
Titulos e Valores Mobilihrios Ltda. (99.99%), RTSPE Empreendimentos e Participaq6es Ltda.
S(99,99%), Fibra Companhia Securitizadora de Cr6ditos Financeiros (99.99%), Fibra Companhia
Securitizadora de Cr6dito Imobilibrio (99.99%), Fibra Projetos e Consultoria Economica Ltda
(99.99%) and Banco Fibra Internqtional Ltd (100.00%).

Income and expenses, and the balances between consolidated companies were eliminated in the
consolidated financial statements. (Note 20)

Lease transactions, stated at their net present value, are classified in current and noncurrent assets
in the consolidated financial statements. These transactions were originally presented in the
financial statements of Fibra Leasing, as permanent assets ("Leased fixed assets") and current
and long-term liabilities ("Other liabilities Others" and "Residual value prepayments").


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A, and its subsidiaries

Notes to the financial statements


(In thousands of Reais)

4 Significant accounting policies

The accounting practices adopted for the recognition and preparation of these financial
statements are derived from Brazilian Corporate Law, and the rules and instructions of the
Brazilian Central Bank (BACEN). Th'e main accounting practices are as follows:

a. Recognition of income

Current operating income and expenses, and transactions exposed to monetary variations are
accrued on a daily basis. Operating assets and liabilities exposed to exchange variation are
price level restated according to the foreign exchange rate at the balance sheet date, according
to the contractual clauses.

b. Interbank funds applied

Stated at cost value plus income accrued up to the balance sheet date.

c. Securities

Are classified into three categories: "trading securities", "securities available for sale" and
"securities held to maturity". Securities classified as "trading securities" are stated at market
value, with adjustments stated in an offsetting entry in the appropriate income or expense
account for the period. Marketable securities classified as "available for sale" are stated at
the market value and adjustments thereto are stated in a separate account in shareholders'
equity, net of tax effects, and are restated to income for the period in which the effective
disposal thereof occurs. The "securities held to maturity" are stated at acquisition cost, plus
interest accrued up to the balance sheet date. Recognition in this category depends on the
financial capacity of the institution to retain them until maturity, which is a Management
decision, based on projected.cash flow and does not take into consideration the possibility of
disposal of these securities. (Note 6a)

d. Derivative financial instruments

Derivatives are stated at their market values on the balance sheet date, and are used to
manage overall risk exposure, and not for hedging purposes. They are accounted for under
the appropriate income or expense account, as presented in the statements of income. (Note
6b)


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries

Notes to the financial statements


(In thousands of Reais)


e. Allowances for loan and lease operation losses and other receivables

Recorded at amounts considered sufficient to cover possible losses. The Central Bank of
Brazil, under Resolution 2682/99, established rules which are based on an analysis of the
risks of clients' current operations and on past performance as well as specific sector or
portfolio risks (Note 10).

f. Other assets

Assets received as payment are recorded under the heading "Other assets" and include
provisions established in an amount considered sufficient to cover probable losses on
realization.

g. Investments

Investments in subsidiaries are valued according to the equity method of accounting. Other
investments are valued at purchase cost and price level restated up to December 31, 1995,
less a provision for losses, when applicable.

b. Premises and equipment and deferred expenses

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment and amortization of deferred expenses are
calculated using the straight-line method at the following annual rates and terms: (a)
property, plant and equipment: vehicles and computer systems 20%, other assets 10%, (b)
deferred expenses: costs of acquisition and development of software 20%, and leasehold
improvements rental contract term.


carr...


Llmopndm (Noa9)

AoW-Ie l-ae -loie


Tanad hole )
Tedm (1o0 1.11)
0. 94,087..)


50--


5*y~Sh .~i608..-Dm5. 9446. 55)
I~60.,0 4.~s.060u1p966le II)



8044.ly.pIinmd 66,08,0


8.U18....A -u-


FR p bornawi.(N pOis 14)
RIopmb Ixnrwi rfrom pubUc wc-or


I


I . __ __ I


..


62.1 4 ^ 7,11.


62,154 2n751_


mmS!










THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 11B


i. Income and social contribution taxes

The provision for income tax is recorded at the rate of 15% plus a surcharge of 10% on
annual taxable income exceeding RS 240. The provision for social contribution taxes is
recorded at the rate of 9%, in accordance with prevailing legislation. Further details of these
tax effects are disclosed in Note 18.

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra SA. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reals)
5 Interbank funds applied

Money market Repurchase agreements

Money market investments are represented by securities in the amount of RS 4,048,113 (R$
2,463,456 in 2003) pledged by Federal Debt Securities in Banco Fibra and Fibra Consolidated.


6 Securities and derivative financial instruments

a. Securities portfolio
Banco FIbra Fibra Cnsolklatedd


Trading (1)
Finacial Treasury Bills LFT
NaooalTr.asury Bills- LTN
NationalTreasury Notes NTN
Cnral Bank Notes- NBC
Private securities
1nvcstmcnt flad (2)
.hares of publicly traded companies
Eumanotes and commercial papers
Other
Held to maturity (3)
uronotes and commercial papers (3)

Available for sale (t)
Financial Treasury Bills LFT
Shares of publicly traded companies
Privae securities
Other

Derivative financial instrments
Swap Receivable
Forward transactions
Other
Total portfolio


2004


2003 2004 2003


Accrual Book Book Accrual Book Book
Value value value value Valse value
880.380 83.5299 2.079.0o64 1.1,001 1.004.229 1d123S.


4.587
462.736
29,426
81.271
207.745
20.077
74,538

419.968
419.968



2.527


4.581
463.004
29.796
82.240
207,745
21.305
74.928

419.968
419.968

2.253
2.210
43


555,104
460.761
74.607
470,587
4,030
429.322
19.710
59,874
5,069
603.242
602.860
382

7.058
1.449
50


12,631 22299
12.631 7.417
382


278985 '7831 297.810 43.020 42,420 68284
278.985 778.382 280.883 43,020 42.420 151,357
16.780 16.780

8 Lim 21. d ,44 70 1.059.180 1.760


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands ofReais)
(1) For the categories "Securities available for sale" and "Trading securities", the book values of the securities were
calculated using the following criteria: a) federal debt securities, forwards and options are priced as described in
Note 7; b) Publicly traded equity securities, and forward transactions linked to these securities are priced
according to the average quotation available from the last quotation made available, or in.the absence thereof, the
most recent quotations, published in the Daily Bulletin of each Stock Exchange; and c) Swaps, based on the
reference values of each contract's parameters (part and counterpart, except Fibra Group), taking into account the
cash flow discounted at the present value based on interest rates disclosed based on the pricing model described in
Note 7, according to the terms of each contract.

(2) Investment Fund Valencia FIF is a mutual fund portfolio comprised, mainly, of the following:. Financial
Treasury Bills LFT R$ 146.961, Shares of publicly-traded companies RS 20,898, Swaps
R$S 22,240, with counterpart of Banco Fibra, Private bonds R$ 21,217 and Others RS 8,737. The portfolio of the
exclusive Investment Fund Barcelona, included in the consolidated financial statements of Fibra Consolidated is
comprised of the following: Repos pledged by Financial Treasury Notes, with counterpart of Banco Fibra
RS 109,933, Swaps RS 3,283, with counterpart of Banco Fibra, Private bonds RS 4,444 and Others RS 32.

(3) As of December 31, 2004, the market value for securities held to maturity are not different from the book values
presented. In Banco Fibra, this includes RS 407,380 (RS 595,443 in 2003) of"Euro Medium Term Notes" issued
by Fibra Leasing S.A., eliminated in Fibra Consolidated.

In December, 2004 the amount of RS 130,356, presented as "held to maturity", was sold. This
operation affected the income for the year in the amount of R$ 2,239, and reflected the
reassessment of management's intention to hold those securities to maturity. ns,'-: .

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries
.




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands ofReais)
b. Derivative financial instruments Swaps and forwards

The Bank enters into operations with derivatives for the purpose of addressing its own and
client needs to reduce exposure to market, currency and interest risks. The Bank has invested
in developing system controls, focusing on management of those risks. The risk management
is performed based on limits and operating strategies. The derivatives, in accordance with
their nature and specific legislation, are accounted for in the balance sheets or as off-balance
items. As at December 31, 2004, the derivatives recorded in the balance sheet and as off-
balance items include forwards and swap contracts, as follows:


Swap contracts

Receivable -
CDI vs. DOLLAR
"CDI vs. PRE
PRE vs. DOLLAR
TOTAL
Payable
DOLLAR vs. CDI
CDI vs. PRE
PRE vs. CDI
Other
TOTAL


Assets
627,676
23,124
616,652
1 267452

560,104
5,046
23,844
905
589,899


Banco Fibra

Liabilities Net receivable
567,832 59,844
23,078 46
398,160 218,492
989.070 278.382

602,850 (42,746)
5,047 (1)
23,796 48
653 252
632.346 (42,4471


Fibra Consolidated


Assets
545,289
23,124

568A413

496,136
5,046
23,559
905
525.646


Liabilities
502,915
23,078

525-993

536,753
5,047
23,464
653
565,912


Net receivable
42,374
46

42.420

(40,617)
(1)
95
252
(40.271)


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands ofReais)

c. Maturity of securities and derivative financial instruments


Banco Fibra
Categories

Trading
Held to maruriy
Available for sale
Derivative financial
instruments (assets)

Total

Derivative financial
i ctuoatenu (liabilities)

Fibra Consolidated
Categories

Trading
Held to maturity
Available for sale
Derivative financial
instruments (assets)

Total

Derivative financial
instruments (liabilities)


More
31 to90 91 to180 181 to thao360
Up to 30 days dyay dys. 360 days day.


883,599 -
6,000 96,351 52,177 265,440
2,210 -

55,682 52,746 22.347 147,607

947.491 149.097 74524 413S47


(39,501)


Total 2004 Total 2003

883.599 2.079,064
419,968 603,242
2,253 8,557

278,382 297,810


S 58.202 2,562448


40) ( 192) ( 3,006) 292 ( 42,447) (159,898)


3110to 90 91 to 80 181o More lt
Up to30 days days days 360 days 360 days Total 2004 Total 2003


1,004229
6,000
2,210


6,631


S 1,004,229
12,631
43 2,253


2,112,865
7,799
8,557


38211 2.4 94 1.70 42420 68.28

1050.652 2.13 7.325 1.320 43 1.L061333 2222.509

( 37,357) ( 8) ( 192) (3,006) 292 ( 40,271) ( 159,747)


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)


d Notional value of derivative financial instrument, distributed between places of
negotiation, as follows:

December 31, 2004

Banco Fibra Fibra Consolidated


CETIP (over the counter market)
BM&F


1,205,292
19,338


1,129,721
19,338


e. Presentations of margins deposited in guarantee for derivative financial instrument
transactions


December 31,2004

Banco Fibra Fibra Consolidated


National Treasury Bills LTN
Others


58,657
1,036


58,657
1,036


Total (1) 59.693 59.693

(1) The total margin values deposited is comprised of RS 47,648 deposited by the Valencia Fund.


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands ofReais)

7 Risk management

Control of market risk exposure, focused on the risk management of the positions assumed by
Management, is directly subordinated to the Senior Bank Executives. The management of
market risk involves a set of controls, which includes the value at risk (V@R) concept within
certain parameters, using the optimized Exponential Weighted Moving Average E.W.M.A.,
which assigns greater weight to more recent events and stress tests. The purpose of this is to
assess the maximum loss potential of a portfolio, taking into consideration the worst-case
scenario which could occur. Combined with other risk assessment instruments, they aim at
presenting, quantitatively, the risks assumed by the Bank. The Bank's risk exposure policy is
considered to be conservative, and the V@R limits and stress scenario are periodically authorized
by a specific committee, which comprises members of the Board of Directors, the Executive
Committee, Risk Management, and Controlling and Funding areas.

The pricing models used by the Bank were developed internally and the calculation of the curves
and reference prices are the responsibility of the Risk Management department, whose
methodology is approved by senior management of the Bank and takes into consideration the
characteristics of each negotiated financial instrument.


8 Interbank account

On December 31, 2004, it was comprised of checks and other documents pending settlement in
the amount of R$ 1,066 (R$ 1,290 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and Fibra Consolidated.

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)

9 Loans and lease operations (Consolidated)

a. Composition ofportfolio
2004 2003
RS % as %


Loans
Working capital
Consumer loans
Repass under Resolution 2770
Import financing loans
Repass National Bank for Economic and Social Development -
BNDES
Vendor and Compror
Other
Lease operations
Pre-export (1)
Other receivables
Co-obligations and risks from guarantees provided
Total loan and lease operations

b. Distribution by economic activity


Industry
- .Commerce .
Services
SAgriculture
Real estate
Public sector
Financial intermediaries
Individuals


763.510
492,007
57,657
23,970
22,234

123,777
41,287
2,583
4,367
217,046
7,028
325.228


58.0
37.4
4.4
1.8
1.7

9.4
3.1
0.2
0.3
16.5
0.5
24.7


659.408
364,600
29,978
28,326
27,413

116,793
53,977
11.201
5,926
,82,395
8,414
207.433


68.5
37.8
3.1
2.9
2.8

17.0
5.6
1.2
0.6
8.6
0.9

100.0


LQ A100.0 9 76


2004 2003
RS % RS */%
589,873 44,7 440,840 45.8
188,398 14,3 103,193 10.7
404,039 30,7 343,252 35.6
22,526 1,7 4,080 0.4
2,662 0,2 -
29,809 2,3 25,840 2.7
27,455 2,1 5,950 0.6
52.417 40.421 4.2_A


Total 1317.1 100.0 963.576 100.0

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)
c. Largest debtors

-2004 2003


% of % of
RS Portfolio Equity


Largest debtor:
10 largest debtors
20 largest debtors


31,287
191,482
300,926


2.4 7.3 43,338
14.5 45.0 266,475
22.8 70.7 389,838


% of %of
Portfolio Equity

4.5 10.4
27.7 64.3
40.5 94.0


d Distribution by maturity


2004 2003


S RS


Up to 30 days
From 31 to 60 days
From 61 to 90 days
From 91 to 180 days
From 181 to 360 days
More than 360 days


295,766
214,790
124,669
259,400
235,486
187.068


Total


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A.,




Notes to the financial statements


% R$S %

22.4 219,786 22.8
16.3 162,167 16.8
9.5 84,783 8.8
19.7 191,522 19.9
17.9 150,792 15.6
14.2 154.526 d 16.0

100.0 a 1000


and its subsidiaries


(In thousands ofReais)

10 Distribution of loans by risk rating levels

a. Presentation of the Loan and Lease Portfolio by risk levels Fibra Consolidated


Current Overdue


Risk Minimum
Level provision
AA
A 0.5


Total in 2004
% of portfolio
Total In 2003
% of portfolio


RS Provision Overdue
424,682
370,514 1,853
345.082 3.451 1,268
146.731 4,402 819
4,875 488 9.993
1.113 334 316
1,826 913 151
72
5,110 5.110 109


lastllmema Total Teal
noldue Provalon operations provisle"a
424.682
370,514 1.853
237 IS 346.587 3.466
308 34 147,858 4.436
563 1,056 15,431 1,544
843 348 2,272 682
281 216 2,258 1,129
270 239 342 239
2,016 2,125 7,235 7,235


127.0 40.3%98 1122 2
1.0% 0.3%


98.7%


99.2%


.747 0.4%
04T 0.4%


2671 m3J Um 222


b. Allowance for loan losses Consolidated


Opening balance
Write-offs against provision
Provisions recorded during the year
Credit assignments


22,087
(8,871)
12,980
(5612)


2003

21,613
(11,396)
11,870


Closing balance


,


I - I I I I










PAGE 12B, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


.THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands ofReais)

The total recovery of loans written off during 'he year amounted to RS$ 1,150 (RS 3,697 in
2003), and renegotiation of loans amounted to R$ 1,134 (R$ 5,121 in 2003) in Bancoibra
and R$ 1,192 (R$ 5,172 in 2003) in Fibra Consolidated.

c. Credit assignments

During 2004, loan contracts were sold to Fibra Securitizadora de Crdditos Financeiros,
(subsidiary) in the amount of R$ 12,263 in Banco Fibra and RS 1,263 in Fibra Consolidated.
Such transactions did not produce any impact on net equity nor on the statements of income
for the year, as the provisions recorded at Banco Fibra were maintained at Fibra
Securitizadora de Creditos Financeiros.


11 Investments in subsidiaries


2004


Subsidiary

Fibra Leasing S.A. Arrendamento
Mercantil (b)
Fibra Disribuidora de Tiulos e Valores
Mobilirios Ltda.
RTSPE Empreendimentos e
Participao6es Lida.
Fibra Projetos e Consultoria Econ6mica
Lda. (c)
Fibra Cia. Scuritizadora de Crdditos
Financeiros
Fibra Cia. Scuritizadora de Cr6ditos
Imobili'rios (a)
Banco Fibra International Ltd. (d)


%of Shareholders
ownership equity
99.999% 32,898


99.990%
100.000%
99.999%


Net Amount of
income Equity investment
1,358 1.358 32.898


6,111 968 968 6,111
320 320 320 320
730 ( 269) (269) 730


2003


Amount of
investment
31,538
5,135


99.990% 1,640 ( 373) (373) 1,640


99.825% 11,564
100.000% 13,272


235 235 11.564
(2,378) 13272

2.,;23 66535


Tomal


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands ofReais)

References

a. On October 13, 2003, Fibra Companhia Securitizadora de Cr6ditos Imobiliarios was
incorporated in its pre-operation stage. The going-public process is still subject to approval
by the Brazilian Securities Commission

b. In accordance with the extraordinary shareholders' general meeting, on November 19, 2003,
the capital of Fibra Leasing S.A. Arrendamento Mercantil was increased by the amount of
R$ 30,000, which was approved by the Brazilian Central Bank on December 3, 2003.

c. On January 23, 2004, Fibra Projetos e Consultoria Econ6mica Ltda. was incorporated

d. On April 7, 2004, the incorporation of Banco Fibra International Ltd. in Nassau Bahamas
was homologated by the Brazilian Central Bank, with an authorized initial investment of
US$ 5,000 thousand. This process is pending approval by the Central Bank of the Bahamas.


12 Foreign branches

The balances between the Nassau Branch and Banco Fibra, eliminated in the consolidated
balance sheet, were as follows: cash and cash equivalents R$ 91,199 (R$ 12 in 2003), interbank
ftnds applied R$ 505,433 (R$ 265,228 in 2003), securities R$ 7,946 (R$ 243,798 in 2003) and
deposits R$ 296,568 (R$ 204,554 in 2003).

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)
The balances of operations undertaken by the Nassau branch, translated into reais at the exchange
rate of R$ 2.6544 (R$ 2.8892 in 2003), consolidated in Banco Fibra as detailed in note 2, were as
follows:

R$


2004


Cash and cash equivalents
Interbank funds applied
Securities and derivative financial instruments
Loans
Other receivables
Other assets
Deferred expenses


8,895
79,643
713,432
25,044
7,501
2,448
65


Liabilities
Demand deposits
Time deposits
Repurchase commitments
Borrowings and repass borrowings
Derivative Financial Instruments
Other liabilities


13,965
312,813
58,809
92,522
4,343
1,059


2003


441
17,429
1,133,151
44,957
5,170
2,952
102


2003


1,010
69,352
60,777
84,650

104


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)

13 Demand deposits, Time deposits (CDB/CD/RDB) and Interbank deposits
(CDI)

Funds by maturity dates

Banco Fibra Fibra Consolidated


Demand and
other
deposit
Up to 30 days 34,457
Fromr31 to 60 days
From61 to 90 days
From 91 to l80 days
From 181 to360days
More than 360 days (1)
Total 2004 34457
Total 2003 2669


Time Interbank
deposit deposit


229,582
117,790
63,454
369,183
126,306

952-788


72,653

264
521,818

594.735
Z 2


Total
deposits
336.692
117,790
63,454
369,447
648,124


,t6118.5I 6


Demand
deposit
21.112





21.112
26-M


Time
deposit
229,582
117,790
63.454
369.183
126,306
46.473
952.788
m3.U


Interbank
deposit
69,374




69-374
31lfl


Total
deposits
320.068
117,790
63,454
369,183
126,306
46.4732
I 1043.274
409


(1) Time deposits maturing from 361 to 720 days, in the amount of RS 40,955 in Banco Fibra and Fibra
Consolidated, and maturing in over 720 days in the amount of R$ 5,518 in Banta Fibra and Fibra Consolidated,
bear interest ranging from 18.4% p.a. to 31.5% p.a. Interbank Deposits in Banco Fibra.
(2) Other deposits refers to investment deposits and amount to RS 375


14 Borrowings

At December 31, 2004, foreign borrowing were represented by foreign currency funds raised from
banks, amounting to R$276,331 in.Banco Fibra and Fibra Consolidated (R$183,736 in 2003)
bearing interest ranging from LIBOR plus 1.15% per year to prefixed rates of 5.7% per year.

Distribution in terms of maturity


Banco Fibra and
Fihra Consolidated


O to 30 31 to60 61 to90 91 to 180 181 o Up to
days days days days 360 days 360 days Total 2004 Total 2003


12.658 7.065 9.469 122,859 8,532 32,748 276,331


183,736


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)


15 Domestic repass borrowing

At December 31, 2004, domestic repass borrowing refers to funds raised from BNDES and
FINAME for operations with clients, totaling R$ 122,761 in Banco Fibra (R$ 143,560 in 2003)
and R$ 123,369 in Fibra Consolidated (R$ 143,560 in 2003).

Distribution amongst maturity

More
oto30 3! to60 61to90 91to180 181to thaa360
days days days days 360 days days Total 2004 Total 2003
Banco Fibra 4,498 4,418 4.464 31,543 17,231 60,607 122,761 143,560
Fibra Consolidated 4,498 4,418 4,464 31,543 17,231 61,215 123,369 143,560


16 Foreign currency portfolio

Banco Fibra and Fibra Consolidated
2004 2003
Interbank Clients Total Interbank Clients Total


Foreign exchange purchased pending
settlement
Rights from exchange sold
(-) Advances in local currency
Income receivable
Liabilities
Obligations for exchange purchased
Unsettled sold exchange
(-) Advances on exchange contracts


147-.15 209.655.

59,954 207,071
87,861 18,336
(19,059)
3,307
147.634 227236
59,956 223,164
87,678 18,311
(213,739)


'357.47 0 51 341 85.516 136857


267,025
106,197
(19,059)
3307


38,651 84,277 122,928
12,690 405 13,095
(405) (105)
1,239 1,239


1175.370 1.400 3 55.21135
283,120 38,789 84,587 123,376
105,989 12,611 405 13,016
(213.739) (81,157) (81,157)


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reals)

17 Composition of other relevant balances

a. Current and long-term assets

Other receivables Other

Refers mainly to deposits pledged as guarantees in the amount of RS 15,732 (R$S 13,724 in
2003) in Banco Fibra and R$S 22,387 (R$ 14,142 in 2003) in Fibra Consolidated, renegotiated
loans of RS 2,821 (R$ 4,510 in 2003,) in Banco Fibra and R$ 5,071 (R$ 6,381 in 2003) in
Fibra Consolidated, amounts receivable from sales of assets in the amount of RS 1,956 (RS
2,032 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and Fibra Consolidated, amounts receivable for settlement of -
operations totaling R$ 13,633 (R$ 4,790 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and R$ 21,178 (R$ 12,543
in 2003) in Fibra Consolidated, recoverable taxes in the amount of
R$ R$ 2,922 (R$ 3,191 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and R$ 5,199 (R$ 4,829 in 2003) in Fibra
Consolidated.

b. Current and long-term liabilities

Other liabilities Other

Refers, mainly, to a provision for contingent liabilities totaling R$ 9,521 (R$ 9,887 in 2003)
in Banco Fibra and R$ 10,569 (R$ 10,944 in 2003) in Fibra Consolidated, and deferred taxes
in the amount of R$ 1,340 (R$ 11,124 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and R$ 6,034 (
R$ 16,246 in 2003) in Fibra Consolidated. Banco Fibra is discussing the legality of certain
lawsuits in which it appears as defendant. Based on the opinion of its legal advisors,
management does not expect significant losses from the outcome of such cases, apart from
the existing provisions.

c. Other operating income

Other operating income refers mainly to allocation of expenses incurred by subsidiaries in the
amount of R$S 2,794 (R$ 3,139 in 2003) in Banco Fibra, and gains on renegotiation of
contracts in the amount of R$ 829 (RS 2,601 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and Fibra Consolidated.

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




NoteS't6the firaiacialstatements

(In thousands of Reais)
d. Other operating expenses

Refer substantially to expenses related to recovery of assets, in the amount of R$ 700
(R$ 571 in 2003) in Banco Fibra and R$ 1,208 (R$ 1,238 in 2003) in Fibra Consolidated and
monetary correction of taxes payable in the amount of RS 209 (R$ 190 in 2003) in Banco
Fibra and Fibra Consolidated.

e. Nonoperating results

Nonoperating income refers mainly to the net income arising from the sale of
nonoperating assets and the respective provisions.


18 Income tax and social contribution

At December 31, 2004 the Bank recognized income and social contribution tax credits calculated
at prevailing rates, as shown below. These credits are recorded in assets under "Other receivables
Other", in view of the estimates of realization of the credits regarding Fibra Financial Group,
according to the expectation of taxable income, supported by technical studies.

Supported by technical studies related to realization of tax credits, the provision previously
recorded for tax credits calculated over social contribution regarding Provisional Measure 2158-
35 of August 24, 2001 was totally reverted, resulting in an increase of deferred tax credits in the
amount of R$ 11,530.

The amount of tax credits not recognized on tax loss carry forwards amounts to R$S 20,475 for
Fibra Consolidated. The amount of tax credits over social contribution regarding Provisional
Measure 2158-35 of August 24, 2001, amounts to R$ 4,765 for Fibra Consolidated.

Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A.,and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements


(In thousands of Reals)



Tax credits
Total tax credits front temporary
differences

Allowance 2rr loan losses
Labor suits
Mark-to-market adjustments
Allowance for valuation of other
assets
Tax less and negative basis for
social contribution
Social contribution Provisional
Measure 2158-35 of 2410812001

Total tax credits
Deferred tax liabilities

Net tax credits
% of tax credits over
Shareholders equity
% of tax credits over Assets


Banco Flbra Fibra Consolidated

Balances at Incorporations Balances at Balances at Incorporations Balances at
12/31/03 (Write-offs) 12/31104 12/31/03 (Write-offs) 12/31/04

12.647 (1-1351 11.512 14-560 QMJf4 12AS6


(1,121) 7,293
(59) 797
(35) 3,270


(2,057) 7,846
(59) 797
(68) 3,661


72 80 152 72 80 152


62.162


(14,564) 47,598 62,162 (14,295) 47,867


3.974 11.530 15.5Is i274 IlS30 L

78,783 (4,169) 74,614 80,696 (4,.869) 75,827
124 9.787 -J (1 912) (124 .6) 1021 (6 D


67,659
16.3%
1.1%


5,616 73,275 64.450 5,343 69,793
17.2% 15.5% 164%
1.0% 1.1% 1.1%


The expectation of realization of tax credits from temporary differences and tax loss carry
forwards per year, and the respective present values, calculated according to average funding
rates, net of tax effects is as follows:


Banco Fibra S.A.:


2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total


Nominal value 18,949 16,586 18,385 16,148 4,546 74,614
Present value 17,830 14,048 14,140 11,311 2,904 60,233






Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries




Notes to the financial statements

(In thousands of Reais)


Assets


I r -


-- I I' I I







Fibra Consolidated
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total


Nominal value 19,528 17.005 18,417 16188
Pitrent value 18,214 14,292 14,166 11,342


4,549 75,827
2.907 60.921


Income tax and social contribution were calculated as described in Note4j.
The calculation of income lax and social contribution of Banco Fibra SA. is as follows:


come before Income taxes and participation of
minority interests
Payment of interest on equity
Income before income and social contribution taxes
Income (25%) and social contribution (9%) taxes
Additions and deductions in the calculation of taxes:
Investments in subsidiaries
Distribution of profits of subsidiaries abroad
Reversal of social contribution MP 2158-35
Realization of tax credits
Net nondeductible expenses of nontaxable income
Interest on equity received
Others
luame tax and social contribution for the year


2004


2003


60,126 138,141


60,126 59,941
(20,419) (20,380)


59,785
(79,929)
11,530
9,785
585
(1.248)


51,702
(77,564)
16,377
449)
255
L 1351)


(19.911)


Banco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries


Notes to the financial statements
(In thousands of Reais)
19 Capital
Capital is comprised of 1,035,887,231 registered common shares, with no par value, paying a
nunimum distribution of dividends of 25% of net income for the year, adjusted according to
prevailing legislation. The distribution of dividends is subject to approval by management at the
Annual General Shareholders' Meeting, which can decide on the total or partial retention of net
income.
On February 12, 2004, the Brazilian Central Bank homologated the capital increase occurred on
December 30, 20G3 in the amount of R$S 66,470.
On April 29, 2004 and November 10, 2004, the General Shareholders' Meeting decided on the
payment of dividends in the amount R$ 20,000 and RS 7,000, respectively.

20 Related-party transactions
As of December 31, 2004 and 2003, the principal balances for related-party transactions were as
follows:
Assets (liabilities) Income (expenses):
2004 2003 2004 2003


Securities and Derivative Financial
Instruments
Other Receivables
Deposits
Open Market Ope. '-ious
Derivative Financial Instruments


643,302
54
(525,381)
(23.926)
(2,174)


724,818
2,215
(723,996)
( 151)


184,316
1,944
(74,627)
(102)
(48,653)


275,846
1,261
(151,438)
( 709)


Related party transactions were performed under normal market terms and conditions and were
eliminated on the consolidation of the financial statements.

Blanco Fibra S.A. and Banco Fibra S.A. and its subsidiaries


Notes to the financial statements
(In thousands ofReais)





21 Management of funds
Fibra Consolidated is responsible for the management of several investment funds and
investment portfolios. The net equity at December 31, 2004, amounted to R$ RS 3,950,014 (RS
2,049,734 in 2003).


Other information


Basel agreement
The financial institutions should maintain shareholders' equity compatible with the risk level of
the structure of their assets, weighted by factors that range from 0 to 300%. in accordance with
BACEN Resolution 2099/94 and later regulations. The shareholders' equity required at
December 31, 2003, in conformity with the prevailing rties corresponded to 22.3% (21.6: '
2003) of the total weighted assets, whereas currently, the minimum required limit is 11%.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 13B


Wall Street plummets




over economic fears


* By MICHAEL J.
MARTINEZ
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) Wall
Street suffered its worst single day
in nearly two years Friday, with
the Dow Jones industrial average
falling 191 points for its third
straight triple-digit loss. Deepening
concerns over economic growth
and higher prices led to the worst
week of trading since August.
An already uneasy market
began the biggest one-day selloff
since May 19,2003, after the Fed-
eral Reserve reported drops in
manufacturing and other industri-
al production, and a Labor Depart-
ment report showed higher oil
costs driving up import prices.
The selloff was bolstered by low-
er-than-expected profits from IBM
Corp., which led to fears that tech-
nology spending would be sub-
stantially worse than expected this
year. Strong earnings from Gen-
eral Electric Co. and Citigroup Inc.
were overlooked, but analysts said
earnings would nonetheless be a
key factor in overcoming the
recent slump.

Inflation
"Earnings are really the only
hope for this market," said Brian
Pears, head equity trader at Vic-
tory Capital Management in
Cleveland. "If, on the whole, earn-
ings can go up, then we might be
able to overcome oil and inflation
and all the other things."
According to preliminary calcu-
lations, the Dow fell 191.24, or 1.86
percent, to 10,087.51, after falling
125 points Thursday and 104 points
Wednesday. It was the Dow's low-
est close since Nov. 2.
Broader stock indicators also
lost considerable ground. The Nas-
daq composite index dropped
38.56, or 1.98 percent, to 1,908.15
for its worst showing since Oct. 25.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index was down 19.43, or 1.67 per-
cent, at 1,142.62, its lowest level
since Nov. 3.
All three indexes set five-month
lows for the second straight ses-
sion, prompted by disappointing


earnings in the tech sector and
questions about slowing economic
growth. With Friday's losses, it was
the first time the Dow lost 100
points three sessions in a row since
late January 2003.
For the week, the Dow lost 3.57
percent, the S&P 500 was down
3.27 percent, and the Nasdaq tum-
bled 4.56 percent. The major
indexes are also at their lowest
points of 2005, with the Nasdaq
down 12.29 percent, the Dow
falling 6.45 percent and the S&P
having lost 5.72 percent.
Bond investors were pleased
with Friday's results, however, as
the bond market continued to ral-
ly. The yield on the 10-year Trea-
sury note fell to 4.24 percent from
4.34 percent late Thursday. The
dollar was mixed against other
major currencies, while gold prices
moved higher.
Crude oil prices were lower and
continued a two-week downtrend,
with a barrel of light crude settling
at $50.49, down 64 cents, on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
The recent drop in crude futures
notwithstanding, higher oil prices
are to blame for the jump in import
prices, the Labor Department said.
Import costs rose 1.8 percent in
March, but even without oil, prices
rose 0.3 percent, more than the 0.2
percent rise economists had
expected.
"There's a lot of evidence that
when we have oil averaging $53
or $54 per barrel, that's inflation-
ary, and we got a whiff of that
today in the import prices," said
Peter Cardillo, chief strategist and
senior vice president with S.W.
Bach & Co. "It doesn't help that
we're starting to see the economy
enter a slowing mode heading into
the second quarter here."
Investors looking at the Fed's
industrial output report also ques-
tioned whether higher energy and
materials costs were affecting man-
ufacturing growth as well. Overall
industrial production rose 0.3 per-
cent in March, up from 0.2 per-
cent in February, but the increase
came only from utility production
due to a colder-than-average
month, and manufacturing and
other industrial sectors showed
losses for the first time in six


months.
IBM said an inability to close
deals before the end of the quarter,
combined with higher pension
costs, dragged on its earnings. The
technology company, which missed
Wall Street forecasts by, 6 cents
per share, hinted at a major
restructuring this year. IBM tum-
bled $6.94, or 8.3 percent to $76.60,
and was the biggest loser on the
Dow.
General Electric rose 25 cents
to $35.75 after the industrial and
media conglomerate reported a 25
percent jump in first-quarter prof-
its, with nine of the company's 11
disparate divisions reporting dou-
ble-digit growth. The company's
forecasts for the second quarter
and full year were in line with Wall
Street's estimates.
Citigroup beat Wall Street's
expectations for its quarterly prof-
its by 2 cents per share, with prof-
its rising a modest 3 percent year-
over-year. The financial company
also said its board had authorized
the repurchase of an additional $15
billion in stock. Citigroup added
35 cents to $45.75.

Drug
The lagging pharmaceutical sec-
tor saw new life after Genentech
Inc. reported strong results from
trials of its Avastin drug in breast
cancer patients, and Ely Lilly &
Co. received a favorable patent
ruling on its best-selling anti-psy-
chotic drug Zyprexa. Genentech
surged $10.72, or 18.3 percent, to
$69.35, while Lilly climbed $2.91
to $58.07.
Declining issues outnumbered
advancers by more than 4 to 1 on
the New York Stock Exchange,
where preliminary consolidated
volume came to 2.71 billion shares,
compared with 2.38 billion on
Thursday.
The Russell 2000 index of small-
er companies was down 11.16, or
1.89 percent, at 580.78. The Russell
lost 4.91 percent this week and is
down 10.86 percent for the year.
Thursday's losses in U.S. mar-
kets had a ripple effect overseas, as
the Nikkei stock average fell 1.66
percent. In Europe, Britain's FTSE
100 closed down 1.09 percent,
France's CAC-40 lost 1.92 percent
for the session, and Germany's
DAX index tumbled 2.04 percent.

The Dow Jones industrials end-
ed the week down 373.83, or 3.57
percent, finishing at 10,087.51. The
S&P 500 index lost 38.58, or 3.27
percent, to close at 1,142.62.
The Nasdaq fell 91.20, or 4.56
percent, during the week, closing
Friday at 1,908.15..
The Russell 2000 index, which
tracks smaller company stocks,
closed the week 29.97, or 4.91 per-
cent, lower at 580.78.
The Dow Jones Wilshire 5000
Composite Index a free-float
weighted index that measures 5,000
U.S. based companies ended
the week at 11,246.79, off 387.80
points from last week. A year ago
the index was at 11,078.10.
The Wilshire 5000 dropped
446.24 points, or 3.82 percent, in
the past three sessions, the largest
percentage drop since Nov. 11,
2002, when the total-market index
fell 5.1 percent.


Legal Notice


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 45 of 2000)

KAKA INVESTMENTS LIMITED
InVoluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
KAKA INVESTMENTS LIMITED. is in Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution is 11th day of March,
2005.

Pamela Hamer,
For & On Behalf of
C.C.S. Directors Limited,
of Akara Building, Suite 8,
Wickhams Cay 1,
Road Town, Tortola, BVI
Liquidator


SCHOLARSHIP FOR MARITIME STUDIES


The Bahamas Maritime Authority and the Bahamas Shipowners
Association are both offering attractive scholarships to young
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting
and challenging career in the Shipping Industry which is gaining
increasing national importance.


The scholarship is inclusive of tuition, fees, course material,
accommodation and transportation cost. Commencing in September
2005, successful candidates will follow a four (4) year degree
programme at the California Maritime Academy in the United States.
Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected
to serve on board a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years.


Applicants should possess or expect to attain a minimum of five (5)
BGCSE passes, including Maths, Physics/ Combined Science and
English Language, at grade 'C' or above and a minimum combined
SAT score of 1000. All applicants must be physically fit and possess
good vision.


Further information and application forms can be obtained from Mrs.
Erma Rahming Mackey, Assistant Director, Bahamas Maritime
Authority, P.O.Box N-4679, Nassau, Bahamas, email:
emackey@bahamasmaritime.com, tel: 394-3024, fax: 394-3014.
Completed applications must be submitted in person or by post, with
copies of academic certificates and proof of Bahamian citizenship,
no later than Monday, 2 May 2005. Interviews will take place in
Nassau in June.


-









PAGE 14 ONDAY, API 18, | 2005 TR^^SPORIBUNETSPORT


e


Arawaks pull no punches


cats are on a mission this
year and there seems to be
no team that can stop them.
On Saturday night at the
Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium,
the Wildcats passed anoth-
er hurdle in the battle of the
New Providence Softball
Association ladies' unde-
feated teams with a 13-6 tri-
umph over the Randella's
Swingers.
With the win, the Wild-
cats remained on top of the
standings at 4-0, while the
Swingers dropped to 3-1 for
second.
"It feels good to be 4-0
because last year we started
off slow, but this year we
have a good start," said
Jack Davis, of the coaches
for the Wildcats. "But I'm
still not pleased with our
performance. We played
around a bit, but as the sea-
son progresses, we will play
much better."
Contest

The Wildcats seemed to
be all business in the first
three innings as they bolted
out to a comfortable 9-2
lead and were heading for
an early night. But they
squandered four runs in the
fifth as the Swingers made it
a contest down the stretch.
However, Mary 'Cruise'
Edgecombe bowed down in
the final two innings and
held Randella's bats at bay
to keep their perfect season
intact.
Edgecombe went the dis-
tance throwing a five-hitter,
striking out four for the win.
Desiree Taylor surrendered
10 hits and struck out three
for the loss.
The Swingers broke the
ice, coming up with the
game's initial run in the bot-
tom of the first on centre
fielder Neressa Seymour's
run-producing single that
plated second sacker
Rebecca Moss.
But the Wildcats
responded with three runs
on a pair of hits in the top
of the second, highlighted
by a two-out, two-run single
from right fielder Jackie 'Lil
Stunt' Moxey.
Electro Telecom put the
game out of reach in the
third when they produced
another six runs for a com-
manding 9-1 lead. As they
batted around the clock,
Edgecombe helped her own
cause with a RBI single and
shortstop Melinda Bastian
produced a three-run in-
the-park home run, fol-
lowed by Shera Woodside's
RBI single.

Solo
Randella's came up with
another run in the bottom
of the frame as catcher
Dorothy 'Dot' Marshall
showed that she had some
speed too as she came
through with a two-out solo
in-the-parker to cut the
deficit to 9-2.
In the fourth, the Wild-
cats put another run on the
board, thanks to an error
that put catcher Dornette
Edwards on base, scoring
second sacker Hyacinth
Farrington, who had led off
the inning with a walk.
Then in the fifth, the
Wildcats got two unearned
runs from first sacker
Renee 'Sunshine' Curry,
who led off with a double
and Jackie Moxey, who fol-
lowed with a fielder's
choice. But they didn't pro-
duce sufficient runs to stop


the game.
And the Swingers made
sure that they would end up
playing seven full innings
when they responded with
four runs on a pair of hits in
the bottom of the frame.
First sacker Debbie
Forbes came up with a one-
out two-run producing sin-
gle and she caught a ride
home on left fielder There-
s;t Miller's two-run in-the-
parker to make it a contest
for the fans who stayed
behind.


with Pot Pourri Mighty


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
CHAVEZ Thompson had
two hits both two-run homers -
to help the Delsol Arawaks blast
the Pot Pourri Mighty Mitts 14-4
in five innings on Saturday night
at the Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium.
With the victory, last year's
runners-up stayed a half game


behind the undefeated defend-
ing champions TBS Truckers in
the men's standings in the New
Providence Softball Association.
The Mighty Mitts continued to
struggle at the other end of the
standings with their second
straight loss to the league's top
two teams.
Thompson had a rare offen-
sive night, going 2-for-2 with five
runs batted in and scoring twice.


* TRACK
BAAA'S NATIONALS
THE Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations completed its National High
School Track and Field Nationals on Sat-
urday at the Grand Bahama Sports Com-
plex. The three-day meet turned out to be
a competitive one.
As usual, there were no divisional win-
ners decided, but three unofficial records
were broken during the competition.
However, here are how the divisions
were decided:
Girls under-15
Catholic High 92; Queen's College 81;
CH Reeves 74; HO Nash 59.
Girls under-17
Sunland Lutheran 122 1/2; CR Walker
119; Catholic High 105; CI Gibson 73 1/2.
Girls under-20
CR Walker 146 1/2; CC Sweeting 105
1/2; Catholic High 94; St. George's 78.
Under-15 boys
CH Reeves 129; Sir Jack Haywood 70;
Tabernacle Baptist 52; Queen's College
44.
Under-17 boys
CC Sweeting 75; CR Walker 74; St.
George's 70; Sunland Lutheran 65.
Under-20 boys
CR Walker 138; Eight Mile Rock 97;
CC Sweeting 85; CI Gibson.
* BASKETBALL
NPBA PLAYOFFS
The New Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation, who will have to seek a new pres-


He connected on a two-run
homer to highlight a four-run
first inning and he duplicated the
feat in the fifth as the game was
eventually stopped via the ten-
run rule.

Patiently
"The pitcher put it right there.
There was no way I was going
to pass up a fast ball," said


dent at the end of the month, continued
its playoff action on Saturday night at the
CI Gibson Gym. The league had to move
from the AF Adderley Gym.
In the division II opener, the Sunshine
Auto Ruff Ryders knocked off the Rock-
ets 76-71 to pull off a two-game sweep in
their best-of-three series. In the division
one feature contest the Commonwealth
Bank Giants swept the Sunshine Auto
Ruff Ryders in a 89-81 decision.
Action will continue tonight at 7:30
when the action returns to the AF Adder-
ley Gym.

* BSC CHAMPIONSHIPS
The Baptist Sports Council will begin its
2005 best-of-three basketball champi-
onship on Tuesday night at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex with Mount
Tabor taking on Evangelistic Centre in
the men's division.
Game two will be played on Thursday
immediately after game one of the 19-
and-under championship between defend-
ing champions First Baptist and Mace-
donia.
On Saturday at the same venue, First
Baptist and Macedonia will play.in the
15-and-under championship and defend-
ing ladies' champions Macedonia will play
Golden Gates.


Thompson, as he waited patient-
ly to hit the ball against Mighty
Mitts' losing pitcher Alphonso
'Chicken' Albury. "The first one,
I didn't realise that it was gone
until it hit the fence. But the sec-
ond one, I knew it was gone."
Thompson said the Mighty
Mitts made them play.
"They brought the competi-
tion to us in the first two innings,
so we stepped up our play,"


* SOFTBALL
NPSA SCHEDULE
The New Providence Softball Associa-
tion has released its schedule of games
for this week at the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Stadium.
Tuesday
7 pm Whirlpool vs Proper Care Pool
Lady Sharks (L)
8:30 pm TBS Truckers vs New Breed
(M).
Thursday
7 pm Nassau Cruisers vs Mighty Mitts
(M).
8:30 pm Electro Telecom Dorcy Park
Boyz vs Delsol Arawaks (M).
Saturday
7 pm New Breed vs Electro Telecom
Dorcy Park Boys (M).
8:30 pm Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks
vs Degeo Bommers (L).
* SOFTBALL CLINIC
The New Providence Softball Associa-
tion is inviting all of its umpires, man-
agers, coaches and players to attend a
clinic tonight at 7:30 at the Churchill Ten-
er Knowles National Softball Stadium.
The clinic is expected to be conducted by
International Softball Federation's Hall of
Famer Arthur Thompson on the rule
changes.


Mitts

Thompson stressed. 4
The Arawaks now look ahead
to a bigger challenge on Thurs-.
day night when they will play the';
electro Telecom Dorcy Parkl
Boyz, who are expected to show-^j
case the brothers pitching and
catching tandem of Edney 'the-'
Heat' Bethel and Edmund!:;
'Binks' Bethel.
"Delsol faced Edney before iti$
Grand Bahama when he beat us,!
in the Nationals," said Thompson
of their trip to the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's National Cham-..
pionships when they won the&
NPSA crown two years ago.
"Although he won the game,
he realised that Delsol are a good
hitting team. So we're ready for.
him this time."

Runs
Delsol, no doubt, were ready
for the Mighty Mitts as well, scor-'.
ing four runs in the first, three.
in the second and third and,1!
another four in the fifth.
In addition to Thompson, the*
Arawaks got a 3-for-4 night with
two RBIs and three runs from
Thompson's younger brother,*i
Michael. Julian Collie also home-'
red with a solo shot to lead off a
three-run second and he finished
with a 1-for-2 night with three
runs scored. Angelo Dillett>
helped out with a 2-for-3perfor-
mance with an RBI and three
runs.
Andre 'Star' Wood Sr stood,
out for the Mighty Mitts with a
perfect 2-for-2 production, scor-i
ing a run.
Cardinal Gilbert picked up the-
win on the mound with a six-hit-
ter, walking four and striking outr-
as many batters. He also give us
just two earned runs. Alphonso
Albury, on the other hand, was
tagged for 11 hits with six walks"
and 10 earned runs.
f


winning time was 24.27 by Stephanie Gebhart-'
from South Dakota.
However, Newbold was ninth overall in the
women's 100 in 12.41. She didn't advance to the
final. The eighth and final qualifier ran 12.39.

MARTIN SECOND
At the 9th annual Tom Botts Invitational a
the Audrey J. Walton Stadium in Colombus'
Mousouri, Donnavette Martin produced a se
ond place finish in the women's long jump with i
leap of 5.62 metres. Tracy Partain won with ai
mark of 5.65.
Martin also took to the track, running ninti
place in the women's 100 in 12.40. Genna Williams
won the race in 11.71. Martin was also sixth in the
200 in 26.87. The event was won by Julia Murry in
24.46.

* ARNETT-WILLIE
TOPPED BAHAMIAN FIELD
At the Gatorade Invitational at the University
of Miami, Phyllipa Arnett-Willie produced 11.7R
for fifth in the women's 100 that was won by
Sheri-Ann Brooke of FIU in 11.24.
Tamara Rigby, competing for Florida Memor-
ial, was eighth in 11.86 with Lisa Mortimer com-
ing in 16th in 12.25.
In the 200, won by American Olympic silver
medalist Lauryn Williams in 22.53, Arnett-Willie,
came in seventh in 23.95.
Rigby was ninth in 24.15, while her team-mate
Angeline Villarceau was 25th in 25.54. Mortimer
was 29th in 25.84 and Cache Armbrister came in
31st in 25.90.
In the 400, which was won by Charlette
Greggs from Miami in 52.71, Villarceau was.
15th in 59.73 and Armbrister came in 18th in
1:01.18.
The Rigby twin sisters Tamara (on lead off);
Tavara (on second) and Villarceau (on anchor)
teamed up with Zindzi Swan for eighth in the 4 x
100 relay in 48.17 for Florida Memorial.
The Rigby sisters Tavara (on lead off) and
Tamara (second) teamed up with Villarceat'
(anchor) and Octavier Spencer for fourth as well
in the 4 x 400 relay in 3:58.40.
In the men's 100, Dereck Carey was 13th in'
10.84 and Tyrone Sawyer got 21st in 11.06. The
winning time was 10.19 by Kevon Puerre from
FIU.
The men's 400, won by Bernard Middleton of
Florida in 46.56, saw Tim Munnings clocked 47.80
for seventh. Von Wilson was eighth in 48.10; Carl
Rolle 10th in 48.67 and Darron Lightbourn 14th in:
50.29.
Oneil Williams was the lone Bahamian repre-
sentative in the men's 800, running 1:56.69 for.
ninth place.
The winning time was 1:49.41 by Moise
Joseph. Ednol Rolle also competed, finishing sev-
enth in the men's 400 hurdles in 53.35.
The winning time was 51.13 by Kerro aClement
ofFlbrida.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 15B









MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


I











M By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

IT WAS a good season
opener in their specialities
for sprinter Dominic
Demeritte and long
jumper Leevan 'Super-
man' Sands at the 26th Sun
Angel Classic.
Competing unattached
at the Joe Selleh Track in
Tempe, Arizona,
Demeritte won the 200
metres in a time of 20.69
seconds.
It was the same time
posted by Kelvin Love of
Arizona State, but
Demeritte was able to nip
him out in the photo fin-
ish.
Everette Fraser compet-
ing unattached, was llth
in 21.67. Fraser was also
fifth in the 100 in 10.60.
Sands popped a winning
leap of 25-feet, 9 1/2-inch-
es for his victory in the
long jump, Trevell Quin-
ley of Arizona State was
second with 25-5 1/2.
Sands did 25-7 1/4 for
the leading mark in the
qualifying round. He was
followed by Quinley with
25-5 1/2.
Meanwhile, a host of
other Bahamians compet-
ed in a series of meets
across the United States
over the weekend. Here's
a look at where and how
some of them competed:

I IFILL QUALIFIES
FOR REGIONAL
Sophomore Grafton Ifill
II won both the men's 100
and 200 for the University
of Pennsylvania and also
competed on their second-
place 4 x 100 relay team at
the William Weaver Stadi-
um.
Ifill II ran the fastest
time by a Quaker since
1984 when he clocked
10.42 in the 100, qualifying
for the NCAA Regionals
in the event. His time was
the fourth fastest in Penn
history. He also won the
200 in 21.31 for the seventh
fastest in the University of
Pennsylvania history.
And Ifill II helped his 4 x
1 relay team, running the
second leg, as they finished
second in 42.03.

* AMERTIL SECOND
At the Sea Ray Relays,
Christine Amertil ran 23.00
for second overall behind
Shalonda Solomon in the
women's 200 invitational.
Amertil won the second of
three heats in the event.

* NEWBOLD THIRD
At the Godfather's D II
Challenge at the Emporia
State University, Shantel
Newbold, competing for
Central Mississippi, came
in third in the final of the
women's 200 in 25.07. The
SEE page 14B


* MIKE TOPOROWSKI (left) and Don Boorman in action (Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

CLOSE buddies Don Boor-
man and Mike Toporowski
will go down in the history
books of the Bahamas Golf
Federation as the first winners
of the Ken Francis Golf Clas-
sic.
The duo, who have played
together for more than a
decade, pulled off the first net
with a combined score of'60.20
to win the title on Sunday at
the Radisson Cable Beach
Golf Club.
"It's fantastic," said Poor-
man, the owner of the.Fox
Hill Nursery on Bernard
Road. "Mike drove the ball
extremely well and mny short
game was good as it could be
and we were able to get the
ball in the hole."
Their performances left the
team of Daryl Merchant and


Jack O'Conner behind in sec-
ond place at 60.95. George
Swann and Andrew Jackson
had to settle for third with
61.15.
The team of Fred Wright
and Milford 'Shaggy' Lock-
hart, however, picked up the
victory in the gross category
with a 61.90.
Toporowski, the owner of
Re/Max Nassau Reality, cred-
ited their success to the
way the course was so well
kept.

Superb
"The condition of this
course was just great. They
did a superb job," Toporows-
ki noted.
The duo took advantage of
the course's manicure by
birdying the first four holes.
They capped off the perfor-
mance by hitting all of the par-


five holes coming into the
clubhouse.
"Golf is where you take it,"
Toporowsko insisted. "We
played the course as well as
we could."
Toporowski, a former
national team player, said they
will dedicate their perfor-
mances to the junior develop-
ment programme and he
called for more support for
the younger players.
They also both indicated
that they were thrilled to be
the first champions of the
tournament that honoured
Francis, a man whom
Toporowski felt did a good
job in promoting the sport
when he served as editor of
the Nassau Guardian.
About 108 golfers partici-
pated in the tournament,
which tournament director
Wayde Bethel stated, will
become an annual event on


the BGF's calendar.
"It went very well. It was
almost challenging for us
because after we didn't get to
host it last year because of the
hurricanes we had more
people than we anticipated
coming out this year,". Bethel
stressed.

Appreciation
"Persons were very eager to
show their appreciation to Mr
Francis. We had some very
good scores and the weather
was just perfect for the hosting
of the tournament."
Bethel teamed up with Ken
Brathwaite, but they didn't
fare as well with a gross of 69.
Bethel said they didn't play as
well as expected because he
was busy running the tourna-
ment.
Richard Gibson, the resi-
dent pro and assistant golf


director at the Radisson Cable
Beach Golf Club, said the
tournament was a good show
of appreciation for Francis.
"I didn't expect the large
amount of turnout that we got.
Everybody turned out to sup-
port him," Gibson stated. "It
was a good tournament."

N OTHER prizes
offered were:

Men's division: Eddie
Carter longest drive on hole
eight and Ian Bayles near-
est to the pin on hole nine.
Ladies' division: Giselle
Pyfrom longest drive on hole
#13 and nearest to the pin.
Junior girls: Eugenia
Adderley longest drive.
Junior boys: Richard Gib-
son Jr longest drive on hole
#7 and Ben Davis nearest to
the pin on hole #12.


ow


. W L-W-9ll~mr~









:MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


The stories behind the news


The recently announced billion dollar
Baha Mar Cable Beach deal is the
"wrong deal" for the country and has
come "at the wrong time", FNM chair-
man Carl Bethel claimed last week. At
a meeting of the Golden Gates con-
stituency association of the Free Nation-
al Movement, Mr Bethel said that while
there is tremendous opportunity for a
realistic, practical and well thought out
investment in Cable Beach, the project
agreed to by the government does not
accomplish this ...


MPs last week dealt with a res-
olution in the House of Assembly
which would allow the govern-
ment to borrow almost $17 mil- i
lion to replace funds used for ;
repairs following hurricanes i,
Frances and Jeanne. I :
The funds would be loaned by -
the Inter-American Develop- *
ment Bank and would be :
returned to the public treasury .
Mr Christie explained ... _


Lone


The jitney driver who allegedly attempted to assault a
15-year-old passenger on Saturday was released on
$5,000 bail and has had his public driver's licence sus-
pended after appearing in magistrate's court last Mon-
day. Andrew Johnson appeared before Magistrate Mar-
ilyn Meeres and was charged with one count of indecent
assault. It is alleged that Johnson inappropriately touched
the young girl while she was a passenger on his bus on
Saturday, April 9, forcing her to jump out of the moving
vehicle and run to safety. As a result, she received mul-
tiple injuries to her stomach and arms. Johnson pleaded
not guilty to the charge and was granted $5,000 bail
with two sureties ...


Crusader


How one i


I- I determined and his admirers
Believe genuinely commit-
ted man. His cause is simple:
to clear Abaco of a Haitian
presence which, he says, threatens to
destroy it.
'Thirty-two years ago, Abaco was the
Centre of a secessionist movement intent
n' retaining the island's British colo-
nial status in the face of Bahamian inde-
pendence. Today, says Mr Cooper, it
isgn danger of becoming a colony of
Haiti, the most destitute, chaotic nation
ih-the western world.
'Uncontrolled immigration has, he
sys, left Abaco in a desperately vul-
nirable state, with the prospect of
wholesale "creolisation" not only a pos-
sibility, but a near certainty over the
next feW years.
If Mr Cooper's assessment of the
island's plight is anywhere near the
truth, the situation is dire indeed, with
Haitians already outnumbering Bahami-
ans in the schools and local culture in
real jeopardy from alien invaders from
the south.
.Mr Cooper stresses from the outset
that he has no hostility to Haitians as
people, and no wish to appear inhu-
mane. He is not, he says, a race cam-
paigner with hate in his heart, but a
concerned Bahamian who believes
Haiti's diaspora will ultimately under-
mine Abaco as a Bahamian society to
the point of extinction.
"I am doing this for my children," he
told INSIGHT as he outlined what he
sees as the horrendous scenario taking
shape around him.
f Mr Cooper, a middle-aged photog-
rapher and entrepreneur who lives at
Cooper's Town, says Haitians are now
so well-established and rooted in Aba-
co that removing them completely will
be nigh impossible. But he says urgent
government action is crucial if the situ-
ation is to be contained.
The problem, in his view, is that
Haitians have become so confident of
their position on the island, so assured
of their role at the bottom end of the
4baconian economy, that they are defy-
ing Bahamian laws to establish them-
elves ultimately as the dominant force.
] It would be easy to dismiss him as an
irrational alarmist if the evidence for
kt least some of his claims were not so
compelling.
At Marsh Harbour, Abaco's "capi-
tal", the existence of the two huge slum
settlements, The Mud and Pigeon Pea,
where thousands of Haitian immigrants
live in a festering muddle of down-at-
heel shacks, testifies to the scale of the
problem.
Mr Cooper says these two unsightly
settlements, where dangerous power
lines hang like trimmings between
buildings and residents relieve them-
selyes in holes in the ground, are mere-
ly^he tips of an enormous problem
which is probably already beyond the


man seeks to hold bck the Haitian hordes


They call him the "one-man crusade", an activist

with a mission. He is determined to halt the spread

of Haitians in Abaco, an island which he says is under

threat from an alien culture. INSIGHT reports...


point of no return.
In the Sandbanks and Farm Road
areas, he says, a new "city" of ram-
shackle huts has appeared, where
Haitians are using old power-lines to.
fence off areas of Crown land as their
own. One woman has already built two
homes on land which isn't hers to rent
out to fellow immigrants. Others are
hard at work with hammers and nails to
cobble together more simple wooden
dwellings in which, he says, they will
continue to reproduce at an alarming
rate to the detriment of the Bahamian
communities all around.
"None of these buildings are up to
code," said Mr Cooper, "Yet if I tried to
build a wash-house in my yard, the
authorities would be down on me in no
time. Nothing is being done to restrict
the spread of immigrants. In ten years
time, Abaco will be called Haiti and
that will be the finish."
Passionate in pursuit of his cause, Mr
Cooper says Bahamians must act now
or suffer the consequences. The gov-
ernment must display the will and
courage to take the matter in hand, he
believes.
A few weeks ago, the dogged cam-
paigner made headlines when he partly
dismantled a newly-built Haitian shack.
There was no family there to be dis-
placed, so he did what he thought need-
ed to be done as a gesture of Bahamian
defiance.
However, the building is now fully
occupied, in spite of having no floor.
A Haitian family has moved in with all
their worldly possessions. Down coun-


MAN WITH A MISSION-
Mr Jeffery Cooper

try byways, deep in the bush, homes
are springing up in substantial numbers,
he claims. Like a cultural tsunami, the
Haitian diaspora appears to be an irre-
sistible force, carrying all before it.
Mr Cooper feels he is probably the
only Bahamian in Abaco willing to step'
up to the plate in an effort to curb the
creolisation process. But he says if oth-
er Bahamians don't back him, they will
be betraying future generations as the
Haitian tide engulfs the nation.
The problem, as he and other Aba-
conians see it, is that the Haitian
invaders are not intent on assimilation
and absorption, they are creating a
"sub-economy" and "sub-culture" out-
side the confines of the host society..


Worse still, islanders claim, many
Haitians see themselves as being outside
the law. The most graphic illustration of
this is the rampant house-building
process, which appears to take no
account of land ownership or planning
regulations.
Repeatedly, half-hearted efforts have
been made to stop the spread of these
hastily-constr.uc~ted homes. :But the
Haitians, either through sheer cussed-
ness or pure ignorance, are continuing
to spread across Abaco, clearing new
areas of bush to accommodate their
humble homes.
In the process,according to Mr Coop-
er, they are degrading the land, poi-
soning the water table, and imposing a
peasant lifestyle on an island which
prides itself on being one of the most
economically and socially advanced in
the Bahamas.
"They throw diapers and other rub-
bish everywhere," said Mr Cooper. "It
is sickening what is happening on this
island."
Now Mr Cooper is to approach Prime
Minister Perry Christie and Works Min-
ister Bradley Roberts in a determined
effort to secure government involve-
ment in his lone mission.
"I am trying to wake up the govern-
ment, and wake up the Bahamian peo-
ple," Mr Cooper told INSIGHT. "The
whole of Abaco appears to support me,
but I am the only one speaking out. It's
time toact." -
The Ministry of Works has a resident.
engineer in Abaco, Mr John Schaeffer.
But he is a Canadian who, according
to Mr Cooper, is not getting the level of
support he needs to halt the house-
building problem in its tracks. Mr Coop-
er says regular house inspections are
needed, backed up by a genuine will to
dismantle all those homes, deemed to
have been built outside planning laws.
Then, lhe said, there needs to be a
proper census of the Haitian popula-
tion on the island. According to him,
they already outnumber Bahamians five
to one, a figure some might find hard to
believe. However, he claims it's accurate
and he sounds convincing.
Moreover, he says, the situation is
worsening by the week, with illegal
immigrants being landed in remote
areas during the night. Meanwhile, links
with Haiti are being cemented by crude-
ly-built motorised vessels which, he says,
arrive in Marsh Harbour at regular
intervals to conduct what appears to be
legitimate trade.
He also claims that residents of The
Mud and Pigeon Pea fly kites over the


settlementsto act as "markers" for new
arrivals who might have lost their way in
the bush. "They are writing to their
families back home and urging them to
come," he says. "The process is ongoing
and very alarming."
So why are Abaconians apparently
so docile in allowing such an imposi-
tion?
Firstly, some acknowledge that
Haitians are a crucial part of the flour-
ishing Abaconian economy. They say
Haitians install themselves at the bot-
tom end of the island pecking order,
doing all the menial jobs Bahamians
refuse to do. Without them, Abaco's
progress would be thwarted.
Secondly, according to Mr Cooper,
many Bahamians are terrified of being
"fixed" by Haitian witchcraft. Yes, it
sounds crazy, but Mr Cooper insists it is
true, and others concur.
"Everyone is scared of obeah," he
told INSIGHT, "It. seems to me that
Haitians are holding the Bahamas
hostage through obeah. Haitians have
made threats to many people, but I am
not afraid. I don't believe in obeah. I
believe in God Almighty."
He said the threat of witchcraft was
potent on Abaco. "It is idiotic, but that's
how many people think. They think
Haitians are dangerous, but my view is
that if these people are dangerous, why
do we allow, them into our country?"
Mr Cooper admits he is seen by some
as "a walking star" in Abaco, the hero
of an anti-Haitian offensive, but he
insists none of his actions are inspired
by hostility to Haitians as people. He is
eager to dispel any notion that he is
engaged in a witch-hunt, whatever his
fears about the obeah menace.
As father of two young children, he
says he wants to preserve the Bahamas
as a recognisable cultural entity, not a
colony of-Haiti, a land whose utter fail-
Sure over two centuries of self-rule has
condemned it to penury and desolation.
"What saddens me is that some
Bahamians are helping this process by
taking bribes from Haitians, providing
bogus work permits and such like," he
said.
"These people are willing to sell out
their own country for a bunch of mon-
ey. But we have to beware. I know there
:are at least two gangs in The Mud and
Pigeon Pea and they have a lot of
weapons.
"There are hostile young men in
there and we need to root them and
the weapons out from house to house.
The Haitians are taking over our
schools, our medical system and our
clinics. Some are so serious about taking
over that they are fencing off their own
areas of land. Where will it all end?"
Mr Cooper has been called The Lone
Crusader, but in truth his views are
*echoed elsewhere, though less notice-
ably. He voices his views on Radio Aba-

See MISSION, Page 2C


The Arawak Group Araowk Av.nue A 0%. Iex U BS68 Nea.au, LahfameLs :* :T


-TiThe i-iTiun


The


* MOTOR vessels at Marsh Harbour, where they load used cooking
oil and other discarded items for the voyage back to Haiti.


- i


i


_ ---~i~urpll~-^upr~--I~C---~-IIO^C----- I-------^ll~-~u








PAGE 2C, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


I i- I litluilm


opu e a
" 8 ) B& K


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear from people who are
making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you
are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.


dict. Successful, maybe, but
that doesn't always make for
happiness. I don't think of Bri-
land as a happy place.

Nassauvian

There used to be an old say-
ing that "where there's muck
there's brass" (meaning mon-
ey), but it doesn't apply to
Harbour Island, where degra-
dation of amenities will lead to
real problems down the road.
The island is booming at the
moment, but it is something


that can never be taken for
granted. If the harbour is
being harmed by sewage and
the place loses its quietness
because of over-development,
it's hard to see why anyone
would want to be there.
In addition to that, there
doesn't seem to be much har-
mony on the island, where
foreigners and local residents
appear to be at loggerheads
much of the time.

L M Cartwright
Nassau


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co and to anyone who will lis-
ten. Others are more circum-
spect.
However, there is plenty of
evidence to show that a Haitian
"sub-economy" is taking root,
with immigrants working togeth-
er to strengthen their hold.
In The Mud and Pigeon Pea,
petty shops, beauty salons and
even a nightclub have been
established. The nightclub has a
cover charge and a menu hang-
ing outside. One house even has
a solar panel, showing techno-
logical awareness, while two
churches flourish in glorified
shacks, one with a sagging roof.
Every week, motorised ves-
sels chug into Marsh Harbour
at the end of three-day voyages
from northern Haiti. They go
back loaded with the detritus of
Bahamian prosperity.
For instance, thousands of gal-
lons of used cooking oil, by-
product of a relatively well-off
society, find their way to Haiti
every year. Stored in plastic jugs,
old water bottles and anything
else Haitians can lay hands on,
the oil is loaded aboard the beat-
en-up old boats for the journey
home.
In addition to establishing
their own economic and social
bridgehead in Abaco itself, the
Haitians are making.,useof
Bahamiiah haid-downs t6: help
relatives keep body and soul
together in the western world's
most impoverished nation.
"Where they get the oil from,
I don't know," said a Marsh
Harbour resident, "I assume
they collect it from restaurants
and maybe local residents, then
stockpile it for the trip to Haiti.
"I suppose when it's been
used a few times in the
Bahamas, it carries quite a few
extra flavours. And when they
get it back to Haiti, it can maybe
be sold for a few dollars. It may
not appeal to us, but it's obvi-
ousaly something they value."
The idea of cooking in some-
one else's cast-off oil might turn
the stomachs of relatively well-
to-do Bahamians. But beggars
can't be choosers, and Haiti has
been reduced to beggar status
for longer than it cares to
remember.
SApart from its renowned fine


art, its incomparable rum and its
unique status as the world's first
black republic, Haiti is noted pri-
marily for being dirt poor and
desperate.
Its average per capita income
still hovers around the $350
mark, which translates into
penury wherever you are, and
life expectancy is depressingly
short. So it's not surprising that
its people grab whatever they
can from the rich neighbour to
the north.
The immense gulf between
Haiti's indigence and the
Bahamas' life of plenty is best
gauged in a colourful tableau
acted out at Marsh Harbour
dock every week or so.
It is here that rough-hewn ves-
sels pull alongside to discharge
whatever meagre fare they carry
from their homeland and receive
comparatively lavish consumer
cargoes from Abaco for the
return journey.
The line-up of discarded
goods is impressive. The dirty
cooking oil, dull brown and
unappetising by the time it finds
its way into Haitian hands, is
only part of the story.

Incredibly
Piled high on the boats are old
' satte s' bAttered bicycles, an
abundance of plastic bottles of
all kinds, chunks of used lum-
ber, an occasional window
frame, obsolete cookers, beat-
up fridges...and, incredibly, even
a derelict car or two.
All are destined for a nation
where consumer luxuries are vir-
tually non-existent among the
poor, and where the compara-
tive extravagance of Bahamian
life is unimaginable. "It seems
that part of Haiti lives off hand-
downs from Bahamians," said
the Marsh Harbour resident,
"What we don't need, they find
a use for. It's interesting to see
the variety of stuff that gets
loaded on to these boats."
Hence, the colonising process
goes on, with The Mud and
Pigeon Pea acting as clearing
houses for the incomers, and
"headquarters" for those already
established on the island.
Through their churches, the
Haitians enjoy a spiritual unity.
Through self-help initiatives,
they find new areas of work to
explore. For instance, they are
now into bottle recycling, col-
lecting vast numbers of beer and
Vitamalt bottles for shipment to
Nassau.
A few years ago, local coun-
cillor Yvonne Key began a cam-
paign to clear the settlements,
claiming their existence could
no longer be tolerated in the
main town of an economically
dynamic island.


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Your article
about Har-
bour Island
and the vari-
ous problems
encountered by its people was
unfortunately true in many
respects.
For many years now, Har-
bour Island has been tainted
by money, and it has created
divisions between various sec-
tions of the population.
Those who say it's the
greatest place in the Bahamas
need to reconsider their ver-


I INSIGHT I


She felt the Haitian lifestyle, a:
crude exercise in survival at their
most basic level, was inappro-,1
priate, dragging down a proud*:
Bahamian community.
Mrs Key said the settlements,
with their festooned power-lines,'
open cesspits and buckled>
shacks, were a typhoid orN
cholera outbreak waiting to hap-"
pen, a throwback to earlier times
when health was under constant'
threat. Two devastating fires;
among the shacks which left
dozens of families homeless'
helped to focus her message.
There was talk of bulldozers
moving in, settlers being trans-
ferred to new sub-divisions out
of town, and Marsh Harbour
returning to its old civilised self.
However, her efforts fizzled out
and the immigrants are now seen
as an alien, irritating but
inevitable and probably eternal
- presence.
Those Haitians who work
accumulate US dollars which
find their way back to Haiti to
support relatives. The $150 min-
imum wage in the Bahamas
might seem like small potatoes
to the average Bahamian, but to
a Haitian used to earning only
twice that much in a year it is
bounty beyond belief.
Unless Haiti itself undergoes a
sudden and wholly uncharacter-
istic transformation over the
next few years, it is hard to imag-
ine that Abaco's immigrant:
problem will get better. While-
Haiti remains poor and unsta-
ble, the exodus will continue. ,;
Since the fall of President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide last yearp
Haiti has become even more'
unsafe than' before. As a result
desperate people continue t4'
seek ways out, with the Bahama
chain of islands acting as conve$
nient stepping stones to a bet.
ter future.
Most undoubtedly want t<
find refuge in the Haitian ghet,
toes of Miami. But many are
content to settle on the strag-
gling isle of Abaco where resist,
tance to their presence is not a$
rigorous as one might expect. ,'
Mr Cooper hopes to change
all that. For him, the mathemaO
ics are against Abaco when thl
Haitian immigration problem ]s
considered long-term. Official
ly, the island has under 14,000
inhabitants. Haiti, meanwhile
has a population of around sev
en million, many of them loole.
ing for an escape at any price'
"If we don't act now, it's over,
he said. 2
Obeah cursed or not, adde).
Mr Cooper, the Bahamas musl
save itself from the Haitiah
hordes or die. .
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmarquis@t*-
bunemedia.net a









THE TIBUN MONDY, ARIL 8, 205,SPGEH3


* EMPLOYEES of the British Colonial Hilton (one pictured
at left), were provided with a wide range of health services
as part of the hotel's annual Health Education Fair last
week.
(The Tribune archive photo)


T he recently
announced billion
dollar Baha Mar
Cable Beach deal
is the "wrong
deal" for the country and has
come "at the wrong time",
FNM chairman Carl Bethel
claimed last week.
At a meeting of the Golden
Gates constituency association
of the Free National Move-
ment, Mr Bethel said that while
there is tremendous opportu-
nity for a realistic, practical and
well thought out investment in
Cable Beach, the project
agreed to by the government
does not accomplish this.
The official Heads of Agree-
ment for the development was
signed on April 6 after the
Baha Mar investment consor-
tium announced it had signed a
new agreement with Philip
Ruffin to acquire his proper-
ties.
Construction, scheduled to
begin in 2007, will affect the
properties on which the Radis-
son Cable Beach Resort, the
Nassau Beach Hotel, the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort and Crys-
tal Palace are currently located.
The development is aimed
at transforming the Cable
Beach strip into a mega-resort,
and is projected to generate
up to 9,000 jobs in the first
three years of operation.
Mr Bethel claimed that is
unacceptable for the govern-


Quotes oftbe We ek


"There is far too much that is wrong about
the recently announced Cable Beach deal. It


going about the streets causing injury and
harm to others.


is the wrong deal, on the whole island, in "Just recently we concluded what we
the wrong place, at the wrong time and is thought was a very (successful) anti-knife
being done in the wrong manner. campaign in our schools. We saw success
"The investors are paying a measly $45 in that there was a major reduction in the
million for a hotel which cost Bahamians number of people we were taking knives
more than $125 million to build, and which, from and subsequently taking before the
as is, is worth more than $45 million." courts.
Chairman of the Free National Move- "But we do have a concern that there
ment Carl Bethel on the billion-dollar Cable still are young men out there carrying
Beach re-development project scheduled weapons on them."
to begin in 2007. Chief Supt Hulan Hanna comments
.... '. ., : on.last week's stabbing death of a.15.-,_
"A lot of our yQung;rnen 'rearing.. year-:iod student of C :V Bethel ;High
themselves with knivesaand mac tieand Scbhool.,. ,
t S .1*f


vn projects to respond to the
rs emergency situation caused by
ie last year's hurricanes.
The bank has agreed to grant
the government up to
$16,700,00 to address the needs
of temporary reconstruction,
C stabilisation and repair of infra-
as structure across the Bahamas.
-k The government is to pro-
an vide the remaining 20 per cent
.t. of the amount used for hurri-
as cane relief $4.3 million.
ft Under the terms of the reso-
th lution, repayments must start
of before July 31, 2010 and finish


no later than January 31,2025.
The work covered by the
loan will be carried out by the
Ministry of Works and Utili-
ties.
Most of the work, which has
been underway since late last
year, would be undertaken on
Grand Bahama, Abaco, San
Salvador, Cat Island, Eleuthera
and New Providence and would
include repairs to schools and
other public buildings, tempo-
rary housing and repair of
infrastructure works such as
docks, roads and bridges.


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A 15-year-old student of
V Bethel High School wa
stabbed to death last wee
when an argument betwee
two teenagers turned violen
Alando Williamson wa
stabbed with a knife in the le
side of his chest. His deal
brought to 13 the number c
murders recorded in tl
Bahamas so far for the year
Police were holding in cu
tody a 15-year-old suspect.
is believed the stabbing wi
the result of a feud that star
ed on the previous Monday.
*****

THE jitney driver wh
allegedly attempted to assault
15-year-old passenger on Sa
urday was released on $5,0(
bail and has had his public dr
ver's licence suspended aft(
appearing in magistrate's cou
last Monday.
Andrew Johnson appeare
before Magistrate Marily
Meeres and was charged wit
one count of indecent assaull
It is alleged that Johnso
inappropriately touched tlh
young girl while she was a pa
senger on his bus on Saturda
April 9, forcing her to jump oi
of the moving vehicle and ru
to safety.
As a result, she received mu
tiple injuries to her stomac
and arms.
Johnson pleaded not guill
to the charge and was grante
$5,000 bail with two sureties.

MPs last week dealt with
resolution in the House c
Assembly which would allo'
the government to borro
almost $17 million to replac
funds used for repairs following
hurricanes Frances and Jeannt
The funds would be loane
by the Inter-American Deve
opment Bank and would b
returned to the public treasury
Mr Christie explained,,as th
government had to use.aone
originally allocated for othe


MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


4











ISSUES IDEAS C

SUNDAY, APRIL 17,2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD 4C




em'
.......... .......... .......... ........................... ..



DURING THIS PASSOVER SEASON, VOICES FROM ISRAEL AND IRAQ OFFER


- E 0MEN =
R EAljREFLEcTIONSOFREEDOMM









S0 -4BY CAROL ROSENBERG ARMY MAJ. HOWARD
crosenberg@heraldcom 'HANOCH' FIELDS, 44,
aroundd the world next weekend, Jews celebrate y rabbi in Iraq:
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S -No -......exodus from Egypt by Israelites as they wound..Just.asfreedom
0=00 their way toward The Promised Land. came at a cost for
_m__4_ ag-m Freedom has been a popular word of late, invoked America and Israel,
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4p life and death, religion, terror and warfare. LEnNsN for Iraqis and coalition
.a*At the same time, great changes are whipping the forces.'
S* * -@ *Middle East from an emerging democracy in Iraq ......
**. meto an evolving Israeli disengagement of settlers
ein the Gaza Strip.

a ewoman'sfolly; a right invoked by oneGoa
mm em person may be an affront to another. RayHeght
4 So, in the spirit of the season',The Herald
Synic41 C 11 has solicited commentaries from a range of ao
Jews.a..ound.thQMiddle East from fa Galilee
e fmw C NO eW,4 Msecular to Sabbath-observing, from
4wa m-em 4W*4b. young to old. Nazarethp
t .. m *AMThe comments range from an
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sometimes have to give up their freedom,
sum .. 4to a young woman in Jerusalem who .ld ISRAEL DEFENSE FORCES
-pf** e11mM ri rsked jailtthis year rather than servein ) ARMY SGT. KEVIN MARKS,
__ __ Israel's army. y21, immigrant,
a -*We found a Jewish settler in the2,ma
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7:i .A t niikr m d
religious leaders to organize a gay eventually made our
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4 1m4001111Tel1AVof1Viv from Egypt.'
." .:-m _*_:.Readtheir words, 2L. el
W "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content NAOMI CHAZAN, 58, peace
Available from Commercial News Providers" activist and professor:
S'This year, the
-9110 Passover season
*0M**4 *Mserves as a painful
SJeruslemW* reminder that those
_________ who systematically
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............... ...ELIS.HABASKIN,18,.of
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'While Jews and



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4W-10. m eam* m 0 RACHEL SAPERSTEIN, 64,
Gaza settler sInce 1997:
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*e wom- Katif, freedom means '4 W--
the right to full, safe '' ~ ~ > 4 ~ ~ E.-D 5 a
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S mm nmcomnity.'- right to openly live in
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__e RABBI ELIYANU',
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en me advice forum:
-e __ 'Freedom means the


* om -s- oppo unity to live in
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JO2RDAN -
YEHUDIT ROSENFELD, 10, AVITAL ROSENFELD, 12,
-ffifth-grader: seventh-grader.
OPINiON PAGE Agb
Freedom means going to public places and
RUBIN: Unless the U.S. takes a more riding on buses without being worried about
active approach to the Gaza being blown up by a terrorist. (Well, more
withdrawal, the Israeli pullout will correctly, without our mother being worried.)'
make the conflict worse
KRAUTHAMMER: The Nationals
come to W ashington and a GO .. .... ...... ..... f f'%M: I T: < ,
f eddi fallsGO TO HERAL NTO SELECTED COMMENTARIES
reformed baseball addict falls ..
off the wagon .I2(:4"! i, -i \ W








5C SUNDAY, APRIL 17,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


Passover is the festival of
Jewish emancipation
from slavery and the
prejudice, injustice, and inhu-
manity it entails. Over the
centuries, this holiday -
which coincides with the joy
of spring has come to sym-
bolize the universal quest for
individual and collective free-
dom.
This year, the Passover sea-
son serves as a painful
reminder that those who sys-
tematically deny others their
liberty and trample on their
basic rights cannot themselves


ELISHA BASKIN
CONSCIENTIOUS
OBJECTOR

I will not

serve in an

occupying

army

his year I expected to
spend Passover in
prison. Like every high
school senior, I faced an auto-
matic draft into the Israeli
Army. But I made the choice
not to serve in the Israel
Defense Forces because
my conscience would not
allow it.
Passover is a symbol of
freedom. It is a festival where
we are commanded to recall
the suffering that our people
endured in Egypt under Pha-
raoh. For years, we yearned to
be free and live in our own
land. The essential mitzvah,
or commandment, which we
are obliged to follow is to
read the Haggadah, the
account that reminds us of
the history of our ancestors in
Egypt. We are commanded
never to forget the experience
of what slavery did to us.
Yet, while Jews and Israe-
lis celebrate our freedom, I
cannot help but wonder how
we can at the same time
deprive our Palestinian neigh-
bors of their most basic free-
doms. We Israelis have
become the Pharaohs of
another people. We deny
them the freedom of move-
ment with checkpoints, road-
blocks, walls, house demoli-
tions, and political
bureaucracy all in the
name of national security.
How can we celebrate our
freedom with dignity when
we deny it to those who share
this land with us?
My country defines me as
a refiusenik an objector -
because I will not serve in an
occupying army. Rather than
send me to prison as a pro-
tester, the army has relieved
me of my obligation to serve.
So this year, I will volunteer
for national service proba-
bly doing community work in
a poor neighborhood and
will celebrate my freedom on
Passover with a clear con-
science.
Baskin was born in Jerusa-
lem to parents who immi-
grated from the United States.
She enjoys cooking, photogra-
phy, reading and the beaches
of Egypt's Sinai Peninsula.


F reedom for me this
Passover means the
right to openly live in
Jerusalem, and share in the
struggle for its renewal.
This August, thousands
of people from around the
world Jewish, Christian
and Muslim; religious and
secular; gay and straight -
are planning to come to
Jerusalem to celebrate in
Hebrew, Arabic, English
and dozens of other lan-
guages Jerusalem World-
Pride 2005, the global gay
celebration themed "Love
Without Borders."
Here at the Jerusalem
Open House, we have


be truly independent. Israel
has controlled the West Bank
and the Gaza Strip since 1967,
and continues to do so against
the will of the Palestinians,
who have repeatedly resisted
Israeli rule.
The adverse material,
human and political conse-
quences of the prolonged
Israeli occupation are by now
legion. The construction of
the separation wall and expan-
sion of settlements have fur-
ther circumscribed personal
mobility, economic viability,
political activity and a lasting


already worked for months
towards this event -
despite a strongly worded,
aggressive opposition by
Jerusalem's mayor and
some religious leaders who
do not want the gathering to
take place. But we have
received support from
other religious and commu-
nity leaders and I am confi-
dent that it will take place
- a great achievement for
democratic values, social
justice, and freedom.
It will also be a very per-
sonal moment of hopeful-
ness and joy. For me, on a
typical day, I would get
plenty of derogatory com-


peace agreement.
The suffering of the dispos-
sessed and disenfranchised, as
Jewish history so poignantly
highlights, harms not only the
subjugated; it also defiles the
oppressors' moral fabric and
internal cohesion.
Israeli society has become
more fragmented, its demo-
cratic ethos increasingly
assailed, its security more
questionable, and its govern-
mental capacities severely
diminished the longer the Pal-
estinian-Israeli conflict has
endured. Unless Israel acts


ments walking hand in hand
with the man I love in Jeru-
salem. But Jerusalem
WorldPride 2005 will not be
one of those days.
Change is possible, and
celebrating diversity in
Jerusalem can be a reality
- if only for a few days. It
will be a global opportunity
to make a stand for liberty,
peace, and pride with
thousands of people from
all over the world joining
together.
El-Ad is executive direc-
tor of the Jerusalem Open
House, a gay and lesbian
center for people of all faiths.
He was born in Haifa.


now to promote a permanent
settlement based on the cre-
ation of a strong, viable Pales-
tine alongside Israel, its own
durability will be irretrievably
compromised.
The lesson of the liberation
of the Children of Israel from
enslavement in Egypt, as that
of all subsequent liberation
movements, is unequivocal:
Freedom cannot be gained
at the cost of repressing oth-
ers.
This Passover, Israelis,
with the help of freedom-lov-
ing people throughout the


world, must dedicate them-
selves to making 2005 a living
testimony to the timelessness
of the Pesach story. They
should do everything possible
to promote Palestinian free-
dom to liberate themselves
from the shackles of occupa-
tion too.
Chazan, a former member
of Israel's parliament, is pro-
fessor emerita of political sci-
ence at the Hebrew University
ofJerusalem and currently
heads the School of Society
and Politics at Tel-Aviv Col-
lege.


I' % I \. I o F % 0 1


M -IN
opyrighted Material

oSyndicatedContentw i

Available from Commercial News Providers'.


- --- -m 44000


AVITAL AND YEHUDIT ROSENFELD
SCHOOLCHILDREN

At Passover, we can feel

as if we were just freed


Freedom means going
to public places and
riding on buses -
without being worried about
being blown up by a terror-
ist. (Well, more correctly,
without our mother being
worried.)
Freedom means having
an army that can, and is, pro-
tecting us and fighting for
us. It means, feeling you're
in your own country where
you can pick up your chin
and grin, and say, "I'm who I
am a Jew!"
And no one will stop us
from saying that. Or feeling
that.
In school, Yehudit just
performed in Fiddler On the
Roof. The show and the title
mean the exact opposite of
freedom. People in the play
were like a fiddler in the
middle of a steep roof-- and
one step could make you fall
right down. They weren't
secure; they never knew
what will happen or who
might get killed in the next


pogrom.
But it isn't just physical.
On Passover, the holiday of
freedom, we remember how
we got out of slavery in
Egypt, where we got bread
for free but could die as
slaves. Once out of Egypt,
we became our own bosses,
and got God's command-
ments, or mitzvot, so we
could be spiritual. We could
make up our own minds.
Each year at Passover, we
get to show that we're free:
We don't have to sit up
straight at the Seder table.
We lean on pillows, like
kings and queens the
queens that we are! And lis-
ten comfortably to the story
of the Exodus from Egypt.
And feel like we were just
freed ourselves.
Avital Rosenfeld, 12, is a
seventh-grader at Jerusalem's
Evelina de Rothschild School
for girls. Her sister, Yehudit,
10, is a fifth-grader there. She
played Yenta, the matchma-
ker, in 'Fiddler On the Roof.


RABBI ELIYAHU MITTERHOFF
WEBSITE DIRECTOR

Man's greatest pleasure

is to do what is right


Do you want to do the
right thing? The
unanimous answer of
a healthy individual to that
question is always yes.
But we don't always do
the right thing because we
are enslaved to lust,
anger, arrogance and jeal-
ousy. And, as a consequence
of our transgressions we
destroy our lives and the
lives of our loved ones. Even
the rich and famous can ruin
their achievements with one
appalling act caused by a
moment of weakness.
Our great rabbis explain
that Egypt epitomized deca-
dence and was an absolute
vacuum of spiritual values.
So besides being physically
enslaved there, we were also
spiritually enslaved. The
king of Egypt tried to spread
the impurity and immorality
of his corrupt society.
His multinational cam-
paign for consumerism and
sensuality left us helpless
and despondent, In such an


environment was it possible
to be moral? Sound familiar?
Our rabbis tell us that in Eg-
ypt we were one step away
from spiritual devastation.
During Passover, we are
given an annual chance to
revitalize our spirituality.
We eat matzo rather than
bread, which symbolizes the
physical pleasures of this
world. G-d redeemed us and
gave us His Torah, with its
faultless balance, as a rem-
edy for our material drives.
Only someone who is
involved in Torah is truly
free. Freedom means the
opportunity to live in purity
and man's greatest pleasure
is to do what is right. Have a
great Passover.
Mitterhoff is the director
of GlobalYeshiva.com, a
Jerusalem-based online
Orthodox Jewish advice
forum to debate and discuss
all types of religious issues
and Jewish law. He immi-
grated to Israel from the
United States in 1981.


RACHEL SAPERSTEIN I GAZA STRIP SETTLER

Rockets'explosions, threat

-of expulsions cloud season


As a resident of Gush Katif,
freedom means the right
to full, safe nights of sleep
without 2 a.m. explosions of
mortar and Qassam rockets in
my community.
Freedom means that our chil-
dren can walk to school in the
morning without gunfire or gre-
nades lobbed at them.
Freedom means knowing I
can enjoy this holiday without
the heart-palpitating knowledge
that my prime minister is going
to expel me and give my home,
synagogue and community to
the Arabs, on the slim chance
that they will give Israel a few
months of quiet.
Freedom means opening the
newspaper and not reading how
a brave people have been


branded "evil settlers" because
they choose to defend their Bib-
lical homeland so it will not
be given to an enemy as a
reward for terrorism.
And lastly, freedom means to
gaze at the army of Israel and see
courageous defenders and not
the means by which Israel will
pull Jews from their homes -
because they are Jews.
May the edict of expulsion be
rescinded and our holiday of
Passover be one of joy and free-
dom.
Saperstein, a mother and
grandmother, was born in New
York and moved to Gush Katifin
the Gaza Strip with her husband
Moshe, an Israeli army veteran.
Both are active spokespersons for
their community.


NAOMI CHAZAN I PROFESSOR, PEACE ACTIVIST



Remember the lesson of liberation


SGT. KEVIN
MARKS
ISRAELI ARMY

I am very

proud to

protect Israel

'll start off by telling a
little bit about myselfI
My name is Kevin
Marks, and I grew up in
North Carolina. After finish-
ing high school, I made ali-
yah and joined the Israel
Defense Forces here in
Israel.
After a lot of training and
hard work, I am now a
fighter in a special unit: the
Golani the best infantry
brigade.
When I sit and think
about what Passover means
to me, a few things come to
mind. Passover is about the
story of our people leaving
Egypt, finally becoming free.
I now remember the
times I celebrated this holi-
day with my family and
friends in America. I haven't
been able to celebrate Pass-
over with my family in
America in the past two
years because rye been in
the army.
But I am very proud to be
here, to protect the land that
God eventually made our
home after the exit from
Egypt.
Marks, who lives in Tel
Aviv when not training with
the military, immigrated in
early 2003 and was drafted
into the Israel Defense Forces
in August 2003.


p


RABBI MAJ.
HOWARD
'HANOCH' FIELDS
U.S. ARMY

Nations'

freedoms

come at a

high cost

Day to day, soldiers
give up their per-
sonal freedoms of
where they work, what they
eat and wear, what informa-
tion they can share, even
when they can retire. Each
of us here is missing at least
a whole year of birthdays
and holidays with loved
ones.
I would like to be home
for Passover, listening to my
children recite the four
questions and discussing
their understanding of free-
dom. But I gave that up
some years ago with the
hope that they can safely
have Passover at home each
and every year, without hav-
ing to go to war themselves.
This Passover, Jewish
service members and civil-
ians serving in Iraq and
Kuwait will make great
efforts to join one of the
many seders taking place on
bases. All of us will be
thankful that we come from
a free nation and will fore-
most discuss our role in the
liberation of an oppressed
one.
We are very proud of
being free. Here in Iraq we
want to share that desire for
freedom. We in the military
are willing to temporarily
give up our personal free-
dom to help Iraq become an
autonomous nation of free
peoples represented by their
own form of democracy.
What America can give
to Iraq is national freedom;
what Americans can learn
from our experience here is
how precious and fragile
freedom is. Just as freedom
came at a cost for America: -
and Israel,;it hasg highcost"
here for Iraqis and Coalition'
forces. As we lean back in
comfort at this Passover
seder, we also will drip wine
for each of the 10 plagues to
remember the suffering and
high cost of freedom.
Fields'family lives in Col-
orado. He has spent 11 years
in the military, 10 as an
American Army chaplain
and one in the Israel Defense
Forces. He wrote this com-
mentary north of Baghdad,
where he will organize tradi-
tional Passover meals -
Seders -for U.S. soldiers.


HAGAI EL-AD I GAY RIGHTS ACTIVIST


Event will show change,


more diversity is possible


................................. .. ....... .......................................


ISSUES & IDEAS.


THE MIAMI HERALD







INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, APRIL 17,2005 u-


OPINION
ALBERTO IBARGUEN, PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JOHN S. KNIGHT 0894-1981)


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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005


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