Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00039
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: February 17, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







'TRY OUR
FILLET-0-FISH'
rmikovinfit

HIGH 78F
LOW 64F

SUNNY AND
NICE


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.72


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


incident: two chPaged


Pair in court on


variety of offences


E By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE man alleged to have
robbed and assaulted three jit-
ney passengers by throwing two
of them from the moving vehi-
cle was yesterday charged in
Magistrate's Court in connec-
tion with a variety of offences
related to the incident.
The jitney bus driver also
appeared in court charged with
several offences relating to the
same incident.
Ward Wilson, a 36-year-old
resident of Fire Trial Road and
28-year-old Tyronne Scavella
of Soldier Road both appeared
before Magistrate Maralyn
Meers in Court Five Bank
Lane.
Wilson is alleged to have
robbed and assaulted three pas-
sengers aboard a bus on Friday,
February 11.
The three passengers were on
a jitney bus travelling to the
Pinewood/Kennedy Subdivision
after 6.15pm. They were
attacked by two men and
thrown out of the vehicle while
it was moving at a high speed.
All three sustained serious'
injuries.
Among the three alleged vic-
tims. were 34-year-old British
national Stephanie Sturrup, who
is married to a Bahamian and
has been living in the country
for eight years, and Sharad
Lightfoot, 25, of Mahogany
Street.
Wilson was charged, being
concerned with another, with
robbing Matthew Brown of $20,
Stephanie Sturrup of a black
plastic hair stylist salon kit val-


ued at $700 and attempting to
rob Sharad Lightfoot of $600.
In addition he was charged with
three counts of causing harm to
them.
Scavella, who was the bus dri-
ver was charged with two counts
of aiding and abetting the rob-
bery of Mr Brown and Ms Stur-
rup, a count of aiding and abet-
ting the attempted robbery of
Mr Lightfoot and three counts
of aiding and abetting the
assault of the three.
Both men opted to have their
cases heard in the Magistrate's
Court rather than the Supreme
Court and pleaded not guilty to
all the charges. Prosecutor Sgt
Clifford Daxon, asked the court
that if it granted the men bail,
that conditions be attached and
that they not have any contact
with any of the witnesses in the
case.
Magistrate Meers, told Wil-
son and Scavella, in order to be
granted bail, they would have
to show why their imprison-
ment, pending trial would be
unjust.
In Scavella's defence, his
attorney Ian Cargill told the
court that Scavella was an
expectant father, has no prior
convictions and has been gain-
fully employed. He asked the
court's mercy and said that his
client would comply with any
conditions attached to his bail.
Wilson also said that he had a
family which depended on him.
Magistrate Meers told the
men that she would grant bail
because the case could not con-
tinue until May. She said that
SEE page 12


* WARD WILSON (gray top) and Tyronne Scavella (black jacket) outside of court yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
ILLEGAL immigration has
contributed to the victimisa-
tion of Bahamian tenants by
"greedy and unconscionable
landlords," according to Eliz-
abeth MP Malcolm Adderley.
Mr Adderley was speaking
during the debate on a pro-
posed amendment to the Rent
Control Act, which would
increase the ceiling'on con-
trolled rent.
He said the fact that immi-
grants are willing to pay for


substandard, unsanitary
accommodation has allowed
landlords to raise the rates on
all properties.
Mr Adderley began his
remarks by saying he agreed
with the sentiments expressed
by Trade and Industry Minis-
ter Leslie Miller at the last
meeting of parliament.
Mr Miller had said that the
illegal immigration situation
in the Bahamas is a "catastro-
phe" that is jeopardising the
ability of ordinary Bahamians
SEE page 12


Improved water

supply on the way
* By PAUL G. vessel, the Clipper Legend, are
TURNQUEST all working around the clock to
Tribune Staff Reporter supply the island with water.
Operating at peak perfor-
BARRING any unforeseen mance, the vessels will be sup-
circumstances or eventualities plying 6.2 million gallons of
water should soon be flowing water a day, equating to 65 per
for everyone in New Provi- cent of the 9.5 million gallons
dence, the Minister of Works used daily.
and Utilities Bradley Roberts "The corporation will under-
announced yesterday. take to provide water during
Mr Roberts said thktt con- ;'he peak periods of 5am to
sumers throughout New Provi- 10am and 4pm to 10pm. Dur-
dence will recognise a distinct ing the off-peak periods being
improvement in their water sup- 10am to 4pm and 10pm to 5am,
ply as the week progresses, as consumers can expect a reduc-
both barges, the Titus and the
Dolphin, and a third contracted SEE page 12


Course runs from r-eoruary z2 TO Marcn 4, zuu0.
Registration Deadline is February 11, 2005.
To register, call (242) 325-2638.
ANDERSONPRICE
Institute of Technology


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2005 Subway Fun Run/ Walk
February, 26th 2005,.


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M f-I I r% r, Ir A


MP: illegal immigration is

contributing to rent problems








I I ~%JSJsJ


LOCALNEWs S


Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale, SoWier Road
t: 393.7111 fax:393-0440
: ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _______________________


V ~~&


BAHAMIAN contractor Mr Redwin Grant (left) signing a contract for the building of homes
in Golden Isles Subdivision #1, on February 15, as the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of
Housing and National Insurance, Mrs Leila Greene, looks on. Also pictured is civil and structural
engineer at the Ministry Mr Anthony Farrington. Mr Grant is one of eight contractors selected
by the Ministry to build the 43 houses in the subdivision. Minister of Housing and National Insur-
ance Shane Gibson said that the government plans for construct 22 subdivisions and approximately
1,043 houses throughout the Bahamas in 2005. 'We take the business of housing in this country
very seriously and it is our sincere hope to provide affordable housing for all Bahamians,' he said.
(BIS photo: Eric Rose)



SNew 43 house



subdivision


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
IN..THE government's con-
tinuing efforts to provide
affordable housing, a new 43
house subdivision willbe con-
structed at a cost of
$2,714,940.
The announcement was
made by Minister of Housing
and National Insurance Shane
Gibson yesterday afternoon.
Mr Gibson stated that the
contractors working on the
project promised him that the
subdivision will be complet-
ed in three months.
The subdivision, which will
be situated in Golden Isles
number one, will consist of
seven two-bedrooms, one
bath homes at a cost of
$52,920 each, 15 three-bed-
rooms, one bath homes at
$57,600 and 21 three-bed-
rooms, two bath at $70,500
each.
"This Crown grant of 10
acres has been given to the
ministry for the purpose of
housing. This is what we con-
sider to be a grand achieve-
ment and promised fulfill-
ment. This passion for pro-
viding affordable homes for
all Bahamians is shared by the
entire Cabinet and it is a tes-
timony to this government's
good faith that each and every
budget has reflected this com-
mitment," said Mr Gibson.
Concerning other housing


initiatives Mr Gibson revealed
that in 2005 there will be 680
new homes built in New Prov-
idejnce and 363 in Grand
Bahama, Abaco,,M6oss Town,
'Exnuma, San Salvador and
Eleuthera.
He also said that the hous-
ing plans for this year com-
prise of 22 new subdivisions
and approximately 1,043
houses, an investment of
approximately $1 million.

Bonds
Mr Gibson noted that the
Ministry of Housing and the
Bahamas Mortgage Corpora-
tion have reviewed the hous-
ing subdivisions plans and are
in the process of requesting
additional bonds from Cabi-
net to fund the projects.
"When these 43 houses are
completed they will show fur-
therthe Government's vision
of providing affordable qual-
ity homes for all Bahamians.
This most excellent housing
programme will adequately
serve this and future genera-
tions.
"In the words of the former
Deputy Prime Minister
Arthur Hanna, it is still our
Government's mission to
wipe every tear from every
eye and the provision of
affordable housing is just
one of the many ways in
which this can be achieved,"
he said.


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THE TIBUNETHURSAY, FBRUAR 17,C005,NAGES


Town residents are


waiting on Sears'


decision


By, RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
B" ZINETown residents
majyave to face the land
developers staking claim to
the4inhomes at the end of
Fethuary, it was revealed
yesterday.
As 'the residents of the
area face the end of their
final extension they are
distressed that Attorney
General Alfred Sears has
yet to make a decision on
the controversial issue.
They were granted a
month's extension in their
land dispute case with the
Harrold Road Land Devel-
opment Company in
November of last year
and a second one in
December which expired in
January.
Struggle
The struggle began when
residents, in October of
2004, received letters from
the Lockhart and Munroe
law firm saying that its
client, Harrold Road Land
Development Company
"Landco" had been grant-
ed certificates of title to
property between Bozine
Town, Knowles Drive and
Harrold Road. The firm
said it was instructed that
the occupants of the land
to whom the letters were
sent were presently occu-
pying a part or portion of
their client's land.
The occupants were giv-
en 14 days from the date
of the firm's letter Octo-
ber 13, 2004 to "pur-


I


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning.
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


End of extension

drawing near


chase the part or portion
of the land" that they
presently occupy or have
legal action taken against
them.
Lawyer Milton Evans,
who represents the resi-
dents, told The Tribune
yesterday that they are still
waiting for a decision from
the Attorney General's
office.
Mr Evans said that if
everything is handled law-
fully, court proceedings
may begin after the exten-
sion wears out.
"We have conducted our
own investigation but at
this time we don't wish to
go public and say what
those findings are.
"If we are to go to court


we will go and at the end of
the day we hope the resi-
dents will remain in their
homes," he said.
Intervene
At a meeting held on
Tuesday, the residents
called on the Attorney
General and Prime Minster
Perry Christie to intervene
on behalf of the Bozine
Town/Knowles Drive
Community who insist
that they have purchased
their properties in good
faith.
Some persons have lived
in the area for more than
30 years and feel that their
voices have fallen on deaf
ears.


SATTORNEY GENERAL
Alfred Sears


Another is charged




in connection with




Nassau Village riot


* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
ANOTHER person was brought before
the courts in connection with the Nassau Vil-
lage riot, bringing to ten the number of per-
sons charged with crimes related to the inci-
dent.
On Wednesday, 44-year-old Glenroy Stra-
chan of Forbes Street, Nassau Village was
brought before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez to answer to charges, which accuse
him of participating in the January 26 riot.
He was charged with throwing missiles to
the annoyance and danger of PC 2370 Bain
and PC Dixon; disorderly behaviour; and
causing damage.
Police allege that he damaged a 1998 police
Ford Escort vehicle, costing the Bahamas
Government $3,200.
Strachan pleaded not guilty, but was still
remanded to Her Majesty's Prison until Mon-
day, when he and six others charged with
similar offences will be brought before Mag-


istrate Linda Virgill at Court One on Bank
Lane for a bail hearing.
In other court news on Wednesday:
Kevin Cooper was sentenced to one year
imprisonment after pleading guilty to stealing
$2,000.
On December 30, 2004, Cooper was given
the cash to hand over to his brother, Ray-
mond Cooper. Instead, Cooper said he used
the money to "buy drugs and party".
Alphonso Leadon pleaded not guilty to
indecent assault.
He was accused of sexually assaulting a
20-year-old woman on January 11. Leadon
told the court that the woman he is accused
of assaulting told him she did not press the
charges.
Magistrate Marilyn Meers said the woman
must come to the court to drop the charges in
order for him to be absolved.
Meanwhile, she granted him $5,000 bail
with two sureties. His wife appeared in court
as one of his sureties. The case was adjourned
to May 12.


-^^


The Nassau Garden Club
is having a
Flower Show
with Design Exhibits and Horticultural
Specimens.
Come and enjoy an afternoon of natural beauty
and shop at the various stalls
which will have items from the Bahamas
National Trust, soft drinks and snacks
by the Discovery Club children,
jewellery by various artisans, preserves made
by local Bahamians and exotic Orchids from
Flamingo Nurseries.
Saturday, 19th February, 2005
From 2:30pm 6:00pm
The Retreat Gardens on Village Road
(opposite Queen's College)
Adults: $3.00
Children under 12 only: $1.00






Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
-Fax: 326-9953
Bay Street (next to Athena Caff) Tel: 323-8240
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2
Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235
e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com P.O. Box N-121


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E 1XIDN-NIWF OE SUACEB


NEW 1:05


SON OF THE MASK NEW 1:20 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:15 10:35
HITCH B 1:00 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:45
HITCH B 2:00 N/A 4:30 N/A 8:00 10:30
POOH'S HEFFALMP B 1:10 2:50 4:30 N/A N/A N/A
ALONE IN THE DARK C N/A N/A N/A 6:10 8:25 10:50
HIDE&SEEK C 1:10 3:25 N/A 6:05 8:20 10:45
MILLION DOLLAR BABY T 1:35 N/A 4:35 7:25 N/A 10:10
ARE WETHERE YET B 1:20 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:15 10:40
,SAULTON PRECINCT 13 C 1:00 3:20 N/A 6:00 8:10 10:40

CONSTANTINE' NEW 1:10 3:35 6:00 8:20 10:40
BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE NEW 1:30 3:50 6:30 8:35 10:30
SON OF THE MASK NEW 1:20 3:40 6:20 8:25 10:25
HITCH B 1:15 .3:30 6:00 8:20 10:35


, I IARE WE THERE YET
^*I.- "~inr~ P nizrr


I11I


3:40 6:10


Bozine


I~INDEX^^^^


I


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 005TTHE TRIBUN


SEVERAL YEARS ago at the height of
the Irish Republican Army's terrorist activi-
ties in London, someone commented that all
the Irish in England should be packed up
and sent home.
"And collapse the country?" retorted his
friend, who had a better appreciation of what
an Irish exodus would have meant to Great
Britain.
The same can be said of the Bahamas in
relation to the Haitians, who have made a
tremendous contribution to this country.
Without the assistance of expatriates of all
nationalities, the Bahamas would not be
where it is today. This fact is a bitter pill for
many Bahamians to swallow, but it is the
truth.
That is not to say that there are no talent-
ed Bahamians with the right work ethic, all it
means is that there are not enough of them. It
also means that our workforce has to be sup-
plemented with outside expertise until the
average Bahamian understands that if he
wants to keep foreigners out of the work-
place, he will not only have to do their jobs -
including the menial work earmarked for
Haitians but he will have to work to very
high standards.
It is unfair-to hold back the progress of
any business for lack of compeqent local staff.
It is also unfair, through an ill-considered
immigration policy, to try to force a business
to hire persons who do not have the right
attitude to work and who refuse to measure
up.
Bahamians feel threatened by Haitians,
but when they want a job done it is the Hait-
ian to whom they turn.
The following story will illustrate the think-
ing of most Bahamians:
Sometime last year a Bahamian maid a
jewel of a woman went to her employer to
ask if she could have assistance in the house
as the work was getting too much for one
person. Most of the maid's time was now
taken up with helping to care for an invalid,
leaving little time for housework.
The employer gave permission, and as she
had so much confidence in her maid she left
it to her to select the person she wanted to
help her.
One morning the maid turned up with the
new employee. The young lady had limited
English.
"Why have you brought a Haitian? Aren't
there any good Bahamians around?" the


employer asked her maid.
"I want someone who will work," was her
quick response. "I have no time for foolish-
ness!"
The Haitian stayed. Despite her limited
English she could do the work and that
was all that the Bahamian maid was inter-
ested in.
Of course, because of government's neglect
of the situation, the country cannot absorb
any more illegal immigrants. The Haitians
already settled here hate to hear about the
new arrivals. They dislike it as much as their
Bahamian neighbours. Many of those already
here crowd together in small shacks, creating
an unhealthy slum in Bahamian neighbour-
hoods. But, as one Bahamian said, "they
don't cause any trouble as long as you leave
them alone."
In the House yesterday morning Marsh
Harbour MP Robert Sweeting observed that
one of the problems with the Haitians is that
they live outside of the law.
This is a problem created by various
Bahamian governments that have made it
impossible for them to live within the law.
Because so many of them are illegal often
because government has not dealt with their
application forms they cannot buy land, or
do business.
They have to sneak around like shadows,
throwing up a lean-to wherever they can find
a plot of land, or huddling together in sub-
standard housing that should be condemned
by the Ministry of Health.
Government's failure to address the Hait-
ian problem has forced these people to exist
on the fringe of society, constantly ducking
the law.
Government complains about corruption in
the immigration department and various
branches of law enforcement, but in the final
analysis it is government's inaction that has
fostered this corruption. When immigrants'
applications for work, or residence or citi-
zenship are ignored, the fact that they are
still here living and working quietly suggests
that someone is being paid off.
The problem has now grown to dangerous
proportions.
While the Defence Force has to step up
its surveillance of our shores to stop the new
arrivals, the Immigration Board has to get to
work to legitimise those immigrants who
qualify, including those who already have
jobs.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Haitians helped build the country


EDITOR, The Tribune.
WITH some 30 years of gov-
ernment refusing to uphold the
law with regard to illegal immi-
grants, the chaos that we seem
to, finally be recognizing, is
going to be soul-searching to
resolve fairly and equitably if
government has the resolve.
The obvious question is: Does
government have the resolve?
Can we turn "illegal" into
"legal" and continue to abuse
those who have legally quali-
fied and applied for some status,
but for years have had no reply
from Immigration? Six to 15
years is quite common I under-
stand.
Immediately we need the
Haitian Ambassador to estab-
lish the accuracy as to what is
the true status for Bahamian-
born persons of illegal Haitian
immigrants to qualify for Hait-
ian citizenship?
I do not believe that when
both parents are Haitian, the
Haitian Constitution refuses to
accept a person whether or not
they were born in Haiti. I do
not believe that if the'father is
Haitian and the wife some oth-
er nationality, the children
would not be given Haitian cit-
izenship as they qualify through
the father. If this is so then
every single illegal Haitian
immigrant can return to Haiti
and have a legal status...BUT...
To round-up illegal immi-
grants who have lived in The
Bahamas for years and their
children, Bahamian born, under
18-years and now even their
grandchildren and put them on
a plane back to Haiti is obvi-
ously out of the question, as
such a decision would be inhu-
mane.
Do we have any idea as to
how many illegal immigrants
are in the country? Is the total
closer to 100,000 or 300,000 or
more? Does anyone know?
Census 2000 counted, which
basically means nothing, 21,426
which is obviously inaccurate.
Can we arrive at a better guess
by using Vehicle Licensing and
also records at PMH, or
through the names of Haitian
children attending Government
schools? Certainly we can com-
mence a data base by requiring
all persons who are not Bahami-
an when using the public ser-
vices, licensing etc, to complete
a date recording form, at least
this will be a start.
The Government must accept
the chronic and unacceptable
position that we are in is the
fault of a malfunctioning sys-
tem for many, many years and


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successive governments.
I am shocked to read that a
Haitian sloop was discovered
as far north as Booby Rocks, a
mile or so south off Nassau with
illegal Haitians on board is
the RBDF totally blind, so inept
and impotent to carry out sur-
veillance? No wonder drugs
continue to flow through our
country, everyone is looking
seemingly the other way.
We all know our individual
policy send them all back,
but not mine!
What if Bahamians stop
employing illegal immigrants,
what will be the result? No
work, bush crack illegal immi-
grants will go, but what do we
do? We employ them daily and
take advantage of them,
because they will work cheaper
than a Bahamian. You see, we
are as much to blame for this
chronic mess as government is,
we just encourage and partici-
pate in the mess.
Say there was a Magistrate's
fine of $2,000 for employing


anyone who is not legal to work
in any capacity? Would that
work? It might but you know
we will corrupt the system and
the status quo of today will pre-
vail because the abuse is on a
national level.
How do we treat our own? I
mean the foreign husbands of
Bahamians. Yes they can sleep
in the matrimonial bed and cre-
ate children but they can't own
property in their own name,
even if every cent is theirs -
can't own a business in their
own name can't own a $1.00
share in a listed BISX Public
Company if they separate
and if the husband remarries it
better be a Bahamian or his sta-
tus could be dead. You see we
treat our own inhumanely and
do nothing to change it.
We must stay level-headed
and I caution those who seem to
think they are the only thinkers
to watch how they step as The
Bahamas is signatory to Inter-
national Conventions which
require us to apply specific
humane policies.

TERRANCE ROLLE
Nassau,
February 9, 2005.


Peace must



be maintained

EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE most important thing is that peace is maintained. In
the hunger and the fury and the rage contained within the
Nassau Village visit, no one cared that peace be maintained,
not the police, not the bystanders, not those who brought on
the uprising.
But wait? Didn't Ron Pinder and Kenyatta Gibson (MP's)
care that peace is maintained? Yes, of course they cared but
they probably found they could not stem the tide of their own
government's promises to the Haitian people.
Who are the Haitian people? Not all of us know because
many Haitians have learned to live with a secret identity.
Now, though, someone gives the impression that civil war is
warranted.
Really? Remember this, that some of our freedoms were
hard won in other lands in other times through the shed-
ding of much blood. The most important thing is that peace
is maintained. For in today's world there is no justice and
there is no truth.
MELISSA K
SWEETING-PERCENTIE
Nassau,
January 26, 2005.






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Heading to Canada for University?

McGill University
McMaster University
Queen's University
University of Guelph
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
University of Western Ontario

If you are planning to attend one of these schools
then apply NOW for one of our scholarships!

Undergraduates only

Applications must be in by
March 31st, 2005

Application forms may be obtained by writing to the Tomlinson
Scholarship, P.O. Box CB 10975, Nassau, Bahamas
& also from COB Financial Aid Office

The Tomlinson Scholarship is funded by High Tor Limited in
memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson


We must stay





level-headed over





illegal immigration


Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978


DON STAINTON
(PROTECTION) LTD.
HILLSIDE PLAZA THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005









THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAUL 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Pair call on Sears to 'bring justice'





to employees of Royal Oasis Resort


B ED BATH &HOME1


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A businessman
and political activist are urging
Attorney General Alfred Sears
to uphold the laws of the country
and bring justice to the employ-
ees and local creditors of Royal
Oasis Resort.
Michael Edwards, former
FNM chairman on Grand
Bahama, believes that action
should be brought against Drift-
wood Limited which owns Roy-
al Oasis for what he claims is
their handling of employees'
monies and non-payment of casi-
no taxes.
He claimed that the operators-
have demonstrated a blatant dis-
regard for the Bahamas, its peo-
ple, its institutions, the princi-
ples of law and in particular the
laws of the Bahamas.

Dollars
"What makes the Royal Oasis
matter particularly perplexing is
the fact that Driftwood Limited
has shut down operations and
owes the government of the
Bahamas millions of dollars as
well as its many local creditors,"
said Mr Edwards.
The Royal Oasis Resort saga
has directly affected the 1,300
employees, who were laid off in
September when the resort
closed for reconstruction as a
result of extensive damage
caused by Hurricanes Jeanne
and Frances.
Employees are under tremen-
dous financial strain to meet
their monthly obligations. to


banks and other lenders. Gov-
ernment is providing rental,
medical and food assistance to
employees through the Depart-
ment of Social Services.
The Government has inter-
vened and is in negotiations with
the operators and its lending
partner Lehman Brothers in
New York for settlement of sev-
erance pay for employees and
the resale and re-opening of the
resort in Freeport.

Interests
Mr Edwards noted that those
elected to parliament are
trustees and defenders of the
people's interests and sover-
eignty.
He said the situation at Royal
Oasis has created economic fall-
out among various persons with-
in the Freeport community;.
Mr Edward claims that "the
callous act" by operators of Roy-
al Oasis has adversely affected
loyal and dedicated employees,
straw vendors at Goombay Park,
businesses at the International
Bazaar, and other businesses.
The laid off employees, some
employed for more than 25 years
are faced with possible repos-
session of their homes, and hav-
ing their credit rating destroyed,
he said. Furthermore, he noted
that straw vendors and taxi dri-
vers that made Royal Oasis
Resort and Casino the hub of
their business can no longer pro-
vide for their families.
Mr Edwards said business for
stores in the Bazaar are at an all
time low and are faced with the


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The Freeport Container Poit has coqmplptee it
$75 million Phase Four expansion project with the acquisition and
arrival of three new HHI craneson Grand Bahama.
The cranes, which are the largest ever built, were manufactured
by Hyundai Heavy Industry in Japan and arrived at the container
port this week, company officials announced on Wednesday.
The super post panamax quay cranes are expected to significantly
enhance operations at the container port, which has become a
major world transshipment hub.
Sherry Rodgers, public relations spokesperson, said the acqui-
sition of the cranes completes Phase Four expansions, which com-
menced in February 2003.
According to officials, each crane has the capacity to off-load car-
go weighing up to 71 tonnes and handle containers weighing up to
61 tonnes. It is also capable of discharging and loading two 20ft con-
tainers simultaneously.

Speed
Standing at 357 feet high, the cranes' operators cabs can reach a
top speed of 210 metres per minute and hoist speeds of 150 metres
per minute.
Freeport Container Port is a privately owned and operated port
of Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH).
It serves as a world transshipment hub between the eastern gulf
coast of the United States, "the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean,
South America, and trade lanes to European, Mediterranean, the
Far East, and Australian destinations.
The port was officially opened in July 1997 and has significant-
ly developed over the years, comprising of a 3,400 ft berth with a
15.5m depth, 10 super post panamax quayside gantry craries, two
Gottwald cranes, 50 straddle carriers, Navis Operating System,
and a 16m channel and turning basin.
In addition to its tremendous stacking capacity, the container port
is capable of handling the largest container vessels in the world.
Hutchison Port Holding is an independent port investor, devel-
oper, and operator with interests in 18 countries throughout Asia,
Middle East, Africa, Europe, and the Americas.
Today, it operates a total of 214 berths in 36 ports together with
a number of transportation related service companies.
In addition to the container port, HPH are also joint operators
of Freeport Harbour Company Limited, The Grand Bahama Air-
port Company Limited, and the Grand Bahama International
Business Centre.


possibility of laying off their
staff.
About 70 merchants at the
Bazaar may be forced to close
their businesses by the end of
this month because of a tremen-
dous drop in sales, he claimed.
He also noted that companies
that did business with the resort
are faced with reducing staff,
while others are near bankrupt-
cy because they were not paid
for services they provided to the
resort.
"The overall result of the cal-
lous and insensitive action by
the Royal Oasis Resort is fur-
ther economic fallout in the
community and more families
will have to beg bread," he said.
He noted that while it is a
right of any owner of any busi-
ness to cease operation at their
discretion, it is also wrong to
cease a business operation at the
expense of creditors.

Conduct
He stressed that transparen-
cy and good conduct does not
only apply to the banking indus-
try, but to other business mat-
ters in the Bahamas.
"The Attorney General is
admonished in his capacity to
uphold the laws of the Bahamas
and to not dispense selective jus-
tice and bring action against
Driftwood Limited," said Mr
Edwards.
He also said the National
Insurance Board and the
Bahamas Telecommunication
Corporation, which are both
quasi-government institutions,
should also join in bringing
action against operators for sums
owed to them.
According to reports, Royal
Oasis also owes millions to the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
and local creditors.
"The question to be asked of
the current administration and
its representatives for Grand











THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 17


2:00am
11:00
12:00
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4:58
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5:30
6:30
7:00
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10:30
11:00
11:30
1:30am


Community Pg./1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean News Update
Immediate Response
Caribbean News Update
Cybernet
CMJ Club Zone
Caribbean News Update
Gospel Video Countdown
Treasure Attic
This Generation
Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
Kids On The Move
ZNS News (Update Live)
Caribbean Newsline
Legends From Whence
We Came
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Da' Down Home Show
The Darold Miller Show
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Pg./1540


Bahama and the Minister of
Tourism no less, is where is
the leadership needed to protect
the rights, interest and sover-
eignty of the Bahamian people?"
Mr Edwards said the people
need relief.
"They need their monies, they
need their dignity, they need
bread on the table and a stable
future for their children and
grandchildren.
"They need it now, not in 2007
because by the time they would
have lost their homes and they
would have starved and more
Bahamians families would have
destructed.
"They need something real
and tangible, and not
mere words and promises," he
said.


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


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WILSONART ADHESIVES
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NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes! I














COB spreads its wings with


new poultry unit operation

E By NATARIO MCKENZIE dom Foundation, the unique "Food production defines us
40x400-ft tunnel ventilated system from a developed and a developing
DESCRIBED as "the first of its is computerised and fully equipped nation." said Dr Rodney Smith
kind in the Bahamas", the poultry to house a maximum of 24,000 while addressing those assembled
unit of The College of the birds. at the launch. He went on to note


Bahamas officially launched its
new operation on Wednesday.
On hand to mark the occasion
were the Minister of Agriculture
and Fisheries V Alfred Gray, Pres-
ident of The College of the
Bahamas Dr Rodney Smith and
Chairman of The College of the
Bahamas Council Franklyn Wil-
son.
The unit located off Gladstone
Road south was established in
October of 2004 and is managed by
COB alumnus Justin Taylor. Five
acres of land were granted by the
Ministry of Agriculture and Fish-
eries to accommodate the project.
Funded by the Campbell Free-


Processed
10,000 chickens have already
been produced at the facility so
far. One day old chicks are flown in
from Morris Hatchery, fed from
the Syfret Food Company which
are located in Florida and
processed with the assistance of
Diamond Farms at the facility.
While striving to reach universi-
ty status, officials at The College of
the Bahamas view the poultry unit
as not only an expansion to their
curriculum but also as an effort to
alleviate the need to import poul-
try.


that chicken was the most popular
meat dish in the Bahamas, how-'
ever most of the chicken consumed
by Bahamians had to be imported.
Describing the facility as "the most
state of the art and scientific envi-
ronment" he noted that he hoped
to see more of poultry units estab-
lished in the near future.
"This is the first for the
Bahamas, and for the College of
the Bahamas," noted Gray in his
address at the launch. "Poultry
production has increased," he said.
"We now produce 65 per cent of
all we eat," he added. Gray said
that he hoped that the College of
the Bahamas would not only used
the facility for research purposes
but seek to produce some of the
remaining 35 per cent of the
imported poultry. He added that
he was proud to have contributed
to the project.






POLICE at Alice Town,
Bimini, apprehended five
illegal immigrants in Bailey
Town on Sunday.
At about 7.40am, a police
officer acting on informa-
tion, went to the area of Bai-
ley Town where he arrest-
ed four Jamaicans and one
Haitian. They are Donovan
Burke, 44, Clinton Slogan,
34, Ray Solan, 41, Oneal
Hosany, 38,
of Jamaica, and Lubin
Gonel, 23, of Haiti.
The men were handed
over to Bahamas Immigra-
tion officials for processing.
Police also seized a 22ft
Mako boat near to where
the immigrants were found.


ASSOCIATION


Press Release


On 14th February 2005 The Central Bank of The Bahamas
reduced its Discount Rate by 50 basis points to 5.25%.
In accordance with this change the banking community
will similarly reduce the Bahamas Prime Rate by 50,basis
points to 5.50% effective 15th February 2005 on all new
credit facilities linked to the Bahamas Prime Rate.


While new credit facilities will be linked to the reduced
Bahamas Prime Rate the process of realigning rates on
existing credit facilities will be completed as expeditiously
as the requisite terms of these arrangements permit.




Bank of The Bahamas Limited
British American Bank
Citibank N.A.
Commonwealth Bank
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation
(Bahamas) Limited
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada


ORAL1'f FAtHIONI

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LINE OF NEW SHOES


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Each Prize consists of: 1 NV water bottle,
1 NV beach blanket, and 1 NV backpack


* CHICKS drink water at
the new poultry unit of the
College of the Bahamas that
officially launched its opera-
tion on Wenesday.
(Photo: Felipi Major/
Tribune staff)


TO ENTER:
1) Write name, address & phone number on a piece of paper.
2) Attach 3 Nature Valley Granola Bar wrappers & drop into
contest box at Lightbourn Trading Co. Ltd., 118 Mackey
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I I


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


1


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Pastor meets the


A w .. A Governor-General


DOCTOR Earl Mason, pas-
tor of Bible Based Fellowship
Church, Temple Terrace, Tam-
pa, Florida (second from right),
paid a courtesy call on Gover-
nor-General Dame Ivy
Dumont on Tuesday, February
8, at Government House. Bible
Based Fellowship Church is
non-denominational. Dr
Mason, who is connected with


a university, has Bahamian stu-
dents and wanted to meet the
Governor-General. Dr Mason
was accompanied by, from left,
Gary King, pastor, Living Faith
Church; Eric Clarke, secretary
and pastor, Maranatha Church;
and Melvin Lewis, treasurer of
the Seventh Day Adventist
Conference. (BIS photo:
Lorenzo Lockhart)


Annual

Heart Ball

draws iAear
PEDIATRIC heart patients
seen at the Cardiology Clinic
at Princess Margaret Hospital
who require heart surgery are
referred to the Bahamas Heart
Foundation, which underwrites
the medical costs for those
unable to afford treatment. The
Heart Ball is the major
fundraiser for the foundation
and this year's ball which is
slated for Saturday, February
19 at the Crown Ballroom, is
being held under the theme,
"Every child deserves a healthy
heart, Make it happen!" Our
photo shows the pediatric car-
diology team at a clinic.
S. i o fitsy/l
: Derek Smith)


LA CASITA
The Art of Island L i ng

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ATNONA RECOGNIZES AND
OF CANADA

LIMITED CONGRATULATE STAFF


The Chairman and Management of The National Bank of Canada
International Limited (NBCI), a Banking and Trust Company wishes
to congratulate those staff members who have achieved long service
with the Bank and also recognise the promotion of staff to Executive
Management.


NBCI congratulates Mrs. Jennifer Rolle-Cox on her promotion to
the position of Senior Vice President of Administration & Operations
of the Bank. Mrs. Rolle-Cox has been employed with the Bank for
7 1/2 years having joined in 1997 as Manager Accounting & Controller.
Prior to her promotion, Mrs. Cox held the position of Vice Preident
Finance and Corporate Secretary of the Bank.
In her current position, Mrs. Rolle-Cox reports directly to the President
& Managing Director of the Bank and is directly responsible for
the overall management and supervision of the Information Technology,
Trust & Corporate Services, Securities, Accounting & Controlls and
Customer Services Departments of the Bank.


NBCI congratulates Ms. Rhonda Richardson, Senior Accounting
Clerk, on her tenure of fifteen (15) years with Bank. She joined


NBCI congratulates Ms. Barbara A. Rodgers on her promotion to
Vice President Compliance and Corporate Secretary of the Bank and
on her recent Nomination as "Compliance Professional of the year
2005." Prior to her promotion, Ms. Rodgers has served in the positions
of Manager Compliance and Manager Trust & Corporate Services.
As Vice President Compliance, Ms. Rodgers joins Executive
Management and is directly responible for the Bank's compliance
with the Laws and Regulations through the administration of the
compliance programme, the writing and development of the Bank's
internal Policies and Procedures, and the development and
implementation of an on-going staff training programme. In addition,
in her capacity as the Corporate Secretary of the Bank, she is
responsible for the corporate secretarial duties of the Bank's Board
of Directors and reports directly to the President and Managing
Director.
Ms. Rodgers has thirteen (13) years banking exprience including cO
and her qualifications include: a Bachelors' of Art Degree, an Advar
Capital Markets, a Diploma in Private Banking, a Diploma in Internati
(STEP) and a Masters' Degree in Business Administration.


4


I













Minister accepts


$21,000 for Drug


Free programme
A kA f ........... A .........


CIB
COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportunity
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Responsibilities Include
ContinualAsolicitationAandAsetupAofAnewASunCardAmerchants
TrainingAmerchantApersonnelAonAuseAofAequipment,ASunCardA
policiesAandAprocedures
MaintainingAexistingAmerchantsAthroughAregularAdocumentedAvisi
PerformingAanntalAreviewsAofAtheAmerchantAportfolio
EnsuringAallAmerchantsAareAinformedAofAanyApromotionsAorAcha
inApaymentAschedules
AddressingAallAmerchantAqueriesAandAconcernsAinAaAtimelyAman
EstablishingAandAconductingAmerchantAsurveysAtoAsolicitAfeedbac
onAserviceAandAproductsAoffered
RecommendingApromotionsAforAtheASunCardAproduct
MaintainingAaAhighAlevelAofAcustomerAserviceAasAexpectedAandA
outlinedAbyAtheABank
andidates should possess
FiveABGCSEsAofAgradeA'C'AandAMB5AofAwhichAshouldAbeAEnglis
LanguageAandAMath(
AAichelor'sADegreeAinABankingAorArelatedAfield
5AyearsArelevantAexperienceAwithAaAcommercialAbankAwouldAbeA
Personal ttributes
StrongAinterpersonalAandAcommunicationAskillsA'oralAandAwritten
enefits Provided
*,ACompetitiveAsalaryAcommensurateAwithAexperience
*NPerformance-basedAincendves
*AMedical,AVision,ADentalAandALifeAInsurance
*.PensionAPlan'
*ADynamicAworkingAenvironment
InterestedApersonsAshouldAsubmitAtheirAresumesAandAcopiesAofAcertifi
inAwritingAorAemiidore Februaryn256n200S6:


HUMANnRESOUICESnDEIARTMENT
Re:nBusinessnPromotionsnOfficer
HeadnOffice6n2ndnFloor6nThenPlaza6nMackeynStreet
F909nBoxnSS362636nNassau6nBahamas
Faxan39430758nornE3mailnto:nacox@combanldtd9com
0


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SENATOR Marcus
Bethel, Minister of Health
(fourth from left), accepted a
cheque for $21,000 from
United States Ambassador
John Rood (third from
right), on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 16, at the Ministry of
Health on Meeting Street.
The donation will be used
to support activities for the
Drug Free Communities
Programme in Nassau and
the Family Islands. The
Drug Free Schools and
Community initiative aims
to raise awareness and pro-
mote community participa-
tion in communicating the
drug prevention message.
Also pictured from right
are Mr Paul Williams,
finance officer and project
manager, Drug Free
Schools; Mr William Weeks,
co-chairman, Bahamas
National Drug Council; Miss
Marcia Munnings, executive
director, Bahamas National
Drug Council; and Miss
Myrna Ortis Kerr, narcotics
affairs officer, United States
Embassy.
(BISphoto: Derek
Smith)


i


,


...... ... ...1-1 11, 1.1 ... ..... .... .. ...... .... ...... .. ... ..... .... ......... ... ... ... ..... ... ..... ........


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005














Is Christie administration




government or opposition?


L ESLIE MILLER,
Minister of Trade
and Industry, may be right
when he describes the ille-
gal Haitian immigration
problem in the Bahamas as
a "time bomb". The only
problem is that Mr Miller
has to realise that he and
his colleagues were hired to
be a bomb squad to diffuse
the bomb and not a jour-
nalist to describe or alarm
the public about it. Increas-
ingly, one gets the impres-
sion that Mr Miller and his
colleagues do not realise
that they are the govern-
ment; rather, it seems that


STRAIGHT UP TALK


Z H I VA R G 0


anyone even remember
those terms? Now, the PLP
in office seem frustrated,
powerless and perplexed
about what to do about any
number of problems ailing
us. In fact, they are more
alarmists and complaining
than members of the gen-
eral public who look to
them to do the job they
were elected to do.


"It is amazing that almost three
years into its administration,
every time the Christie
administration is faced with a
question about what it is doing
to resolve the nation's problems,
it answers by saying that it is
'putting a plan in place'."


they are still in opposition.
They appear not to believe
that they have any power
to do anything about the
problems that ail this coun-
try. This is in sharp con-
trast, however, to their pos-
ture prior to becoming the
government. In opposition,
the PLP seemed to have all
the answers to our nation's
problems and what answers
they did not have they
promised to get from "The
People", who needed to be
"consulted". They promised
"help" and "hope". Does


In response to the height-
ened alarm and pressure
regarding the illegal immi-
gration problem, The Hon
Vincent Peet promised to
develop a "comprehensive
plan" to deal with the prob-
lem. As one of my friends
would say, "Well
motabite!" The PLP pre-
sented voters with a docu-
ment called "Our Plan".
What was "Our Plan"? Was
it not a "plan"? Are we to
believe that for almost
three years, the PLP has


L AI N G


been dealing with the per-
sistent immigration prob-
lem without a plan? Incred-
ible!
This much is certain, if
Mr. Miller is right and the
illegal immigration problem
is a time bomb, Bahamians
had better run for a bomb
shelter because there does
not appear to be in office
today, a government ready
or able to diffuse that
bomb. This is unfortunate
because both Bahamians
and Haitians stand to loose
when that bomb goes off.

WHEN WILL THE
GOVERNMENT START
EXECUTING?

t is amazing that
almost three years
into its administration,
every time the Christie
administration is faced with
a question about what it is
doing to resolve the.
nation's problems, it
answers by saying that it is
"putting a plan in place".
The latest such example is
The Hon Alfred Sears'
response to questions about
the disrepair a-t A F Adder-
ley Secondary School. The
Minister said that his min-
istry was developing a com-
prehensive plan to address
school repairs. This is
incredible! Almost three
years in office, the minister
is only now trying to put a
school repair programme in
place. When he made his


maiden speech as Minister
of Education, the minister
said that he would put such
a plan in place. Three years
later he is still putting one
in place.

T he minister noted
that personnel had
been put in the ministry to
deal with technical matters
of school repair. This would
not be the first time such a
thing was done. Early in its
term, the FNM attempted
the same thing. The experi-
ment did not work well
because the work of school
repair remained largely in
the hands of public works.
Quite frankly, the ineffi-
ciency in the public educa-
tion-system today is not
merely a matter of having
a comprehensive plan; it is
also a matter of having a
committed minister. The
things that teachers find
themselves complaining
about and even sitting out
about could have been
addressed if they had a min-
ister who was curious
enough to know what was
going on in his schools and
was committed enough to
follow through on work he
promised would be done.
The post-hurricane school
repair programme in Grand
Bahama is pathetic. Months
after the passage of the
storms, no significant work
had been done. What com-
mitted and involved minis-
ter would not have known
such a thing, especially after
making a number of trips
immediately after the
storms and eloquently
expressing his concern
about the plight of teach-
ers, students and their
schools. The fact of the
mn'stteri,.t,,Mr Sears


must stop consoling himself
with his ability to speak and
roll up his sleeves and start
seeing that some work is
actually done in the Min-
istry of Education. If the
burden of his two offices is
too much, which this writer,
believes it is, he should beg
PM Christie to relieve him
of it so that the nation's
education system can have
the benefit of a focused and
productive minister.
Mr Sears is indicative of
his government; they are
not executors. They are
talkers and the people of
The Bahamas are talking
about them and the talk
aint good. When you
promise the world, you
should be able to deliver at
least a rock, even if not a
cay. The government can-
not feign planning for five
years; at some point, the
planning must stop and pro-
duction must begin. The
People wait.

BY THE WAY,
WHERE IS THE
DIRECTOR OF
EDUCATION?

T hrough the many
debacles taking
place in education today,
one has to be alarmed that
the presence and voice of
the Director of Education,
Iris Pinder; is so absent.
While two hurricanes great-
ly damaged schools in
Grand Bahama, we did not
see or hear from Mrs Pin-
der on any occasion. The
Minister came with his new-
ly appointed Deputy Direc-
tor, Mr Cecil Thompson,
but not the Director of
Education. How could a cri-
sis warrant the attendance


of the political directorate
but not his chief technical
advisor? Through all the
many closures of schools
because of sit in, fights, dis-
repair and shortages of
teachers and security per-
sonnel, the voice and pres-
ence of the director of edu-
cation were missing. One
can only hear from Mr
Thompson who is not even
the most senior deputy
director.
Why? Has a determina-
tion been made for politi-
cal reasons that the Direc-
tor of Education cannot
function?
The fact is that it is
entirely unusual for Mrs
Pinder to be so low keyed
in matters of public educa-
tion. Anyone who knows
her well knows that she is a
doer, an executor and pro-
ducer. Indeed, she is espe-
cially good in moments of
crisis.
At heart, Mrs Pinder is an
educator and cares deeply
about the education system.
Something is wrong, very
wrong in education. Minis-
ter Sears seems to have
alienated the Director. Why
this is the case is a mystery
for sure.
This much is true, howev-
er, it is causing significant
problems in the public edu-
cation system and the losers
in the process are the chil-
dren of our land.


THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
"I waited for help; I
hoped it would come. Yet
still I wait." The Disap-
pointed.
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Your car.


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AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS *mi


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Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


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Encouraging Appoaling M smerizing



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Telephone: 325-49 61 Wulff Road







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


Si


'Explosion of science'


Carlton Francis


at


Primary


an nu raylrtcinnxr Y'r,:3(itcewon




n&1IM

starring JOHNNY DEPP
directed by GORE VERBINSKI (Pirates of the Caribbean)
Open Casting Call

PIRATES OF TIE CARIBBEANII & ll
casting locals from the Caribbean for backgroundlextras
Men & women of all ages/types are needed to portray
sailors, soldiers, pirates and asian seamen.
The film is shooting in the Bahamas in summer/fall 2005.
No acting experience needed. ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID.

Grand Bahama Island
Saturday, February 19th
drop-in from lpm-4pm
Lighthouse Pointe LObby
Westin @ Our Lucava
Beach and Golf Resort

for more information:
Casting Office (784) 451-2347
www.plratescastlng.coIm


* "The Earth is our Heritage, Protect it" is the theme for this Science week at Carlton Francis Primary School, Marine educator Janeen;
Bullard from Project Beach a non-profit affiliate of Dolphin Encounter on Blue Lagoon Island shows the children a sharks jaw.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
CARLTON Francis Prima-
ry School will not experience
a usual school week, but will
,encounter an explosion of sci-
ence" through its annual science


A job well done!














ELWOOD ROLLE KISHON TURNER
(Works for Nassau EMS) (Works for Doctors Hospital Emergency
Transport Services)













LAVARDA ADDERLY SHAKARA SMITH
((Works for Nassau EMS) (Works for Nassau EMS)

They are 1st Paramedics Trained in The Bahamas to obtain
The United States National Registry for Paramedics.

I am very proud of them, as well as The entire Bahamas Should
Be proud.
From
Warren Grant Jr. NREMT-P/ CCEMTP
EMT/ Paramedic Instructor, TEMS LTD
Flight Paramedic, Air Ambulance Services Ltd.
President, of The
Bahamas Emergency Medical Association


week.
The students will explore the
theme "The Earth is Our Her-
itage, Protect it" through activ-
ities such as a cleah-up cam-
paign, scientific knowledge
contest, a science fair and exhi-
bition, and various preserita-
tions from individuals in the
science field. .
Science co-ordinator at the
school Joan Knowles said that
the reason for. having such a
week is to sensitise students to
the importance of science.
"We want to teach them that
science is living. Everyday we
do things science is connected
to. In today's world science is
so important because of the
technology going on. Also
there are things that happen in
the environment that they need
to be aware of and learn
about," she said.
One of the highlights of the


week is the official opening of
the science fair and exhibition.
The school's science club will
conduct the assembly and the
Ambassador to the Environ-
ment Keod Smith will be the
guest speaker. The topics that
will be used for scientific dis-
plays rang from animal habi-
tats, by the students of grade-
two, and the solar system,
which will be presented by
grade five.
Community
Also each grade level will
have a speaker from the-wider
community whose daily activi-
ties deal with science. Some of
the groups scheduled to pre-
sent are The Adventure Learn-
ing Centre, Batelco, Bahamas
National Trust, The Meteoro-
logical Department, and the
Royal Bahamas Defence


Force.
The students will also get a
chance to test their skills on
life, earth and physical science
in a scientific knowledge con-
test.
Principal Earl Smith said:
"So many things are happen-
ing in our environment today
that is destroying it, so we want
to create an awareness in stu-,
dents and sensitise them to how
they should protect and save
their environment from vari-
ous disasters intentional or
unintentional.
"The earth is the means of
us surviving, it is from the earth
where we get our food, why
destroy that?"
Cameron Anderson, a grade
six student who is also part of
the science club, said: "We are
doing so many experiments,
and its really fun, and not just
work," he said.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE







A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the post of Network Support Assistant in the
Information Technology Services Department Finance Division.
Duties for this job may include, but are not limited to the following:
* Assisting with the continuous operation and maintenance of the Corporation's Local and
Wide Area Networks (New Providence & Family Islands).
* Troubleshooting and resolving network hardware/software conflicts
* Ensuring that all network devices are properly configured and functioning
* Providing end-user support for hardware, software and network access issues.
* Network performance monitoring and the maintenance of corresponding statistical data.
* Maintaining network architecture documentation.
* Repairing Personal Computers and peripheral equipment.
* Monitoring and maintaining computer equipment inventory/supplies.
* Identifying and recommending Information Technology solutions
Job minimum requirements include:
* An Associate Degree with concentration in Computer Science (B.S. Degree preferable)
* A minimum of 3-5 years experience maintaining LAN/WAN environment.
* Network + and / or A+ Certification (Cisco CCNA a plus).
* Sound technical knowledge of network and computer operating systems.
* Demonstrated knowledge of the operation and function of standard networking equipment.
- Sound knowledge of the office automation software such as the Microsoft Office suite.
" Troubleshooting skills
* Excellent written and verbal communications skills
* Knowledge of effective user support services
* A team player that is performance driven and results oriented
Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form to
The Manager, Human Resources & Training,
Blue Hill and Tucker Roads
P.O. Box N-7509,
Nassau, Bahamas
on or before Tuesday, March 1, 2005







SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
/ > ^ .a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
SJohns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, Pro Golf Shop, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
HARBOUR BAY ONLY


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


GAIN
FABRIC
SOFTENER
64 Oa
$549


CLOROX

BLEACH RIUAR
1So oz
$489


SUNBELT
CHUNK STYLE
DOG FOOD
16 OZ
$349


WINN DIXIE

HEAVY DUTY
37.5 FT
i I1 so


ASTOR
VEGETABLE
OIL.
48 OZ



WINN DIXIE
PLAIN &
IODIZED SALT
26 OZ
2/.990


WINN DIXIE

MAYONNAISE




THRIFTY MAID
LONG
GRAIN RICE
5 LB
S1 9 9


THRIFTY MAID
LARGE SWEET
PEAS, SLICE
BEETS & CORN
15.5 OZ
2/s $ 89


ROBIN HOOD

GRITS
5 LBS


GOLD & RED
APPLES NI
LB
3/.990
POTATOES
$199
EACH
ROMAINE
HEARTS
$269
EACH


MIX.NMATCH
NECTARINES, RED PLUMSi PEACHES
$119
LB
TOMATOES
5X5 & 6X6
EACH
-990
RED & WHITE
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
$499


WINN DIXIE WINN DIXIE
SPREAD ENGLISH MUFFINS
SBs 2 6 CT


W/D
SLICED CHEESE
$l 89


W/D
CORN ON COB
$s45
g:$ 2 6 EAR
PRESTIGIO
4 CHEESE, PEPPERONI 3 MEAT
DELUXE & SPREME PIZZAS
$ 99
32 & 34 OZ

HUNTS
KETCHUP SQUEEZE
BOTTLE
32 OZ
S$ 89

HERSHEY'S


OH HENRY
62.5 G
2/$ 109


TIDE W/ DOWNY
31 USE SOFT OCEAN
MIST, APRIL FRESH,
CLEAN BREEZE
80-OZ
$849


W/D
ORANGE JUICE
64 66-Oz

W/D
ASSTD & MIX
VEGETABLES
S- S19
16-OZ
W/D
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS
'$349
64 OZ


AQUAPURE
WATER

(NASSAU ONLY)
1 GAL
.99ee

KRAFT
SALAD DRESSING
REGULAR ONLY
8 OZ
2/$300

GOYA
GREEN
PIGEON
PEAS
15 OZ
-99<


CARIBBEAN


CHUNK LITE TUNA
(WATER) io-PAK .................3/$1.89
THRIFTY MAID
SPAGHETTI RINGS W/
MEATBALLS & REGULAR
SPAGHETTI W/
MEATBALLS is-oz ............... .......99
THRIFTY MAID
RAMEN NOODLES
ASST'D FLAVOURS 4- oz ........5/$1.00
CRACKIN GOOD
ASST'D PIES 11 -oz...................$1.69
WINN DIXIE
MACARONI & CHEESE
DINNER 10o-oz.......................2/$1.09
ISLAND QUEEN
COCONUT WATER 11 -oz............89
LIBBY'S
LITE 4PAK MIX FRUIT & DICE
PEACHES 4.5 -oz ......................$3.99
CHEK
ASST'D SODAS REGULAR
OR DIET 6 PK..........................$....$ 99


KELLOGGS
TRIPACK
CEREAL
40 OZ



LAYS
POTATO CHIPS
ASSORTED -
NASSAU ONLY
6.5 OZ
$29o

ULTRA JOY
ANTIBACTERIAL, REGULAR,
TWIST OF LIME, LIME &
INVIGORATING SPLASH
12/6 OZ
.1 79


GATORADE
ALL
FLAVOURS
64 OZ
$439

HILL
COOKIES
ASSORTED
150 GR
.690

CARNATION
EVAPORATED
MILK
14.5 OZ
2/$ 1 25


TURKEY

WINGS
LB
.990


PORK LOIN
ASSORTED CHOPS
FAMILY PACK
-$2.59 PER LB
$26L9
;RESH
GROUND
BEEF


s B 99
LB


SMOKED
WHOLE PICNIC
HAM
s 139
SLICED S1.59 PER LB


MISCUT
CHICKEN
WINGS
LB
.990
PRESTIGE
CHOICE
BOTTOM
ROUND ROAST


$ 77
^ iLB


ROTISSERIE
CHICKEN
EACH
$799
WHITE & YELLOW
AMERICAN
CHEESE
$399


CHARMIN
BATHROOM
TISSUE WHITE
4 PACK
$189

ORVILLE REDENBACKER
MICROWAVE
POP CORN
10.5 OZ
$249

BLUE BIRD
DRINKS ALL
FLAVOURS
(NO JUICERS)
11.5 OZ

2/.990


PUOK DANISH
RIBS & PORK
DANISH RIBS-
5LBS PACK-
$8.95
$ 999
I LB


TYSON
TWIN PACK
GAME HENS
PER PAK


ALL VARIETY
2.6 OZ


HORMEL
COOKED HAM
s299
TOUFAYAN
PITA BREAD
ALL VARIETY
2/$250O
J 12 OZ-


QUAKER
FRUIT/
GRANOLA BARS
10 PACK

$399

KRAFT,
KOOL-AID,
HANDI SNACK
GELS
ALL FLAVOURS
4-PAK
$1 69


DEVON
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ
.99$
CASE ($23.76)


STORE
HOURS:


_ __ ~ls~ulsuw


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


Isi i: ~ig


~i\"is~ge















Roberts: improvement in




water supply on the way


FROM page one

tion in supply. There will, how-
ever, be no disruption in ser-
vice," he said.
The minister also announced
that the contract for a five mil-
lion gallon a day water produc-
tion plant, to be built next to
the BEC power station on Blue
H1-ills, has been awarded to Con-
solidated Water Company Lim-
ited under a build, own, operate
agreement.
The Cayman Islands based
company presently owns the
two million gallon a day reverse
osmosis plant at Windsor Field,
and has similar operations in
Barbados, Belize, and the
British Virgin Islands.
Mr Roberts said the govern-
ment's delay in awarding the
contract was for reasons other
than the bid evaluation process
itself. He mentioned that the
government had also taken spe-
cial notice of a proposal to
install an underwater line from
Central Andros to New Provi-


dence, which promised 10 mil-
lion gallons of fresh water a day
from that island.
While this seemed to be a
"cure-all" solution, Mr Roberts
reiterated that there were many
underlying and technical issues
that made it too much of a risk
for the time being.
"This required major capital
expansion to operations in
Andros, as well as the highly
complex issue of installing an
underwater pipeline that would
have to cross The Tongue of
the Ocean. There were many
different views on the technical
challenges of the feat, but the
vulnerability and reliability of
such a system raises too many
questions. The proposal has not
been totally eliminated, but for
now considered just too far
ahead of its time," he said.
Highlighting some aspects of
the Consolidated Water's con-
tract, Glen Laville the acting
deputy general manager at the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion said that under the current
contract, the company will be


Assistant Manager,

Credit Administration

& Training
RBC FINCO, Head Office
The successful candidates should possess the following
qualifications:
* University degree in Banking, Finance or Business
Administration
* Minimum 10 years-banking experience in Personal
and Consumer Lending
* Credit analytical skills is required
* Have a basic understanding of collateral security,
financial account i.e. able to read and understand
small business financial statements
* Problem loan management experience
* Strong communication and interpersonal skills
* Strong leadership, problem solving and confidentiality
skills
* Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)
Responsibilities include:
* Providing support to the Manager, Credit Risk in the
administration of the lending function, concentrating
on the administration, training, counselling and
coaching of staff.
* Ensuring that the credit policy guidelines are reviewed,
updated and changes implementation timely.
* Liasing with RBC to ensure that FINCO's credit
guidelines are consistent with RBC's Credit Rules and
Guidelines where appropriate.
* Conducting and organizing credit seminars/workshops
for RBC FINCO in consultation with RBC HR and
Training Departments.
A competitive compensation package (base salary &
attractive variable compensations) will commensurate
with relevant experience and qualifications.
Please apply before February 18, 2005 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com
www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean -1 RBC
Royal Bank
R fthb dGl4-,Iobe L kybol and. I RBCatIr adalksof Ryal Bnkof anadf Canada


expected to produce one mil-
lion gallons of water a day with-
in the next six months, with
increases in volume to follow
shortly thereafter.
"After a 10 month period,
they will be expected to pro-
duce an additional two million
gallons a day, and at the end of
13 months to be at full capacity.
This will start within the next


few days when the contract will
be executed," he said.
Mr Roberts said that the next
stage is for the corporation to
invite tenders for a two million
gallon a day plant to be built at
Arawak Cay.
He said that it is hoped that in
the next three to four months,
the corporation could official-
ly launch that programme.


"After the Arawak Cay plant
would have been installed, I can
tell you it's the intent of the cor-
poration to also install a two
million gallon a day plant in the
eastern end of the island. We
intend to bring closure to this
question of available, quality
water, and put that behind us,"
he said.
Mr Roberts apologised for


the inconvenience that the
water shortage has caused over
the past few months, and said
he hopes that residents
will see some immediate
relief in their current water
shortages.
He asked that they take some
solace in knowing that the per-
manent solution is in the mak-
ing.


MP: illegal immigration





is contributing to





problems with rent

FROM page one .. ... ..... ., th,
***~it Cii. < i .,RI L. l-T^ t*^/l^ --t*A.A..fJ CA,.'.JIAIi '.j^ t^iii/- Li*+3Li IL U4..tJ.irr IL r ti '. i^/nt-iLE LLJL L tat' tiir t / hQ o'tiLiA


to rent affordable accommodation.
Human rights activist and lawyer
Elizier Regnier hit out at the minister's
speech, saying it had contributed to the
Haitian community's state of "total pan-
ic," and fear of possible genocide.
During his contribution to the debate
yesterday, Mr Adderley pointed out
that if uncontrolled, the price of rent is
governed by the laws of supply and
demand.
The present ceiling on rent has
allowed "certain landlords" to charge
"whatever the market will bear," for
properties in substandard condition, Mr
Adderley said.
He said that this included properties
that are "without water, without inside
toilets, without sanitation, without pow-
er."
Mr Adderley said the problem is due,
"to a large extent, to the fact that over
the many years, the mass migration of
illegal immigrants to this country raises
the demand in the market for greedy
and unconscionable landlords.".
He explained that many immigrants
are "desperate" for somewhere to live,


ani LIIereiore acCek JL c ommtloM UaLloni
that would be considered substandard to
most.
This, he said, makes it "a question of
take it or leave it" for many
Bahamian tenants, who are forced to
pay rent far above the worth of a prop-
erty.
Mr Adderley added however that the
problem is also a sign of a disturbing
trend in public morality, which seems to
express "no conscience, no concern for
our fellow men."
He said that the modern Bahamas
can be characterised by selfishness,
greed and "self-aggrandizement," and
this is the root of the "almost insur-
mountable social problems" faced by
the country.
He called the proposed amendment a
small step in the right direction, but said
that the matter of rent control would
have to be visited again sometime in
the future.
Mr Adderley said that the most
important aspect of rent control legis-
lation is to ensure that "justice prevails
on both sides; for the landlord, and in
the case of the tenant.


last week, Minister Miller said that the
Bahamas is sitting on a "time bomb,"
which will explode unless the country
deals realistically with the issue of illegal
immigration.
He claimed that affordable rental
units are being removed further from
the grasp of Bahamians because of the
high number of illegal immigrants in
the country.
Mr Miller said that there are some
landlords who will not rent to Bahami-
ans because they can make more mon-
ey from illegal immigrants than from
bona fide Bahamians.
The minister claimed there is a situa-
tion developing where illegal immi-
grants are also using educational and
health care facilities to the detriment
of Bahamians requiring the same ser-
vices.
"If I was to take you to Garvin Tynes
Primary in Sunset Park Number One
there are more Haitians, Haitian-
Bahamians, you can call them whatever
you will, in that school as students than
Bahamians like you and me who were
born here," said Mr Miller.


Twvo in court



over incident



on jitney

FROM page one

considering the length of time before then, imprisonment would be
unjust.
She set bail for each man at $10,000 with two sureties one of
whom must own property. In addition both must report to the
police station every Friday before 6pm Wilson to the Carmichael
Road Police Station, and Scavella to the Wulff Road Police Station.
She told them that they are not to have any contract with any of the
witnesses in the case.
They are both to return to court on May 17.




THE

PET-VET
BIRDS
DOGS
CATS
EXOTICS






MOBILE VETERINARY SERVICE
House Call Services:
Geriatric Care Health Certificate
Home Euthanasia Dermatology
Preventative Medicine Minor Surgery
Dr. Dwight A. Dorsett
Veterinarian


I C-R N


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


te





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 13


r (


UPPER LEVEL
TOWN CENTRE MALL
PHONE: 322-6593


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e.
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THE TRIBUNE


~kk~'`;34~:


ir~o^ -^^K~py^ ^^ca ^o ^


<(I $


i


Nall


i


50"~~


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~ SALE! ~B~s Qebr


50~ 0~~


'699







PAGE 4, TURSDY, FERUAR 17,005 *HE TIBUN


0 qpw


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


\AVC%


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite
tenders from suitably qualified firms for a Market Survey to provide
feedback on BTC's Products and Services and Customer Satisfaction.

Interested firms may collect a Tender Specification from BTC's security
desk located in the Administrative Building, JFK Drive, Between the
hours of 9:00 am and 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday.

Proposals marked "QUANTATIVE MARKET SURVEY & FOCUS
GROUPS TENDER" should be sealed and delivered on or before 12:00
pm on Friday, February 25th, 2005 to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
21 John F Kennedy Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders'.
I- -1 "


Party time for



Emergency



Hostel children


THIRTY residents of the
Bahamas Children's Emer-
gency Hostel were treated to a
party at Burger King, n Har-
ro d Road. In ad'ihitn to
enjoying BK sandwiches,
chicketi tenders, and sodas, the
residents had full access to


Burger King's spectacular and
kid-friendly children's play-
ground. Katie Forbes, the
hostel's director was pleased
that Burger King had set a sgtel-
lar example of good corporate.
citizenry, especially during the
month of January when busi-


ness is slow all around. Encour-
aging the support of other
organisations to lend a help-
ing hand to the residents, Ms
o,,,-rbe' thanked manager -enk
;,,.ifer l1ockhart and the entire
Burger King, team -for-hosting'
the party, for the time they
spent with the children and for
making the event an unforget-
table experience.
The children received Burg-
er King toys with which they
were absolutely delighted.
Before the end of the evening,
the children had several oppor-
tunities to climb through the'
tunnel, slide down, laugh and
share 1 memorable moments
with each other. Pictured (1 to
r) sharing with the children are
Ms Lockhart and Ms Forbes.,
(TCL Photo;
Andrea, M Myers),


Raymond LUGO


-J > A V L with purchasc of 2 or more Rcvion Products*
*Lipstick, wah je powder, cyeshadow
Come in and W Kyour YIN T h \Wtoday!
Ln Raymond demonstrate what Rcvion Cosmetics can do for you!
I. l'Mff ||",lI|


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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


KOSTA

BODA
SINCE 1742


SOLOMON'S MINES

AVAILABLE AT
Solomon's Mines Main Store Bay Street
Solomon's Mines Mall At Marathon


--~-~~---~~-~~ ----~~-~--~-- ---.----.-- -~-------~~~-----~----~~---~ ----~~----~~~--~~~~-~~- -~---~~~~-~~~~~~ -----~--~~~--- -----.---..-....~~~~~~..~.~~~.~~I~~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005













Celebration for 80 times repeat guests
THIS month was extreme-
ly sentimental for eighty-time
SuperClubs Breezes Bahamas
repeat guests Stanton and Son-
ja Chea.
The Chea's, local business
owners, entered the doors of
Breezes this past weekend to
begin their-eightieth stay since
the hotel opened its doors in
1995.
2 They were also celebrating
forty-seven years of marriage,
Valentine's Day and Mr
Chea's seventieth birthday.
With all that to commemorate,
there was no doubt that they
would be celebrating at
Breezes. When asked what
keeps them coming back, Mrs with the staff, the laid back D!" Pictured (l-r) are Jackson
Chea said without hesitation, and relaxing atmosphere, the Weech, general manager,
"It's the guest relations, the great local rate they offer and SuperClubs Breezes Bahamas;
relationships we have built my favourite musician Funky Sonja Chea; and Stanton Chea.


Young Bahamians




set in on the act


in Hollywood


YOUNG Bahamian actors
got a taste of Hollywood
recently when they met


** m




P -- *




^
~- --
*


accomplished professional
actors taping episodes of the
ABC sitcom, "My Wife &
Kids" on Paradise Island.
Members of Doris Johnson
Senior High's drama club met
the stars of the sitcom on
their set at Cove Beach,
Atlantis.
Advice
They got sound advice and
brief instructions from the
show's producers and actors,
including Damon Wayans,
Tisha Campbell-Martin and
special guest star David Allen
Grier.
The young actors, who were
led by drama coaches Deme-
tra Rolle and Dotlan Edge-
combe, were impressive
enough to land small roles in
one of the episodes that were
taped at Atlantis. The ten stu-
dents were cast as themselves
- a group of students touring
Atlantis. Their drama coaches,
Mrs Rolle and Mrs Edge-
combe, were cast as them-
selves.


"The experience of. work-
ing on a professional televi-
sion set opened our students'.
eyes to the real world of tele-
vision and the entertainment
business," Mrs Rolle said.
"They now realise that it's not
all glamorous. There is a lot
of work that goes into a
show."
The rewarding experience
also gave students a valuable
credit for their acting resumes,
Mrs Rolle said.
Admire
"We have 'to thank the
show's producers and actors,"
said Mrs Edgecombe. "It
meant so much to the children
to have actors they admire
give up their time to assist
them and teach them some-
thing. They were truly
inspired, and they will never
forget it."
Part one of the "My Wife
& Kids" episodes was broad-
cast February 15 on ABC.
Part two airs at 8pm on Feb-
ruary 22.


RESTAURANT MANAGERS

AND ASSISTANT MANAGERS


The successful applicant must have at least three (3)
years experience in Food and Beverage operations, fast
food preferably.

Must possess good leadership and interpersonal skills.

-Mi t i-e good written and oral communication skills.

. Must be able to implement and maintain company
standards and procedures.

Must be self motivated.

Must be able to work flexible hours, including late
nights, weekends and holidays.
ni-s


INTERESTED PERSONS SHOULD
SEND RESUME WITH LETTER OF
REFERENCE TO:
#12 Bradley Street, Palmdale,
P.O. Box N-8425, Nassau, Bahamas,
or Tel: 322-5865/6


-


I.





"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
o




-n -,, mn -l


- -dim..4b


- -- _


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-ow


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 15


- w














CDR 'confronting challenges of a




viable future' during fifth anniversary


THE Coalition for Democ-
ratic Reform, as part of the cel-
ebration of its 5th anniversary
of formation, recently held a
one-day conclave at the Gulf-
stream Room of the Nassau
Beach Hotel. CDR officers &
members from throughout the
nation attended the ten hour
closed-door session.
Under the theme, "Con-
fronting the challenges of a
viable future", the members
reviewed the progress of the
organisation to date and dis-
cussed the way forward. Deputy
Chief Executive Officer Charles
Maynard chaired the sessions
and discussions were led by a
number of presenters including
the Chief Executive Officer Dr
Bernard Nottage. Areas of con-
centration included party devel-
opment, political action, cam-
paign financing and strategic
political planning.
The conclave, which was
termed as a success by those in
attendance, will serve as a
springboard for the party's


aggressive schedule of political
activities. Officers and members
recommitted themselves to the
ideals, aims and objectives of
the party. Those in attendance
resolved to build the organisa-
tion, work toward the deepen-
ing of democracy in the
Bahamas and the adoption and
implementation of policies and
programs that will improve the
quality of life of Bahamians.
Over the course of the next few
weeks, a number of key
appointments will be
announced as the party moves
to implement its new strategy.

Events
The CDR plans a number of
other events to commemorate
the party's anniversary. There
are also plans for a series of
meetings in which its leaders
will speak to the nation, address
issues of national importance
and take the Government to
task for it's lack luster perfor-
mance.


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We are looking for people who:
Know what it means to give outstanding customer service
Have an interest in.Food and Beverage sales and management
Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our company
Truly believe the customer always comes first
Have a strong Food and Beverage background
We offer:
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STriple Cotton Drapes $190.00
Upholstery Fabrics $5.00
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4''
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Position Available
Marketing Support Assistant
Nassau, Bahamas

Job Duties to Include:
Day to day and special event marketing support
(incl. advertising, promotions and public relations).
Media bookings and relations.
-Talent for live broadcasts.
Tracking expenditures to keep in line with budgets.
Merchandising and store floor support.

Individuals applying must:
Have marketing and media experience
Have excellent written and communication skills.
Have working knowledge of Word, Excel and of
the Internet. Experience with graphics programmes
a plus.
Be outgoing and enjoy working with others.
Be organized, able to take initiative and work
unsupervised.
Have own transportation and be available for
travel and weekend and seasonal hours.
Merchandising experience a plus.

Interested persons should send r6sum6s to:

Attn: Human Resource Department
Re: Marketing Support
P.O.Box SS-6704
Nassau Bahamas

Or via fax: 242-394-0513 or email to
marketing@abacomarkets.com
Deadline: Friday, February 18 2005.


RE-BATH BAHAMAS
"Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler"
Telephone (242) 393-8501
What we can professional install:
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Toilets, sinks and Acrylic Bathtub Liners.
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


41dbW 4mp 4MM 4M 4M
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Cyne jin the









THE TRIBUNE THURSDAYIIFEBRUARY 17, 2005,CPAGEE17
.. . . . . . . . .


Tying the knot on

Valentine's Day
SUPERCLUBS Breezes Bahamas congratulates the five couples that
were romantically united at the resort this Valentine's Day. Clockwise
from top left: Rickey and Roxie Franks of Blountville, TN; Samuel and
Carol Fulginiti of New Castle, DE; Errol and Melanie Fearon of Lon-
don, England; Talaq and Tanya Jabbar-bey of Newark, DE; and
Masato and Yayoi Dina Takai of Schaumburg, IL. For one simple, up-
front price, wedding guests can take advantage of SuperClubs super
offer to marry, honeymoon and vacation-hassle free. SuperClubs, the
Caribbean's Only Super-Inclusive Resorts provides couples with the
cake, the champagne, the flowers, the minister and the license! Super-
Clubs Super-Inclusive wedding offer makes wedding dreams come
true.


V 1@


We the family of


TOMLINSON
would like to thank....

Everyone who sent letters, cards,
emails, phoned or have spoken to
us personally regarding the loss of
"MOM". We cannot begin to put
into words our appreciation for your
kind words in helping us through
the healing process.


ll Mt. Carmel

classmall Preparatory Academy
sizes Register NOW for

September 2005


STesting space
for
Grades K5 1


Testing on Saturday, February
19, 2005 at 8:30am $15.00
1 fee + bring pencil & pen
a


"Whosoever accepts one such little child
in My name accepts Me"


hone: 325 6570/1: ;


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) is pleased to
invite tenders for the purchase of a number of used vehicles.

Interested persons may collect tender documents from BTC's Administrative
Office, JFK Drive between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday
through Friday.

Vehicles may be inspected at BTC's Perpall's Tract Compound between
the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm., Monday, February 14 through Thursday,
February 24, 2005. Vehicles will be sold as is.

Bids marked "TENDER FOR USED VEHICLES" should be sealed and
delivered by 5:00pm on Friday, February 25, 2005, to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & Chief Executive Officer
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds forge a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE















Sandals executive Andre




1ands BHA top sales award


SANDALS Royal Bahami-
an Spa Resort & Offshore
island's Director of Sales
Andre Newbold is the winner
of this year's Bahamas Hotel
Association's Sales Executive
il Year.
i: track and field and bas-
kelball star at RM Bailey
Senior High School, Andre
an athletic scholar-
.a, upon completion. He
attended Texas Christian Uni-
versity where he majored in
*: ingc It was while
employed as a fitness instruc-
tor that he was introduced to
the world of hospitality. "I
really sort of stumbled into.
it, he reminisced. "There
were some individuals that I
had admired in the industry
who persuaded me to give it a

Dedication
In 1984 he joined the Sher-
aton British Colonial where
he held numerous positions.
His dedication to excellence
and amicable personality led
o five promotions including
)Ies Manager and Director
11 Sales. In his capacity as
,.d of the sales team he was
able to incorporate long last-
ing relationships with Tour 0 ANDRE
Operators and Charter Oper-
ators in the Bahamas and
Caribbean Travel Industry. "I ducing revenue programme.
knew that I was in a field that "My goal is to have a sound,
gave me immense happiness effective, consistent and reli-
and it showed in everything I able sales force." This includes
did." sales, weddings, banqueting
Upon joining Sandals Roy- and catering services. Sandals
i Bahamian in 1999 as Direc- Royal Bahamian performs
or of Sales, Andre was eager and caters to over 2,000 local
to continue the trend of excel- and international weddings
lence. Andre has been the dri- each year.
ving force of promoting the "Our focus is ensuring that
resort and the Bahamas local- when wedding couples leave,
ly and internationally. He they can not stop talking
revamped both the Sales and about what a great time they
Wedding Offices and ifiitiat- -had" stated Andre. "The same
ed a stable on property pro- 6goes-for our travel agents.


tations. "He is dedicated and
is willing to undertake any
task.
"We are always confident
that he will provide
outstanding representation
when promoting the
Sandals product and The
Bahamas."
Andre also attended Cor-
nell University School of
Hotel Administration for Pro-
fessional Development Pro-
gramme where he obtained


certificates in Basic Hotel
Sales and How to capture the
Leisure Marketing.

Certificates
Other accolades include cer-
tificates of Achievement in
Sales Development from the
Sheraton Corporation, Pro-
fessionalism On-'the-job from
Best Western International, a
Certificate of Merit from the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism,


a Certificate in Market Analy-
sis and Strategic Rate Plan-t
ning and the coveted designagi
tion of Certified Hospitality-
Marketing Executive6.
(CHME) qualifying him aP'i
one of the Bahamas' premieti
Sales and Marketing Execu.'
tives. He is a 1985 Bahama-
Host Graduate and former]
council member of the'
Bahamas Amateur Athletic
Association and an avid tennis
player. .
1: ..


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NEWBOLD


They know that they can pick
up the telephone and get the
results that they desire. They
have come to relay on me and
I appreciate their confidence
that my department and I will
do whatever possible to make
their clients and them happy."
Just one year after joining
Sandals, Andre received the
Manager of the Year Award.
This further added credence
to his role at the all inclusive
couples resbi r9teialMan-
S t i'ffWi' h aid-
Andrewis afi nwith,'niAnmi-


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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005::


THE TRIBUNE


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US companies in Mexico launch


effort against AIDS discrmi


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sw-o 0
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Lowe's Wholeslee Tel: 393-7111 Fax: 393-0440


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
foir improvements in the
area or have won an
a4ard.
If!so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


S -


0 -


mp


;-


0 9




1. 1 1


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


INTERNATIONAL NEWS


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Baha Mar seeking Ruffin






close deadline extension


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The consortium
behind the pro-
posed $1.2 billion
Cable Beach rede-
velopment has
asked Philip Ruffin, owner of
the Wyndham Nassau Resort
and Crystal Palace Casino and
the Nassau Beach Hotel, for an
extension to today's deadline
for acquiring his resorts, as
negotiators move close to clos-
ing the mammoth deal.
Talks between Baha Mar and
the Government on completing
the approvals for a project that
has promised to add $450 mil-
lion per annum to the Bahamas'
gross domestic product (GDP)


were yesterday said to be going
down to the wire.
Sources said the two parties
resumed talks early yesterday
morning in a bid to complete a
purchase agreement for the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort,
which is owned by the Govern-
ment through the Hotel Corpo-
ration, and a Heads of Agree-
ment.
Prime Minister Perry Christie
was said to be personally
involved to ensure a project that
he has touted over the past two
years comes to fruition, appear-
ing only briefly during yester-
day's House of Assembly
debate. He has also eschewed a
trip to the CARICOM summit
in Suriname. Other Cabinet
ministers are all heavily


Group behind $1.2bn Cable Beach
project confident deal will be
struck as talks run close to the
wire, with PM personally involved


involved.
Although Mr Ruffin was said
to be "not available" when The
Tribune tried to contact him
yesterday, and did not return a
call seeking comment, observers
of Cable Beach developments
said they would not be surprised
if Baha mar sought an exten-
sion. It is uncertain whether Mr
Ruffin would agree to an exten-
sion.
Sources close to Baha Mar,


though, acknowledged that the
consortium would "appreciate"
an extension of today's Febru-
ary 17 deadline with Mr Ruf-
fin.
The group, which has as its
lead investor Lyford Cay bil-
lionaire Dikran Izmirlian, had
agreed a 120-day purchase
option with Mr Ruffin, which
locked the Wichita-based bil-
lionaire into a four-month peri-
od when he could not talk to


any other interested party or
walk away from the Baha Mar
deal.
However, The Tribune
revealed last month that Baha
Mar feared.its $1.2 billion pro-
posal could be blown up if it
failed to conclude negotiations
with the Government before'
the option on Mr Ruffin's prop-
erties expired, as the latter
would then be free to walk
away and never return to the
negotiating table.
Baha Mar, though, is under-
stood to be confident that all
the pieces necessary for a deal
with the Government are falling
slowly into place, and that it is
now a matter of time before the
project is sealed.
Co-operation from Mr Ruf-


fin on an extension would thus
ease the immediate pressure on
both sets of negotiators,
although it is likely that he
would want Bahi Mar to pay
more funds into the deposit -
held in escrow that the group
paid when agreeing the origi-
nal purchase option.'
The Tribune reported earlier
this week that a potential stum-
,bling block was unexpected
repair work needed to the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort.
It is understood that the due
diligence process undertaken
by Baha Mar has revealed that
the Radisson, which is owned
by the Government's Hotel
Corporation, needs more
See DEAL, Page 5B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


Plans to solve New Provi-
dence's chronic water shortages
by laying a multi-million dollar
pipeline between Andros and
this island were turned down
because "the risks are too high",
the minister Of works and pub-
lic utilities said yesterday,
describing it as "ahead of its
time for now".
Bradley Roberts said the pro-
posal by Hydro Bahamas, which
committed to deliver 10 million
gallons of freshwater per day to
New Providence by pipeline
from new wellfields in Andros,
raised "too many questions" on
technical and engineering
aspects.
Although he acknowledged
that the Hydro Bahamas plan
appeared initially to be "a cure-
all solution", a major capital
investment in expanding the
Andros wellfields was required.
The pipeline would also have
to be installed across the deep-
water Tongue of the Ocean.
Mr Roberts said yesterday:


"There are many different
views on the technical chal-
lenges of the feat, and the vul-
nerability and reliability of such
a system raises too many ques-
tions.
"It has been concluded at this
stage that the risks are too high
for such a scheme, and too
much redundancy will still have
to be put in place. The propos-
al has not been totally elimi-
nated, but for now considered
ahead of its time."
Mr Roberts said the reverse
osmosis plant option, which yes-
terday saw Consolidated Water
awarded the contract to build,
own and operate (BOO) a plant
at Blue Hills, was the "most cost
effective option" for the Water
& Sewerage Corporation.
The Tribune revealed Hydro
Bahamas' proposal last April
22. The scheme is understood
to be the brainchild of Hannes
Babak, chairman of BISX-listed
Freeport Concrete, who did not
return a call seeking comment
yesterday.
See PIPE, Page 4B


Family Guardian:


'too early' to say


whether Sagicor


alliance is dilutive


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Family Guardian yesterday
told The Tribune it was too ear-
ly in its negotiations with Sagi-
cor to answer how the Barbados
financial services conglomerate
would take a 20 per cent equity
position in its parent company.
This question will be of spe-
cial interest to FamGuard Cor-
poration shareholders, as Sagi-
cor would either gain its 20 per
cent stake by acquiring ordinary
shares from current sharehold-
ers or by the company issuing
new shares from its Treasury.
The latter option could be dilu-
tive to earnings per share (EPS)
and dividends.
Going down the first route
would see Sagicor needing to
pay $6.935 million for a 20 per
cent stake in FamGuard, if it
bought at the company's closing
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX) share
price of $4.02. There are cur-
rently 8.625 million ordinary
shares outstanding, giving Fam-
Guard a listed market capitali-


sation of just under $35 million.
The easiest way for Sagicor
to acquire its stake from existing
shareholders would be for it to
buy from at least one maybe
more of FamGuard's three
largest shareholders. They are
Pyfrom Enterprises, which has a
36.7 .per cent stake, the Estate
of Jack Knowles with 16.8 per
cent, and chairman Norbert
Boissiere with 13.1 per cent.
However, FamGuard and
Sagicor could take the alterna-
tive option with the former issu-
ing new shares from its Trea-
sury probably around two mil-
lion new ordinary shares could
dilute EPS and dividend pay-
ments for other shareholders
simply because more shares are
on the market, while Family
Guardian's profits and revenues
are unlikely to rise in the short
term at least in proportion to
the increase in issued share cap-
ital.
With the company authorised
to issue up to 15 million shares
at a par value of $0.20 each,

See SHARES, Page 4B


Francis seeks lending




rate reduction from




insurance, credit unions


By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas governor (pitcured
right) yesterday said he had
written to the insurance and
credit union regulators asking
that they request companies
they regulate to also reduce
their mortgage and other lend-
ing rates, taking their cue from
the reduction in Bahamian
Prime made by the clearing
banks.
Julian Francis also urged
Bahamians not to use the
opportunities created by the
announcement of interest rate
reductions to increase con-


sumption spending.
Mr Francis said Bahamians
should instead seek to pursue
investments that are not only
personally beneficial, but also
contribute to the growth of the
economy.
"I believe personally, that it
would be wrong, it would be a
big mistake for the consumer in
our economy to see this as a
signal to borrow more money
in order to consume more
heavily," he said.
The Central Bank
announced on Monday that it
had decided to reduce the dis-
count interest rate from 5.75
See BANK, Page 4B


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


The benefits




from a data-





driven site


ANSBACH ER
The Ansbacher group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services and wealth management, has an
opening in the Bahamas for a
SENIOR SECURITIES, FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND MONEY MARKET TRADER
Reporting directly to the Head of Banking, Securities and Operations, the jobholder will be the primary trader
for the bank. The individual will be responsible for all securities and foreign exchange trading for the bank.
To place deposits and manage liquidity with correspondent banks on a daily basis to maximize use of the
banks assets. To ensure at all times, the bank operates within bank placement limits as set by the Group.
To apply, candidates must:
Have a minimum of 3 years active trading experience with a recognized financial institution, preferably at a
managerial level.
Have a thorough understanding of the global financial landscape and be able to understand and execute
transactions in securities, treasury, futures and options, structured products and foreign exchange.
Be proficient in the use of spreadsheets and database software including Bloomberg.
Holding a relevant degree, professional qualification such as Series 7 or equivalent work experience (minimum
of 5 years)
Be a self starter who is detail oriented and able to work/think and communicate effectively under pressure
within a team environment.
The successful candidate will enjoy a competitive salary, bonus and benefit package, commensurate with skill
and experience.
Qualified individuals are invited to apply in writing, with a full resume to:
The Human Resource Manager,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-7768,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax 242-326-5020


Financial AdvisorssLtd.
Pricing Information As Of: fm c A i t
16 February 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
1.39 0.95 Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 0.197 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.40 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 5.75 5.88 0.13 11,139 0.152 0.330 11:5 5.61%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.95 1.45 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.45 -0.35 1,000 0.101 0.000 14.2 0.00%
1.00 0.87 British American Bank 0.95 0.95 0.00 0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
7.47 6.60 Cable Bahamas 7.40 7.40 0.00 0.510 0.240 14.5 3.24%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.64 6.75 Commonwealth Bank 7.64 7.64 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.8 5.10%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.02 3.13 Famguard 4.02 4.02 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.9 4.23%
10.25 8.21 Finco 10.25 10.25 0.00 0.649 0.480 15.8 4.68%
7.67 6.45 FirstCaribbean 7.67 7.67 0.00 0.513 0.330 15.0 4.30%
8.60 7.95 Focol 7.95 7.95 0.00 10,200 0.710 0.500 11.1 6.29%
1.99 1.40 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.40 -0.59 1.000 0.025 0.000 56.0 0.00%
10.38 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.818 0.405 11.6 4.26%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.58 6.55 -0.03 1.062 0.201 0.000 32.7 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
13.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 16.00 1.328 0.960 10.5 6.86%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2085 1.1529 Colina Money Market Fund 1.208514*
2.1191 1.8944 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.1105***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648***B
2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020*
1.0894 1.0276 Colina Bond Fund 1.089371"***
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidellty
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelit
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price.- Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
- AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/**** AS ATDEC. 31, 2004
* AS AT FEB. 4, 2005/*- AS AT JAN 31, 2005/1--- AS AT DEC. 31, 2004


These are just some of the ques-
tions that are regularly asked
by businesses of all shapes and
sizes.
This two-part series will assist
you in making the right choices
when the time comes for, you
to put your business online.
A web site generally fits into
one of two categories: a) Static
web site and b) Data-driven
web site.
With a static website, a busi-


ness is only trying to provide
information about the business,
including services and contact
information. This type of web
site is considered static because
the content does not change and
may include some animation.
An example of these types of
website is an 'online brochure'.
Next there are the data-dri-
ven web sites. The idea behind a
data-driven web site is that you


MEET & GREET ACADIA

ARE YOU A STUDENT trying to make up your mind on the best
university for you or planning on attending Acadia and have
questions about university life?
ARE YOU AN ACADIA ALUMNUS interested in an update on new
initiatives at Acadia or interested in meeting other Acadia
alumni and catching up with old friends?
MEET DR. GAIL DINTER-GOTTLIEB, PRESIDENT OF ACADIA
and Acadia students, alumni and staff at a Meet & Greet for
our alumni, prospective students, parents, and families.





ACADIA UNIVERSITY J


Where? The British Colonial Hilton
1 Bay Street Nassau
When? Thursday, February 24, 2005
Time? 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
How? R.S.V.P today!
Telephone: 902.585.1120
Fax: 902.585.1058
Email: alumni.event@acadiau.ca


http://4u.acadiau.ca


Web

have information (data) in a
database that you need to pro-
vide to a group of people,
and/or you need to collect infor-
mation from a group of people.
Good examples of data-dri-
ven web sites are BankBa-
hamasOnline.com (Internet
banking), Amazon.com (online
store), dataBahamas.com
(online business directory) and
Google.com (search engine). In
each case, visitors to the web


sites are provided with infor-'
mation from a database after
inputting their search criteria.
Using a data-driven web site
can radically change your busi-
ness model overnight. With it
comes great potential for
improved efficiency and cus-
tomer service.
There are many businesses in
the Bahamas that are good can-
didates for implementing a
data-driven web site. For exam-
ple, all those businesses who
take orders from customers and
then deliver those orders to
their customers.
Wouldn't it be nice for your
customers to use their comput-
er to access your web site, view
your inventory list and then
place their order online? Once
the order is placed, a packing
order can be printed in the
warehouse for delivery after
updating your accounting sys-
tem.
What just happened? For
one, the customer did not keep
your sales staff on the line for
an extended period. The cus-
tomer was able to place the
order at a time that was conve-
nient for them. This is a simple
example but, as you can see,
there are real benefits that can
justify the cost to implement a
data-driven web site.
In part II of this article we
will discuss the process required
to put your business online.
To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
gITwork@providencetg.com


NB: Alexander J. Hanna is
vice-president of Software Solu-
tions, a division of Providence
Technology Group. Providence
Technology Group is one of the
leading IT firms in the
Bahamas, specialising in net-
working solutions, consulting
and advisory services and soft-
ware solutions.


FirstCaribbean Internet Banking
Your Bank... more choice...


If you're looking to
improve efficiency and
customer service in
your business, then
consider the idea of
putting your business online.
You may feel your business
should be online; others are
doing it, so why not me? How
much does it cost, is it secure
and will it benefit my business?


on the


Making IT Work





by

Alexander


Hanna


Proidnc


I :


I


BUSINESS I


w


























by

GamNw

N~Vr


* -


"Copyrighted Material.

- Syndicated Content *


Available from Commercial News Providers"

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ftD - p


THE TRIBUNE


I (Including sessions during the Easter holidays) I
Cost: $395.00 .


I n


I Don't delay...sign up today...and secure your place!

I
I Contact the C. F.| Administrator at Queen's College I

Phone: 242-393-1666
Fax: 242-393-3248 I
| Email: dcfe@qchenceforth.com


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 3B



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading
financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100
million customers worldwide,

is seeking candidates for the position of


DOCUMENT CONTROL MANAGER


FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigrpup international offshore trust
companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman
Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and Singapore.
Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Management of document control unit (Imaging, Safe Keeping, Dual
Control, Warehouse, Records Management.)
Ensure that all records are kept within compliance to Citigroup standards.
Implementation of GWS records management strategy.
MIS reporting.
Management of risk and assist in coordination of audit.


KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

Historic imaging and records management experience and familiarity
with Trust and Company documentation.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with various business units on a global basis.
Influencing,, organizational and leadership skills.
Initiative and the ability to think strategically
People Management.
2-4 years Imaging and/or records management experience.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Operation Controls Head
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR
Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com

Deadline for application is February 23, 2005.











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I Duration: 26th February-30th April

Saturdays 9:00a.m-1:00 p.m


P.O. Box AP-59222
Nassau International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas


The Airport Authority invites Tenders for the provision of seventy-five
(75) standard size Sanitary Disposal Units on the following premises at
Nassau International Airport: (A) All public ladies restrooms within
Terminal 1 & 2; (B) General Aviation Centre; (C) the Authority's
Executive Offices; (D) Air Traffic Services Centre; (E) the Airport Car
Parking Booths

The Contracts will run for a period of twenty-four months beginning
April 1, 2005. It is required that all units are replaced on a weekly basis
or as necessary, with clean, sterilized units.

, Interested Companies will be required to demonstrate their experience
and ability to carry out the contract, including financial capability and
staffing.

The Authority will arrange for a familiarization tour of areas comprising
? the contract immediately following a briefing session from all interested
parties, which will be held at the Board Room of the Executive Offices
of the Authority on Thursday 24th February, 2005 at 2:30 p.m. Companies
wishing to submit tenders should contact the Authority prior to the date
so that arrangements can be made for participation in the briefing.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "TENDER
FOR SANITARY DISPOSAL UNIT SERVICES" and addressed to
the undersigned:

The General Manager,
The Airport Authority,
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be hand delivered to the Executive Offices of the
Airport Authority not later than 4:00 p.m. on the 4th March, 2005.

Companies who have submitted Tenders will be invited to attend the
Tender Opening process on Tuesday 8th March, 2005 at 10:30 a.m.

The Authority reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


p


I










PAGE B, TURSDY, FERUAR 17,2005UHEITIBUN


Bank (From page 1B)


per cent to 5.25 per cent.
This was followed by a
request to retail banks to con-
sider a similar reduction of the
prime rate from 6 to 5.5 per
cent.
It was announced by the
Clearing Banks Committee,
speaking on behalf of the retail
banking sector, that the banks
would comply.
Mr Francis said the Central
Bank had also written to the
Registrar of Insurance Compa-
nies and the Director of Co-
operative Credit Unions to
request that the institutions
which they regulate consider a
proportional reduction in lend-
ing rates.
"We expect that in due time
we will hear from them," he
said.
According to Mr Francis, the
public should avoid reacting to
the announcement by increasing
consumption, as this would be
"counterproductive to the
process of consolidating our
economy and contributing to an
improvement in the rate of
development."
He said that it would also be
a drain on the country's foreign


reserves, as Bahamians would
seek to buy "consumption items
in Miami and in Florida more
generally".
Mr Francis said that on the
other hand, the reductions are
"a great opportunity" for
Bahamians to invest in "the
productive side in the econo-
my, to invest in housing for
example, to invest in small busi-
nesses, to invest if necessary
simply in saving accounts".
He said that such a reaction
would have positive results for
economic growth.
"There is close to $5 billion of
credit in our economy and a lot
of that bank credit is directed
to, for example, the housing sec-
tor, something like 1.5 billion,
and a lot of it is directed at the
commercial sector, the business
sector.
"That is the sector which is
in fact really producing the jobs
in the Bahamas," the governor
said.
Mr Francis explained that the
reduction means that business-
es have "a cheaper source of
the main ingredient of most
businesses: that is credit, so that
they are able to operate at a


'higher level and employ more
people."
The Housing sector, he said,
should also benefit, as persons
can more easily afford housing
because credit is cheaper.
"This is also good for the
economy because the housing
sector is one of the important
sectors in our economy. In oth-
er words it creates many con-
struction jobs, and other spin
off jobs which really related to
the housing sector or the hous-
ing industry," he said.
According to Mr Francis, the
Central Bank decided on the
reduction because of the recent
increase in liquid funds in the
economy.
"For some time we have been
experiencing in our system a
build up in excess liquidity; that
is the money which banking
institutions hold available for
lending but are not lending for
the time being" he explained.
Mr Francis sai this has been
the case for around two years,
and that in view of this, "it was
appropriate there should be
some reaction on the part of the
cost of money".


Shares (From page 1B)


FamGuard certainly has room
to issue more ordinary shares.
Patricia Hermanns, Family
Guardian's president, yesterday
said she could not say which
option the company would take
as talks with Sagicor which are
expected to be completed with-
in 90 days were still ongoing
and she did not "want to pre-
empt discussions one way or
another".
She added that the dilution
effect was one factor being tak-


en into consideration, and
added of the plans to give Sagi-
cor a 20 per cent stake: "It
would have a number of impli-
cations and these are the things
that are part of the ongoing dis-
cussions. These things have to
be considered."
The discussions between
Family Guardian are likely to
have been sparked by the series
of acquisitions by Colina Insur-
ance Company, which have cre-
ated a mammoth life and health


insurer that dwarfs its three
rivals Family Guardian, British
American Insurance and British
Fidelity in terms of size and
market share. Sagicor's long-
term plans for the Bahamas are
uncertain. It is unclear whether
it would be satisfied with a mere
20 per cent stake in Family
Guardian, and could be view-
ing the move if it receives reg-
ulatory approval as the first
step in creating another giant
insurer.


Pipe (From page 1B)


The Tribune understands that
the Hydro Bahamas pipeline,
which would have cost more
than $150 million to lay, would


RE NT',


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Well placed on Paradise Island, near Atlantis.
Visitor and local pedestrian traffic.
* Excellent parking facilities.
* Well maintained building & landscaping.


Paradise Village
Shopping Plaza
Paradise Island
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


have been financed by private
sector capital from largely
European-based investors. They
would also have financed the
development of a new 26 mil-
lion gallon wellfield in Andros,
meaning that the "risk" and
capital investment would be
borne by the private sector and
not the Government.
Hydro Bahamas also said its
pipeline would be laid at a
depth of 6,500 feet, using tech-
nology that had helped lay deep
water pipelines at 10,000 feet in
the Gulf of Mexico, allaying
fears on the engineering and
technical aspects.
If it failed to deliver the
promised 100 million gallons of
freshwater .to New Providence
per day, Hydro Bahamas sug-


gested it be penalised at an
amount that was double the
throughput fee it would charge
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration.
Hydro Bahamas proposed.
that it would charge $4.85 per
1,000 gallons, below the $6.30
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-1
ration currently pays. The water
became cheaper the more the'
Corporation purchased, within
the pipeline having built-in'
redundancy capacity for an1
extra five million gallons peri
day. As a result, Hydrot
Bahamas was saying its water:
prices would be almost 23 per
cent cheaper than what the,
Water & Sewerage Corporation'
currently pays or could be deliv-
ered by a reverse osmosis plant.'


pv OWf


-


* *


-

"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
















*



l --










o


FirstCaribbean

Career Opportunity


FirstCaribbean International Bank is the region's largest publicly traded bank, with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million people in 16
countries. We manage over 500,000 active accounts through more than 80 branches and centres throughout the Caribbean, Bahamas
and Belize.

As we continue to grow, FirstCaribbean is seeking dynamic candidates for this senior-level position, which reports directly to the Chief
Operating Officer.

Responsibilities
* Achieve sector goals/targets and maintain exceptionally high quality of delivery to internal and external customers
* Lead, motivate and develop a team of operation managers and their staff within the FirstCaribbean Operations Centres
* Ensure successful achievement of significant business change by identifying, planning, and implementing operational business requirements in line with the
evolving needs of the business
Build and sustain a proactive operations culture
Lead the operations areas responsible for in the execution of all banking transactions, including maintaining a fully controlled environment

Prerequisites
* Demonstrated results leading, managing and motivating large, distributed teams
* Previous experience in a large regional, multi-country operations environment, within the financial experience of preparing and presenting business cases and
similar proposals to Executive teams
Exceptional communication skills, with ability to interpret and effectively explain information to both subordinates and Executive teams
University degree with a minimum of 10 years' experience in the business/financial world
Strong Banking knowledge in the area of general routine and risk management
Thorough knowledge of Internal and External Audit requirements
Sound understanding of Operational Risk, Compliance and Information Technology issues

We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package based on experience and qualifications.
Applications with detailed r6sumes should be submitted with a cover letter no later than February 28, 2005 to:

Jamise Sturrup
Admin. Assistant
Human Resources
308 E. Bay Street 4th Floor
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P. 0. Box N-8329
Nassau, Bahamas

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company
of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


FirstPEAInCaribbean j


THE TRIBUNE


o








THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


Consolidated


Water gets


Blue


Hills contract


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bradley Roberts,
minister of public
works and utili-
ties, yesterday
confirmed that
Cayman-based Consolidated
Water, which already has oper-
ations in Nassau and south
Bimini, had won the $22 mil-
lion contract to build, own and
operate the Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant.
Describing Consolidated
Water's operations as having
enjoyed continuous growth, Mr
Roberts said it had the finan-
cial ability to "deliver the goods
as committed and on time". Tri-
bune Business revealed exclu-
sively that Consolidated Water


had won the Blue Hills contract
yesterday.
Mr Roberts acknowledged
that the two leading bids for the
20-year contract, those from
Consolidated Water and UK-
based Biwater International,
had been close on price, and
"both companies appear to be
competent and able to deliver
the goods".
But controversy had previ-
ously injected into the contract
process by Biwater, which had
called for an international team
of auditors to review all the
bids, arguing that the Bahamian
people were not getting the best
value for money if the Govern-
ment awarded the deal to Con-
solidated Water and ignored the
almost $9 million in annual sav-
ings it was offering to produce


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NERLY JEAN BAPTISTE
BLANC, BERNARD ROAD, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX EE-16948,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JANE CLARANDER
CHRISTIE-ARCHER late of Hutchinson Street,
Pyfrom Addition, Eastern District, New Providence,
The Bahamas.
Deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required
to send the same duly certified in writing to the
Undersigned on or before the 28th day of February,
2005, after which date the Executrix will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.


McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
Attorneys for the Executrix
Chambers,
P.O. Box N-3937
Mareva House
No. 4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.


by stopping water leakage.
When questioned as to why
Consolidated Water was cho-
sen over Biwater despite the
latter's claims, Mr Roberts
replied: ""Because in the eval-
uation of our consultants, and in
the judgement of the fine peo-
ple at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation, they felt that Con-
solidated on balance was the
better company. And therefore
they were selected."
When asked about Biwater's
claim that the Government


could save almost $9 million
under its bid, Mr Roberts told a
press conference: "That is what
they say."
He indicated that Consoli-
dated Water's bid was also
offering to reduce losses
through leakage from the water
distribution system by one mil-
lion gallons per day during the
initial years of the Blue Hills
contract.
However, Mr Roberts did not
See WATER, Page 6B


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOHNSON JEAN BAPTISTE
BLANC, BERNARD ROAD, FOX HILL, RO. BOX EE-16948,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CHERLINE CHERUBIN OF
WASHINGTON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17TH day of FEBRUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES
ACT (No 45 of 2000)

TRANSFORMING GROUP LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation
"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), TRANSFORMING GROUP LIMITED, is in
Dissolution".
The date of commencement of dissolution is 8th day of
December, 2004.
MR. BADRI GOBECHIA
of 6 Kipshidze Str., App. 5,
Tbilisi 380030,
Republic of Georgia
Liquidator


GN 165

MINISTRY OF
TRANSPORT & AVIATION



NOTICE
PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice
that in consequence of the owner's personal choice,
application has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in respect of the
ship "ATLANTIC PRESTIGE" Official Number
729583 Gross Tonnage 45780 Register Tonnage 24885
owned by Maud Shipping Ltd., with its principal place
of business at Winterbotham Place, Marborough &
Queen Street, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau, The Bahamas
for permission to change her name to "MAUD"
registered at the port of Nassau in the said new name
as owned by Maud Shipping Ltd.

Any objection to the proposed change of name
must be sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O.
Box N-4679, Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas within seven
days from the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 31st Day of January, 2005.
J Mervyn Jones
Director of Maritime Affaris


Deal (From page 1B)
upgrading and repair work done to the property than was previously
expected.
Millions have already been spent by Baha Mar on its project,
which it said will inject $450 million in annual gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) into the economy. Phase I of the project will accom-
modate 2.500 new or completely refurbished rooms, an expanded
golf course, a 'Las Vegas' style casino and 75,000 square feet of con-
vention space.
About 4,700 full-time jobs for Bahamians would be created dur-
ing the first 12 months of construction, with annual wages paid to
them estimated to total $125 million.
In its first full-year of operation, the Baha Mar Cable Beach pro-
ject would provide direct employment for an "additional" 4,500
Bahamians, with this number expected to increase by 50 per cent
in its second year.


The Tribune
call 322-1986

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES
ACT (No 45 of 2000)

STAYNER SECURITIES S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation
"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), STAYNER SECURITIES S.A., is in Dissolution".
The date of commencement of dissolution is 22nd day of
December, 2004.

GEORGY ULUKHANOV,
of 1, Dgebuadze Str., app. 259,
PO 380002, Tbilisi, Georgia
Liquidator


Innovative Offshore Bank is
presently looking for a

back office
administrator
The successful applicant must
* have several years of private banking
background
* be computer literate

We require knowledge and experience
with
* Securities
* Corporate Actions
* Foreign exchange transactions
* Payments and transfers
* Accounting
* Reconciliations

Team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently
with minimal supervision. Series 7
certification is an asset.

We offer
* a salary which is commensurate with
the job, a pension plan and medical
insurance
Please send your resume and one (1) letter of reference
to SYZ & CO BANK & TRUST Attention Betsy
Morris (betsy.morris@syzbank.com) P. 0. Box N-1089
Bayside Executive Park West Bay Street & Blake
Road Nassau Bahamas Fax: 327-6629


KINGSWAY ACADEMY

ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be holding
Entrance Examinations for students
wishing to enter Grades 2 through 6,
on SATURDAY, MARCH 5 AND 19.


Parents are asked to collect


Application


Forms from the


Elementary School office before the
testing date from 8:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.


For further information contact the
school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF ELKIN RENAL
STORR late of Stapledon Gardens in
the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 7th day of March, 2005, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Sandringham House
83 Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor


BUSNES


_ I


F










PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Water (From page 5B)


: Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL

February 10, 2005

Financial Performance For The Six-Month Period Ended 31st, Decembei 2004
With Comparison To The Same Period Last Year

The Bank is pleased to report, once again, that it achieved record results for the 6
months ending December 31, 2004. Interest Revenue moved up 2.47% over last year,
outpacing the 0.45% rise in Interest Expense. Those events combined to produce net
interest income growth of 3.85%, mainly reflecting the marginal rise in Loans and
Advances.

Meanwhile, new Net Provisions continued its sharp decline falling 50.53% below last
year,'lespite a $500,000 increase in General Provision. This marked reduction reflects
consistent recoveries from written-off accounts and the stabilization of Provisions,
which grew substantially last year following the adoption of new provisioning
guidelines.

The dramatic drop in new Net Provisions overshadowed the 3.63% rise in Total Non
Interest Expenses contributing to a 12.21% jump in Net Income from $3,817,590 last
year to $4,283,749. Thereafter, EPS settled at 36 cents compared to 32 cents last year.

Consequent of the recent lending freeze, the above-mentioned tepid rise in Loans and
Advances caused Total Assets to remain essentially unchanged, growing just 0.50% to
$387,720,910. This event combined with the substantial rise in Net Income to yield a
17 basis points increase in annualized ROA year on year to 2.22%.

The Bank is pleased to report that in view of its performance, the Board of Directors
approved dividends of 10 cents per share to be paid on February 14, 2005. In
addition, on December 6, 2004 the Bank paid extraordinary dividends of 7 cents per
share for the first time.

The outlook for the remainder of the fiscal year remains positive as key economic
indicators point to a meaningful rise in Gross Domestic Product. When augmented
with projected strong foreign reserves and high sector liquidity, a rebound in credit
activities is foreshadowed.

We take this opportunity to thank our Shareholders and Customers for their
continued confidence and support. Also, we express our gratitude to our Board of
Directors and dedicated Staff whose commitment and service are noteworthy.


Managing Director


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
2004 2003 Ju-. 30, 2004


ASSETS
Cash and due from banks
Investments, loans and advances to customers, net
Other assets
TOTAL
LIABILITIES
Deposits from customers and banks
Bonds payable
Other liabilities
Total liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital:
Authorized 25,000 preferred shares of $1,000 each
25,000,000 common shares of $1 each
Issued and fully paid 12,000,000 common shares
Share premium
Treasury shares
General reserve
Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL


$ 43,817,152
328,273,123
15,630,635
* 387,720,910

S 311,833,874
17,000,000
17,302.665
346,136,539




12.000,000
7,589,064
(264,850)
1,400,000
20,860,157
41,584,371
$ 387,720,910


S 47,136,123
325,312,546
13,336,963
$ 385,785,632

S 313,478,885
17,000,000
16,004,787
346,483,672




12.000.000
7,589,064
1,400,000
18,312,896
39,301,960
$ 385,785,632


S 47,087,054
324,832,134
12,858,863
$ 384,778,051

S 319,928.319
17,000,000
8,519,575
345,447,894




12.000,000
7.589,064
(267.750)
1,400,000
18,608,843
39,330,157
$ 384,778,051


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED STATEMENT OF INCOME
6 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2004 ,
(Expressed in Bahamian dollar) ''


address Biwater's claims that it
was awarded the Blue Hills con-
tract on September 30, 2004,
something documents produced
by Biwater chairman Adrian
White appear to prove.
A 'Letter of Acceptance' sent
to Biwater on September 30,
and signed by Abraham Butler,
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration's general manager, seems
to support Mr White's claims
that Biwater was initially hand-
ed the Blue Hills contract.
In a letter written to Prime
Minister Perry Christie on Feb-
ruary 7, 2005, to which Mr
White said he had yet to receive
a reply, the Biwater chairman
said: "We feel that the full and
huge guaranteed financial ben-
efits to your government of our
bid cannot have been put fully
to you and your Cabinet."
Mr White previously told The
Tribune that if awarded the
Blue Hills contract, Biwater
would guarantee to the Water
& Sewerage Corporation that
by the end of its first opera-
tional year it would prevent
one million gallons per day
being lost from the water sys-
tem through leaks.
He added that preventing the
leakage of one million gallons,
which would be sold to the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
at $5.5 per gallon, would save
the Government just over $2
million per annum. If Biwater
failed to hit its target, it would
make up the difference through
increased production at Blue
Hills and cash payments to the
Corporation.
Mr White wrote in his letter
to the Prime Minister: "If this
saved water is sold at your cur-
rent tariffs ($19.98 per 1,000 gal-
lons and assuming 95 per cent
collection efficiency), there
would be an additional income,
without additional expense, of
$6.928 million annually. These


two savings above amount to
$8.935.565 million in the full
first year, dramatically reduc-
ing Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration's annual government sub-
sidy.
"It can be clearly seen that
with our proposal to guarantee
one million gallons per day leak
reduction after the first year,
plus switching from water cost-
ing an average of $6 per 1,000
gallons to ours at $4.2 that
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion's losses (and subsidy from
the Government) can cease
after 24 months."
He added that his company's
plans would save the Bahamas
$102 million over the lifetime


of the 20-year Blue Hills con-
tract.
Consolidated Water's busi-
ness plan for the Blue Hills
plant has yet to be detailed, but
the company already operates
the Windsor Field reverse
osmosis plant through the
Waterfields Company, which
produces two million gallons of
water per day for the Water &
Sewerage Corporation.
Several sources said the given
Consolidated Water's existing
operations in this nation, it
made sense to award the com-
pany the Blue Hills contract.
However, Mr White disagreed,
telling The Tribune that the
Bahamas would be "putting all
its eggs in one basket", with his
company having spent more
than $3 million on its failed bid.
The Government is also plan-
ning for further reverse osmosis
plants at Arawak Cay and Win-
ton.



TWNA HIGT
S330,00


NET INTEREST AND OTHER INCOME.
Interest income
Interest expense
Net interest income
Less net provision for loan losses
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
Non-interest revenue
Income from investments

NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
NET INCOME
EARNINGS PER SHARE


NET INTEREST AND OTHER INCOME
Interest income
Interest expense
Net interest income
Less net provision for loan losses
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
Non-interest revenue
Income from investments

NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
NET INCOME
EARNINGS PER SHARE


CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income
Adjustments for non-cash items

Net change in non-cash operating items
Net cash provided by operating activities

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Acquisition of fixed assets
Purchase of investmens
Proceeds from maturity of investments
Net cash used in investing activities

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Dividends paid
Net cash used in financing activities

NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH
POSITION DURING THE PERIOD
CASH POSITION, BEGINNING OF PERIOD
CASH POSITION, END OF PERIOD


2004

$ 13,471,643
5,375,862
8,095,781
395,910
7,699,871
2,306,672
870,934
10,877,477
6,593,728
$ 4,283,749
$ 0.36


2004


$ 6,553,187
2,693,535
3,859,652
199,061
3,660,591
1,098,716
433,038
5,192,345
3,192,209
$ 2,000,136
$ 0.17


2004


$ 4,283,749
1,025,697
5,309,446
330,543
5,639,989


(4,377,706)
(1,980,500)
205,200
(6,153,006)


(2,756,885)
(2,756,885)


(3,269,902)
47,087,054
$ 43,817,152


2003

$ 13,147,356
5,351,997
7,795,359
800,358
6,995,001
2,324,455
860,769
10,180,225
6,362,635
$ 3,817,590
$ 0.32


2003


$ 6,771,229
2,738,052
4,033,177
585,503
3,447,674
930,015
430,322
4,808,011
3,170,380
$ 1,637,631
$ 0.14


2003


$ 3,817,590
2,743,451
6,561,041
403,059
6,964,100


(1,523,096)


(1,523,096)


(1,920,000)
(1,920,000)


3,521.004
43,615,119
$ 47,136,123


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
6 MONTHS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2004

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These consolidated interim condensed financial statements are prepared in
accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting polices used in
the preparation of these consolidated interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended June
30, 2004.

The consolidated interim condensed financial statements include the accounts of
Bank of the Bahamas Limited and its wholly owned subsidiary, Bank of the Bahamas
Trust Limited.

2. COMPARATIVES

Certain comparative figures have been restated to comply with the current year's
presentation.


VACANCY


The Airport Authority is recruiting suitably qualified Bahamians
to work in its close circuit television surveillance unit.


MANAGER requisite qualifications Bachelors Degree in

Business Administration or related studies with five (5) to ten
(10) years working experience with the last three (3) managing
or supervising CCTV surveillance room personnel.


Candidate must demonstrate good leadership qualities with
effective communication skills and proficiency in microsoft
office software programme or basic education with ten (10) to
fifteen (15) years working experience; the last five (5) supervising
or managing CCTV personnel. In addition, the candidate must
demonstrate food leadership qualities and effective communication
skills and proficiency in microsoft office programmes.,


SUPERVISOR requisite qualifications Bachelors Degree in
Business Administration, Information Technology or a related
subject in addition to five (5) to seven (7) years post qualification
experience, the last three (3) of which should have been in a
supervisory position. Must have good oral & writing skills and
be conversant in microsoft office programmes. While relevant
experience is an asset, candidates without relevant experience
who meet all other criteria will be given consideration.


SURVEILLANCE OPERATOR -requisite qualifications -
Candidates must have tertiary level qualification at the Associate
Degree level, good communication skills and be computer literate.


Salary for the position will be in accordance with the Airport
Authority's salary scales.


Qualified candidates must submit their Resumes and three (3)
letters of reference by Monday, 28th February 2005, to:


Manager, Human Resources
The Airport Authority
Nassau International Airport
P.O.Box AP-59222
Nassau, Bahamas


PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, CHARLES DEON
SHERMAN, of Farrington Road, intend to change my
name to CHARLES DEON ISRAEL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publicationtof this notice.


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED STATEMENT OF INCOME
3 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
6 MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2004
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


BUINS










THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 7B


Tourism In UIS


National Bank of Canada
(Financial Statement)


beconwmes casualty





of war on terror



--- "Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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VACANCIES


The Anglican Schools are now

accepting Applications for

Students registering for Grades

Kg Grade 5 at the Primary level

and Grades 8 10 at the

Secondary level for St, John's
N- - r- C,. A I 1 1


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Legal Notice


NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
CANADIAN ARCTIC LIMITED



Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 4th day of
March, A.D., 2005. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.


Dated the 15th day of February, A.D., 2005.


Gail Huff
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.






Legal Notice


NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
CANADIAN ARCTIC LIMITED


NOTICE IS HERFBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CANADIAN ARCTIC
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provision of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 15th
February, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Ms. Gail Huff of 16945
Northchase Blvd., Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 15th day of February, A.D. 2005

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company


To the Shareholders of National Bank of Canada


We have audited the Consolidated Balance Sheet of National Bank of Canada (the "Bank"] as at October 31, 2004 and the Consolidated
Statements of Income, Changes in Shareholders* Equity and Cash Flows for the year then ended. These consolidated financial statements.
are the. responsibility of the. Bank s Manaqement. Our resoonsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements
based on our audit.

W~. onductgd our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and
perform an audit.to obtain reasonable assurance whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstateme.i
An audit include$*examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statement'..
An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by Management, as well as evaluate
the overall conspletiated financial statement presentation.

.t our opinion, the's consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Bank as at
October 31. 2004'andcthe results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian generaiv
accepted accounting' principles.

The consolidated financial statements as at October 31, 2003 and for the year then ended were audited by Samson Belair / Deloitte &
Touche, s.e.n.c.r.l.. and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. who issued an unqualified opinion on the consolidated financial statements *
their report dated November 28, 2003.

Samson B4lair/ Deloitte & Touche. s.e.n.c.r.L
Chartered Accountants
Montreal. December 2, 2004




Note 2004 2003

Interest income and dividends

Securities 588 526
Deposits with financial institutions 113 131
2,605 2,634
Interest expense
Deposits 800 1.030
Subordinated debentures 99 105
Other 323 175
1,222 1,310
Net interest income 1,383 1,324

Other income
Financial market fees 633 544
Deposit and payment service charges 200 192
Trading revenues 198 335
Gains on investment account securities, net 91 1
Card service revenues 49 49
Lending fees 9 238 204
Acceptances, letters of credit and guarantee 65 63
Securitization revenues 180 204
Foreign exchange revenues 72 66
Trust services and mutual funds 244 210
Other 196 170
2,166 2.038
Total revenues 3 549 3362
3,549 3,362
Provision for credit tosses 6 86 177

Operating expenses
Salaries and staff benefits 1,359 1,287
Occupancy 200 1,92

Communications 77 80
Professional fees 118 112
Other 304 274
2,392 2,257
income before income taxes and non-controlling interest 1.071 928
Income taxes 16 318 277
753 651
Non-controltingq interest 28 27
Net income 725 624
Dividends on preferred shares 14 23 25
Net income available to common shareholders 702 599
Average number of common shares outstanding Iltousandsl 17
Basic 170,918 177,751
Diluted 173.276 179.,235
Net earnings per common share
Basic 4.10 3.37
DiLuted 4.05 3.34
Dividends per common share 14.,. 1.42 1.08



Note 2004 2003

ASSETS
Cash resources
Cash 481 222
Deposits with financial institutions 5;296 6,825
5.777 7,047
Securities
Investment account 4 7.428 6,998
Trading account 4 20.561 19,151
Loan substitutes 18 30
28.007 26,179

Securities purchased under reverse repurchase agreements 4,496 3,955

Loans 5 and 6
Residential mortgage 15,500 13,976
Personal and credit card 7.825 6,101
Business and government 18,751 18.934
Allowance for credit losses (5781 (6301
41,498 38.381
Other
Customers liability under acceptances 3,076 3.334
Premises and equipment 7 267 263
Goodwill 8 662 660
Intangible assets 8 180 183
Other assets 9 4,844 4,929
9,029 9,369
88.807 84,931

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLLRS' EQUITY
Deposits 10
Personal 23.675 23.512
Business and government 24,299 22.700
Deposit-taking institutions 5.458 5,251
53,432 51.463


Other
Acceptances
Obligations related to securities sold short
Securities sold under repurchase agreements


3,076
10,204
8,182


Other liabilities 11 7,931 6.,992
29.393 27,457

Subordinated debentures 12 1.408 1,516
Non-controlling Interest 370 398

Shareholders' equity
Preferred shares 14 375 375
Common shares 14 1,545 1.583
Contributed surplus 15 7 2
Unrealized foreign currency translation adjustments. (101 6
Retained earnings 2,287 2.131
4,204 4.097
88,807 84.931

Real Raymond Pierre Bourgie
President and Chief Executive Officer Director



Note 20042003

Preferred shares at beginning 375 300
Issuance of preferred shares. Series 15 200
Redemption of preferred shares, Series 12 for cancellation (125)
Preferred shares at end 14 375 375


Common shares at beginning
Issuance of common shares
Repurchase of common shares for cancellation
Common shares at end

Contributed surplus at beginning
Stock option expense
Contributed surplus at end

Unrealized foreign currency translation adjustments at beginning
Losses on foreign exchange operations with a functional currency
other than the Canadian dollar, net of income taxes
Unrealized foreign currency translation adjustments at end

Retained earnings at beginning
Net income
Dividends
Preferred shares
Common shares
'ncome taxes related to dividends on preferred shares,
Series 12, 13 and 15
premium paid on common shares repurchased for cancellation
Share issuance expenses, net of income taxes
Retained earnings at end


1,583 1.639
42 26
1801 1821
14 1,545 1,583


2
5
15 7

6

116)
(101

2,131
725


1231
(2431

(11
(302)


2
2

17



1,945
624

(251
(1931


2,2872,131


Shareholders' equity 4,204 4,097

Interested parties may obtain a complete copy of the audited accounts from National Bank of Canada (International) Ltd.,
1st Floor Goodman's Bay Corporate Center, PO. Box N-3015, Nassau, Bahamas.


I __


BUSNES


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 8B THURSDAYFEBRUARY 17 2005


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Welcome to the fashion and entertainment magazine of the world. Published quarterly from the Bahama Islands, we
bring you, art, culture, fashion, travel, music and celebrity news.

GLOBE targets an untapped market. We're bringing the latest entertainment, business and technology news to the
Bahamas and the world. GLOBE Magazine is cutting edge. Our targeted readership ranges in age from 17 through
55. Our topics range from health and sex issues, fashion, music, art, and travel to the hottest and latest business
and technology news available. Our magazine crosses all social boundaries and is for everyone that likes to stay
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PAE O, HRSAYSEBURY17R00TRIUN POT


CAFL All-Stars


imr


ress


coac


in


Orlando clash


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Commonwealth
American Football League's
All-Star team have returned
from their trip to Orlando,
Florida over the weekend
after a 44-20 loss to the Orlan-
do Guardians.
Despite the defeat, team
manager/head coach Jim LaR-
oda said the Bahamian players
gave a good account of them-
selves, even though some of
them arrived on game day
because of a delay in their
flights.
"We played a very good
game. I think they were very
impressed with the way we
played," said LaRoda on the
team's return home.
"All of the guys who were
there played well. We had a
really good time."
The Guardians scored two
touchdowns in the first quar-
ter, one of which came as a
result of a bad snap on a punt,
to snatch a 14-0 lead.
Crucial
Early in the second quarter,
the All-Stars made a crucial
turnover near their end zone
as the Guardians' huge
offence took over, scoring on
a seven-yard drive to extend
their lead to 20-0.
All-Stars' quarterback
Drameko Clarke finally con-
nected on a pass to Kris Kemp
on third and goal from the
nine-yard line to break the ice
for the Bahamas, cutting the
deficit to 23-6 at the half.
The All-Stars eventually
picked up their offence in the
second half and made it an
exciting contest the rest of the
way, although the Guardians
had already sealed the deal
from the first quarter.
Clarke would go on to con-
nect with Kemp for all three
of the All-Star touchdowns.
Glen Rolle scored on a two-
point conversion.
LaRoda, who was assisted
by Tom Lunn, said he was
very impressed with the way
linebackers Ricardo Hamilton
and Sherwin Brown both
played. He was also pleased
with Patrick Arthur, who
caught an interception; Fred
Rahming, Arthur Thompson,
Brensil Rolle, Ken Bethel and
William Hunt.
While this is expected to be
a continuing experience for


* MEMBERS of the CAFL's All-Star team that played against the Orlando Guardians in Orlando on Saturday take time out for a photograph. Standing at left
is All-Stars' manager/head coach Jim LaRoda and Adam Curns, coach of the St Cloud High School teqam. At right is All-Stars' assistant coach Tom Lunn with
Paul Petty, a long-time college coach in the United States next to him.


the CAFL, LaRoda said if
they can secure the necessary
funding, they will be able to
perform a lot better than they
did.
"This one, we just concein-
trated on the young guys
because there was supposed
to be a lot of scouts," he not-
ed. "There were some, but
none as many as I had expect-
ed.
Better ,2
"But all of the persons who
were there to scout the game
was impressed with the way
we played. Our guys played
good. They played much bet-
ter than the way they played
here."
The CAFL will now switch
their focus back to the,
remainder of their regular sea-
son.
But LaRoda said they will
definitely learn from their mis-
takes and downfalls in this
game and he's vowed that the
CAFL will get revenge on the
Guardians when they meet
again next year.


prrp lr koNr ow


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THE BAHAMAS RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION





FINAL$







Saturday, February 1Im


Wintlon Rugbhy Centre


3 m


- Men's Final


Baillou vs. Cuckoos


5Dm


- Youth Final


Cuckoos vs. Buccaneers


THE BRFU WOULD LIKE TO THANK
EVERYONE WHO HAS SUPPORTED RUGBY
THROUGHOUT THE 2004 2005 SEASON.


9


Officials gear up


for Hugh Campbell


FROM page one
possession ruling, however, the Oew ruling alter-
nates the possession, from the tip.
Under the American rules, a team has a 35
second shot clock while FIBA allows a 24 sec-
ond shot clock.
FIBA rules allow a team eight seconds to
advance the ball from the baseline over the half
line, a player can only hold the ball without
moving for five seconds. --L .
As of late, the FIBA ruling has been used in
the recent Olympic Games and regional tour-
naments which the Bahamas national teams
participate in.
The officials hired to call games in the coun-
try's premier basketball tournament for high
school players, will have to undergo a study
course for three days, starting this Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, at the AF Adderley
school.
The course of study was implemented by
NPBAO to better the officiating during the
tournament, in hopes of bringing all the officials
together on one accord.
The largest set of officials, old and new are
expected to officiate the games, with more to
come aboard after the clinic.
Williams added: "We are open to the public
for persons wishing to join the referees associ-
ation. However, these interesting persons will
have to undergo several exams.
"All referees have to go through a physical
and fitness training and a course of study. The
course helps explain things that aren't to clear to
the officials and also introduces the new rules
which FIBA has.
"The physical is different from the fitness,
the physical part is actually calling the game,
while the fitness part is seeing the shape the
official is in."
In order to pass the physical part of the ref-
erees training, the official has to run more than


17 laps in eight minutes, have his or her breath-
ing checked and, as of late, be a certain weight.
The breathing of the official are checked by
the NPBOA's physician. The official has to
have a regular breathing pattern within the,
minute of the check up. '
The tournament will welcome two offi'i si
from Freeport, Charles Knowles arid Livingsn
Lewis; one from Eleuthera, Abaco, and And
Ricardo Pinder, Larry Rolle and Kendal 0ay'oi,
respectively; and 13 from the.,capital.) aTl
was the past president of the NPBA. '
For the second time since the tournament'
inception, a female official will be calling.
Task
"We are happy to bring in officials fromi-the`',
different Family Islands. It is sometimes a dif-
ficult task, but it works out in the long run for us
all," said Williams.
"This is why we hold the clinics, welcoming
everyone who is interested in the sport to join.i
especially females.
"For the officials over here, we meet every
Saturday to discuss the different rule changes,
finding ways to implement them in the games."
Although the score board in AF Adderley
will not identify the amount of fouls a player
has, a coach will be able to see the amount of
fouls.
In charge of the official scoring will be Ann
Bullard.
The tip-off in the tournament is set for Mon-
day February 21st and will run until the 28th,
with the final two days of play being held at
the national. '
The first game in the tournament will be
played between Temple Christian and GHS,
Mount Carmel and Nassau Christian
Academy and CC Sweeting and Aquinas Col-
lege.
Monday games are scheduled to start
3.30pm.


"' I~


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


- a


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


Hugh Campbell winner





is a tough one to call


T'S that time of the
year when the presti-
gious Hugh Campbell Bas-
ketball Classic will be
staged.
Who will emerge as this
year's champions?
Will the title go back to
Grand Bahama, or will it
remain here?
Since the inception of the
tournament in 1982, only
six times has the title stayed
in New Providence. The
first team to win it was the
LW Young Golden Eagles
in 1982.,
It wasn't until 1987 that
the AF Adderley Fighting
Tigers finally won their own
tournament. They came
back and duplicated the
feat in 1988.
But, after a nine-year
drought, the CR Walker
Knights brought the title
back here. And in 2002, the
CI Gibson Rattlers joined
the elite field of champions.
Last year, the Rattlers
reclaimed the title, joining
the Fighting Tigers as the
only two-time champions
from New Providence.
The tournament record,
however, belongs to the
Catholic High Crusaders,
who broke a 4-4 tie with the
Hawksbill High Hawks
when they won their fifth
title in 2003.
Depending on how you
look at it, there is a tie for


STUBBS
I ';',, ; -; ,i.:: .:.,


But Bain was also instru-
mental in the back-to-back
titles won by AF Adderley.
He served then as the assis-
tant coach to Doug Collins.
Beside that, the only


(Catholic High), Ricardo
Pierre (CI Gibson), Quintin
Hall (Hawksbill), Fabian
Lightbourne (CR Walker),
Tyrone Gardiner (Taberna-
cle), Brian Bain (Catholic


"I think this year's
tournament will have a
little more flavour to it
with the Government
Secondary Schools
Sports Association yet to
crown their champions."


OPINION
m -


the top coach in the tour-
nament between Jimmy
Clarke and Norris Bain.
They both would have
coached four championship
teams.
While Bain did it with the
Tabernacle Falcons, Clarke
went to Grand Bahama and
won three straight titles
with the Hawksbill High
Hawks before he came back
and added his fourth with
CR Walker.


player to earn the most
valuable player award twice
is centre Roger Farrington,
who played a key role as
shot blocker for the Hawks
in the first of their two
championship titles.

T here's been a num-
ber of other MVP
players who shined during
the tournament and have
excelled at the collegiate
and professional level.
Among the list are Ben
Russell (Catholic High),
Mario Green (Hawksbill),
Timmy Jones (Eight Mile
Rock), Locksley Collie and
Dexter Cambridge (AF
Adderley), Julian Coakley


High) and Christopher
Turnquest and Stevenson
Jacques (CI Gibson).
If what we've seen so far
this year, there will. be no
shortage of talent available
this year.
Fans can look forward to
some exciting action from
start to finish in the week-
long double elimination
tournament.
I think this year's tourna-
ment will have a little more
flavour to it with the
Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association
yet to crown' their champi-
ons.
With their regular season
still in progress, it means
that it's anybody's guess as


to who will win it all.
So far, only the Bahamas
Association of Independent
Secondary Schools have
completed their season. But
the champions, St.
Augustine's College Big
Red Machines, have opted
not to compete.
However, the Jordan
Prince William Falcons,
who have a solid team and
are coached by 1988 MVP
and former Dallas Maver-
icks player Dexter Cam-
bridge, are in.
Despite losing to the Big
Red Machines, the Falcons
should be among the con-
tenders.
There are at least four
teams from the GSSSA, led
by the Rattlers, and includ-
ing the CV Bethel
Stingrays, CR Walker and
Dame Doris Johnson" Mys-
tic Marlins, who could also
pose a threat.
And from Grand
Bahama, there's a lot of
talk about Tabernacle, Sir
Jack Hayward and Catholic
High.
So it seems as if this
year's tournament will once
again live up to the
advanced billing as the most
exciting sporting event on
the high school calendar.
Only time will tell who
will emerge on top
It will all start to unfold
on Monday, so get ready for
high-school basketball at its
best.


Softball

meeting
THE NEW Providence Soft-
ball Association will hold its
annual general meeting and elec-
tion of officers today at 7.30pm
at the Churchill Tener Knowles
Softball Stadium.
Each team is asked to send
two representatives to the meet-
ing.


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


4.





~~
N'


Oficils~ gea .....


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

OFFICIATING will play
a huge factor in the 23rd
annual Hugh Campbell Invi-
tational tournament, as
teams and coaches are
expecting to see the same
level of refereeing through-
out the Bahamas.
Several years ago, the dif-
ference in officiating and
ruling almost caused havoc
in the tournament, when
teams coming in from some
of the Family Islands
weren't used to playing
under the FIBA rules.
Instead, teams like
Catholic High, Tabernacle,
and Sir Jack Hayward
played their basketball
league under the American
ruling, a ruling which is used
in the National Basketball
Association, American col-
leges and high schools.

Ruling
Under the American
High School ruling, a player
on the court is allowed to
call a time-out at any given
time during the game.
This method was used as
a strategic advantage for the
team, who were either down
in the game, had the ball
tied up from the opposing
team, or couldn't advance
the ball because of a trap,
or on an inbound pass.
Stopping play under the
American ruling, usually
prolonged the game, while
the FIBA rules were
designed to speed up the
flow of the match.
Under the FIBA ruling,
the team can only be given a
time-out when it is signalled
by the coach; the request
must be put in to the scoring
table and will be allowed on
a dead ball.
According to Anthony
Williams, head official in the
New Providence Basketball
Association Officials
(NPBAO), the shot clock
was the main concern for
many of the Grand Bahama
teams.

Concerns
He said: "The changing in
the rules was of more con-
cern to the Grand Bahama
teams, New Providence
based teams were already
used to playing what we call
modify FIBA ruling.
"This will be the second
year the FIBA rules will be
used, in the past Grand
Bahama teams had to adjust
to playing with the 24 sec-
ond shot clock, instead of
the 35 second shot clock
they are use to."
In the past Tabernacle
Falcons' head coach Norris
Bain was the first to voice
his opinion about playing
under the FIBA rules, say-
ing that "the quickened pace
of the game doesn't help the
younger players, in terms of
running a set offence."
The modified FIBA rules
give coaches and players
opportunities to call time-
out on the floor. Jump balls
were used instead of the
SEE page 10B


* A PROUD moment for St John's College junior boys as they show off their trophy (above) and banner (below).
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

IN FRONT of a crowd ihat
had supported them thro0gh-
out their ups and downs this
season, the St John's College
junior boys unveiled their sec-
ond Bahamas Association of
Independent Schools Sports
(BAISS) championship ban-
ner, yesterday in the school's
gymnasium.
A noisy ceremony, which
commemorated the team's
performance this year, saw
the green banner was raised
in the auditorium.
Giants were treated to a
day on the town after the cer-
emony, with a special lun-
cheon at the Atlantis Sea-
grapes restaurant.

Trophy
Members of the team, who
were presented with the
team's trophy and jackets,
eagerly awaited the unveiling
ceremony.
And, with the pull of a
string by the team members,
the second banner was
unveiled, sending the school
crowd in a frenzy.
This is the second BAISS
junior boys title in the last
three years for the team,; a
title that came off a two game
sweep over the St
Augustine's Big Red
Machines.
The Big Red Machines, this


year's pennant winners, hand-
ed the Giants their only loss
of the season. A loss which
came days away from the
playoffs.
The repay came in full for
the Giants, with an impres-
sive game two victory. Giants
defeated the Big Red


Machines 50-42.
During the game
the Giants picked off
twelve of the Big Red
Machines balls early in the
first half.
The points conversion off
the steals not only boasted
their morale, but gave them a


13 point lead heading into the
locker room.
The 2-1-2 full court press
applied by the Giants in the
second half was unbreakable,
limiting Lawrence Benoit, Big
Red Machine's leading scor-
er, to only 13 points.
Leading the way for the


Giants was Ehrin Hanna and
Craig Smith. Hanna, who
played a pivotal role as the
Giants' point guard, fed
Smith on six occasions, con-
tributing to Smith's game
high performance of 17
points, eight rebounds, six
assists and five steals.


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


The Tribune


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Faithful Catholic daughter




celebrating 96th birthday


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
S/ A FAITHFUL
Catholic daughter
of her church," was
how Fr. Thomas
Brislin described
Mrs Victoria Louis at the 6.30
pm Mass at Sacred Heart
Church on Saturday, February
12.
Father Tom, pastor of
Sacred Heart, recognised Mrs.
Louis as part of the backbone
of the Shirley Street parish.
Mrs Louis, who celebrates
her 96th birthday today, was


described as faithful and dedi-
cated by her pastor, and her
son, Dr. John Louis Jr.
Victoria Moses was born in
Nassau on February 17, 1909
to the late K.S. Moses and his
wife, Leila. At an early age she
entered St. Francis School,
operated in Nassau by the Sis-
ters of Charity of Mt St Vin-
cent on the Hudson, New
York. She was later enrolled
as a student in Queen's Col-
lege.
She and her husband, John
Louis, owned and operated
Louis' department store on


Bay Street for .many years. It
closed in 1987. In 1990 her hus-
band of more than 60 years,
father of her three children,
Dr. John Louis, Frederick
Louis, and Sylvia Malone, died.
According to Fr. Tom, Mrs
Louis was one of the pioneers
of the Catholic Church in the
Bahamas. She was born 12
years after Sacred Heart was
built. She knew many of the
early priests who worked in the
Bahamas, from the founder of
the Bahamas mission, the Rev.
Chrysostom Schreiner, OSB.
Fr Tom said that Mrs Louis is


involved in all areas of the
parish. She attends parish
council meetings whenever
they are called.
Her dedication to her
church and family is the only
life she knows, said this 96-
year-old grandmother. She
speaks of her three grandchil-
dren with love and admiration.
She talks of them before she
mentions her own three chil-
dren. John Louis, III, is a den-
tist like his father, Dianna
Louis-Butsavage is a lawyer
and Laura Jean Louis is sports
editor with ESPN.


"My mother is a fantastic
lady, she has more dinner par-
ties than I do," says her son,
Dr John Louis, admiringly.
"She has a good sense of
humour, and, of course, I pay
her to laugh at all of my jokes."
"About two years ago she
held a fund raiser at her home
when the New St. Francis
cathedral was being built; she
sold tickets, cooked most of
the food herself and raised
about $5000.
"She loves her three grand-
children and her five great
grandchildren."' '


"My mother is an amazing
woman," said daughter Sylvia
Malone. "She still does the
cooking, which I like because
we live together."
When asked why she
attends all of the church func-
tions at her parish, her candid
reply is: "I feel they cannot do
without me there yet. I have
been there for almost 50 years.
And we have a wonderful
priest at Sacred Heart in the
person of Fr. Tom, whom I am

e e MASS, Page 3C


World Day of the Si


'God created


everything out


of nothing'


i o Cpyri gh teo Mater

indicate' onten B

Available-ror T:Gommercial News Providers"


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
REV :inston Barker of
Life, Ministries on Soldier
Road, in an impassioned ser-
mon, thanked the government
and the people of the
Bahamas for their support of
Grenada following Hurricane
Ivan, which devastated the Isle
of Spice.
"God created everything
out of nothing," said Rev
Barker, adding that He is able
to restore countries after
being ravaged by hurricanes.
(Last year the Bahamas was
hit by hurricanes Jeanne and
Frances, and Grenada by Hur-
ricane Ivan.)


He was speaking at a special
service organised by the
Grenada/Bahamian Associa-
tion to celebrate the 31st
anniversary of Grenada's
independence.
The same God who brought
order out of chaos will be the
one to continue to deliver his
people in these islands who
are still feeling the impact of
the storms, he said.
Many people are without
homes and jobs, he noted, but
added that "God of the
impossible shall make all
things possible".
"And we will rebuild again

See SERMON, 2C


100%

'Bible B0h&ift Shop


1, COME THIRSTY MAX LUCADO
, WINNING WITHPIPEOPIE JOHN Ca MAXWELL f
3. THE TEN COMMANDMENTS OF WORKING IN


i'~<~


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THE TRIBUNE.,
74


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


E SLIII


Church of God gets ready



for 'grand' gospel concert


By CLEMENT JOHNSON
THE Church of God will be celebrating
this season of love in a grand gospel con-
cert at the East Street Cathedral, East
Street and Lily in the Valley Corner.
The Inner Circle group will be hosting a
night of worship under the theme "Heart
of Worship". Special guests include 2004
Marlin Award winner Tamika Smith and


ANGLICAN
CHURCH
MEN
THE organisation is sched-
uled to hold its 32nd Annual
Conference in Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, March 10-13. All men
in the Anglican Church are
invited to register at their
parish.
Conference speakers include
Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
Canon Basil Tynes, Troy Sands
and Archdeacon Corenell
Moss.

CALVARY


2005 Marlin Award nominees Minister
Dwight Armbrister and the Golden Gates
Praise Team, among others.
According to the group's president
April Cartwright, the event promises to be
a night of power, praise and celebration.
The post-Valentine concert is designed
to encourage both the young and not so
young to fall in love with Jesus all over
again.


Church School, 10 am Divine.
Worship Service (Preacher:
Minerva Knowles), 7 pm -
Divine Evening Service
First Monday of each month,
7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-
ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30
pm Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry


ZION


pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

EAST
STREET
GOSPEL
CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pmfi Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting


"Persons attending can expect an atmos-
phere of worship as they enter the sanc-
tuary, and feel free to express themselves
in shouts of praise," said Ms Cartwright
"Persons will be encouraged to show love
with loved ones during this special concert.
Bring your dancing shoes and expect a
special visit from God."
The concert begins at 7pm on Sunday,
February 20.


PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE
MOST HOLY
TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

FIRST

HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD


CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, February 20:
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Ser-
vice, 7:30 pm Men's Fellow-
ship Meeting, WOI Meeting
Tuesday, CDC Mass Choir
Rehearsal
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session
Thursday, Band and Praise
Team Rehearsal
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Upcoming events
February 28-March 3 Men
With A Purpose Conference
March 28-April 3 WOI
Conference
March 27 Easter Sunday


CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
TH1E following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
February 20, 9:15 am -


THE church at East and
Shirley Streets is pleased to
host The Institute In Basic Life
Principles Basic Seminar
scheduled for February 28 to
March 5. (Monday-Thursday -
7 pm to 10 pm, Friday and Sat-
urday, 9 am to 6:30 pm.
To secure your space, please
register by February 15. For
further information, call 341-
3009 or 457-0827 or 328-5776.


ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
February 20, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and'Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7


Sermon (From page 1C)


because the bible tells us that
to everything there is a sea-
son," said Rev Barker.
He reminded the congre-
gation of their responsibility
to take care of one another.
"We have nowhere but earth
to live, and as we walk the
corridors of life we will meet
disaster, and the devastation
of that day will be an experi-
ence and we will rebuild
again."
Rev Barker said that the
Bahamas was destroyed by a
devastating hurricane in 1929,
but was rebuilt; and that
Grenada was destroyed in
1955 by Hurricane Jeanie,
and was also rebuilt.
He said that in most cases
after a disaster people are
religious but once things


"And we
will rebuild
again because
the bible
tells us that
to everything
there is a
season."

Rev Winston Barker


begin to return to normal
they begin to take God for
granted. "Man does not
realise that there is no guar-
antee that they will survive
the next disaster. We must
work together. God will
shake the nations one more
time. We fought Jeanne and
Frances but there is another
one beyond the horizons, that
we are not able to see. We
need to get used to destruc-
tion. God will bring his peo-
ple back to holiness because
too many of his people are
not doing what they are sup-
posed to do."
In times of need, said Rev
Barker, God always sends a
prophet, priest and king to
deal with the needs of his
people.


Anglican youth


to hold 'Media


Explosion'


THE Anglican Diocesan
Youth Department will hold
a "Media Explosion" on
February, 19, the diocese
announced yesterday.
This is expected to be the
first of many conscious steps
by the Anglican youth
department to initially train
young people of the diocese
and the nation on the media
and its usefulness in commu-
nicating the gospel.
"We will bring in media
personnel, including primar-
ily the owner and staff of
Jones Communications,
MOVI Advertising Agency,
staff from ZNS and a few
other media outlets from
around the country for a one-
day workshop and training
seminar for the youth of the
Anglican Diocese. We are
inviting up to 10 people from
each parish and the Angli-
can schools for a hands-on,
in depth training in Internet,
television, radio and print
media," according to a state-
ment released by the diocese.
Four seminars are sched-
uled:
Internet Technology
Workshop, Youth Depart-
ment Building Tarran Tay-
lor.
Print Media Workshop,


Practice, 7:30 pm Senior
Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 7 pm Parish
Dinner and A.G.M (Commu-
nity Centre)
Saturday, 6 am Intercesso-
ry Prayer Meeting, noon to 6
pm ACW Steak-Out, 2 pm -
Acolytes Practice (Rector: Rev
Fr S Sebastian Campbell)

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN


THE church on First Holi- IDI
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is KIRK
scheduled to hold the following
services: YOU a]
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday with the c
School, 11 am Morning Wor- am or 11
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship day Schoo
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer 11 am set
Meeting Group i
Wednesday, noon Prayer evenings.
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm The Kir
Bible Study corner of
Thursday, 7:3.0 pm Praise Princes' St
& Worship Service Central Ba
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30 able imm
pm Youth Meeting Kirk. Visi
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm www.sta
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly) U ITI
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our MINI
Men Evangelism) 1
1st Sundays Women's Day INT.
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants THE'ch
3rd Sundays Mission hold the f
Day/Communion Morni
4th Sundays Men's Day 2nd & 4th
Service Mort


ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of February 20-26:
Sunday, 9 am Family
Eucharist, 6:30 pm Mass
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's,
Anglican Church Women
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm -
Anglican Church Men, Prayer
Group Meeting
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale'
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band


Meeting -
urday @ 5
Christ
3rd Sunda
Divin
@ 10.30an
Comn


re invited to worship
hurch family at 9:30
am on Sunday. Sun-
ol meets during the
vice and the Youth
meets on Friday
rk is located at the
f Peck's Slope and
street, across from the
ank. Parking is avail-
ediately behind the
t us also at:
andrewskirk.com


East Building Conferenc-.
Room Jones Communica-
tions.
Television Media Work-
shop, Chapel MOVI
Advertising Agency.
Radio Technology
Workshop, Library of Main
Building Jones Communi-
cations, Love 97.
The seminars will be held
simultaneously and will each
run for about 45 minutes.
Each session will have up to
20 young people participat-
ing. The sessions are sched-
uled between 9am and 2pm.
Each will include Power
Point presentations and a
practical application segment.
Up to 100 young Anglicans
are expected to attend this,
training event.
"Our goal in having this
event is two fold: one, to pro-
vide the youth of the parish-.
es with the tools that they
need to begin a communica-
tions ministry, and two, to
begin media projects at the
diocesan level, including a,
youth radio programme,"
said the statement.
For more information con-
tact the Anglican Diocesan
Youth Office at 322-3015 ext.'
2038 and ask for Father
Enrique McCartney.


Service 1st Sunday @ 6pm.
Evening Worship 1st &
3rd Sunday @ 6pm.
Word Explosion Every,
Wednesday @ 7.30pm.
Youth Meeting -Frida'y @,
7.30pm.
Women of Destiny Meet-*
ing 2nd Tuesday @ 7.30pm.
Men of Honour Meeting -,
4th Tuesday @ 7.30pm.
Praise Choir Rehearsal -7
1st & 3rd Tuesday @ 7.30pm.
Live broadcast every 2nd.,
and 4th Sunday at 11:00 am via
More 94.9FM.
Faith Touch is aired 1st,
2nd and 3rd Sunday at 8:00 am
via More 94.9 FM.
Faith Touch is also aired
every Thursday at 9.45am via
101.9 Joy FM.
United Faith Ministries
International is located in the
Summerwinds Plaza, Harrold'A
Road. The senior pastor is
Apostle Phalmon Ferguson.
For further information, e--
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949


UNITY


*ED FAITH CENTER


STRIES


lurch is scheduled to
ollowing services:
ing Glory Worship -
SSunday @ 8am
ning Glory Prayer
- Wednesday & Sat-
am.
ian Education 1st &
iy @ 9.30am.
e Worship Sunday
a.
munion & Healing


OF LIGHT
THE church invites you to'
experience "An Evening of,
love with Dr Marilyn Rossner,
interfaith spiritual leader and-
minister, on Thursday, Febru-
ary 17, 7.30pm at the church;
on East Avenue, Centreville.,
Donation: $20.00.
On Sunday, February 20,
10.30am Ms Rossner will be'
the guest speaker at the Sun-
day Celebration of Spirit and,
Love. The message will be
"The Power of Love".


E-mail your articles

to The Tribune's

Religion section:

srose@tribunemedia. net


BAPTIST
DELIVERANCE BFICRCH


1


(Cj~wwf,) P


o l L. UJL.I% Ll









THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 3C


....RE S




ms the Ho *, MSHri tur"







t 0warmudof 41himm. atioj


* By Rev Angela C
Bosfield Palacious

What is your
favorite
sin? Where
are you
likely to be
tempted and you succumb
without any resistance at all?
In which areas are you more
likely to succeed in causing the
devil to flee? In this regard, our
daily prayer needs to be:
"Come quickly to help us who
are assaulted by many tempta-
tions and, as you know the
weakness of each of us, let each
one find you mighty to save."
(Collect for the First Sunday
after Lent, BCP)
We each have the daily
option to trust God's word on
boundaries for behaviour or to
decide that we know better. In
the story of Adam and Eve,
they allowed themselves to be
persuaded to disobey a direct
command. They chose knowl-
edge gained through disobedi-


ence and suffering over wis-
dom offered by revelation in
God's time. The rush to cir-
cumvent the slow processes of
growth continues today as
"forced-ripe youth" or overly
ambitious and greedy entre-
preneurs engage in activities
that ruin their reputations and
bring shame upon their fami-
lies. When we doubt God's
love and care exhibited in
restricted freedom, we com-
promise our integrity and lose
our peace of mind.
Rather than entertain tempt-
ing thoughts, we are to follow
Our Lord's example of using
Holy Scripture to defend our-
selves with an immediate
response using biblical truths.
He wards off suggestions to
indulge himself in short-cuts to
satisfy his hunger after fasting,
to establish his identity as the
Son of God, and to confirm his
authority as the Ruler of the
world so as to depend totally
upon God's directives. Every
action is viewed in light of His


MEDITATION


* REV ANGELA PALACIOUS


relationship to God in the form
of reverence for God's word,
"One does not live by bread
alone but every word that pro-
ceeds from the mouth of God";'
respect for God's truths, "Do
not put the Lord your God to
the test"; and worship of God
alone, "Worship the Lord your
God and serve only him." (Mt.
4:4, 7, 10 NRSV)
,,hen We do fall into temp-
tatibn, Psalm 51 offers us words
with which to express our
heart-felt regret and to ask for
God's forgiveness and ongoing
strengthening to be trans-
formed: "Hide your face from
my sins and blot out all my
iniquities. Create in me a clean
heart, 0 God, and renew a
right spirit within me. Cast me
not from your presence and
take not your Holy Spirit from
me. Give me the joy of your
saving help again and sustain
me with your bountiful Spirit."
(Ps 51:10-13 NRSV)
Each one of us is free to
choose the path that we ulti-


mately take. God has given us
the undeserved gift of grace so
that we may have power over
sin, no longer fear death, and
enjoy eternal life. Christ died
on the cross so that we do not
have to continue to live as we
are doing in the present. God
will help us if we wish to be
changed: "Just as one man's
trespass led to condemnation
for all, so one man's act of
righteousness led to justifica-
tion and life for all.
"For just as by one man's dis-
obedience the many were made
sinners, so by the one man's
obedience the many will be
made righteous." (Rom. 5: 18-
19 NRSV)
As David Cerullo has writ-
ten in Choices and Rewards:
"With Satan on the attack we
cannot sit idly by. Confront
him, bind him, and cast him
out." Use the words of Jesus:
"Away with you, Satan," (Mt.
4:10 NRSV) to overcome your
temptations, especially your
favourite ones.


Why does the Christian Church celebrate Lent?


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

LAST week the Christian Church
began the season of Lent with Ash
Wednesday.
In one of the offices I heard a
woman asking about the significance
of the cross traced in ashes on the
forehead.
She was informed that it was Ash
Wednesday, which marked the begin-
ning of lent, and that the ashes were a
reminder of our mortality.
The woman responded that she did
not see "what it was all about", and
that she did not participate in Lent
because she was a Baptist.;:,


This prompted a response form me. Today, Lent is marked by a time of
I asked her if she celebrated Good prayer and preparation to celebrate
Friday and Easter Sunday, and she Easter.
said yes. Christians use this period as a time
It is interesting that in this day and for introspection, self examination,
age a Christian, regardless of denom- repentance, penitential prayer, fasting
ination, would only see Lent as being and almsgiving.
observed by the "High Church" as All of these are not unique things
part of their liturgical worship. that Catholics or Anglicans need to
As early as the fourth century, Lent do, but all of Christianity should want
was that period set aside as a time of to participate in what Lent invites us
preparation for those who were to be to become better Christian, better
baptized, a time of concentrated study people.
and prayer before their baptism at Many people want to enjoy the cel-
the Easter vigil, the celebration of ebrations of Palm Sunday and the joy
the resurrection of the Lord early of Easter Sunday. But the journey
Easter Sunday., ..,starts on Ash Wednesday, the5 .LJtelt'i'


season that we must go through, the
darkness of Good Friday, in order to
fully understand and appreciate the
Joy when' the alleluia is sung at the
Easter vigil service for:the first time in
40 days.
Lent is a way all people can place
themselves before God, humbled,
bringing in our hands no price to pur-
chase our salvation. It is a way to con-
fess our inadequacy before God, to
strip ourselves bare of all pretenses to
righteousness.
Perhaps during Lent, instead of
praying for others as if we were vir-
tuous enough to do so, we should
taKe"off'our righteous robes long


enough during the next 30 days to
put ashes on our own heads, to come
before God with new humility and
willing to confess, "Lord, be merciful
to me a sinner."
Maybe we should be willing to
prostrate ourselves before God and
plead, "Lord, in my hand no price I
bring: Simply to the cross I cling."
That might put us in a position to
hear God in ways that we have not
heard Him in a long time. And it may
be the beginning of a healing for
which we have so longed. This is
needed by all people, regardless of
denomination or religion. We all need
God.


Reforming our lives


* By Rev James Moultrie

LENT touches something in
all of our lives. The sight of
Jesus fasting and praying in
the desert moves us to the core
of our being. But it also forces
us to take a closer look at our
own lives and to see what we
need to reform.
We are challenged by the
image of Jesus, the sinless One
to improve our lives and our
relationship with Him. But
very often our efforts at'
renewal fall short of the mark;
they do not go deep enough.
Many-of us have a surface reli-
gion when what we need is a
deeper relationship with God.
How deep is our religion as
we move into the Lenten sea-
son this year? What changes
do we need to make this Lent?
Many of us need a new way
of living.
But if we want to change
our lives fundamentally and
deeply, we have to strengthen
our inner lives; we have to cast
aside the old ways to which we
have become-so accustomed.
Change means substituting
new habits for old ones. We
have to be determined to do
what needs to be done in that
process, and stick to it. If we
are to benefit from physical
exercise, we need to stick with
the daily routine and not give
up after a few sessions. Simi-
larly, the change of heart to
which Lent calls us can be
achieved only through faith-
ful prayer.
Even. though repentance
and prayer go hand in hand,
they are especially appropri-
rate during Lent. Lent is a
moment of grace; it is a 40-day
window of opportunity which
Swe must take advantage of. It


* REV JAMES MOULTRIE


"We are
challenged
by the image
of Jesus, the
sinless One to
improve our
lives and our
relationship
with Him."
-Rev J Moultrie




is a time of penance and effort.
We often see Lent as a period
of solemn sacrifice, but it can
also be a time of great joy. As
we journey toward Easter
Lent becomes more and more
bearable and eventually the
joy of Easter breaks forth.
During Lent the church


gives us enhanced opportuni-
ties for prayer and meditation
as we walk with Jesus to the
cross of Calvary. It is not just a
time when we give up some-
thing for Lent; but rather it is a
time when we take something
special on. It's not just a time
for giving up sweets or ciga-
rettes or some other habit. It is
a time when we take on a new
ministry or a holy activity for
God. The church also offers
such opportunities; take
advantage of them this Lent.
We like to say that the dev-
il is busy during Lent, as if he
is not busy throughout the
year! The truth of the matter is
that the devil does not always
appear as a repulsive charac-
ter. He often appears as an
attractive, intriguing, charm-
ing character, even as a friend.
He also appears at times to
have your best interest at
heart, as when he offered
Jesus bread and all the king-
doms of the world at His
temptations. We need wisdom
to recognise him in all his dis-
guises and strength to be able
to resist the temptations that
are sure to come, especially
those that come under the
guise of good. We have to be
especially vigilant during Lent
less we fall for Satan's flattery.
What can we do? What do
we have to do? Lent is a good
time to turn from power to
love; to be kind; to act justly;
and to walk humbly with God.
May God help us to let go of
the sin that too easily beset us
and that we may be clothed
with newness of life.
I wish you a holy Lent.

Father James Moultrie is
the Rector of St Matthew's
Anglican Church.


Mass (From page 1C)

going to kill for letting everyone know it was
going to be my birthday. I do not like too much
publicity. I do what I do for the church because
it's my Christian duty and responsibility."
I told Mrs. Louis that I would look for her at
mass on Saturday, but she informed me that
she would not be there because she was attend-
ing a wedding that day at St Francis Xavier
Cathedral.
Mrs Louis also loves to travel and has visited


many countries around the world.
At Mass on Saturday Fr. Tom joked that
the secret of her youthful looks was not because
she was of Lebanese descent, but that she had
Irish blood in her veins.
"I am thankful to God for his blessings, and
Mary his mother," said Mrs Louis. "I do not go
anywhere without my rosary, and I am also
grateful for my children and grand and great
grandchildren."















F ie-year agreement signed for




management of Nazareth Centre

M ByiBahais Iformation She said the agreement was Children's home granted $350,000 per year

Services a "significant" event in the life om e 000 year
'.". '/.I *'--:--- ----~- -- : ---- .f t1.I- XTI -^7nr *lh /~'Pnt p %ni *. *


he Bahamas gov-
"i!; ernment and the
Roman Catholic
Archdiocese of
S- Nassau have
signed a five-year. agreement
for the management of the
Nazareth Centre, a home for
children located in the Millen-
nium Gardens Subdivision.
The agreement took effect
from January 1,2005.
The contract signing cere-
mony was held Thursday at the
Catholic Chancery Office,
located on the Priory Grounds,
West Hill Street.
Minister of Social Services
and Community Development
Melanie Griffin signed on
behalf of the government, and
Roman Catholic Archbishop
Reverend Patrick C Pinder
signed for the Archdiocese of
Nassau.
Refuge

The Nazareth Centre was
officially opened on May 5,
2002 and provides a refuge for
children from infancy to 12
years. '
The agreement calls for a
grant of $3350,000 per annum
'to cover administrative and
management costs, in addition
to utilities, property upkeep,
food, toiletries, clothing, bar-
Sbering and beauty care, school
fees and related expenses and
pocket expenses for the resi-
dentsiof thhiiome. The grant
w;atilso-coviertransportationh
and laundry costs.
Mr s Griffin lauded the.
RomanCatholic Archdiocese
for continuing to manage the
faculty despite the absence of a
formal agreement.' The
Catholic Church took over the,
management of the facility in
2002.


0 ot the Nazaret L entre anL U
"formalised the partnership"
between the government and
the archdiocese.
Aspects
"There were negotiations
over the past months on cer-
tain aspects of the agreement
and some compromises were
made. The end result is that
we have an agreement that
both government and the arch-
diocese are comfortable with
and, more importantly, one
that will allow for the Nazareth
Centre to fulfil its purpose for
the children who have and will
enter its doors," said Mrs Grif-
fin.
She expressed appreciation
on behalf of the government
to the Roman Catholic Arch-
diocese for its "steadfastness"
to the Nazareth Centre and the
patience displayed over the
extended period it took for the
facility to be completed.
"I am particularly grateful
that at no time was there any
indication by the Archdiocese
to withdraw its support or- will-
ingness to manage the centre,
despite the absence of a for-
mal agreement," Mrs Griffin
added.
The Centre, which accepted
its first child in September,
2002, presently provides
-refuge, care and protection for
41 children who have been
neglected, abandoned or
orphaned. The children live in
three cottages one for boys,
one for girls and one for tod-
dlers and infants.
The accommodations pro-
vide the children with their
own beds, dressers and night
stands, a fact administrators
and staff of the facility are
extremely proud of.
Twenty-four hour care is


GE Free Standiig Spectra that for you.
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JBP66WB


3 22- ?/g 9/9
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Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.


'C.


* MINISTER of Social Services and Community Development Melanie Griffin (seated second from right), signs an agree-
ment between the government of the Bahamas and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Nassau for the management of the
Nazareth Centre. Archbishop Patrick C Pinder (seated second from left) signed on behalf of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese,
at a ceremony at the Catholic Chancery Office, Priory Grounds, West Hill Street. Also from left, in front row: Basil Albury,
chairman of the Board of Directors of Nazareth House; and Barbara Burrows, permanent secretary, Ministry of Social Ser-
vices and Community Development. Back row, from left: Fr Chris Santangelo; Sister Joan Anderson, administrator,
Nazareth House; Patricia Coakley, board member; Mellany Zonicle, director of Social Services; and Alan Strachan, under-
secretary, Ministry of Social Services and Community Development.


provided for the residents, cov-
ering three shifts of 7am-3pm;
3pm-llpm and 11pm to 7am.
Basil Albury, chairman of
the Board of Directors of the
Nazareth Centre, paid tribute
to the efforts of Sister Joan
Anderson, the Home's admin-


GEOFFREY


JONES & CO


istrator, and Mrs Griffin, who
have been a "catalyst" in
ensuring that the centre was
completed and that all the nec-
essary accommodations were
put in place.
"Were it not for somebody
like Sister Joan, and,c.ertainly
the full cooperation within the
last year, in particular, of the
ministry under the leadership
of Minister Griffin...this cen-
tre literally became a reality in
all of its aspects because in the
beginning we were operating
out of the administrative facil-
ities," said Mr Albury.
Children

"The Nazareth Centre has
been a home to almost 50 chil-
dren and there would be no
way we could accommodate
them had we not had all of the
facilities which are now in


place and we do thank Minis-
ter Griffin. She has really been
the catalyst behind getting this
done very quickly so that we.
were able to literally rededi-
cate the facilities as fully oper-
ational in April of 2004."
Mr Albury said the Centre
has become an "important
part" of the Bahamian com-
munity and has been recog-
nised as such by successive
governments.
"The previous administra-
tion, through the then Prime
Minister, invited Archbishop
Pinder's predecessor (Arch-
bishop Lawrence A Burke,
who now serves as Archbishop
of Kingston) to take on the
management of the Centre,"
said Mr Albury. "There is tru-
ly an enormous need for the
Nazareth Centre and we see
that every day,"
Archbishop Pinder said the


(BIS photo: Raymond Bethel)

Roman Catholic Community
has been extremely supportive
of the work being done at the
Nazareth Centre. He singled
out the work done by Sister
Joan and her staff, the Board
of Directors of the facility and
the group, Friends of Nazareth
Centre, who have done a
tremendous amount of work
in raising funds to assist the
work done at the Centre.

Partnership
"I look forward to a good
and fruitful partnership
between ourselves and the gov-
ernment, and to a long and
happy relationship for the
good of all of those in our com-
munity, for whom the Centre
will be available and those who
will benefit from the good
work the .Centre provides,"
Archbishop Pinder added.


Seminar for registered



nurses and caregivers


FOLLOWING the launch-
ing of the Parish Nursing and
Church Health Care Ministry
at St Margaret's Parish earlier
this month, a seminar is sched-
uled for February 12 26 for
Registered Nurses and care-
givers interested in teaching
and counselling their respec-
tive congregations and com-
munities about healthy
lifestyles and incentives.


While this ministry was ini-
tiated and launched under the
auspices of the Anglican Dio-
cese, it is an inter-faith pro-
gramme.
Nurses from the Baptist,
Methodist and Pentecostal
denominations are also wel-
come to join the introductory
course on Parish Nursing and
Church Health Care Ministry.
On Sunday, February 27, a


Certificate and Commission-
ing Service will take place at
Holy Cross Parish, Soldier
Road. The Certificates are to
be presented to the partici-
pants by Deputy Prime Minis-
ter Cynthia Pratt, who is a for-
mer nurse. President of the
Nurses Association, Ampusam
Symonette, is also expected to
offer the volunteers some
words of encouragement.


The Bahamas Anglican

Cursillo Presents


New Year Retreat A Day of Meditation & Quiet Reflection
St. Anne s Parish Church
Saturday, February 26th
10 AM- 2 PM


Lenten Reflections
Parish Church of the Holy Spirit
Friday, March 11th
6:30 PM

Bahamas Men s Cursillo #18
June 2 5

Cursillo Gala Banquet
Radisson Hotel
Friday, July 8th


INGLCa N


Diocese Of The Bahamas
& The Turks & Caicos Islands


I- -I-


PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


an a








THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE


FEBRUARY 17, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Everyday Food Antiques Roadshow Chippendale New Florida Scientific Ameri Nova Efforts to preserve the Decla-
O WPBT Lamb chops. desk; Gibson mandolin; daguerreo- can Frontiers ration of Independence and the
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CBC imes (N) (CC) Language of Love." (N) (CC)
Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Dennis Miller Mark Bumett. (N) The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
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G4Tech 00) The Screen X Play "Silent Hill Cheat Filter Judgment Day Icons Mark Cinematech
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(:00) Walker, Touched by an Angel An American FAMILY PLAN (2005, Comedy) Tori Spelling, Greg Germann, Jordan
HALL Texas Ranger businessman's aide is wanted by Bridges. A woman must pretend to have a family to keep her job. (CC)
1T (CC) Chinese authorities.
Dream House Holmes on Homes "Best Laid Plan" Real Renos "Jim Weekend War- Mission: Organi- Hot Property
HGTV Budget roblems n (CC) Moves... Again" riors Living room zation Adult's "Belfast" (CC)
arse. (CC) f (CC) makeover, childhood room.
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n (CC) Humiliation. (t n (CC) Debra is late. to buy Will. Joey. (CC) "Ray's Journal"
S** SEDUCTION IN A SMALL TOWN (1997, Dra- VOWS OF DECEPTION (1996, Mystery) Cheryl Ladd, Nick Mancuso,
LIFE ma) Melissa Gilbert, Joely Fisher. A family is inexplica- Mike Farrell. An alluring ex-convict turns a lawyer's world upside down.
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MSNBC :0 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- MSNBC Reports Scarborough Country
~MSBC tmann
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N V (CC) Happened Before!" (N) (CC) sciousness" (N) T (CC)
OLN (:00) KillerIn- Hunting 201 Buckmasters Buckmasters The World of Best & Worst of In the Hunt
stinct Beretta Tred Barta
SPEED NASCAR Trackside at Daytona (Live) Champions Quest: The Drive to Speed Weeks on Speed Channel
EUD___Win the Rolex 24 at Daytona (N)
Praise the Lord Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Ross Friends Rachel t* GALAXY QUEST (1999, Comedy) (PA) Tim Allen, Sigourney
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1 (CC) stay. A (CC) spontaneous, by aliens. (CC)
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TLC Shell of a 1970 Mustang. (CC) bus A380" The Airbus A380 is de- bus A380" The Airbus A380 is de-
Ranch" (CC) signed for 555 passengers, signed for 555 passengers.
(:00) Law & Or- NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Minnesota Timberwolves. From the Target Center in NBA Basketball:
TNT der"Compe- Minneapolis. (Live) (CC) Mavericks at
tence" d Suns
TOON Ed, Edd n Eddy Ozzy & Drix Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) Codename: Kids Mucha Lucha Teen Titans Rave Master
"Sugar Shock" Next Door n (CC) "Mad Mod" "Breaking Our
TV5 PRINCESSE MARIE (2004) (Partie 2 de 2) Catherine Les Yeux dans Le Compteur d'oiseaux Une rela- TV5 Le Journal
Deneuve. Marie Bonaparte se rend a Vienne. I'4cran tion unique avec la nature.
TWC (6:00) PM Edi- Storm Stories Storm Stories Evening Edition (CC)
tion (CC) (CC) "Swept Away"
(:00) La Mujer Rubi Amor Real Aquiy Ahora
UNIV de Madera
(:00) Medical In- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit * LIAR LIAR (1997, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Maura Tiemey, Jennifer
USA investigation "Sur- Rape suspected in mentally chal- Tilly. A lawyer is forced to tell the truth for 24 hours. (CC)
vivor" (CC) lenged woman's pregnancy.
VH1 The Surreal Life Celebrity Fit Club n Awesomely Oversexed f Strange Love Strange Love
n (CC) f f
Home Improve- THE VOID (2001, Science Fiction) Adrian Paul, Amanda Tapping, Andrew WGN News at Nine f (CC)
WGN ment "Adios" f Mcllroy. A corporation's new form of cheap energy may destroy Earth. ft
(CC) (CC)
Everybody * SHE'S ALL THAT (1999, Comedy) Freddie Prinze Jr., Rachael WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond Leigh Cook, Matthew Lillard. A high-school student wagers he can re- Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Ray's Journal" make a plain Jane. n (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! "Teen WWE SmackDown! (N) C (CC) Dr. Phil
WSBK Tournament" (N)
(CC)

:00) * NATIONAL SECURITY * BAD BOYS II (2003, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Jordi Molla. Two detectives
HBO-E 2003, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, battle a drug kingpin in Miami. t 'R' (CC)
Steve Zahn. l 'PG-13' (CC) _
(:00) Carnivale ** LACKAWANNA BLUES (2005, Drama) S. (:45) *** SEABISCUIT (2003, Drama) Tobey
HBO-P The Road to Epatha Merkerson. Premiere. A woman takes care of a Maguire, Jeff Bridges, Chris Cooper. Three men lead a
Damascus" f boy and helps struggling blacks. t 'NR' (CC) racehorse to glory in the 1930s. f 'PG-13' (CC)
BO- (6:30) (15) * CALENDAR GIRL (1993, Comedy-Drama) Jason Priestley, ** NATIONAL SECURITY (2003,
HBO-W HEAD OF STATE Gabriel Olds, Jerry O'Connell. Three friends try to get a dream date with Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Steve
(2003) Marilyn Monroe. f 'PG-13' (CC) Zahn. C 'PG-13' (CC)


(6:30) *** MYSTIC RIVER (2003, Crime Drama) *** PRETTY WOMAN (1990, Comedy-Drama) Richard Gere, Julia
H BO-S Sean Penn. A detective probes the murder of his Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. An executive plays Pygmalion to a young street-
friend's daughter. n 'R (CC) walker. 'R' (CC)
(:45) * GHOST (1990, Fantasy) Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore, Whoopi Goldberg. A ** 4 STARSKY & HUTCH (2004)
MAX-E murder victim returns to save his beloved fiancee. ft 'PG-13' (CC) Ben Stiller. Two detectives investi-
Sgate a cocaine dealer. (CC)
(6:45) *i DREAMCATCHER (2003, Horror) Morgan ** DR. SEUSS' THE CAT IN THE HAT (2003, Corn- EROTIC CON-
MOMAX Freeman, Thomas Jane. Four telepathic friends en- edy) Mike Myers. A mischievous feline invades the FESSIONS VOL.
counter malevolent aliens. f 'R' (CC) home of two children. f 'PG' (CC) 6 (1996) 'NR'
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SHOW HOME ROOM Yun-Fat. iTV, A monk chooses a callow youth to protect son 2: All L BUSINESS 2004, Comedy) Ice
(2003) 'R' (CC) a sacred scroll. f 'PG-13' (CC) Breaks Loose Cube. iTV., 'PG-13' (CC)
(5:45)** ** TWILIGHT (1998, Mystery) Paul Newman, Susan (:45) * BODY OF EVIDENCE (1992, Mystery)
TMC STARSHIP Sarandon. A retired detective investigates an old disap- Madonna, Willem Dafoe, Anne Archer. A defense attor-
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YOUR OWN ISLAND

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SLT S aO


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Don Mackay Blvd


THURSDAY EVENING


: _i :_:::__::_ :_: : :


f= m


III~-'~1C-L~------- --------~- ---------- --s~--





THE


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005


"Your Bahamian Supermarkets"

SUPER
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'THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 7C




THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C, THURSDAY,,FEBRUARY 17, 2005


Bargain faderI,"y..rd 4n the
unle every Saturda.ad so s
Stands throwghout:-the Country:,,


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the Tribune and one moth
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r !Er BAn iM


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Peao


3A 2Ab


L A P L CE: t 'R 5


...... T ... une
10 DAIY CIRCULA








THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 9C


THE TRIBUNE


RELGIO


Teehoe: 2-39/22341sFa:32-09 a AST& AKO'* :. .O. N341 asa, Bahamas


~LJ~t. ~ TU V'NAL IONALMINIS TRJEITI E
* To bear witness for Christ and His truth by through Bible Teachings, Seminars, maturation of our children/youth. Evangelism,& Home,- C ili
spreading the gospel throughout all of our Specialized Courses and Conferences. To accelerate our holistic outreach evangel-
islandsin allits fullness and power, to bring To fully embrace plurality of leadership in istic efforts with a view to reach and touch
about the rule of God in the hearts of men. all of its positive goodness. people everywhere in our Bahamas to the
To worship God in spirit, in truth and in To love God totally and our fellowmen as up building of the ldkingdom and to the Woe'M in r IFe it u
holiness. ourselves. growth of the Church of God.RaoTl ei ioi i nAr
To train, develop and equip our people for To pay focused and specialized ministry To prepare our people for the return of the -ChisinEua -IHsitls Piso
Godly Living and Christian Service attention to the growth, development and Lord. Yut inisrieP-- I n- r csi
Men['s Ministrie


It Jesus and e



Revival Crusade in Freeport, Grand Bahama


A TIME OF PRAISE- As the Island-Wide Crusade kicks off, many give praises and thanks to God. THE MESSENGER- Minister Betty Kemp declares hie Word.


S n these desperate and evil
times, an urgent call is sent
out to all to experience a


personal touch from our Lord
and Saviour Jesus Christ. The
saints of the Grand Bahama
district have organized their
Annual Power surge,
Breakthrough Crusade. This
evangelistic outreach effort
with a powerful theme "It's
Jesus and Me" resonates in the
believer's testimony and caus-
es sinners to respond to the
alter invitation.
After much anticipation,
many congregated at the Coral
Rd. Community At Heart
Tabernacle this past Sunday,
February 13th at 7 p.m.
Crusade Co-ordinators, Pastor
Barry Morris and Sister Cheryl
M. Forbes invited the presence
of God into the sanctuary with
worship and praises.
Prayers were offered up by
Bishop Rudolph Arthur,
National Administrative
Assistant and Senior Pastor of
the Sea Grape Church.
Scripture reading was done by
Mr. James Kemp, husband of
Minister Betty Kemp. Our
national shepherd, Bishop Dr.
Elgarnet B. Rahming brought
remarks and precious greet-
ings. An excellent time of.
singing and fellowshipping


came as the powerful Praise
and worship team led by Sister
Melissa Hart and the Crusade
Choir directed by Sister
Damaris Thompson, Minister
of Music and Fine Arts minis-
tered under the anointing of
God.
Using her sub-theme 'God
is on your side during difficult
times', Minister Betty Kemp,
speaker for the evening,
recounted experiences during
her early years and showed
how God delivered her from
what may have seen as impos-
sible. Indeed the message was
a blessing to the church.
Throughout the Island-wide
Crusade, many others minis-
tered tremendously such as
Ministers Steven Cefort,
Maxine Rolle, Cecil Bethel,
Barbara Gray and Jarenda
Rahming.

TOMORROW NIGHT,
FRIDAY FEBRUARY
18th, A LIVE RADIO
BROADCAST OF THE
EVANGELISTIC CRU-
SADE WILL BE HEARD
ON (810) ZNS 3- RADIO
BAHAMAS, BEGIN-
NING AT 7:00 P.M.
ALL ARE INVITED TO
TUNE IN.


OVERSEER- Bishop Dr. Rahmin in gs greeting. Crusade co-ordinator Minister Barry in worship. P.R. Officers present gifts to visitors.Directed by Min. Damaris, Crusade Choir sings "Jesus Opened Up The Way".






Bishop Neville A. Dean laid to rest
Photos by Mancer Roberts ......


Valencia Dean-Brown leads worship.


Min. of Health, Hon. Marcus Bethel.


nanama Brass nana leads procession .all bearers take Biisop Dean's caskti
to G. B. Memorial Park. to the Hearse for burial procession.


This past Saturday, February
12th a Grand and Glorious
Home-going Celebration was
held for the late Bishop Neville
A. Dean, Senior Pastor of the
Coral Rd. Community-At-Heart
COGOP Tabernacle. Hundreds of
relatives, church members and
friends came to pay their last
respects to 'A Man of Great
Strength, Courage, Compassion,
Gracious Spirit and Unassuming
Love'.
Bishop Dean was a unique indi-
vidual who left a lasting impres-
sion on all with his passion for
excellence in all he did. His
teachings and ministry life was a
true blessing to the entire Church
of God of Prophecy in the Bahamas,
Caribbean and around the World.
Bishop Neville Dean was a gifted
musician (Trombonist) playing in
the Bahama Brass Band for many
years, he also served as a Licensed
Evangelist, Pastor, Instructor for
BTI and CBL, District Overseer,
National Educational Officer, Youth
Camp Director, and committee
member for Caribbean Regional
(onf erences and others,
Ilishop Neville A. Dean borne his
afflictions as a good soldier and
aierved God faithfully until the end.


THE LATE BISHOP
NEVILLE ALFRED DEAN
August 6, 1948 January 31, 2005
Left to cherished his memories are
his wife; Queen Ve-Elcer Dean.
mother; Amy Dean-Levy, children;
William and Valencia Brown,
Antillia Dean, Heston and Da'Nell
Dean and Steinmann Dean other rel-
atives, friends and the Church of
God of Prophecy Family.
Officiating was Bishop Dr. Elgarnet
Rahming, National Overseer. Also
paying special tributes were Bishop
Dr. Brice H. Thompson, General
Presbyter and Bishop Adrian
Varlack, General Headquarters
Representative.


| f itriing Pastor Timothy Johnson, Min. Joy Simmons,
Min, Roberta Rolle

S Evangelist Rachel Mackey. Terez Davis
& Bishop Lawrence Rolle,
F,^^ FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL, i
S3413539 Minister Naquel Brown
O r l", R C r u s a d e S e c re ta r y


---------


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The Adventists
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists


www.bahamasconference.org


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Adventists


Adventist 2nd Annual


Iur rnu I : ur. Leonara Jonnson presenting me sermon at me nnual Adventlst Law tnforcment nanKsgiving
Service on Saturday, February 12, 2005, at the Gran't Town Seventh-day Adventist Church. ABOVE PHOTO:
Officials from various government agencies listen attentively during the service.


EDUCATION SUMMIT: More than two hundred delegates represnting all the Adventist Churches in New
Providence, Bahamas Academy administration, pastors and officers of the Bahamas Conference, attended the
annual Adventist Education Summit held at Workers House, Harrold Road, on Sunday, February 13, 2005, 9;00
a.m. to 12:00 noon. Important plans and concerns were presented regarding the develpment of Adventist
Education in the Bahamas and the new Bahamas Academy.


NEW RADIO PROGRAM
A New radio pro-
gram began this
Friday at 6 am. Tune
in every Friday for
refreshing health and family
life tips and just good old
Biblical teaching on Path to
Life with founder and Host of
Path to Life Ministries, Pastor
Paul A. Scavella.


Watch

Adventist

Spotlight
Tuesday 8:00 PRM.
Cable Bahamas
Channel 12


Three Island-Wide Evangelistic
Campaigns Starting Soon


If you speak Haitian Creole or French, then plan to attend the"Seek Ye First the
Kingdom Gospel Campaign" beginning Saturday, February 19, 2005, at 7:00 P.M.
Haitian-Bahamian Adventist pastor, Edward St Fleur, will open the word of God each
night. Come and be blessed


For fullRestoraion,'



Plan to attend the Power of Truth Crusade beginning Sunday, February 20
next to the Mall At Marathon.


Plan to attend the Real Harvest Experience Gospel Campaign beginning
Sunday, February 27, near the main entrance of the Golden Gat s Plaza


24/7
Chrncistiana



3ABN
Cable Bahamas
Channel 75


I -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005














TMOE BUNT TFABORR 1,

T L- FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
I Wil.w Tree Av., Pneood Gardens r P.O. Bo:: N-9705 ITe: (242) 392-2322 Fax: (242) 392-4343
S.:.:Webst ,ww.moutabr org wwneilelliismitistries oom -.Emai: mtbRbate- ~ eibs


Full


Gospe


Celebrates


1OsC


BISHOP PAUL S. MORTON
INTERNATIONAL PRESIDING BISHOP

housands of Full Gospel Baptists from around the
country will gather at Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist
Church, Monday February 21st Wednesday February
23rd 2005; for the 10th Annual Full Gospel Baptist
Church Fellowship Bahamas Regional Conference.
As is customary at this event, delegates can look
forward to the anointed ministry of the Regional Mass
Choir, Praise and Worship Team, Dance and Drama
ministry; that make all contribute towards making the
Conference a rich and rewarding experience each year.
But by far the highlight of all Full Gospel Conferences
is the ministry of the word; thus it is only fitting that this
year the Bahamas Region will be blessed to hear from
top leadership in this regard. Leading the way will be
International Presiding Bishop Paul S. Morton of New
Orleans Louisiana; he will be followed by the
.International Executive Secretary, Bishop Carlos
Malone of Miami Florida and closing out the conference
will be International Third Presiding Bishop and
Bahamas Regional Bishop, Neil C. Ellis.
The Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship is an
international organization established twelve years ago
by Bishop Paul S. Morton of New Orleans, Louisiana.
Bishop Morton was convinced of. the fact that there
were many charismatic Baptists in the Body of Christ
that wanted to operate in the fullness of the Sprit of God
and still remain Baptists. He was led to form the organ-
ization to provide fellowship, covering and a new level
of ecclesiastical excellence, empowerment and order for
these churches. To date the Fellowship has been blessed
with churches on every continent and annually hosts one
of the largest non-denominational conferences in the
world.
With this new move of God and this fresh wave
of glory God saw to it that the Bahamas was not to be
left. In 1993, the then Rev. Neil Ellis was invited to
attend the first International Conference in July and it


BISHOP INEIL tC. ELLIS
INTERNATIONAL 3RD PRESIDING BISHOP
was at that time that he was directed by God to join the
Fellowship. In November of the same year, the Revs.
Mitchell Cooper (New Providence), Godfrey Williams
(Freeport), Lamont E. Moss (Exuma), and Bruce Rolle
(Bimini) joined the Fellowship and the Bahamas
became a part of the Florida Region, with Bishop Carlos
Malone serving as the Regional Bishop, and Overseer
Neil Ellis as the State Overseer for the Bahamas.
In July 1994 a 450 member delegation which
included 27 Senior Pastors traveled to New Orleans to
attend the 2nd Annual Conference, and most of the
Pastors and their churches joined the Fellowship. at that
time. Because of the rapid growth of the Fellowship in
the Bahamas, in November of that same year, Bishop
Morton gave Overseer Ellis the mandate to form the
Bahamas Region; and in February 1995, the region was
organized by Overseer Ellis, who was consecrated later
that year to the bishopric and installed as the Regional
Bishop and Bishop of Foreign Ministries. Bishop Ellis
assumed responsibility for all churches in the
Fellowship outside the continental U.S.A.
Some of the first overseers included: the Rev. L.
E. Moss, Drs. B. Wenith Davis, and R. E. Cooper, Jr.,
and Mitchell Cooper. Drs. John E. Cleare, Michael C.
Symonette and Elkin Symonette were among the first
Elders of the Region. Rev. Samuel Green was appointed
as Special Assistant to the Bishop of Foreign Ministries.
After ten short years, the Full Gospel Baptist
Church Fellowship in the Bahamas continues to grow
and attract churches from around the country. With the
recent growth of the Fellowship more persons were
needed at administrative level to effectively manage the
affairs of the region, consequently, two State Overseers
Davis and Williams were consecrated State Bishops.
Over the years, the Fellowship has developed its
Men, Women, Youth, Evangelism and Christian
Education Divisions at a National Level. Additionally,
many of its leaders have grown and distinguished them-


BISHOP BISHOP CARLOS MALONE
INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
selves in both the National and International arenas.
Some of our Bahamian leaders have been blessed to
have risen throughout the Tiers of Leadership of the
Fellowship and presently a Bahamian (Bishop Neil C.
Ellis) serves in the third highest position possible in this
distinguished International Organization; that of Third
Presiding Bishop. Another important hallmark of the
Fellowship both locally and internationally is the pro-
motion of women in Ministry and here again the
Bahamas is making an international impact; as a
Bahamian woman has risen to the second highest Tier of
Leadership within the Fellowship Internationally, that of
General Overseer. Appointed to the position of
International General Overseer of Youth is our own
General Overseer Ilsa Evans. The Full Gospel Baptist
Church Fellowship has also afforded many Bahamians
the opportunity to develop and utilize their ministry
gifts of preaching and teaching at both the National and
International Conferences in unprecedented fashion. In
short, the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship has
done much to advance the cause of the Kingdom and the
lives of its members both at home and abroad. Its an
International blessing!
On the local level the Full Gospel. Baptist
Church Fellowship continues to share in the planning
and execution of the work and events of the Bahamas
Christian Council.
Under the bold, visionary leadership of Bishop
Neil C. Ellis, the Fellowship which has been blessed
with member churches on the islands of Abaco, Bimini,
Exuma, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama, Inagua and New
Providence, has sought to exemplify integrity, excel-
lence and order in ministry in unprecedented fashion.
As the Bahamas Region celebrates its 10th year,
all indications are that the Fellowship continues to be
strong and successful realizing our mandate and mis-
sion of 'Changing A Generation'.
To God Be The Glory


::: : ~ ~: ~ ::::::::::::::: : ---- ------- ------------ -r 11-41 ...,,.1


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2005, PAGE 11C


THE TRIBUNE










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