Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00033
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: February 10, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"TRY OUR
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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.66 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005 PRICE -500


I'


ii
I


Strong words


from Leslie Miller

in the House


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas is facing a
"catastrophe" and is sitting on a
timebomb which will explode
unless the country deals realis-
tically with the issue of illegal
immigration, Trade and Indus-
try Minister Leslie Miller told
the House of Assembly yester-
day .
He said if Bahamians didn't
deal with the situation "it will
deal with us."
The minister's fiery words
began the second reading of the
Rent Control Bill. He said
affordable rental units are being
removed further from the grasp
of Bahamians because of the
high number of illegal immi-
grants in the country.
"If I was to take you to
Garvin Tynes Primary in Sunset
Park Number One there are
more Haitians, Haitian-Bahami-
ans, you can call them whatever
you will, in that school as stu-
dents than Bahamians like you
and me who were born here,"
said Mr Miller.
Many parents, he said, are
frustrated and turn to their MPs
and complain that they cannot
get their children into primary
school.
"I am not saying that those
who came to our shores for a
better way of life should not
enjoy some of the institutions
such as a basic education but
this is my Bahamas, this is all I
have, all we have is the


Bahamas," he said.
The minister claimed there is
a situation developing where
illegal immigrants are also using
health care facilities to the detri-
ment of Bahamians requiring
the same service.
"Not only Haitians, but
Jamaicans and others in the
Caribbean and elsewhere. You
have Africans now, Chinese,
Taiwanese, you name it they
are here, that come here preg-
nant with one view to have
children in the Bahamas to
ensure that they get a birth cer-
tificate and that child is allowed
to go to the schools. There is a
lot of frustration, there is a time-
bomb we are sitting on," Mr
Miller said.
The minister said that if
Bahamians do not deal with the
situation as a country there is
going to be an "explosion to
happen more sooner than later
unless we realise what is upon
us."
"This problem did not hap-
pen overnight. I am told that in
some areas of Abaco you have
more foreigners than Bahami-
ans. I don't care who these peo-
ple are and how some people
may plead for their cause, I say
to them 'please man, do me a
favour, go back home, we love
you but we can't afford for you
to impede the progress of natu-
ralised Bahamians,'" he said.
All of these issues, said Mr
Miller, tie into the inability of
SEE page 13,


ion


Thousands mark the beginning of Lent


THOUSANDS of Bahamians attended
mass yesterday to receive ashes in com-
memoration of Ash Wednesday, which
marks the beginning of Lent.
Lent is traditionally a period of spiritual
discipline, fasting and moderation in prepa-
ration for Holy Week and Easter.
On Ash Wednesday, ashes are smeared
on a person's forehead in the shape of a
cross as a mark of their mortality as the
Bible says: "Remember that you are dust
and to dust you shall return." It is one of the
most important days in the church's calen-
dar.
Yesterday, Catholic Bishop Patrick Pin-
der officiated at the noon Ash Wednesday
service at St Francis Xavier Cathedral.
Bishop Pinder described the plague of


locusts which used to have devastating
effects on towns in the time of Jesus,
because they would eat all the vegetation in
sight and leave the town in famine to illus-
trate his sermon.
"Sin is like a plague of locusts, it comes
around and we are tempted," he said.
Bishop Pinder urged the congregation to
remain accountable to God as they
embarked on the journey of Lent.
He told them to use this period of fasting,
alms-giving and prayer to turn away from
their sin, and take their devotional duties
much more seriously.
"Simplify your life, care for others and
strengthen the community," he said.
Roman Catholic faithful worldwide
prayed for Pope John Paul 11's recovery as
he.missed out on public Ash Wednesday
SEE page 13


HM.B'li






E By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A CANADIAN firm has
been awarded the manage-
ment and operations con-
tract for Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA), it was
announced in parliament
yesterday.
After a 10-month selec-
tion process, Vancouver
Airport Services (YVRAS),
one of nine firms to submit
proposals to manage and
operate the airport, has
been chosen to transform
NIA into a high-end, 21st
%century facility.
Speaking during yester-
day's House of Assembly
sitting, Minister of Trans-
port and Aviation Glenys
Hanna-Martin said that gov-
ernment has accepted the
Sr6commendatidn of the Air-
port Authority (AA), and
that "negotiations will short-
ly begin with Vancouver
Airport Services toward the
development of a detailed
management agreement in
the first instance, to be fol-
SEE page 12


Work on

runway to

cause NIA

setbacks
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
TRAVELLERS using Nas-
sau International Airport (NIA)
will be required to check in
three hours before departure,
Transport and Aviation Minis-
ter Glenys Hanna-Martin told
the House of Assembly yester-
day.
As of yesterday and until
SEE page 13


Course runs from F-eDruary 28 to March 4, 2UUS.
Registration Deadline is February 11, 2005.
To register, call (242) 325-2638.
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PAGE THUSDAYFEBRARY 1,2005THE TIBUN


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Man appears




on dangerous




drugs charges


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
A 58-YEAR-OLD man has
been set $25,000 bail after
appearing before the drugs
court on Wednesday for
allegedly selling the sex drug
Viagra and illegal substances.
Ian Lever of 16 Nelson St,
Blair Estates, pleaded not
guilty before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel to four counts
related to his dangerous drugs
charges.
His counts were: Possession
of dangerous drugs with the
intent to supply; importation
of dangerous drugs; exporta-
tion of dangerous drugs; and
operating a business without a
business licence.
Police say Lever, a whole-
sale pharmaceutical distribu-
tor by profession, was found
with 69 bottles containing 100
Viagra pills on November 11,
2004. He was also found with
10 boxes of Frizium, also
known by the scientific name
Benzodiazephine. The drugs


were valued at almost $64,000.
The importation and expor-
tation are alleged to have
occurred between April 10
and September 7, 2004.


He pleaded not guilty to the
charges and was granted
$25,000 bail with one surety.
The case was adjourned to
October 5 and 6, 2005 for trial.


MEMBERS of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force were
forced to fire warning shots and take evasive action on Wednes-
day morning after a Haitian freighter attempted to ram their ves-
sel.
The Harbour Patrol Unit of the Defence Force sent a patrol
boat to investigate the suspicious activity of the Haitian vessel
spotted shortly after midnight in Nassau Harbour, a spokesman
for the Defence Force said.
While attempting to stop and board the 60-ft freighter, which
was manoeuvering without running lights, its occupants attempt-
ed to ram the Defence Force vessel.
The 18-ft Impact craft was forced to take evasive action and
to also fire warning shots in an effort to cause the Haitian ves-
sel to stand down and desist from its aggressive posture, the
spokesman added.

Anchored
No one was injured in the incident but 19 undocumented
Haitians, 14 men and five women, were found in the hold of a
Haitian sloop anchored in the harbour who had reportedly
been dropped off by the freighter Trust in Jesus.
The vessel and its four crew were being held in police custody
yesterday and the passengers were being held by immigration
officials at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre.
The boat's master is expected to be charged for attempting to
ram the Defence Force craft and smuggling human cargo, the
spokesman said.
Defence Force officials said on Wednesday that the incident
was "unusual and isolated" and not a typical occurrence when
dealing with Haitian vessels.
More than 400 illegal Haitian immigrants have been caught
in Bahamian waters this year.



Arrested after two years at large


POLICE arrested Lemuel
Gibson yesterday, after he had
been at large for more than two
years.
According to police reports,
officers of the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEU), acting on
information, at 4.30am yester-
day conducted a search of a pri-
vate residence in the
Carmichael Road area.
Supt Raymond Gibson, in
charge of DEU, told The Tri-
bune that Gibson was discov-
ered in one of the rooms of the
house and was subsequently
arrested and taken to Fox


Hill prison.
Gibson, following the ruling
ordered by Magistrate Caroli-
ta Bethel, was committed to be
extradited to the United States
on October 5, 2001, to face
charges of; conspiracy to pos-
sess and supply cocaine and
Indian hemp (two counts); con-
spiracy to possess and import
cocaine and Indian hemp (two
counts); possession with intent
to supply cocaine and Indian
hemp (two.counts) and impor-
tation of cocaine and Indian
hemp (two counts).
On February 5,2002 Supreme
Court Justice Jon Isaacs dis-
missed the extradition order
and granted $100,000 bail to the
accused. It was at this time that
Gibson allegedly absconded,
police reported.
An arrest warrant was then
issued for Gibson's arrest.


Share

your

news
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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROICAL

EXTERMNATOR


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 3


LOCALNW


Police and prison officers march





to House over medical insurance


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE and prison officers
took their grievances to the
House of Assembly yesterday,
pressing the government to pro-
vide them with proper medical
insurance.
The officers marched from
their Bank Lane offices to the
House in Parliament Square,
where they claimed they are "fed
up" with the fact that they cannot
be properly covered with insur-
ance if they are hurt in the line of
duty.
"We are paying the ultimate
sacrifice," said Inspector Bradley
Sands, President of the Police
Staff Association.
"The officers put their life on
the line for this country and they
should not have to worry about
their health or healing."
Law enforcement officers in
the Bahamas are presently under
a 1984 Imperial Life insurance
schedule. The officers said most
medical facilities refuse to take
their cards. They must pay the
price in full, and then go through
certain procedures to be re-
imbursed. If the officers do not
have the funds, they are turned
away, protesters said.

Issue
The associations also took issue
with the fact that if an officer is
injured, he or she is given 28 days
leave, despite tha nature of the
injury. After that time frame
expires, seven eighths of their
salary is taken out of their month-
ly pay check.
The antiquated policy has oth-
er drawbacks, Mr Sands said. For
example, a surgery which cost
$5,000 in 1984 costs much more
today, yet the insurance company
will only pay 80 per cent of
$5,000.
"We are responsible for the sta-
bility of the country," he said.
"We face the daunting task of
finding the funds to pay our own
medical bills in order to be
served. Officers are shot in the
line of duty, knocked off of patrol
bikes, or involved in accidents.
These things can be fixed with
the stroke of a pen. We want
them to show that they care
now."
At the House, the officers held
a discussion on the steps with
Minister of National Security
Cynthia Pratt. She told the offi-
cers: "I want it as much as you
do, because my life is in danger as
well.
"The wheels are in motion. We
have to put our heads together,
see where the money is coming
from, and then move forward."
Minister Pratt informed them
that the medical insurance for
police officers is very near, as it
has already been approved and
is about to be implemented. She
said policies for prison and
Defence Force officers are in the
making, and will hopefully be
implemented this year.
But Inspector Sands, along
with Prison Staff Association
President Clive Rolle, said they
do not want separate packages.
Chanting "solidarity", the men
said they plan to stand together -
police, prison, and Defence Force
officers.
The presidents explained that
last year, the government was
presented with a package for all
officers under the Ministry of
National Security. They explained
that putting the groups together


the prison, police force or
Defence Force."
"Show us the love; show us you
care," said Mr Sands.
"I confer with my fellow offi-
cers. We presented the proposal
for all officers.
"This is a pressing issue that


OFFICERS of the
Police Staff Association
speak with Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt.
From left to right: Alfreda
Rolle Secretary, Clive Rolle
Prison Staff Association,
Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt and Police Inspec-
tor Bradley Sands.

will be less expensive for the gov-
ernment.
Prison officers seemed dis-
heartened to hear that Minister
Pratt wanted to meet with the two
associations separately.

Meeting
Corporal Alfred Marshall said
he felt the way the government is
going about it is "discriminato-
ry" and "unfair". He said he was
in the meeting years earlier when
Mr Floyd Bastian was president.
From then to this day, he said he
has not seen any change in the
situation.
When asked how police offi-
cers felt about,getting their poli-
cies implemented spol;, Inspec-
tor Sands said: 'That troubled
me. If we don't stand together,
we will be defeated."
Officer Rolle added: "We start-
ed as a unified body, and that is
how we will end up. We want this
for every law enforcement offi-
cer, whether they are a part of






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Before the officers left the
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COMMONWEALTH SANK

Employment Opportunity
- Delinquency Supervisor, The Mall Drive, Freeport

This position provides an excellent opportunity for individuals
seeking a meaningful career in banking. The successful candidate
would be required to perform collection services on delinquent
accounts.

Key Responsibilities:
Overseeing the day to day operations of the Delinquency
Department
Approving collection activities
Performing administrative functions to assist with the recovery
process in accordance with the Bank's policies and procedures
Making field calls and contacting delinquent customers for the
recovery of funds
Preparing reports and court documents to assist with the recovery
process

Knowledge, Skills and Experience:
Six years commercial banking experience; four of which should be
in the collections area
Ability to deal tactfully with customers
Good oral, written & human relation skills
Bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Banking & Finance or
related field would be a plus
Must attend Bank sponsored delinquency and credit training
annually

Remuneration Package:
Competitive salary commensurate with experience
Performance-based incentives
Health, vision and dental insurances
Life insurance
Pension plan

Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates
in writing or email before February 18, 2005 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
Re: Delinquency Supervisor
Head Office, 2nd Floor, The Plaza, Mackey Street
P.O. Box SS-6263, Nassau, Bahamas
S Fax: 394-0758 or E-mail to: acox@combankltd.com


I


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



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The law





should apply





to everyone


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I AM an expatriate Perma-
nent Resident of The
Bahamas and I have lived in
Nassau with my family for 15
years. I would like to recount
an incident which occurred on
January 31,2005 which I found
to be both frustrating as well
as disturbing.
After dropping off my
mother at the Delta check-in
counter at the Nassau Inter-
national Airport for her return
trip to Indiana, I proceeded
to park in the parking lot
across the street. I found a
spot near Delta and pulled in.
There was a car already
parked to my right, yet there
was room left in that space for
another car. When I got out
of my car, I checked the line
to make sure I was within the
designated parking space. I
noticed there was a car parked
in front of the car to my right;
clearly illegally parked. I ran
into the airport to attend to
my mother who does not see
well. Not more than 10 min-
utes later, I returned to the
parking lot to see my car being
towed away! I was incredu-
lous! I looked to my left and
saw at least 12 vehicles parked
illegally along the sides of the
walls, not to mention cars
parked without drivers in the
terminal area (this is a huge
breach of security to leave
unattended vehicles near the
airport facility) yet only my
car was being towed.
Anyone who has ever
parked in the airpSrt lot
knows you have to weave in
and out to try ani get around
all of the illegally parked cars.
It's a joke! and yet only my
car was being towed.
I ran to the tow truck and
asked the driver why my car
was being towed when there
were so many cars clearly
parked illegally. He simply
sucked his teeth and proceed-
ed to impound my car. I
returned to where my car had
been parked only to discover
that the car to my right was
parked over a NO-PARKING
sign on the pavement and the
car ahead of this car was
parked against a wall, hiding
another NO PARKING sign.
Both of these cars were ille-
gally parked and what's
worse, they were hiding the
NO PARKING signs which
would have informed me that


I could not park in that space.
Yet my car was towed and
their cars remained. I checked
both cars' registration and
they were registered in
Bahamian names. My married
name is Polish and could nev-
er be confused for a Bahamian
name. To my dismay, I
realised that as a non-Bahami-
an I was being singled out.
I went to the Police Station
to complain that I believed my
car had been towed because
I was not Bahamian, while
Bahamian registered cars
were allowed to park illegally.
No one listened to me and had
no interest in my complaint.
To prove a point, I returned to
the parking lot with a pen and
paper to record the names of
those cars illegally parked in
preparation for writing this
article. These are the names I
recorded: Sweeting, Rolle,
Farquharson, Davis, Arm-
brister, Charlow, Knowles and
Lightbourne.
A gentlemen working at the
airport, in uniform, saw me
and asked what I was doing. I
explained that my car had
been towed, while cars regis-
teted in Bahamian names
were allowed to park illegally.
Long story short this gen-
tleman, a Mr Don Thompson
(I regret that I do not know
his title) listened to my story


and agreed that his was an
unfair, situation that my car
should NOT have been towed
while other illegally parked
cars were not. Mr Thompson
took the time to listen to my
complaint. He was very pro-
fessional and very under-
standing. He had my car
released to me without pay-
ing a fine. I hope that he reads
this letter. I cannot thank him
enough. (It took about one
hour to resolve this situation.
When I drove away, not one
illegally parked car had been
removed).
As a final note, we all know
that people park illegally all
over this island, with no regard
for the inconvenience they
cause. Drive into any shop-
ping centre or food store park-
ing lot and cars are parked
directly in front of stores, dis-
regarding proper parking
spaces. Handicapped spaces
are filled with non-handi-
capped people's cars. What
makes these people think they
are so special, that they can
disregard rujes and regulations
and park whenever they
please? One comment I have
for Bahamians: "Pride is a
wonderful thing, but arro-
gance can ruin a society."


A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
RESIDENT
Nassau,
February 3,2005.


Minister setting


a poor example

EDITOR, The Tribune.
AS A PRACTISING Bahamian physician, I was absolutely
stunned while listening to Mr Fred Mitchell, Minister of Foreign
Affairs, on "Issues of The Day", this past Monday.
Mr Mitchell in explaining the exceptions when he decides not
to request Secret Service protection in the United States said
that one of those occasions is when he goes to Minnesota,
United States, for his semi-annually medical check-uip.
Why does a Bahamian politician have to go overseas for a
medical check-up?
I would have thought that Mr Mitchell and his PLP col-
leagues would encourage Bahamians to go to Bahamian doctors
wherever a Bahamian doctor has the facility and expertise to
render the desired medical service.
Surely an annual medical examination can be performed by
many doctors in the Bahamas.
I and many of my fellow doctors are outraged that such a poor
example is being set by Fred Mitchell.
Foreign Affairs does not mean going to a foreign doctor.

A DISGRUNTLED
BAHAMIAN DOCTOR
, Nassau,
February 4, 2005.







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Slot #386
Nassau, Bahamas


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* *
















Reggae, artist treatens .legal



dea in action over alleged 'attack.


MBv PACO NUNEZ the attention of Prime Minister manner, because he was The concert in New Provi- Spice, whose real name is


AN AMERICAN
tourist had been found
dead in his hotel room in
Grand Bahama, police said
on Wednesday.
Todd Eric Morris, 33,
was discovered dead in his
room on Wednesday
morning by security offi-
cers at the Our Lucaya
Hotel. They had forced
their way into the room
after being contacted by a
concerned friend who had
not seen him for the two
previous days.
Mr Morris from Pennsyl-
vania was found on his bed
with an assortment of pills
next to his body, police
said.

Sign.
A do not disturb sign
was on the door and the
night latch had been
engaged. The telephone
was off the hook and there
were three notes written
on cloth napkins and
paper, police confirmed.
His body was taken to
the Rand Memorial Hospi-
tal where he was officially
pronounced dead at
11.30am.
Police confirmed there
was no evidence to suggest
foul play although they
said an autopsy will be per-
formed to ascertain an
exact cause of death.
Mr Morris, who arrived
in the Bahamas on Friday,
February 4 was due to
leave the country this Fri-
day. Police said their
inquiries were continuing
into the matter.











THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 10


2:00am
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4:58
5:00
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6:30
7:00
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Community Pg./1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean News Update
Immediate Response
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Ethnic Health America
CMJ Club Zone
Caribbean News Update
Gospel Video Countdown
Treasure Attic
This Generation
Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
Kids On The Move
ZNS News (Update Live)
Caribbean Newsline
Legends From Whence
We Came
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Island Jams
The Darold Miller Show
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Pg./1540


NOE N-V 3rsre


M 0 my n ov .v.
Tribune Staff Reporter
A REGGAE artist who
alleges that he was the victim
of an "attack" by Bahamian
police is seeking legal advice
and threatening to take action,
The Tribune learned yesterday.
The artist, Richie Spice,
claims that a plain clothes offi-
cer at Nassau International
Airport choked him and forced
to the ground without provo-
cation.
His attacker never identified
himself as an officer, the artist
is alleging.
Witnesses said that police
aimed guns at members of the
artist's group, and that Spice's
brother was struck by one of
the officers.
They said the incident came
out of nowhere, and that no
one was searched or accused
of anything, or arrested by the
police.

Radio
In the wake of the incident,
Spice's version of events has
been recounted on several
Jamaican radio stations.
Other reggae artists claim-
ing to have been similarly vic-
timised have reportedly
expressed their unwillingness
to perform in the Bahamas in
the future.
A source in the Bahamian
entertainment industry said
that a number of Jamaican
musicians are planning to meet
to consider a boycott of the
country.
The incident is the latest of
several recent confrontations
between Jamaicans and police
at NIA.
Reggae superstars such as
Ghost and Junior Kelly are
reported to have been stopped
by NIA police, and Kelly is
said to have been arrested after
an altercation with an officer,
who Spice claimed was the
same one who attacked him.
Jamaican cricket Legend
Courtney Walsh was also
reportedly treated "roughly"
by police at NIA in June of last
year.
The incident was brought to


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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Perry Christie by Jamaican
Prime Minister PJ Patterson,
who expressed his concern at
the matter.
Acting Commissioner of
Police John Rolle told The Tri-
bune that he had been made
aware that an incident involv-
ing Spice had taken place.
He said however that he
could not confirm any details
as he was waiting for a report
from the Airport Police Sta-
tion.
On Tuesday night, the inci-
dent was reported on the
Grand Bahama radio station
Mix 102 FM, where Spice gave
a telephone interview from
Jamaica.
"The police 'dem attack us,"
he told the interviewer.
According to Spice, the inci-
dent occurred on Monday
when the artists were passing
through the airport on their
way back to Jamaica.
Spice said he was the first of
the group to pass through the
security checkpoint, which he
did without incident.
He said that a man in civilian
clothing then approached him
and ordered him into a room,
saying he wanted to search
him.
Spice said that he asked the
man to identify himself, but he
refused, and proceeded to
throw the artist's luggage into
the room.
"I ask him why you dealing
with my things in such an angry


angry," Spice explained.
He said that when he
approached the bags, he felt
the man grab him.
"The person grabbed me
from behind, grabbed me by
my throat," he said.
Spice said that he resisted
the grip, and was forced to the
floor by officers and his clothes
were ripped.
"I never experienced this
before, and I travelled all over
the world," he said.

Photos
According to fellow reggae
artist Chuck Fender, who said
he witnessed the incident, offi-
cers also accosted a Bahami-
an woman who had taken
some photos.
"All five of them rushed
down and snatched the cam-
era," he said.
Bahamians in the entertain-
ment industry yesterday point-
ed out how detrimental the
potential boycott by Jamaican
artists can be for the Bahamas.
One pointed out that reggae
artists draw crowds of thou-
sands and are vital for the
livelihood of Bahamian organ-
isers and promoters.
Spice was in the Bahamas
with several other artists
including Red Rat, Chuck
Fender and Boscom X for the
Fifth Element concerts in New
Providence and Freeport over
the weekend.


ANDRE NEWBOLD
YrF*.-. "aaii


dence is said to have drawn an
audience of 3,000 while the
event in Freeport is said to
have been attended by 2,000
people.
A radio personality in
Freeport who is acquainted
with the artist said that in her
view, the police could not have
had any reason to become
physical with Spice.
"He ain't never bother no
one," she said.


Richell Bonner, is the brother
of reggae superstars Pliers and
Spanner Banner and is a recog-
nised upcoming star on the reg-
gae scene.
He said told the Mix
102 interviewer that he had
been well received by the
Bahamian public, and that
despite his treatment by police,
he wished to return to the
Bahamas to perform in the
future.


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


- M 1








PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


3,000 citrus plants from Abaco


are bein

3 By PAUL G. yesterday that the more than
TURNQUEST 3,000 young citrus plants, recent-
Tribune Staff Reporter ly imported from Abaco and cur-
rently being held at the Bahamas
OFFICIALS at the Depart- government's propagation plant
ment of Agriculture announced on Gladstone Road, are being


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monitored'


closely monitored for the Citrus
canker disease.
On January 7, 2005 the Min-
istry of Agriculture confirmed
that the 3,700-acre Bahama Star
Farm at Treasure Cay, Abaco
had been closed because of the
incurable bacterial disease infect-
ing its citrus groves.
The director of Agriculture
Simeon Pinder said that the
plants were imported from a nurs-
ery in central Abaco in Decem-
ber, where they were being
housed for more than 24 months
with the intent of being distrib-
uted throughout the country to
farmers who have had substan-
tial damage to their farms as a
result of the recent hurricanes.
The plants had been intended
for shipment last week, but that
shipment was postponed.

Precaution
Mr Pinder said: "The govern-
ment cannot swear that those
plants have not been exposed to
the canker. As a precaution they
have not been distributed as yet,
and they will not be moved until
we are sure that they are canker
free. But we will not destroy per-
fectly good plants. That is going
too far in terms of precaution."
Mr Pinder advised that the dis-
ease does not reach full develop-
ment, or show visible evidence of
its presence without optimum
weather conditions.
"At the time of purchase, we
had no reason to believe that
these plants were carriers of the
disease, but we are monitoring


them regularly, for any signs," he
said.
A source and expert in the agri-
cultural field said that the young
plants have not been properly
tested for the disease, a process
where samples need to be
shipped off to Florida or Britain
for DNA analysis.
"Should officers not have been
dispatched by now to do their ini-
tial surveys of the area? Properly
identification of this disease must
come from lab analysis and DNA
testing. Testing that we don not
have here in the Bahamas.
"Also the concentration of the
canker on the leaves of the plants
in Abaco was in its mature state,
leaving one to believe that the
disease had been there at least a
year," he said.
According to the source, who
wished to remain anonymous, the
discovery of the disease was made
by US Agricultural inspectors
stopping a routine shipment of
citrus being sent from the
Bahama Star Farm to Florida.
"We didn't find this out our-
selves. The department of Agri-
culture was informed of the dis-
ease. We now understand that
due to the drop in income of the
Haitian labourers who worked on
that farm, grapefruits and other
plants from the Bahama Star
Farm are being sold in the Marsh
Harbour area illegally.
"It's impossible for the gov-
erminent to stop people from sim-
ply walking in there and picking
the fruits and selling them to oth-
er locals. Because of the scale of
the farm, there is simply no way


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to quarantine that area," he said.
Echoing this concern, Mr Pin-
der said that currently his major
concern is not the sale of fruit
from the farm, but the removal
of live plants.

Concern
"We now have security at the
farm examining vehicles entering
and leaving the farm. The
removal of live trees is the major
concern we have right now,
because they are in fact like incu-
bators, acting as hosts spreading
the disease," he said.
Being pro-active in their han-


dling of the "outbreak", Mr Pin-
der said that they have already
begun testing farms on various
islands, to see if the disease is
being contained.
"We have obtained a list of the
clients for the past two years of
farms in Abaco and are going to
the various islands to see if the
disease has manifested itself
there. Obviously we are asking
for the public's assistance and co-
operation with this," he said.
"Although we have destroyed
all the seedlings there," Mr Pin-
der said, "what concerns me is
that, we don't know how many
were sold or taken out of the farm
before we took control of it."


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE government announced its intention to appoint a perma-
nent resident envoy in Beijing next year in light of increased trad-
ing activities with the Chinese commercial sector.
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Service Fred Mitchell
confirmed that the government fully supports the opening of the
Bahamian embassy in China and said that the Bahamas and China
are on the threshold of an "unparalleled trade relationship."
Also announced was the current negotiations between Chinese
and Bahamian governments to sign a memorandum of under-
standing on air services that would allow Chinese airlines to fly to
the Bahamas direct.
At present the Bahamas-China bilateral trade is valued at approx-
imately $120 million annually and Mr Mitchell said it is expected to
grow significantly in the next two years as Bahamians explore the
value of merchandising a wide array of Chinese made consumer
goods.
Mr Mitchell added that the Bahamas can expect an increase in
the manufacturifig of hospitality products in the Bahamian tourism
market through the use of Chinese machinery and technology,
along with business opportunities in Grand Bahama's container
ports.

Countries
The Bahamas was one of 10 Caribbean countries that participated
in the China Caribbean Economic and Trade Co-operation Forum
held in Kingston, Jamaica last week.
At this forum, an agreement termed "The Guiding Framework
for Economic and Trade Co-operation," was signed and Mr
Mitchell said this will serve as a template for a specific bilateral trade
agreement between China and the Bahamas."
The Bahamas also signed a memorandum of understanding that
granted the Bahamas as an approved destination status for Chinese
tourist groups.
"We have already had several cross border exchanges," said
Mr Mitchell, "and there is opportunity for more of these to take
place in an economically sustainable matter. We intend to dis-
seminate these other newly executed agreements so that both the
government and the private sector can be actively engaged in a con-
tinuous effort to ensure implementation of these agreements."
Mr Mitchell said that there are five main goals that both Chinese
and Bahamian governments are following for the continued devel-
opment of relations.
They are: The exchange of high level visits at political level; the
creation of and exploration of new forms of co-operation; the
increased role of the two governments in providing quality service
for private sectors; the promotion of cultural exchange to enhance
mutual friendship and understanding; and the enhancement
of consultation and co-operation to safeguard our common inter-
est.
Mr Mitchell said: "Should the Bahamas and China, with the aid
pf the private sectors in both countries strive to achieve these five
noble objectives, the relationship between the two countries should
herald a long, bright and glorious day of close co-operation, and
prosperity between the Chinese and the Bahamian people."


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THETRBUE HUSDYFEBUAY 0,205,PAE


LOCAL, NEWS


DPM outlines police report




of riot at Nassau Village


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of National
Security Cynthia Pratt outlined
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday the police report of the
Nassau Village riot two weeks
ago.
According to minister Pratt,
a traffic accident occurred on
Alexandria Boulevard and
Sampson Street in Nassau Vil-
lage at about 7.40pm on Janu-
ary 26, when a motorist hit a
pedestrian. Two police motor-
cyclists were dispatched to the
scene to investigate, and during
this time, a scuffle ensued
between the driver and a resi-
dent of the area.
An officer proceeded to
intervene in the dispute and
was met with hostility from sev-
eral bystanders, and eventually
assaulted by an angry resident.
Eventually, this officer, in fear
of his life, drew his weapon and
fired, hitting an 18-year-old res-
ident of the area.
"This incident quickly erupt-
ed into a full scale uprising and
police re-enforcements had to
be summoned. Officers heard
what was believed to be gun-
shots coming from the basket-
ball court area, and sheltered
themselves behind the ambu-
lance and police vehicles," she
said.
Minister Pratt said that the
crowd continued to become
more and more aggressive
towards the police, and that a
man who had been taken into
custody earlier, escaped from a
police vehicle and ran into the
crowd that had gathered.
"The mob attacked and
torched several vehicles, includ-
ing an unmarked police car,
and damaged the private vehi-
cle of a senior police officer,"
she said.
According to the report, at
about 11.10pm that night, after
calm had been restored for a


short time, the violence broke
out again, with rocks and bot-
tles being hurled at the police,
and gunshots being heard in
the distance.
"After regrouping the offi-
cers noticed that two other
police vehicles were extensive-
ly damaged, and that attempts
had been made to torch one of
them. The following day (Jan-
uary 27) police received calls
from residents in Nassau Vil-
lage of gunshots in the area,
and when they went to investi-
gate, found the main streets
into the area blocked off," she
said.
This "unprecedented and
intolerable action" she said,
could not be tolerated by the
police. Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson and a team
of his top officers visited the
area, and listened to the con-
cerns and complaints of resi-
dents, and reminded them that
"respect for the law" must pre-
vail.
Damage
"In the end there was exten-
sive damage to police vehicles,
and a total of five persons were
injured, three from gunshot
wounds, and the two officers
who were beaten. I have had
an opportunity to visit the
young men who were injured in
the hospital, and fortunately I
am able to report that they are
recouperating well," she said.
Since this unfortunate spout
of violence, the minister said
that she has visited the area on
numerous occasions to talk
with residents and community
leaders, in what she says were
"useful meetings in reducing
the tension in the area."
Minister Pratt said that what
was revealed "rather promi-
nently" in the investigation of
the matter, was the tendency
of some individuals to take the
law into their own hands and
show a violent disregard and


disrespect for the rule of law.
"This we will not tolerate.
The rule of law is the most
essential girder in the architec-
ture of democracy. Throw it
away, and you throw away the
political system we have grown


to love and cherish," she said.
Investigations, both crimi-
nally, and departmentally are
still continuing into the matter,
and persons with information
are asked to continue to assist
police with their investigations.


Grand Bahama


men discovered


stranded on cay


THREE Grand Bahama
men reported missing at sea
were discovered stranded on
Sail Cay after their 25-ft boat
developed engine problems
during a fishing trip over the
weekend.
Fishing
According to reports,
Rollins Colebrooke of Piner-
idge Estates, and Israel Saun-
ders and Walton Rolle of


Freeport, left from Dover
Sound around midday Thurs-
day on a 25ft vessel named
'Humdinghy'.
Sometime around 7.30pm
on Thursday, Mr Colebrooke
contacted his son-in-law
Rollin Stuart and told him
that they were stranded on
Sail's Cay with engine prob-
lems and requested assis-
tance.
The men were finally res-
cued on Sunday.


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Position Available
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Job Duties to Include:
Day to day and special event marketing support
(incl. advertising, promotions and public relations).
Media bookings and relations.
Talent for live broadcasts.
Tracking expenditures to keep in line with budgets.
Merchandising and store floor support.
Individuals applying must:
Have marketing and media experience
Have excellent written and communication skills.
Have working knowledge of Word, Excel and of
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Be organized, able to take initiative and work
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Merchandising experience a plus.
Interested persons should send resum6s to:
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P.O.Box SS-6704
Nassau Bahamas
Or via fax: 242-394-0513 or email to
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Deadline: Friday, February 18 2005.


I


I


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


THLJMIUIUMIO








PAGE8. HURDAYFEBUAR 10 200 TH TRBUN


I LOCALES


Suspected illegal



immigrants caught



in joint operation


* By NATARIO MCKENZIE
A joint operation between
police and immigration officials
resulted in a round up of more
than 100 suspected illegal
immigrants on Wednesday
morning.
The operation took place just


a few hours after the discovery
of a group of 14 illegal Haitian
immigrants stowed away in a
sloop in Nassau Harbour.

Immigration
Immigration officials assisted


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by officers of the Internal Secu-
rity Division took to the streets
on Wednesday morning in sev-
eral areas of New Providence
in an effort to crack down on
undocumented individuals liv-
ing illegally in the country.
The raids in the Bain Town
and Farm Road area resulted
in more than 100 people being
taken into custody.
On Wednesday motorists
and residents looked on a offi-
cers of the Internal Security
Division scuffled with and
hauled individuals off jitney
buses and ventured into resi-
dential areas in search of
undocumented immigrants.
Custody
According to immigration
officials among the individuals
taken into custody, there were
reportedly 19 Haitian men, 33
Haitian women, 42 Haitian
children, 20 Jamaican men and
one Bolivian man.
Immigration officials noted
however that these numbers
were not conclusive as a
screening process was under-
way to determine the status of
these persons.
Some may be charged and
deported and others may have
proper legal documentation,
said a police spokesman.








CALL 380.8188


HO Nash Jr High


student diagnosed


with tuberculosis


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A NINTH grade student at
the H.O Nash Jr High School
has been diagnosed with
tuberculosis, prompting
health officials to perform
tests on all the students and
staff who may have come into
contact with her.
Health officials also
expanded their testing to
include Straw Market ven-
dors who worked in close
vicinity to one of the studen-
t's family members.
Tuberculosis is a chronic
bacterial infection which is
transmitted when an infect-
ed person sprays germs into
the air by talking, coughing,
or sneezing.
People who inhale these
germs can become infected,
through TB germs can live in
the body without making a
person sick.
Principal
Yesterday, Principal Paula
Adderley told The Tribune
that the young student had
been absent from school last
week and said the school's
nursing staff was notified
when she was diagnosed with
tuberculosis.


Health officials to perform
tests on all students and staff

members who may have come
into contact with her


As a precautionary mea-
sure, she explained that about
150 students and all the
teachers who wished were
given a TB test.
She explained that in addi-
tion to the girl's homeroom,
nurses also tested the chil-
dren who had elective classes
with the infected student.
Dr Baldwin Carey, the
Director of Public Health
said that once a disease like
tuberculosis is identified, an
immediate and automatic
step is to test the persons,
who would have had direct
contact with the infected case
(ie family members) and then
to an extended classroom. He
said this is standard and nor-
mal procedure.
In the case of the student,
he said just passing her in the
corridor at school would not
be as significant as staying in
a classroom with her which


is why the entire school will
not be tested. However, he
said the testing has had to be
extended as a family mem-
ber of the child is a vendor'
at the Straw Market.
"In that case, we tested the&.
vendors who worked in their
immediate area," Dr Carey
told The Tribune.
He added that health offi-
cials explained the situation
to the rest of the vendors and
said he was confident they
were able to allay any fears..
Dr Carey said that in the
Bahamas, the number of
tuberculosis in the general
populace is "not excessively"
high.
He said there are higher
incidences in certain seg-
ments of society such as HIV
infected persons, and home-
less persons whose immune
and resistance levels are low-
er.


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear from people who
are making news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds for a good '
cause, campaigning for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and, share your


a


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


;<&







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 9


The


is

* PART TWO

T HE countrie
most vocally o
the FTAA do not nece
oppose free trade. They
ly oppose the conditions
which they would ha
trade more freely wi
USA under the original
of the proposed FTAA
Brazil, Venezuela anc
Latin American countr
members of the WT(


it dead?


STRAIGHT UP TALK


s that
)ppose
ssarily
Smere-
Sunder
ave to
th the
Storms
d other
ies are
O and


Z H I VA R G
It is conceivable that under
new negotiated terms, these
countries could sign an agree-
ment that represents some
shadow of the FTAA.
Finally, free trade has an
advocate more powerful than
the USA. It is globalisation


LAING


overlooked in order to take
advantage of the benefits the
world's hottest economy pre-
sents.
How do those seeking to
minimise cost not look to
Africa and Asia as frontiers
for affordable, some might
say, "cheap" labour, especial-
ly when more is done to raise
the standard of the human
resources in these territories?
Look at what is happening
in India, which has become
the labour capital for certain
aspects of the global technol-
ogy industry. To pursue these
opportunities companies will
need easier flows for their cap-
ital and other resources. That
ease will come through gov-
ernments negotiating arrange-
ments to allow this to take
place. Hence, the free trade
movement will continue to
advance, unless anarchy gets
the best of it or Christ comes
before.
I might note further that the
fate of the FTAA rests in
large measure on the extent
to which newly re-elected
President George Bush places
it in any meaningful way on
his agenda.
If President Bush wishes
this programme to be a part of
his legacy, we can expect to
see a revival of the FTAA
push. If he does not, we will
not see much of a push, at
least not for the next four
years.
Doubtless the combined
forces of September 11, 2001,
and the run toward re-elec-
SEE page 10


regional trading blocks such
as MERCOSUR and the
ANDEAN PACT.
Even if they are not happy
in these arrangements, they
do not have the intense oppo-
sition to them as they do to
the FTAA because the
arrangements do not seem to
pose the competitive threat
that the perceived terms and
conditions of the FTAA
appear to pose.
This is why Brazil and oth-
ers did not move to end any
suggestion of an FTAA alto-
gether. Rather they chose to
water down the FTAA so
much that it would give them
more flexibility to commit to
those obligations that they
cduld live with while aban-
dtning those with which they
could not live.


and the profit opportunities
that it presents to capital inter-
ests with the resources to
spread their wings.
As technology compresses
time and space, making it eas-
ier to move products and ser-
vices across the globe, com-
panies will be hard pressed to
look to new markets to satisfy
their shareholders' drive for
profit maximisation.
How can companies resist
the pressure to access the Chi-
nese market, predicted to be
the largest and most power-
ful economy in the world in
the decades to come?
Even now, many of the
political issues such as human
rights violation and anti-capi-
.talist philosophies that once
drove opposition to doing
"business in China are being


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


< *1 '* ,' i'


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Is the FTAA dead?


FROM page nine

tion greatly shifted the focus
of President Bush in respect
of the FTAA.
The fact that the presi-
dent's domestic economic
focus was viewed as shaky
by many of his detractors
and the fact that the US
economy grew narrowly also
served to push the FTAA off
the president's agenda.
In many quarters free
trade was not perceived as
a positive campaign issue for
President Bush, especially
given all the controversy
about "exporting American
jobs".
Economic circumstances
and powerful corporate


interest could, however, play
a major role in what the
president does about this
matter. I believe that he will
continue to push free trade
but will do so from a less
imposing perspective and
with a view to inviting the
support of his democratic
rivals.

I have often said and I
continue to say so, we
in The Bahamas need be
aware of and pay attention
to matters related to free
trade, be it the FTAA,
CSME or WTO.
They will be important
issues shaping global and
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in the medium and long
terms; and by extension,
they will influence our
national economic reality. It
is regrettable to me that the
government appears entirely
too 'nonchalant about the
issue and far too unsettled
as to a position on the mat-
ter.
By now we should have
and could have taken a posi-
tion on the issue of "free
trade", forgetting for the
moment the specific arrange-
ments that seek to promote
them.
Do we believe that free
trade is an economic policy
that benefits The Bahamas?
The answer to this basic
question will shape our
national and international
trade policies without regard
to any trade arrangements
that we are contemplating.
The answer will also guide
us more definitively as we
negotiate these arrange-
ments. It only stands to rea-
son that if I do not support
free trade as good for my
economy then I do not sup-
port belonging to any
arrangement that promotes
it.

We should have
positions on the
specific trade arrangements
under consideration as well,
especially the CSME and the
WTO. All the talk still,
almost three years later, of
having to ask Bahamians
what to do is frightful.
Frankly, the government
is being unfair to ask them
what to do about these
arrangements when Bahami-
ans do not spend as much
time considering the issue,
do not have as much infor-
mation and are not them-
selves involved with the
detailed negotiations on the
issue as is the government.
In any event, after
appointing a huge trade con-
sultative committee that has
been using taxpayers' dol-


lars to fly around the coun-
try having meetings and hav-
ing in the government per-
sons with great knowledge
in these matters, particularly
Minister James Smith, it is
absolutely troubling that we
cannot by now take a posi-
tion on these matters. But
that is what it is.
I say to Bahamians that
while we need to be aware
of these free trade matters,
we need to be more focused
on creating, enhancing and
preserving national econom-
ic value.
Specifically, we need to be
focused on generating value
that is outstanding both
within our nation as well as
within the international eco-
nomic arena. When our
products, services and skills
are so outstanding that the
peoples of the world seek
them out at any cost, we will
find a viability in the global
economy that not only helps
us survive but allows us to
excel.
The FTAA is not dead,
though it is severely wound-
ed. Free trade, which is a
powerful philosophy that
sparks efforts to create
arrangements like the
FTAA, is very much alive.
With this said we must con-
tinue to be vigilant in fol-
lowing the matter:

(Remaining excerpt from
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Lucaya Luncheon, February
1, 2005, Freeport, Grand
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THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
"Some people say we
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study the situation so much
that we get caught up in the
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Martin Luther King, Jr.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


iti;AL








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 11


Jamaica 'committed' to CCJ



despite privy council decision


By LARRY SMITH

LAST week, the privy council
in London struck down Jamaica's
attempt to legislate the Caribbean
Court of Justice as its final court
of appeal.
The reason given was that a
simple political majority in the
Jamaican parliament was setting
up a final court over the
entrenched judicial system pro-
tected in the constitution. And
such a court would be vulnerable
to political pressures.
The CCJ is one of the under-
pinnings of the Caribbean Single
Market & Economy which
Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad-
Tobago are set to establish later
this month. Other Caricom coun-
tries including the Bahamas -
are supposed to join the CSME
by the end of the year.
Some Caricom countries have
already passed laws to establish
the CCJ to deal with single market
matters, and others are in the
process of doing so. Leonard
Archer, our ambassador to Cari-
com, has said the Bahamas would
seek exemption from the CCJ as a
final court of appeal, while accept-
ing it as the CSME's trade court.
However, the government has yet
to present a formal policy pro-
posal on CSME membership for
public discussion.

Honour
Jamaican Prime Minister P J
Patterson said on Friday he
"remains committed to the estab-
lishment of the CCJ as our final
appellate court, (and) intends to
'take the necessary steps, arising
from this decision to honour our
commitments to the Jamaican
people and our partners in the
region."
The prime minister's legal team
is currently reviewing the judge-
ment and the Jamaican cabinet
will consider the matter in full
today (Monday), Mr Patterson
said.
"We will have to have consul-
tations with all our CARICOM
partners concerning the way for-
ward with respect to the estab-
- lishment of this court as a tribunal
, for the resolution of issues con-
cerning the CARICOM Single
Market and Economy," he added.
But the Jamaica Observer said


Patterson had "suffered a blood-
ied nose, which could result in
adjusting his timetable to retire
as prime minister and step down
as president of the PNP."
Lawyers for three civil society
groups namely the Jamaican Bar
Association, Jamaicans For Jus-
tice, and the Independent Jamaica
Council for Human Rights,
appeared together with lawyers
for the opposition Jamaica Labour
Party appeared at a hearing
before the Privy Council in Eng-
land last December.
And on Thursday of last week,
the British judges ruled that leg-
islation to remove the right of
appeal to the Queen in Council
and substitute the CCJ as the final
court of appeal was unconstitu-
tional.
According to JLP parliamen-
tarian Delroy Chuck, writing in
the Jamaica Gleaner, the ruling
was "a landmark decision of mon-
umental importance that has rein-
forced and enhanced constitu-
tional authority, the rule of law
and, hopefully, good sense in the
process of constitutional reform."
Opponents of the measure
argued that the Jamaican parlia-
ment could not, by simple major-
ity, create a final court of appeal
superior to the supreme court of
Jamaica and the court of appeal,
without that final court being
entrenched in the constitution to
give security of tenure to its
judges.
The Jamaican opposition had
called for a referendum on the
court's establishment, followed by
an amendment to the constitu-
tion. According to Edward Seaga,
the former JLP leader who
launched the action in 2003, "such
a court can have no permanency
as, by the same simple majority,
Jamaica's participation can be
withdrawn. In these circum-
stances, a court of this nature
would be vulnerable to real or
perceived threats of dissolution,
leaving it open to fear and favour.
"The strength of the highest
court must rest in its impregnable
position from all conditions which
can unduly influence it. This can
only be assured by entrenching
its position in the constitution so
that it cannot be affected by a sim-
ple majority vote in Parliament."'
Judges of the Jamaican court
of appeal can be removed from
office only by elaborate constitu-


tional procedures, subject to
review by the privy council. How-
ever, no such provision was made
for judges on the Caribbean
Court.
Rickey Singh, writing in the
Jamaica Observer, called the privy
council ruling "a serious setback
for Caricom's efforts to have the
CCJ as its final appellate court...42
years after the end of British colo-
nialism in Jamaica, euro-centric
values, more specifically
British, continue to prevail in var-
ious aspects of our Caribbean
life."
The CCJ has been a dream of
some Caricom leaders since the
1970s. But more recently its main
potential role has been as the
arbiter of disputes within the
Caribbean Single market & Econ-
omy.
Although the ruling conceded
that the Patterson government
had the right to abolish appeals
to the privy council by simple
majority vote, it said a new supe-
rior court could not be established
without constitutional entrench-
ment.

Weaken
"The risk that the governments
of the contracting states might
amend the CCJ Agreement so as
to weaken its independence is, it
may be hoped, fanciful," the
judges said. "But an important
function of a constitution is to give
protection against governmental
misbehaviour, and the three
Acts (establishing the court in
Jamaica) give rise to a risk which
did not exist ,in the same way
before.
The Jamaican legislation had
"the effect of undermining the
protection given to the people of
Jamaica by entrenched provisions
of Chapter VII of the Constitu-
tion. From this, it follows that the
procedure appropriate for amend-
ment of an entrenched provision
should have been followed."
Although the privy council
itself is not entrenched in, the
Jamaican constitution, the British
judges said they were "known to
be wholly immune from execu-
tive or parliamentary pressure in
any jurisdiction from which
appeals lay."
In recent years, critics of the
CCJ have focused primarily on its


financing and its insulation from
political interference. And finally,
in the case of Jamaica, the method
by which the court should be
established.
Caricom governments had been
urged to establish a trade court
for the CSME separately from the
final court of appeal for the
region.
But according to a Caricom
press statement, the privy council
ruling did not distinguish between
the two functions:
"This may well be because the
Jamaica legislation was an inte-
grated one dealing with both a
regional and appellate jurisdic-
tion.
"Because of this, it is not clear
at this early stage what is the
implication of the ruling for the
timely establishment of the CCJ in
relation to the exercise of its orig-
inal jurisdiction to ensure the effi-
cient functioning of the CARI-
COM Single Market and Econo-
my," the statement said.


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I


r- LOCAL NEWS I








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


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agreed standards and con-
cepts" for between 20 and
30 years.
Following this, the entire
upgraded facility will then
be transferred back to the
Authority to receive fee
payments from the operat-
ing company, she added.
When the government
last spring first announced
it had invited proposals
from private companies to
operate and manage NIA,
Minister H-anna-Martin
promised that the airport
would become "the jewel
of the Caribbean."
She said the selected
company would be expect-
ed to undertake a develop-
ment of new terminal facil-
ities, which will present
Bahamians with economic
opportunities and offer
high-end shopping possi-
bilities to visitors.
Mrs Hanna-Martin was
adamant that the new NIA
would be a uniquely
Bahamian facility and an
"experience in itself."'
The ministry estimated
that the renewal of the air-
port terminal will cost
close to $200 million.
Outlining the selection
process in the House of
Assembly yesterday, the
minister said following the
Airport Authority's
Request for Proposal
(RFP), which invited qual-
ified companies to submit
their offers for the man-
agement development and
operation of NIA, on


March 4, 2004, 40 interna-
tional firms and consor-
tiums responded request-
ing further information.
"All interested parties
attended briefings and site
visits organised by the
Authority, and all ques-
tions submitted by any of
the parties were
answered," she said.
On the closing date of
April 20, 2004, nine pro-
posals were received.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said
that to assist the Airport
Authority in the review
process, Prime Minister
Perry Christie appointed
an ad hoc committee under
the chairmanship of
permanent secretary in
the Ministry of Transport
and Aviation Archie
Nairn.
The committee com-
prised representatives
from the Office of the
Prime Minister, the Office
of the Attorney General,
the Ministry of Tourism,
the Ministry of Finance,
the Ministry of Works and
Utilities as well as the
Department of Civil Avia-
tion and the Airport
Authority.
The services of experts,
"with global experience in
airport management agree-
ments and development
concepts" from the
accounting firm Pricewa-
terhouse Coopers were
also engaged, as was the
expertise of aviation advis-
er in the ministry, James


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FROM page one

lowed immediately by a
build/operate/transfer (BOT)
arrangement for the long-term
development of NIA into a
first-class facility of which
Bahamians and.visitors alike
can be proud."
The minister explained
that the BOT arrangement
is the globally accepted
method for airport devel-
opment, under which the
"Airport Authority will
continue to own NIA, but
the management company
will operate and develop
the facilities in accordance
with set and mutually


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Wilding, said Mrs Hanna-
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couver Airport Services
(YVRAS) and Bahamas
Aviation Services.
The minister explained
that with the further assis-
tance of Pricewaterhouse
Coopers advisers "a higher
set of parameters" was
developed and the four
short-listed companies
were separately inter-
viewed in greater detail.
During this time, a
Bahamian delegation made
familiarisation visits to air-
ports which are managed
by the four short-listed
firms, including facilities in
Frankfurt, Germany;
Ottawa International Air-
port in Canada and Van-
couver International Air-
port, operated by YVRAS,
before finally choosing the
Canadian company.
The chosen YVRAS has
been named as one of the
top 10 airports in the world
for five consecutive years,
from 1999-2003, by the
International Air Trans-
port Association.
The minister concluded
the announcement by say-
ing: "In the next few
months NIA will be well on
its way to a complete trans-
formation resulting in a
facility that will be the
envy of the region and a
place of which we can all
be justly pioud."' .


I









THE TRBN HRDY ERUR 0 05 AE1


LQCAL NEW,


Leslie Miller


speaks in House

FROM page one
Bahamians to have affordable housing because they are being
pushed out by the tremendous number of foreigners.
"You have some people who won't rent to Bahamians
because they can make more money from illegal immigrants
than from bona fide Bahamians. If we don't deal with this, it will
deal with us. This is a catastrophe we are facing and it is noth-
ing to be taken lightly," Mr Miller said.
However, he said the perception that the majority of those
committing crime in the Bahamas are foreigners "is far from the
truth" and that Bahamians are responsible for killing themselves.
The minister said that all elected officials are obligated to
work on the behalf of Bahamians.


Airport work to




cause setbacks


FROM page one
June, the secondary runway at
the airport will be used exclu-
sively by all flights as the main
runway, 1432, will be closed for
reconstruction work.
The minister admitted this
arrangement will cause setbacks
for those travelling in and out of
the airport.
"This will have an effect on
air traffic movements and trav-
ellers are likely to experience
delays due to the construction
work. As a consequence the
travelling public will be required
to check in for departures not
less than three hours in accor-
dance with airline require-
ments," she said.
Runway 1432 is in a critical
state of disrepair and has been
for many years.
As a result, preliminary engi-
neering works were carried out
by Earth Tech Canada Incor-
porated, an energy firm
engaged by the Airport Author-
ity.


Eleven airport construction
companies were then invited to
submit proposals for the repair
and reconstruction of the run-
way.
Ultimately three companies
submitted proposals and gov-
ernment authorised the Airport
Authority to enter into a con-
tract with Lagan Holdings Lim-
ited of Belfast, Northern Ire-
land, for the reconstruction and
redevelopment of the runway.
Ground was broken for the
work last June, but was delayed
because of setbacks caused by
the two hurricanes which hit the
Bahamas last year.
Under an accelerated
arrangement the runway itself
will be completed by the end of
June, 2005, in time to receive
the inaugural flight of Virgin
Atlantic Airlines.
The remaining aspects of the
airport improvement project
will'be completed by the end of
August. These include reloca-
tion of the main taxiway and all
taxiway connectors to the main
runway.


"The project has provided
opportunities for direct employ-
ment of almost 100 Bahamian
employees and some 40 inde-
pendent truckers.
"Under the contract Lagan
Holdings is required to engage a
minimum of 45 per cent
Bahamian employees.
"However, I am pleased to
say that the present number is
76 per cent of the total persons
engaged in the project," said
Mrs Hanna-Martin.
The minister said these devel-
opments mark the beginning of
milestones in the economic
growth of the Bahamas and the
government's commitment to
ensure a good quality of life for
Bahamians.
"In this regard it is anticipat-
ed that in the next few months
Nassau International Airport
will be well on its way to a com-
plete transformation resulting
in a facility that will be the
envy of the region and a
place of which we can all be
justly proud;" said the min-
ister.:


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Thousands

mark the

beginning

of Lent

FROM page one

prayers for the first time in his
26-year papacy.
The 84-year-old Supreme
Pontiff, who has Parkinson's
Disease, has spent the last nine
days in a Rome hospital due to
respiratory problems and
influenza.
Anglicans throughout the
world also celebrated Ash
Wednesday mass.


I


. .. .. . . .. . ..~ ~. . . ... ...... . .


0 N l


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE
















SHealth and


fitness


fair


for seniors


* By GLADSTONE THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services
THE government's urban renew-
al programme in the Grants and
Bain Town communities moved to
"the next level" on Tuesday with
the launch of their community
health and fitness fair for seniors.
Hundreds of seniors packed the
Charles H Thompson Memorial
Centre, Vesey Street, on Tuesday
for free medical checks and infor-
mation on ageing.
They were offered screenings for
diabetes, hypertension and choles-
terol, among others. Medical per-
sonnel were on hand to examine
their eyes, ears, feet and mouth, fill
prescriptions, demonstrate physical
activities, and give important advice
on nutrition, food safety and money
management.
Organised by the Grant's Town
Urban Renewal Project and the
Department of Public Health in the
Ministry of Health, it is the first in a
series of health promotion projects
that will accompany the urban
renewal projects.
The Grant's Town Urban
Renewal Project is headed by Assis-
tant Superintendent of Police Car-
olyn L Bowe, with headquarters on
the comer of Baillou Hill Road and
Cameron Street.

Planning
"My staff are here in full force,"
observed Dr Baldwin Carey, Direc-
tor of Public Health in the Ministry
of Health. "We are very happy to be
a part of this because a very impor-
tant part of our planning involves
non-communicable diseases which
significantly impact the health of
our seniors.
"We are also expanding our
health care services to the elderly by
taking care of them in all our com-
munity clinics. We do. that now, but
the elderly have another level 'of
care that's needed. We want to
upgrade our people .so they, cn
understand and take care of the
elderly in that setting.
"We are also concerned about
the elderly who live alone, the social
environment of the elderly, and the
need to nurture these people. This
kind of event goes a long way in
making them fetd that they are
cared for and that we want to do
what we can to help them."
Scores of well wishers and a host
of senior Ministry of Health offi-
cials were on hand to promote the
fair. It was supported by the Min-
istry of Social Services and Com-
munity Development, the Sandi-
lands Rehabilitation Centre, Coral


E THIS gentleman has his blood pressure checked during the
Tuesday's Health and fitness Fair for Older Persons organised by
the Grant's Town Urban Renewal Project and the Ministry of
Health.
(BIS photo: Derek Smith)


Pharmaceuticals, the Over-The-Hill
Reunion, the Senior Citizens Asso-
ciation of Bain/Grant's Town, the
business community and private cit-
izens.
Dr Daniel Johnson, director of
the Chronic Non-Communicable
Diseases Unit in the Department
of Health, told of bringing commu-
nity health care to the communities
as part of the urban renewal pro-
gramme.
"We will bring it in a form and
fashion that the community itself
can continue- these projects," said
Dr Johnson, a podiatrist. "The gov-
ernment won't be here every week
doing it, but the church, the civic
organizations, the older persons
associations, the diabetic associa-
tion, the heart association, the can-
cer association will come into the
communities and keep these pro-
jects going."
Although these fairs are sched-
uled for each third month, each
community will continue with its
health promotion programme.
By all counts, Bahamians are liv-
ing longer, healthier lives, Dr John-
son.notqed. ...
". c'We have a lot of healthiyolder,
people '(aiendiing fi, "fair 'r, said'
Dr Johnson. "A lot of these peo-
ple areov'er '80. They are walking
arid talking, they are vibrant, and
their minds are clear."
However, non-communicable
diseases are "fast becoming our
most pressing health issue in terms
of where we see the mortality -
where most people are going to die
from heart attack, stroke, cancer,
congestive heart failure, amputa-
tions. And as you grow older there
is the threat of blindness, kidney
failure and other things.
"What we're trying to do is,
before you get ill we're trying to
see if we can catch things early and
prevent it. So, we're really into pre-


vention and control. You can't pre-
vent a heart attack with the
fellow rushing into the emergency
room.
"You have to get out of the hos-
pital and go into the community
where the guy lives and teach him
how not to have a heart attack."
Minister of Health Dr Marcus
Bethel said he was particularly
pleased that this fair was specifical-
ly designed for seniors.
"Too often, persons in this par-
ticular group are marginalised and
must fend for themselves even
though they have given much to the
development of our society," said
Dr Bethel.

Trust
"One of the moral tests of any
government is how it treats the
elderly. Given this event and others
to come, I trust my government
passes this test with flying colours."
The fair, he said, speaks to the
Ministry of Health's mandate which
is to ensure that the highest quality
of services for health promotion,
protection and care are accessible to
,, aLpersoBqs in the Bahamnasin order
to achieve optimal health.
"As we have seen with the suc-
cess of our national AID'S 'pro-
gramme, education is key to guc-
cess in the delivery of healthcare
generally, and partnerships With
NGOs and the private sectopare
essential to successful healthcare
outcomes," said Dr Bethel. 'It is
once again being demonstrated
here."
The Ministry of Health will ton-
tinue to support the Grant's and
Bain Town urban renewal project
by posting a healthcare worker at
the office, and have a community
health care nurse accompany the
urban renewal team on walkabouts,
said Dr Bethel.


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE





o" o

"Copyrighted Material
SSyndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"
a -NNW-


,THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 15


Ir






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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


a


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iCALtt 5H&CAUf R
NASS~~A_ AAA


tes


Stephen Moncur
Cacique Winner
2004 Supervisor of the Year


Dellarese Frazier
Cacique Winner
2004 Employee of the Year


aa 4aao a aa te


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.... ......... Jason McBride and Judy Rolle.


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Chef Jason McBride
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Judy Rolle
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I , , o


S t e p hen aA^nd DeK1!^arese^
^^^^Two of the n^^ation's Finest Tourism Star














Minister Griffin: quick delivery





of services essential to success


E By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
MINISTER of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment Melanie Griffin, has
urged her ministry employees
to continue to deliver excellent,
timely and compassionate ser-
vices to all citizens in need of
their services as Bahamians
"will not tolerate anything less".
Minister Griffin also assured
employees that the government
is working as expeditiously as
possible to improve their work-
ing conditions and in meeting
certain human resource needs.
"We must remember that the
Bahamian public is more aware
of and vocal in demanding what
they perceive to be their rights,
therefore, they will not accept
mediocre service," Minister
Griffin told a one-day motiva-
tional seminar on Friday, Janu-
ary 4.
Minister Griffin said the
establishment of a new, effec-
tive and time-sensitive vision in
the delivery of social services
was one of her primary objec-
tives upon assuming responsi-
bility for the ministry in May,
2002.
She said the vision included
the empowerment of persons
who use those services "to pro-
vide for themselves and their
families as we wish not to create
a welfare state in the shortest
possible time".
Minister Griffin said the new
approach will be multi-faceted
and co-ordinated with other


"We must remember that
the Bahamian public is more
aware of and vocal in
demanding what they perceive
to be their rights, therefore,
they will not accept mediocre
service."

MINISTER of Social Services and
Community Development Melanie Griffin


ministries and partnerships with
the church, civic, community
and social organisations.
"The Farm Road Pilot Pro-
ject is a great example of how
this collaboration can work suc-
cessfully," said Minister Grif-
fin. "It is my view that we have
made some strides in bringing
about the changes that I envi-
sioned, but I feel that 2005 will
be our most exciting year".

Connected
Minister Griffin said the min-
istry will implement a number
of projects and programmes to
bring about even greater suc-
cesses in the delivery of services
in 2005, including the full com-
puterisation of the Department
of Social Services that will allow
all of the department's satellite
offices to be connected to the
main frame. This, she said, will


cut down on bureaucracy.
Also on the drawing board is
the establishment of the Resi-
dential Care Facilities Authori-
ty in July, 2005. The Authority
will have oversight of all exist-
ing residential care facilities to
ensure that they are operating
at an acceptable standard.
She said officials from the
Ministries of Education, Health
and Social Services and. Com-
munity Affairs have been hold-
ing regular meetings towards
establishing a National Parent-
ing Programme, scheduled to
come on stream in September,
2005.
Minister Griffin said the min-
istry also plans to introduce a
Social Work Cadet Programme
into senior high schools in New
Providence and Grand Bahama,
and which, if successful, would
create a skills bank of social
workers.


"Our aim is to also encour-
age more young people to see
Social Work as a viable and
exciting career," said Ministry
Griffin. "Once successful, it is
envisioned that the Department
of Social Services would have
a skills bank from which to
draw social workers with the
relevant degrees in social
work".
Minister Griffin said the min-
istry has also begun to address
key personnel issues in a num-
ber of areas, including social


work where plans are underway
to hire additional social workers
and probation officers.
"You would also be pleased
to note that we have identified
security personnel for the com-
munity outreach centres, who
should be in place in a matter of
weeks," said Minister Griffin.
"The Willie Mae.Pratt Centre
for Girls and the Simpson Penn
Centre for Boys were not over-
looked as they received both
supervisors and security per-
sonnel to supplement their


staff," she added.
Minister Griffin said approval
has also been granted for the
hiring of 30 persons from the
Work Programme into the per-
manent and pensionable estab-
lishment.
She said this will result in the
longest serving, most qualified
and above-average employees
being appointed to the public
service before July, 2005.
"We are working consistently
to ensure better working con-
ditions for you as well as to
ensure that your personnel
issues are addressed," Minister
Griffin said.

Direction
Minister Griffin also
announced the appointments of
Mrs Marva Minns and Mrs
Camille Bullard to the posts of
Deputy Director of Social Ser-
vices and Director of Commu-
nity Affairs respectively. She
said the new appointments will
augur well for the future direc-
tion of the ministry.
The Minister pledged to do
what is in the best interests of
those Bahamians, making use
of the services and programmes
provided by her ministry.
"There are thousands of
Bahamians out there, children,
persons living with disabilities,
senior citizens and indigent per-
sons...who depend on what I do
as the Minister of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment and that motivates me
everyday to go out and do my
best in every area.
"I am excited about the task
at hand and I pray that most of
you will join me in taking care
of the task at hand," Mrs Griffin
said.


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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


rr,


- 0 l


THE TRIBUNE







LOCALANDINERATIONALNW


New board

at Antique

Auto Club
THE Antique Auto Club of
the Bahamas recently elected
it's new Board of Directors
for 2005-2006. The club, a
hobby and social club, was
formed in 1987 by six men
keenly interested in "old cars"
for the purpose of sharing a
common interest in vintage
and special interest automo-
biles and has grown to it's cur-
rent membership of 46 men
and women.
The club holds an antique
car show each year. Proceeds
raised through the sale of
steak & chicken dinners are
donated to a charity benefiting
children. Plans are underway
for the 2005 Show to be held
on February 26 at Arawak
Cay (Fish Fry area). This year
it is being co-hosted by the six
Rotary Clubs of Nassau as
part of the celebrations for the
100th anniversary of Rotary
International and is being
billed as "The Centennial Car
Show". For more information
on the Club visit it's new web-
site at www.antiqueautosba-
hamas.com.


* PICTURED are; Elliott Lockhart, Director, Murray Forde,
Secretary, Jim LaRoda, Wilson Chea, Directors, Peter Arm-
strong, President and Richard Blake, Treasurer. (Missing from
photo; Tony Burrows, Vice President)
(Vision Photo: Tim Aylen)


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THE TRIBUNE


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- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA PAE2,TURDYEERARW0S05 H RBN


KPMG donates to


'Tsunami


Relief for Sri Lanka' fund


WHEN ONLY THE BEST WILL D


a;~t


DO IT
AT


The Plaza


Mackey Street


Tel: 393-5943


KPMG presented a cheque
to the "Tsunami Relief for Sri
Lanka" fund which was
launched in the Bahamas fol-
lowing the devastation caused
by the Asian tsunami of
December 2004.
While making the presen-
tation Mr Tracy Knowles,
Senior Partner, stated: "All of
us were saddened by the
recent tragedy as a result of
the tsunami in Southeast Asia.
Funds were collected from our
partners and staff to provide
aid to those who in some cas-
es lost everything.
Rebuild
"We hope that our donation
will help to meet the needs of
those suffering and enable
them to begin to rebuild.
KPMG International has also
pledged $1 million to this
cause in addition to those
donations raised by KPMG
member firms. We are pleased
that our staff have responded
and added our donation to
this combined effort."
Mr Ravi Jesubatham who
accepted the donation on
behalf of the fund thanked
KPMG for responding to the
appeal in a meaningful way
and added that he is pleased
with the steady support com-
ing through from the length
and breadth of the Bahamas.
The Asian tsunami killed over
225,000 persons in 11 coun-
tries on Boxing Day, 2004. In
Sri Lanka, over 38,000 are
confirmed dead with several
thousand still unaccounted for.
Approximately 800,000 per-
sons lost their homes in the
coastal areas of Sri Lanka.
Donations can be deposit-


Sientnt e ecial
Purchase any Mac system during the month of February
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ed into the 'Tsunami Relief
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Alternatively, cheques made


payable to 'Tsunami Relief for
Sri Lanka' can be mailed to P
0 Box CB-11665, Nassau,
Bahamas. All contributions
made to the fund will be


remitted to the Red Cross in
Sri Lanka for utilisation in
specifically identified projects.
KPMG in the Bahamas
operates from offices in Nas-
sau and Freeport. KPMG is
the global network of profes-
sional services firms of KPMG
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KPMG member firms pro-
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With nearly 100,000 people
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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite
tenders from suitably qualified firms for a Market Survey to provide
feedback on BTC's Products and Services and Customer Satisfaction.

Interested firms may collect a Tender Specification from BTC's security
desk located in the Administrative Building, JFK Drive, Between the
hours of 9:00 am and 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday.

Proposals marked "QUANTATIVE MARKET SURVEY & FOCUS
GROUPS TENDER" should be sealed and delivered on or before 12:00
pm on Friday, February 25th, 2005 to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
21 John F Kennedy Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


~s~f~i


- :PAGE 20, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE











[1-' i's hiAe love, -He i- kas i be









o Whe WyA Nssoa Resov+


LACeI ANGUS


~f., ~~~--
~


01I


APPETIZER


A collection of Hot Spices rubbed into Tender Bahamian Conch, grilled and served
with Red Pepper Coulisse and Pigeon Pea Relish or

Chilled Shrimp served with Cocktail Sauce
SALAD

With Focaccia Croutons
ENTREE
File+- Migo'd FovesHeve
Black Angus Tenderloin Steak, topped with Wild Mushrooms or

t- P4e A Beo With Jumbo Lump Blue Crab, Spinach and Fresh Mozzarella or

SesOame Cv-Lsi-eA Gv Pan-seared and served with Thai Plum Sauce
DESSERT


lkAivhcAAol C ocol ot-e Rospbevvy T-'I-Re
Chambord soaked Raspberries, Devils Food Cake and Chocolate Pastry Cream.
Topped with Chocolate Whipped Cream and Chocolate Shavings.
Tea, Coffee or Espresso
Mini Bottle of Champagne per person


/
~
~
~iw ~
~ '-N


APPETIZER

A layered assortment of Roasted Vegetables and Italian Cold Cuts or

Chilled Shrimp served with Cocktail Sauce
SALAD

With Focaccia Croutons
ENTREE
Filel- Mi$Hxoi Foves+-ieye
Black Angus Tenderloin Steak, topped with Wild Mushrooms or

uSH e4 Breesi? os- Ckickew
With Jumbo Lump Blue Crab, Spinach and Fresh Mozzarella or

sesatwe CrAs+-edA Groipev
Pan-seared and served with Thai Plum Sauce
DESSERT
lAilvi tAI Ccocol o-e Ros b'evy Tn-ie
Chambord soaked Raspberries, Devils Food Cake and Chocolate Pastry Cream.
Topped with Chocolate Whipped Cream and Chocolate Shavings.
Tea, Coffee or Espresso
Mini Bottle of Champagne per person


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Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday
House Champagne by the glass $7
House Wine by the glass $5
Stage Lounge Delight $7.95


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Sunday, Feb. 13, 2005: 12pm 4pm $27 inclusive. 4pm 11pm $33 inclusive


Monday, February 14, 2005: Lunch 12pm 4pm $19.50 inclusive.
Dinner 5pm 11pm $33 inclusive j


WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORTS
& CRYSTAL PALACE CASINO
West Bay Street, Cable Beach
For information & Reservations, call 327-6200 ext.6904


Februry 11 i, 14



peig-ht,, ..-.,le OCC L ,pincy
includes breakfa t'atth


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


st~ge Lsh~ge


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ASSORTED 62.5 oz ..............2/$1.00
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CORN FLAKES is-oz ...............$3.99
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62.5 G
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80 OZ



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15 OZ



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--e I --I Y _---e~l~l~M-IIl-Il~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2004






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 23


(VIARTNELL'S


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OWDIE bWRS AND CANDIES
UNYINE ASSOD TAhINYINIASSmID Ps,




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wBAS.ETS)


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8 OZ

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COCKTAIL PEANUTS
REGULAR AND SALTFREE
2- OZ
$349

CAMP
CREAM OF
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SOUP.
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$1 19

SREDIWHIP U

WHIPPING
CREAM

$469

PEPRIDGE FARM
LAYER CAKES*
ASSORTED FLAVORS
19 OZ


W/D
CORN ON
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TYSON
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$799
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THE TRIBUNE


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Hotel industry's 'outstanding


individuals'


are recognised


N By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Hotel
Association on Tuesday
recognised the outstanding
individuals in the hotel
industry who were the recent
winners of the distinguished
Cacique Awards.
This year's ninth annual
awards ceremony was held
in Grand Bahama at the
Regency Theatre.
In the hotel sector employ-
ees were awarded in six cat-
egories. Employee of the
Year Dellarese Frazier, was
a waitress in the Bimini Mar-
ket at Radisson Cable Beach
Resort and has since been
promoted to the assistant
manager at that restaurant.
Supervisor of the Year was
awarded to Stephen Moncur,
a captain and supervisor of
the banquet department at
Radisson Cable Beach
Resort.
Sales Executive of the
Year was awarded to Andre
Newbold, director of sales at
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort and Spa and Offshore
Island.
Chef
Chef of the Year was
awarded to Jasmin Young,
executive sous chef and culi-
nary trainer at A.tlantis
Kerzner International.
Manager of the Year was
awarded to Lynn Johnson,
general manager of the
Green Turtle Club.
Hotelier of the Year was
awarded to Paul Thompson,
managing director, of th'e
Lyford Cay Club.
President of Bahamas
Hotel Association Earle
Bethell said that the associa-
tion is proud of the individu-
als and will continue to


CACIQUE Award winners in the hotel industry pose with their trophies.
From left to right: Dellarese Frazier, Stephen Moncur, Lynn Johnson, Andre Newbold and Jasmin Young.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff

ensure that their employees must say, that we are most He added: "It is an awe- She also won two bronze committee and BahamaV
are recognised. appreciative to know that some achievement in the medals at the Culinary Hotel Association."
"We know for a fact that it you all recognise what it is industry. This is the. number Olympics in Germany. Ms Johnson the family
is very difficult to even like to stand heads and one industry of this country Mrs Young advised: island recipient from Green
become a finalist in the shoulders above all the oth- and we want you all to know "Once you feel that passion Turtle Cay, Abaco said that
Cacique awards. The com- ers in your areas," said Mr that we really appreciate that while you are working, that she has been in the business'
petition is very stiff and we Bethell. you all put your best foot is the way you know that this for 24 years and is still learn
forward everyday of the is the industry for you. Try to ing. She said that her per-
week to ensure that the guest find what it is that you do sonal mission statement is
is satisfied in our tourism best, so that you can give "To face everyday challenges
industry. Our industry is back and share your skills with utmost optimism."'
most grateful for individuals with others." Ms Frazier said that work-p
such as yourselves, you are ing in the hotel industry is a
leaders in your fields. The Exclaim ed very rewarding career, and:
only thing we ask is that you that the sky is the limit. A
continue to excel and make Mr Moncur dedicated the "I was able to school my
sure at the end of the day award to his mother Mae children through the hoter:
you pass on what you all Symonette who also worked industry and come next yeai
liilgli excel at to others." in the hotel industry. He said my daughter will be gradu-1.
The recipients at the press that she started as a maid ating as a lawyer.
r IJ II conference yesterday show- and worked her way up to "You must continue going
.. W.... , cased their Duho trophies as executive house keeper. He to training sessions and sem
well as express their grati- exclaimed that the Cacique inars to educate yourself td
tude to various individuals., award is a wonderful idea. achieve your goals. Fron,
The Chef of the Year, Mrs "You have people who line employees are very
Young holds many certifica- have toiled for so many years important to your establish-2
tions in culinary arts and has and are never recognised, ment because they can cause
worked for various hotel but this award takes time out your business to excel oi
chains in the United States, to recognise people. I would cause a decrease in your rev-
including the Ritz Carlton. like to thank the Cacique enue," she said.

':"*' : ^'' ':; ':^e K'^ ^^uW^ .^tfW *


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) is pleased to
invite tenders for the purchase of a number of used vehicles.

Interested persons may collect tender documents from BTC's Administrative
Office, JFK Drive between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday
through Friday.

Vehicles may be inspected at BTC's Perpall's Tract Compound between
the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm., Monday, February 14 through Thursday,
February 24, 2005. Vehicles will be sold as is.

Bids marked "TENDER FOR USED VEHICLES" should be sealed and
delivered by 5:00pm on Friday, February 25, 2005, to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & Chief Executive Officer
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


THE TRIBUNE


FAUit 24, I HUHtiUAY, I-tbIHUAHY 10, 2005








THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 25


LOCALAND3ITERATIONALNW


International Dog Show Ir i afk final
7 I^ r^ I t- 41k U1% . (I ^
THE Bahamas Kennel Club will be holding its 24th Internation- a ll
al Dog Show and Obedience Trials sponsored by Pedigree on March


- qf


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Syndicated Content b
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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White Zinfandel (1.51tr & 750ml) (Delicato,
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All Champagne & Sparkling Wines
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Rheinberg Piespoeter Michlesberg (750mi)
All Bolla varietals
Harveys Bristol Crea (Itr)
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assau Royale Flavoured Rum (ALL)
Beefeater Gin (750ml, Itr & 40 oz.)
Finlandia Vodka (750ml & Itr)


Carolans Cream (Itr)
Amarula Liqueur


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-- ~u a~---- -~-3la-C-F -- II


I-~II I----_- I - IIII--I-- --


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 25


8


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


This title basically hits the Caribbean
Style of Architecture and Cuisine


*


FREEPORT:
Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug


Special Price:


's5






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 27


THE TRIBUNE


COMICS PAGE


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LOCALAND3ITER ATIONALNW

oin tig love)

n Nassau Village
IIN AN effort to improve
ilations with the residents of
Nassau Village, police and
religious leaders visited the
4ieigbourhood to promote a
"love thy neighbour" theme.
The initiative is a part of The
brban Renewal Project, in
which police, the community
And other governmental agen-
t4ies work together to combat
social ills and to revitalise
deteriorated inner city prop-
erties.
Sgt Quinn Bethel led a dele-
gation of religious leaders on
te tour Sunday night. Pic-
hined infront from left to right
are Rev Ishmael Martin, Rev
r Charles Culmer, Rev
gene Bastian and BishopN M
Rupert Johnson.


Mario Duncanson)


tious over Midde st c-fire


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28, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


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Government ducks 'hardball'





approach on the Royal Oasis


Fears repercussions for Hurricane Hole and
Holiday Inn properties owned by Lehman
Brothers/Driftwood; as observers urge it to apply
to courts for resort to be placed in receivership


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Prime Minister Perry
Christie yesterday
hinted that the
Government was
avoiding a 'tough
line' approach on the Royal
Oasis Crowne Plaza & Golf
Resort for fear there might be
repercussions for the other
Bahamas-based hotels and
workers employed by the
Grand Bahama resort's owners
and operators.
However, several private sec-
tor sources have told The Tri-
bune over the past week that
the Government should play
"hardball" with the Royal
Oasis' owner and chief lender,
Lehman Brothers private equi-
ty arm, and its operator, Drift-
wood.
They have advocated that as
a major unsecured creditor, due


to the $13 million in unpaid tax-
es owed by the Royal Oasis'
holding company, Driftwood
Freeport Ltd, plus $2.5 million
in unpaid National Insurance
(NIB) contributions, the Gov-
ernment should apply to the
Supreme Court for the compa-
ny to be placed in administra-
tive receivership.
Royal Oasis is between $22-
$30 million in debt, a situation
that Obie Wilchcombe, the min-
ister of tourism, described as a
"quagmire".
However, responding to
questions from High Rock MP
Kenneth Russell in the House
of Assembly yesterday, Mr
Christie said that although the
Government had "a plan" to
deal with the Royal Oasis situ-
ation, and the plight of its 1300
staff who are currently out of
work, he did not want to divulge
details for fear it might impact
other Bahamian hotel proper-


ties.
Lehman Brothers' private
equity arm is the owner of the
256-room Holiday Inn Sunspree
Resort on Paradise Island, plus
the former Holiday Inn Nassau
at Junkanoo Beach, West Bay
Street, which has been renamed
as the Nassau Palm Resort and
Conference Centre. Driftwood
Hospitality manages both prop-
erties in addition to the Hurri-
cane Hole Marina, which
Lehman Brothers also owns.
The Tribune revealed recent-
ly how Lehman Brothers and
Driftwood were seeking a buy-
er for Hurricane Hole Marina,
but it is now understood that a
potential deal has fallen .
through. Sources said that Drift-
wood was being represented in
that transaction by attorney
Valentine Grimes, although it
is uncertain whether he is
involved with the Royal Oasis
controversy.


QUAGMIRE Obie Wilchcombe, minister of tourism


Mr Christie said yesterday:
"We believe we have some
leverage [with Lehman Broth-
ers and Driftwood] but we have
to exercise the greatest care, as
we are dealing with people who
still have interests in the
Bahamas.
"Clearly, they have contin-
ued interests in the Bahamas
and it is that continued interest
we have to protect as a lot of
people are employed [at those
three businesses] while we
negotiate with them."
The Prime Minister said the
Government was "pressing very
strongly" for Lehman Brothers
to pay the Royal Oasis staff the
severance pay due to them, esti-
mated to be about $8 million,
in addition to paying all out-
standing NIB contributions.
Apart from retaining its
Washington attorneys, Hogan
& Hartson, and former attor-
ney general Paul Adderley and
Harvey Tynes QC to explore
the legal options open to it, Mr
Christie said the Government
had a plan that was dependent
on the response it had received
from Lehman Brothers.

See EFFECT, Page 3B


0*aenen-


locke,i.


inene alk



ove $a In


Cablea Bac

investment


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


The Government is locked in
intense negotiations with the
Baha Mar investment consor-


tium in a bid to clinch the $1.2
billion project to redevelop the
Cable Beach strip, as the lat-
ter's February 19 deadline to
See TALKS, Page 4B


Bahamas 'moves


up the cycle' in


money laundering


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas "has moved up
the cycle" of international mon-
ey laundering, an international
economic crime expert has
revealed, no longer being used
as a country where the proceeds
of crime enter the global finan-
cial system.
Professor Barry Rider, a con-
sultant to UK law firm
Beachcroft Wansborough and
former head of a inter-govern-
mental organisation's special
intelligence unit on economic
crime,told the Nassau Confer-
ece that the Bahamas was no
longer used by criminals as a
Jurdiction where ilit funds
e-1iIed the financial system.
Whe he visited the BahaD s
n 1979, Professor Rider said
Sm tion was "a depot -
W1y", where people coulM dig
l sums of cash into bhns,
depii it and then give inru
to wire transfer it to ter
However, when Professor
Rider n aed to the Balhim
in 1994 it was evident that -e
BahamW place in the inekum.
tional money laundering
)roces ha changed.


Acknowledging that "every
jurisdiction in the world is
involved at some stage" in mon-
ey laundering, Professor Rider
said: "What has happened to
the Bahamas is that it has
moved up the cycle."
During the time of his first
visit, Professor Rider said there
was a Bahamas-based institu-
tion that was supposedly rep-
utable but "on the top 10 want-
ed list" in the world for money
laundering. That business was
"now alive, well and
respectable", having gone legit-
imate.
However, despite the anti-
money laundering and anti-ter-
ror finance crusade involving
the banking system that was
launched by the US in the wake
of the September 11 attacks,
Professor Rider said the
amount of funds laundered
through informal channels was
greater than that l the banking
system.
He said: "If gene's looking at
money laundering at's in the
Bahamas, I'd not be lokling at
the banks I'd be leaking at the
likes of some of year retail
shops.
"That is a real fae hmauw
tionally."


Government confirmsYVR


as preferred

By NEIL HARTNELL port".
Tribune Business Editor Glenys Hanna-Martin,


A subsidiary of the company
that manages Canada's Van-
couver International Airport
was yesterday named as the
preferred bidder for the con-
tract to manage and operate
Nassau International Airport,
charged with developing it into
"a first class international air-


the


minister of transport and avia-
tion, confirmed Tribune Busi-
ness's October 26 front page
exclusive, which revealed that
Vancouver Airport Services
(YVRAS), a subsidiary of
YVR, the Vancouver airport
operator, had been selected by
the Government as the pre-
ferred bidder.


airport

Mrs Hanna-Martin yester-
day told the House of Assem-
bly that talks with YVRAS
would "shortly begin", focus-
ing on a management agree-
ment first, before moving on
to a Build/Operate/Transfer
(BOT) agreement for Nassau
International Airport's long-
term development.
She added that if negotia-
tions with YVRAS failed, the


bidder

Government would begin talks
with the runner-up bidder,
Bahamas Airports Manage-
ment Group, a consortium fea-
turing the Ottawa Internation-
al Airport operator, Sypher-
Mueller Consultants and the
Royal Bank of Canada.
The third placed finisher, as
recommended to the Govern-
See AIRPORT, Page 5B


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Setting the framework for


e-commnerce in theBahamas

SCopyrighted Material -..



- --z"-S.-- Syndicated Content __
Av---ilable fromrcia News Providers

:Available from ommercial News Providers ..


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


ATTARA LIMTED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000,
ATTARA LIMITED, has be dissolved and struck off the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 26th day of January, 2005.



Ben Raphael Nicholas Warner,
Lister House, 35 The Parade,
St Helier, Jersey, JE2 3QQ
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


RVS MANAGEMENT INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, RVS
MANAGEMENT INC., has be dissolved and struck' off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 3rd day of February, 2005.



Victor J Rodriguez,
Rio Branco 1358/1201,
Montevideo, Uruguay
Liquidator


1


BUSINESS


m














THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 3B


Effect (From page 1B)


That response, he said, had
been received earlier this week
and was now being analysed
because there were some con-
ditions attached.
Several sources have sug-
gested that Lehman Brothers'
opening negotiating ploy will
be to ask the Government to
write-off the casino taxes and
NIB contributions that the Roy-
al Oasis owes, as the price it is
seeking from any potential pur-
chaser involves a sum that
would write off the massive lia-
bilities.
However, although the
Radisson, Spanish hotel chain
Barcelo, a company with a
"Paradise Island interest" like-
ly to be RIU Hotels and
Resorts and a company with
hotel interests in Antigua were
also said to be interested in
acquiring the Royal Oasis, it is
unlikely given the property's


troubled history that any buy-
er would be willing to pay the
price Lehman Brothers is seek-'
ing.
Knowing the Government
will be desperate to resolve the
unemployment of Royal Oasis
staff, especially with a general
election just over two years
away, Lehman Brothers will
feel it is in a strong negotiating
position. As Pat Bain, the hotel
union president said of Lehman
Brothers: "They hold the trump
card."
This is also because, as The
Tribune can reveal, of the
financing structure 'created
when the Royal Oasis was
acquired for $25 million by
Driftwood Freeport back in
2000.
To acquire the resort,
Lehman Brothers set up a lim-
ited partnership that would act
as a holding company for the


property, along with other part-
ners. The private equity firm
then advanced a substantial sum
to the partnership to meet the
acquisition price, meaning that
the resort was highly leveraged
- had taken on a great deal of
debt from the outset.
The terms of the debt repay-
ment were also said by sources
to have been particularly oner-
ous.
Although the set interest rate
attached to the payments was
2-3 per cent above the London
Inter-Bank Offering Rate
(LIBOR), it is understood that
for as long as the debt was out-
standing an extra 1.5 per cent
in interest per month was to be
paid. This effectively added a
further 18 per cent in interest
payments per annum at a com-
pounded annual rate.
Several tourism industry
sources said the high debt levels,


in a Bahamian hotel industry
that produces a relatively low
rate of return on investment
due to its operating costs, stored
up problems for the Royal
Oasis from the word go. They
suggested that the former FNM
administration should never
have approved the financing
structure, but this was ignored
due to the need to revitalise
Grand Bahama's tourism struc-
ture.
And apart from being the
main lender, Lehman Brothers
is also understood to have a 50
per cent stake in Driftwood
Hospitality, and since it is the
largest'shareholder, Driftwood
- the Royal Oasis operator is
effectively the private equity
arm's "alter ego".
Under the financial structure,
Lehman Brothers, which grad-
ually took over sole control of
the partnership that directly


owned Royal Oasis, had first
call on any cash flow and funds
the resort generated. Driftwood,
as managing partner, had sec-
ond call, with everyone else
having third call on whatever
was left.
Effectively, Lehman Broth-
ers' private equity arm has posi-
tioned itself as the Royal Oasis'
owner, operator and, as its main
financial backer, the leading
secured creditor. This means
that if the property is sold,


Lehman Brothers will have first
call on the funds raised from a
buyer, enabling it to recover its
minimal equity investment and
leaving everyone else to fight
over the scraps.
A private equity group such
as Lehman's typically buys trou-
bled hotels and companies with
a view to turning them round,
earning a 10-20 per cent annual
return on their investment
before selling them on, in theo-
ry for a handsome profit.


INSIGHT

For the stories behind

the news, read Insight

on Monday
__mmma


i'He6 Slpnbuin ssdobusi


5jScotiabank


1973 Bertram 31Ft. Flybridge Model
Totally Reconditioned All Grip Paint
New Schaffer Outriggers
New Seat-flybridge
New Raython Radar And Arch
* New Spotlight, New Stereo
New Windless And Fortress Anchor 600Ft Rope
* New Pulpit And Railings, New Canvas
* Interior: Sleeps 4 Nice Cushions
One Head, Microwave & Refrigerator
4.5 Panda Generator New Diesel & Cased In
Sound Shield 12000 BTU Airconditioner
* 50 Gallon Water Holding Tank And Washdown
* Fuel: 230 Gallon Deisel
* New Battery Charger
* Owner Has New Boat On The Way
* Over 150K Invested Asking 95K

All Offers Considered. This Boat Is A Great Boat For
The Weekend Pleasure Or Fishing.
Great For Deep Sea Fishing Business

Tel: 242-363-1270 Bus. 242-457-0852 Cell 242-362-0347 Hm.
___ I__________________


-Colina
Pricing Information As Of: _____
09 February 2005

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close TOday's Close Chan DaIly Vol. EPS $ DIV $ PIE Yield
1.39 0.95 Abaco Markets 0.95 0.95 0.00 0.197 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.40 7.75 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas .55 5.55 0.00 0.152 0.330 10.8 5.95%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.95 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.87 British American Bank 0.95 0.95 0.00 0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
7.47 6.50 Cable Bahamas 7.47 7.40 -0.07 2,000 0.510 0.240 14.5 3.24%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.30 6.60 Commonwealth Bank 7.30 7.30 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.3 5.34%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.40 1.50 0.10 5550 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.99 3.99 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.26%
9.87 8.18 Finco 9.87 9.87 0.00 0.649 0.480 15.2 4.86%
7.50 6.45 FirstCaribbean 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 7.95 Focol 7.95 7.95 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.1 6.29%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.65 6.63 -0.02 0.201 0.000 33.1 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ DIv $ P/E Yield
13.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 16.00 1.328 0.960 10.5 6.86%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00.00.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2075 1.1522 Colina Money Market Fund 1.207511"
2.1191 1.8944 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.1191 **
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648*"***
2.1746 2.0524 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.166020**
1.0894 1.0276 Collna Bond Fund 1.089371 **.

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by dosing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid S Buying price of Collns and Fidellti
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask S Selling price of Collna and fldellty
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mtha
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month-1ainlgs FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 100
- AS AT JAN. 31, 2005/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
* -AS AT JAN. 28, 2005/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/1-* AS AT DEC. 31, 2004


BUSINESS


ii I


--


^I









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


complete the purchase of Phillip
Ruffin's two hotel properties
looms ever nearer.
The Baha Mar negotiating
team and its government coun-
terpart, headed by Dr Baltron
Bethel, deputy chairman and
managing director of the Hotel
Corporation, are said by sources
close to the process to be locked
in talks at the Radisson Cable
Beach resort Sources close to
the process said an agreement
needed to be reached by the
end of this coming weekend to
give the investors a chance to
wrap everything up.
Apart from negotiating a
Heads of Agreement, the talks
are also centred on reaching a
purchase agreement for the
Radisson, which is owned by
the Hotel Corporation.
Sources said both sides have
been locked in intense negotia-
tions for more than a week, with
the Government seemingly hav-
ing realised the urgency of con-
cluding a deal before Baha
Mar's February 19 purchase


option for Mr Ruffin's resort
properties, the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort and Crystal Palace
Casino, plus the Nassau Beach
Hotel, expires. Increasingly,
more government departments
and agencies are becoming
involved in the talks.
Baha Mar now has only nine
days in which to conclude a deal
with the Government before Mr
Ruffin is released from the pur-
chase option, which he has been
bound into for 120 days, and
can walk away. Mr Ruffin is a
notoriously difficult negotiator
who has no shareholders to
answer to, and sources believe
that if Baha Mar fails to com-
plete by February 19, he will
walk away and not return, blow-
ing all hopes of revitalising a
declining Cable Beach strip.
Prime Minister Perry Christie
gave a hint of the urgency
attached to the Cable Beach
strip talks when he addressed
the Grand Bahama Chamber
of Commerce's Installation
Banquet on January 29, saying:


"We are trying to settle, hope-
fully, in a matter of hours if not
days, a Cable Beach develop-
ment which is characterised in
the context of billions."
The Tribune revealed last
month how the Baha Mar con-
sortium, who has as its lead
investor Lyford Cay billionaire
Dikran Izmirlian, was afraid
that the $1.2 billion project
could be "blown up" if it failed
to conclude the Radisson pur-
chase and Heads of Agreement
before the Ruffin option
expired.
Prior to February 19, Baha
Mar has to complete several
other steps, including getting
bank financing in place to
reduce the multi-million dollar
equity exposure of its European
and North American investors.
Lenders will want to do their
own due diligence on the pro-
ject, examining appraisals and
engineering reports before they
commit, and sources close to
the process said this was being
held up by a lack of agreement


with the Government. Baha
Mar has also been delayed in
readying insurance coverage
and investing millions to main-
tain the'three hotels' opera-
tional capabilities.
One source close to the
process said of Baha Mar's posi-
tion in January: "They don't
understand why they can't close
with the Government and get
things moving forward. If they
can't do a deal with the Gov-
ernment, they can't do all the
next steps to tee up the closing,
and if they can't tee up the clos-
ing it will blow their deadline
with Ruffin."
Baha Mar has previously said



a peBepo w ath,


that if approved, it project
would add $450 million per
annum to the Bahamian econo-
my's Gross Domestic Product
(GDP). Phase I of the project
will accommodate 2,500 new or
totally refurbished new rooms,
an expanded golf course, a 'Las
Vegas style' casino, and 75,000
square feet of convention space.
About 4,700 full-time jobs for
Bahamians would be created


during the first 12 months of
construction, with annual wages
paid to them estimated to total
$125 million.
In its first full year of opera-
tions, the Baha Mar Cable
Beach project would provide
direct employment for an "addi-
tional" 4,500 Bahamians, with
this number expected to
increase by 50 per cent in its
second year.


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
P.O. Box N-4378
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


TEMPORARY POSITION AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Kingsway Academy High School is in need of a qualified
teacher immediately until the end of the Easter Term
for the following subjects:

* Art and Crafts
* Food & Nutrition
* Needlework Sewing

Successful applicants must:
Be born again Christians, with minimum
qualifications of a Bachelor's Degree in the
appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teacher's Certificate
Be familiar with the B.J.C. and B.G.C.S.E.
Syllabus (H.S.)
Have excellent communication Skills
Have high standards of morality
Have a love for children and learning
Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities.

Applications can be collected from
Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
The Business Office, Bernard Road

Tel-34-26-- "- .-- e73 -630


Talks (From page 1B)


Career Opportunity

Development Company seeks Office Coordinator

Excellent computer skills to include Word, Excel, PowerPoint &
Project Management software.
Familiarity with plans, construction and specifications a plus
Excellent opportunity for growth

Job Function includes, but is not limited to the following:

Administration of programs, projects, and/or processes specific to
the overall development team
Word processing, maintain files, schedule and organization of
meetings, coordinate travel itineraries upon request
Monitor and order general office supplies as needed, adequately
maintain and secure office equipment
Provide general office support for copying, faxing and mailing

Requires:

Minimum of 3- 5 years of previous related experience
Good proofreading and editing skills
Effective verbal and written communication skills
Discretion regarding personnel and industry-related matters*
Excellent interpersonal skills
Attention to detail
_--Team player
th
Resumes must be received before February 12 2005. Please forward via
email to: info(a)bahamardevelopment.com fax: (242) 702-4202.


ACCOUNTS


ASSISTANT

Security and General, a local Property and Casualty Insurance Company
seeks to employ a mature, ambitious individual for the rolle of Accounts
Assistant.

Qualifications:

2-3 years Bookkeeing experience
At least an Associates degree in Accounting
Good oral and written communication skills
Computer literate

The company offers an competitive remuneration package, salary
commensurate to experience.

Resumes should be sent to The Human Resource Manager, at P.O.
Box N-3540 by February 16, 2005.


OJPMORGAN TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED.


SCHOLARSHIP AWARD

J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited seeks to offer a four (4) year scholarship
assistance towards the tuition of a Bahamian student, who has been accepted in a Bachelor's
degree program at an international accredited institution or at The College of The Bahamas.
Studies must be in the related business fields of Accounting, Finance, Corporate Law,
Management or Business Administration.

OBJECTIVE

As a corporate citizen, J.P. Morgan Trust Company's goal is to make a positive impact on the
Bahamian local economy through contributing by means of offering this scholarship award
to assist in the further development of a young Bahamian pursuing a career path in the financial
sector.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of J.P. Morgan Chase Private
Bank, is an offshore financial institution with over 30 years of combined operations in the
Bahamas.

Criteria & Conditions:

1. The candidate must be from a family of combined financial income of $50,000 or less (to
be verified by employment letter).
2. Candidate must have passed at least 5 BGCSEs with grade passing of C and above.
3. A high school graduating grade point average of 3.0 or above.
4. The candidate to obtain a copy of high school transcript from the school, sealed and address
to the Human Resources Manager at J.P. Morgan Trust Company.
5. Candidate must maintain a college grade point average of 3.0 or above.
6. A copy of the college transcript must be submitted to Human Resources Manager within
three to five weeks at the end of each school year.
7. The candidate cannot be an immediate family member of J.P. Morgan Trust Company.
8. The candidate must be "drug free" throughout the entire enrollment period.
9. The candidate to be offered summer employment with the bank (June-August) whilst
pursuing full time studies.
10. Only Bahamian citizens are eligible to apply.
11. Application may be obtained from the office of J.P. Morgan Trust Company, 2nd Floor,
Bahamas Financial Center, Shirley & Charlotte Sts. Deadline is March 31st, 2005.


BUSINESS


b









THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


(From page 1B)


ment by the Airport Authori-
ty, was Fraport Worldwide Air-
port Services, based in Frank-
furt, Germany.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
under the proposed BOT
arrangement, the Airport
Authority would continue to
own Nassau International Air-
port. A management company
such as YVRAS would operate
and develop the facility for
between 20-30 year, upgrading
it before transferring it back to
the Airport Authority. The lat-
ter would also receive fee pay-
ments from YVRAS for the
lifetime of the agreement.
As part of the much-needed
upgrade to Nassau Internation-
al Airport, the Government is
looking for a new $200-250 mil-
lion terminal to be constructed,
but YVRAS is no stranger to
either that or the BOT arrange-
ment in the Caribbean.
It already has a 30-year con-
tract, as part of a consortium,
to manage and develop Sang-
ster International Airport in
Montego Bay, Jamaica. As part
of the arrangement it will
expand the existing terminal
facility to a capacity of six mil-
lion passengers, requiring an
investment of about $200 mil-
lion over the contract's lifespan.
YVRAS operates 14 airports
in five different countries,
including Providenciales Inter-
national Airport in Turks &
Caicos, where it has a 15-year
contract to manage the termi-
nal, Santiago in Chile and six
Dominican Republic Airports.
Its selection as preferred bid-
der will also have pleased
Kerzner International, and may
have acted as a spur to the com-
pany completing its revised
Heads of Agreement in Decem-
ber and starting construction
work on the main aspects of
Phase III. Kerzner Internation-
al is understood to have been
very impressed by its parent's
Vancouver operation.
Meanwhile, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin said yesterday that a pas-
senger facility charge would
help create a development fund
to "propel" Nassau Interna-
tional Airport forward.
Although work on repairing
Nassau International Airport's
runways was now "in high
gear" through contractor Lagan
Holdings, the process has suf-
fered "severe setbacks" due to
last September's hurricanes.
She warned that travellers


By NEIL iARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor
E T 2 6 20 0k
v, ree entity fiat as ages
au< operates Vapicover later-
niatoni ipalA rt. has eeu o-ho'
sn as ie preferred bidder to
become Nassau International
Airport's managemet/operat-
S ig partner, sources told The
Tribune ast night .
Although few details were
provided a.oiit the terms of the
ianagetei contract, it is ?
understood that the Govern-
meat and YVR are now in talks
^to cleade the agreement in
the shortest possible tinieframe.
That is because sorting out
Nassau international Airport is
crucial oierner t
ual executing on its fmll $1 bi-
lion Phase II expansion on
Paradise Island.
The company is thought to
he awaiting progress at the air-
Po t before taking a fiil deei-
sion, and has uiit~i Decemberr
31. to decdewhether i wil, go
through with the major part of
Phase ll, which include the
15 SAtdmo Island golf eomrse aad
water-hased theme park attract
YVR's selection is likely to
Please rNerzner nteraational,
thOugh, as the company lhad
been said by sources to have
been impressed by the frinaer's
Vancouvei Airp operation.
The.Airport .Authonty for
Vancouver InteinaiMonal Air-
port,.which is Cmanada's second


busiest handling some 14.3 mil-
lion passengers and 232,200
tJake-ols and landings peryear-,
has created a subsidiary, Van-
couver Airport Services
(YRVAS). that operates 14 air-
ports in five countries, including
in Jamaica and the Dominicani
Republic.
YVRAS is involved at Sang-
ster International Airport in
Montego Bay, Jamaica; Santia-
go International Airport in
Chile; and six Dominican
Republic airports.
YVR is understood to have
earlier heavily courted. he Gov'-
ermnent, flying several Cabinet
ministers -including trhePrime
Minister, Gle iys Hanna-Mar-

See FLY, Page 3S


HOW Tribune Business revealed YVR's selection on October 26
were "likely to experience way, set to replace it. Travellers. B ahamians and 40 independent
delays" after the main runway, would now be required to check truckers, and 76 per cent of the
runway 1432, was closed to in for departures not less than tofil workforce engaged on the
take-offs and landings as of yes- three hours prior to take-off. project were Bahamians, com-
terday to allow for repairs, with The runway repairs had pro- pared to the minimum 45 per
runway 927, the secondary run- vided employment for 100 cent stipulated in the contract.


Airport


....4.. .. t*6cn


- ~---


"COMMITTED TO COMPLIANCE"












NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
&
ELECTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
(PREVIOUSLY CIRCULATED BY EMAIL AND
APPEARING IN BACO'S NEWS LETTER)



Speakers at the meeting:


Attorneys
Monique Cartwright & Andre Rahming
Investment Funds


Cheryl Bazard
Whats new in Compliance
(Compliance Trends)


Elections for all positions on the Executive
Committee will take place.



DATE
17th February, 2005


Time: 4:00 pm


VENUE


British Colonial Hilton
Register now with
Marsha Ferguson at 502-3142
or
Duhiza Swaby at 328-8121


BUINS


HJ HIGGS & JOHNSON
Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law


invites applications for attorneys for our Freeport Office.

Applicants must have a minimum of 4-6 years experience in
Litigation and Conveyancing, demonstrate an ability to work
independently and possess a thorough working knowledge and
technical competence in the areas mentioned. (Applicants with
experience in only one of the mentioned areas may also apply).

Successful applicants can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits.

Apply in confidence to:

Vacancy
P.O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
or via email at: gbastian@higgsjohnson.com.



TEMPLE CHRISTIAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

URGENTLY NEEDS

1 Spanish Teacher (Grades 1-6)
1 Teacher's Aide

Applicant must:

A. Be a born-again practicing Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian Schools.

B. Have an Associates and or Bachelor's Degree
in Education from a recognized College or
University in the area of specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.

D. Be willing to contribute to the school's extra
curricular program.

Application must be made in writing with a full
Curriculum Vitae, a recent coloured photograph and
three references should be sent to:

The Principal
Temple Christian Schools
Collins Avenue
.P.. RO.BoxN-1566
Nassau, Bahamas










P B5 TRIB


KINGSWAY ACADEMY

ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be holding
Entrance Examinations for students
wishing to enter Grades 2 through 6,
on SATURDAY, MARCH 5 AND 19.,


Parents are asked


to collect


Application Forms from the
Elementary School office before the
testing date from 8:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.


For further information contact the
school at telephone numbers
324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269


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MVIUST SELL


Two Storey Commercial Building 4025 sq. ft.
Comprising a Motel with eight 1 Bed/ 1 Bath units and Two commercial stores on the ground
floor
Lot No. 151 8,704sq.ft. Bay Street, Lower-Bogue, Eleuthera
Interested persons should submit written offers to be received no later than February 28, 2005 to:
Commercial Credit Collection Unit
RO.Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas or
For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Manager (242) 335-1464 or (242) 335-1400 North Eleuthera or.
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit Phone: 356-1686,356-1685, 356-1608
Financing available for the qualified purchaser
Serious enquiries only


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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE
SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGER
SAFETY & ENVIRONMENTAL DEPARTMENT
ENERGY SUPPLY DIVISION
A vacancy exists in the Energy Supply Division for a Safety and Environmental Manager.
The Safety and Environment Manager is responsible for implementing and maintaining best practices in Safety
and Environmental Administration and Operations within the Corporation. The manager will also advise line
managers on safety and environmental procedures and policies, focus on minimizing accidents, and injuries,
organize safety training, and monitor the safety and environmental practices of the Corporation.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:
" Developing and managing Corporation-wide safety and environmental programs
* Developing corporate-wide policies and procedures on fire prevention
* Assisting and advising line Managers in developing departmental plans on fire extinguishing and controls
* Liaising with Insurance Companies and arranging safety inspections by Insurers Inspectors
* Performing safety audits of all Corporation facilities.
* Maintaining and updating Corporation-wide policy on employee safety rules and practices
* Advising on suitable methods of measuring corporate safety performance
* Directing. and evaluating Contractors performing environmental work and projects
* Assisting and advising line managers in safety training and other safety matters
* Planning, organizing and conducting seminars and courses on safety topics
* Serving on special committees investigating major industrial accidents
* Coordinating the preparation and the updating of the hurricane precaution plan
* Monitoring pre-hurricane season preparations and reports for Management
* Establishing goals and objectives for environmental compliance for the Corporation
* Ensuring that ALL Divisions comply with environmental regulations by defining environmental problems,
performing site surveys, inventory and record keeping control, secure relevant permits. Environmental audits,
contingency, planning provide recommendations for environmental compliance and evaluation of progress
* Identifying hazardous materials and establishing safe handling methods to minimize risk to workers and the
environment
* Maintaining and updating company policies and procedures related to Safety and the Environment within
the Corporation
Job requirements include:
* A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Occupational Health & Safety, Environmental Health or in a related
discipline
* A minimum of 5 years post-tertiary experience in an industrial safety and environment position
* Excellent leadership and management skills
" Strong Project Management skills
" Good interpersonal skills
* Strong judgement and sound reasoning ability
* Ability to interpret technical reports and drawings
* Sound knowledge of safety and environmental regulations, practices & procedures
Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application Form to
The Manager, Human Resources & Training, Head Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Roads,
P.O.Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas, on or before Monday, February 14,2005.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, NEVILLE SANDS
RO.Box N-742, Freeport, Grand Bahama, intend to change
my name to JAMES NEVILLE BOWLEG If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
F-43536, Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


DEVELOPMENT

ASSISTANT
Bahamas National Trust
Primary Responsibility: Manage the membership database,
acknowledgement process and be an integral part of the Development team
to raise funds to support the Bahamas National Trust.
Position location: Nassau, Bahamas
Reports to: Director of Development
Primary Tasks:
Manage the membership database using Paradigm software.
Oversee all membership services and membership outreach activities.
Assist in developing short and long-term strategies for raising money
for BNT.
Interest and knowledge in doing research of the internet.
Oversee the development and implementation of BNT's website.
Write letters and reports.
Research and write grants.
Coordinate and carry-out the gift acknowledgement process.
Assist in organizing and carrying-out special events and parties.
Organize and coordinate volunteer's activities.
Assist with setting up and preparing for fundraising visits to
individuals, companies, government and foundations.
Primary Skills Required:
Meticulous attention to details.
Proven aptitude to work with Paradigm software.
Minimum three years work experience.
Exceptional writing and interpersonal communications skills.
Knowledge of website design and implementation, a strong plus.
Demonstrated ability to conduct research on the internet.
Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities,
meet deadlines and pay attention to details.
Experience in organizing volunteers, a plus.
Working knowledge of MS Office, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Paradigm
software.
Commitment to natural resource conservation in the Bahamas a plus.
Willingness to occasionally work long hours to meet tight deadlines.
Positive attitude.
To apply for the position email or send cover letter, resume, three
references including telephone numbers and email address, and two
writing samples by February 27, 2005 to:
Bahamas National Trust
P.O. Box N- 4105, Nassau, Bahamas or bnt@batelnet.bs


WorldCom chief





was warned over





accounting plans


THE TRIBUNET
1 1-m


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


- --








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10,2005, PAGE 7B


Wall Street up




over Fiorina's





firing at HP



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LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CHARNWOOD INVESTMENTS
LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd day of February,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Elvira Lowe
ofi P..BoxN-7757Nossau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Elvira Lowe







(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 31st day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.BoxN-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Sngrid Davis
(Liquidator)


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAMBYDEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, LAVONDA FEASTER of
Buttonwood Avenue, New Providence, Nassau, Bahamas, intend
to change my son's name from CECIL TAVON WILFRED
FEASTER to TAVON WILFRED FEASTER if there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objectionsto the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamtas,,iiater than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.


Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading
financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100
million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of

DOCUMENT CONTROL MANAGER


FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore trust
companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman
Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and Singapore.
Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES
Management of document control unit (Imaging, Safe Keeping, Dual
Control, Warehouse, Records Management.)
Ensure that all records are kept within compliance to Citigroup standards.
Implementation of GWS records management strategy.
MIS reporting.
Management of risk and assist in coordination of audit.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED
Historic imaging and records management experience and familiarity
with Trust and Company documentation.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with various business units on a global basis.
Influencing, organizational and leadership skills.
Initiative and the ability to think strategically
People Management.
2-4 years Imaging and/or records management experience.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Operation Controls Head
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR
Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com
Deadline for application is February 23,2005.


BUSINESS









PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNEf


Wal-Mart closes Canadian






store over union contract


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NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JANE CLARANDER
CHRISTIE-ARCHER late of Hutchinson Street,
Pyfrom Addition, Eastern District, New Providence,
The Bahamas.
Deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required
to send the same duly certified in writing to the
Undersigned on or before the 28th day of February,
2005, after which date the Executrix will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.


McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
Attorneys for the Executrix
Chambers,
P.O. Box N-3937
Mareva House
No. 4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your.story.


- a -


GN 159

MINISTRY OF

HEALTH

BAHAMAS SOLID WASTE
MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES (DEHS)
HAZARDOUS WASTE FACILITY NEW PROVIDENCE ISLAND AND
GREAT ABACO REGIONAL SANITARY LANDFILL
Loan N: 1170/OC BH


The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas has received a loan from the
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) towards the cost of The Bahamas Solid Waste
Management Program, and it intends to apply part of the loan proceeds to the Construction
of:

1. Hazardous Waste Facility for New Providence Island; and

2. First stage development of the Great Abaco Regional Landfill

The Project Execution Unit, under the auspices of The Department of Environment
Health Services (DEHS) and The Ministry of Health, now invite firms, joint ventures
or consortiums for IDB's Members Countries to participate in this bidding process by
presenting sealed bids for the design-build of the DEHS Hazardous Waste Facility and
first stage development of the Great Abaco Regional Landfill. The procedures for the
contracting for the provision of service, financed by this program will be subject to the
provisions of this loan contract.

The service to provided is listed below (with the minimum basic specifications described).
Bidders may bid on the packages.

* Design-Build Proposed Hazardous Waste Facility, Harrold Road Landfill New
Providence Island and

* First stage development of the Great Abaco Regional Landfill

Interested parties may obtain further information, including eligibility to participate
and may obtain a copy of thebidding document from the office of the:

Project Coordinator
Bahamas Solid Waste Management Program
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
FARRINGTON ROAD
P.O.BOX SS 19048
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 322-8087 or (242) 322-8037
FAX: (242) 322-8074

Interested Tenders may purchase a complete set of tender documents by submitting a
written application to the Department of Environmental Health Service and upon
payment of a non-refundable fee of $50.00. The method of payment will be certified
cheques or cash.

Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope(s) marked "Tenders for the Design -
Build of Hazardous Waste Facility for New Providence Island" and sent to:-

The Tenders Board
c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance
P.O.Box N-3017
Nassau, N.P.
The Bahamas

All tenders must reach the Tender's Board no later than 4:30p.m. on March 7th, 2005.
All tenders must be submitted in triplicate. Tenders will be open at 10:00a.m. on March
8th, 2005 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


DIRECTOR of

DEVELOPMENT

Bahamas National Trust
Primary Responsibility: Lead the fundraising team to create and carryout short-
and long -term strategies for raising money to support the Bahamas National Trust.
Position location: Nassau, Bahamas
Reports to: Executive Director
Primary Tasks:
Head the fundraising team and directly supervise development staff.
Serve on the BNT senior management team.
Develop short and long-term strategies for raising money for BNT.
Write letters and reports.
Research and write grants.
Review and edit other staff's writing that has to do with fundraising.
Oversee the gift acknowledgement process.
Organize and coordinate committees charged with fundraising.
Organize and carry-out special events and parties.
Design and set-up a planned giving program.
Organize and coordinate volunteer's activities.
Assist in production of materials including brochures, wqbsite, powerpoint
presentations.
Assist with setting up and attending fundraising visits to individuals,
companies, government and foundation.
Coordinate all fundraising activities done by BNT.
Primary Skills Required:
Strong background in project management and program administration.
Minimum five years work experience, ideally in the fundraising arena.
Four-year college degree or greater.
Exceptional writing and interpersonal communications skills.
Demonstrated ability to research and write grants.
Demonstrated ability to effectively use the internet for research.
Exceptional people skills and ability to establish and build relationships.
Experience in developing and carrying-out fundraising activities.
Basic knowledge of planned giving and other development techniques.
Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities, meet
deadlines and pay attention to details.
Experience in supervising staff and volunteers.
Working knowledge of MS Office, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Paradigm
software.
Commitment to natural resource conservation in the Bahamas.
Willingness to work long hours to meet tight deadlines.
Willingness to travel throughout the Bahamas and abroad.
To apply for the position email or send cover letter, resume, four references
including telephone numbers and email address, and two writing samples to
bnt@batelnet.bs by February 27, 2005.


__


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 10, 2005

S7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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0 WPBT Beef skewers. aha, Neb.; railroad and train col- can Frontiers that the Vikingsdiscovered the
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WFOR (CC) "Formalities" A (CC) (DVS) "Unbearable" (N) ) (CC) (DVS) Sleef A postal worker and her
$12,000 cargo go missing. (N)
Access Holly- Joey turns Will & Grace (N) The Apprentice "Soap Dopes" The (9:59) ER "Shortness of Breath" (N)
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) on the charm with A (CC) teams are assigned to create a mini 0 (CC)
a reporter. movie ad for a body wash.
Deco Drive The O.C. The Lonely Hearts Club" Point Pleasant Boyd offers to coor- News (CC)
WSVN (N) n (CC) dinate a church fund-raising dance
marathon. (N) (CC)
Jeopardyl Teen Extreme Makeover Seven people get the makeovers of their dreams. (N) PrimeTime Live (CC)
* WPLG Tournament" (N) A (CC)
(CC)

American Jus- Cold Case Files "Murder Illustrated; Blood Relations; Killer on the Strip; The First 48 A victim's body is
A&E tice A Son's The Doll Mur" A man stands trial for a murder committed at age 15. (CC) burned beyond recognition. (CC)
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BBCW News News News
BET Grammy Nomi- The Parkers/ Girlfriends n Soul Food 0 (CC) Club Comic View
PET nation Special (CC) (CC)
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C1C TImes (N)(CC) (N) (CO) The National (_C)
Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman, Dennis Miller Nick Stahl. (N) The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC ConanO'Brien Joan Rivers. (N)
(:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
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players. (CC) Snopp Dogg. Use (CC) rebel, ies (CC)
COURT Cops n (CC) The Investigators "Cliffhanger' Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators Phone records
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rich husband for her daughter. (CC) turmoil. (CC)
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 9BI


[ L WODlEU RITURE


I _. ,MOM


m








P B SB1T E


ST JOHNS GIANTS
came out blazing hot in the
first half of play in the
junior boys championship
match up, to claim their
second consecutive cham-
pionship title.
Giants, who lost steam
in the fourth quarter, held
on to for a 50-44 victory
over the St Augustines
College Big Red Machines.
The smart play by Ehrin
Hanna helped the Giants'
cause, as the Big Red
Machines came chugging
back in the final minutes
of the fourth.
Hanna's two appear-
ances on the free throw
line, with 54.3 seconds left
on the clock, sealed the
victory. The crucial
turnover by Travis Not-
tage, with just about 30.5
seconds left, after a missed
free throw by Hanna,
became the turning point
for the Big Red Machines
- who were left with noth-
ing else to do but foul the
closest player.

Blocking
Jevaughne Saunders, the
leading scorer for the Big
Red Machines, was called
for a blocking foul on Han-
na, who was making his
way down the court for an
open look at the basket.
Although Hanna wasn't
the leading scorer for the
Giants, his six points, with
just seconds remaining,
sent the Big red Machines
packing.
He said: "We just tried
to put a man-to-man press
on them because we saw
that they were catching us
up in the fourth.
"SAC always thought
that they were a dominat-
ing team, so we came out
to prove to them that we
were are the number one
team to beat in junior
boys."
SAC's head coach John
Todd said: "This is the first
time we walked away emp-
ty handed, but it is better
to leave with a second
place title than to leave out
with nothing."
: The Big Red Machines
have three teams playing
in the BAISS champi-
onship series senior girls
and boys, both being down
one game.









*. -


Overcoming the




impasse in baseball


T SEEMS as though the
impasse for baseball is,
not playing the sport in the
high schools, but rather, bring-
ing all of the personalities
under one umbrella.
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom,
made a bold initiative, that
should have been done a long
time ago, to try and get the
Bahamas Baseball Associa-
tion back into the fold.
In 1986, baseball was in tur-
moil after it was discovered
that the BBA was not consti-
tutionally fit to govern the
sport in the country because
the islands of Grand Bahama,
Bimini and Inagua were not
a part of the association.
Moreover, New Providence
didn't even have a league of its
own. It was being run by the
BBA.
The BBA, however, as an
association, was the govern-
ing body for the sport and was
recognised as such by the
International Baseball Feder-
ation.
So whether or not they were
constitutionally right at the
time, the BBA were, and still
are, the governing body in the
Bahamas.
The problem could have
been corrected by allowing the
BBA to change its name to a
federation and allow an asso-


STUBBS
\, ........ ............ . .... #" -1


OPINION
MOllMMM M '11% II

ciation in New Providence to
be formed to coincide with the
others in Grand Bahama,
Bimini and Inagua.
Instead, sports minister after
sports minister tried to side-
step the problem and eventu-
ally a New Providence associ-
ation and a federation was
formed.
But the problem still existed


because the BBA was still
being recognised by the IBF
and the Bahamas Olympic
Association as the governing
body.
Wisdom, however,
announced in November 2002
that they will no longer recog-


done to him and he invited
him back into the fold to assist
the programme.
It was a good gesture, but
as Wood reacted, he doesn't
have anything to apologise for.
His only concern was to do
what he was mandated to do.


hamper the growth and devel-
opment of the sport into the
school system the way it is
going right now.
The BAA, for years, had
agitated for baseball to be
played in high school. They've
even tried in several occasions,
but they ran into a stumbling
block because of the dispute
that existed.

S o in order for the intro-
duction of the sport in
the schools to be successful as
softball is, there needs to be a
more cohesive effort from the
administration level.
Right now, it shouldn't mat-
ter who is in charge of the
BBA as the governing body.
The only way to affect the
change is for those interested
to rejoin the BBA.
Just as the ministry did in
trying to get the bodies togeth-
er to start the baseball pro-
gramme in the schools, they
can intervene in making
sure that an amicable agree-
ment is reached by all con-
cerned.
They can also facilitate the
election of officers so that the
membership can select those
persons whom they deem as
more competent leaders.
If that isn't done, the
impasse in baseball will
remain right where it is.


nise the BBA as the governing
body and he cancelled the
instrument in the Sports Act
that granted them their recog-
nition.

Yet the BBA still
existed and was able
to travel to complete in IBF
sanctioned events under the
BOA banner without the sup-
port of the ministry.
At a press conference to
officially announce the for-
mation of baseball in the high
schools, Wisdom publicly
apologised to Wood for any
wrong doing that he may have


While Wisdom has called
for all involved in the sport to
bury the hatchet and agree to
cooperate for the "children of
this country," it's going to take
a lot more than that.
I still think the first and
foremost thing to do at this
point is for everybody to pub-
licly acknowledge that the
BBA is the governing body
for the sport.
Once that is done, then it's
only fitting that all fractions
in the sport come together
under one umbrella to form
one common goal.
There are just too many
fragmented pieces that will


* ITpan

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"While Wisdom has called for
all involved in the sport to
bury the hatchet and agree to
cooperate for the 'children of
this country,' it's going to take
a lot more than that."


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Observing Ash


Wednesda


Lfhousnds rceive ark o the ross a Lentbegin


Yesterday thousands
,.-, i of Bahamian Chris-
tians observed Ash
y [ Wednesday, mark-
ing the beginning
of Lent. Churches throughout the
Bahamas were packed with parish-
ipners wanting to receive their ash-
.es.
Ashes, an early symbol of
penance used by the ancient Jews,
also had important meaning for
other pre-Christians cultures.
Ashes and dust have been used
interchangeably to stress not only
penance but also the inevitability
of physical death and decay.
It was first heard from the angry
God of Genesis: "With sweat on
your face you will eat bread, until
you return to clay, for it was from
clay that you were taken, for you
are dust and unto dust you shall
return."
In days gone by, the faithful who
received the ashes wiped them off
their forehead when they left the
church. The mark of the ashes was
t6 be kept in their hearts instead.
SMany people yesterday walked
Aound with the cross traced out of
dshes on their foreheads, which in
Jie Christian tradition is not only a
reminder it is also a conversion.
"Rend your heart, not your gar-
ment.....I. am sending you grain,
new wine and oil..;" (Joel-2-12-
18).
On Ash Wednesday the 40 days
journey of Lent begins, it should
be a time when we not only give
up a bad habit like smoking, curs-
ing or drinking, etc, it should be a
time when we strive to not only
do more but be more loving and
caring.


S By NICOLA PACIOTTA
"REMEMBER o man, that
dust thou art and unto dust
shalt thou return." Derived
from the Old Testament book
of Genesis, these were the
words heard yesterday, the
first day of the Lenten season,
as thousands of Bahamians
received the mark of the cross
in ashes on their foreheads.
For the next 39 days, Chris-
tians throughout the Bahamas,
and the world, will turn their
combined gaze toward disci-
pline, self-sacrifice and peni-
tence in their spiritual lives.
Leaders of the Christian
'church want to know that
Bahamians, in an effort to help
them "release human desires
and draw the spirit being clos-
er to God", can identify and
give up something they nor-
mally have a hard time doing
without.
The Rev Canon Warren H
Rolle, rector of St Mary's
Anglican Church in Nassau,
believes that Bahamians have
become a very indulgent peo-
ple and a very indulgent soci-
ety.
"We like to use all good
things in this life. But it's
important for people to
remember that there's more to
life than just (good) food,
drink and clothes. Abstaining
from or diminishing one's plea-
sures and focusing more on
God ... this is very beneficial
to everyone," said-Father
Rolle.
Lent is a time to remember
that people should draw closer
to their Creator, he noted,
adding that "there's always a
need for self-denial by practic-
ing acts of charity".
"As Jesus fasted and prayed
in the wilderness for 40 days,
we may also find an extra time
or place for prayer," he said.
Father Rolle pointed to
some of the things people can
and often do to show acts of
kindness and sacrifice visiting
the sick or shut-in at hospitals


(Photo: Mario Duncanson)


Christian Council calling on Bahamians


to reflect and support law enforcement


0 By PETURA BURROWS
-0Tribune Feature Writer
THE Bahamas Christian Council is call-
ingon Bahamians to reflect and support
enforcement two weeks after the Nas-
s Village riot stunned the larger com-
n~ity.
1 an interview with Tribune Religion,
president of the Council, Rev William
Thompson, said that while he would not
speculate on what caused tempers to flare
itthat community until a complete police
lin estigation has been conducted, he not-
d!that the Nassau Village Riot was not
the beginning of violence in this country.
In a press statement released by the
Council on the riot that left five injured,
members said that these recent occur-
rences of violence came from a different
root. "It is quite obvious that the seeds for
this calamitous event were planted quite
some years ago, and nurtured over the
years."
On Wednesday, January 26, shortly
after 7pm, the events which Bahamians


* REV WILLIAM THOMPSON


likened to scenes of violence in Haiti,
began to unfold. According to several wit-
nesses, the riot was the result of a traffic
accident.
Even after the riot squad and the K-9
Unit were called to the scene, the resi-
dents were still at unrest. And the volatile
situation continued the following day
when residents created makeshift barri-
cades to keep the police out of the com-
munity.
According to Reginald Ferguson, assis-
tant police commissioner in charge of
crime, three civilians received gunshot
wounds and two officers were injured in
the incident. Investigations are still under-
way.
The Nassau Village incident was remi-
niscent of the Kemp Road riot in 2002
when an angry mob of Kemp Road resi-
dents faced police officers in an "all-out
attack".
In order to avoid similar incidents in

See RIOT, Page 6C


or geriatric homes, and the
incarcerated in prisons, etc.
The religious fast has always
been one of the Christian.
methods of growing spiritually
attuned with God.
Often, people mistake the
fasting of Lent for 40 days as a
literal interpretation of not eat-
ing food for 40 days, but
Father Rolle said that this
understanding is not one he
"We like to use
all good things
in this life. But
it's important
for people to
remember that
there's more to
life than just
(good) food,
drink and clothes.
Abstaining from
or diminishing
one's pleasures
and focusing more
on God ... this is
very beneficial
to everyone."
-The Rev Canon
... ...... Warren,oalle
advocates.
"Fasting over 40 days of
Lent could simply mean alter-'
ing the amount and types of
indulgences to make yourself
spiritually available for God's
work in your life," he said.
"There is a need for spiritu-
al exercise... there's a need in
the Bahamas to be more spiri-
tually fit," he said.
"The modern generation is
not too much into giving up,

See LENT, Page 6C


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PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


Analicans' annual Lenten Mission set


THE TRIBUNE


ANGLICANS will meet in annual
Lenten Mission February 13 -18, 7
o'clock nightly, under the theme
"Twenty One Points of Light For
Twenty First Century Christians", in
the Holy Trinity Activity Centre, Sta-
pledon Gardens.
The Missioner for this year is inter-
nationally-known Caribbean theolo-
gian and scholar, Rev Dr Kortright
Davis, Rector of The Holy Comforter
Episcopal Church in Washington DC,
and Professor of Theology at Howard
University.
Born on the island of Antigua, Rev
Davis trained for the Priesthood at
Codrington College, Barbados, by the
Community of the Resurrection. He


was ordained Deacon in 1965 and
Priest in 1966, in the Diocese of
Antigua.
Since his ordination, he has served
as Rector of several parishes in the
West Indies.
Additionally, he also served on the
faculty of Codrington College, and
as an executive of the Caribbean Con-
ference of Churches.
Rev Davis was also one of the
Archbishop of Canterbury's repre-
sentatives on the Anglican Roman
Catholic International Commission
(ARCIC II), and has been a mem-
ber of the Faith and Order Commis-
sion of the World Council of Church-
es.


The event brings
together Anglicans
from throughout
New Providence and
the wider Diocese,
and provides an
opportunity for
corporate worship,
bible teaching and
fellowship


He currently serves as consultant
to several other ecclesiastical bodies,
the Anglican Dioceses and academic
institutions.
He is the author of several books,
including "Emancipation Still
Comin'"; "African Creative Expres-
sions of The Divine"; "Can God Still
Save The Church?"; "Serving With
Power"; and "Reviving The Spirit Of
Christian Ministry".
Rev Davis earned his Doctor of
Philosophy degree from the Univer-
sity of Sussex, Sussex, England, and
has had the honorary degree of Doc-
tor of Divinity :conferred on him by
The General Theological Seminary,
New York and by St Paul's College,


Lawrenceville, Virginia.
Rev Davis is married, and is the
father of three children and four
grandchildren.
The annual Lenten Mission brings
together Anglicans from throughout
New Providence and the wider Dio-
cese, and provides an opportunity for
corporate worship, bible teaching and
fellowship.
The following groups will lead the
services from Monday to Friday,
respectively: The Anglican Church,
Men, Curtsillistas, Anglican Church:
Women, Youth and the Guild of St
Ambrose. Persons who will be attend-
ing the Mission are asked to bring
their bibles.


ANGLICAN
CHURCH
MEN
THE organisation is sched-
uled to hold its 32nd Annual
Conference in Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, March 10-13. All men
in the Anglican Church are
invited to register at their
parish.
Conference speakers include
Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
Canon Basil Tynes, Troy Sands
and Archdeacon Corenell.
Moss.


CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, February 13:.
Speakers include Bishop V
G Clarke and Pastor James
Newry
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Ser-
vice, 7:30 pm Men's Fellow-
ship Meeting, WOI Meeting
Tuesday, CDC Mass Choir
Rehearsal


CBJUr CF NfTE{


Wednesday, 7:30 pm- Bible
Enrichment Session
Thursday, Band and Praise
Team Rehearsal
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Upcoming events
February 28-March 3 -.Men
With A Purpose Conference
March 28-April 3 WOI
Conference
March 27 Easter Sunday

CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
February 13, 9:15 am -
Church School, 10 am Divine
Worship Service (Preacher:
Minerva Knowles), 7 pm -
Divine Evening Service
First Monday of each month,
7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-


ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30
pm Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-'
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry

ZION
BAPTIST
CHURCH
THE church at East and
Shirley Streets is pleased to
host The Institute In Basic Life
Principles Basic Seminar
scheduled for February 28 to
March 5. (Monday-Thursday -
7 pm to 10 pm, Friday and Sat-
urday, 9 am to 6:30 pm.
To secure your space, please
register by February 15. For'
further information, call 341-
3009 or 457-0827 or 328-5776.


'The Eucharist, The


Light and Life of the


New Millennium'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
"THE Eucharist, The Light and Life of the
New Millennium" is the theme of the Catholic
Archdiocese's annual city-wide Mission, Feb-
ruary 14-18, at Loyola Hall, Gladstone Road.
This year's guest speaker will be Dr Ken-
neth Howell, director of the John Henry Car-
dinal Newman Institute of
Catholic Thought, and
Adjunct Professor of Reli-
gious Studies at the Uni-
versity of Illinois. Dr How-
ell teaches classes on the Cat
History, theology and Phi-
losophy of Catholicism. Archdi
The services will begin
on Monday, February 14, annuv
at 7.30pm. Each night
promises to be educational wide
and spiritual as Dr Howell
will speak on the follow- kici
ing topics:
Night 1: Our Lenten Mo0
Journey to the Easter
Eucharist.
Night 2: Caught up to
heaven: The Eucharist
Now and Forever.
Night 3: Twice Trans-
formed: The Bread of Life for Sinners.
Night 4: Christ the Priest, Christ the Sac-
rifice.
Night 5: Two sacraments in the Flesh:
Marriage and Eucharist.
Dr Howell was a Presbyterian minister for
18 years and a theological professor for seven
years in a Protestant seminary where he
taught Hebrew, Greek and Latin, as well as


biblical interpretation and the history of Chris-
tianity.
During his ministry and teaching, Dr How-
ell's own reading on the real presence of
Christ in the Eucharist started him on a six-
year journey that eventually led him to
Catholicism. On June 1, 1996, he was con-
firmed and received into the Catholic Church


holic
iocese's
al city-
vlission
soff
nday


at St Charles Borromeo
Parish, in Bloomington,
Indiana.
Of his conversation, Dr
Howell says: "I never
would have guessed how
rich is the fullness of the
faith found in the Catholic
Church. After 25 years of
searching for the historical
Jesus Christ, I can now say
Eureka, 'I found it.' Or
rather, I should say, 'it
found me'. For my journey
to the fullness of the faith
was guided by a Provi-
dence beyond my control,
a Providence that flows
from a loving heart greater
than I ever imagined -
the Eucharistic Heart of
Jesus."


Dr Howell is the author of three books,
"God's Two Books: Copernican Cosmology
and Biblical Interpretation in early Modern
science", "Sign and Instrument of Christian
Unity" and "Mary our Mother". His fourth
book due out this year, is entitled "The
Eucharist: A supper for Lovers".
Services for the annual mission will begin
nightly at 7,30 from February 14 to 18.


ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH.
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
February 13, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training; Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice
Tuesday, 6;40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins'
and Mass, 4 pm,- Confirma-
tion Classes,,, :6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

EAST
STREET
GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing.services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, 'the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting


PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD

THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
lst Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of February 13-19:
Sunday (Feast: Epiphany
VI), 9 am Family Eucharist,
6:30 pm Mass
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's,
Anglican Church Women
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm -
Anglican Church Men, Prayer


Group Meeting
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and'
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale,
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice, 7:30 pm Senior,
Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass,
and Breakfast, 7 pm Parish'
Dinner and A.G.M (Commu-,
nity Centre)
Saturday, 6 am Intercesso-;
ry Prayer Meeting, noon to 6;
pm ACW Steak-Out, 2 pm -
Acolytes Practice (Rector: Rev;
Fr S Sebastian Campbell)

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK ,

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30,
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the&
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-'
able immediately behind the'
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com (

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT.
THE church in the Summer'
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 8 am -Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,
10:30 am Divine Worship:
Service (Live broadcast at 11L
am on More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer meet-
ing every Wednesday and Sat-
urday at 5 am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm -
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
For further information, e-
mail: ufm@bahamas.niet.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949


INSIGHT

For the stories
behind
the news,
read Insight
on Mondays


i


- --- - I I


1 -1 1


---
















Minister launches Parish Nursing




and Church Health Care Ministry


* MINISTER of Health Dr Marcus Bethel along with Mary Johnson, director of nursing, and
scores of healthcare professionals at the launch of the Parish Nursing Programme over the
weekend at St Margaret's Anglican Church. The pilot project is being done in collaboration
with the Anglican Diocese of the Bahamas.


In a special ceremony,
Minister of Health Dr
Marcus Bethel
launched the Parish
Nursing and Church
Health Care Ministry at St
Margaret's Anglican Church
at the weekend.
The ministry of Parish Nurs-
ing has its roots in the New
Testament (Romans 16:1-2)
beginning with Phoebe, and
church historians trace the
ministry to the Lutheran
church in Germany.
Sharing the outline for the
new ministry that will spread
across the Diocese and around
the Bahamas, Dr Bethel high-
lighted how the programme
allows nurses to collaborate
with a congregation, helping
to meet the physical, emotion-
al and spiritual needs of the
whole person, promoting
health and wellness.
"It is my belief that as a
nation many benefits could be
derived from this programme
which can positively impact the
quality of life for our citizens,"
said Dr Bethel. "We as health-
care providers have long dis-
covered that in order to
achieve the goals of our nation-


Special ceremony held at St

Margaret's Anglican Church


al health strategic plan, it is
necessary that partnerships and
alliances are forged with
church groups and other non-
governmental organisations
and agencies as we seek to


"It is my belief
that as a nation
many benefits could
be derived from this
programme which
can positively impact
the quality of life
for our citizens."
Dr Marcus Bethel

improve and sustain the health
of the nation."
The Anglican Diocese has
embarked on this pilot pro-
gramme as part of an exten-
sion of its Pastoral Care Min-


istries under its Diocese 2000
and Beyond programme. Nurs-
es for other denominations
have also been invited from
churches around the common-
wealth to participate in the
programme.
In North America, the
Parish Nursing Ministry began
when Lutheran Pastor and
Hospital Chaplain, Rev
Granger Westberg, founded
the movement in the United
States in 1983. Since then, the
movement has evolved and
become what is known in some
countries as Caring Ministry
or Health Ministry, all being
led by Christian nurses.
In 1992, the model moved
to Canada and in 1996 spread
to Australia, where it is known
as Faith Community Nursing.
It has now arrived in the
Bahamas.
Officiating Sunday's service
at St Margaret's was Rev
Angela Palacious, coordinator
of the Diocese 2000 and
Beyond programme.


World Day of the Sick draws near


* By FRANCIS NORONHA

IN the Catholic Church,
February 11 is the Feast of our
Lady of Lourdes (World Day
of the Sick). The August 2004
pilgrimage of Pope John Paul
II to the Marian Shrine in
Lourdes, France, was his sec-
ond visit. On his previous visit
in 1983, the Pope roundly con-
demned the oppression behind
the Iron Curtain, and, itilet
words of CBS Senior Corre-
spondent, Tom Fenton, "Com-
munism is now dead, and Pope
John Paul II played a major
role in consigning it to the
trashcan of history".
Lourdes is a small French
town where a simple 14-year-
old girl, Bernadette Soubirous,
had a series of visions of the
Blessed Virgin in 1858.
Today, Lourdes is the most


popular Catholic shrine in
Europe, and pilgrims from all
over the world converge on it
for spiritual solace and strength
and for healing at the flowing
spring water.
In more recent years, Lour-
des acquired fame due to well-
known poet, novelist and play-
wright Franz Werfel, a Ger-
man-speaking Jew who was
born in Prague in 1890.
During Worlda ifi a'tZre?
the collapse of France in 1940,
Werfel and his wife fled from
the Nazis and reached France.
They planned to proceed to
Spain and then to Portugal, but
were unsuccessful in attempts
to obtain visas.
Confusion reigned supreme,
with French, Belgians, Dutch,
Poles, Czechs, Austrians and
exiled Germans fleeing from
the pursuing armies. Werfel


recalled: "There was barely
food to still the extreme pangs
of hunger", and no shelter was
available. A family informed
the Werfels that nearby Lour-
des might be the only place for
safety.
The Werfels managed to
reach Lourdes, and Franz
admitted that he had a very
superficial knowledge of its
"miraculous history". They hid
in the 16wn-f6r some weeks,
filled ,with fear and dread ful-
ly aware of their fate if they
were captured. In fact, the
British radio announced that
they had been captured and
murdered by the Nazis.
During this period, Franz
learned more about the histo-
ry of Lourdes and Bernadette
Soubirous, resulting in a vow
that if he and his wife reached
America safely, he would "put


'A daily discipline'


off all other tasks and sing, as
best as I could, the song of
Bernadette".
The Werfels reached Amer-
ica in 1940, and in 1942 Franz
published his book "The Song
of Bernadette" (subtitled The
Immortal Story of Bernadette
of Lourdes) an instant best-
seller. Franz noted in the pref-
ace: "All the memorable hap-
penings which constitute the
substance of this, b.ok took
^ *}' K-i .,.,.;


place in the world of reality.
Since their beginning dates
back no later than 80 years,
there beats upon them the
bright light of modern history
and their truth has been con-
firmed by friend and foe and
by unbiased observers."
The resulting film "The Song
of Bernadette", with Jennifer
Jones, Vincent Price and other
stars gleaned four Academy
Awards, and was screened to
vT vt?


large audiences all over the
world.
It is still regarded as one of
the most successful films in his-
tory, making Franz Werfel
internationally famous.
Today, Lourdes attracts over
six million pilgrims annually
from all over the world. In this
age of skepticism and cynicism,
Lourdes stands as a beacon of
faith, hope and healing for all
mankind.


* By REV ANGELA BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS

ALL too often we think of discipline as pun-
ishment rather than training. A discipline in
the academic world meant a preparation for a
particular profession with examinations and
tests after carefully reading and study. The dis-
cipline of the athlete involved daily dietary
:observations, physical exertion using prescribed
;exercises, and mental preparation to develop
stamina, perseverance and a desire to win at all
:costs. Spiritual discipline included the daily
reading and study of Holy Scripture, prayer
and fasting, self-examination and repentance,
acts of charity and ministry.
Lent is the season set aside by the church as
,a time to consider the routines of our life and to
alter the rhythms so as to pay more heed to
'accomplishing specific goals. Just as there is a
prize to be won as a result of each avenue of
:self-sacrifice when it comes to the academic
.and the athletic, when it comes to spiritual dis-
cipline, we are concentrating on improving our
relationship with God with serious intentional-
ity. The Holy Spirit is given free rein to
"rein us in", in order that the Lord may reign
:in our lives.
Sometimes, we are encouraged to establish a
pattern for the 40 days that may need to be
:incorporated into our daily routine when Lent
is over. It is a question of toning and sculpting
spiritual muscles to enable us to endure the
increased rigours of a maturing spiritual devo-
-tion.As we grow in grace and use our gifts, we
iscern the areas where change is required to
'become more like Christ, and demands of dis-
,cipleship continue to the test our character.
;, It is a sound practice to feast on the Word
*when we fast from food. The fast is an imposed
,,imit on an insatiable appetite. We are desirous
'of losing "spiritual weight" having become over-
,weight in self-indulgence, selfishness and self-
Ssatisfaction.
Our deliberate acts of self-denial may also
include fasting from certain television pro-
,grammes, and activities that may not enrich
,our health or character, but the food fast is
:mentioned by our Lord as an expectation:
,"when you fast" (Mt. 6:16).
' Fasting is mentioned as a regular discipline
Along with prayer and acts of charity.
There will be no flowers on our altars so that
'we fast from the beauty in order to feast again
:at Easter time. There will be the penitential


MEDITATION


l REV ANGELA PALACIOUS


colour of purple on the vestments and linens to
visually remind us that we are to be sober and
serious during this season. The Stations of the
Cross will be offered as an extra mid-week ser-
vice to walk the Via Dolorosa (Way of Sor-
rows) with our Lord, reminding us of his suf-
fering and sacrifice for our sins.
What changes are you prepared to make in
your life that assist you with introducing or
increasing a sustained spiritual regimen? If you
begin with daily self-examination, you will be
able to evaluate your current situation. Prayer,
study of Scripture, fasting, repentance, acts of
kindness, weekly worship, ministry, and a will-
ingness to witness, are some of the aspects of
Spirit-imposed discipline helps us to avoid the
punishment of suffering the consequences of
sin. Let this Lent be life-changing for you.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


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PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Catholic Church 'has always




maintained' prison ministry


a By CLEMENT JOHNSON

T he Catholic
Church in the
Bahamas has
always main-
tained a pastoral
ministry at Her Majesty's
Prison, Fox Hill.
Presently a team attends to
the needs of the more than
1,200 men and women held
there. The team is made up of
a priest, deacons, nuns, and
laymen. Father Glen Nixon,
pastor of St. Thomas More
Catholic Church in Palmdale,
is the director.
In an article published in the
Bahama Catholic during the
month of November, Fr Nixon
penned his reflections on the


need for greater compassion
to be shown towards the men
and women behind bars.
According to Father Glen,
many Bahamians are involved
with Christian Ministries that
seek to help the poor, heal the
sick, feed the hungry, clothe
the naked, care for the elderly,
educate the ignorant, and the
like.
However, there is one par-
ticular ministry that seems to
fail to get attention Prison
Ministry.
Following are some excerpts
from the article by Fr. Glen
Nixon:
"First of all, in this article, I
do not intend, because of the
subject matter I have elected,
to share or to imply that con-


cerns for victims of crime and
violence are of secondary
importance when it comes to
Prison Ministry. Hopefully, as
we improve our efforts in the
area of Restorative justice the
article can be devoted solely
to the pastoral care of victims
and their families.
"Secondly, I do not intend
to debate or argue the validity,
authenticity or sincerity of any
past or existing Christian Min-
istry within our Archdiocese.
This withstanding, I do intend
to remind all Christians of their
obligation to care for the
imprisoned."
Fr. Nixon further said that
although it may be difficult to
believe, we must remember
that God cares for inmates as


much as he cares for free citi-
zen.
"On this point, Matthew
chapter 25 leaves no doubt. In
Matthew's Gospel we read, 'in
prison you visited me'. Prison
Ministry is not the easiest of
Christian Ministries; however,
it is not optional when it comes
to the mission of the Christian
Church. Putting aside our prej-
udices, judgmental attitudes
and fears we are called to
extend the love of Jesus to inti-
mates who more than anything
desire freedom. Through
Christian love we must help all
prisoners to understand that
freedom does not only come
from just laws and a democra-
tic society, freedom comes
from knowing Jesus Christ.


"It may very well take some
time getting used to the musty
air of prison, the clanging of
steel bars, being around offi-
cers with guns and talking to
inmates who have committed
unspeakable crimes, but we
preach 'Freedom In Christ' to
inmates. For us Christians, it
is not a question of if we will
do it, but a question of when
and how we will do it?" He
says the time is now for people
of goodwill to put into action
what they preach.
Fr. Nixon says that Prison
Ministry can be more effective
through the prayers of the
faithful, praying for the minis-
ters and those who are minis-
tered to. Donation of toiletries
can also help.


"So many inmates no longer
have the support of family and
friends and often go without
basic needs such as soap,
deodorant, etc. During the
summer months, fresh drink-
ing water is a precious com-
modity along with fresh fruits
such as grapes, oranges and
apples."
"Another way to help,
would be to visit family mem-
bers who are in prison when-
ever possible."
Fr. Nixon said that Prison
Ministry team-members can-
not take the place of families
"when it comes to helping
inmates rebuild their lives. At
best the most we can presently
do is to foster and facilitate the
process".


'Guarding our Anglican Heritage'


THE Anglican Church Men will
hold its 32nd annual Conference in
Marsh Harbour, Abaco on March 10
under the theme, "Guarding our
Anglican Heritage".
Conference chairman Charles Hep-
burn said, "This is a special confer-
ence, as in the past we have had
speakers who were non-Anglicans
serve as facilitators. This year all the
facilitators will be Anglicans, speaking
on the theme from their perspective,
and this will hopefully inspire the
Anglican Church Men of the Diocese
to safeguard that which is ours and
use it for the growth and develop-
ment of the Anglican Church in the
Bahamas."
Speakers include, Archbishop
Drexel Gomez, Archdeacon Corenell
Moss, Canon Basil Tynes and Troy
Sands.
The Anglican Church Men is made
up of men who have formed them-
selves into parochial units with the
cooperation of the Parish Priest but
whose affairs are conducted solely by


Angicn huchMe t ghld32d nua CnfreceinMashHabor


* ARCHBISHOP DREXEL
GOMEZ


M ARCHDEACON
* CANON BASIL TYNES CORENELL MOSS


branch members. Membership is lim- municants. The objectives of the
ited to men over the age of 18 who organisation are to give greater glory
are confirmed members of the Angli- to God through worship, fellowship,
can Church and who are regular co m-; study and tassistithe Priest and


parish. ACM president Herbert Scott
added: "The purpose of the confer-
.,eisnot only fqortheen in, our,
S p through self


* TROY SANDS


discipline live as a daily witness to
enable others to see Christ in us as we
c9ptuiue ap 4 tno take the leader-
shipQe witl(mouhurcb".
"^ '*''^^^*^ "'i';*^' ". ^^*


~A-NN-LJNCING-.


Riot (From page 1C)


the future, the Bahamas
Christian Council has issued a
call for Bahamians to unite
and preserve cooperation
between residents and law
enforcement officers.
The Council believes that
the social and psychological
fall out of this unfortunate
incident could have a long last-
ing negative impact on the
community.
"Any riot of any system like
that would bring a negative
effect to the community it
occurs in first, and eventually
the whole nation. And no
question about that because it
is abnormal," said the presi-
dent of the Council.
But Rev Thompson said
that Bahamians should have
learned something from the
Nassau Village incident.
"We should have learned to
self-reflect," said Rev Thomp-
son.
"I think what came out of
this, we have to take another
look on the inside of us and
make sure that we are one
people who are truly law abid-
ing and people who try to live
in a community as one, seek-
ing to love each other and
share with each other differ-
ent concerns," he said.
When a community
becomes divided, he added,


lawlessness inevitably follows.
"However, when a community
is on one accord and unified,
when you are looking after me
and I am looking after you, we
sort of destroy that lawless
position."
In its press release, the


"It is quite
obvious that
the seeds for
this calamitous
event wereI
planted quite
some years
ago, and
nurtured over
the years."
Bahamas Christian
Council statement

Council said it was "deeply
saddened by, and sincerely
regretted" the recent unrest
and violence in Nassau Vil-
lage.
The Council said it was most
distressing to see "normally
gentle, peace-loving citizens


engaged in violent confronta-
tion with heavily armed, riot-
dressed police officers while
.tear gas and gunshot sights and
sounds destroyed the peace
and tranquility of a residential
community".
Of special regret were the
injuries suffered by residents
and police officers, the Coun-
cil noted.
But Bahamians must now
get past these incidents and
re-build its foundation of
respect for each other and the
law, said the Council.
"It is now a very opportune
time for Bahamians to strong-
ly re-embrace the principle
that law and order must pre-
vail in an orderly, progressive
society and that police repre-
sent the collective authority of
the people and this authority
cannot, must not be eroded,"
said the council, adding that
the responsibility is also on
authorities to make sure that
they act with "sensitivity",
even when enforcing the law.
"Every effort should now be
taken by all concerned to
ensure that the unfamiliar,
ugly, embarrassing scenes and
pages of the media are never
repeated, as the damage to our
national image, our economy,
and our people would be very
difficult to recover from."


Lent (From page 1C)


TUESDAY WORKSHOPS WEDNESDAY WORKSHOPS
* The Churchin 2015- What Will It LQok Like E.A.C. GENERAL ASSEMBLY a 1:30 p.m.
* Harnessing & Maximising 21st Century Responding to the Challenges to Traditional
Technology Christian Family Structures
* Preparing the 21st Century Caribbean Church Prayer: Strategy for Permanent Change
for Persecution Understanding Islam in the Caribbean
* Understandng Islam in 21st Century Context Context
* Global Economics & 21stCentury Caribbean Developing and Managing Church Finances
Church *The Church and Sexuality in the 21st Century
SChristians & Bigotry in the Age of Post The 21st Century Church's Response to
Modenism,. Pluralsm, & Legislative Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Developing Leadership Skills in 21st Century Responding to Violence in the Christian
SRole of the Church In Society in the Ught of Family
Jesus' ltininent Return


THURSDAY WORKSHOPS
* Holistic Strategies (or Impacting 21st Century
Caribbean Cities
* Translormng People Through Fine Arts
* Transforming Youth Through Sports Ministry
* Understanding the Challenges of Cross-
Cultural Transformation
* Expressing Holiness In the 21st Century
* Starting / Using Schools to Transform A
Generation
* Chisian Witness In the Midst of Godless
Spiritualty
* Pastoring the 21sl Century Caribbean
Missionary on the Mission Field


An invitation is extended to all Pastors, Ministers and Lay Persons!
FULL REGISTRATION:
Early Bird Package (before Jan- 31.20051 ...$200
Regular Package ..................... $225
PARTIAL REGISTRATION:


but taking on. Fasting directs us toward the
need to preserve the life we have, and the need
to pray."
Monsignor Alfred Culmer, Chancellor in the
. Catholic Archdiocese, is a teacher of theology
and scripture and a parish minister.
He believes that Lent can be marked by
many things, people giving up, doing more or
even being more.
In his Ash Wednesday morning service, he
implored his congregation to slow down and
live.
Said Monsignor Culmer: "Stress is a big thing
in our lives and Lent is a time of interior renew-
al. We must step back from our daily busy
schedules and the routine of life for intense
prayer and reflection."
Bahamians, as are many of the world's citi-
zens, are often caught up in the "rat race" of
doing and spend too much time anxious and
worried, but the Monsignor recommends reflec-
tion on being a child of God, a person of faith
and a Bahamian rooted in the values of the
gospel.
He asked: "What are we giving of ourselves


... what is God saying in my life ... how does
it make me a better Bahamian? Step back and
see what God wants.
"During these days of Lent, we should spend
more quality time in the presence of God.
Prayer helps us focus even Jesus was busy
preaching the gospel, but he took time for
prayer. Praying helps us centre our lives, and
our self-worth and self-esteem come out of our
relationship with God."
Not the first to say that self-worth is what's
missing from Bahamian life, the Monsignor
feels that "too many people live their lives for
others, when God must be at the centre of our
hearts".
For Lent, Monsignor Culmer says the scrip-
ture "be still and know that I am God" beckons
us to live a quality life by having a relation-
ship with God.
"Silence is at the heart of prayer; Micah,
chapter three, verse eight tells us to act with jus-
tice, love with compassion and walk humbly
with God. I urge all Bahamians to focus on
walking humbly with God this Lenten season,"
he added.


I


-- --









THE TIBUN THUSDAYFEBRARY 0, 205,IPGEO7


grout Oci lew 0


The Adventists
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventistsv


www.bahamasconference.org


Free Community Wellness Programme Launched
On Monday, February 7, 2005 a "12 Weeks to Wellness" programme ,
sponsored by the New Englerston Seventh-day Adventist Church and
Bahamas Conference Health Ministries, was launched at the Bahamas
Academy Gymnatorium, Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas.
The presenter for the opening night's programme, Dr. Idamae
Hanna, discussed "The Ten Challenges of a Healthy Lifestyle." The per-
sons in attendance were challenged to
(1) Choose a healthy lifestyle, (2) Have
a healthy breakfast and lunch and a light
supper, (3) Avoid alcohol, (4) Learn to
manage stress, (5) Leave cigarettes and
illegal drugs alone, (6) Eat at least 5
fruits and vegetables per day, (7) Drink
at least 8 glasses of water per day, (8)
Dr. Marcus Bethel speaking during the opening of Getat least 7-8 hours of rest per day, (9)
the 12 Weeks to Wellness Program. Exercise at least 3-5 times each week,
(10) Set limits on the amount and time you eat.
Among the dignitaries giving remarks were Dr. Leonard A.
Johnson, president of Bahamas
Conference of Seventh-day 4 p. ir
Adventists, Hon. Glenys Hanna
Martin, Minister of Transport and
Aviation, and Senator, Dr. Marcus
Bethel, Minister of Health. Dr.
Bethel commended the partici-
pants for their enthusiasm and
attention which will ensure the About 400 participants sat anxiously as they got their
success of the program. He also first instructions for the wellness program.
congratulated the organizers of the program for initiating such a unique
health and wellness orientated program free of charge This FREE com-
munity action program will be conducted on Monday evenings, at the
Bahamas Academy, for the next twelve weeks.


Three Island-Wide Evangelistic

Campaigns Starting Soon


Participants enjoy a foretaste or ineir exercise program lea oy Mrs. Rollins, a professional pnysical inerapisi ano
exercise specialist.

Local Elders and Pastors Attend Bible Software Seminar
To assist its local elders and pastors in their sermon preparation, the
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists sponsored the Libronix
Training Seminar, conducted by Morris Proctor. The elders met at the
Grant's Town Church Annex on Sunday, February 6, and the pastors
gathered at the Conference Office on Monday and Tuesday, February 7
and 8, 2005. The participants in the seminar learned how to access infor-
mation through, the Libronix Digital Library System to help them in their
sermon preparation.


Plan to attend the Power of Truth Crusade beginning Sunday, February 20
next to the Mall At Marathon.


Morris Proctor conducting the software seminar at the The pastors sitting in front of their laptop computers dur-
Adventist Headquarters ing the seminar.

Fifty Couples Attend Marriage Seminar
JAt a time when couples in our
society are looking for solutions
to their marital problems, the
Marriage Maintenance Seminar
that was conducted last weekend
by Dr. and Mrs Walter Wright
was a welcome activity.
LEFT PHOTO: Dr. Walter Wright sharing during
the seminar at the Nassau Beach Hotel. Fifty cou-
ples participated in the seminar.


Plan to attend the Real Harvest Experience Gospel Campaign beginning
Sunday, Febriuary 27, near the main entrance of the Golden Gates Plaza


Couples attending the seminar enjoy a delicious vegetarian meal in the Pineapple Place at the Nassau Beacn
Hotel. The fellowship was great!
Advnts 2d nua Tae Sho
Suda, ebuay 7,10a~m to40 Ol n hsdy


If you speak Haitian Creole or French, then plan to attend the"Seek Ye First the Kingdom Gospel Campaign"
beginning Saturday, February 19, 2005, at 7:00 P.M. Haitian-Bahamian Adventist pastor, Edward St Fleur, will
open the word of God each night. Come and be blessed


I^^ATd1e7 tist Makn A3 D 11 *tifference ^'iST^


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


REIGO


J pRKNATIOA:L VI S EION/OURA O J E TIVEMISESI

* To bear witness for Christ and His truth by through Bible Teachings, Seminars, maturation of our children/youth.
spreading the gospel throughout all of our Specialized Courses and Conferences. To accelerate our holistic outreach evangel- I
islands in all its fullness and power, to bring *' To fully embrace plurality of leadership in istic efforts with a view to reach and touch LvicRl t
: : :: i :- -m a pe ple ev lerywfr in. fi-lm If thf ""
about the.rule of God in the.hearts of men. all ofitspositivegoodness. people everywhere in our Bahamas to the-
b worship God inspirit, intruthand in To love God totally and our fellowmen as up building of the kingdom and to the .*, m ''sIFr it
holiness. ourselves, growth of the Church of God.
To train, develop andequip our peo Le for To pay focused and specialized ministry To prepare our people for the return of the Ch i ia du aiHs a & ro
Godly Living and Christian Service attention to the growth, development and Lord.Mr


a110i a family m is


"More Than Married Conference"

An Intimate Encounter By Kevan and Dr. Anita Dean


General Presbyter:


"Englerston must


use eyes of Faith"

Photos & Story by Pauline Curry


Bishop Dr. Brice H. Thompson Bishop Rudolph V. Bowe
General Presbyter for Caribbean & Senior Pastor & District Overseer-
Atlantic Ocean Islands New Providence


LEADERS -Following the Magnificent Conference, leacturers and Church Leaders took time out for a photo moment. Standing left to right- Dr. Ron and
Mrs. Doris Warford, Southeast Regional Co-ordinators for Great Commandment Network Ministries of Atlanta, Georgia, Minister Jacqueline B. Rahming,
National Overseer, Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, Bishop Ghaly S. & Sister Angela Swann, National Directors for Family Ministries.


On Saturday February 5th,
over fifty (50) couples
gathered at Radisson
Hotel for the "More Than Just
Marriage Conference."
Recognizing that we live in a soci-
ety where physical and emotional
abuse, separation and divorce are
escalating daily both in and out of
the church, the one-day workshop
organized by the National Family
Life Ministry Directors for the
Churches of God of Prophecy,
Bishop Ghaly and First Lady
Angela Swann demonstrate the
importance and concern of devel-
oping of a stable, healthy Christian
Families in our country. The facil-
itators were Dr. Ron and Mrs.
Doris Warford, the Southeast
Regional Coordinators for Great
Commandment Network/Intimate
Life Ministries of Atlanta Georgia.
Married to each other for over 35
years they used an experiential and
professional platform to take cou-
ples from all ages, walks of life
and levels of intimacy to new and
uncharted areas as they began a
new journey and an experience to
be remembered. The idea encour-
aged by the facilitators for, each
couple to take a vacation from
"who they are" for a day to really
discover who they are "suppose to
be" through experiencing and
evaluating their relationship both
vertically with God and horizon-
tally with each other. Each couple
was reminded of countless exam-
ples of model Christian relation-
ships and God's design for mar-
riages as they examined scriptures
throughout the Bible from Genesis
with Genesis 1:26 to Revelations
2:5 and dynamic ministry of the
Holy Spirit.
Two Great Commandments were
so important that God would rein-
troduce them and place special
emphasize on them "Loving God
with all of our hearts, mind,
strength ... and love our neighbor
as our self." It was clearly demon-
strated that the health of our rela-
tionship with Him is represented


through our relationship with each
other. Using Matthew 22:37 as the
frame in which this precious pic-
ture of a healthy marriage sits in,
Dr. Warford and his wife Doris
would position this picture as the
back drop of the opening discus-
sion. Dr. Ron and his lovely wife
Doris shared their personal experi-
ence of loneness and now oneness
as they helped each couple to chart
their course through a path that
would lead to intimacy in three
areas of our life: Spiritually,
Emotionally, and of course
Physically. In order to make this
journey the couples were chal-
lenged to do as Revelations 2:5
says, Remember from where you
have fallen, Repent and Return to
the deeds you did to get you there
in the beginning.
Sessions Briefing
God's Design For Relationships
- The first session dealt with
aloneness and how overcoming
the first human crisis through lov-
ing each other ... and God. God
wants us to experience intimacy in
all three of the dimensions of inti-
macy.
Top Ten Relational Needs the
second session focused on how to
know and meet each other's God-
given needs: Acceptance,
Affection, Appreciatior,
Approval, Attention, Comfort,
Encouragement, Respect, Security
and Support. Through an informa-
tive, in depth, assessment to reveal
where each of us "were" the
answers to a series of questions
enabled us to learn what our
spouses top three needs were.
Time was allotted to discuss them
and find out how to better meet
those needs.
Relevant and Caring Responding
in Session three showed what can
happen if needs are not met
through the visible tool "The
Emotional Cup." When the emo-
tional cup begins to be filled with
negative emotions such as hurt,
disappointment, anger, resent-
ment, fear, guilt condemnation,


just to name a few these negative
emotions can manifest themselves
through depression, drug addic-
tion, sleep and eating disorder, etc.
The ministry of the Holy Spirit
equips us with appropriate and
proper tools required to bring heal-
ing to the deep-rooted hurts.
Healing Hurts through
Confession and Forgiveness this
is exactly what the fourth session
did allowing the couples to share a
personal hurt. Empathy was expe-
rienced as we "felt with" our
spouse. We shared the pain caused
by the actions to our spouse. A
deep and sensitive time of seeking
and receiving forgiveness released
and initiated the beginning of heal-
ing as empathize with each other.
Experiencing God's plan for
resolving hurt, anger and guilt was
rewarding. We were also asked to.
share an exciting moment with our
spouse giving them an opportunity
to rejoice with us.
Family Origin in the last session
for the day dealt with how the
families we came from shaped us
and how we can respond today -
Leaving mother and father and
cleaving to your spouse
(leaving/cleaving principle). Dr.
Warfold informed us if we are still
looking to your parents to meet
your intimate needs then we have
not left home. In this session we
were able to share with our spouse
which parent met the three inti-
mate needs of approval, affection
and attention and how it made us
feel. These needs have to be
understood, shared and met by our
spouse in order for the cleaving
principle to be effective.
* In the concluding session and
throughout the day, the resource
book (Intimate Encounter) served
as a practical guide to discovering
the secrets of a really great mar-
riage. How to continue to grow
and how we can respond today?
The attendees learned that it is
vitally important that each individ-
ual and each couple accept respon-
sibility as (Romans 14:12) tells us


that each of us shall give account
of himself to God. Second, we
must show empathy "For godly
sorrow produces repentance lead-
ing to salvation, not to be regretted
... (2 Corinthians 7:10).
Consequently, we must agree with
God with the assuredness that He
will deliver us for His Word says,
"If we confess our sins, He is
faithful and just to forgive us our
sins and to cleanse us from all
unrighteousness (1John 1:9). The
workshop was'filled with words of
wisdom, encouragement and most
importantly the imparting of the
necessary tools to defeat the devil
on what he has staked out as his
smallest most effective battle
field, the marriage union that God
has ordained, sanctioned, blessed
and desires to see flourish in our
churches, community, country and
indeed the world.
The conference was blessed by
the presence of our National
Overseer of The Church of God
of Prophecy in the Bahamas -
Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming
, and his lovely wife Minister Jackie
Rahming. He reminded us to fol-
low the pattern of marriage with-
out deviation as it is so vividly laid
out in Ephesians 5.
If nothing else was to be learned
from the day of discovery and
recovery, Dr. Warford left the
group with one secret. The secret
is, in order to have a happy God-
centered marriage, which is
designed to bring Him glory, we
must WORK. Prayer, Faith with
no work will not be enough to
defeat the enemy who is seeking to
destroy not just you but the very
image of GOD. Find out more
about the Dynamic National
Family Ministry of the Churches
of God of Prophecy here in the
Bahamas as we build healthy, sta-
ble Christian Marriages and fami-
lies, which represent right rela-
tionships with the Father and each
other. You won't want to miss the
next event!


It began with a jubilant praise and wor-
ship service in the Sanctuary. The praise
team welcomed the presence of the Lord
in.the sanctuary and over the proceedings
as they led the congregation in a grand "
Jumper" praise and worship service. All
the saints joined in the worship. They
stood lifting their voices and rejoicing to
the honor and'glory of God. The church,
of God of Prophecy at Englerston was
celebrating Youth Sunday which is
always a special time but this Sunday we
were blessed to have the General
Presbyter of the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, Bishop and Sister Brice H.
Thompson as our guest speaker. The sen-
ior pastor, Bishop R.V. Bowe and the
congregation welcomed this "hero from
Acklins "who fondly refers to Englerston
as his home away from home. The serv-
ice was directed by Brothers Leon Cox
and Patrick Ferguson.
The saints at Englerston were chal-
lenged to put faith in action. Many times
as Christians we operate in the natural
rather than the spiritual realm. In the
scripture text 2Kings 6:1-23, the axe head
was able to defy all the laws of gravity,
rise to the surface of the water and swim.
The first step that brought about this
miraculous act came about because the
young man acknowledged that he had
lost the axe head. Many Christians have
not acknowledged that they have lost
their axe, their cutting edge and hence
their faith is weaker than it use to be.
When we confess that they are helpless
and seek help from God they will live in
defeated.
We were called to trust in God, for he
is unchanging. Man's philosophies and
programmes can overwhelm us. We have
fears of terrorism, fear of sickness, old
age, being feeble and lonely. Persons
have financial fears that they will not be
able to pay their bills while others have
fears of losing control of their families.
The saints were charged not to operate in
this spirit of fear but rather from a posi-
tion of power and a sound mind. We
should have the confidence that when we
go through the river it shall not overflow
us. We were challenged to live expecting


the impossible. We were reminded that
God was still God and if we used our
spiritual eyes we would be able to see all
that God is doing around us and for us.
Faith in God can activate the impossible
to happen.
Bishop Thompson told the charged
congregation that when you operate in
faith, you have access to secrets. God
showed Elisha what the King was plan-
ning for Israel. Elisha was able to cir-
cumvent the plans of the king and take
Israel out of harms way. When we stay
connected and operate in the spiritual
realm we like Elisha can escape the plans
of the enemy. The enemy seeks to kill,
steal and destroy us but thank God for the
prophet who can sound the alarm and
warn God's people. When the spirit lives
within you have protection and security.
God speaks to his people thru his holy
spirit and we are able to live victorious if
we abide in him. -
Our Bishop reminded us that like
Elisha, we need to see the invisible.
When the prophet was encompassed with
the Kings army, he declared that there
were more that be with us than be with
them. The soldiers saw the army with
their artillery, but Elisha used his spiritu-
al eyes and saw the Heavenly host of
angels that was surrounding them. We are
never alone and we worry needlessly at
times because God has already given his
angels charge over us to protect us, sus-
tain us and take care of every situation.
The General Presbyter challenged the
saints at Englerston to accomplish the
unthinkable. We were called to use tle
weapon of prayer which can effectively
destroy the enemy. If we stay on our
knees and call the name of Jesus, the
enemy will flee. There is power, deliver-
ance, healing and victory in the name of
Jesus. Like the prophet Elisha, we can
command seeing eyes to be blinded and
blinded eyes to see. In conclusion, the
saints were encouraged to treat their ene-
mies with love, to feed them and to pray
for them to have a change of heart.
The service concluded with prayers
and the laying on of hands for persons
who had special needs.


_1___1__1_







1 1t- I MIDUllNt
SI


MOUNT TABOR

FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
WlI Iw Tre Ave., Pinewood Gardens P.O. Box N-9705- *Tel: (242) 392-2322 Fax: (242) ,392343
Websie: ww nmounlaor. org wAw.neilelliministriers.comn Email: mttaborQbaatel~inebs



. NEWS


\ -L L E LLU.JJ^-


C3OOD TIIVME


It's hard to believe that it's already been 7 years! Seven
years, since Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Senior Pastor of
Mount Tabor Full Gospel Baptist Church saw the need
to pull women from around the country together for one
night of fun, fellowship and inspiration annually. For
seven years now, women could look forward to at least
one evening each year when they could leave the kids
and their husbands at home, and go "hook up" with
thousands of their girlfriends from throughout the island
and around the country for a "straight talk", high ener-
gy, spiritually inspiring session designed just for them!
Because he was all too aware of the tremendous load
that many women carry, Bishop Ellis was convinced of


PASTOR ILSA EVANS.


resonates with a sense of hope, joy, peace and an over-
riding spirit of optimism; that was echoed in remarks by
Pastor Ilsa Evans, Pastor of Public Relations and Special
Projects at Mount Tabor, Pastor Helen McPhee, Pastor
of Agape Full Gospel Baptist Church and First Lady of
Mount Tabor, Mrs. Patrice Ellis. The Lord used all of
these women mightily to further encourage, inspire and
lift the spirits of their sisters. Women could be seen
laughing, dancing, shouting, praising and worshipping


BISHOP ELLIS DELIVERS MESSAGE ENTITLED,
"TALK TO ME WHEN THIS IS OVER"!I


the fact that they could use some encouragement and
inspiration at the outset of the year to help them with the
challenges and the opportunities that they would face in
the days, weeks and months ahead. Thus the event is
strategically set to take place within the first few weeks
of the year. A wonderful time to strengthen and give
back to those who give so much of themselves.
So on Monday, January 31, Bishop Ellis hosted
the seventh such gathering in as many years and once
again the sanctuary was packed to capacity with women
of all ages, denominational persuasions and economic
status. In an atmosphere saturated with excitement and
anticipation, the night got started at 7:00 PM with a
powerful session of intercessory prayer, led by Pastor
Rochelle Moss, Pastor of Intercessory Prayer at Mount


FIRST LADY PATRICE ELLIS ENCOURAGES WOMEN TO
LET GO AND LET GOD.
Tabor. Then it was time to celebrate the goodness and
greatness of God in song. Mount Tabor's Praise and
Worship Team not only got the ball rolling, but they set
such a rich and wonderful atmosphere in the sanctuary
that even those that may have come to service downcast
and depressed had to "trade in their sorrows for the joy
of the Lord". As the "Holy Ghost Party" shifted into
high gear, it was becoming evident why thousands of
women look forward to this meeting annually. The room


HON. ALLYSON GIBSON & SEN. PAULETTE ZONICLE
AMONG WOMEN IN THE HOUSE.


MIN. NADINE Moss
"You DON'T KNOW THE COST..."


as they were free to let their hair down and let it all hang
out! Some ran, others jumped, while others simply sat
and took it all in and prepared themselves to receive
their marching orders for the year from their "spiritual"
father or brother, Bishop Neil C. Ellis.
After an incredibly anointed rendition of CeCe
Winans song, "Alabaster Box" by Minister Nadene
Moss, the ladies were ready to receive the blessing that
they needed most; a word from God through His ser-
vant. Bishop Ellis started out his message by telling the
women that the word "Hallelujah" would become very
popular in their vocabulary because of all that God
would do in their lives this year. In a message entitled;
"Talk To Me When This Is Over" derived from Psalm
105:16-22, Bishop Ellis went on to point out the fact that
seven is God's divine number of completion and as ruch
God had brought the women together in this 7th annual
gathering to officially bring to completion one season of
their lives and launch them into a brand new one! He
used the sermon text which deals with Joseph's pilgrim-
age from the pit to the palace, to show the women that
God in his sovereignty will sometimes allow adversity
and famine in our lives; not to hurt us but to help us.
These painful, unwelcome intruders are often God's
tools that fashion within us the character necessary to
maintain what we obtain, and His vehicle of choice for


PASTOR HELEN MCPHEE.


HALLELUJAH!
ushering us. strategically into our divine destiny. He did
however, make unequivocally clear to the women that if
they stayed faithful to God and committed to the
process, God would not let- them die without possessing
their promise; therefore they should and could say to
skeptics and others in the midst of their process; "Talk
To Me When This Is Over".
Finally, Bishop Ellis capped off his life changing
message and a rich incredible night with a challenging
alter call for persons caught up in and faced with other
ungodly proclivities such as witchcraft, lesbianism and
adultery. He encouraged these women by reminding all
present of the fact, that the degree to which God will
bless us is often tied into what we are prepared to give
up. Joseph walked into his blessing-by walking away
from Photiphars wife's indecent proposal. Many women
responded to the call and came forward to receive
salvation, deliverance and empowerment to leave the
session, walking in victory.
The all female choir sent the women home on a
powerful note, with a foot stomping, soul stirring rendi-
tion of "We've Got The Victory"! After doing the same
thing for seven years, one would think that it would get
old, boring and
stale, but that is
certainly not prov-
ing to be the case
ith Neil C. Ellis
Ministry' 'Annual
Service Just For
Women. The gath-
ering continues to -4.
attract new partic-
ipants each year
and those that
have been attend-
ing for years; are
convinced that it
gets better and
better each year.
As a matter of
fact,some declared
resolutely that
once again this
year's event was
the "Best Ever"!


MAKING THE POINT!


To God Be The Glory!


CAPACITY CROWD.


I FEL THT BSHOP AL FEMLE COIR PRASE ~lE ORD


ATTHE


7TH ANNUAL SERVICE JUST F


I FEEL THAT BISHOP!


ALL FEMALE CHOIR.


PRAISE THE LORD!






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