Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00030
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: February 7, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







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Volume: 101 No.63





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Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


h BAHAMAS EDITIONra
BAHAMAS EDITION


_,ONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


ns


Edwin Culmer to head

Detention Centre


* By PAUL G.
STURNQUEST
i-Tribune Staff Reporter
MARKING a new direction
in the management and outlook
of both the nation's correction-
al and detention facilities,
Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt announced yesterday the
appointment of a new Prison
Superintendent, and the trans-
fer of the present superinten-
dent to head the Detention
Centre on Carmichael Road.
Edwin Culmer, the current
superintendent of the prison
will move, with the concurrence
of the Minister of Immigration
Vincent Peet, to head the
Detention Centre, while crimi-
nologist Dr Elliston Rahming
will take over his position at the
prison.
Mrs Pratt said that the deci-
sion of bringing in an "outsider"
of the prison official system is a
step forward in converting the
prison from a punitive institu-
tion, to a correctional one.
"As chairman of the Nation-
al Commission on Prison
Reform, Dr Rahming will now
have the opportunity to imple-
ment the far reaching findings
of his excellent report. He now
has the responsibility of bring-
ing the most modern innova-
tions of the science of criminol-
ogy to bear at Her Majesty's
Prison, including fostering an
appreciation of the rights of vic-
tims of crime," she said.
The appointment of Mr Cul-
mer at the Detention Centre,
will bring someone with more
than three decades of experi-
ence and training in custodial


9




Y


* DEPUTY PM Cynthia Pratt
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)
administration, she said.
"We want to thank Mr Cul-
mer for his 33 years of dedicat-
ed work at the prison,who has
stuck with the prison through
thick and thin. He is a champion
of prison reform who has
worked in every area of the
prison, and we give him our
deepest thanks for his long and
distinguished service," she said.
She said that Mr Culmer will
have "an administrative support
team, and the officers and staff
at the Detention Centre, which
will continue under the respon-
sibility of the Department of
Immigration and the Minister
responsible for Immigration."
Mrs Pratt was "gratified that
he is eager for this new chal-
lenge as we look forward to the
strengthened administration of
SEE page 12


S artifical Flowers
Chocolates V Gift askets
* Stuffed Animals Decorative Baskets
SGreeting Cards Linens/Cushions
* Party Goods Televisions M
Slooks Wine Cooters
* rystal Rfrierators
* China V Furniture


A creative celebration


CREATIVE Christian Arts Ministries International had plenty to celebrate on Bay Street yesterday. The organisation
celebrated its first anniversary, the commissioning of its church and the installation of Pastor Henry Higgins and Co-Pastor .
Dr Ann Higgins (both pictured above) with a colourful junkanoo rush-out.
(Photo: Felipi Major)


* By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE ninth traffic fatality of
the year was marked yester-
day in Grand Bahama with
the death of a 17-year-old
male resident of number 16
Clear Court, off Bahama Reef
Boulevard.
According to Supt, Huluan
Hanna, around 2.55am yes-
terday on Midshipment Road,


Hugo David Thuillard, while
driving a Mitsubishi SUV, reg-
istration 33580, lost control of
the vehicle and struck a tree.
Upon impact Thuillard was
ejected from the vehicle,
receiving head and body
injuries. He was later taken
to the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital where he was pro-
nounced dead.
While the matter is still
SEE page 12


Former ambassador:

trade link to China

could cut cost of living


M By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A DIRECT trade link to Chi-
na could help bring down the
cost of living in the Bahamas,
said former ambassador to Chi-
na Sir Arthur Foulkes.
Sir Arthur applauded the
efforts of the Bahamas govern-
ment to pursue the potential


Chinese tourist market, but said
that they may not be acting
aggressively enough.
"A mission should have been
opening in Beijing long before
now," he said. "We are a small
country and we can't afford to
have missions everywhere in the
world, but we have to be strate-
SEE page 12


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Harbour Island youngsters




raise $1,400 for tsunami relief


U


- INDEX]


MAIN SECTION
Local News..........P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9
Local News......................P121416
Editorial/Letters ........................................P4
Advts ........... ................ P ,11,13,15,17
BUSINESS/SPORTS SECTION
Business................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
T. V. G uide..... ............................................P9
Sports............................................P10,11,12
INSIGHT SECTION


C om ics ................................ I.. ..............P4
W eather ........................... P8............ .......... P8

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES


CLASSIFIED SECTION 20 PAGES


MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS


Sports/Business .......................J12 Pages


FUNDS FOR VICTIMS After working on a project to illustrate the devastation caused by the Asian tsunami, which claimed from
228,000 to 310,000 lives in December, two young Harbour Island girls decided to make a contribution by collecting funds for the survivors.
Here they are shown with their tutor, Danielle McAlpine and one of their posters to illustrate the tragedy. From left to right: Cristy Ross,
10, Ms McAlpine, and Alessandra Cecconi, 12.


HARBOUR ISLAND -
Two young Harbour Island
friends, shaken by the suffer-


ing left in the wake of Asia's
tsunami, decided that some-
how they had to help.
Going from door-to-door
Alessandra Cecconi, 12, and
her friend Cristy Ross, 10,
raised $1,400 from the local
community. Fishermen, bar
owners, hotel workers and
even tourists were delighted
to be given the opportunity to
contribute.
Project
The girls, who are home
schooled together, "had seen
the news reports and with
their tutor, Danielle
McAlpine, they did a big pro-
ject on the tsunami," said
Alessandra's mother, Tracy
Barry of The Landing. "They
decided that they wanted to
do something to help the vic-
tims. They researched various
charities trying to make the
decision who they would give


the money to. They decided
upon Mercy Corps which had
minimal administrative costs
taken from donations."
Mrs Barry said that "many
locals expressed gratitude and
excitement at the opportunity
to give a donation for the
tsunami relief as they didn't
know how, to go .about making
a doiaitibri' otherwise*"Fisher-'
men, hotel workers, bar own-
ers, they all gave generously.
The girls are very proud of
their accomplishments know-
ing that they are helping to
make a difference in the lives
of many people in the devas-
tated areas."
The girls know, said Mrs
Barry, "that their island is so
often on the receiving end of a
lot of generosity and charity
in many different forms and
it was exciting for them to see
so many locals taking the
opportunity to give to others."
The Asian tsunami was


among the deadliest disasters
in modem history. It originat-
ed in the Indian Ocean just
north of Simeulue island, off
the western coast of northern
Sumatra, Indonesia, on
December 26 -the day after
Christmas-last year.
Shores
The resultant tsunami dev-
astated the shores of Indone-
sia, Sri Lanka, South India,
Thailand and other countries
with waves 50ft high.
Deaths as a result of the
tsunami are estimated from
between 228,000 and 310,000,
but the count is not yet com-
plete.
The final toll may never be
known as many bodies were
washed out to sea. The fur-
thest recorded death due to
the tsunami was at Port Eliza-
beth, South Africa, 5,000 miles
from the epicentre.


.-1JJ .1~- .~LLL.1 ..J..... T1I













PTA bus owners and operators plan to





donate to hurricane and tsunami relief


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
"'.I,'iErecently formed Public Tran-
,,sit.ss6ciation yesterday announced
thi'; launch of its organisation's
fundraising initiative to aid hurricane
and tsunami relief efforts.
The.event, named "Widows Mite
Spronation", or WMD, will take place
,.9p Febary 1A and willinvolve more
*41Jan ^2 us owners and opera-
s ^ whqiaAeplepdged to donate all of
Ath'enia gs overa two-hour period
la Andending at
pir will continue with
routes, but whenever
tral area of Rawson's
e operators will stop their
and empty their earnings into a
'& 1tion area on Bay Street.
h e totalamount collected for the
WIMJ initiative will be divided
stW v iEMA for Bahamian hur-
i^cane ,iief efforts, and the Salva-
"lkon, ;y, to aid the international
.Hu i~ii1elief efforts.
Pr, i.ent of PTA, Reuben Rah-
ng d that the acronym WMD,
usually associated with the term
"weapons of mass destruction", is a
negative concept, similar to the repu-
tation that operators of Bahamian
public jitneys have been associated
::with in the past.


















By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST.
Tribune Staff Reporter
SAGATHA Marcel, MP
for South Beach and
Tourism Ministry parlia-
mentary secretary, said it is
necessary for her to respond
further to an article pub-
lished on February 4 in The
Nassau Guardian that
makes it appear that she has
slandered trade unions.
"I had hoped that this
matter had been put to rest
and that I had uttered my
last remarks on the matter
of my relations with the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Corporation.
"I wish to make it
unequivocally clear that I do
not regard unions as dan-
gerous to the country, and
I certainly do not believe
that unions will lead to the
demise of the country," she
said.
Ms Marcel said that the
views that she expressed,
and which are accurately
reported (in the other news-
papers), are that any insti-
tution which appears to con-
done the delivery of poor
service will adversely
affect the growth and
development of the
country.

Unions
"The newspaper's
(Guardian) report does not
in any way reflect my true
views on unions and their
general contribution to the
country. Having spent most
of my working life in
Human Resource Develop-
ment, I am all too keenly
aware of the need for work-
er's organizations, including
unions and the positive role
they can play in the positive
development of a work
site and the country gener-
ally."
Ms Marcel said she thinks
it would be inappropriate
for her to enter in a "tit-for-
tat" with the union
leaders who have called for
her to resign from her posi-
tion as parliamentary secre-
tary, and that in light of
her explanation, she feels
that the matter of resigna-
tion or apology does not
arise.
"I would be happy to
engage in a private dialogue
with union leaders on this
and any other subject at a
time which is mutually con-
venient, and I trust that this


matter is now at an end,"
she said.


"By us coming together as a
collective body it reflects on this
teaching. We believe that no matter
how much hardship you may be in,
no matter how small the amount
you give, if given in love it is the
greatest of all donations."

PTA President Reuben Rahming


"We in the public transportation
system have been looked at very neg-
atively in our society and most of it is
justly so," said Mr Rahming. "We
have always operated in pockets with-
out uniformity, but now as a unified
body, we are best able to represent
ourselves in an honest way and also to
be able to live up to things we repre-
sent and put forward. When they look
at us and see our heart, we are some-
thing positive and not something neg-
ative."
Mr Rahming said the fundraising
event's name, Widows Mite is derived
from a New Testament teaching in


which Jesus Christ exemplified the
perfect attitude toward widows.
In Mark 12 the Bible reads that
Jesus sat opposite the Temple trea-
sury as worshippers gave their money
offerings and noticed that the wealthy
gave large amounts of money, but a
widow gave only a small amount -
the widow's mite.
Jesus commended the widow for
her worship and generous spirit, and
said she had a sincere and godly heart.
"By us coming together as a col-
lective body," explained Mr Rahming,
"it reflects on this teaching. We
believe that no matter how much


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
MORE than 60 Grenadians living in the
Bahamas yesterday commemorated their coun-
try's 31st independence anniversary and shared
with Bahamians their national theme that many
Caribbean countries are currently embracing.
At the commemorative church service at Life
Ministries on Soldier Road, Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell saidt4ha the the,n
"Rebuilding with a vision for'a better nation,'
sends a wider signal into the Caribbean about
the resilience of people.
Minister Mitchell added that the theme
"touches one and all." He said that the success
of other Caribbean countries has led to some of
the wealth that Bahamians enjoy today.
Mr Mitchell also announced that the
Bahamas government has offered scholarships
to Grenadian students who wish to study hotel
and tourism management.

Damage
Prime Minister of Grenada, Keith Mitchell, in
his Independence Message to his country stated
that the widespread damage to that island's
public facilities and the ongoing construction
work prevents Grenadians from celebrating
with the traditional "pomp and ceremony of
years gone by."
He added that the impact of Hurricane Ivan
has taught the country many lessons about their
abilities and shown the world that the resilience
of Grenadians will emerge.
"As we embark on another year as an inde-
pendent nation," said Prime Minister Mitchell,
"we do so as a people committed to ensuring we
are better prepared in the event of future nat-
ural disasters."
Dr Loren Charles, is a Grenadian married
to a Bahamian, and has been working at the
Princess Margaret Hospital since 1996.
"Oftentimes Bahamians don't know much
about the Caribbean," said Dr Charles, "but


hardship you may be in, no matter
how small the amount you give, if giv-
en in love it is the greatest of all dona-
tions."
He added that the PTA would
have donated sooner, but the organi-
sation had not yet been structured
enough to contribute.

Vital
"This is a matter of heart," contin-
ued Mr Rahming, "we as a business
are showing our love to the nation.
You don't want such a vital service as
the PTA not to be nationalistic at
heart. Then you will find an entity
being controlled by someone that
does not have the nation itself at
heart."
The PTA encouraged members of
the public to support the PTA's
endeavour by donating this Friday
morning at Rawson Square.
"Those that feel they don't have
anything significant to give can join us
and bring your widow's mite," said
Mr Rahming, "we can pool our mites
together and deliver it to our brothers
here in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas and to those abroad, those
who have suffered."


* FOREIGN Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell


forums like this can be used to teach each oth-
er. Bahamians and Grenadians can teach others
about each other's cultures and lifestyles."
According to Dr Charles, most Grenadians
living in the Bahamas are professionals in the
health care, teaching, and the business com-
munity.
He said that some Grenadians have been liv-
ing in the country for more than 40 years.


S I 0


ARE WE THERE YET B 1:20 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:15 10:40
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA C 1:30 4:30 N/A 7:20 N/A 10:15
ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 C 1:00 3:20 N/A 6:00 8:10 10:40
RACING STRIPES B 1:15 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:15 10:35
ELEKTRA T 1:20 3:30 N/A 6:15 8:20 10:50
COACH CARTER T 1:00 4:00 N/A 7:15 N/A 10:15
CLOSER C 1:30 N/A 4:15 7:10 N/A 9:45

ALONE IN THE DARK NEW 1:30 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:15 10:40
HIDE AND SEEK NEW 1:20 3:45 N/A 6:25 8:25 10:25
MILLION DOLLAR BABY NEW 1:10 4:00 N/A 6:45 N/A 9:45
ARE WE THERE YET B 1:00 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:30
COACH CARTER T 1:00 3:50 N/A 6:30 N/A 10:00
ELEKTRA T 1:30 N/A 3:40 6:15 N/A N/A
ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 C N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:30 10:45
I II Re v AlID Lm nT RSERVEu TICKET AT 3.a354a OR WWWu nln it mM INEatECO


Mitchell praises




Grenadian theme


I


. I. .80 1F.i 4


THE TRIBUNE


MUNIUmT, rcr-iut-rn i i, t-ouv, rmlr o









PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRURY 7,2005 THE TRIBUN


IF THERE IS anything certain to deter
return visitors to the Bahamas, it is the secu-
rity check points put in place by the US
Department of Homeland Security.
One frustrated staff member at an airline
check-in counter at Nassau International Air-
port complained that angry visitors blame
Bahamians for the inconvenience being
caused. "They think it's our fault, that we
don't care for our passengers," she was quot-
ed as saying.
We know exactly what she is talking about.
One of the check points, we were told, is not
required by the FAA, but has been instituted
by Homeland Security. In the Bahamas we
certainly have one more check point for
boarding an aircraft than they have in the
United States.
Although we have gone through the air-
port's check-in frustrations many times, we
decided to pay special attention last week to
what was going on, listen to the comments of
passengers around us and take notes.
At the end of the day we decided that if we
were a tourist, we certainly would not be
returning to the Bahamas anytime soon. As
for ourselves, we are now going to investigate
the possibilities of avoiding Nassau airport
altogether by overnighting on a cruise ship to
Miami and returning to Nassau by plane. As
far as we are concerned it is that bad.
On Sunday, January 30, The Tribune pub-
lisher and her husband arrived at Nassau
International Airport at 2.35pm for a 4.30pm
flight to Miami. The check-in line to the
American Eagle counter was short and so in
no time their passports and tickets had been
checked; their seats assigned and their board-
ing passes issued.
Then came the delays. Although the airport
was busy, it was not one of its busiest days.
For example, they only had to walk to the end
of the airport terminal to join the security
line to retrace their steps back up the termi-
nal to enter the security check point, just
behind the airlines' check-in counters. This
was a good day. On a busy day the queue to
get to the US security check-point inside the
building would extend west, the length of
the inner terminal, out the door, along the.
pavement and the length of the outside build-
ing, past the immigration offices. On that
particular Sunday the line did not go outside
the terminal building. But inside it slowly
inched its way forward.
Eventually the publisher and her husband
arrived at the entrance to the security checks
and the metal detector machines, located at
either end of a narrow corridor behind the
airline check-in counters, one of which they
had just left. One line of passengers moved


east, the other west. On entering, passengers
moved half way up the narrow corridor, then
did a U-turn and retraced their steps back
down the corridor until they arrived at the
electronic machine. The narrow corridor has
to accommodate two lines of traffic moving
shoulder-to-shoulder, one going east, the oth-
er west.
The publisher and her husband arrived at
the electronic machine at 3.35pm one hour
after arriving at the airport. Here everything
was thoroughly checked handbags, hand
luggage, jackets, belts, anything that might
set off the machine's alarm was removed and
put in a tray for electronic inspection, while
passengers, now divested of most of their
belongings, walked through the security door.
At the entrance to US Customs and Immi-
gration, passengers were again stopped, while
their US Immigration and Customs forms
were checked. Once inside, another line was
joined. Snide comments from tired passengers
started in the narrow corridor outside. But
once on American territory everything went
smoothly until US Immigration officers start-
ed to call for American citizens to come for-
ward, and people started to jump the line.
This was when the real grumbling began. The
Bahamians, resigned to the practice, just
shrugged their shoulders and said nothing.
However, Europeans used to the etiquette of
queuing jumping a queue is a big no-no
with them were not impressed. They had
plenty to say about queues and "preferen-
tial" treatment.
If this is what the Americans want to do,
then we would suggest that, like the Bahamas,
which has its "returning residents" booth for
is own citizens, the Americans have the same,
so that once a passenger is inside the US
area, their citizens will know exactly which
line to join. That way they will avoid insulting
other persons who have been queuing for an
unnecessarily long time often longer than
those who have come from the back of the
line to get "preferential" treatment and are
by now getting anxious about.missing their
flights.
One gets the impression in this area that
flights and times, and planes taking to the
skies without their passengers are not a high
priority with Homeland Security.
So far our passengers are still in line wait-
ing to be called to the. US Department of
Security counter. After leaving this counter
there is yet another full security check to go
through, duplicating in every particular the
one that they have just cleared.
As we have used up our allotted space
today, this discussion will be continued
tomorrow.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387


Frustrations at Nassau airport


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE word "victimisation"
was used to describe the evil
and wicked practice of spiteful
and vindictive actions against
an individual or a group to
punish them for their way of
thinking during the tenure of
the former PLP government.
By duping, swindling, cheat-
ing or denying entitlements,
the objective of such uncon-
stitutional behaviour was to
whip people in line to support
the government of the day,
otherwise suffer punishment
for daring to go contrary to
government's position. Under
Hubert Ingraham's FNM gov-
.ernment, a serious effort was
made to end such disgraceful
behaviour. This commitment
was continued under the new
PLP government. In fact,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
on a number of occasions has
announced that, under his
watch, victimisation will not
be allowed to raise its ugly
head in a decent Bahamas.
Most surprisingly, PM Christie
remained awfully silent dur-
ing the Sidney Stubbs BAIC
fiasco where individuals were
fired because of their politi-
cal opinion.
However, even though a
government may have adopt-
ed a position on victimisation,
that still hasn't stopped oth-
ers on their initiatives from
carrying out this forbidden
practice. As a human and con-
sumer rights advocate for
years, at times I had to speak
out against some unfair prac-
tices at BaTelCo. With their
exclusive monopoly for tele-
phone services in the
Bahamas, BaTelCo earned a
unique bad reputation for
lousy service. At times they
were accused of ripping off
the public. For example, dis-
connecting phones when the
bill had been paid so they
could collect the disconnec-
tion fee. Or having you pay
for calls that you didn't make.
In fact, each month, thousands
of telephones are disconnect-
ed, resulting in tens of thou-
sands of dollars collected by
BaTelCo. This is done on a
single day simply by someone
with a computer. Clearly, the
overhead for such mass dis-
connections is nowhere near
the amount of windfall col-
lected by BaTelCo.


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How is this money account-
ed for by BaTelCo? Certainly,
this benefit is not passed on
to the consumer. Remember
the super mass disconnection
that took place in January
2003 when literally thousands
of telephones were discon-
nected? The public was
informed that the new com-
puter system had developed a
"glitch".
For Grand Bahama now, all
disconnections will be done
out of Nassau. The local
Grand Bahama BaTelCo
office had no discretion in this
matter.
In July, 2003,1 Iwrote a letter
critical of the way BaTelCo
was mistreating its customers.
Literally, within hours of
The Tribune carrying my arti-
cle hit the streets of Nassau,
my business telephone was
disconnected without notice.
Needless to say, this had an
immediate and negative
impact on my business as like
so many small businesses, the
telephone is the life line of the
business.
This was also at a time when
I was struggling with a health
crisis when a family member
was being treated in the Unit-
ed States.
It was absolutely essential
that I was available for emer-,
gency calls. But those stone
cold bureaucrats at BaTelCo
turned a deaf ear to my sad
story and my telephone
remained disconnected for
almost a year.
The logical conclusion to all
of this was that they were pun-
ishing me for speaking out
against BaTelCo.
I had been a loyal BaTelCo
customer since 1983. Along
with my associated businesses
and my personal telephones,
over the years, I had literally
paid BaTelCo tens of thou-
sands of dollars for services
rendered over the past twenty-
two years.
Obviously, I am one of their
elite customers who deserved
some attention. Regardless
when the phone lines were not
working or were disconnect-
ed and when my directory list-
ings were omitted, BaTelCo
gave me no credit.
Then the drama continued.
In.September 2003 as they had
for the past twenty years, my
office was visited by an agent
from the Directory with
regards to me continuing my
ads.
No contrary instructions
were given.
One can just imagine my
surprise when after twenty
years of being featured in the
Directory, I was completely


omitted from under three dif-
ferent headings. Not only that,
when I called directory infor-
mation they had no listing for
my office. Thanks 'to BaTel-
Co, I lost big as patients could-
n't contact me or even check
the yellow-pages for me. Nei-
ther an apology nor a refund
for the advertisement was
issued to me by BaTelCo.
When I thought that this
series of weird coincidences
was over, there was more.
After the episode of omission
the previous year, it is reason-
able to expect that some kind
of priority treatment from
BaTelCo.
However a couple of weeks
ago when I picked up my new
2005 Directory, I was
absolutely stunned with
BaTelCo's repeat perfor-
mance of completely omitting
my residential and business
listings from the Directory.
This year BaTelCo didn't
even extend to me the cour-
tesy of contacting me for my
Directory ads.
This kind of treatment by
BaTelCo is nothing short of a
complete disgrace and it con-
firms an unwritten policy of
victimisation.
BaTelCo must change its
attitude towards servicing the
customer.
The good news is that the
BaTelCo monopoly has been
broken as other telephone
companies come on stream
and the customer is now being
given a choice.
The Minister with respon-
sibility for BaTelCo, the Hon-
ourable Bradley Roberts has
announced a temporary three
month reduction in long dis-
tance fees back in October.
Why?
Is this just a political ploy
to appease his PLP followers
as they were due to have a
PLP party convention in
November?
This is what happened the
year before when BEC rates
were "slashed". Ironically,
with the increase in oil prices,
many are paying more today
for electricity as the Bahamas
is in no position to control the
price of oil.
Thanks to Shane Gibson
and his crew who marched on
Bay Street in a reckless man-
ner, the FNM government was
unable to complete the sale of
BaTelCo.
Today, even at a basement
bargain price, we can't seem
to give away BaTelCo. BaTel-
Co will be an albatross around
the necks of the Bahamian
people for a long time to
come.


DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE, DDS
Boston,
Massachusetts
January 31, 2005.


34' BAJA
- Twin 250 Mercury EFI Outboards
Head Under Center Console


Boat in A/1 Shape


Asking


$59,000.00


Prh.- 325-23834


Sick and





tired of





BaTelCo


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005
















Public Transport Association is





'ready to work with government'


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Public Transit Associ-
ation announced yesterday
that it is ready to work with
government to implement a
step-by-step module aimed at
bringing positive changes to
public transportation.
The Public Transport Asso-
ciation (PTA) was formed
three months ago and present-
ly consists of about one third
of the 500 bus franchise own-
ers in the country.
Many of the members were
once a part of the six-year-old
Bahamas Omnibus Owners
Association (BOOA), but
after a division among the two
associations, many members
opted to join the newly formed
PTA.
Rueben Rahming, president
of PTA, said the reason for
the division is a simple lack of
communication and in order
to rid the Bahamian public of
their antagonistic views of
Bahamian public transporta-
tion, there must be a strategic
and unified voice which speaks
of positive changes in the sys-
tem.
Mr Rahming said that gov-
ernment in the past has always
turned to foreign entities as
consultants, and this is a prac-
tice that must change.

Agency
"It is disrespectful for any
governmental agency to look
outside for help," said Mr
Rahming yesterday, "we know
there is room for consultants
but let's use what we have in
the Bahamas first, and when
we have reached our limits
then look outside for help."
Vice President of the PTA,
Louis Major, owner of Major
Bus Service, said he has spent
more than 20 years trying to
improve bus service in the
country.
"We have worked diligently
trying to improve this service,"
said Mr Major.
He said he has worked along
with many people over the
years, including agencies with-
in both the government and
the opposition, to formulate
improvements to the opera-
tion of the public transporta-
tion system.
Years ago, Mr Major said a
programme of proposed
changes to the system, includ-
ing revised bus routes and
amendments to road traffic
operations was produced and
presented to the government.
The next step was to assist in
.forming BOOA, which at the
time included Mr Rahming.
According to Mr Major, the
association did very well for
the first two years, but things
eventually went downhill.
"Most of the executive
members got lax, and the












MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 7
6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
7:30 Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:03 Caribbean News Update
12:30 Immediate Response cont'd
1:00 Lisa Knight & the Round
Table
1:30 This Generation
2:00 Gospel Video Countdown
3:00 Treasure Attic
3:30 CMJ Club Zone
4:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
4:30 Kids on the Move
5:00 News Update ZNS
5:30 Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
6:00 Holy Hip Hop
625 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13- Freeport
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8:30 Island Poets
9:00 Legends: From When We Came
10:00 Sports Lifestyles
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 NewsNight 13-Freeport
12:00MN Renegade
1:00am Community Page 1540AM


NOTE: 1
rih to mak lat int


office began to deteriorate,"
said Mr Major. "So what hap-
pened is that when we didn't
have an election, many of the
members got delinquent."
Mr Major was elected as
vice president of PTA and
accepted the position.
"I got involved, and I am
going to stay involved. I tried
to bring Mr Jacques and Mr
Rahming together, they are
both very good at what they
do," said Mr Major. "But
some conflicts happen, we all
don't see eye to eye, but as it is
right now, the PTA is about
the general public. We cannot
make all the changes in the
world if we don't have the help
of Road Traffic, the police, the
government and the general
public."
Mr Rahming added that
government could be an obsta-
cle to the PTA if it chose to
be, but he said so far the gov-
ernment has been impressed
with the organisation's plans.


"We seek to come up with a
joint partnership plan with
them that we know that once
implemented will benefit all
those who are affected by it,"
said Mr Rahming.

Franchise
He said that government
should ensure that the stake-
holders of the Bahamian pub-
lic transportation system, the
franchise owners, should play a
legitimate role in bringing any
legislation to pass.
"We are the 99.9 per cent
owners of this business," he
said, "the government doesn't
put any money into the bus-
es, they are just a regulatory
entity. In order for us to work
together we first must agree
on, one simple fact, that in
order for this to happen you
must sincerely respect our
stake in this business, as
Bahamians, and our ability to
contribute by allowing us to


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


take the lead with your assis-
tance in this matter."
His message for the Ministry
of Transport and Aviation:
"Let's do this for the good of
our country. We don't have to
be enemies, this is ours and
that should not be frightening
to the government that this is
ours, because we are Bahami-
an and they the government
is ours too. We just want them
to understand that we could
not care less about politics,
let's take this entity that has
been so hindered by political
interference in the past and
restore credibility back to this
business. We are ready if they
are sincere."
Nicholas Jacques, president
of BOOA, said yesterday that
he applauds the effort to bring
some unification to the indus-
try. He added, however, that
the only problem he sees is
that the PTA does not seem
to be a legally registered asso-
ciation.


"You can't separate unions
from association, they are all
one and the same and all have
to be registered with the
Department of Labour," said
Mr Jacques. "Until such time
they get that certificate from
the government stamped, they
are not legitimized and not
legally registered."

Unite
Mr Jacques said he has
attempted in the past to better
organise and unite the bus
owners and operators, but he
feels that the PTA has spread
propaganda about him to dis-
suade members from follow-
ing his leadership.
"I know the reason why,"
he explained, "they have 1
branded me as a Haitian and
were not going to follow a
Haitian. All of my family is
Bahamian but my father is
Haitian, so I don't know what
that makes me but I can trace


my roots back to the Bahamas
just like every other Bahami-
an. The propaganda they used
to frustrate Omni members, is
don't follow that Haitian."
,Mr Jacques said that the
BOOA has more than 270
members, but only 50 finan-
cial members pay their dues
every month.
Despite claims by the PTA
that his union does not exist
because there were no elec-
tions held in September as
required by the constitution,
Mr Jacques says this is not the
case.
"That's a lie," he said, "I
never received a letter from
Director of Labour saying the
union is dissolved and until
such a time the union or asso-
ciation still exists.
"Nevertheless, I welcome
unification and representation
because we all hope to
improve the public trans-
portation system in the
Bahamas."


0


Marathon Mall *


Shirley Street Paradise Island Lyford Cay Shopping Centre
Cable Beach Shopping Centre Carmichael Road


IIB ~ (Bt ~ i


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6 MONDY, FERUARY7,200CTHE RIBUN


Church is


in a rush


to


* CREATIVE Christian Arts Ministries International cele-
brated their first anniversary, the commissioning of their church and
the installation of Pastor Henry Higgins and Co-Pastor Dr Ann
Higgins with a junkanoo rush-out from their very own group on
Bay Street yesterday.
(Photos: Felipe Major)

Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005







THETRBUE MNDYFEBUAY ,205,PAE


celebrate anniversary


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KIDZSPANISH 8-12 YEARS New Session 12 February 2005
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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


Silent Auction

bids to raise funds
JOE GIBSON takes home bamboo framed 'Royal Poinciana
Frees' hand painted by P. Taylor over the weekend. Joe won the
prize artwork at the annual Silent Auction hosted by the St.
Matthew's Social Outreach Ministry at Nassau Beach Hotel. The
auction is the outreach's largest fundraising event that aids the
Parish daycare facility, a home for the aged in the parish commu-
nity.
The event also supports its wide range of outreach efforts such as
help to hurricane victims in Grand Bahama last year and gifts of
Christmas toys for homeless and less fortunate children in the
community Joining Joe is Associate Priest Canon Neil Roach.
(Photo: St. Matthew's Communications Department)


'01 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!


QUALITY ,.
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
'isil our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals Queen's Highway 352-6122


The agent doesnt set the price you do


READY to sell, but confused
about pricing? No matter what
you hear elsewhere, pay close
attention to any advice that a
real estate professional offers.
Remember that the agent does-
n't set the price you do. Make
sure you understand all the facts
before making your decision.
Would you think that a home
that sells in just a few days was
probably underpriced? You'd
be wrong obviously, the home
was perfectly priced! If the sell-
ers and the buyers- did their
homework, they probably found


*
Bahamas real^
estate today


out exactly what other homes in
the area listed for, sold for, and
didn't sell for. Homes priced at
"fair market value" stand a great
chance for an early sale.
I If you begin by asking for
more than the home is worth,
you'll be cheating yourself out of
consideration by serious; 'quali-


fied buyers who know better.
You'll get less interest, less
offers, lower offe offers, or even


worse you could accept an
offer that will be later withdrawn
when the lender discovers
that the appraised value
came in lower than the asking
price.
The real proof that a quick
sale wasn't priced too low.is the
homes in the neighbourhood
that haven't sold yet or have
"expired."
Ask the agent for those prices
and then you'll understand how
pricing correctly from the get-
go results in a full price sale in
the shortest time.


MORTGAGE CAMPA IGN


U


GOLDEN GATES ASSEMBLY WORLD
OUTREACH MINISTRIES

Celebrates its

35th Church Anniversary

Under the Theme
"Inheritance of the Promise" Exodus 15:17
Sunday 13th February 2005 at 8:00am and 10:30am and
7:30pm
and Monday 14th February 2005 at 7:30pm.














* Prophetess Saveletta Fowler, Final Hour Ministries.
* Dr. Evangelist Jennifer Deveaux, United Faith Ministries
International.
* Apostle Arthur Duncombe, The Lord's House of Faith,
* Powerful Praise and Worship
* Selection by the Ministry in Songs, and the Community
Band
* Recognition of the Elders Board.
* Ecclesia Live Recording/ Variety Show.

For further information please contact the Church Office,
Monday to Friday at 242-361-3347, 9:00a.m. to 5p.m.

Host Bishop Ros & First Lady Althea Davis
Come and Let Us Celebrate Jesus!


. m, .







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7,2005, PAGEEW9


* PICTURED from left: front row Cheryl Carey, Kendia Barr, scholarship recipient; Kirk-
lyn Collie, UM 2004 Class; Dr Pandora Johnson, VP, Research Planning & Development. Sec-
ond row Jerome Elliot, Nicola Farrington, Gorgette Robinson, Iris Moxey and Zanta Adderley,
all members of UM 2004 Class.


University of Miami class


provides scholarship


THE 2004 graduating class
of the University of Miami
MBA programme has started
what they hope will become
a tradition for future gradu-
ating classes. This class has
provided financial assistance
to a business student in The
College of The Bahamas'
Bachelor degree programme.
Fourth year accounting major
Kendia Barr is the recipient
of a partial scholarship to
complete a Bachelor degree
at COB.
Kirklyn Collie, a member of


UM's 2004 Class, noted that
the demand for the class'
funds were great; however,
they concluded that a schol-
arship programme would be
the best investment.
Development
"We thought it was impor-
tant that we contribute to the
development of other stu-
dents, particularly the busi-
ness students," said Collie.
"We plan to encourage other
classes for follow our lead so


that at the end of the day, stu-
dents would have greater
opportunities to pursue their
dreams."
According to COB's Direc-
tor of Financial Aid and
Housing, Cheryl Carey, the
selection process was based
on needs as well as academics.
Her office supplied the grad-
uating class with a list of
deserving applicants and they
made the selection.
She too hopes that this will
become a tradition by UM
graduates.


Share


your
newsU

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for.a
good cause, campaigning
Nfor improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTANT

We are seeking to fill the following immediate multi-year,
contract position for a project on Paradise Island, Bahamas.
This position would be responsible for all aspects of accounting,
including; job costing, monthly invoicing, bank reconciliation,
pay roll, accounts payable, purchase order control, contract
and change order control and review. Experience with Microsoft
Office and construction accounting is an asset.

Respond by email to; info@pbwlbahamas.com
Fax: 1.242.363.1307
Mail to: Paradise Blue Water Ltd.
P.O.Box SS-6386
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas

Only the short list candidates will be contacted. Thank you for
your interest.


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Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941

Open: Monday- Saturday
8am,5pm

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


STAFF & FACULTY


VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following post of
Assistant Vice President, Academic Affairs in the Office of Academic Affairs, which
oversees the administration of academic services at The College, including the development
and implementation of curricular activities, academic policies and regulations. The
successful candidate must possess a terminal degree in a relevant area, have moved
up the academic rank to the Senior Lecturer level, have relevant work experience including
appropriate supervisory level exposure, having served in various capacities such as Dean
and Chair. Excellent analytical, organisational, report writing, presentational and
interpersonal communication skills are required for this position.

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

The Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs is a new position that will serve a
leadership role at The College, ensuring that the education objectives of The College are
attained and its policies are maintained. In assisting with the execution of the responsibilities
of the Office of Academic Affairs, the Assistant Vice President Academic Affairs reports
directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and undertakes duties that entail:
Responsibility for the Summer Sessions offerings, including full academic
programmes and those offered through Continuing Education Extension Services;
Focusing on strategic faculty development, a specific focus on new and adjunct
faculty;
Coordinating with the academic deans, facilitating the development of and support
for faculty research and creative activity efforts;
Continuing revision of the curriculum, assessment of student learning, advising
across the institution, the experiences of first-year and transfer students, liaison
with student affairs;
Stimulating collegial processes for further development of undergraduate majors,
general education implementation and assessment, and interdisciplinary
opportunities;
Providing leadership in the creation of a proposed Honours Programme which will
offer courses in advanced study to challenge highly motivated students;
Promoting creative use of instructional technologies to provide quality instruction;
Coordinating with other campus offices on regular and ad hoc campus-wide issues;
Resolving student academic complaints, appeals, etc.;
Coordinating curriculum assessment, including programme reviews of undergraduate
majors (in cooperation with the academic deans and the Director for Research and
Grants), general education, technology-mediated instruction, and other curricular
initiatives across The College;
Coordinating the new programme approval process with the Academic Affairs
Office;
Representing Academic Affairs on College committees, as assigned;
Representing the interest of undergraduate graduate education in strategic planning,
enrolment management, and policy development;
Assuring the highest standards for undergraduate education and the quality and
integrity of the undergraduate curriculum in collaboration with the academic deans;
Working closely with the Deans Council and the existing Academic Board to
enhance undergraduate education;
Fostering and seeking out external support for mission-related research and
outreach initiatives that are College-wide, including support from national and
international agencies; in this regard, he or she will work closely with the Director
of Research and Grants; and
Working with the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement to produce
brochures for all majors and centres of excellence (Institutes).

The initial term of appointment is three years, with eligibility for renewal of the appointment.

... Salary:Scale SM4 5... d0 'li5 O0t ". '' '.:.....i ^ ,^

The application deadline is February 11, 2005. To ensure full consideration, interested
candidates should submit a College of The Bahamas Employment Application, a
Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts. To expedite the appointment
procedure, applicants are advised to request three referees to send references under
confidential cover directly to the address listed below without waiting to be contacted
by the College.

Please visit the College's website to obtain more information about the institution and
to access the College's Employment Application Form.

Applications should be forwarded in confidence to:

Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
RP. 0. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Facsimile: (242) 302 4539
Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs


The College of The Bahamas invites applications frorr suitably qualified
individuals for the following positions to be filled for the 2005-2006
Academic Year:

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION AND CREATIVE ARTS

Lecturer in Music (2)

1. The successful candidate must be able to teach traditional theory and harmony,
piano skills, music history and analysis up to the bachelor level. Candidate must
also possess some skills in choral work and have at least a Master's degree. A
teaching certificate is preferable but not necessary. The ideal candidate must have
at least three years teaching experience at the tertiary level and some professional
experience
2. The successful candidate must be able to teach strings, preferably through the
Suzuki method. The ideal candidate will be able to formulate string programmes
for tertiary level students and members of the wider community. Candidates should
be able to teach other aspects of music as required. A Master's degree is required;
a teaching certificate is preferable but not necessary. The ideal candidate will
have at least three years teaching experience in a string programme at
the tertiary level and some professional experience.
Salary Scale: $29,600 $47,800
Interested candidates should complete a COB Application Form, available
on the website www.cob.edu.bs; and submit along with a detailed-
curriculum vitae and cover letter of interest, giving full particulars
of qualifications and experiences and three work references no later
than February 25, 2005 to:


Mail:



Email:


The Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
P. 0. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
hrapply@cob.edu.bs


Facsimile: (242) 302 4539


Cc


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.


URSE


CODE BEGINS OUR. DAYS TIME TUITION RESOURCE Venue
& FFF ATERIAI S


BahamianCusine COOK806 Feb.10 6Wees' hurs. 60-9
Gourmet Cooking I COOK23 Feb.7 6weeks Mon 6:0-9pm
GounnetCookingll COOK824 Feb.7 weeks Mon. 60-90pm
Asian Cooking COOK 800 Feb.8 6 weeks Tes. 6. -900pm
FrenchCoo COOK820 Feb.9 6weeks Wed. 60O-9 m
Health Conscious Cookin COOK 827 Feb. 9 6 weeks Wed. 6.'990: m
Vegetadan Cooking COOK 831 Feb. 10 6 weeks Thurs. 6%9.o pm
Cake&PashyMakingI C00K813 Feb.8 lOweeks Tues. 6M.900pm
Cake&Pas Makin II COOK814 Feb.8 lOweeks Tues. S:00 m
BreadMakin COOK810 Feb.10 6weeks Thurs. 6 -9: m
CakeDecoraing I COOK817 Feb.9 10weeks Wed& 6:00-92opm
Cake Decoration II COOK818 Feb.9 lOweeks Wed. 6:900i90m


225.00
$200.00
$225.00
$225.00
$225.00
200.00
$200.00
$225.00
$25000
$20000
$22500
$225.00


$10-$12 rweek
$20perweek
$20 per week
$20 week'
$20 week
week
$20 week
$10-$15perweek
$10-$15 rweek
$5-$10 week
$10- $15 per week
$10 -$15 perweek


SHTS Manl Kitchen
SHTS Main Kitchen
SHTS Main Kitchen
SHTS Main ithen
SHTS Main KtWce
SHTS Man Kchen
SHTS Main bihKom
SHTSl ader Ken
SHTSP miwhen
SHTS Lader Kihen
SHTSlaIer Kitce
SHTS Pasby Kitchen


Max. En


15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15


For further information please contact the Industy Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studes at 323-5804,323-6804 or fax 325-8175


LATE APPLICATION

DEADLINE
Late application deadline for all new applicants interested in attending The College of The Bahamas this
Fall (September) 2005 semester, are reminded of the following:
Late application deadline: .February 11, 2005 at 4:00 pm Late application fee: $50.00
Note: The following supporting documents must accompany application form
One copy of pages 1-4 of a valid (not expired) passport or certificate of identity
One official College/University transcript if previously attended a College/University
One official High School transcript if still in high school or graduated less than three years ago
One copy of all academic certificates (BJC's, BGCSE's, CXC's, GCE's Etc.)
For more information, call the Office of Admissions at 302-4499.

RESEARCH EDGE FORUM
The topic forFebruary's Research Edge Forum is "Crown Jewel of Tropical Flowering Trees"


Friday, eoruary 1a at 12 noon
Lecture Theatre, School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies


Presenter: Dr. John Hammerton, former assistant director of agriculture and chief
scientist of the BEST Commission.
The crown jewel in this case is the Poinciana, an ornamental tree originally from Madagascar
but now found throughout the tropics and sub-tropics.


The College of The Bahamas
in collaboration with the United States Embassy
Cordially invite you to attend

"Celebrating the Legacy"
of
African-American and Bahamian Contributions and Development
of the 20th Century Miami
A lecture in observance of Black History Month by
Dr. Marvin Dunn, Associate Professor of Psychology at
Florida International University

Tuesday, February 15th at 7:00 pm
Choices Restaurant and Dining Room, Bahamas Tourism Training Centre
Thompson Boulevard


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School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES SPRING SEMESTER


.


Applicants are invited to join a dynamic team in building the College of The Bahamas
into a University System. The College seeks to employ the following:

CAMPUS ARCHITECT
A Campus Architect is required to meet the challenge of coordinating the initial
designing of new buildings and the renovation projects for existing buildings and
facilities as the College expands. The successful individual will work with the Special
Assistant to the President and the President on overall policies concerning architectural
design and construction of the new and existing campuses. Other duties will be
assigned.
Qualifications:
The successful candidate must have a Bachelor's degree in Architecture from
an accredited college or university and a professional license with the Bahamas
Architects Board; at least 10 years of supervisory professional work experience
particularly with institutional projects; good communication skills; thorough
knowledge of programming, design, construction, budgeting and scheduling
of projects. A basic knowledge of contracts, purchasing and bidding requirements,
codes and statutes relative to construction and design is required. Must be
skilled in both manual and computer aided drafting. Competence in Microsoft
Word and Excel is also required; Knowledge of Microsoft Project and PowerPoint
are desired.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR BENEFITS
The Human Resources Department seeks applicants who will be responsible for the
maintenance and administration of the College benefit programs. This individual will
act as a liaison between employee/insurance providers; provide administrative support
to human resources function as needed; and ensure that programs are administered
in accordance with policy and procedure guidelines.
The successful candidate must have a strong customer focus; be able to work in a
dynamic, highly sensitive environment; possess excellent oral, written and interpersonal
communication skills. Good organizational skills and attention to detail are necessary
and proven ability to set work priorities is expected.
A Bachelor's Degree preferably in Human Resources Management or a related area is
required and at least 5 years of progressively responsible human resource management
experience that include administration of benefit programs including Group Health and
Life Insurance and Pension. This position requires a discreet, mature and tactful
individual. Must be able to use the Microsoft Office Suite.
Salary Scale: AS-2 $23,380 $35,980
Interested candidates should complete a COB Application Form, available on the
website www.cob.edu.bs ; along with a detailed curriculum vitae with a cover letter of
interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience and three work references
no later than February 25, 2005 to:
Mail:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs
Facsimile: (242) 302-4539
............... ........ ...... ..- ............ ....--- ..... -.-.. ........... ..............


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HE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 11


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & TENSION SERVICES


Personal Development Spring Semester


COMPUTER OFFERINGS

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Description:This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not
understand how it works. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii)
Microsoft Access Database Management.


Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Monday, 7 February 2005 6:00pm 9:00pm
Saturday, 12 February 2005 10:00am 1:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Section 01 (CEES)
Section 02 (CEES)
Tuition: $450.00


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description:This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various
software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I Begins:Thursday, 10 February 2005
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm Duration: 12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Pre-requisite:None
Time:9:30am 4:30pm


Begins:Thursday, 3 March 2005
Duration:1 day Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$160.00


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training
in the following areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System
Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.


Pre-requisite:None
Time:6:00pm 9:00pm


Begins:Wednesday, 9 February 2005
Duration: 12 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$450.00


PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting
and Repairs.


Pre-requisite: None
Tuesdays and Thursdays


Begins: Tuesday, 8 February 2005 Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm
Duration: 12 weeks Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees:$500.00


QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that
20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students
will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.


Pre-requisite: None
Duration: 6 weeks


Begins: Tuesday, 1 March 2005
Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Fees: $330.00


WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will
cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics,
Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
"Begins: Thursday, 24 February 2005 ;Tifin'9:30iofri' 4:30pm .. Duration: 2days'-
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email
nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time payment).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, course Schedule and Course materials.



PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT..

COURSE NO. SEC. NO. COURSE NAME TIME )AY START DURATION FEE
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm lon/Wed 14-Feb 10 weeks $250
A0CA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm ueffhur 15-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm "ue/Thur 15-Feb 10 weeks $300
ANIMAL CARE
ANIM800 01 DOG GROOMING 600-9:00pm ue 1-Mar 10 weeks
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm ue 1-Mar 8weeks $225
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS I 6:00-9:00pm Mue 1-Mar 8 weeks 225
MKTH900 01 MARKETING 6:00-9:00pm hur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
CUST900 01 SUPERIOR CUST. SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm *hur 24-Feb 1 day $170
COMPUTERS
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm 1on 7-Feb 12 weeks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10:00-1:00pm at 12-Feb 12 weeks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm hur 10-Feb 12 weeks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I 6:00-9:00pm ted 9-Feb 12 weeks $450
COMP960 01 EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT WIS 9:30am-4:30pm "hur 3-Mar 1day $160
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm r ue/Thurs 8-Feb 12 weeks $500
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm 8ue 1-Mar 6 weeks $330
COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pim hurs&Fri 24-Feb 2 days $550
COSMETOLOGY _
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION I 6:00-9:00pm on 28-Feb 8 weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE& PEDICURE I 6:00-9:00pm uses 1-Mar 8 weeks $225
COSM807 01 NAILART TECHNICIAN I 6:00-9:00pm 0on/Thurs 28-Feb 6 weeks $500
COSM805 01 SCULPTURED NAILS I 6:00-9:00pm ed 2-Mar 6 weeks $250
DECORATING
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm ue 1-Mar 10 weeks $225
FLOR801' 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm [ on 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm hur 3-Mar 10 weeks $275
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Ved 2-Mar 8 weeks $225
DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm rue 1-Mar 8 weeks $250
ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS I 6:00-9:00pm ue 1-Mar 8 weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I 6:00-7:30pm fon/Fri 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
ENG 803 01 WRITING & PUBLISHING WORKSHOP 930am-3:30pm ;at 5-Mar 1 day $170
HEALTH & FITNESS _
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm r hur 3-Mar 10 weeks $465
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm 'ue 1-Mar 10 weeks $620
LANGUAGES _
CRE900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm fue/Tffhur 1-Mar 10 weeks $225
CRE901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm fon/Wed 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm eue/Thur 1-Mar 10 weeks $225
SPA 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm fon/Wed 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPE 900 01 PUBLIC SPEAKING I 6:00-9:00pm fon 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
LANG900 01 SIGN LANGUAGE I 6:00-9:00pm Dn 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
MANAGEMENT_
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT I 6:00-9:30pm "hur 10-Feb 12 weeks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT II 6:00-9:30pm on 7-Feb 12 weeks $300
MGMT902 '01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT W/S 10am-4pm thurs&Fri 3-Mar 2 days $350
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I 6:00-9:00pm hurs 24-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWINGI


SEW 800 01 BASIC OF F
SEW 802 01 BASIC OFF


9FW 89II


Y REP AR D MAKING I


TTINGI
TTING II


eon 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
fhurs 3-Mar 10 weeks $250.
rue 1-Mar 10 weeks $225


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or email nlacrolx@cob.edu.bs All fees
are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMT PROGRAMMES

W&a is your goal?
/ PROMOTION
/ QUALITY SERVICE
/ SALARY INCREASE
/ NEW CAREER
o CAREER ENHANCEMENT
we can provide you with superior education and
training to help you accomplish your goal.
FALL 2004 FALL 2005
Classes for Spring 2005 will Begin Saturday 12th F ebra 2 W
Are you preparingfor apromoon, career change orwareeredanscrear? The jPfesmfd Demelpuest Deparauent can help you achieve yaww IagaUA widrersy of causes and programmes
leding certificate certifcationand licensurrwerofre .sbambcanshmafup m .rinsel perfrm- dainyethanwfryoorganization. S enit auv igerr thavesecuredparonerships
with lendinginernational institutions tohelp you accompli yoc grarg Yam c antei yo teional development credentials at he Cole of
NoEDnInDeExamRequired. TuitionisPaid PerTlhrm. lItenatienalPlgramesAvaitble.
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
The Catficate in Lamting Disabilities Programm is designedloequiptacher withthe rissemanyforwasmking with diverslearcnens. Patticipjatrmir neWmuba ceda niques touidentify
students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilaicsreld nto lsAgnage adl co uicative ar d develop strategies that can he used with uinms wb hf e Ism diagmWed as learning
disabled. The programme comprises six (6)counrses:
Sp Tiarm.n.. Sm.armr FallTerm
SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED 903 Strategies and iinsvetoaa1-S$168 SPED 905 Assessment- $17S8
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 SPED 904 Strategies and ilntervention1- $4 CPM 903 Professional Developm iSeminar- $100
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning $168 ETIC90D Ethics & Pofess .RespaD.-$250 (Optional)
PREREQUISITE: An Associate Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a Bachelo Degree.
BEGINS: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sal. 8:0am-12:15pm Duration: 3 Temna
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to esucesflly sit the intenmationalA+ Micasoft Cetification Examination. Techniques t ideiy l ceffy chanica
problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning experience with lab exercises that allows the student to apply theory to practice.
Part : COMP 954 Software- $510 Part 2: COMP955 Hadware
PREREQUISITE: For The International Examination: Successful completion of all course work for Parts I and 2.
BEGINS: Per Demand Day/lime: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2Tenns
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access. Microsoft Outlook, and PowerPoint To help the studc to develop avitgaio and
design skills, the instructorprvides easy to understand notes and conducts five demontratins on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful compleion ofb e nm li tioeal
examinations, the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOUS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:
Spring Term Summer Term FaTllTem
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist-$610 ETHC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- 250 COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 ProfessionallDevelopmentSemi'm- $100
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint
Microsoft Outlook
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350
PREREQUISITE: None BEGINS: Spring and Fall Day/Tme: Sat.8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 Terms
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME
This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management at James Madison University, Harrisohnug, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors.
Managers, and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed for today's management challenges. A comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high
standards of performance.
Spring Term Summer Termn
CPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 CPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Respons.- $250
Fall Term
CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an Associate Degree OR a B. A. Degree from an accredited orrecognized college/auniversity.
BEGINS: Spring and Fall Day/fTme: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives (ILEX), Bedfoid, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal leveL Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of
Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers, Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive anay of
legal office skills, the Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
Spring Term Summer Tenr
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills-$350 ETHC90 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
LAW 900 The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
Fall Term (Options- choose one) -$600
NB. Options are subject to change on a semesterly basis.
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: An AA Degree and 3 years work experience at the junior executive or administrative assistant levels.
BEGINS: Spring and Fall Day/Time: SaL 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-paperexamr to a computer-based test, Ihe revised CPAExam
will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new am also has
increase emphasis on general business knowledge and information technology. The Becker CPA Review is designed to prepare experienced and or non-experieced accountants to sit the CPAUnifi ed
Examination. Courses include:
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
PREREQUISITE: A Bachelors Degree from an accredited or recognized college/univesity in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
BEGINS: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat, 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Wks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those individuals seeking professional development ad aspiinglo
rise through the ranks in the HR field.
Spring Term Summer Term
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETfHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $20 HRM 902 H/R Development &Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
Fall Term CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: A Bachelors Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years as a manager, supervisor or trainer
BEGINS: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT, ..
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solvdmplicaed problems and masterchallenges in decision making. This prgraime ins aimed at spervieore and middle
managers who wish to update their supervisory skills, or persons who have been promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisoIy maigetsenl. Courses include:
Spring Term SuiumnerTrm ra F ATam
'CPM'900 PersonalSkills5 i : SUlPV 90M0uiepvisoryManagemet(SUPV-I)- $500 . CPM902 itoespenasilSitls-$600
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 901 Administrative Skills (SUPV 2)- $700 ETH900 Ethics aml Prof Respo sibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $ 100
PREREQUISITE: 3r ore years experience asa Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and anA.. A Degree in any discipline from a recognized or accredited institution.
BEGINS: Spring and Fall Day/ftime: Sat. 8am-12pmi Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT
With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the operational management prcess In an eflt to equip the support
level staffto function efficiently in the work environmenltC, EES islsed to offeraperoficincy programme in basie office skills.
SpfriTum Snur FalllTerm
COMP906Microsoft Office Specialist-$610 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 COMP906 Micosoft Office Seclist. $610
WRS 900 Writing & Research Skills -$350 CPS 903 Office Technology- $150 CPS 909 Business Com al $150
CPS 904 OfficaAdminishation- $150 CPS 901 Accounts-$250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seain- $100
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above.
BEGINS:_.- Spring.andEall, Day/lime: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative Professionals (IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare
administrative professionals and clerical assistants to write the CPS international exum.
Spring Term Summer Term Fall Term
CPS 900 Economics- $150 CPS 903 Office Technology- $150 CPS 901 Accounts- $250
CPS 902 Business Law- $200 CPS 904 Office Administration- $150 CPS 906 HIR Management- $150
CPS 901 Accounts- $250 CPS 905 Behavioral Science In Business- $150 CPS 907 Org. & Management- $150
CPS 909 Business Communications- $150
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE 4yrexpriernceOR A..A..Degree+3Yrs.experienceORaB.A.DegrseeamdOYn.Expmrience.
BEGINS: Spring andlFall Day/Time:SaLt.am-lpm Duaionl: ERMS
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE
The Joureyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Jouineyman PPlaning Esumalion. Topics includes: interpretation of codes, disposal and dryinqe s mys, mon
drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitaryfixtures, basic drawings tonsciale, warsu yanddisltribdioseofmale trials and tools, repairs andmainteuance. The exuaminsaisoianed
conjunction with The Ministiy of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are quedI to a one (I) PfessionlDevelopmentSeminar.
Fall Term S-hiiT (ot(0tlm
lPLM900 Journeyman Plumbing- $800 SUPY 900 Supervisory Management- $500
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar-$100 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
PREREQUISITE: Students should have wortingmowledge and sklls in the filing meas: iiekrtatieof codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm draiMgedispo d .,a1 lot
sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distrlbutio, use of MSalnd atoolrepairs and maintunace.
Begins: Fall Daylime: Tuesdays 6pim-9pm Duration: 1 TERM
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Manter Plumbing Examination. Students should have above average knowledge m dll lie lk n e
interpretation of cdesdisposal nd drinagesystms, stonn drainagedispol lysteinstalof sanitaryfixtures, basicdrawings to scale, watersupply d ibia.mof=amis"ad ,
repairs and maintenance. Special emphasis will be plaedoplant mamnagensment and formian respoesibilities.
FallTerm Saneram (Optionl)
MPLM900 Master Plumbing- $950 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumhing Supervisors)
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainagesy* ml rse im pdispoal syum, intllio of
sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Fall Day/trime: Tuesdays 6pm- 9pm Duration: I TERM
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS
This course is designed to strengthen the candidalesundestanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting conceps, apri fe a mthcmk pic l aily to
and accurately read a financial statemet/spreadshed is an essential skill for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 coveo mavys ti fial way,mey so Iuinld eales tha
aids the students' learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS 901 Accounts- $250
PREREQUISITE: None BEGINS: Perdemand Day/Time:Sat/tlhursl,"e.8am-12:15pm OR- 6p -9pa Dw aio 10Wks
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
This course examines guidelines forthe professional behavior of members of any organisation. Aselect of codes of ehicstd elhicscaeswillbeexpl tosppot a ethical practical
discourse on why she application of ethics and professional responsibility is important in all aspects of society.
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responability- $250
PREREQUISITE:None BEGINS:Perdemand Daymime:Sat. 8asm-12oon ORlThunelhTe-6pin-9pm Dimation:8Wks
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS
Thiiscourse is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking kills to prepe them foreentry into CEES' professional development progmmao. WRS 900 is
also stanctured to provide certification candidates with the skills necessary to successfully write petilion aad research ppes.
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350
PREREQUISITE: None BEGINS: Per demand Daylime: S l-8 lm-12Dioon ORThturiue-6pm-9pm Duration: 8Weeks
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMMES
All students applying for Iitemational Certification Courses and Programmes that as offered in conjunction with foreign institutions are required to contact the CES Office for infumt0 on textual
application and examination fees.
FEES: The Following Fees Apply:
1. COB Registration....................................... $40.00 (oue-time fee)
2. Insurance........................... ..................... $25.00 (valid for l year)
3.IDCard....................................... $25.00 (oetime foree)
S4.Techoology Foe..................................... $75
5. Books..................................................... $ Please contact COB Bookstore for prices.
6 Awards Ceremony.... ................... $150.00 (must bh paid by the 2nd Term)
7. External Application Fees....... ......... Please check with the CEES Office for information.
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration sessions:
The first four pages of yonr PASSPORT
Copies of your certificates/liceSunes and collegesuniversity transcripts
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
INO entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes.
2.Tsition is charged per term; i.e. you will he billed only for courses offered in the cunrent term.
3.Non-Babamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4.At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each of histher stamped receipts rpresening payment for tuition, fees o for the e t tert
5.Rememhber to obtain from your lecturer the correct ISBN Number for all required textbooks.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. SmiMS and whlap addtess irnpaart ismes di ae val to the
adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general public. This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units or pofeisioaln n Dlyisg for s-certifiat in
their respective disciplines.
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY
The Annual Awards Ceremuny and reception is normally held at The British Colorial Hiltuon Hotel once during the Fall term. Adu]t students anceumftlly cnrmpeing proluanes antd cmaes r awardted
certificates, certifications and/or licensure.
Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or


Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712 Fees May Be Pald By Cash, Crdit Card, or Ball Cerelied Ch Tqub:
The College of The Bahamas, Business Offce
CEES Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Courn Maleriab


QLYV ovu I vi II Ljrlmrrn I ivlmr\1 1 1







PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7,2005 THE TRIBUNE


BBIALNEWS


Deputy PM makes prison and


detention centre announcement


FROM page one
the Detention Centre demonstrating that it con-
tinues to meet all internationally accepted norms."
Mrs Pratt said that in short order a support
team to assist Dr Rahming and the officers and
staff at the prison, also will be introduced. She
mentioned that in the meantime she was con-
cerned about the number of young men who are
returning to the prison for a second and even
third time.
"I am also concerned that they are sitting in
prison and not doing enough to prepare them-
selves for honest and productive work on the
outside. I have accordingly asked Dr Rahming as
he moves forward, to put the necessary training
and productive work programmes in place, so
that prison life can better prepare the inmates
for their return to society."
Noting that she is aware of the prison being
short staffed, Mrs Pratt said that that is an issue
that she is currently addressing.
"We have never had an uprising at the prison,
and that is something we should commend our
officers for. We know we have a shortage of staff,


and we have known that for years. But it is being
addressed. We shouldn't be selling our officers
short by only highlighting the negative, we should
also look at all the good work they have done,"
she said.
Mr Culmer said that his appointment at the
Detention Centre is a new challenge, one that
he readily accepts.
"When I was asked to head the Centre I accept-
ed it because there must be changes in life, and
change will come as long as you're employed in
the civil service. First I will look at the rules that
govern the facility and see if they are adequate to
run it, and to see if they correspond with
Amnesty, and other human rights laws," he said.
"With that sense I don't think we need a mili-
tary style place there, because these persons are
coming looking for a better life. And these are the
things I will look at first. The rules that govern,"
he said.
DEPUTY Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
announced yesterday the repositioning of
Edwin Culmer (left) and Elliston Rahming to
the press.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)


Applications available
Lyford Cay Foundation
Scholarships


The Lyford Cay Foundation is pleased to announce
that applications are now being accepted for
academic scholarships at the graduate and
undergraduate levels. Apply for:







The US $5000/yr Lyford Cay
Foundation Awards

Cdn$7,500/yr The Canadian
Lyford Cay Foundation Awards

-* Estelle Siebens Excellence
Awards in specialized disciplines

Application forms available from all secondary school
guidance counsellors, C.O.B.
Financial Aid Office or through tie
Lyf ord Cay Foundation, ','
P.O. Box N-7776, Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline for completed applications is
March 31, 2005




NOTICE OF SALE

Crown Life Insurance Company
invites offers for the purchase of:-

"Plaza on the Pond" situated on
the comer of East Bay Street
and Ernest Street approximately
500 feet east of Church Street
and the New Paradise Island
Bridge.

Crown Life Insurance Company will
sell as mortgagee under power of sale
contained in a Mortgage dated 16th
January 1990 and recorded in the
registry of records in the city of


Nassau in
to 268.

Term:


volume 5384 at pages 241



Ten percent (10%) of the
purchase price at the time
of contract and the balance
upon completion within
thirty (30) days of contract.


Crown Life Insurance Company
reserves the right to reject any and all
offers.

Interested persons may submit written
offers addressed to the office manager,
P.O.Box N 272, Nassau, Bahamas to
be received not later than the close of
business on Friday the 25th February
2005.


Former ambassador


FROM page one
gic. We ought to have a perma-
nent mission somewhere in the
East and China is the obvious
place."
Sir Arthur said that the world
is expanding and changing at a
rapid rate and China's econo-
my has consistently expanded
over the years.
"China is going to be, if they
keep on the road they are now
on, a major power, second only
to America," said Sir Arthur.
"If we cultivate our relationship


with China, it is a vast country
- not so easy to make them
aware of us, but if we do it
properly by cultivating a diplo-
matic relationship, we will get
our share of that market."
Sir Arthur said that Bahami-
ans normally shop in Miami to
buy clothing that is made in
China.
He added that merchants put
a mark up on this clothing,
and a direct link to China
could reduce costs significant-
ly.
He also said that although
tourism has proven to be more


ASH WEDNESDAY SERVICES

Tuesday Feb 8th, 2005
Shrove Tuesday
1:00pm Midday Mass,
Guest Choir,
Bahamas Electricity Choir

ASH WEDNESDAY FEB 9TH, 2005

6:00am Sung Mass, Liturgy for Ash
Wednesday, Imposition of Ashes
1:00pm Midday Mass, Guest Soloistand
Pianist, Mrs. Joanne and Mr. Lee
Callender
7:30pm Joint service between St. Barnabas
and Our Lady's. Service will be held
at Our Lady's Catholic Church.


SBIG


SALE


SONY
ERICSSON
T62U
Only
$90


NOKIA 3200
Camera Phone *
FM Radio
$260






MOTOROLA
V180
Nice Phone, Just
$290


SAMSUNG
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Very Nice Phone
$250


MOTOROLA
C200


MOTO
V 505 C
Phone




MOTOROLA
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o sas


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95

HAIER
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Phone
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$360


InJwv


SAMSUNG
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$250


SIEMENS
CT 56


sustainable than any other
industry, and the Bahamas has
enjoyed a sustained level of
prosperity for years, that will
soon change.
"We are a service industry,"
he said, "and the next order of
business is to make rules with
regard to services, the Bahamas
is inevitably going to be sucked
into these issues and we have
to be ready."
Collaborating with Caribbean


neighbours is the way to pre-
pare for this, he said.
"I believe in collaboration.
We need collaboration of our
Caribbean sister countries to
put over the point of view of
small countries.
"We have the same problem
which is smallness and vulnera-
bility but together we have 12 to
14 votes internationally in the
United Nations.
"That counts for something."


Scholarships available
$5,000 Lyford Cay Foundation
- Technical Training Awards


Interested in a career in...
* agriculture/agribusiness
* air conditioning & refrigeration
* auto, marine & aviation mechanics
* Construction & related trades
* diesel technology & mechanics
" heavy equipment operation
i machine shop/welding
* computer service technology
* hospitality & tourism
* technical instruction & education
* health care, medical technology & more

d..'" .


Apply today for a yforday Foundation Technical Training cho
Apply today for a Lyford Cay Foundation Technical Training Scholarshit


p


Applicants must be
Bahamian with high school diploma
Plan to pursue a vocation valuable to The Bahamas &
Pledge to return to The Bahamas upon graduation
Other qualifications may apply
Applications available from The Manager's Office, BTVI, or write to
Technical Training Scholarships, Lyford Cay Foundation,
P.O. Box N 7776, Nassau.
or online at www.lyfordcayfoundation.com
DEADLINE TO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MAY 1, 2005


NOKIA
1100
; : : a 'i: ,
:*.. ; ,'S*j


Traffic fatality

FROM page one
under investigation, Supt. Hanna said that from the information
police have gathered it is still too early to say whether the vic-
tim was wearing a seat belt.
"We don't know. Sometimes a crash can be so severe that it
can actually catapult you from a seat belt, but we don't know.
It's too early to say," he said.
In other news over the weekend, police reported that at
9.30am on Saturday, a body was discovered in the sea just
behind the old traffic police station, the former Pan American
Airlines building just west of Potter'y Cay Dock.
Supt Hanna said: "Some fishermen in the area discovered the
body, and summoned the police. The dive team, including tte
Police and the Defence Force, fished the body from the water.
At the time the individual was wearing a long sleeved shirt, and
a pair of blue jeans."
According to Supt. Hanna the identity of the man is still
unknown, but he appears to be about 30 years of age.
"We don't know how he got there or how he drowned, but the
body will be submitted for an autopsy," he said.
Also in the news, a 38-year-old male resident of Cameron
Street was arrested yesterday when police, armed with a search
warrant, inspected his home and discovered a .38 Loston hand-
gun, and one live round of ammunition.
The resident is currently in police custody and is expected'to
be arraigned in court later this week.
At 5.30pm on Saturday, police also recovered another firearm
on Wright's Lane, off Wulff Road.
According to Supt. Hanna, it was police on a routine patrol of
the area, who noticed two men acting in a suspicious manner.
"These persons upon seeing the officers walked away. When
the officers searched the area, they found a .357 weapon with
nine live rounds," he said.
Investigations into the matter are continuing.


LG C1300
Sleek Stylish Phone
$280


r YIOU:----H-ICErAT$1-I


Waler' n-luA sBrieBLtd
^^^^^ #296 East St.i^^^^^^


I I 1 I


I -- -------


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


::





MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


'Your Bimi SuUPWums' HOT

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VALUE THE
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lrlD


$L99
PER LB


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U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK
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ROAST
237 -LB


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$499
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LETTUCE NECTARINES
$419 PER LB
$s4 19 $i4 99


LEG QUARTERS
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CARNATION
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2/AR 25
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OIL
$289


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TUSCAN GARDEN 7PC WALL PICTURES SHEET SETS
BATH GIFT SET PICTURE FRAMES FLATWARE SESTS
PRIANA FOOT WALL MIRRORS FOOT SPA
THERAPY GIFT SET COMFORTERS CONAIR HAIR DRYER
PLACE MATS FEATHER BEDS CONAIR 12PC HAIR KIT
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~S~Bleq








THE TRIBUNE .


PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


Problems continue in Haiti one





year after start of rebellion


Ask How.

Ask Now.


Ask Sherwin-Williams.


Whether a Do-lt-Yourselfer or an Industry Professional, we
offer the quality PAINT products, service, tools and advice
you need to get your job done right!
A palette witb over 2,000 colors that are all crisp, rich, vibrant,
versatile and timeless.
Interior/Exterior Wood Stains & Pure Polyuretbanes.
+ Wood and Deck Sealers.
Concrete Stains and Sealers.
Faux Finishing Latex and Oil Glazing Liquids.

FrT -


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Te- (22)32+-5470 -U -24)3247548


t a



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top 4 1 40 me 4GOS 0 4W WM &#I- 4 Om- *
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We are seeking h
photographs on:


historical Bahamian


* Lifestyles
(rum-running, sponging, family
scenes, church etc;)


* Architecture
(colonial buildings,
homes etc)


hotels, island


Timeline: from 1850's to 1970's

Black & White photos preferred.

We wish to buy the photos & prefer
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Contact: (242) 424-1585


d o-

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Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Invites Application for the following position:

RETAIL SHOP MANAGER
at SANDALS ROYAL BAHAMIAN

The successful applicant should satisfy the following minimum
requirements:-
> Tertiary level education in Business, Marketing or Management.
> Have a minimum of 3-5 years experience in retail environment.
> Have experience in retail merchandizing.
> Computer skills Microsoft WORD, EXCEL. Knowledge of a
retail point of sale system would be an asset.
> Ability to work varied shifts (including evenings/weekends
and holidays)
> Knowledge of the tourism product would be an advantage.
> Must have excellent interpersonal and leadership skills.
> Proven track record in building and working as a part of a
team.
> Pursue excellence in customer service
> Excellent oral and written communication skills are essential.
> Creative ability, visual display and merchandising skills are
a necessity.
> Must be able to supervise & motivate a retail sales team.
> Outstanding ability to negotiate and foster strong supplier.
relationships.
> Ability to meet and exceed corporate targets; must be profit
oriented.
> Owner of a reliable motor vehicle would be an asset.

Applications should be emailed or faxed to:

GENERAL MANAGER
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Cable Beach, Nassau
P.O. Box CB13005
Fax: (242) 327-6961
Email: wbullard@srb.sandals.com
Applications close on Monday, February 28, 2005.





O O


e


- - -








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180 OZ




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MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
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$1 0!9!9
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10 LB



LIBBYS
WHOLE KERNNEL
CORN
104 -OZ-
Ag5a


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SO LBS
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s49


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2/$500
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ASSORTED 10- PAK......... ....... .$3.99
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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT





The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. wishes to advise that
it will commence disconnecting services for all accounts with
overdue balances, and ceasing services to accounts with no activity
for three or more months beginning Monday, February 14, 2005.

Customers whose services are disconnected will have their security
deposits applied to the outstanding charges, and will be required
to apply for a new account and pay a new deposit and reconnection
fee.

As a result, both cellular and landline subscribers with outstanding
balances on inactive accounts are urged to safeguard their services
by contacting the Credit & Collections office, JFK Drive to make
payment agreements.

Payments may be made at any BTC cashier counter as well as any
branch of Royal, Scotia, British American and First Caribbean
Banks, as well as Finco Bank Line. Subscribers are also reminded
that for their convenience, BTC's Mall at Marathon office is open
on Saturdays to facilitate bill payment during the hours of 10:00am
to 5:00pm.


-


L --


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


7rt-'-. .V








THE TRIBUNE


The Bchamasf Ministry of Tourism

salutes the winners of the
^&i~~~~~~~ ~~~ i jj^ ii./sw1 1i~ j ii, .^^^


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2004, PAGE 17


9TH ANNUAL


CACIQUE
AWARDS 2005


(Su rlu Travel r
(Sunworld Travel & Tours)


HR DEVELOPMENT
Felice Renee McKinney
Grand Bahama


NATURE TOURISM
Ben Rose
Grand Bahama


SPORTS, LESIURE & EVENTS
David (& Kathleen) Ralph
Regatta Time In Abaco


a -Cay
K Amalame


CREATIVE ARTS
Elyse Wasile
New Providence


HANDICRAFT
Joseph Albury
Abaco


SPECIAL AWARD
Brian and Jennifer Hew
(Kamalame Cay, Andros)


MINISTER'S AWARD
Margarita Clarke
New Providence


INTERNATIONAL


TRAVEL WRITER
Paula Thrasher


AIRLINE
AirTran Airways


TOUR OPERATOR
Paradise Island Vacations


TRAVEL AGENT
Neil Henderson
(Banana Travel UK)


CRUISE LINE
Discovery Cruise Lines


BAHAMAS HOTEL


ASSOCIATION


HOTELIER OF THE YEAR
Paul D. Thompson
Managing Director
Lyford Cay Club


MANAGER OF THE YEAR
Lynn Johnson
General Manager
Green Turtle Club


CHEF OF THE YEAR
Jasmin Young
Executive Sous Chef
Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island


EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR
Dellarese Frazier
Radisson Cable Beach Resort


PEOPLE'S


CHOICE BAHAMIAN


COMPETITION


SECULAR
Mr. Gofa
Phil Stubbs
Grand Bahama


GOSPEL
Hold on to Jesus
. Da Fam
New Providence


~st~







PAGE 18 MONDA, FEBRARYR7,205OTHETRIBUN


Trinidad


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Disease kills thee



more in Guyana


FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THE BAHAMAS!

ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
EAST & SHIRLEY STREETS
is very pleased to host

THE INSTITUTE IN BASIC LIFE
PRINCIPLES
BASIC SEMINAR
Why is there so much conflict everywhere? In our homes, at our
schools, on our jobs, on the streets, in the churches and even in our
own personal lives... If you want answers... lasting answers If
you want to make a difference in our bejeweled Bahamas then you
should register for this Seminar without delay! Find out:-
Why every conflict is caused by violation of one of 7 Basic,
non-optional, Scriptural principles resulting in
"demonic tormentors"
What is stopping your success & how to overcome lifelong
habits
How to overcome depression, anger, bitterness, lust, fear
and anxiety
Steps to prevent gang violence, teen pregnancy, domestic
violence
What 4 decisions every father should make with his
daughters
What are the 3 stages of a nation's destruction
How to Build a total marriage & and stop abnormal social
development
Learn what is the basis for a peaceful, purposeful and
fulfilled life
Who should attend:
Youth, Singles, Couples, Parents, Grandparents, Employees, Pastors, Leaders,
Teachers, Families
Date:
Monday Feb 28th Saturday March 5th
Time:
(Mon Thu 7:00 pm 10:00 pm)
(Fri & Sat 9:00 am 6:30 pm)
(You will need to take a vacation day on Fri. March 4th)
Cost:
$40 with Workbook ($65 with Workbook & Textbook)
$100 Married Couple (2 workbooks & 1 textbook)
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT 341-3009,328-5776 or 325-3556.
To secure your space register by Feb 15th at the church's office!


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PAGE 18, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Determined Pope makes






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IF YOU HAVE SOME BASIC BUSINESS SKILLS,
YOU COULD MANAGE JUST ABOUT ANY BUSINESS.. .EVEN YOUR OWN

It's a new year...You're probably feeling that it's time to move up in life...But how?

Option One Start a business
Option Two: Get the training you need to get job promotions
Option Three Sign up for a seminar or workshop with the Centre for Entrepreneurship
at The College of the Bahamas and let them show you how to acquire the skills you need
to start a business of your own or move up the corporate ladder.

Here's the best news yet: CFE is putting on just the seminar you need, whether you're aiming for a
business or a promotion

What? How to Organize and Manage your Business

A comprehensive five-day seminar designed to take the mystery and complications out of organizing
just about any business A step-by-step, hands-on course to build your foundation for business success

Your Guides? Business experts with proven track records from the public and private sector

When? February 14-15 AND February 21-23, 2005

Where? Choices Dining Room, School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies
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Telephone: 328-5613 or 328-5629 OR Fax us: 322-2054


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PAGE 20, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


'Mardi ,.
Gras' at
StJohns
School"i
ST JOHNS SCHOOL host-
ed their very own 'Mardi
Gras' fair yesterday com-
plete with clowns and other
colourful entertainment.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson) ' ,


Dream Home,Weddings
& Zumba Bally





Saturday, February 12, 2005
10 am to 6 pm

Live radio broadcasts
with 100 Jamz and More FM


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Call: 327-8361 or 327-4091
Fax: 327-4092
Booths by:
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.Contractors, Insurers
:Sandals, Destination Travel, Jet Blue, Air Jamaica, Styles of New, York
Bally Total Fitness & F. Rich Trading
Fashion & Talent Show
Bridal & Spa Show
Pizza Hut, Pepsi
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444'UShare

your
MEMOS
newus
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
-- campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.








MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Bea siess s S
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


I


Ratingf


Uency


-eSl l
boost


Bar president



attacks unions'



'naked assault



on rule of law'


Backs Industrial Tribunal and staff;
calls for its removal from under
Ministry of Labour's portfolio


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
he Bahamas Bar
Association's pres-
ident has hit out at
trade unions for
Their "naked
assault on the rule of law"
through demonstrations against
the Industrial Tribunal, accusing
them of attempting to pressure
a government minister to inter-
fere with the judiciary.
In a letter sent to Harrison
Lockhart, the Industrial Tri-


bunal's president, attorney
Wayne Munroe said the fact
that it fell under the Ministry
of Labour's portfolio seemed
to have encouraged the two
main trade union bodies to
attempt to exert pressure on
Vincent Peet, the minister in
charge, to interfere with its
processes.
Mr Munroe said it was "whol-
ly inappropriate" for the Indus-
trial Tribunal to be included
within the Ministry of Labour's
portfolio, adding that the
unions' demonstration was "the


most cogent argument of the
immediate need" for its work'
and judicial officers' status to
be "properly recognised".
Mr Munroe said: "Excited by
this fact that the tribunal is with-
in that Minister's portfolio, and
perhaps ignorant of the statu-
tory protection of the tenure of
the President and Vice-Presi-
dent of the Tribunal, the union-
ists have adopted a course of
seeking to encourage a mem-
ber of the executive to interfere
with a judicial officer in the dis-
charge of his function.
"We are confident that the
Minister of Labour, who is also
a counsel and attorney, knows
better. We are disappointed
See LAW, Page 3B


'Serious skills gap'


needs to be bridged

Secondary school vocational
training 'outdated', and BTVI
and COB failing to deliver
workers with technical degrees


Kerzner International's Atlantis resort

















Pushes Ocean Club income

up 46% to $14.5m from $9.9m


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


A leading Wall Street analyst has revised
upwards itfs200Searnmngs per share (EPS) esti-
mate for Kerzner International from $2.62 to
$2.80, in addition to increasing its price target
from $70 to $72 due to the company's better


than expected fourth quarter results.
Lawrence Klatzkin, an analyst with invest-
ment bank Jefferies & Company, maintained his
'Buy' rating on the Atlantis and One & Only
Ocean Club, owner's stock and still described
Kerzner International as having "much potential
See ANALYSE, Page 4B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's president told The
Tribune that he believes the
forthcoming Public-Private
Partnership conference on edu-
cational reform is the first one
to focus on bridging the "serious
gap" between what students
and taught and the skills
employers require.
Winston Rolle said the con-
ference, scheduled for Febru-
aiy. 24, aimed to both examine
hp.w students could be
e,(ipped with the skills to fill
gaps in the labour force, and
also to "sensitise" the private
sector as to why it was in its


interests to become involved in
the Bahamian educational sys-
tem.
"There's really a serious gap
that we need to try and bridge,"
Mt Rolle said.
In a letter announcing the
conference, Mr Rolle said it was
"widely acknowledged that the
Bahamas' future economic
prosperity and economic growth
is underpinned, to a large
extent, by the capacity of the
education and training systems
to upgrade the skills and com-
petencies of the existing work-
force as well as to train new
entrants to the labour market.
"Acute skills shortages,
See SKILLS, Page 5B


Anti-corruption

watchdog cites

Public Accounts

Committee woes


Bk NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
->^
An international anti-corrup-
tion watchdog has found that
the, Bahamian Parliament's
Public Accounts Committee
fails to properly scrutinise the
public finances and government
spending, and has expressed
concerns over the public pro-
ur ement process and that


Prime Minister Perry Christie's
Ministerial Code of Ethics has
failed to function in practice.
Transparency International,
in its 2004 study of the Bahamas
and seven other Caribbean
countries, said the Bahamian
Code of Ethics required Cabi-
net Ministers to avoid material
conflicts between their private
See WATCH, Page 6B


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I "lt I IuIbUNL


I /-.A-- L-..i., IVI%,-/I l I,/-I, I L-l-. i i -l i I, .UUV


By Fidelity



Capital Markets


The Bahamian mar-
ket saw great
activity last week,
with just under
59,000 shares
changing hands. The market
saw nine out of the 19 listed
stocks trade, of which four
advanced, two declined and
three remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was British American Bank


(BAB), with 16,100 shares
changing hands and accounting
for 27 per cent of the total
shares traded. The big mover
in the market last week was
Cable Bahamas (CAB), whose
share price rose by $0.27 to
close at its new 52-week high
of $7.47. On the down side,
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) share price fell by
$0.10 to end the week at $1.40.


COMPANY NEWS
Freeport Oil Holdings
Limited (FCL) -
FCL released its financial
results for the quarter ending
October 1, 2004, achieving a
modest growth in earnings over
the equivalent period in 2003. "
Net income rose by 2.98 per
cent to total $1.6 million com-
pared to $1.5 million in 2003.
Revenue and sales grew by 33.8
per cent to total $17.6 million,
while operating expensea
increased by 38 per cent to total
$16 million.
Operating income for the
period was $1.58 million and
EPS grew by $0.01 to total
$0.19.


Kerzner International
(KZL) -
In its latest quarterly results,
KZL realised an adjusted EPS
of $0.26, not only beating out
US analysts' estimates of $0.20,
but improving by $0.10 over its
2003 adjusted EPS.
Net revenue improved by 9.9
per cent to total $143.6 million
compared to $130.7 million in
2003, while EBITDA increased
by 19 per cent to total $31.2 mil-
lion.
Operating income for the
period was $15.4 million, while
net income stood at $8.4M.
KZL's solid performance in its
last quarter was driven primar-
ily by the strength of its flag-
ship property, Atlantis, Paradise


Bahamas market


Findex:
Unchanged:
Percentage Change:


420.14
0.00 points
0.00%


Market Capitalisation: $2.11 billion
Change: $14.4 million
Volume Traded: 58,987


Volume Leaders:
Volume %
BOB 9,046
BAB 16,100
DHS 10,000

Major Market Movers:
Closing Price
BAB $0.95
CAB $7.47
CBL $7.24
FIN $9.87
KZLB $6.58


Island.
Investors responded
favourably to the record break-
ing earnings achieved by KZL
in the fourth quarter. KZL's
share price rose by $2.85 on Fri-
day past to close at $65.88 per
share or $6.58 per KZL-BDRs
in the local market.

Investors Tip of the Week
The majority of Bahamians
dream of buying their own
homes. The transition from
renter to home-owner can give
you a sense of accomplishment
and pride, as you see the tangi-
ble manifestation of your hard
earned money. However, for
many persons just saving the
down payment for a house can
short-circuit the dream of home
ownership.
During the month of Febru-
ary, we will outline a number


of Volume
15.34%
27.29%
16.95%

Price Change
$0.08
$0.27
$0.09
$0.12
$0.86


ownership, you will find your-
self motivated to save every
penny that you can. To boost
your desire, spend a weekend
looking at houses or condos
within what you think is your
price range. Saving will be a
whole lot easier if you have a
vision of a two-bedroom, two-
bath house with white shutters
in Blair Estates dancing in your
head.
This vision will make it easier
to say no to shopping sprees,
buying a new car or going on
an expensive vacation. It is fruit-
less to approach a bank or
mortgage broker without first
having your down payment in
place.

Dividend/AGM Notes:
BOB to pay dividends of
$0.10 on February 14, 2005 to
shareholders of record as at


For these and more fantastic World Traveller offers, including flights from
Freeport, please call British Airways at 1-800-AIRWAYS, book on-line at


0,


ba.com or call your travel agent by 11 February 2005.








BRITISH AIRWAYS


For sale until 11 February 2005 for outbound travel from 28 January 2005 until 13 June 2005. Minimum stay: 5 days,
maximum stay: one year. Tickets must be purchased 4 days after the booking is made, but no later than 11 February 2005. No
changes, upgrades or refunds allowed. One free stopover allowed in London where applicable. Valid on direct services only.
Weekend surcharges apply. This fare attracts additional taxes and fees, and bookings made via 1-800-AIRWAYS will be
charged an additional $10 fee. Other conditions apply.





oColina g01gCgHn
W osEOfFinancial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
04 Februa 2005

s2wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.39 1.10 Abaco Markets 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.197 0.000 N/M 0.00%
7.50 7.30 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 5.55, 5.55 0.00 0.152 0.330 10.8 5.95%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.95 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.87 British American Bank 0.87 0.95 0.08 6,250 0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
7.47 6.30 Cable Bahamas 7.47 7.47 0.00 0.510 0.240 14.6 3.21%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.24 6.58 Commonwealth Bank 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.2 5.39%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.1 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.99 3.99 0.00 0.406- 0.170 9.8 4.26%
9.87 8.10 Finco 9.87 9.87 0.00 0.649 0.480' 15.2 4.86%
7.50 6,40 FirstCaribbean 7.7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 7.95 Focal 7.94 7.94 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.1 6.30%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J.S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.58 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.30 6.58 0.28 0.201 0.000 31.3 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
$2wk-HI 52wk-ow Sy'mbol Bid $ Ask$ Last Price Weekly'Vol. BPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 16.00 1.328 0.960 10.5 6.86%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 eNM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
S2wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2060 1.1509 Colina Money Market Fund 1.205953*
2.1191 1.8944 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.1191 ***
10.2648 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648"***
2.1746 2.0012 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.174583**
1.0848 1.0823 Collna Bond Fund 1.084821 *.*

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidellth
82wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidellty
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In dosing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divded by the last 12 month earning, FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
-AS AT DEC. 31, 200 AS ATDEC. 31, 20041-AS AT DEC. 31. 2004
*-AS AT JAN. 14, 2005W--AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2004


of tips that can help you begin
your mission to home owner-
ship.
Step 1- Get with
the programme
The first step towards saving
enough money for a down pay-
ment is a psychological one -
desire. You must REALLY
want to buy a house.
With enough passion for


February 9,2005.

FCL to pay dividends of $0,11
on February 15, 2005 to share-
holders of record as at January
21,2005.

ICD to pay dividends of
$0.135 on February 17, 2005 to
shareholders of record as at
February 3, 2005.


Share your news
The Tribune wants t
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





*Accounting records in bad shape?
* Need financial statements for the bank?
* Need a business plan and financing proposal
prepared?
* Need business licence prepared/certified?
CALL US WE CAN HELP
* Business Start-Up Assistance
* Compliance Commission Examinations
* Easy Bookkeeping Records Fits every business
* Small Business Packages and Systems
* Computerized-quickbooks Setup Training
* Small Business Financing Handbooks......$35
* Business Start up Cassette Tapes.....
" Business Advisory Session Daily Reduce Fee
Building Contracts


(Materials and Refreshments)
* Small Buisiness Financing Feb 26 10am
* Small Business Accountin Mar 26 10am



TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 FAX: 323-3700


| Small Business Consultants


International markets
FX Rates
Wkly % Change
CAD $ 1.2474 0.68
GBP 1.8756 -0.65
EUR 1.2841 -1.53

Commodities:
Wkly % Change
Crude Oil $46.48 -1.48
Gold $415.90 -2.33

International Stock Market Indexes:
Wkly % Change
DJIA 10,716.13 2.77
S & P 500 1,203.03 2.70
NASDAQ 2,086.66 2.50
.Nikkei 11,360.40 0.35


BUSINESS



MARKET WRAP









THE TIBUN MONDY, FBRUAR 7,205,IPGESS


S&P


maintains


its


Bahamas


ratings


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Standard & Poor's
(S&P) has given the
Government a boost
by becoming the sec-
ond Wall Street
credit rating agency within three
weeks to reaffirm its ratings on
the Bahamas' sovereign debt,
although it warned that
improvements in the public
finances were necessary for any
upgrade.
In confirming its 'A-' and 'A-
2' long-term and short-term rat-
ings respectively on the
Bahamas' sovereign debt, S&P
said the 'Stable' outlook bal-
anced positive tourism and
financial services trends "with
the lack of progress in structur-
al reform, in particular tax
reform and privatisation".
The Wall Street credit rating
agency added: "New tourism
investment, planned for 2005
and beyond, and ongoing
improvement in financial sec-
tor legislation, supervision and


regulation, should boost the
prospects of these sectors.
"However, any future ratings
upgrades are more likely to
depend on structural improve-
ments in public finances, greater
fiscal flexibility and the gradual
reduction of debt."
Still, the debt rating confir-
mation coming two weeks
after Moody's, the rival credit
rating agency, reaffirmed its
position will be welcomed by
the Ministry of Finance and
Public Treasury.
Effectively, the ratings mean
that the Bahamas will still be
able to borrow at relatively low
interest rates should it choose to
tap the international debt mar-
kets with a bond issue, in addi-
tion to keeping current debt ser-
vicing payments low.
S&P said the Bahamas' rat-
ings reflected its relatively high
average $18,000 per capita
income and political stability,
plus "prudent fiscal policies",
steady monetary policies and
record of macroeconomic sta-
bility.


'There is a
lack of
progress in
structural
reform.'

The fixed exchange rate
regime with the US had kept
inflation low, while "generally
prudent fiscal management has
led to only moderate accumu-
lation of government debt (25
per cent of GDP on a net basis
by year-end 2004)".
Meanwhile, the relatively low
net public sector external debt,
measured at about 7 per cent
of current account receipts
(CAR), reduced the impact
from the Bahamas' narrow tax
base and high dependency on
imports.
However, as a small and open
economy, the Bahamas was vul-


nerable to external shocks, par-
ticularly hurricanes, a US eco-
nomic downturn and a tourism
slowdown.
S&P also criticised the "lim-
ited fiscal flexibility" provided
by an "inefficient tax structure"
and infrastructure needs.
"Tax revenue depends upon
taxes on international transac-
tions, which hinders trade lib-
eralisation and narrows the tax
base, as well as on tourism-relat-
ed charges, which exacerbates
risk stemming from the econo-
my's limited diversification,"
the credit rating agency said.
S&P also expressed concern
over "persistent and high cur-
rent account deficits", which
have averaged 9 per cent over
the past five years. External liq-
uidity was weak, even though
the deficits were financed by
foreign direct investment and
other financial inflows.
Gross financing requirements
totalled 600 per cent of useable
reserves, although this was
expected to fall to 390 per cent
in 2005.


Law (From page 1B)


that one of our colleagues who
was among the demonstrators
does not seem to appreciate the
full consequences to the rule of
law of the position advocated
by them."
The latter sentence is likely
to refer to Trade Union Con-
gress (TUC) president Obie
Ferguson, who is also an attor-


ney. Both the TUC and Nation-
al Congress of Trade Unions
(NCTU) demonstrated against
the Industrial Tribunal and
called upon the Government to
look at removing Mr Lockhart
on January 28, with Mr Fergu-
son criticising Mr Peet for being
"very indecisive".
In response, Mr Munroe said
the Bar Association encouraged
all Tribunal staff to "not be
deterred from performing your
function without fear or
favour".
"We would encourage :all
members of the Tribunal: to
refuse to recuse yourselves in a
matter where the sole basis of


the application is that one or
other of the parties cannot work
with you because they do not
approve of positions that you
take on the law as you see it,"
Mr Munroe added.
The Bar Association presi-
dent said that any parties
unhappy with the Industrial Tri-
bunal's verdicts could appeal
the matter directly to the Court
of Appeal.
He also hit out at the condi-
tions in which the Industrial Tri-
K bunal was forced to operate.
.._Mr Munroe said: "Let me
' "ecndly that I am saddened to
see that the powers that be still
fail to recognise the role that


judicial bodies play in main-
taining order in society. It is dis-
heartening for me to have to
attend before you in premises
that are in no way fitting as a
court building.
"It is completely inappropri-
ate for judicial spaces to be
accommodated in the same
structure as a wholesale liquor
store. The really sad thing,
though, Mr President, is that
the liquor store is much better
appointed and maintained than
your spaces. No doubt the sale
of intoxicating liquor is a more
worthy pursuit than the admin-
istration of justice by this Tri-
bunal."


JORDAN PRINCE
WILLIAMS
BAPTIST SCHOOL

p ENTRANCE EXAM

If you want your child to learn in a safe,
productive High School Environment,

If you want your child to Excel in
Christianity, Academics and Sports


JORDAN PRINCE WILLIAMS
BAPTIST HIGH SCHOOL
IS THE PLACE!

Entrance Exams for Grade Seven (7)
Saturday, February 19, 2005
9:00am l:00pm

For further information please contact
the Office between the
hours of 8:30am and 3:30pm

Telephone Numbers:

361-4847/9


Celebrate Heart Month
February has been designated as Heart Month, and The Bahamas Heart
Association has planned a month of activities to mark this occasion. Help
the Heart Association by participating in these activities and learn how you
can prevent heart disease.

January 30, 2005 Christian Life Church
The Committee will start the month off giving thanks to God at the
Christian Life Centre church at 9:30 am, located on Sea Breeze Lane.

February 19, 2005-41st The Annual Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Ball
Founded in 1964, The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Ball is
Heart Month's largest fundraising event. It operates on a 100 percent voluntary
basis, with all proceeds going toward its cause. This year's ball will be held in the
Crown Ball Room, on February 19. Cocktail reception begins at 7:15 p.m. and dinner starts
at 8:30 p.m. The Lady Sassoon "Gold Heart Award" will be given to someone who has
worked, tirelessly to assist people in the community. Ticket donations are $200.00.
For more information, call 327-0806-10.

February 24, 2005 Health Fair at Town Centre Mall
Need your blood pressure or cholesterol checked? Then come to Town Centre Mall
between the hours of 7:00 am and 6:00 pm on February 24, and have it done for free at
the Heart Association's Healthy Fair. Local companies,experts and healthcare providers, like
Doctor's Hospital Health Care Systems, Commonwealth Drugs, British Fidelity Assurance and
Lowes Wholesalers, the distributors of Astrazeneca, will be on hand at exhibit booths to
provide and share with you the latest products and services.
It's informative, it's fun and it's free!

February 26, 2005 Subway Fun Run/Walk
The Subway Fun/Run Walk is a fundraising event that's geared to local companies, employ-
ees, family members and friends. Cash proceeds are to be shared between The Bahamas Heart
Association and The Strider Track Club. The race will be held on Saturday, February 26, 2005.
Last minute registration will start at 6:00 am on the day of the race. The race will start
promptly at 7:00 am at The Western Esplanade, continue west to Goodman's Bay round-about
and then back to The Western Esplanade. Entry fee is $12.00 per person. Applications can be
picked up at any Subway restaurant. Early registration will begin on February 14th and continue
to February 25 at Subway, Harbour Bay Shopping Centre. For Group Registration contact Maria
call 356-7326.
The Bahamas Heart Association's Heart Month is proud to be sponsored by:


" ASSURANCE LIMITEDD
4- A Member of the C L FINANCIAL GROUP
Era blaSitlbsfldllflhyco, or visil www Mlshfltdeltiio


is in you?


Do It




foryour
HEART


i DOCTORS HOSPITAL i


creativeislanddesiqns


QUAKER


I Bank of The Bahamas
L I M I T E D


Head Office
Claughton House
Charlotte & Shirley Streets
RO. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas


The Board of Directors of Bank of The

Bahamas Limited is pleased to advise

that a dividend of ten cents (100) per

share was declared on 28th January,

2005 to all shareholders of record as

at 9th February, 2005 and payable as

of 14th February, 2005.


A. bf-


/ LAURA A. WILLIAMS
CORPORATE SECRETARY


K-j


_ _


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


I',-









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


Analyse (From page 1B)


for future growth" not reflected
in its current share price that
lay beyond the Paradise Island
'Bread and butter".
Mr Klatzkin, in a report
released the day after Kerzner
International's full-year and
fourth quarter 2004 results
announcement, revised upwards
his forecast for the One & Only
Ocean Club's 2005 operating
income by 46 per cent from $9.9
million to $14.5 million.
He wrote: "We did not think
Ocean Club could do much bet-
ter, but now that the villas are
open, its first quarter RevPAR
is trending up 24 to 25 per cent
over last year's $739."
This, coupled with the expect-
ed $6.6 million in operating
income set to be produced by
the Mexico-based One & Only
Palmilla, had encouraged Mr
Klatzkin to raise his 2005 EPS
estimate. He also increased full-
year total operating income esti-
mates from $183 million to $191
million.
For 2006, Mr Klatzkin fore-
cast further EPS and operating
income increases to $2.96 and
$206 million.
His estimates provide further
good news for those Bahamian
investors who purchased Kerzn-
er International Bahamian
Depository Receipts (BDRs)
last summer. The company's
Wall Street share price closed at
$65.88 on Friday, a gain of $2.88
on the day, taking today's open-
ing BDR price to $6.58. This
represents an almost 40 per cent
capital appreciation or return


on investment on the $4.71 price
at which the BDRs started trad-
ing on the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX).
The rate of return is also like-
ly to call into question why the
Kerzner International BDR was
only about 50 per cent sub-
scribed, and why major institu-
tional investors such as the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) declined to participate.
It is understood that only about
300 of Kerzner's Bahamian
employees chose to buy into the
offering and gain an even
greater return, due to the dis-
counts they were offered.
Meanwhile, Mr Klatzkin said
Atlantis "continues to outshine"
with its 10 per cent year-on-year
operating income increase pro-
ducing a record year. He added
that he expected the resort "to
achieve another record year on
top of this one".
First quarter 2005 revenue
per available room (RevPAR)
from Atlantis was already fore-
cast to be up 7-8 per cent upon
the previous year, with total
operating income for Paradise
island projected to be ahead by
10 per cent.
During its first full year in
operation, the Phase III expan-
sion was projected to add
another $100 million in addi-
tional operating income to
Kerzner International's figures.
Mr Klatzkin said an analysis
that included the $650 million
Phase III expansion, $1.1 bil-
lion Dubai venture and $230


million Morocco resort-casino,
plus drawing board ventures
such as the three UK casinos,
Singapore and a casino in the
Catskills, enabled him to
increase Kerzner Internation-
al's share price target from $70
to $72 despite using "conserva-
tive assumptions".
While Paradise Island and the
company's existing businesses
generated a share price value
of $57, Mr Klatzkin said the
three additional projects should
add $15 in additional value, tak-
ing Kerzner International's
stock to $72.
The Jefferies & Company
analyst forecast that Atlantis,
The Palm development in
Dubai would generate $25-$30
million in operating income dur-
ing its first year of operation,
2008, inclusive of the $20 million
development fee it stands to
earn.
The Morocco project is
expected to generate $15-$20
million in operating income dur-
ing its first year of operation,
which Mr Klatzkin described as
a strong 32-43 per cent return
on Kerzner International's ini-
tial $47 million equity invest-
ment t.
Mr Klatzkin wrote: Our
only concern would be whether
management has the manpower
to run the development of these
three new projects, the Atlantis,
the Palm in Dubai, Morocco
and the expansion at Atlantis
in Paradise Island all at once
and the skill to keep their eye
on the ball. Given past history,
we are confident Kerzner can
handle all of the upcoming pro-
jects."


PROFESSIONAL DELIVERY SERVICE
"Sit back, relax and let the professionals take on your stress!"
NO package too big or too small.....
We arange import and export services and cleai all your goods
through Bahamas Customs. With our connections in the US, we
can also purchase, pick up or deliver any item you desire. Let us
deal with the hassle for you. Use our around-the-clock pick up
and delivery system.

a Family Islanders included.


Pinedale Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 242-326-3335
Fax: 242-326-3334
email:
amck1960@yahoo.com
celestinemckinney@msn.com
I amckinney@coralwave.com


\Don't delay! Give us a call today! 'I


Share

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


FIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS LIMITED
A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

Fidelity is seeking to employ an
ASSISTANT SECURITIES TRADER

Minimum Requirements
3 years experience in the financial service industry
Bachelors Degree, preferably in Finance, Banking or Accounting.
Canadian Securities, Series 7 or International Capital Markets
Qualifications.
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent analytical skills
Proficient in the use of spreadsheet and database software


Primary Job functions
Provide market quotes and market information to clients.
Execute security trades
Manage client relationships
Conduct research on companies
Active monitoring and reporting of capital market developments

Remuneration & Benefits
Attractive salary and performance bonus
Group medical and pension plan
Interest subsidies on employee loans

Please forward cover letter and resume to;
Fidelity Group of Companies
P.O. Box N-4853, Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Human Resources Manager
Deadline: February 15, 2005.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GROUP MAJOR
MEDICAL & LIFE INSURANCES SERVICES FOR
EMPLOYEES & RETIREES

TENDER No. 576/04

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of group major medical and life insurances services for employees and
their dependants and retirees.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 16 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 576/04

"GROUP MAJOR MEDICAL AND LIFE INSURANCES PLAN"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


Career Opportunity


Development Company seeks Office Coordinator

Excellent computer skills to include Word, Excel, PowerPoint &
Project Management software.
Familiarity with plans, construction and specifications a plus
Excellent opportunity for growth

Job Function includes, but is not limited to the following:

Administration of programs, projects, and/or processes specific to
the overall development team
Word processing, maintain files, schedule and organization of
meetings, coordinate travel itineraries upon request
Monitor and order general office supplies as needed, adequately
maintain and secure office equipment
Provide general office support for copying, faxing and mailing

Requires:

Minimum of 3- 5 years of previous related experience
Good proofreading and editing skills
Effective verbal and written communication skills
Discretion regarding personnel and industry-related matters
Excellent interpersonal skills
Attention to detail
Team player

Resumes must be received before February 12th, 2005. Please forward via
email to: info@bahamardevelopment.com fax: (242) 702-4202.


I


MONO"


BUSINESS











Skills (From page 1B)
notably in technical areas, raise
questions about the relevance
and capacity of this system."
Mr Rolle's letter said the con-
tent of vocational educational
programmes at the secondary
school level was "outdated",
while the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI), the chief provider of
technical and vocational train-
ing post-secondary school "does
not have the capacity to deliver
training beyond entry-level
vocational education".
He added that College of the
Bahamas graduates with tech-
nical degrees were "in short
supply".
Mr Rolle said: "The challenge
is even greater in the Family
Islands where the lack of access
to core and advanced technical
training programmes has result-
ed in businesses having to
import labour while Bahamians
are frustrated in their efforts to
secure employment."
The Chamber of Commerce
president told The Tribune that
the conference would "look at
the entire educational system
and ensure that as we develop
students from a very young age,
that they have the skills neces-
sary, and that there is a tie-in
with the skill sets needed by the
business community".
He said there were similari-
ties with what the Ministry of
Tourism was attempting to do
in ensuring that the School of
Hospitality and Tourism Studies
was "steering students in the
right direction required by the
sector". Mr Rolle also said the
educational system was failing
to produce students who could
fill gaps in the workforce.
The Bahamian workforce's
capacity and skills are likely to
be increasingly tested by the
number of proposed new invest- Ki]
ment projects the Government tea
has predicted will soon come for
on stream. Mr Rolle said the
conference was an attempt to
"get the private sector more A
involved in what happens in the F
educational system" in terms of
its ideas and resources, *N
acknowledging that it was "vir-
tually impossible" for the Gov- Sue
ernment to provide all the
required funding for education.
The Chamber of Commerce
president said it was in the pri-
vate sector's best interests to
become involved, as companies
incurred higher labour costs if
they needed to import workers
from outside. The Government
has requested technical and
financial assistance from the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) to address defi-
ciencies in the Bahamas' "work-
force development system".
The project aims to create a
secondary and post-secondary
training system that has modu-
lar competency courses; the
flexibility to respond to labour
market demands; has strong pri-
vate sector partnerships; and
strengthens the capacity of the
Ministry of Education and
BTVI to monitor and update
training programmes.


LOOKING AT REFORM Alfred Sears, minister of education


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
P.O. Box N-4378
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


TEMPORARY POSITION AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

ngsway Academy High School is in need of a qualified
acher immediately until the end of the Easter Term
* the following subjects:

.rt and Crafts
ood & Nutrition
Ieedlework Sewing

ccessful applicants must:
Be born again Christians, with minimum
qualifications of a Bachelor's Degree in the
appropriate subject areas
Have a valid Teacher's Certificate
Be familiar with the B.J.C. and B.G.C.S.E.
Syllabus (H.S.)
Have excellent communication Skills
Have high standards of morality., ,, ,
Have a love for children and learning
Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities.
V - -- -- -- -- -- -- -
Applications can be collected from
Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
The Business Office, Bernard Road

Tel 324626 9 24688 9 64-30


BUSINESS I


BEAUTY SALOON EQUIPMENT MACHINERY


* (1) Styling Chairs
* (1) Shampoo Chairs



SEWING MACHINES

* (1) Fleet Wood Sewing Machine
* (1) New Home Sewing Mahcine



TABLES

* (2) Cocktail Tables (Square)
* (3) Green Patio Tables (Round)
* (2) Wood Tables (Round)
* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)


COOLERS/FREEZERS

* (1) Silver Chest Freezer
* (2) chest Freezers
* (1) Reach in Freezer
* (1) Reach in Refrigerator


* (1) Air Condition No. WG 18000R
* (1) 20 gal Electric Water Heater
* (1) Digital Scale
* (1) Food Mixer

VEHICLES

* (1) 1997 Dodge Stratus
* (1) 1992 Toyota Coaster Bus
* (1) 1996 Ford Explorer
* (1) 1999 Ford Explorer/No Engine

VESSELS

* (1) 28' Vessel
* (1) 24' (2002) Chris Craft W/Engine
* (1) 29' (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece)
* (1) 53' (1998) Vessel (Pegasus)
* (1) 18' Vessel w/engine

STOVES

* (3) Deep Fat Fryers
* (1) 6 Burner Stove


GLASSES

* (18) Crates of Wine Glasses
* (1) Box of Wine Glasses


Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked "Tender" should be submitted to:
Bahamas Development Bank
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
for additional Information
Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be
received by February 11, 2005.
The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.


O BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGER
SAFETY & ENVIRONMENTAL DEPARTMENT
ENERGY SUPPLY DIVISION
A vacancy exists in the Energy Supply Division for a Safety and Environmental Manager.
The Safety and Environment Manager is responsible for implementing and maintaining best practices in Safety
and Environmental Administration and Operations within the Corporation. The manager will also advise line
managers on safety and environmental procedures and policies, focus on minimizing accidents, and injuries,
organize safety training, and monitor the safety and environmental practices of the Corporation.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:
* Developing and managing Corporation-wide safety and environmental programs
* Developing corporate-wide policies and procedures on fire prevention
* Assisting and advising line Managers in developing departmental plans on fire extinguishing and controls
* Liaising with Insurance Companies and arranging safety inspections by Insurers Inspectors
* Performing safety audits of all Corporation facilities.
* Maintaining and updating Corporation-wide policy on employee safety rules and practices
* Advising on suitable methods of measuring corporate safety performance
* Directing and evaluating Contractors performing environmental work and projects
* Assisting and advising line managers in safety training and other safety matters
* Planning, organizing and conducting seminars and courses on safety topics
* Serving on special committees investigating major industrial accidents
* Coordinating the preparation and the updating of the hurricane precaution plan
* Monitoring pre-hurricane season preparations and reports for Management
* Establishing goals and objectives for environmental compliance for the Corporation
* Ensuring that ALL Divisions comply with environmental regulations by defining environmental problems,
performing site surveys, inventory and record keeping control, secure relevant permits. Environmental audits,
contingency, planning provide recommendations for environmental compliance and evaluation of progress
* Identifying hazardous materials and establishing safe handling methods to minimize risk to workers and the
environment
* Maintaining and updating company policies and procedures related to Safety and the Environment within
the Corporation
Job requirements include:
* A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Occupational Health & Safety, Environmental Health or in a related
discipline
* A minimum of 5 years post-tertiary experience in an industrial safety and environment position
* Excellent leadership and management skills
* Strong Project Management skills
* Good interpersonal skills
* Strong judgement and sound reasoning ability
* Ability to interpret technical reports and drawings
* Sound knowledge of safety and environmental regulations, practices & procedures
Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application Form to
The Manager, Human Resources & Training, Head Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Roads,
P.O.Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas, on or before Monday, February 14, 2005.
1


SBAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #39 (2,500 sq. ft.) with house 1,104 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, 1 bathroom Englerston
Subdivision (Appraised Value $70,000.00)

2. Lot #65 (7,300 sq. ft.) with house 2,078 sq. ft. Eleuthera Drive and Gibson Ave,
Yamacraw Beach Eastates (Appraised Value $160,000.00)

3. Lot #214 (5,000 sq. ft.) with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms house and upholstery
shop Roosevelt Ave., Pyfrom Subdivision. (Appraised Value $83,780.00)

4. Lot #14, BIk #17 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment Key West St.
& Balfour Ave., Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $187,000.00)

5. Lot #171 (100'x100') with two story building East Street opposite Deveaux
Street. (Appraised Value $320,000.00)

6. Lot #109 (60'x70') with house 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms Craven Street, Ridgeland
Park. (Appraised Value $80,000.00)

7. Lot #785 (5,000 sq. ft.) with house 4 bedroomsss, 2 bathrooms and a 1 bedroom
efficiency Bay Geranium Ave. & Cascarilla St., Pinewood Gardens.
(Appraise Value $139,000.00)

8. Lot #210 (7,225 sq. ft.) with house Yamacraw Beach Estate drive pass the Fox
Hill Prison, turn left onto Yamacraw Hill Rd., take first corner on the right Yamacraw
Beach Drive then the fourth corner on th right Current Rd., then third corner on
the left corner property with house #18, pink trim white.
(Appraised Value $215,000.00)

9. Vacant property (18,644 sq. ft.) Situated on the western side of Carmichael Rd.

ANDROS

10. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 sq. ft.) in the settlement of Fresh Creek,
Central Andros. (Appraised Value $73,258.00)

GRAND BAHAMA

11. Lot #9 with hosue (3) Bedrooms (1) Bathroom and an incomplete split level
extension west Pinedale Road, Pinedale, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.
(Appraised Value $95,000.00)

ABACO

12. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco.
(Appraised Value $29,916.00)

13. Lot #51 (15,600 sq. ft.) with stone house Crown Allotments, Murphy Town,
Abaco. (Appraised Value $104,960.00)

14. Lot #55 (6,900 sq. ft.) with stone house Crown Allotments, Murphy Town,
Abaco. (Appraised Value $87,350.00)

ELLgUTHERA

!1.5. Propert 31 'x111' with house Lord Street in the settlement of Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $45,000.00)

EXUMA

16. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story building 4,160 sq. ft. apartment upstairs
and shop downstairs, George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value $468,000.00)

17. Vacant lot #11636 (10,000 sq. ft.) on the southeastern side of Lobster Cay Rd.,
about 500 ft southwest of Queens Highway, Exuma. (Appraised Value $15,000.00)

INAGUA

18. Lot #43 (40'xl 00') with house Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street.
(Appraised Value $120,000.00)

ELETRONIC EQUIPMENT

CD Mixer Theater Pop 6 Popcorn Machine
(1) Microwave
(1) Compaq Persario Computer Monitor & Tower








PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Watch (From page 1B)


interests and public duties, and
avoid using their positions to
enrich themselves or their fam-
ilies.
Ministers were required,
upon taking office, to discon-
tinue private work, resign as
directors and officers in any pri-
vate company, and divest them-
selves of holdings in companies
that held contracts with the
Government.
However, Transparency
International said: "In a number
of cases, however, public con-
troversy has surrounded the
extent to which this and simi-
lar provisions have been violat-
ed in practice."
The report cited the contro-
versy surrounding Leslie Miller,
minister of trade and industry,
in 2003 when the Bahamas


Telecommunications Company
(BTC) leased office space in a
Harrold Road shopping com-
plex his firm allegedly owned.
Mr Miller denied any conflict
of interest or wrongdoing at the
time, saying he had relinquished
all his private interests upon
assuming office.
Transparency International
noted that all eight Caribbean
countries surveyed did not have
a properly functioning Public
Accounts Committee as part of
their Parliaments.
This potentially left "the door
very wide open to corruption",
as the Auditor-General's
reports in all countries were
receiving ineffective scrutiny.
On public procurement and
contracts, the Transparency
International report said that in


ISIGHT- -

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the Bahamas, "there have been
instances in which conflicts of
interest concerns have led to
questionable outcomes, partic-
ularly at the level of Cabinet
procurement of works".
When it came to competitive
tendering and the advertising
of public works contracts,
Transparency International
claimed that not all were adver-
tised to the private sector.
It added: "Additionally, pub-
lic works procurement may be
selective based on past experi-
ence, especially in the area of
major development projects,
except in the case of projects
funded by international donor
agencies. In such cases, stan-
dard international competitive
bidding rules apply."
And Transparency Interna-
tional said for projects funded at
the local level: "Sole sourcing
is generally discouraged at all
levels. Ministers also have some
power of discretion under the
selective tendering process. His-
torically, this has been an area
of abuse with allegations of
nepotism and cronyism."
The report also expressed
concern that the Bahamas was
the only one of the eight coun-
tries surveyed in which the
Director of Public Prosecutions'
position did not have statutory
protection, leaving him "in
effect subordinate to a politi-
cally-appointed attorney gener-
al".


IFOR SALE!

25ft. WhiteWater W/Twin 2003
Yamaha 150HSP, Engines

200 Gallon Fuel Holding Tank i
All new guages, ....
Moving Map System
Outriggers (Not Shown) 4.
Overall Boat and Engines are A 10 .
4, New Bottom Paint
Brand New Trailer

Price $45,000.00 All offers considered.
Tel: (242) 363-1270 or 457-0852


NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 1730
in the Subdivision called and known as "Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision" situate in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providenve one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single family
Residence, consisting of three (3) Bedrooms, one (1)
bathroom.

Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 980 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 4998". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday 11th, February, 2005.



NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 30,
Avacardo Gardens situated in the South Western District
of one of the Island of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment, consisting of two
(2) Bedrooms, one (1) bathrooms in each unit.

Property size: 6,600 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,350 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 0294". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.


NOTICE


FINCO INVITES TENDERS


Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 9,
Westglade Subdivision situate in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence. Situated thereon is Vacant
Land.

Property size: 9,467 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 0867". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.



NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 1858,
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision situated in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single-family residence consisting of (2) Bedrooms,
(2) Bathrooms.

Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 914 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 0811". All offers must be received by the close of
business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.


NAMED IN REPORT Leslie Miller, minister of trade
and industry, denied the allegations made against him


Legal Notice


NOTICE

LIMITTE LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) LIMITTE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution .under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on February 3,
2005, when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Paseat Estate, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

Dated this 4th day of February, A.D. 2005.


Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator




NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS


Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #32, Blk
#6, South Beach Estates situated in the Southern District
of the island of the Commonwealth of the Bamnnas. Situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (4)
Bedrooms, (2) Bathroom.

Property size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 2,009 sa. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 6291". All offers must be received by the dose
of business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.



NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS


Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #1500,
Misty Gardens situated in the Southern District on one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is Duplex Apartment consisting of (2) Bedrooms,
(1) Bathroom.
Property size: 5,520 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,934 sa. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 8009". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.


NOTICE

In the Estate of PAULINE MAJOR late of
2100 Boulevard L6vesque East, Apartment
PHC17, Laval, Province of Quebec in
Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demands against the above Estate
are required to send written notification of the
same to FirstCaribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) Limited, Shirley Street Branch, P.O.
Box N-7125, Nassau, The Bahamas: for the
attention of the Corporate Manager Assistant on
or before the 8th day of March, 2005.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY &
COMPANY '
Attorneys for the Estate
CHAMBERS
Shirley House
Fifty Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas.


BUSINESS I








THE TIBUN MONDY, FBRUAR 7,USINEPGES7


FTAA better option


than


free


trade deal


with


US


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he Bahamas'
Ambassador to
CARICOM is
arguing that the
Bahamas should
not opt to sign a free trade
agreement with the US and stay
out of the Free Trade Area of
the Americas (FFAA) because
Washington would not allow
this nation to maintain its pre-
sent tariff structure and is like-
ly to grant fewer concessions.
Leonard Archer, in an infor-
mation paper on the CARI-
COM Single Market & Econo-
my (CSME) and the Bahamas'
international trade relations,
wrote that because the US was
a member of the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) it was
bound by the principles of non-
discrimination, which meant it
could not allow the Bahamas to
enjoy a better tariff structure
than its other trading partners.
Mr Archer said: "Based on
available evidence, there is
nothing to suggest that the Unit-
ed States would be interested
in negotiating a free trade
agreement with the Bahamas
that would enable the Bahamas


to retain its present tariff struc-
ture.
"To do so for the Bahamas
would be contrary to its negoti-
ating stance in the FTAA, and
would make it difficult for the
US to advance its trade agenda
in the Americas."
Mr Archer added that given
that the US treated the
Bahamas as a, developed nation
international forums such as the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) and the World Bank, the
Bahamas would end up with
fewer concessions in negotiat-
ing a bilateral treaty with Wash-
ington than it would in talks to
enter the FTAA as part of
CARICOM.
A recurring them of Mr
Archer's booklet is that if the
Bahamas decided to join the
CSME, it would enable this
nation to negotiate more con-
cessions and better terms from
joining both the FTAA and
World Trade Organisation
(WTO).
As a CSME member, the
Bahamas would be able to
claim all WTO concessions
already granted to CARICOM,
while it would be under no
obligation itself to grant con-
cessions that were greater than


those already agreed by other
CARICOM countries.
As part of the CSME, Mr
Archer said the Bahamas would
be treated in the same way
under the WTO and FTAA as
the poorest CARICOM coun-
tries and obtain better terms.
However, due to its relatively
high standard of living and third
highest per capita income in the
Western Hemisphere, if the
Bahamas was to negotiate entry
on its own it would be treated as
a developed country and be giv-
en less favourable terms.


Prime Minister Perry Christie has to make a decision on the Caribbean Single Market & Economy


Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a
leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries and
over 100 million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of
APPLICATION SUPPORT

FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION
Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore
trust companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas,
Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and
Singapore. Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.
The Technology Department supports all locations and local applications
of the business.
MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES
Production support of software for key application.
Provide application support technically to the business which
includes the detection and resolution of issues.
Assist application support Project Managers where
necessary.
Interfacing with the information security management
structure.
Management of risk and assist in coordination of audit.
KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED
SQL and Oracle programming and/or DBA experience, Visual
Basic, Citrix, Crystal Reports, Net, Win2K, Web technologies,
MS Office applications, DBMS knowledge, programming skills
in a windows environment.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with the business, internal and external vendor
management, and bug tracking.
Influencing and leadership skills.
Historic programming experience with languages and web
applications
2-4 years DBA hands-on programming experience.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR
Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com
Deadline for application is February 6, 2005.


IVIUST SELL











Two Storey Commercial Building 4025 sq. ft.
Comprising a Motel with eight 1 Bed/ 1 Bath units and Two commercial stores on the ground
floor
Lot No. 151 8,704sq.ft. Bay Street, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
Interested persons should submit written offers to be received no later than February 28, 2005 to:
Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P.O.Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas or
For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Manager (242) 335-1464 or (242) 335-1400 North Eleuthera or
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit Phone: 356-1686, 356-1685,356-1608
Financing available for the qualified purchaser
Serious enquiries only


BAHAMAS. ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

CONSTRUCTION OF 34.5 KV "ASH", AAAC THREE-PHASE
TRANSMISSION LINE
CROSSING ROCKS, ABACO, BAHAMAS
TENDER No. 563/04
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
construction of approximately 16.5 miles of 34.5 KV "ASH" AAAC 3-phase
transmission line with all associated hardware mounted on single wood poles from
CROSSING ROCK to SANDY POINT, Abaco, Bahamas.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 23 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 563/04
"LINE CONSTRUCTION CROSSING ROCK, ABACO"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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RBC
FINCO



NOTICE TO

SHAREHOLDERS


The Annual General Meeting of
Finance Corporation of Bahamas
Limited (FINCO) will be held on
Thursday 17th March, 2005 in the
Governor's Ball Room, British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, Number One Bay Street,
Nassau N.P., The Bahamas at
6:30pm.






KEVA L. BAIN
CORPORATE SECRETARY


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KPMG has vacancies for Chartered Accountants or
Certified Public Accountants at the Audit Senior
level. Candidates for the position will hold a CPA
or other professional designation recognized by the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants and
will have a minimum of. two to four years of
professional public accounting experience in a
public accounting firm. Excellent opportunities
exist at both our Nassau and Freeport offices to
broaden your professional experience in a varied
practice that offers competitive salaries and
employee benefits.
Applicants should submit a r6sum6 by February 11 to:
Freeport- KPMG, P.O. Box F40025 or kpmg@batelnet.bs
Nassau KPMG, P.O. Box N123 or plemarrec@kpmg.com.bs
AUDIT TAX S ADVISORY
2005. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International,
a Swiss cooperative.




NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF ELKIN RENAL
STORR late of Stapledon Gardens in
the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 7th day of March, 2005, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.
HIGGS & JOHNSON
Sandringham House
83 Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor


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PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, SHERON LEASA, intend
to change my name to SHARON LISA GOFFE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.


Thinking about your next
career move?


The Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
is now registering for the fourth (4th)
Session of the National Youth Leaders
Certification Programme, schedule to
commence on Tuesday 22nd February,
2005.

The Ministry invites all interested Youth
Leaders or Youth Workers to pick up
application forms from the Ministry's
Headquarters on Thompson Boulevard,
Ministry of Education Building 2nd Floor,
West Wing, Monday Friday between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

For further information please contact Mr.
Gregory Butler, Assistant Director of Youth
at telephone numbers 502-0600-5.


GN 163

MINISTRY

OF FINANCE
PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR SALE OF VEHICLES

Tenders are hereby invited for the purchase of one (1)
or more of the following vehicles:
1. 1999 Kia Claris #2007
2. 1994 Black Oldsmobile Regal #1470
3. 1997 Navy Blue Crown Victoria
4. 1995 Green Nissan Sentra #980
5. 1998 Hyundia Elantra #1946
The vehicles may be inspected at the Ministry of Finance,
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, Cable Beach, Monday
Friday, between the hours of 9:00 am to 4:30 pm.
Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope (s)
marked "Tender for Sale of Vehicles", addressed and
delivered to:
Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach
No later than 5:00 pm on 18th February, 2005.
The Government reserves the right to reject any or all
tenders.


BUSINESS







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 7, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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(CC) gioma; larynx transplant. nual procedures. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order An investment analyst Law & Order Detectives investigate Law & Order Briscoe and Green
TNT der Gunshow" is killed after recommending stock in after a comic's infant son is dropped find several suspects in the death of
A (CC) (DVS) a bankrupt company. A from a window. A a private investigator. A
TOON Ed, Edd n Eddy Ozzy & Drix A Yu-Gi-Ohl! Codename: Kids Mucha Lucha Teen Titans Rave Master
(CC) (CC) Next Door IA (CC) (Part 1 of 2)
TV5 Vie privee, vie publique (:35) Coeurs Photos TV5 Le Journal
T C (6:00) PM Edi- Storm Stories Storm Stories Evening Edition (CC)
TWV lon (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) La Mujer Rubi Amor Real Cristina Mi suegra no me quiere.
UNIV de Madera
(:00) JAG "First Law & Order: Special Victims Unit *, MYSTERY MEN (1999, Comedy)Hank Azaria, Janeane Garofalo,
USA Casualty" A A teen brings molestation charges William H. Macy. Premiere. Substitute superheroes battle a nefarious
(CC) against her father. (CC) criminal. (CC)
VH 1 Wendy Williams The Surreal Life The Surreal Life I Love the '90s: Part Deux "1995" I Love the '90s: Part Deux "1996"
A (CC) A (CO) O.J. Simpson trial. A Winter Olympic games.
Home Improve- *** KING (1978, Biography) (Part 1 of 3) Paul Winfield, Cicely Tyson, WGN News at Nine A (CC)
WGN ment "Shopping Ossie Davis. Based on the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. (CC)
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Everybody 7th Heaven "First Date" Ruthie Everwood Andy and Amanda de- WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond goes on her first official date. (N) n cide to tell their kids about their rela- Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
______ "Pet Cemetery" (CC) tionship. (N) A (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
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WSBK Toumament" (N) ane surprises "Phatheadz" A unwittingly hires Mona'sboss
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H BO-E ohn Cusack, Gene Hackman. A man tries to manipu- Daughters" A meeting is called to Galbraith. Terrorists detonate a dirty
late an explosive trial. A 'PG-13' (CC) set up an informal government, bomb in London. A 'NR'


(6:15)*** Camivale "Creed, OK" Dolan push- Unscripted Unscripted A Taxicab Confessions: New York,
HBO-P PEOPLE I es Justin to make a difficult deci- Krista endures an (CC) New York New York City passen-
KNOW (2002) sion. A (CC) audition. A gers reveal secrets to cabdrivers.
(6:30) ** * THE RUNDOWN (2003, Adventure) The Rock, :45) * RUNAWAY JURY (2003, Suspense) John
HBO-W TORQUE (2004) Seann William Scott. A bounty hunter must find his Cusack, Gene Hackman. A man tries to manipulate an
'PG-13' (CC) boss's son in the Amazon. A 'PG-13' (CC) explosive trial. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(:15) **r A WALK IN THE CLOUDS (1995, Drama) *** t THE ENGLISH PATIENT (1996, Drama) Ralph Fiennes, Juliette
HBO-S Keanu Reeves. Two people fall in love while pretend- Binoche, Willem Dafoe. Flashbacks reveal a plane-crash survivor's tragic
ing to be married. A 'PG-13' (CC) tale. A 'R' (CC)
(5:45) THE PEO- **x STARSKY & HUTCH (2004, Comedy) Ben 45) Hold Up ** GOODFELLAS (1990,
MAX-E PLE vS. LARRY Stiller, Owen Wilson, Snoop Dogg. Two detectives in- Robbery. Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Lotta,
FLYNT (1996) vestigate a cocaine dealer. A 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) Joe Pesci. A 'R' (CC)
S* DR. SEUSS' THE CAT IN THE HAT (2003) Mike UP CLOSE & PERSONAL (1996, Drama) Robert Redford, Michelle
MOMAX Myers. Premiere. A mischievous feline invades the Pfeiffer, Stockard Channing. A TV newsman grooms a new reporter for
home of two children. n 'PG' (CC) stardom.. 'PG-13' (CC)
(600)*** **sS DARK BLUE (2002, Crime Drama) Kurt Russell, Brendan Glee- Shouting Silent (iTV) (N)
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TMC THE ITALIAN Streep, Glenn Close. Premiere. Forty-five years in the life o a South Drama) Jane Fonda, Robert
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YOUR OWN ISLAND

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PAG B


Bradley


and Deandra


strike gold in Exuma


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
BRADLEY Rolle and Dean-
dra Bodie were the sprinting
kings and queens of the 13th
annual LN Coakley track and
field invitational, held over the
weekend in Moss Town, Exu-
ma.
Rolle and Bodie struck gold
in both the 100m and 200m,
Bodie also won the 400m in the
under 20 girls division Rolle
competed in the under 20 boys'
division. The pair were also
named the most outstanding
athletes in the under 20 boys
and girls division.
Bodie didn't rest with her
three individual gold medals,
she also jump started her team
in both relays to claim two gold
medals.
However, Rolle had to settle
for four gold medals, and two
silvers, losing the 400m and the
4x400m to Doris Johnson Mys-
tic Marlins.

Qualifying
Although the meet was not
be considered a Carifta quali-
fying meet, several of the ath-
letes were just short of qualify-
ing times.
Rolle, who qualified for the
high school nationals in both
the 100m and 200m, is eager to
set his mark in the capital.
Although he isn't too sure if
he can make it down to the two
Carifta trials, he is hoping that
his performances at one of them
will give him a spot on the team.
This year's Carifta games is
set to take place in Trinidad and
Tobago, March 24th-28th tri-
als for the games are slotted in
February 19th and March 18th-
19th. The national high school
championships have an April
14th-16th scheduling.
Rolle said: "Making the
Carifta team has always been a
dream of mine, I know what I


have to do and I think this year
when we go down to the trials I
will be able to make the team.
"Training has been coming
on great, I now believe I am
running faster than last year and
my performances over the
weekend shows exactly where
am at and where I want to be.
"I am not scared, I know
there are some great runners in
Nassau, I haven't seen them but
then again they haven't seen
me. I don't mind being that oth-


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er guy who comes in and sur-
prises the pack. I guess that is
what will take place when I
reach."
Rolle won the 100m in a time
of 11.35 seconds and the 200m
in 23.35 seconds, no time was
available for Rolle in the 400m.
However, Rolle wasn't the
only person burning the tracks
for the LN Coakley Panthers,
teammate Ricardo Clarke
cleared 5'9 11/2 inches to win
the under 20 boys high jump.


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wr


Clarke also competed in the
long jump, which he won with a
leap of 20 feet one, and the
200m, shot putt and discus
events in which he placed sec-
ond fourth respectively.

Dominating
In the under 15 girls division,
dominating performances came
from Geusla Baptiste from Cen-
tral Eleuthera and teammate
Laura Heastie.


Both Baptiste and Heastie
walked away with three gold
medals and two silvers.
Baptiste was named the most
outstanding athlete in the
under 15 girls division over
Heastie.
Heastie said: "I was very
excited about competing this
is my first time running and I
think I did very well. I don't
know if I am going into Nassau,
but if I make the team I will be
happy.


"Knowing I helped our team
win the under 15 girls division
makes me happy."
Other outstanding perfor-
mances came from LeByron
Sweeting, who competed for the
first time in Exuma. Sweeting
is a student of Nassau Christ-
ian Academy, he won the under
20 boys 400m and finished sec-
ond in the 100m, 200m, and
long jump.
Sweeting is a Carifta games
hopeful.


The Caribs leave




it late to snatch,'




win from All-Stars


M By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Junior All-Stars came close to winning
their first game in the New Providence Wom-
en's Basketball Association, only to be pipped
by the College of the Bahamas Caribs.
Playing without starters Kimberley Rolle
and Adina Knowles, the Lady Caribs strug-
gled before they held off the All-Stars
48-45 on Saturday night at the DW Davis
Gym.
Trailing 43-39 with a little over three min-
utes left to play, the Lady Caribs went on a 9-
2 spurt that sealed the deal as they held onto
second place in the standings at 6-4. ,
Gigi Rigby came up with four points, Chris-
tine Sinclair had three and Alexis Russell
chipped in with two in the run as COB took
the ball inside and converted a couple free
throws when they got fouled.
"I had to play the second line of my bench
for pretty much the entire game because two
of my starters were unable to make it," said
COB's head coach Linda Davis.

Captain
"It took a little while to find that leader on
the floor because our captain, Kim, was out
and Christine had to step up in a role that
she normally doesn't play. So it took us a
while to connect and, as a result, the juniors
capitalised on it."
The All-Stars, still winless in nine games,
played one of their best matches so far, but
coach Sherelle Cash said the lack of players
coming out to practice is making the differ-
ence right now.
"Everybody still has their own school thing
going on," Cash stated.
"But I guess if this can go on until the sum-
mer, we will see them play a lot better because
everybody would be out by then.
"Despite that, they still played well and I
don't want anybody to count the Stars out
yet. We have a lot of games to play and any-
thing could happen."
The All-Stars, using the league play as a
part of their development programme, are


FROM page one
excited about competing. We
had made plans to be here
from the first day, but house
sports clashed with the meet
but we said we we'll still come
in good faith, said Belinda Wil-
son, head coach.
"One thing I am realising is
that they are going all out in
the events in which we were
able to enter. We are contem-
plating on heading into North
Andros, I have some athletes
that are interested in going, so
if we can muster up the funds,
we will be there.
"I must say that we put a lot
of effort into travelling, what I
try to do is give the athletes
has much exposure as possi-
ble, but financially it is a big
strain. I would like to encour-
age the other schools in Nas-
sau to attend some of the
meets, the meets are on a cal-
endar and they happen around
the same time every year."
The Marlins were the only
school that represented the
capital in the meet. Because
of their late arrival they were
only able to compete in 15
events.
LN Coakley's principal
Brikley Collie was satisfied
with the school's participation,
but says an outreach pro-
gramme must be established


hoping to travel this summer to represent the
Bahamas.
"Once we can get in some good practice
and unity, everything will fall into place,"
Cash projected.
Rigby would wind up producing her best
game in COB's initial season in the league,
scoring a game high 18 points with eight
rebounds and five steals.
Russell came up with 16 points, 12 rebounds
and four assists and Sinclair helped out with 13
points, seven assists and seven steals.
For the All-Stars, Sasha Ferguson came
late and still managed to lead the way with 12
points and five steals. Tadasha ,Curry had
eight points,:four awsts aiid three steals.
Controlled
Assistant"coach Anastacia Moultrie, who
provided some leadership on the court, con-
trolled the middle with 13 rebounds, six blocks
and three assists.
In what was closely contested game from
start to finish, neither team was able to get
into an offensive rhythm as they finished tied
at 8-8 after the first quarter.
It wasn't until midway in the second quarter
that the Lady Caribs were able to break away
with a 17-14 lead. But the All-Stars battled
back to trim the deficit to 20-19 at the half.
The All-Stars would ride their momentum
into the third quarter as they opened an ear-
ly 25-21 lead. But it was short lived as the
Lady Caribs stormed back to take a 34-30
lead at the break.
In the fourth, the All-Stars would regain
the lead, but they couldn't hold off COB down
the stretch as they were a little more deter-
mined to win the game.
"I wish I could erase today's game, partic-
ularly after coming off such a high against
the (Esso on the Run) Angels in our last
game," coach Davis noted.
"But we're looking forward to meeting the
Warriors on Tuesday. We've beaten them
twice and then they took the last round. So I
think it will be a real good match-up. If our
girls come out with theiriheads up, I think we
will give the fans a real treat."


to bringing more schools from
the capital and the nation's
second city.
He said: "I am satisfied with
this year's meet, the perfor-
mances displayed by the ath-
letes were exceptional, but
something needs to be done
to attract more schools from
out of Nassau and Grand
Bahama.
"A little over seven schools
are represented but there is
only one school in from Nas-
sau and the other schools are
all from the Family Islands.
"This was a much bigger and
better meet than last year and
as we look at 14 years of host-
ing this invitational, we have to
look at ways in which we can
bring in more schools.
"We try to offer our stu-
dents all the opportunities
awarded to them and we try
to cooperate with the schools
and events that are held in
Nassau, if we can do that we
feel as though some way or the
other they should reciprocate
and allow their athletes to
work with us."
Despite not having the par-
ticipation of many of the
schools in the capital, the meet
was deemed a success by the
coaches who voluntarily
brought their athletes down.
For Christine Jenoure, head
coach of North Andros High
the meet give her a chance to


form a bigger and better squad
by the time she is ready to take
her athletes to the capital to
compete in the National High
School championships,
Central Eleuthera High
School brought a 60 member
contingent down, hoping to
over throw the Panthers. How-
ever, they were only successful
in one division, the under 15
girls.
The school will also be com-
peting in the North Andros
Invitational and, according to
head coach Tony Crane, they
will be ready.
Crane said: "The meet went
well, were able to take one of
the divisional titles away from
LN Coakley but all the other
divisions they did pretty well.
"Our school didn't bring
down all the athletes has
planned, we brought about 15
girls to compete in the under
15 girls division, five in the
under 20 girls and four in the
under 20 boys.
"The under 20 boys I am
really proud of, they did very
well, only having four athletes.
They all made it into the finals
of all of the events they com-
peted in so I am very proud of
that."
Committee members are
promising a bigger and better
invitational next year, organ-
ising the meet from as early as
late December.


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PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005









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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2005


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


mm 8 5 A O NE


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
THE LN Coakley Pan-
thers captured eight of the
ten relays and five of the six
divisional titles, to dominate
their 13th Annual track and
Sf invitational.
e meet, which was held
the weekend at the
Onion Bowl Track, in Moss
Town, Exuma, saw schools
from mostly the southern
part of the Bahamas vie for
'bragging rights'.
This was the first meet for
many of the athletes, with
their next major event com-
ing this weekend in North
Andros.
For Ann Bullard, head
coach of the Panthers and
director of the meet, the
invitational couldn't come
at a better time, giving her
and the natives a first hand
opportunity to view the tal-
ent on the island.

Worked
She said: "One has to be
pleased with the athletes'
performances. They've
worked hard over the past
two months and it showed
in their performances today,
that hard work really pays
off in the end.
"I must say that all the
athletes did great, but when
you look at some of the stel-
lar performance names
like Bradley Roll.e, Ray-
mond Finley and Deangleo
Ferguson, Santino Morley,
really stood out. These are
just a few of the athletes that
give their all, winning more
than two to three medals.
"Bradley did great, he
worked hard all the time in
practice and we really want-
ed to drop his time in the
100m. He wanted nothing
more than to run a ten sec-
ond race and I think he did
that here today.

Effort
"No medal count can take
.way from the effort put in
by all of the athletes, all the
athletes who competed in
the track meet performed
very well."
Panthers ran away with
the under 15 boys, under 17
boys and girls, and the under
20 boys and girls' division.
-The only division they didn't
win was the under 15 girls, a
.category which went to Cen-
tral Eleuthera High School.
Central Eleuthera were
.runners-up in the other divi-
sions.
Schools hailing from
Mayaguna, Long Island,
Eleuthera, North Andros
and New Providence took
part in the event.
This is the second time
the Doris Johnson Mystic
Marlins competed in the
invitational, bringing some
30 athletes down this time.
The Marlins were a day late
for competition, landing in
Exuma on Saturday, after
hosting their annual house
school sports.
"Last year we came down
and the children were pretty
SEE page 10B


Sunburners and Pros clash






in fumble recovery fiasco


OA R *N* T*
* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
PANDEMONIUM broke
out at Windsor Field on Satur-
day as the umpires called a
game, which was tied at 14-14,
on a controversial fumble recov-
ery.
Players from the Nassau Sun-
burners and the Orry J Sands
Pros argued whether or not the
fumble recovery should have
been allowed under the rules
they play by.


While the Sunburners argued
that it was the right call, the
Pros argued that it should not
have been allowed because they
are playing under the NCAA
rules and not the NFL.

Controversy
The controversy came with:
15 seconds left when the Sun-
burners got their second touch-
down run from Marvin
Rodriquez to cut their deficit
to 14-13.
Rodriquez again attempted
to carry the ball inside the end-


zone for the extra point, but he
was stopped, the ball was kicked
out of his hands and Oneil
Meadows retrieved it.
Meadows managed to scoop
it up and raced inside, scoring
the extra point, tying the score
at 14-14. One of the referees
ruled that it was good, but
another claimed otherwise.
After a lengthy decision, the
referees held up the call, forcing
an overtime period. While the
Sunburners lined up, the Pros
came off the field.
The referees then blew the
whistle, signalling that the game


was stopped.
"After all the decision that
carried on and nobody wanted
to listen, we just decided that
in the best interest and the pro-
tection of the umpires, we
decided to call the game," said
Val Maura, who served as the
chief referee for the game.

Physical
The referees were lambasted
from both sides, but it almost
turned physical as the Pros'
head coach Sherwin Bain got a
little too hot under the collar.


He declined to comment on
the decision, but his assistant
Sherwin Johnson said he feels
it's a personal vendetta against
the Pros.
"There was no way that the
conversion should have been
allowed to hold up," Johnson
stressed. "Only the player who
fumbles the ball should be
allowed to retrieve it and take it
in and score on a conversion.
"We simply don't like the
way we were treated today. We
feel that the officials have some-
thing against the Pros and if
that's the case, we don't feel
that they should be out here
calling the games."
While Maura said they only
called it the way they saw it,
they were not willing to officiate
the game after it became too
confrontational with the teams.
Sunburners' head coach Ian
'Reds' Lightbourn, however,
said despite the controversial
call, he felt like the referees did
a good job in officiating the
game.
"It worked out in our favour
because we were down because
we marched from the 40-yard
line and walked into the end-
zone," Lightbourn stated.
"All of a sudden, they started
carrying on bad. It was only a
controversy with the call the ref-
eree made. But we feel they
made the right decision."

Declined
Lightbourn said they were
committed to staying on the
field and playing the overtime
period. But the Pros declined
as the game was called.
"We had three officials. The
person who was on the ball said
the Sunburners couldn't
advance it because it was a fum-
ble and the whistle was blown
to call the play dead," said quar-
terback Obie Roberts.
"He was the person on the
call and he was over-ruled by
two officials who were not on
the play.
"When they went and dis-
cussed it, the person who was
on the play was ignored."
Roberts, who took over from
Michael Foster (who was sitting
out a one-game suspension
from his ejection in their last
game), said the Pros come out
game after game and have to
encounter problems with
either their opponents or the
fans.
"Today, it was the referees,"
Roberts noted. "On top of that,
it was a very well played game
between the two teams.
"We thought we had the
game in our pocket until that
call was made."
The Pros had jumped out to a
6-0 lead in the second quarter
when Dwayne Small ran in a
64-yard touchdown and they
scored on the extra point con-
version.
The Sunburners had tied the
score when Rodriquez scored
on a six-yard run in the second
quarter.
Then in the fourth, Roberts
ran in a 34-yard TD to put the
Pros up before Antoine Roberts
added the extra point on
the conversion for the 14-7
lead.


L
V
A









MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7,2005


- u TrE I~iIm


The stories behind the news


Former US President Bill Clinton
last week praised the Bahamas for
reducing the mother-to-child transmis-
sion of HIV/AIDS.
He said the country could be a mod-
el for treating sufferers.
Saying that the improvements mean
that the Bahamas is leading the way in
the fight against HIV/AIDS, Mr Clinton
also hailed the fact that the number of
patients currently receiving life-saving
AIDS medicine has more than tripled,
from 500 to more than 1,600


I PLACES


The behaviour and attitude of
some prison officers is an obstacle
to the rehabilitation of Fox Hill
inmates, according to Superin-
tendent Edwin Culmer last week.
Mr Culmer cited cases of prison-
er abuse and drug trafficking in
Fox Hill Prison by officers, and
said that the hostile reaction of
inmates to such behaviour
makes them more difficult to
rehabilitate...


The Bahamas became an approved travel destination
for China last week, giving the country a chance to attract
the 16 million Chinese who leave mainland China each
year on holiday. Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
told The Tribune that this agreement is cause for major
excitement in the Bahamas tourism sector.
According to the World Tourism Organisation, China
will become the top tourist destination in the world and
the fourth source of outbound tourism, with an estimat-
ed 100 million outbound travellers, by 2020.
This agreement means that Chinese tourists are able to
travel to the Bahamas more easily as part of organised
tour groups ...


Why


are


we


waiting?


Irritation grows over delay on LNG plant decision


Bearing in mind that
every major industrial
development brings its
risks, it is as well to
consider the worst-case
scenario should a Bahamas LNG
plant find itself faced with an extreme
emergency.
Yes, the impact of a large explo-
sion would be drastic. Yes, lives would
be at risk. Yes, the environment
would suffer a blow. And yes, the
reverberations of an LNG catasrophe
would be felt throughout the econo-
my. One scientist likened such a hap-
pening to "a small atomic bomb
explosion", agreeing that on-the-
ground damage would be substantial.
However, the chances of such an
occurrence short of a terrorist attack
or an enemy air raid are almost as
remote as an asteroid strike on Nas-
sau Harbour, according to experts.
No-one who knows much about LNG
terminals, and the obsessive care that
goes into safety work surrounding
them, seriously entertains the possi-
bility of a big bang.
The real disquiet now raging
around the LNG question is not about
safety alone though that is still a
potent consideration, but actual loca-
tion and the government's allegedly
uncertain handling of a proposal with
such far-reaching possibilities for the
nation's future.
That an LNG facility in the
Bahamas would reap economic ben-
efits is now considered beyond serious
doubt. Some believe such a project
would underpin the Grand Bahama
and Bimini economies for many years
to come and set the islands on course
for a glorious revival of mega-pro-
portions. It would also establish an
important strategic link between the
Bahamas and the United States which
would empower the Nassau govern-
'ment as never before.
While environmental and security
concerns are still paramount, and
understandable, supporters of LNG
believe these can easily be overcome
once all the potential benefits are out-
lined and proper assurances given.
What's really bugging them is the gov-
ernment's apparent inability to assess
intelligently what's before them and
make a reasoned determination of
the pros and cons. The perception is
that, rightly or wrongly, the govern-
ment is dragging its feet again.
Prime Minister Perry Christie said
on radio last month that two propos-
als for LNG storage in the Bahamas
would be approved in "short order".
One, for the AES project on Ocean
Cay, a man-made island near Bimini,
was earmarked for approval subject to


The debate over whether the Bahamas should host a liquefied natural gas plant to
feed Florida with fuel has now been raging for several years. Persuasive arguments
have been advanced on both sides. INSIGHT has been considering the pros and
cons for the national economy, and wondering why a decision is taking so long...


See LNG, Page 2C


m
Hanes
WMfjjlsS


I









I /r-%. -. -.. % IVI.IIL/MI i9U-r'FLI /I- i I I, I UUo


LNG (From page 1C)


"a closer look at a couple of
figures". The other, Tractebel's
Freeport Harbour scheme, is
due for "imminent" approval if
agreement can be reached on
an alternative location.
At the time, 'Mr Christie said
a decision would. be reached
by the end of January. Well,
that date has been and gone,
and still the prospective devel-
opers are awaiting the nod.
While no-one is surprised by
the missed deadline, irritation
is now growing apace while
arguments over where to put
the plant rumble on...
The hang-up over Freeport
Harbour centres on whether
such a facility should be situ-
ated so close to a population
centre and cruise terminal. Mr
Christie has personally
expressed grave reservations
over the site. He even men-
tioned it in a recent speech to
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce, claiming that he
always considered matters in
the light of a "worst case sce-
nario".
But supporters of the
Tractebel proposal see many
"positives" in having the plant
in an area already designated
for industrial use and are more
than ready to argue their
cause.
Differences over the
Tractebel plan run deep, and
even have tentacles stretching
all the way back to the contro-
versial Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, which gave
Freeport its special status half
a century ago.
The government's insistence
on a new, more isolated loca-
tion for the Tractebel facility
outside the port area has rekin-
dled disquiet over its overall
attitude to Freeport and dis-
tasteful memories of the "bend
or be broken" speech of Prime
Minister Lynden Pindling in
the late 1960s.
For an LNG facility to stand
outside the Port Authority
area would, observers feel,


break faith with the Hawksbill
Creek Act and decimate
unnecessarily a tract of open
Grand Bahama land in a way
that would ultimately dimin-
ish the island's tourist appeal.
While the Ocean Cay
scheme appears to be on track,
and set for formal approval,
the Tractebel proposal, in light
of Mr Christie's reservations,
looks poised for a rockier ride.
Yet supporters insist it is by
far the best option, and offer
cogent and persuasive argu-
ments in its favour.
INSIGHT was told last week
that the government's appar-
ent concern over Freeport
Harbour as an LNG location is
without foundation for several
reasons.
Firstly, Freeport was created
specifically as the industrial
capital of the Bahamas with
tax and other incentives to pro-
mote it as such.
Secondly, it was the govern-
ment's duty. in light of the
agreement to co-operate with
the Port Authority to develop
industry in that area.
Thirdly, the Port Authority
had, in pursuit of its mandate,
successfully promoted indus-
trial development in the port
area for more than 50 years.
In the last 15 years, this suc-
cess had reached "stellar"
heights, with a wide range of
enterprises from boatyards to
pharmaceuticals finding a
home there.
With an LNG facility,
Freeport and the Bahamas as a
whole would benefit from
cheaper energy and at least 30
maintenance and repair jobs
per year to the ship repair facil-
ity, and the chance to convert
Grand Bahama Power from oil
to environmentally more
friendly gas.
In addition, Tractebel would
not only engage in a $12 mil-
lion clean-up of the toxic 200-
acre Bahamas Cement site, but
also contribute to an alterna-
tive cruise ship facility.


For Freeport, this would
amount to a double whammy -
a $50 to $75 million cruise ship
port near Williams Town and a
new power plant to support
continued infrastructural
growth in the port area.
While mention of LNG
sparks fears of disasters like
Chernobyl and Bhopal (nei-
ther of which, incidentally, was
caused by liquefied natural
gas), its proponents insist that
it is environmentally more
friendly than oil refining, phar-
maceuticals, the shipyard or
the pollution produced by
Grand Bahama Power. All
round, they believe, LNG is
more benign than other sub-
stances which attract far less
negative publicity.
The considered alternative


sub-text in all the debates now
raging round the LNG contro-
versy.
For the Port Authority,
Tractebel's harbour plan
would ensure $3 million a year
in licence fees, millions of dol-
lars in throughput fees plus
dockage, pilotage and berthing
income of $4-$7 million.
This money would generate
a useful $10-$15 million a year
to help develop and maintain
the port area, which has suf-
fered considerable deteriora-
tion over many years.
With the recent death of
Edward St George, and the
advancing age of Sir Jack Hay-
ward, the Port Authority is all
too aware of the need to turn a
profit. The St George-Hay-
ward team has for years


"We need thousands of

jobs here. But as things

stand the government is

strangling growth. This

will not improve the PLP's

standing in Grand Bahama,

where it seems Freeport

is being locked down by

both the party and the

BEST Commission."
-Commercial source


to Freeport Harbour, the
South Riding Point area east of
Freeport, is seen by its oppo-
nents as far less suitable for
several reasons.
While Grand Bahama's
industrial growth had occurred
on the western side of the port
area, South Riding Point
would open up a new ugly and
dirty tract of industrial expan-
sion where wetlands and
beaches.would be destroyed.
Not only would it affect
marine eco-systems, it would
also discourage tourist devel-
opment because the area
would be unsuitable for any-
thing other than industrial
growth for many miles around.
However, environmental
considerations are only half the
story. Equally important are
the economic implications.
Revenue distribution cannot
be discounted as a powerful


bankrolled a joint dream in
Grand Bahama, but this cru-
cial injection of substantial
funds will not be available in
the long term.
A businessman said: "Eco-
nomidally, there is now a real
need for the Port Authority to
stand on its own feet. We need
to care for the interests of
Bahamians in Freeport and
establish a source of income
for the next 50 years.
"The Freeport Harbour
LNG site would be an anchor
for such future security.
Freeport's economy is mrreces-
sion, there is a need for jobs
and the government needs to
approve investments in the
Port Area to allow the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement to
work."
With Tractebel already
licensed for the LNG project,
critics consider it "bad faith"


for the government to encour-
age development of a new site
on the island. At the moment,
confirmation is awaited from
the BEST Commission that the
project can be developed in a
safe, sustainable manner. The
commission's failure to deliver
a verdict has, according to crit-
ics, presented competitors with
an advantage.
A commercial source said:
"We need thousands of jobs
here. But as things stand the
government is strangling,
growth. This will not improve
the PLP's standing in Grand
Bahama, where it seems
Freeport is being locked down
by both the party and the
BEST Commission."
Currently, Tractebel and its
financial partners, El Paso and
a Florida Power and Light sub-
sidiary, are itching to.get start-
ed on the project. Vice-presi-
dent Jim Ebeling confirmed
only last week that a $40 mil-
lion relocation of cruise ship
facilities was on offer to
counter any perceived risks to
tourism.
However, behind the scenes
there is an air of bewilderment
and barely concealed aggrava-
tion.
Apart from the Port Author-
ity's understandable concern
that they might be squeezed
out of a potentially lucrative
deal a deal, what's more, that
would contravene the spirit of
Hawksbill there is puzzle-,
ment over the BEST Commis-
sion's niggling interference.
Tractebel, sources claim,
believes BEST is raising tech-
nical points which cannot, at
this stage, be addressed ade-
quately. As there are several
potential technical scenarios
under discussion, it is prema-
ture for them to nit-pick their
way through inappropriate
detail, they say.
A more sensible course, the
sources claim, is for the gov-
ernment to include required
protocols covering design, safe-
ty and environmental matters
in any agreement between
Tractebel and the Port
Authority.
While everyone is trying
hard to be gentlemanly about
the delays, there is.real exas-
peration over the governmen-
t's allegedly hypocritical stance
over safety.
Although enjoying consid-
erable powers vested under the
Health and Safety Act, the
government according to
informed sources does not
have a single inspector in the
nation's industrial capital.


A businessman said: "It's
hard to see how any investor
can take us seriously as a
nation when we put a company
like Tractebel through the
ringer while it's quite clear no-
one else is being monitored or
regulated."
The strong feeling is that
Tractebel's scheme is being
thwarted by unnecessary
bureaucratic delays, and that
BEST's contribution is ill-
informed.
There is, according to the
critics, a lack of sophistication
on the government's part
which is contributing to its
inability to make up its mind.
In the process, they say, the
future of a new generation of
Freeporters is being jeopar-
dised.
While the prospect of a gas
pipeline to Florida will always
throw up doubts for environ-
mentalists and the unscientific
among us, much wider issues
are now at stake.
Those who believe passion-
ately in Freeport and all it
stands for feel that a snub for
the Port Authority at this stage
will revive all the old argu-
ments against the PLP and its
attitudes to foreigners.
Oddly, even after half a cen-
tury, Freeport is still seen by
some politicians as a "foreign"
entity in that its founders were
outsiders and its earliest pro-
ponents the now discredited
merchant-politicians known as
the Bay Street Boys.
Without the precious cash
injection the LNG facility
would bring, Freeport could
begin a downward spiral, with
the Port Authority no longer
able to maintain it at its pre-
sent level, according to sources
there.
With Freeport deteriorating
into a non-viable slum, the
government would be deprived
of the $150 million it collects
annually from the northern
city, they claim.
Hence, a process Sir Lynden
Pindling began with his "bend
or be broken" speech all those
years ago would have reached
its conclusion. Freeport would
have finally been bent to
breaking point and a golden
dream would have evaporat-
ed in the process.
With LNG, however, the city
could reach forth into an even
brighter future, providing new
opportunities in an atmosphere
of sustained growth.
"It's the only choice that
makes any sense," said a
Freeport resident who hopes
the best is yet to come.


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INSGH


THE most dangerous prison-
ers in the Bahamas more than
700 of them are being guarded
by only 15 officers, it emerged
last week as security problems at
Fox Hill Prison came under the
spotlight.
Prison Superintendent Edwin
Culmer admitted that he was
glad the inmates had never
attempted an organised upris-
ing. Mr Culmer, whose aston-
ishing disclosures came when
The Tribune toured the prison
to see first-hand the conditions
at the controversial jail, also
reflected on a "tremendous"


staff shortage in the maximum
security block.
****

FORMER US President Bill
Clinton last week praised the
Bahamas for reducing the moth-
er-to-child transmission of
HIV/AIDS. He said the country
could be a model for treating
sufferers.
Saying that the improvements
mean that the Bahamas is lead-
ing the way in the fight against
HIV/AIDS, Mr Clinton also
hailed the fact that the number
of patients currently receiving


life-saving AIDS med
more than tripled, fro
more than 1,600.
He said the dif
between today and 20
he last visited the Bah;
like daylight and dark.
Mr Clinton paid a
call on Prime Minist
Christie. The two men
a wide range of topics,
issues relating to the C
and the United Sta
HIV/AIDS.
****

THE Bahamas be(


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licine has approved travel destination for
m 500 to China last week, giving the
country a chance to attract the
fference 16 million Chinese who leave
002 when mainland China each year on
amas was holiday. Foreign Affairs Minis-
ter Fred Mitchell told The Tri-
courtesy bune that this agreement is
er Perry cause for major excitement in
discussed the Bahamas tourism sector.
including According to the World
,aribbean Tourism Organisation, China
rates and will become the top tourist des-
tination in the world and the
fourth source of outbound
tourism, with an estimated 100
came an million outbound travellers, by
2020. This agreement means
that Chinese tourists are able to
travel to the Bahamas more eas-
ily as part of organised tour
groups. Chinese tourist groups
are only allowed to travel to
countries which have been
granted "Approved Destination
1 4 Status" (ADS) by China.
To date China has signed
U4 0 ADS agreements with 59 coun-
tries and regions in the world.
The ADS agreement was one
of two agreements the Bahamas
signed yesterday at the start of
the three-day China-Caribbean
trade forum in Kingston,
Jamaica.
0000

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie was last week urged to
show. "guts" by Bishop Neil Ellis
the fiery church leader who
has always been considered one
of his biggest supporters.
Bishop Ellis' call came in a
powerful sermon which stunned
his congregation and set alarm
bells ringing among government
politicians.
The bishop's outburst came
as he urged Mr Christie to show
courage in dealing decisively
with the apparent lawlessness
of "foreign elements" in the
Bahamas and government col-
leagues who threaten the
nation's stability and reputation.
000****

THE behaviour and attitude
of some prison officers is an
obstacle to the rehabilitation of
Fox Hill inmates, according to
Superintendent Edwin Culmer
last week.
Mr Culmer cited cases of pris-
oner abuse and drug trafficking


rs"


* FORMER United States President Bill Clinton toured
Princess Margaret Hospital last Friday.


in Fox Hill Prison by officers,
and said that. the hostile reac-
tion of inmates to such behav-
iour makes them more difficult
to rehabilitate.
Mr Culmer also hit out at
some of the senior officers
working under him. During an
interview with The Tribune, Mr
Culmer spoke at length about
the high recidivism rate at the
prison and the efforts to com-
bat it through the rehabilitation
of prisoners.
He said the key to prisoner
rehabilitation is giving inmates
access to skills that will allow
them to lead constructive lives
after they are discharged.


DAVID Desland Nicholas
and Francis Touissant, both 20,
were last week arraigned in
Magistrate's Court Five charged
with murder and assault with a
deadly weapon.
Nicholas, of Florida Court, off
Robinson Road, and Touissant,
of Fox Hill Road, allegedly beat
and stabbed 30-year-old Philip
Andrew Moss to death at Da
Bing sporting lounge, Fox Hill
Road.
Both accused, not allowed to
plead, were remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison. A preliminary
inquiry is scheduled to begin on
April 21.


THE Rev Canon David


(The Tribune archive photo)

Harold John Laurence Pugh, 84,
died last week at his sister's
home in South Wales. Father
Pugh, founder of St Anne's
High School and a major figure
in the Anglican church in New
Providence for more than half a
century, had been ailing for
some time. He was always
regarded as a man of deep faith
who gave selflessly throughout
his life.
****

THIRTY two-year-old Ethan
Saron Newry, of Carmichael
Road, was arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court One last week on
eight charges relating to the
armed robbery of British Amer-
ican Bank on Frederick Street.
The accused, also known as
Ethan Campbell and "Fragile",
was charged with four counts of
armed robbery totalling
$12,823.57. He was also charged
with one count of receiving the
money. And he was charged
with possession of an unlicensed
firearm with intent to endanger
the life of Franklyn Clarke, who
was shot in the wrist during the
incident.
Newry also faced one count
of possession of an unlicensed
black and silver Larson pistol
with the serial number erased
and one count of possession of
three live .308 rounds of ammu-
nition. The accused is scheduled
to return to court on February
22.


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Nassau, Bahamas email: lawnboy@batelnet.bs


Quotes /the Week

"It is not the school but the Bahamian society Prison Superintendent Edwin Culmer sets
which is bursting in terms of violence and you the record straight on Cuban detainees who
have the students coming into the schools from have levelled claims of abuse at Fox Hill Prison
the society, but not all of the schools are explod-
ing with violence." "We are working very closely together on the
Minister of Education Alfred Sears on war against drugs and I think one of the critical
ZNS's talk show Immediate Response reasons is Bahamians have a strong sense of
respect for law and order and justice. Drug traf-
"He was a father figure to me. He came into ficking isn't consistent with those values."
my life shortly after my own father died in 1953 US Ambassador John Rood speaking at a
and was a guiding light. He was certainly one of gathering to welcome former US Ambassador
the best-loved priests in the Bahamas and a lead- to the Bahamas Arthur Schechter to the
ing figure in the Anglican church for more than Embassy
50 years."
The Tribune columnist George Mackey "God is with us because, if not, we would
following the death of The Rev Canon David have been trampled a long time ago. "
Harold John Laurence Pugh Prison Superintendent Edwin Culmer on
security problems at Her Majesty's Prison, Fox
"I have come to Grand Bahama to impress Hill
upon you that when people face a disaster, when
they lose their jobs, when investors abandon "I believe God has anointed Perry Christie to
their properties, when there is uncertainty and lead this country at this time, but he has to have
fear, there is no government in this country and the strength, the guts, and the ability to deal with
no political party who would not engage in ini- those around him or you go down with them ...
tiatives and employ strategies to stand between "When violence breaks down in a town, it's
those victims and disaster." time for all sensible people in any kind of lead-
Prime Minister Perry Christie speaking ership in the country to stop and analyse. There
at the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce is too much hypocrisy in national leadership.
Installation Banquet You know what's the problem, many people in
national leadership don't even have a personal
"While they were in the compound, the prison dream, much less a national one. I'm not just
was not responsible for them. They were in the talking politicians national leadership."
custody of immigration and defence force offi- Bishop Neil Ellis preaches at Mount Tabor
cers." Full Gospel Baptist Church


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ISSUES I DEAS

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6,2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


IN MY OPINION
CARL HIAASEN




Memo from

Grandpa: Please

don't eat worms

I'm standing at the window of the
hospital nursery gazing at you,
nine pounds and four ounces of
snoozing pink innocence and bound-
less possibility.
Naturally it's my hope that you
grow up to be happy, caring, gener-
ous, productive, principled and
unselfish. Your parents will have
much to say about that, and there's no
doubt they'll steer you wisely through
childhood, as they are doing with
your brother and sister. Like most
mothers and fathers, they're reluctant
to risk dampening their children's
aspirations by heaping too much grim
reality upon them too soon. This is a
worthy and loving instinct.
However, being a grandfather
invests me with a cranky candor that
you may have to indulge me from
time to time as you grow older. We
might as well begin now.
The world into which you have so
hungrily arrived is a complicated,
troubled and sometimes heartbreak-
ing place. You were fortunate to have
been born in the richest and most tol-
erant country, though it's far from
perfect. You'll get a chance to make it
better, and I hope you do.
Waiting down the road are oppor-
tunities so plentiful and varied as to
throttle the imaginations of those of
us born in the '50s. The choices you
make ought to be yours alone, but it
would be baloney for me to say that
I'll be bursting with pride no matter
what you do.
Example: While flipping TV chan-
nels the other night, I came upon a
program called Fear Factor. Believe it
or not, the show features young men
and women swallowing live worms
and repulsive parts of dead animals -
the ultimate goal being to get famous
and win a wad of cash.
You will learn that this sort of ii-
less self-degradation is what passes
for entertainment in some parts of
modern American culture.
Surely the parents (and grandpar-
*TURN TO HIAASEN

MIDDLE EAST

Let's seize

opportunity

while we can

BY RICHARD HAASS
www.project-syndicate.org

It has been a long time since the'
words opportunity and Middle East
appeared in the same sentence. But
now they are. Even better, this opti-
mism may have some basis in reality.
One important reason for this change
in attitude is, of course, Yasser Ara-
fat's disappearance from the scene.
Like the Thane of Cawdor in Shake-
speare's Macbeth, "Nothing in his life
became him like the leaving it."
i Arafat never grew
Beyond the man who
appeared at the
United Nations dec-
ades ago with both an
olive branch and a
I gun. His unwilling-
ness to jettison terror
HAS ~ and choose diplo-
HAAss macy proved his
undoing, as he lost legitimacy in the
eyes of both Israel and the United
States. The result was the failure to
create a Palestinian state.
But it is not simply Arafat's passing
that provides cause for optimism. We
now have a Palestinian leadership
legitimized by elections, one that
appears to be opposed to using terror-
ism as a tool to achieve political aims.
Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen) has a
good record of questioning the wis-
dom of the intifada that has taken too
many lives and caused only misery
*TURN TO HAASS

OPINION PAGE
MIDEAST SUMMIT: The big idea is to


agree on vision and make headway on
the core issues, 2C
SOCIAL SECURITY: Excerpts from
President Franklin D. Roosevelt's 1938
radio address on the third anniversary
of the Social Security Act


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THE MIAMI HERALD


6L SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


OPINION
ALBERTO IBARGOEN, PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


Below are excerpts from
President Franklin D. Roose-
velt's Aug. 15, 1938 radio
address on the third anniver-
sary of the Social Security
Act. The full text is at
www.ssa.gov/history.


Millions of our
people were living in
wastelands of want
and fear.


T oday ["Social Secu- merchants and to bankers.
rity"] has significance True, the little man often
for more than 40 million profited by such this type of
men and women workers legislation; but that was a
whose applications for old- by-product rather than a
age insurance accounts have motive.
been received; this system is Taking a generous view
designed to assure them an of the situation, I think it
income for life after old age was not that government
retires them from their jobs. deliberately ignored the
It has significance: working man but that the
For more than 27'/2 working man was not suffi-
million men and women ciently articulate to make
wage earners who have his needs and his problems
earned credits under state known.
unemployment-insurance The powerful in industry
laws. and commerce had power-
For the needy men, ful voices, both individually
women and children receiv- and as a group. And when-
ing assistance and for their ever they saw their posses-
families at least 2.3 mil- sions threatened, they
lion all told; with this cash raised their voices in
assistance 1.7 million old appeals for government
folks are spending their last protection.
years in surroundings they
know and with people they PROTECTIVE LAWS
love; more than 600,000 It was not until workers
dependent children are became more articulate
being taken care of by their through organization that
own families; and about protective labor legislation
40,000 blind people are was passed. While such
assured of peace and secu- laws raised the standards of
rity among familiar voices, life, they still gave no assur-
For the families and ance of economic security.
communities to whom Strength or skill of arm or
expanded public health and brain did not guarantee a
child welfare services have man a job; it did not guaran-
brought added protection, tee him a roof; it did not
And it has significance guarantee him the ability to
for all of us who, as citizens, provide for those dependent
have at heart the security upon him or to take care of
and the well-being of this himself when he was too old
great democracy, to work.
These accomplishments of Long before the eco-
three years are impressive, nomic blight of the depres-
yet we should not be unduly sion descended on the
proud of them. Our govern- nation, millions of our peo-
ment in fulfilling an obvious pile were living in .,waste-
obligation to the citiiznsofitlands.ef V t and fear. Men
the country has beenidoing-. and women too old and


so only because the citizens
require action from their
representatives. If the peo-
ple, during these years, had
chosen a reactionary admin-
istration or a "do nothing"
Congress, Social Security
would still be in the conver-
sational stage a beautiful
dream which might come
true in the dim distant
future.
STRONGHOLD
But the underlying desire
for personal and family
security was nothing new.
In the early days of coloni-
zation and through the long
years following, the worker,
the farmer, the merchant,
the man of property, the
preacher and the idealist
came here to build, each for
himself, a stronghold for the
things he loved. The strong-
hold was his home; the
things he loved and wished
to protect were his family,
his material and spiritual
possessions.
His security, then as now,
was bound to that of his
friends and his neighbors.
But as the nation has
developed, as invention,
industry and commerce
have grown more complex,
the hazards of life have
become more complex.
Among an increasing host
of fellow citizens, among
the often intangible forces
of giant industry, man has
discovered that his individ-
ual strength and wits were
no longer enough. This was
true not only of the worker
at shop bench or ledger; it
was true also of the mer-
chant or manufacturer who
employed him. Where here-
tofore men had turned to
neighbors for help and
advice, they now turned to
government.
Now this is interesting to
consider. The first to turn to
government, the first to
receive protection from
government, were not the
poor and the lowly those
who had no resources other
than their daily earnings -
but the rich and the strong.
Beginning in the 19th cen-
tury, the United States
passed protective laws
designed, in the main, to
give security to property
owners, to industrialists, to


infirm to work either
depended on those who had
but little to share, or spent
their remaining years within
the walls of a poorhouse.
Fatherless children early
learned the meaning of
being a burden to relatives
or to the community. Men
and women, still strong, still
young, but discarded as
gainful workers, were
drained of self-confidence
and self-respect.
The millions of today
want, and have a right to,
the same security their fore-
fathers sought the assur-
ance that with health and
the willingness to work they
will find a place for them-
selves in the social and eco-
nomic system of the time.
Because it has become
increasingly difficult for
individuals to build their
own security single-
handed, government must
now step in and help them
lay the foundation stones,
just as government in the
past has helped lay the foun-
dation of business and
industry.
We must face the fact
that in this country we have
a rich man's security and a
poor man's security and that
the government owes equal
obligations to both. National
security is not a half-and-
half manner: It is all or none.
NO EASY LIFE
The Social Security Act
offers to all our citizens a
workable and working
method of meeting urgent
present needs and of fore-
stalling future need. It uti-
lizes the familiar machinery
of our federal-state govern-
ment to promote the com-
mon welfare and the eco-
nomic stability of the
nation.
The act does not offer
anyone, either individually
or collectively, an easy life
- nor was it ever intended
so to do. None of the sums
of money paid out to indi-
viduals in assistance or in
insurance will spell any-
thing approaching abun-
dance.
But they will furnish that
minimum necessity to keep
a foothold; and that is the
kind of protection Ameri-
cans want....


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Shir iami HMIM I EDITORIAL


Bargaining for peace in the Middle East

OUR OPINION: TIMING OF SUMMIT HOLDS PROMISE OF MAKING PROGRESS


A s Israeli and Palestinian
leaders prepare for the
first high-level talks since
negotiations collapsed four
years ago, it's tempting to
imagine a Hollywood-style
scenario: The heavens will
open suddenly, and the dove
of peace will descend on the
summit meeting at Sharm el
Sheik on Tuesday. Would that
it were that easy.
There are grounds for opti-
mism, but this is still the Mid-
dle East. The reasons behind
this enduring conflict haven't
vanished. For there to be an
enduring peace, the Palestin-
ians must demonstrate that
they are capable of running a
lawful, independent state that
believes in democracy and has
no room for militias or orga-
nized extremists bent on
destroying Israel.
But let's start with the posi-
tive. The crackdown on vio-


lence by Palestinian leader
Mahmoud Abbas is commend-
able. Israeli Prime Minister
Ariel Sharon's willingness to
sit down and talk is a welcome
change from only weeks ago.
For his part, President Hosni
Mubarak pf Egypt, who is
sponsoring this week's sum-'
jimitdeserves credit fofrusing'
his influence to advance the
cause of peace.
And the timing could not be
better. There's a new Palestin-
ian leader, a new secretary of
state Condoleezza Rice is
making her first trip as Secre-
tary of State to the region -
and a new Bush administration
bent on making democratic
reforms in the Middle East.
As a practical matter, Pales-
tinians should renounce the
use of violence as a political
weapon once and for all. Israel
should reciprocate with confi-
dence-building measures.


Egypt must help lead the Arab Palestinian prisoners in Israeli
world to support the peace jails, or blanket amnesty for
process. Palestinian extremists with
The United States, for its blood on their hands will be
part, must show that it intends set aside until both sides have
to remain firmly engaged in more confidence in each
the peace process and not sim- other.
ply drop in from time to time. Mr. Abbas does, of course,'
Europe can playa uedful rol e -dese-encourageniient for his'
by offAring greater ridee -" :-starice.igainst terror, and he
standing for the Israeli posi- got it on Wednesday night
tion. when President Bush said that
It will be tempting to get he would ask Congress for
sidetracked from these core $350 million to support Pales-
issues. We trust that the nego- tinian "political, economic and
tiators won't be. So, when Mr. security reforms."
Abbas comes to the summit The focus of the negotia-
meeting expecting conces- tions should be on making
sions in return for restraining headway toward resolution of
Hamas and other terrorists, he the core issues. In a place
will be reminded that Israel where all time is contempora-
last month already agreed to neous and all previous injuries
pull back from some military are still remembered, the big
positions in the West Bank idea is to agree on vision and
and Gaza Strip. make concrete only a few,
Demands on Prime Minis- achievable and small steps in
ter Sharon for the release of the right direction.


PROPERTY INSURANCE


Bill offers owners a 'chance to fight back'


BY RON KLEIN
Klein.Ron@flsenate.gov

The proposal seems sim-
ple and straightforward
enough. Open to the
public the rate-making process
when insurance companies
apply for increases, give con-
sumers a dedicated watchdog
to, for a change, protect their
interests, and make sure poli-
cies are "easy to read."
These
were some of
the concepts
' behind legis-
lation I
unveiled last
w e e k
designed to
KLEIN create an
insurance
market that addresses con-
sumers' interests of fair prices
and comprehensive coverage.
The bill also contains provi-
sions like prohibiting insur-
ance companies from drop-
ping customers who have
loyally paid their premiums
for five years and have not
filed a single claim. It allows
for the creation of a low-inter-
est loan program for residents
seeking to fortify their homes
to prevent future hurricane
damage, and premium dis-
counts for homeowners who
do just that.
Common sense, noncontro-
versial measures to most folks
wanting to know they're being
charged fair prices for their
insurance premiums and not
being exploited for the sake of


policyholders that they can
look forward to a 20-percent
surcharge on their premiums
for each nonweather-related
claim they file.
The rate-hike requests are
coming as more and more
homeowners are receiving
notification that their policies
are being canceled.
And they're coming at a
time when the industry as a
whole is still projecting record
profits for the year.
There's something seri-
ously wrong with this picture.
As the insurance reform
legislation makes its way
through the Capitol, I'm issu-
ing a call to action. Floridians
need to make their voices
heard, especially if they've
been notified of yet another
rate increase or cancellation.
It's the only way to ensure that
these common-sense propos-
als are given a fair hearing, and
something is done to loosen
the stranglehold the insurance
industry has on Florida prop-
erty owners and the entire
rate-making process.
Forward all information to
my office and then contact
your state senator and repre-
sentative. Ask them to support
real insurance reform that will
truly reinforce your own and
your neighbors' ability to pur-
chase fairly priced, compre-
hensive, property and casualty
insurance.

Sen. Ron Klein, D-Boca
Raton, is the former leader of
the Senate Democratic Caucus.


an industry's bottom line.
Right?
Well, not exactly. Predict-
ably, but sadly, the insurance
industry is railing against the
legislation, dismissing the con-
sumer-friendly reform mea-
sures as "reckless propaganda"
and "a massive increase in
government intervention."
Excuse me? We're talking
about an insurance product
that every homeowner in this
state, if they're financing their
homes, is forced to have. And
we're talking about an industry
that since Hurricane Andrew
has dropped thousands of citi-
zens who never filed claims,
and has hiked premiums with
little to no consumer involve-
ment in the process.
This bill gives Florida prop-
erty owners a chance to fight
back, to demand and receive
truthful answers from the
insurance industry about such
questions as why policies can't
be written in plain English or
why Citizens Property Insur-
ance, the state insurer of last
resort, can't offer competitive
rates. More importantly, it
would force the industry to
publicly explain why rates
keep going up in double digits
annually, even though until
last year, Florida enjoyed
almost a decade without any
major hurricane strikes.


Maybe, if we can better
understand what happened to
all that money when there
were no hurricane strikes, we
can figure out if it's really in
the consumers' best interests
to buy the industry's argument
that any additional rate
increases are truly necessary
now.
The assault by the insur-
ance industry on consumers'
wallets has been under way for
some time now, especially in
South Florida, where rates
have doubled and in some
cases, tripled.
But that's changing. The
industry is using the catch-all
excuse of an unprecedented
season of hurricanes to justify
its rate hike requests to Talla-
hassee. And it's affecting
everyone from Pensacola to
the Florida Keys, regardless of
whether the homeowner was
affected by the storms or not.
I In fact, last week, Nation-
wide Insurance Company, the
state's fourth largest insurer,
joined about 20 other Florida
insurers including State Farm
(Florida's largest insurer) aid
Citizens (number two) in seek-
ing approval for hefty rate
increases since the hurricanes.
Not only is Nationwide
seeking a 28.3 percent rate
hike, but it's also reportedly
notifying its roughly 300,000


VERBATIM

Social Security

protects all society


The assault by the industry on consumers'
wallets has been under way for some time now.
Rates have doubled, even tripled.


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