Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00027
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: February 3, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text









SALADWS l
I'm Iovin'l It,

HIGH 78F
LOW 62F

S CLOUDY WITH
A SHOWER


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.60 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005 PRICE 500


nkp


32-year-old arrives


at court under


heavy police guard


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
ETHAN Saron Newry was
arraigned in Magistrate
Court's yesterday on eight
charges relating to. Mon-
day's armed robbery of the
British American Bank in
Frederick Street.
The 32-year-old
Carmichael Road resident,
also known as Ethan Camp-
bell and Fragile, was escort-
ed to Court One Bank Lane
under heavy police guard
surrounded by a crowd of
curious onlookers. Once he
was in court, Magistrate Lin-
da Virgill read the charges
from a three-page packet of
dockets.
Newry was charged with
four counts of armed rob-
bery totalling $12,823.57. He
was also charged with one
count of receiving the mon-
ey.
In addition, he was
charged with possession of
an unlicensed firearm with
intent to endanger the life
of Franklyn Clarke, who was
shot in the wrist during the
incident.
Newry also faced one
count, of possession of an
unlicensed black and silver
Larson pistol with the serial
number erased and one
count of possession of three
.308 live rounds of ammuni-
tion.


Magistrate Virgill told
Newry, who was represented
by attorney Alfred Williams,
that he was not required to
enter a plea on the armed
robbery charges. She said
she would therefore link all
eight charges together and
he would not be allowed to
plead on any of the posses-
sion related charges.
Prosecutor Ercil Dorsette
told the court he wished to
canvass a voluntary bill of
indictment.
If the voluntary bill pro-
ceeds, it would mean that
Newry would not have a
preliminary inquiry, but
instead his case would go
straight to the Supreme
Court for trial.
Mr Williams did not
object to the idea, but said
he wished to put on record
that his client had been
beaten while in custody.
In addition, he said his
client suffered from a drug
addiction problem and
requested that he receive
treatment from Sandilands.
Magistrate Virgill
informed Mr Williams that
Newry would be remanded
at Her Majesty's Prison,
where he would receive
treatment for drug depen-
dency.
He is to return to court on
February 22, where it will
be determined if the volun-
tary bill will go forward.


bery: man c


ETHAN Saron Newry is brought to court yesterday to face numerous charges in connection
with Monday's armed robbery of the British American Bank on Frederick Street.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


Ioen





N By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRISON officers were
never in charge of the
Cuban detainees who have
levelled claims of abuse at
Fox Hill Prison, according
to Superintendent Edwin
Culmer.
Mr Culmer said he could
not confirm or deny the
claims of abuse, because
although the Cubans were
housed at the prison, they
were at all times guarded by
Immigration and Defence
Force officers.
"While they were in the
compound, the prison was
not responsible for them.
They were in the custody of
Immigration and Defence
Force officers," Mr Culmer
said.
He explained that the
men were housed in a sepa-
rate building from other
inmates while the process
facilitating their repatriation
took effect.
Most of the Cuban
nationals who were at the
prison have already been
sent back to Cuba, accord-
ing to Mr Culmer.
More than 40 Cubans
were transferred to Her
Majesty's Prison in connec-
tion with a fire at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre last December.
The fire destroyed one
building on the compound,
and led to a riot that was put
down by Immigration and
Defence Force officers using
SEE page 11


'Major excitement' over travel deal with China


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas became an approved
travel destination for China yesterday, giv-
ing the country a chance to attract the 16
million Chinese who leave mainland Chi-
na each year on holiday.
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
told The Tribune that this agreement is
cause for major excitement in the Bahamas
tourism sector.
According to the World Tourism Organ-


isation, China will become the top tourist
destination in the world and the fourth
source of outbound tourism, with an esti-
mated 100 million outbound travellers, by
2020.
This agreement means that Chinese
tourists are able to travel to the Bahamas
more easily as part of organised tour
groups.
Chinese tourist groups are only allowed
to travel to countries which have been
granted "Approved Destination Status"
(ADS) by China.


To date China has signed ADS agree-
ments with 59 countries and regions in the
world.
The ADS agreement was one of two
agreements the Bahamas signed yester-
day at the start of the three-day China-
Caribbean trade forum in Kingston,
Jamaica.
The Bahamian delegation, headed by
Mr Mitchell, includes Tourism Minister
Obie Wilchcombe, Trade and Industry
SEE page 11


Course runs from February 28 to March 4, 2005.
Registration Deadline is February 11, 2005.
To register, call (242) 325-2638.
ANDERSONPRICE


Nassau and l:~ Ba a* Islands' Leading Newspaper


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION




BAHAMAS EDITION








PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


N US AMBASSADOR JOHN ROOD


I-NDEX

~711


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THE Bahamian public's
"sense of respect for law
and order" is at the heart
of the bi-lateral fight
against drugs, US Ambas-
sador John Rood said yes-
terday.
Mr Rood was speaking at
a gathering to welcome for-
mer US Ambassador to the
Bahamas Arthur Schechter
to the Embassy yesterday.
"We are working very
closely together on the war
against drugs and I think
one of the critical reasons
is Bahamians have a strong
sense of respect for law and
order and justice. Drug traf-
ficking isn't consistent with
those values," Mr Rood
said.
The ambassador said that
drug trafficking is only one
of several bi-lateral issues
that he would like to focus
on while in the Bahamas.

Resolve
Mr Rood said he hopes in
particular to resolve "some
of the items we don't see
eye-to-eye on."
These, Mr Rood said,
include the countries'
respective stances on Cuba
and Haiti.
He acknowledged that
the issue of illegal immi-
gration from Haiti is both
costly and time-consuming
for the Bahamas.
"If we don't figure out a
solution to the Haitians
coming into this country, it
is going to cause unrest,
pressure on social services,
etcetera," he said.
, Mr,,Rood said that the.US
and the Bahamas agree "90
per cent" ,on illegal immi-
gration, and pointed out the
bi-lateral efforts which led
to a total of 5,000 illegal
migrants being apprehend-
ed in Bahamian waters in
2004.
Mr Rood said that anoth-
er aim of his time as ambas-
sador is to increase interac-

TRPCL
EXTERINTR

FO ISTPRBLM
PHN: 2-25


"I enjoy the job, I enjoy
the people, I enjoy the
food, the music, the culture.
"It's been a great experi-
ence," he said.
He welcomed Ambas-
sador Schechter to the
Embassy and congratulat-
ed him on his accomplish-
ments while in the
Bahamas.

Love
Mr Rood said the visit is
a sign of Ambassador
Schechter's "love for this
country, his love for the
people of the Bahamas."
"He is an example of a
man who put his heart into
his job," Mr Rood said.
He said Ambassador
Schechter not only accom-


tion between the Bahami-
an public and the Embassy.
To this. end, he said, a
group of Embassy staff
have begun to visit schools
and read to children once a
week.
"Visiting schools is going
to be one of my priorities
as ambassador because I
think it's important that we
let school children know
what we're about.
"We consider ourselves
very close friends of the
Bahamas and we want to
talk about that friendship
and that relationship," he
said.
The ambassador, who
arrived in the Bahamas last
September, said he is
already extremely enthusi-
astic about the post.


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter


AMERICAN authorities have issued an arrest
warrant for a murder suspect who they believe is a
Bahamian.
The suspect, who goes by the names Quentin or
Gary Shaun Bodie, allegedly set fire to his girl-
friend's apartment in Hollywood, Florida on Jan-
uary 22, while she was still inside, then fled the
scene.
The family of the victim, 35-year-old Donnet
Mays, are appealing to the public for help to find
Bodie, who they claim had physically abused Ms
Mays throughout their relationship.
Nineteen year-old Eisha Dixon in a phone inter-
view with The Tribune yesterday said her mother
met Bodie in the Bahamas and they arrived togeth-
er in South Florida four years ago.
"I just moved in with my mother four months
ago," said Ms Dixon. "I grew up with my grand-
mother and I moved in with my mother to get
ready for college."
She said that she and her mother were forming,
a closer bond during the short time they had togeth-
er before her mother was killed,,and she had loyed
her dearly despite the time they had spent apart.
"I love my mother. I wanted to be with her," Ms
Dixon said. "She didn't deserve to die like that, and
I don't know much about Gary, but I am sure he
did it."
Ms Dixon said that her mother had argued with
Bodie almost every evening, and just last week
the family had to call Hollywood police to report
him for domestic violence.
Detective Carlos Negron confirmed yesterday
that police are searching for Bodie, and they sus-
pect he may have fled to the Bahamas.
"I am so glad that you are calling from the
Bahamas," said Ms Dixon. "From what I know he
has a wife and daughter there and they may be at
risk as well."
Ms Mays had worked at American Express in
Plantation, Florida, and her supervisor Viveine


plished much while in the
Bahamas, but earned the
public's respect in the
process.
"I just hope I leave the
Bahamas with the kind of
reputation he left with," Mr
Rood said.
Mr Schechter told his for-
mer colleagues that return-
ing to the Bahamas was
"like coming home."
He told The Tribune that
he had returned to visit the
many friends he had made
during the time as ambas-
sador.
Mr Schechter praised Mr
Rood and the Embassy staff
for their gracious reception.
He called the new ambas-
sador "a gentleman" and
said he is confident he will
do an excellent job.


Tapper told the Miami Herald that Ms Mays had
said she wanted to end her relationship with Bod-
ie.
Ms Tapper stated: "She was trying to leave him
but she was afraid he might hurt her. She would say
'Wherever I go, he'll follow me, he'll find me.' "
Yvonne Henry, best friend of Ms Mays told
police she received a call from Bodie the same
day her friend was killed.
According to Ms Henry, Bodie called and said:
"Come over to the house and see what I've done,
I burned the place with Donnet inside."
When police officials arrived at the apartment
complex, Ms Mays' body had been burned so bad-
ly, they had to take dental impressions in order to
identify her.
Assistant Commissioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson said that Bahamian police are not aware of
the incident and as far as he knows, American law
enforcers have not been in touch with the Com-
missioner directly.
"This happened almost two weeks ago so we
should have received that information already,"
said, Mr, Ferguson. "We have a good relationship
Sixth international law organisations and we usually
get the information right away."
Mr Ferguson said there are a number of ways
that Bahamian police can be contacted in order to
co-operate with any investigation, and he is eager
to hear more about the case because if the
suspect is Bahamian, he may be wanted in con-
nection with other crimes.
Mr Ferguson said that some matters go through
the American Embassy in Miami which are fil-
tered to police through foreign affairs representa-
tives, and may take some time before it reaches top
police officials.
The Bahamas is a member of The International
Criminal Police Organization (Interpol), which
maintains a large database charting unsolved crimes
and both convicted and alleged criminals.
The Bahamian police force can contact one or
more member nations by sending a message
relayed through Interpol.


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US Ambassador: Bahamians





h we respect for law and order


N II * | I*I V


Arres warant ssue







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, l-'A L 3


THE TRIBUNE


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff
Report
POLICE are investi-
gating a missing persons
report at sea after a
boat on its way to Cat
Island caught on fire
and all but one crew
member made the swim
to shore.
Superintendent Hulan
Hanna reported that
they received a call
around 7.15pm on Tues-
day evening from the
three survivors who
filed the missing person
report for Patrick
Ferguson of Yellow
Elder.
Dencil Evans, 35, of
South Beach Drive;
Ricardo McCardy, 35, of
Garden Hills; and
Charles Pierre of Mar-
ket Street, told police
that in the area of Ben-
net's Harbour, Cat
Island, their 21-foot
boat caught fire and
their attempts to extin-
guish the flames had
been unsuccessful and
the destroyed boat
sank.

Swim
Mr Hanna said that
the men then decided to
swim to the nearby
beach area, but Mr Fer-
guson was the only one
who did not make it.
The crew reported that
Mr Ferguson was a
strong enough swimmer
to make the five minute
swim, and one crew
member, who was a non-
swimmer, successfully
made it to shore.
A United States Coast
guard helicopter was
involved in the search
that police say com-
menced Tuesday
evening, and reported
no sign of Mr
Ferguson.
Mr Hanna said Mr
Ferguson is still consid-
ered missing.
There is no update on
the search for Mitch
Rolle, who went missing
at sea January 24, off
the north-eastern coast
of Acklins and officials
have given up hope to
find him alive. Volun-
teers are continuing to
search the beach for his
body.


FOR311A IILWI -



Tpoical Ex i
PE2215


Fred Mitchell: CARICOM won't




back El Salvador's candidacy


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
WHILE CARICOM contin-
ues in their deliberation as to
who should take over the lead-
ership of the Organisation of
American States (OAS), the
bloc has said that is definitely
opposed to El Salvador's can-
didacy.
Speaking with The 'Tribune
from the China-Caribbean
forum in Jamaica yesterday,
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell said that although no
decision has been made by
CARICOM, the organisation
has decided that it will not back
El Salvador's former President
Francisco Flores who is sup-
ported by the United States.
The US feels that the leader-
ship of the OAS should remain
within Central America.

Consensus
"At the last heads of govern-
ment meeting we reached no
consensus but it is very clear
that CARICOM will not sup-
port El Salvador," said Mr
Mitchell.
CARICOM will therefore be
choosing between Mexico's
Foreign Secretary Luis Ernesto
Derbez and Chile's Interior
Minister Jos6 Miguel Insulza,
said Mr Mitchell.
Mr Insulza, who is in Jamaica,
was to meet Mr Mitchell yes-
terday.
"No decision will be made
until the next heads of govern-
ment meeting in Surinam but
at the moment the Bahamas has
not made up its mind," the min-
ister added.
This meeting is expected to
be held from February 16-17.

Relations
However, Mr Mitchell said
that the Bahamas was partial to
Mexico because of the good
relations between. :the, -two:,
nations,.but said it was too ear-
ly to say what the final word
will be.
In the meantime the candi-
dates for the top OAS position
are realising the importance of
courting CARICOM, which has
14 votes to offer in the upcom-
ing election.
Mr Insulza addressed the
OAS permanent council on
Tuesday in Washington, DC,
and presented his platform to
lead the organisation.
Other Chilean officials are
also concentrating their efforts
in the Caribbean.
The Santiago Times yester-
day reported that on Tuesday,
Mr Insulza met for lunch with
the 14 CARICOM ambassadors
to the OAS, before flying to
Jamaica, the first of eight
Caribbean nations he will visit
in the coming days.


D 3] ER PANES* ECORTIV
PILW US&BDCVR


Chilean President Ricardo
Lagos is also expected to travel
to the Caribbean later this
month to lobby for Insulza at a
meeting of CARICOM to be
held in Guyana on February 19.

Elections
The US is pushing for elec-
tions to take place by the end of
the month.
A candidate must receive 18
votes to be elected, but the
Chilean has so far only received
support from Argentina, Brazil,


BIG


Venezuela and Uruguay's Pres-
ident elect Tabard Vazquez,
who will start his term on
March 1.
"I don't think it would be
good to anticipate the elections,
since the Caribbean hasn't
made up its mind yet," Insulza
told The Santiago Times.
Meanwhile, Chilean Educa-
tion Minister Sergio Bitar is in
Haiti and on Tuesday met with
the prime minister of the inter-.
im government, Gerard
Latortue, to lobby for Insulza's
candidacy.


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most active countries in the
peacekeeping efforts on the
troubled island state since
March 2004, when former Pres-


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* Haiti's first democratically elect-
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WAR' launched



to highlight



women's rights

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The Grand Bahama Human Rights Asso-
ciation has officially launched WAR (Women Against
Rape) to highlight the importance of women's rights in the
Bahamas, especially in instances of rape, sexual abuse
and domestic violence.
Human Rights Association president Lawyer Freder-
ick Smith said the association's WAR Committee will act
as vanguard for women's rights speaking out against injus-
tices, discrimination, disrespect, abuse, inequality, and
unethical behaviour toward the nation's women.
"We hope that with this WAR Committee of the GB
Human Rights Association the women of this nation will
be begin to be heard," Mr Smith said during a town meet-
ing on Tuesday evening at Workers House to discuss the
current rape issues and concerns of women.

Equality
lpiming that the PLP has never really stood for wom-
e -'s iglits for years, Mr Smith said it was thePELP that
mobilized the nation against the constitutional referendum'
for equality between the sexes for women rights.
Mr Smith said it is appalling that in this era women
should have lesser rights than men, especially when women
represent more than 55 percent of the voting population.
"We are declaring WAR on government it is a war
for rights; a war that is beginning to develop an educa-
tional process about women's rights. And WAR will be
going from island to island promoting women's rights and
inspiring women to come together to denounce abuse," he
said.
"Women Against Rape stands not just for women who
have been raped, but stands for all of women's rights in
this country. It stands for equality, respect and fair treat-
ment of women, it stands for due process the most sacred
of rights."


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


EIOIAULTTRSTOTH6 EITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Work must be




done on Marsh




Harbour Airport


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE Marsh Harbour Inter-
national Airport is a national
disgrace. It was.too small
when it was built 20 years ago
primarily for Bahamas Air. It
is now the second busiest air-
port in the Bahamas with 16
scheduled airlines as well as
hundreds of private and char-
ter flights.
I have been writing letters
for years to the proper author-
ities and have participated in
countless meetings and plan-
ning sessions through two
changes in Government
administrations! I now have
lost my patience and seek the
help of the media.
I think I speak for all Aba-
conians when I say I am
ashamed and embarrassed of
Marsh Harbour International
airport. We all are tired of the
proposed plans and broken
promises.
What message are we send-
ing to our visitors our bread
and butter? Welcome, thank
you for spending your money
here! We can't even offer
them a seat or a space for their
bag as they wait for their
flights. Passengers have to
push and shove and trip over
each other's bags to reach an
undersized counter. They
often have to wait for hours
standing up in stifling, crowd-
ed conditions or outside in the
sun or rain.
Sir Stafford Sands, the
father of tourism for the
Bahamas often said that the
first and lasting impression a
visitor gets after arriving in
our country was from three
sources: Immigration, Cus-
toms, and Taxis. The Marsh
Harbour Airport is ruining
any chances of anyone else
making a good impression no
matter how hard they try.
Think about it the hot,
crowded airport terminal
lounge is the last memory of
their Abaco visit. To think
how hard we all work from
taxi drivers, to hotel front desk
clerks to wait staff and bar-
tenders, shop owners, fishing
guides, etc, to ensure our
tourists have a fabulous stay
and come back and the Marsh
Harbour International Airport
is sabotaging all the good
deeds and hard work of the
Bahamian people. I can't for-
get the dedicated airline
employees and bag handlers
who are working in sub-


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human conditions, day in and
day out. This is ridiculous and
the situation has to change,
immediately!
We have over 1,000 hotel
rooms/rental cottages and
another 1,000 marina slips in
just Marsh Harbour, Hope
Town, Man-O-War and Gua-
na Cay. We are growing in
leaps and bounds and the air-
port needs to be a part of this
expansion.
The other big issue for me, a
retired pilot, is the safety. For-
tunately we have the best fly-
ing conditions in the world but
there is too much uncontrolled
air traffic vying for. the same
short, rut-pocked runway that
also serves as the only taxi


way It is barbaric and only by
the Grace of God have we
not killed anyone or been shut
down by the US Department
of Aviation as unsafe!
In my experienced opinion
it is just a matter of time
before we have a serious acci-
dent and I will take no plea-
sure in saying, "I told you so!"
Marsh Harbour Interna-
tional needs another passen-
ger terminal, taxi way and a
control tower. No more pro-
posals! No more promises!
DO IT NOW, before it's too
late.

LEONARD M
THOMPSON
Retired pilot, hotelier,
politician,
Still a Proud Bahamian
Abaco,
January 17, 2005.


Caution on


membership

EDITOR, The Tribune.
AFTER the dismal performance in support of full member-
ship in CARICOM and CSME by Ambassador Leonard Archer
the public should be extremely cautious as to the sweat-talking
that seems to be developing from the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs where they suggest because there is no perceived neg-
ative in joining CSME, then we should have no fears. Eco-
nomic development, job creation are not conditional on whether
there is a fear-factor.
Listening to Ambassador Archer on Parliament Street it was
obvious that the Ambassador does not have any comprehension
of our Constitution and suggested strongly to challenges of
attorneys Delaney and Thompson that a Referendum would not
be required.
What can we say how Caribbean direct investment has ben-
efited us? We can look at the purchase from the Government,
FNM, of the hotels Ambassador Beach and Royal Bahamian for
bargain basement discounts.
We must look to the amalgamation of Barclays Internation-
al with CIBC and the choice of Bridgetown, Barbados as the
corporate headquarters although it is well known that the
Bahamian operation creates the most profit to the group.
Ambassador Archer did not state how the reduction of Cus-
toms duties in preference to CARICOM goods would be made
up? Income Tax?
There is no one CARICOM country with a similar economy
and financial structure that we have developed to our benefit.
Unfortunately Prime Minister Ingraham at the first Americ-
as Conference in Miami when FTAA was floated signed on
without any consultation predictions are that the chances of
FTAA moving forward are narrowing daily.
J WILLIAMS
Nassau,
January 24, 2005.




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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 5
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3,2005, PAGE 51
LOA EW


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
IN THE event that the
Bahamas is chosen as the
venue for the next
"Tradewinds" military exer-
cise in April, the country
could see up to five million
dollars worth of investment.
Hosting the annual mili-
tary exercise, a joint effort
by maritime and naval
forces from the United
States, Europe and the
Caribbean region, could
mean major revenue intake
for the Bahamas.
Addressing the topic of
the training exercise during
Tuesday's meeting of the
Rotary Club Nassau, Act-
ing Minister of Foreign
Affairs Vincent Peet
announced that the event
"should pump significant
monies into our economy."
Yesterday Minister Fred
Mitchell told The Tribune
that the annual exercise is a
significant event and the
Bahamas is making an effort
to meet the deadline to be
selected as the venue.

Forces
"At the moment this is
proving to be a little diffi-
cult, however, as we are try-
ing to bring all our forces up
to par before the deadline,"
Mr Mitchell added.
The minister explained
that the main theme of this
year's exercise will be to
ensure that all maritime
units develop the necessary
skills for anti-terrorism oper-
ations.
He further said that the
exercise would bring eco-
nomic benefits, as the coun-
tries participating in the
event will spend money in
the Bahamas through "items
they purchase and invest-
ments they make in our
infrastructure."
Acting foreign affairs min-
ister Peet said that "alone
the fuel that they will pur-
chase for their vessels, will
mean profit for the'
Bahamas."




THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 3


2:00am
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Community Pg./1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
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Ethnic Health America
CMJ Club Zone .
Gospel Video Countdown
Treasure Attic
This Generation
Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
Kids On The Move
ZNS News (Update Live)
Cybernet
Holy Hip Hop
One Cubed
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Da' Down Home Show
The Darold Miller Show
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Pg./1540


I


ii


$67,735 has been spent





on repatriation in January


I By CARA BRENNEN MINISTER of Bahamas for many years and said Mr Peet also refuted claims that
Tribune Staff Reporter Immigration Vincent Peet while the subject is very emotional, last week's melee in Nassau Vil-
(Photo: Mario Duncanson) persons have to take a rational lage was a direct result of immi-
THE Bahamas has spent $67,735 position, and not overact. gration. I do not subscribe to that,
in repatriation cost for the month He said that there are many and we should not incite people to
temirUlO. aiL.u.... n..h -aLet ....... a .... I.......


of January according to Immigra-
tion Minister Vincent Peet who
said 430 illegal immigrants were
returned to their countries so far
this year.
In a press conference held yes-
terday, Mr Peet said that of that
number, 388 were Haitian nation-
als, 31 Jamaicans, four Colombians,
three Guyanese, three American,
and one was Mongolian.
Mr Peet said his ministry
remains committed to working with
its partners, The Royal Bahamas
Police/Defence Forces and the
United States Coast Guard, to


"stem the flow of illegal immigrants
to our shores."
This combined effort resulted in
362 illegal immigrants being sys-


eLmIcaLly alppretenoale, U.processe
and taken to the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre so.far this year.
Of that number, 293 were inter-
dicted at sea and 69 on land. 328
were Haitians, 22 Jamaicans and
12 other nationalities.
They were apprehended
throughout the country, on New
Providence, Athol Island, Rose
Island, Inagua, Highbourne Cay
and Long Cay off Exuma.
As of yesterday, 46 detainees
remain at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre: 29 Cubans, sev-
en Haitians, two Jamaicans, two
Dominicans, two Philippinos, two
Sri Lankans, one Nigerian and one
American.
Mr Peet added that in 2003, the
government spent $678,000 on
repatriation, compared to $52l,000
in 2004.

Economic
Mr Peet said the country
remains greatly concerned by the
current political instability and eco-
nomic deprivation in Haiti which
means that until conditions in that
country improves, the Bahamas
will become a magnet for Haitians
in search of a better life.
"No other country in the region
would benefit more from Haiti's
political stability and economic
prosperity than the Bahamas."
He added that the Bahamas has
become the newest member of the
International Migration Organisa-
tion, which allows it to utilise all
of the resources of that body in
determining the best way forward
to combating the problem. In addi-
tion studies are being done to
determine exactly how many illegal
persons are in the country.
However, he said the Haitian
problem has been with the


Haitians or persons of Haitian
decent who are in the county legal-
ly and deserve, the benefits of that
status.
They have also blended into the
community and serve in the uni-
form services and other vital parts
of the community. From the gov-
ernment's standpoint, he said, the
primary goal is to apprehend those
persons who are in the country ille-
gally.


overreact."
He reiterated his belief that
while there needs to be sensitivity
training for persons dealing
with the detainees, the investiga-
tions into claims of brutality
among the migrants were unfound-
ed.
He said that instead of criticising
the Bahamas' efforts, international
organisations should make contri-
butions to help the country.


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
SHarbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


'Public awareness'



needed to deal with



illegal Haitians issue

By PAUL G. TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
STATING that the illegal Haitian communities of the
"Mudd" and "Pigeon Pea" should be examples of how problems
escalate out of control when they are simply overlooked, Cas-
sandra Davenport, a member of the Bahamas Forum, said that
a pro-active approach is needed to rectify this social issue.
Ms Davenport said that only through public awareness and
interest, can anything really start to happen on the issue.
"We need to spark public interest, so that people get involved.
Ultimately it's going to be the Bahamian 'public that has to
deal with the illegal Haitians, the point is we believe in a peace-
ful solution to the problem, but do they?" she said.
In the 2000 Census Report, the population of Abaco is listed
at 13,170 people. It is estimated that there are some 1,500 hous-
es in the Mudd alone, and each house is averaged at containing
six persons, bringing the Haitian population in the Mudd area
alone to over 9,000 people,
"Bare in mind that other pockets of settlement by Haitians
exist in Abaco, some only identifiable by air or by travel deep
within the pine forest," she said.
Dr David Allen, speaking on the issue said that we must
never forget that the Bahamas has benefited tremendously
from the massive contribution by honest hard working Haitians
in helping to build the economic structure of our country.
"The fact is that at times when'Bahamians refused to do
certain jobs, our brothers and sisters from Haiti came in and
filled a very important gap, and played an essential role in the
development of the country," he said.
Dr Allen mentioned however that there is no doubt that
hostility of Bahamians towards Haitianis seems to be growing,
because of what he terms "a competition for limited resources."
"The fact is some of our Haitian immigrants do very well in
school and there is a feeling of fear among residents that they
will eventually take over the country and Bahamians will be dis-
placed. This was a real concern among many Bahamians we
talked with, who feared that we will become like the Fiji Islands,
where Indians migrated and eventually displaced the local peo-
ple in running the country," he said.
Ms Davenport said that the problem we now face is how to fix
this "looming disaster" and avoid an uprising. She added that
these migrant workers were granted work permits for a specif-
ic amount of time, but have simply overstayed their approved
time in the Bahamas.
"The people themselves are accountable for having over-
stayed their approved time here. It is incumbent upon the hold-
er of a work permit to leave this and other countries, once the
time specified under that permit has expired. In this country and
others, such people are fined or imprisoned and subsequently
deported.
"Can a group of Bahamians decide to settle in Bermuda,
Jamaica, Barbados or the Cayman Islands? I think not. Each
island mentioned would have routed the Bahamian group in
short order. Are their any pockets of illegal Haitian nationals
resident in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, or the Cayman
Islands? The answer is no. So why are they in the Bahamas? I
think it is simply because we allow them to stay," she said.


6 GaiUARDIAN

INSURANCE
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on Friday, February 4
to allow all staff to attend
the company's
Annual Awards Day.


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NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes! I








PAGE THUSDAYFEBRARY 3 2005THE TIBUN


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* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
CORAL reefs in the
Bahamas face the threat of
being ruined forever as man-
made emissions are weaken-
ing them and damaging their
delicate ecosystem.
The results of scientific
studies which were released
this week show that in as little
as 30 years, the world's coral
reefs will begin to collapse,
the likes of which could have a
devastating effect on every liv-
ing thing in the ocean.
Also, the economic conse-
quences for nations that rely
on coral reefs could be seri-
ous, researchers say.
Nursery
Coral reefs attract tourists,
serves as a nursery for fish-
eries and buffers small island
states against the waves.
The Bahamas Reef Envi-
ronmental and Educational
Foundation (BREEF),
warned these latest
reports are critical for the
Bahamas.
Spokeswoman Casuarina
McKinney said the Bahamas
finds itself in a position where
although the country's emis-
sions output is very small, it
and other island states suffer


Results of study

released this week


the most from large industrial
countries.
The Bahamas' closest neigh-
bour, the United States, is said
to be the world's biggest con-
tributor of greenhouse gases.
The US has yet to sign on to
the Kyoto Protocol, a United
Nations global agreement
which seeks to achieve quan-
tified emission limitation,
hence curbing the climate
changes caused by industrial
societies.
Scientists say the ocean is
soaking up about half' of all
man-made carbon dioxide.
While the ocean's removal of
carbon dioxide from the
atmosphere has slowed global
warming, the sink effect is
changing the oceans chem-
istry.
Scientists say the result has
slowed the growth of plank-
ton, corals and other inverte-
brates that serve as the most
basic level of the ocean food
chain.
Researchers from the Unit-
ed States, Europe, Australia,
South Korea, Japan and other


nations have now completed
the most comprehensive sur-
vey of ocean carbon chem-
istry.
Diverse
"This ecosystem, which is
the most productive and
diverse in the ocean, is going
to disappear," Professor
Jonathan Erez told the BBC.
This critical issue was dis-
cussed in Mauritius last year at
a conference designed for
Small Island Developing
States (SIDS).
For the Bahamas, there was


recognition of the fact that
coral reefs must be protected
as they act as barriers from
hurricanes.
Also, the conference recog-
nised the establishment of the
Exuma land and sea park. The
department of fisheries is in
the process of establishing five
more marine park sites around
the Bahamas.
Ms McKinney said the
country and the world at large
must be willing cut back on
the use of diesel and gasoline
for cars and generators, for
example.
She said there are alterna-
tive sources of power, such as
the sun and the wind,
which must be further
explored.
Also, the Bahamas should
encourage its neighbours
to sign the protocol, she
advised.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005








THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEW


on


million to be spent




ousing subdivisions


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
THE government will spend
$85 million in 2005 for 22 new
housing subdivisions and 1,043
homes, Shane Gibson, Minister
of Housing and National Insur-
ance, announced on Monday,
January 31.
Minister Gibson, who has
responsibility for the Bahamas
Mortgage Corporation, was
speaking at the official ground-
breaking ceremony for the con-
struction of the corporation's
new $5.9 million headquarters.
Minister Gibson said that
since assuming office in May,


"To this Government, it is not
just a cliche that a man's home
is his castle. As a caring and
compassionate Government
we take that saying very
seriously and it is our sincere
desire to provide affordable
housing for all Bahamians."

Minister of Housing Shane Gibson


2002, the Government has con- subdivision," he said. and will soon break ground
structed in excess of 600 houses He said the Government has within the next two weeks for
in New Providence and hun- spent $2 million for the con- construction of an eight-unit
dreds more are "on the drawing struction of 25 homes in Moss rental complex in the St Cecelia
board" for New Providence and Town, Exuma, and another $1.2 Constituency.
the Family Islands this year. million is earmarked for the
e construction of 15 homes in a Budget
Hom es new subdivision to be called
Moss Town II. "In this 2004/2005 budget, the
He said that in New Provi- Another 10 homes at a cost government increased the
dence in 2005, new homes will of approximately $800,000 -- are amount allocated for public
be built in Jubilee Gardens III, to be constructed for San Sal- rental housing from $500,000 to
Golden Isles I and II, vador, while his Ministry is wait- $1 million. The amount allocat-
Carmichael I and II, Fire Trail ing for land grants to be ed for repairs to public rental
Gardens I and II, and Millenni- finalised for housing subdivi- units was increased to $800,000
urn Gardens II. sions in Pineville and Nicholls from $300,000, and the amount
"This totals 680 new houses Town, Andros, and Governors budgeted for small house
to be built at a cost of approxi- Harbour and Lower Bogue, repairs rose to $500,000 from
mately $59 million," Minister Eleuthera. $300,000.
Gibson said. The Minister said homes are And this, of course, shows the
He said in Grand Bahama, also being constructed on scat- government's commitment to
another 221 homes are to be tered sites in Bain and Grants providing affordable housing,
built in Sunset Subdivision, Town and Farm Road con- in all categories, to residents in
West Heights and East Coral I stituencies as part of the ongo- The Bahamas," said Minister
and II, at a cost of $17.7 mil- ing efforts to improve and beau- Gibson.
lion. tify the inner cities of New He said his Ministry and the
Minister Gibson said homes Providence. Bahamas Mortgage Corpora-
will be built in Abaco at a cost He said the Government will tion have reviewed the housing
of $2.7 million, and will include soon begin construction of subdivision development plans
the construction of houses at houses on scattered sites in the and are in the process of send-
Central Pines and Spring City, St Cecilia, Fort Charlotte and ing a request to Cabinet for
and the sale of lots in Sandy Englerston constituencies, the additional bonds to fund the
Point and Central Pines. initial phase of which will cost projects.
"We have already sold all 100 approximately $227,000. "As you know all of our
lots that we developed last year Minister Gibson said his Min- funds are raised through the
in the Sandy Point Subdivision ist has just completed the con- issuance of bonds, once they're
and we .aeaftbout. tf ~.. -' igy limin Ir~ht thl approvedd by the House of
constructob 'iast tret Southi Assembly. We've already


exhausted the last $35 million
as approved by the House, and
we're in the process of apply-
ing to the government to issue
bonds in amounts of around $50
million for the completion of
these projects," Minister Gib-
son said.
He said his Ministry has
already signed 58 contracts to
complete housing repairs in
New Providence, with more
expected to be signed soon.

Future
Minister Gibson said the
Government sees a "glowing
future" for the Bahamas and its
plans for 2005 can be consid-
ered "a grand achievement and
promised fulfillment."
With the amount of con-
struction planned by the gov-
ernment, it was necessary to
construct a new facility for the
Bahamas Mortgage Corpora-
tion to facilitate its clients.
The proposed building will
be built on a site east of the
Ministry of Works building on
John F Kennedy Drive, and will
house the Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation, the Department
of Housing, the Ministry of
Housing (the proposed Hous-
ing Corporation), the Urban
Renewal Commission
and the Unit for Transforma-
tion.
Minister Gibson said it will
be the first time in the history of
the Bahamas that all the agen-
cies connected with housing will
be housed under one roof.
"To this Government, it is not
just a cliche that a man's home
is his castle.
"As a caring and compas-
sionate Government we take
that saying very seriously and
it is our sincere desire to pro-
vide affordable housing for all
Bahamians," he said.
The Minister said the build-
ing, scheduled for completion
by July 2006, will make it more
convenient and less time con-


suming for customers.
"When this facility is open for
business, it will further enhance
the government's vision of pro-
viding quality homes for all
Bahamians and it will ade-


quately serve this and future
generations," he said.
A Bahamian company,
Holiday Corfstruction and
Builders, has the contract for
the project.


I Valet / V


$85


Dcrions







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


Is


the


FTAA


dead?


* PART ONE

BY NOW I believe
that most of you
know that "FTAA" stands
for Free Trade Area of the
Americas, which is an ambi-
tious proposal to integrate the
economies of 34 democracies
in the Americas, stretching
from Canada in the north to
Argentina in the south.
If created, the FTAA
would be the world's largest
trading bloc, consisting of
some 800 million people and
some $12 trillion.
Its chief promoter is the
United States of America,
which initiated discussions at
the Summit of the Americas
in Miami in 1993. The agree-
ment was to be concluded by
January this year and brought
into force by year's end.


STRAIGHT UP TALK

Z H IVAR GO LAING


In my book, Who Moved
My Conch? Understanding
the Implications of Free Trade
for the Economy of The
Bahamas, I expressed doubts
about meeting this deadline
and so said, so done. Is the
failure to meet the FTAA
deadline, however, a sign that
the proposal is dead? I say
definitively no.
From its inception the
FTAA was plagued with
resistance, from within and
without. Many countries
negotiating the agreement
expressed trepidation early
in the process. Countries like
Brazil and Venezuela had


concerns about it, primarily
because they felt that many
of their industries could not
compete with the US in a
completely open trading envi-
ronment.

Small countries like
those of CARICOM
had issues because they
feared that not sufficient con-
sideration might be given to
the disadvantage that the
smallness of their economies
would pose in such an enor-
mous trade arrangement, par-
ticularly given the difficult
economic adjustments they


Only the short listed candidates will
Thank You..


be contacted -


would have to make.
Add to this a growing and
increasingly more organised
opposition to globalisation in
general, and the perceived
economic ,colonialism of
transnational or multi-nation-
al corporations in particular.
Few of the meetings of the
FTAA and other global trade
meetings mounted by world
governments were met with
impressive resistance by anti-
free trade forces. No doubt,
countries participating within
these trade discussions that
had issues of their own used
the external pressure applied
by anti-globalisation and anti-
free trade movements to
advance their cause. To some
extent they were successful.
Today, the FTAA as ini-
tially proposed or envisioned
is only a shadow of itself.
Since the Miami Meeting of
Trade Ministers in 2003, the
proposal has been dubbed
"FTAA Lite", referring to
the significant modification
of the original proposal,
which was intended to be
comprehensive and a "single-
undertaking," meaning that
the final agreement was to be
one in which nothing was
agreed until all was agreed;
that is, all-or-nothing, take it
or leave it.

T his would be the case
in any of the nine
negotiated areas: market
access, agriculture, services,
investment, government pro-
curement, intellectual prop-
erty, competition policy, sub-
sidies, anti-dumping, coun-
tervailing duties and dispute
settlement.
However, the uproar of the
Miami Trade Ministers Meet-
ing necessitated a compro-
mise in order to prevent the
negotiations from falling
apart. As a result ministers
agreed to an "FTAA lite",
which introduced significant
flexibility, in that countries
could choose which areas
under negotiation they would


negotiate and undertake.
The ministerial declaration
notes: "Taking into account
and acknowledging existing
mandates, ministers recognise
that countries may assume
different levels of commit-
ments...In addition, negotia-
tions should allow for coun-
tries that so choose, within
the FTAA, to agree to addi-
tional obligations and bene-
fits."

ince Miami, little has
happened in the
FTAA process. In fact, since
April, 2004, no official new
developments have taken
place. The principal manage-
ment body of the FTAA
process, the Trade Negotiat-
ing Committee (TNC), has
not met since February, 2004,
which has made it impossible
for other technical groups to
meet because the TNC has to
set the parameters for their
discussions. From all appear-
ances, the FTAA is pafal-
ysed. But does this mean that
it is dead.
In my book, I predicted
that the FTAA would not
come into force in 2005 but
would come into force in
some form or the other per-
haps in 2007. I still believe
this. What is eventually
achieved may not even be
called the FTAA but it will
promote the intent of the
FTAA, which is freer trade
between the countries of the
Americas. Why?
First, the reasons that drove
the US to pursue the FTAA
remain unchanged.
America still wants to
open new markets for its
goods and services.
America still wants to
remove barriers that hinder
its exports.
America still wants to
bring WTO enforcement
rules to bear on trade in the
region.
America still wants to,
remove what it regards as
unfair trade practices.


These are powerful eco-
nomic motives for America
and they are driven by pow-
erful alliances between
America's political establish-
ment and its business com-
munity.
Multiple billions of dollars
in profits and political capi-
tal are at stake and as long as
that is the case, there will con-
tinue to be a push for free
trade, even if its name is no
longer the FTAA.
Even as we speak, the US
pursues something called the
Transatlantic Business Dia-
logue (TABD), which seeks a
Barrier-free Transatlantic
Marketplace (BFTM)
between the US and Europe.
Canada pushes on with
aggressive talks with China
and Latin American countries
continue evolving their inte-
gration arrangements'
between themselves.
Even CARICOM is imple-
menting one of the most com-
prehensive regional integra-
tion efforts in the world, the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) despite
ambivalence among some of
its members, including The
Bahamas.
These are clear signs that
the objective of freer trade
remains on the agenda of
national economies, even if
the regional integration
efforts are met with some
hurdles. No, free trade is not
dead; it is only waiting its turn
to find a form palatable to all
the political factions.
(Excerpt from Speech given
by Zhivargo Laing at Rotary
Club of Lucaya Luncheon,
February 1, 2005, Freeport,
Grand Bahama)
THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
Nothing perpetuates a
movement like the pursuit of
profit.
zhivargolaing@coralwave.com
www.pldsystems.com


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CI Gibson students 'celebrate


excellence'


during exhibition


* By TIFFANY GRANT
STUDENTS of the C I Gib-
son school have combined the
creativity of art work, technical
studies, and home economics, in
a two day exhibition called "Cel-
ebrating Excellence in Techni-
cal Studies, Home Economics
and Arts."
The display, which is set up in
the school's auditorium, features
students work in cosmetology,
cookery, artistic drawings, car-
pentry and electrical work. This
is the first time the school has
put on a display of this magni-
tude.
Vice Principal of the school
Nevelon Gaitor said that the idea
for this venture came after the
Ministry of Education had can-
celled their exhibition, due to the
hurricanes, where the various
schools would have participated.
He said that as a means of


"It is basically to show
positive things about C I
Gibson. We do not want all
negative, but would like to
create a balance so that
persons coming to this school
will know that there are good
things we have here as well."

Vice Principal Nevelon Gaitor


encouragement for the students
it was decided that they will put
on their very own exhibition.
"It is basically to show posi-
tive things about C I Gibson. We
do not want all negative, but


would like to create a balance so
that persons coming to this
school will know that there are
good things we have here as
well," said Mr Gaitor.
Charmaine White, a home


economics teacher, said that stu-
dents are interested in her subject
because with the Bahamas being
a tourist oriented destination,
many students are interested in
working in the hotels.

Skills
"Doing home economics is a
chance for them to apply some of
the skills needed to work in the
hotel industry. We not only pre-
pare food, but they learn how to
do table setting and how to speak
properly, among other things,"
she said.
Over at the electrical engi-
neering exhibit were a group of
energetic boys who were eager to
illustrate their display of the elec-


trical work that is needed for a
house. Step by step Dwight
Major, a student, explained how
electricity is transmitted through
a home and also offered some
advise on how hard work can
pay off.
"You must have confidence
that you can do it and hope that
you can stay in it. You have to be
consistent in class. Not because
you got an 'F' in that class you
are going to say 'no man this
does not work for me', you have
to keep working at it. As you
work at it you will see more
progress," he said.
Education Officer at the Min-
istry of Education Sharon Fer-
guson said: "I believe that home
economics education is an area
that allows students to develop a


multiple of skills. The incorpo-
ration of cosmetology is a
demonstration of the fact that
there are skills that are interre-
lated across the board and can
be used for various careers," said
Ms Ferguson.

Encouraged
"I think it is a very important
area in the school's curriculum,
which needs to be encouraged
and appreciated more by the
general community. As we look
at what is happening around us
we recognise that the technical
and vocational subjects are real-
ly the foundation and strength
of our national economy," she
said.


*Nw w -


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Syndicated Content -.

Available from Commercial News Providers"

*


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 9


o o-


** *


- dm -


o


qw,






PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2004
SAVA.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
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' s. ________ _________


Travel deal



agreement



with China


FROM page one

Minister Leslie Miller and
Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin.
The delegation also signed a
trade agreement which is
expected to offer numerous
new opportunities for the
Bahamas in terms of manu-
facturing and producing more
goods in the country and sell-
ing them for the export mar-
ket.
The Chinese will assist
Bahamians in establishing
training programmes for pro-
ducing souvenirs and hand-
crafts as well as training in the
fields of agriculture and ani-
mal husbandry.
The Bahamas also expects

FROM page one
rubber bullets.
The incident followed
repeated claims of physical
abuse by guards at the deten-
tion centre.
The Cubans have claimed
that they did not start the
fire, which broke out after an
escape attempt by three
Cuban nationals.
One Cuban detainee, 33-
year-old Alexi Leon Ortuota,
told the Miami Herald last
month: "They beat us like
dogs. They don't give us soap
or drinking water. They give
us nothing."
According to the article,
detainees also claimed that
some guards forced persons
in their custody to eat off the
ground, raped two women,
and subjected two Cubans to
mock executions.
Immigration Minister Vin-
cent Peet said he would
appoint an inter-ministerial
task force to investigate the
allegations
A government statement
claimed the Miami Herald
article was "not a proper
description of what happens
at the detention centre, nor at
the prison."
The minister said the gov-
ernment had "nothing to
hide," and had completed an
investigation into earlier alle-
gations of abuse and laid the
findings on the table of the
House of Assembly.
Mr Peet pointed out that
the Bahamas has been placed
in the middle of a migration
problem not of its own mak-
ing, but has tried its best to
deal with the situation.
However, he said the prob-
lem has drained the country
of much needed resources
which should have gone
toward national social issues
instead.
In addition, he said, the
country had just suffered the
ravages of two hurricanes,
further stretching the coun-
try's budget. He said the
Bahamas should be receiving
sympathy rather than criti-
cism.


to sign a civil aviation agree-
ment with the communist
nation, which will focus on the
establishment of direct flights
from Beijing to the
Caribbean.
The summit is already con-
sidered a landmark for future
development for island
nations of the region.
During his address to the
gathering, Mr Mitchell point-
ed out that about 25 year ago,
China experienced a deliber-
ate and conscious paradigm
shift, with respect to the man-
agement of its economy, using
sound scientific principles.
And today, this initiative has
resulted in the evolution of
the world's most dynamic
economy which, in the fore-
seeable future, will grow from
strength to strength and exert
a profound and positive influ-
ence on global commercial
activity.
For the Bahamas' own part,
he said, the country is on a
path of social, political and
economic development which
would urge the Bahamas away
from chronic dependence on
the former colonial powers
and bring it into an inter-
dependent relationship with
new and emerging powers
such as South Africa, India,
Brazil and the People's
Republic of China.


"It is at this juncture that
the paths of China and the
Bahamas converge, as both
countries set out in quest of
unprecedented prosperity for
their peoples," said Mr
Mitchell.
Chinese investment in the
Bahamas has already totalled
over $1 billion.
Twelve Caribbean countries
are participating in the trade
forum, including Cuba.
The Chinese delegation is
headed by Zeng Quinhong,
vice-president of the People's
Republic of China.
Mr Quinhong is accompa-
nied by a large delegation,
including the vice-ministers of
foreign affairs, finance and
commerce, as well as the
chairman and president of the
export-import Bank of China
and a number of leading
entrepreneurs from the Chi-
nese business sector.
The prospect of creating
trade ties with China have
excited many in the economic
sectors throughout the
Caribbean region. During the
first 11 months of 2004, China
invested about $890 million
abroad.
Mr Mitchell said the forum
marks the beginning of a new,
productive phase in the eco-
nomic development of the
Caribbean.


The

Usd

M OM. ~


)ELI

rTERS -


MEDIUM
EACH

S399


THE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY
is offering limited Bursaries
for Bahamian-Music Students
(voice or instrument)
for
September 2005.
These Bursaries are available
For either The College of The Bahamas
Or other Approved Colleges.


MUSIC BURSARY

Application forms may be obtained from the
Music Department of The College of The Bahamas
Or by post from The Nassau Music Society,
P.O. Box N-1129, Nassau
(irncludeself-addressed stamped envelope)

Applications must be submitted
No later than 31st, March 2005


THE TRIBUNE









PAG 1, HU Y BRUARY 3, 2005 THE TRIBUNINEERNIONA S .1


nan


warns


Sudan


OVCiCopyrigh'teid Materialigs


Syndicated Content --


.w 41W


Available from Commercial News Providers".
-


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-4b-


We are seeking historical
photographs on:


Bahamian


* Lifestyles
(rum-running, sponging, family
scenes, church etc;)


* Architecture
(colonial buildings,
homes etc)


hotels, island


Timeline: from 1850's to 1970's

Black & White photos preferred.

We wish to buy the photos & prefer
original copies

Contact: (242) 424-1585


S


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Upw..- mom o -i .m.-

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When: February 18 & 19, 2005 Where: British
IN THIS PROGRAM YOU WILL LEARN TO:


Colonial Hilton Nassau, Bahamas


* Solve problems in your organization
*Challenge assumptions, change perceptions and generate solutions
* Apply creative thinking in new product development, marketing strategies, quality programs, customer
service and organizational conflicts
* Use strategy to promote efficiency and effectiveness
* Foster innovation within your organization


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS


BUSINESS CENTRE


We are looking to find a suitable applicant
to fill the position of a
Business Machine Trainee Technician
Candidates must have the following:

Resume
Certificate in a related field
Valid driver's license
Current Police Certificate

Only suitable applicants need apply.
Please forward resume and copies of necessary certificates to:
Human Resources
Business Machine Technician
#284 Bay St.
or fax to (242) 328-4365




VERSACE / CHOPARD
UNLEASH YOUR POTENTIAL
Sales Manager Ladies fashion

SALES ASSOCIATES
Competitive salary plus excellent benefits.
You live for fashion. What you don't know about leading fashion
brands isn't worth knowing. And crucially, you have proven
your sales and management ability at the highest level. All of
which means that this is the perfect opportunity to make you
mark at the cutting-edge of fashion, working with the most
prestigious brands and designer names in one of the most
renowned retail environments in the world.
It goes without saying that you must be as passionate about sales
and service as we are. And rest assured, if you share our high
standards, we'll reward your insights and initiative with a first-
class remuneration package that includes 50% discount off
clothes and jewelery worn for work. So if you can deliver the
high quality service we've built our reputation on, please bring
your, Resume, Photo ID, Police Record, Reference letter.
To: Versace Boutique
Crystal Courts
Atlantis
Anytime After 4:30pm
Or: The Colombian
Down Town
Next to First Caribbean


I
II


a -
a -~ ~- __
S.
a - a S. a -
0 0 0 -
- a a


- 4-M 444- -


THE TRIBUNE .


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


o


0


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0 Q







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas one of few countries with


'handle'


on HIV/AIDS epidemic


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
MINISTER of Health and
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel told a pilot Prevention
of Mother-to-Child Transmis-
sion of HIV Curriculum train-
ing workshop on Monday that
statistics show that the
Bahamas is one of a few global
countries that "seems to have a
handle" on the HIV/AIDS epi-
demic.
The workshop, hailed as a
"landmark event" by sponsors,
organisers and participants, is
being held at the SuperClub
Breezes Resort. Delegates
from seven regional countries
are attending the workshop
including host country the
Bahamas, Antigua, Barbados,
3uyana, Haiti, Jamaica and
rrinidad and Tobago.

Statistics
Dr Bethel said statistics show
:hat the country has recorded
Decreases in a number of areas
:ritical in the battle against the
-pidemic, among them, the
lumber of new cases of HIV
nfections over the past five
years; a reduction in mother-
to-child transmission from 30
per cent to two per cent over a
ten-year period, and a reduc-
tion by almost 50 per cent in
the number of persons dying
from complications associated
with the disease, due to
increased access to antiretro-
viral therapy.
The numbers of persons
receiving antiretroviral therapy
has increased over the past two
and one-half years from 300 to
more than 1,600.
"I am told that the workshop
is being held here so that you
can experience, first hand, our
successful National HIV/AIDS
programme, and the story of
-our national programme is one'
that I am truly proud of and
enjoy telling its story," said Dr
Bethel.
"It is also a story that


* DR MARCUS BETHEL, MINISTER OF HEALTH
AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES


demonstrates what could hap-
pen when one combines strong
political will with education,
effective partnerships and,
indeed, hard work and has now
become a blueprint for other
programmes in the health sys-
tem here in the Bahamas," Dr
* Bethel added.

Evidence
. "We in The Bahamas feel'
that we have shown definite
evidence of turning the tide
against this huge problem that
is devastating the lives of mil-


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The Lyford Cay Foundation is pleased to announce
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Application forms available from all secondary school
guidance counsellors, C.O.B.

Financial Aid Office or through the
Lyford Cay Foundation,
P.O. Box N-7776, Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline for completed applications is
March 31, 2005


lions of persons around the
world and is indeed wreaking
havoc on the health systems
and economies of hundreds of
countries globally," Dr Bethel
added.
Dr Bethel said that the high
priority given the epidemic by
successive governments of the
Bahamas since 1985 has been a
major catalyst behind the coun-
try's successes in the battle
against HIV/AIDS.
He said the strong leadership
and dedication of Bahamian
medical professionals led by
National HIV/AIDS Director
Dr Perry Gomez, has
been "immeasurable and price-
less" in the fight against
HIV/AIDS.

Providers
"As a matter of fact, it is our
health care providers who are
in fact at the heart of our suc-
cesses here in The Bahamas,"
Dr Bethel said.
"Added to this is the tremen-
dous support from government
ministries and agencies, non-
governmental organisations
such as the AIDS Foundation,
the Samaritan Ministries, the
All Saints Camp and the Zon-
ta Club, the business commu-
nity and of course internation-
al support organisations such
as the Clinton Foundation, the
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pital stays by patients and that
the establishment of a pool of
trained counsellors has helped


"I am told that the workshop
is being held here so that you
can experience, first hand, our
successful National HIV/AIDS
programme, and the story of
our national programme is one
that I am truly proud of and
enjoy telling its story."
Dr Marcus Bethel


the programme the success it
has become," he said.
Dr Bethel said the decen-
tralisation of voluntary coun-
selling services has led to a
decrease in the length of hos-


to reduce the demand for those
types of services from staff at
the HIV/AIDS Centre, while
enhancing the integration
process of HIV care into com-
munity health centres.


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Email: sanpin@hotmail.com

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Invites Application for the following position:

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The successful applicant should satisfy the following minimum
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> Tertiary level education in Business, Marketing or Management.
> Have a minimum of 3-5 years experience in retail environment.
> Have experience in retail merchandizing.
> Computer skills Microsoft WORD, EXCEL. Knowledge of a
retail point of sale system would be an asset.
> Ability to work varied shifts (including evenings/weekends
and holidays)
> Knowledge of the tourism product would be an advantage.
> Must have excellent interpersonal and leadership skills.
> Proven track record in building and working as a part of a
team..
> Pursue excellence in customer service
> Excellent oral and written communication skills are essential.
> Creative ability, visual display and merchandising skills are
a necessity.
>- Must be able to supervise & motivate a retail sales team.
> Outstanding ability to negotiate and foster strong supplier
relationships.
> Ability to meet and exceed corporate targets; must be profit
oriented.
> Owner of a reliable motor vehicle would be an asset.
Applications should be emailed or faxed to:
GENERAL MANAGER
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Cable Beach, Nassau
P.O. Box CB13005
Fax: (212) 327-6961
Email: wbullard@srb.sandals.com
Applications close on Monday, February 28, 2005.



























SCHOOL The International School of The Bahamas
accredited by:
Council of International Schools
New England Association of Schools and Colleges
...""" International Baccalaureate Organisation
4 world school



Applications invited for 2005/6 Year

Vacancies exist at all levels (PS through year 13/grade 12) but limited space for
the Early Learning Centre and years 7 to 10 (grades 6-9). Early registration of
students advisable at all levels.

International Baccalaureate Organisation Primary Years Programme

A new ultra-modern Library, Research and Information Technology Centre

A beautiful purpose built Early Learning Centre, opened in 2002

BGCSE examinations at end of year 11

Over 80% A-C BGCSE passes every year since 2001

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme years 12 & 13

Outstanding extra curricular activities

Fees for 2004 -2005 range from $1,335/term for preschool to $3,350/term for
years 12-13

Visit our web site and call to arrange an appointment to find out more about our
programmes and visit the school

Contact:
Mrs Sally Varani-Jones
Director of Admissions
Telephone: (242) 324 2621 Fax: (242) 324 0816
E-mail: SVarani-JonesCalst-andrews.com
Web site: wWw.st-andrews.com











BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently seeking a
Bahamian national for the position of

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP OFFICER


Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Officer must have banking or financial
degree and at least 7 years private banking experience in the offshore banking sector,
be fluent in Spanish &/or Portuguese, have knowledge of international investment
instruments & money markets, ability to partner with team members, must be confident
regarding customer relations, investments & portfolio management and have thorough
knowledge of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international
banking practices.

Personal qualities

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work independently with minimal supervision
Financial and analytical background
Able to lead and supervise
Interest in development of PB products and marketing
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities:-

Service & advise customers
Supervise account relationships in Latin America
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors or agents
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking professionals
Meet deadlines on timely basis


Deadline for receipt of applications is February 21,2005.

Resumes should be faxed to #702 1253 or mailed or delivered to the offices of BSI,
addressed to:-
Personnel Officer
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.


project, we help with that as
well. Everything, we provide is
free of charge," he added.
Mr Sears added that every
other Saturday, they hold pro-
gramme meetings, where the
children get to meet and listen
to motivational speakers from
all walks of Bahamian life,
including Pastor Myles
Munroe, and the 'Golden
Girls', Tonique Williams -Dar-
ling and Debbie Ferguson.
"I want them to be motivat-
ed so that they know that hard
work pays off," he noted.
At the end of each year, Mr
Sears holds a gala awards pre-
sentation.
Competition
Last month, studefits com-
peted in a speech competition,
"How can we prevent students
from dropping out of school,"
and an essay competition,
"What can we do to rid our
community of drugs."
In addition awards including,
round trip tickets to Orlando,
and computers were awarded
for the most improved GPA
students, overall excellence and
attendance. If their schools per-
mit, the winners are treated to
a special assembly in their hon-
our.
Mr Sears said that last year's
assemblies generated much
interest among students and
said so far, he has received
more than forty applicants. He
said that there are more boys
than girls enrolled and said
children need avenues to steer


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


LOA NW


'Encouraging students to





reach their full potential'


Ivan Kent Sears Students Academic Achievement Award Programme in its sixth year
i M 1


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
WITH violence and under-
achievement prevalent in
schools today, one concerned
citizen has made it his mission
to encourage students to reach
their full potential.
Ivan Kent Sears grew up in
the Englerston community and
benefited greatly from the
senior citizens in the area who
served as his role models.
Now years later, as the suc-
cessful head of I&S Backhoe
Services Company, Mr Sears
felt compelled to do something
to give the area's students, who
he saw as duckingg school", a
sense of direction.
"I thought I would put
together a programme which
would provide children with an
incentive to learn," he said
explaining his motive for cre-
ating the Ivan Kent Sears Stu-
dents Academic Achievement
Award Programme.
The programme, in its sixth
year of existence, caters to ele-
mentary, junior high and high
school students to monitor
their academic progress and
has grown from six students to
more than sixty.
"Once the parents consent
to their child being in the pro-
gramme, we also inform the
school. We have a homework
centre at my company, where
they come in Monday through
Friday and get help with their
homework from a staff of vol-
unteers and if they have to go
somewhere to do research for a


(Photo: Mario Duncanson)
them in the right direction
The programme also helps
children get summer employ-
ment, as last summer 40 par-
ticipants were able to secure
jobs at First Caribbean Bank.
Last years winners included:
Overall Excellence Winner
Widline Guillaume, a ninth
grade student at DW Davis, as
elementary school speech and
essay winner; Eric Carey, a fifth
grader at Columbus Primary;
Terrance Carey, a ninth grade
student at A.F. Adderley, who
was the junior winner of speech
and essays; and Nicoya John-
son, an eleventh grade student
at Mount Carmel Academy
who also won both categories
for the senior division.
Speaking with The Tribune,
Nicoya and Widline, said their
GPAs have gone up signifi-
cantly and they feel that they
are reaching their full poten-
tial. As for the boys, Eric and
Terrence said the programme
has helped to improve their
weak subjects and they are
looking forward to continuing
the programme through high
school.
Mr Sears said they hope to
award at least one graduate of
the programme, a four year
scholarship to Midtown Uni-
versity in Tennessee.
An Informational session
will be held on February 5, for
new students who wish to join
the 2005 school year session.
For additional information on
enrollment or programme
activities, people are asked to
call: 322-7250.


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT





The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. wishes to advise that
it will commence disconnecting services for all accounts with
overdue balances, and ceasing services to accounts with no activity
for three or more months beginning Monday, February 14, 2005.

Customers whose services are disconnected will have their security
deposits applied to the outstanding charges, and will be required
to apply for a new account and pay a new deposit and reconnection
fee.

As a result, both cellular and landline subscribers with outstanding
balances on inactive accounts are urged to safeguard their services
by contacting the Credit & Collections office, JFK Drive to make
payment agreements.

Payments may be made at any BTC cashier counter as well as any
branch of Royal, Scotia, British American and First Caribbean
Banks, as well as Finco Bank Line. Subscribers are also reminded
that for their convenience, BTC's Mall at Marathon office is open
on Saturdays to facilitate bill payment during the hours of 10:00am
to 5:00pm.


* PICTURED (l-r) are Terrance Carey, Nicoya Johnson, Eric Carey and Widline
Guillaume with their trophies from the award programme.


I





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 15


ntroducing new daily jet service from Nassau!


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segment is defined as one takeoff and landing; (b) up to $18 per round trip in local airport charges; and (c) September 11 th Security Fee of $2.50 per enplane-
ment originating at a U.S. airport, up to $5 per one way or $10 per round trip. International and Puerto Rico fares do not include government taxes and fees of
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THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3,2005 THE TRIBUNE


r A, A RIBBEAN


Defiant Fidel Castro slams


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Family Guardian marks


'.1 1 ,** .


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2005
marked the Family Guardian's 40th
anniversary as an insurance company that
has served Bahamians with commitment
throughout the decades.
Speaking at the anniversary cocktail
reception at the British Colonial Hilton on
Tuesday evening, President and Director
of Family Guardian Patricia A Hermanns
addressed members of government, the
financial services sector, as well as share-
holders, policy holders and business asso-
ciates, reiterating that the "Family
Guardian is a company that was born and
bred in the Bahamas."
Founding member, Chairman and CEO
of Family Guardian Norbert F Boissiere
recalled how he and his co-founders the
late Jack Knowles and the late Roscow
Pyfrom, as "three confident young men"
set out 40 years ago to start their own
insurance company.
"On February 1,1965, Roscow and Jack
opened our first office on Madeira Street
in the Palmdale district, while I did the
same on High Street of Bridgetown, Bar-
bados," he noted.
Mr Boissiere thanked- all those who
have played a role in the Family Guardian
story including policy holders, providers of
service to the company, members of staff


"Many events have occurred in the life
of the Bahamas over the past 40 years
and through it all Family Guardian has
delivered on its promises to its policy
holders and has remained true to its
original objective to provide high quality
products and service to its customers at
all levels."

Director of Family Guardian Patricia A Hermarins
past and present and he expressed spe- Further outlining the company's histoa
cial appreciation for the sacrifices of the ry, Mrs Hermanns said that Family
families of the company's staff. Guardian had grown to include not only
Mrs Hermanns added: "Many events large ordinary life insurance policies, but
have occurred in the life of the Bahamas also health insurance through the launch
over the past 40 years and through it all of Bahamahealth, annuities and mort-
Family Guardian has delivered on its gages.
promises to its policy holders and has "And we will continue to expand our
remained true to its original objective to product lines in order to adapt to the
provide high quality products and service changing needs of the 'insuring public,"
to its customers at all levels," she noted. the Family Guardian president assured.


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or online at.www.lyfordcayfoundation.com
DEADLINE TO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MAY 1, 2005


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


m


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


- .


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 17


~~:


Mal







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


BLbAES


'Reading fever'


at


Jack


Hayward High School


0 By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services
FREEPORT, Grand Bahama
- In a moving ceremony that
showcased two Bahamian pub-
lications, the Minister of Edu-
cation's Book Club was offi-
cially launched at Jack Hayward
High School last Thursday.
Jack Hayward High is the
first Family Island school and
the second Bahamian high
school to embrace the pro-
gramme.


"We have started something
that we hope will transcend
Grand Bahama and spread
throughout the Bahamas," said
the principal Benjamin Stubbs.
"The children here have a
passion for reading.
"We hope that through their
interest and their development
in reading they can also
improve their academic stan-
dards."
Through February, required
reading for the Club are Beulah
Richmond's 'Anancy and
Friends'; 'Living in the Light of
Hope: A Nation Speaks of


HIV/AIDS'; and Jamaica Kin-
caid's 'Lucy'.
Education Minister Alfred M
Sears noted that it was the
"power of the written word"
that sustained him during his
"painful sojourn" at the Boys
Industrial School, an institution
for delinquent youngsters.
"Had I not taken the decision
in the Boys Industrial School to
make reading a central part of
my daily activity," he said,
"more than likely I would not
have made it through. I would
not have been able to accom-
plish my dreams.
"The more you read the more
likely you will write. Tell your
story."

Accompanied
Minister Sears was accompa-
nied by Permanent Secretary
Cresswell Sturrup, Deputy
Director of Education Cecil
Thompson, Deputy Director of
Education Patricia Collins,
Assistant Director of Education
Damaris Thompson, and Dis-
trict Superintendent Hezekiah
Dean.
The school's patron, Francis
Singer-Hayward, threw her "full
support" behind the Book Club.
She is the wife of Sir Jack Hay-
ward, chairman of the Grand
Bahama Development Compa-
ny, after whom the school is
named.
"I told Minister Sears I will
support this programme in any
way I can because I feel that it is
so terribly important," she said.
"There is no way that I can
possibly express Sir Jack and
my great pleasure and pride, as
avid readers and appreciators
of literature, that our beloved
school is involved in support-
ing such a wonderful pro-
gramme as this.

Excitement
"I hope the Club will grow in
enrollment here and that our
school library will soon be filled
with all these wonderful books
that we are being encouraged
to read so that it too will
become a place of the hope,
promise and excitement to our
students, which I experienced
in my youth," said Mrs Singer-
Hayward.
The Club at Jack Hayward
High held its first official meet-
ing on November 24 with a
membership of 28 students and
11 teachers. To date there are
49 students and 21 teachers.
"We are bursting at the
seams," boasted Delores Kell-
man-Jones. "We have exceeded
what is considered the norm for
the size of a book club. That is
so because our attitude is to
encourage and encourage.
"Eventually we will have to
break into smaller groups so
that the Book Club discussions


EDUCATION Minister Alfred Sears and Jack Hayward High patron Francis Singer-Hay-
ward are welcomed by students for the launched of the Minister's Book Club.
(BIS photo: Gladstone Thurston)


can become more effective.
"There is a reading fever on
campus and it is contagious
among the students, teachers
and administrators," said Mrs
Kellman-Jones.
Threat
With electronic alternatives
posing the biggest threat to
reading, principal Stubbs and
his team are counteracting
forcefully.
"We are putting a lot of
emphasis on our teachers in get-
ting our students to see the
vision," he said. "We have the
television, DVD and video
games, but we feel. that those
forces can be counteracted in


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the classroom, teacher to stu-
dent.
"We are happy that the Min-
ister had the vision to institute
this Book Club and we are
excited to be a part of the pro-
gramme."
Minister Sears said there was
"a hunger among our students
for constructive intellectual
engagement and this club
demonstrates that once the idea
is launched people will basical-
ly be carried by the power of
literature.

Spirit
"All of the (selected) books
are books of redemption. They
show the human spirit over-
coming difficult circumstances.
They show that you cannot
imprison the spirit of a people.
. "These are important lessons
to aid our young people as they
encounter difficulties, peer pres-
sure, violence, abuse at home,
that they can survive, that there
is an alternative and that they
have it within themselves to
realise all their dreams.
"I am very pleased and I want


to commend the administrators
and the teachers and
students of this school for lead-
ing the way on Grand
Bahama."
Deputy Director, Mrs Collins
said students read the required
text books, and they will read
manuals or instructions.
"We are trying to take it to
the stage where persons are
reading simply for the plea-
sure," she said. "We want stu-
dents to realise that reading is a
source of refuge, an escape, a
worthwhile hobby.
"It is a challenging task there-
fore the book Club committee
has to select books that students
can identify with. The selection
is crucial given the many dis-
tractions that the youngsters
face."
"I am so proud of this school
and I love it so much," beamed
patron, Mrs Singer-Hayward,
"and I think that all of the stu-
dents know that I consider them
to be a member of my Family,
Sir Jack and I both do. We love
them and we love the school. It
is our passionate commitment
to the school."


Quantam Jazz 1400
Wheel Chair, Multi
Positions &
Adjustments Battery
Operated.
(Motorized) Go any
where by yourself.


2003 Dodge
Caravan, converted
as shown for
Disabled Person,
easy wheel chair
access. Loaded
only 4,000 miles.


w


DIVIDEND NOTICE




CIB
COMMONWEALTH BANK


TO ALL "C" PREFERENCE
SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank
Limited has declared a Semi-Annual Dividend for
shareholders of record at February 15, 2005, payable
February 28, 2005, as follows:-

"C" Preference 8% per annum (paid semi-annually)

The payment will be made on February 28, 2005,
through Colina Financial Advisors Limited, the Registrar
& Transfer Agent, in the usual manner.

Charlene A. Pinder-Higgs
Corporate Secretary


v l lIDAv
'4t-


All You Need is a Van. I can install the lift and I
also have the scooter. Go to your destination,
then use the scooter to maneuver (Like the Mall)



Cal Sands 3634.5


ZC~L~.TF~I-~?_;:II I;-iiil--






LOCAL NEWS


$1,000 donation

for Cancer Society
THE Nassau Amateur Operatic Society recently donated $1,000 to the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas to honour the life and memory of Mr Sidney Brown. Pictured left to right are Judy Ward-
Carter, President of the Cancer Society, Lesley Cancino, Secretary of the NAOS and Susan
Roberts, Treasurer of the Cancer Society.


TOWN CENTRE MALL




































































Best Choices, Best Deals!



Todhunter-Mitchell-Caves VillagelBahamas Wines & Spirits-Shirley Street/Wholesale Wines & Spirits-East West HighwaylChez Thierry, Butler & Sands-JFK Drive
Harbour Bay Liquor-Harbour Bay Shopping CentrelBeverage Depot Vintage-Roundabout, Cable Beach
GRAND BAHAMA
RND Liquor Store-RND Plaza/Butler & Sands-Queen's Highway/Seahorse Liquor Store, Seahorse Plaza
ABACO
A&K Liquor Store-Queen Elizabeth Drive, Marsh Harbour
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. NO FURTHER DISCOUNT APPLICABLE ON THESE ITEMS.
PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.

i i









ai *


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


Tractebel


offers


$40m


to


relocate cruise ships


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
A senior official
with Tractebel,
part of a con-
sortium seeking
approval for a
liquefied natural gas (LNG) ter-
minal on Grand Bahama, said
the company had "undertaken"
to provide $40 million to fund
the relocation of Freeport Har-
bour's cruise ship terminal to
ease government fears about
any 'accident impacting the
tourism industry.
Jim Ebeling, Tractebel's vice-
president of business develop-
ment and project manager for
its proposed Calypso LNG


pipeline and terminal in
Freeport Harbour, told The Tri-
bune the Government was con-
tinuing to review information it
had requested.
This, he said, followed the
release of the Sandia Study,
which looked at potential risks
to LNG facilities, both from an
operational standpoint and acts
that were considered intention-
al, such as terrorism.
Mr Ebeling said one of the
reasons that Tractebel had long
made the decision to establish
its LNG terminal, which will be
situated at the old Bahama
Cement site, at a certain mile
radius away from Grand
Bahama residents was to ensure
their safety in the unlikely event
of any accident.


'Undertaking' aims to ease

government concerns on

LNG safety implications

for the tourism industry


As for terrorism, Mr Ebeling
said company officials felt con-
fident that LNG plants had not
been identified as possible ter-
rorist targets, and believed it
was highly unlikely that any
group would target a US-based
LNG terminal.
Following the Bahamian gov-
ernment's request for addition-
al information, Mr Ebeling said


Tractebel officials had submit-
ted the Sandia Study and other
documentation to the Bahamas
Environment, Science and
Technology (BEST) commis-
sion.
He added: "We believe we
have answered all the issues
related to any environmental
concerns, or concerns that
might come up during the con-


struction period. We've been
asked about specific issues
based on this newly-released
information in regard to the
safety and security of residents.
That is one of the reasons we
took such a large parcel of land
to provide a buffer.
"As for the potential impact
on the tourism industry, which
is so important to the economy,
Tractebel has undertaken to
provide financial support of up
to $40 million to relocate the
cruise port to another part of
the island, to assuage any con-
cerns or feelings of misgiving
that the Government may have
had. We're very sensitive to the
perception of risk and we're
working with them."
However, Tractebel and the


other two companies seeking to
build an LNG terminal and
pipeline from Grand Bahama
to Florida, have effectively
hedged their bets on which of
the two proposed sites will win
government approval.
Tractebel has linked up with
a Florida Power & Light (FPL)
subisdiary and El Paso Corpo-
ration to combine their devel-
opment resources, minimising
risk and financing costs for all.
Ultimately, only one of the
Calypso and El Paso Seafarer
projects will be constructed
depending on government
approval, with Tractebel and El
Paso affiliates being the equity
owners of the pipeline, and
See GAS, Page 3B


Allyson Maynard-Gibson congratulates Family Guardian for its 40
years of service to the Bahamian people.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

Star acquisition

was 'marriage

made in heaven'


Governor laments



Retreat's failure to



debate focus of



financial services


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
Despite describing the Exu-
ma Retreat for Bahamian
financial services executives as
a useful exercise, the Central
Bank of the Bahamas gover-
nor said more time should
have been spent trying to
arrive at a consensus on what
the sector's focus should be


going forward. As a result,one
of the Retreat's more impor-
tant objectives was not
achieved.
In an interview with The
Tribune, Julian Francis said
he had hoped that more time
would have been given to the
development of new products
and the focus of the industry
going forward.
"I would have hoped that
we would have been able to


spend more time seeking to
arrive at some agreement as
to any further changes to what
the focus of the financial ser-
vices sector should be, the
products and focus going for-
ward. I had hoped more time
would be given to those issues
and I regret it did not happen,"
the Central Bank governor
said.
See DEBATE, Page 6B


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ALLYSON MAYNARD-
GIBSON, minister of financial
services and investments, has
hailed Family Guardian's 2001
acquisition of Star Insurance
Company as "a marriage made
in heaven", given that the com-
pany's net income of more than
$3 million for the nine months
to September 30,2004, dwarfed
2003's $381,000.


While the minister's com-
ments, made at Family
Guardian's 40th anniversary cel-
ebration at the British Colonial
Hilton, may raise some eye-
brows in the insurance industry
given that it took until 2003 to
consolidate Star's operations
and policy portfolio, she-praised
the staff, management and
Board who "did their part to
make it happen".
See PARTY, Page 5B


Freeport Concrete

expects 'slight rise'

in first quarter sales


Bi' NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Freeport Concrete's chair-
man said the company expects
to report "a slight increase in
sales" for its 2005 first quarter,
due to the demand for building
supplies generated by Hurri-
canes Frances and Jeanne, even
though its Grand Bahama-
based Home Centre store suf-
fered storm-related damage
worth more than $1.3 million.
Writing in the company's
2004 annual report, Hannes
Babak, Freeport Concrete's
chairman and largest share-


holder, said hard work from
staff in the aftermath of the
September 2004 hurricanes
meant "we expect to report a
slight increase in sales for the
first quarter of fiscal 2005 versus
the same period last year".
Freeport Concrete generat-
ed just over $5 million in total
sales during the three months
to November 30,2003, the com-
parative period that the first
quarter of fiscal 2005 is up
against.
Although the company's con-
crete operations and Nassau-
See SELL, Page 3B


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Four easy steps



to make business



continuity simple


One of the barri-
ers to getting
started with
Business Conti-
nuity (BC) is
that it is perceived to be too
complicated. With the right help
and the right process, BC can
be easy.
Real-world experience has
helped us to view BC as a four-
step process: PLAN>EXE-
CUTE>MANAGE>REVIEW

Step 1: PLAN
Requirements Analysis >
Solution Design > Documenta-
tion of BC Plan
A requirements analysis is
conducted to assess how your
company wishes to recover after
an event, analysing corporate
objectives as well as critical
business unit requirements. For
example, what kind of failires
are you to trying to mitigate?


For these and more fantastic World Traveller offers, including flights from
Freeport, please call British Airways at 1-800-AIRWAYS, book on-line at
ba.com or call your travel agent by 11 February 2005.


BRITISH AIRWAYS


For sale until 11 February 2005 for outbound travel from 28 January 2005 until 13 June 2005. Minimum stay: 5 days,
maximum stay: one year. Tickets must be purchased 4 days after the booking is made, but no later than 11 February 2005. No
changes, upgrades or refunds allowed. One free stopover allowed in London where applicable. Valid on direct services only.
Weekend surcharges apply. This fare attracts additional taxes and fees, and bookings made via 1-800-AIRWAYS will be
charged an additional $10 fee. Other conditions apply.


How much downtime can each
of your divisions tolerate? In
today's climate, it is not uncom-
mon for companies to say they
need to be up and running with-
in 24 hours.
A solution is designed based
on the requirements analysis,
and this can be incorporated
into a phased approach -
focused on the areas of greatest
need to meet your budgetary
requirements.
Step 2: EXECUTION
Implementation > Accep-
tance Testing
To implement your BC Plan,
an internal Business Recovery
Team is created to work with
your BC consultants. As BC is a
business project and not an IT
project,-the Business Recovery,
Team will represent a broad
spectrum of your divisions.
Acceptance testing is crucial
to ensure that your BC Plan
meets business requirements. A
full test will include simulating a
failure, moving into recovery
mode and falling-back into nor-
mal operating mode.
Step 3: MANAGE
Monitoring & Reporting >
System Updates
You have your BC solution
completed. Sure, as of yester-
day it was fine, but what about
today? Regular monitoring of
the BC Plan identifies areas of
failure which can then be
addressed.
In particular, IT system
updates are essential to ensure
your IT systems continue to
support your BC Plan.


Step 4: REVIEW.
Semi-Annual/Annual Review-
It is one thing to keep yliur
recovery systems in readingssi
and it is another to ensure that
the solution still fits the chang-
ing needs of the business. ,'-r,
Semi-annually or annuailty
you need to review the require-.
ments of the company and busi-'
ness units. This process i~sto
identify significant changesqt-&
your business that could prpe
vent a full business recovry!
for example, a new business unit,
has been established. Aiy.,
changes are incorporated iqtop:
the BC Plan, enhancementLs
deployed and a full test of the
BC Plan undertaken.
There it is, four simple steps
tboybur BC Solutioh: '
PLAN >EXECUTE >MAN."
AGE and >REVIEW '*
Ensuring that your busiiie
recovers after a disaster dbes
not have to be complicated$.
With the right help, Busifiess
Continuity is a simple process,
To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail maki4-
gITwork@providencetg.cot .-
About the Author:., L:
Brian Hassan is the senior
vice-president of Consulting &
Advisory Services, a divisiotbof
Providence Technology Groupl
Mr Hassan has more than 20
years experience in IT strategy
and consulting in the Bahatias.
Providence Technology Group
is one of the leading IT firitis,
specialising in Networking Solu-
tions, Consulting & Advisory
Services and Software Solu-
tions.
;<' .3


To advertise in
The Tribune
call 322-1986


pI


Making IT work






Brian

Hassarn `-


PrvI dne
- IM il,][S~&&IoS1F*


NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that WALLESM
EMILE PHILIPPE of Fox Hill Road, is:
applying to the Minister responsible fdo
Nationality and Citizenship for
Registration/ Naturalization as a citizen:
of The Bahamas and that any person who:
knows any reason why registrationA,
naturalization should not be grantecd
should send a written and signect
statement of the facts within Twenty-eighC
(28) days from the 3rd day of February
2005 to the Minster responsible foi:
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-:
7147 Nassau, The Bahamas."


THE TRIBUNI\-


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005







THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 3B


ThE TRIBUNE


Bahamas name



.used by US firm



for 'fraudulent'



$7.5m share plat


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A US publicly-quoted com-
pany allegedly used a fraudu-
lent press release claiming it was
about to establish "a new dis-
tribution channel" in the
Bahamas for its bottled water
products as part of a massive
stock manipulation scheme that
netted the perpetrators almost
$7.5 million.
A lawsuit filed against
Queench, a New York-based
water product distributor, sev-
eral of its directors and their
associates, by the US Securities
and Exchange Commission
(SEC), alleged that the compa-
ny issued "11 false press releas-
es portraying itself as a thriv-
ing and dynamic company".
Apart from the Bahamas dis-
tribution channel release,


Queench's claims that it had
vendor and distribution con-
tracts with the US military and
other major companies were
decsribed the SEC as "outright
lies or gross distortions" of the
company's true state, as its net
income for 2002 and 2003 was
reported as $24,000 and
$152,000 respectively.
Two Queench directors,
brothers Lester and Lennox
Parris, and their sister, Lyndell,
used the Bahamas press release
and other claims to artificially
inflate the price of the compa-
ny's stock, selling 28.6 million
shares to companies controlled
by two other defendants, Joel
Ramsden and Michael Rao, for
$2.55 million.
The latter two then resold
those shares to unsuspecting
investors, pocketing more than
$4.9 million from the artificially


inflated stock price.
The SEC lawsuit described
the March 8 press release, in
which Queench claimed it had
launched a distribution channel
into the Bahamas for its bottled
water products, as a "fraudu-
lent statement".
"In truth, the company had
not established a distribution
channel in the Bahamas," the
lawsuit said.
The false press release in
question had described the
Bahamas as the "launching
pad" for Queench to market
and sell its products in the
Caribbean.
It said the Bahamas was par-
ticularly attractive because 40
per cent of all cruise ship pas-
sengers in the Caribbean
stopped in this nation, with five
million tourists visiting annual-


Gas (From page 1B)


Trattebel and FPL owning the LNG receiving
terminals.
-The $700 million Seafarer pipeline and gas ter-
tminal, if chosen, would be funded from a 70/30
debt/equity mix.
Ilowever, Prime Minister Perry Christie said
early last month that one of the LNG proposals
should be approved by the end of January, and
that the other would be given the green light
"imminently".
_ The Prime Minister indicated that the AES
Corporation project, slated for Ocean Cay off
Bimini, would be the first one approved after he
had taken a final look "at one or two figures" to
ensure the Bahamas maximised the revenue ben-
efitg from hosting LNG terminals. However, no
approval or Heads of Agreement has been forth-
coming.

Sell (From page 1 B)

based Robin Hood retail for- square foot fa
mat had largely escaped hurri- location in Fre
cane damage, Freeport Con- "We should
crete said the Home Centre had ness from this
suffered "significant damage". February 2005.
'..The total cost of the loss of tre anticipate
inventory, office equipment, operations at
furniture and fixtures was in new location la
excess of $1.3 million," chief Despite the
executive Ray Simpson and prevented thi
chief financial officer Darvin from operating
Russell wrote in the 2004 annu- main premises
al report. mat is likely to
.-.However, the company was significantly I
fully insured for all damages from the dem
and the Home Centre had materials front
'"recovered quickly" despite a tion companies
major portion of its leased store public.
remainingng in disrepair". In his assess
..Mr Simpson and Mr Russell reminded shi
wrote: "Meanwhile, to augment Freeport Conc
sales of building supplies with total group sal
oiln other merchandise, primar- over 2003, witl
ily-appliances, televisions, elec- improving slig
trical, plumbing and paint cent from 25.6
[Robin Hood products], we He added: '
have leased an additional 10,000 focused on co


On the Grand Bahama proposals, Mr Christie
said approval was likely to come if a suitable
location, away from Freeport Harbour, was found.
The LNG proposals have been under consid-
eration by the Government for some time.
In November, Mr Ebeling said the clock con-
tinued to tick at Florida Power and Light (FPL),
with the deadline for submissions of energy pro-
ject proposals that would help meet the demands
of the state's growing population needs, said to
have been in December 2004.
Mr Ebling said the security of supply was a big
question for FPL and time was of the essence.
He said the company was prepared to start
construction fairly quickly and, having gone
through the approval process with the Port
Authority, is just waiting on the Government
for a decision.



cility in a prime to improve our gross margin
eport.' e while simultaneously increasing
commence busi- our sales. It is our hope that this
location in early emphasis on profitability will
. The Home Cen- contribute to an improved stock
es resuming full price."
our current or a Freeport Concrete entered
ater this year." into a 10-year lease agreement
damage that has for the Home Centre's premis-
e Home Centre es when it acquired that busi-
ig fully from its ness, formerly named Builder's
s, that retail for- Depot, in August 2001. The
o have benefited agreement gave the company
post-September the option to renew for another
and for building 10 years, and another option
boandthconstruc- gave Freeport Concrete the
s and the general ability to purchase the building
ment, Mr Babak if its chose to do so.
areholders that This option became exer-
rete increased its ciseable on August 15,2004, just
es by 32 per cent before the hurricanes struck,
th gross margins with the purchase price set at
htly to 26.05 per $3.5 million less 2 per cent per
5 per cent. annum starting from June 1,
'We will remain 1998. The purchase option has
)ntinuing efforts been assigned to a sharehold-
er.
Monthly rental payments on
- i the Home Centre's damaged
1 1 --- -. ...


premises are linked to a US
Consumer Price Index, but can-
not amount to less than
$306,000 per annum.


SBAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGER
SAFETY & ENVIRONMENTAL DEPARTMENT
ENERGY SUPPLY DIVISION
A vacancy exists in the Energy Supply Division for a Safety and Environmental Manager.

The Safety and Environment Manager is responsible for implementing and maintaining best practices in Safety
and Environmental Administration and Operations within the Corporation. The manager will also advise line
managers on safety and environmental procedures and policies, focus on minimizing accidents, and injuries,
organize safety training, and monitor the safety and environmental practices of the Corporation.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Developing and managing Corporation-wide safety and environmental programs
* Developing corporate-wide policies and procedures on fire prevention
* Assisting and advising line Managers in developing departmental plans on fire extinguishing and controls
* Liaising with Insurance Companies and arranging safety inspections by Insurers Inspectors
* Performing safety audits of all Corporation facilities.
* Maintaining and updating Corporation-wide policy on employee safety rules and practices
* Advising on suitable methods of measuring corporate safety performance
* Directing and evaluating Contractors performing environmental work and projects
* Assisting and advising line managers in safety training and other safety matters
" Planning, organizing and conducting seminars and courses on safety topics
* Serving on special committeesinvestigating major industrial accidents
* Coordinating the preparation and the updating of the hurricane precaution plan
* Monitoring pre-hurricane season preparations and reports for Management
* Establishing goals and objectives for environmental compliance for the Corporation
* Ensuring that ALL Divisions comply with environmental regulations by defining environmental problems,
performing site surveys, inventory and record keeping control, secure relevant permits. Environmental audits,
contingency, planning provide recommendations for environmental compliance and evaluation of progress
* Identifying hazardous materials and establishing safe handling methods to minimize risk to workers and the
environment
* Maintaining and updating company policies and procedures related to Safety and the Environment within
the Corporation

Job requirements include:

* A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Occupational Health & Safety, Environmental Health or in a related
discipline
. A minimum of 5 years post-tertiary experience in an industrial safety and environment position
* Excellent leadership and management skills
* Strong Project Management skills
* Good interpersonal skills
* Strong judgement and sound reasoning ability
* Ability to interpret technical reports and drawings
* Sound knowledge of safety and environmental regulations, practices & procedures

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application Form to
The Manager, Human Resources & Training, Head Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Roads,
P.O.Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas, on or before Monday, February 14,2005.





FIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS LIMITED
A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

Fidelity is seeking to employ an
ASSISTANT SECURITIES TRADER

Minimum Requirements
3 years experience in the financial service industry
Bachelors Degree, preferably in Finance, Banking or Accounting.
Canadian Securities, Series 7 or International Capital Markets
Qualifications.
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent analytical skills
Proficient in the use of spreadsheet and database software


U


Primary Job functions
Provide market quotes and market information to clients.
Execute security trades
Manage client relationships
Conduct research on companies
Active monitoring and reporting of capital market developments

Remuneration & Benefits
Attractive salary and performance bonus
Group medical and pension plan
Interest subsidies on employee loans

Please forward cover letter and resume to;
Fidelity Group of Companies
P.O. Box N-4853, Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Human Resources Manager
Deadline: February 15, 2005.


JORDAN PRINCE
WILLIAMS
SBAPTIST SCHOOL


ENTRANCE EXAM


'If you want your child to learn in a safe,
productive High School Environment,


If you want your child to Excel in
Christianity, Academics and Sports


JORDAN PRINCE WILLIAMS

BAPTIST HIGH SCHOOL

IS THE PLACE!


Entrance Exams for Grade Seven (7)
Saturday, February 19, 2005
9:00am 1:00pm


For further information please contact
the Office between the
hours of 8:30am and 3:30pm


Telephone Numbers:

361-4847/9


m El


.a,.Colina. ol

Pricing Information As Of: F
02 February 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Todays Close Chane Daly Vol EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.39 1.10 Abaco Markets 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.197 0.000 N/M 0.00%
7.50 7.30 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 5.55 5.55 0.00 0.152 0.330 10.8 5.95%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 400 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.95 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.87 British American Bank 0.87 0.87 0.00 0.007 0.040 11.8 4.60%
7.47 6.30 Cable Bahamas 7.20 7.47 0.27 4,800 0.510 0.240 14.6 3.21%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 -0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.20 6.58 Commonwealth Bank 7.15 7.20 0.05 4,891 0.632 0.390 11.2 5.42%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.1 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.99 3.99 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.26%
9.87 8.10 Finco 9.75 9.87 0.12 6.810 0.649 0.480 15.2 4.86%
7.50 6.40 FirstCaribbean 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 7.95 Focol 7.95 7.95 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.2 6.29%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.32 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.16 6.32 0.16 0.245 0.000 24.5 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
13.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 16.00 1.328 0.960 10.5 6.86%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2060 1.1509 Colina Money Market Fund 1.205953*
2.0536 1.8944 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.1191**
10.2148 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648"****
2.1746 2.0012 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.174583**
1.0848 1.0823 Colina Bond Fund 1.084821."".
FINDEX: CLOSE 420,140 1 Y7D 12.2koiao00 10
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fideliqt
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ **** -AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
* AS AT JAN. 14, 2005/"** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ **** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
-r RT~AO,&5MALL:u A#m,.lp


I BUIES


1111








PAGE B, TURSDY, FBRUAR 3, 005UHEITIBUN


Family Guardian's headquarters after 40 years in the business.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

IVIUST SELL
;!! *'- :^^^^_^^^ .""" >--- .... . I. ....










Two Storey Commercial Building 4025 sq. ft.
Comprising a Motel with eight 1 Bed/1 Bath units and Two commercial stores on the ground
floor
Lot No. 151 8,704sq.ft. Bay Street, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
Interested persons should submit written offers to be received no later than February 28, 2005 to:
Commercial Credit Collection Unit
; .P.O.BoxN-7518
Nassau, Bahamas or
For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Manager (242) 335-1464 or (242) 335-1400 North Eleuthera or
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit Phone: 356-1686, 356-1685, 356-1608
Financing available for the qualified purchaser
Serious enquiries only



Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a
leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries and
over 100 million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of

APPLICATION SUPPORT

FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION
Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore
trust companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas,
Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and
Singapore. Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.
The Technology Department supports all locations and local applications
-of the business.
MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES
Production support of software for key application.
Provide application support technically to the business which
includes the detection and resolution of issues.
Assist application support Project Managers where
necessary.
Interfacing with the information security management
structure.
Management of risk and assist in coordination of audit.
KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED
SQL and Oracle programming and/or DBA experience, Visual
Basic, Citrix, Crystal Reports, Net, Win2K, Web technologies,
MS Office applications, DBMS knowledge, programming skills
in a windows environment.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with the business, internal and external vendor
management, and bug tracking.
Influencing and leadership skills.
Historic programming experience with languages and web
applications
2-4 years DBA hands-on programming experience.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR
Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com
Deadline for application is February 6, 2005.


One of the founders of Family Guardian, chairman Norbert Boissiere,
addresses its 40th anniversary celebrations.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)



GRAHAM, THOMPSON & Co.


COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW NOTARIES PUBLIC

is pleased to announce that


Erica Paine (Freeport)

and


Linda Beidler D'Aguilar (Nassau)

have joined the Firm as Partners.


Nassau Chambers
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O.Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas
Tel: (242)322-4130, Fax: (242)328-1069
Linda Beidler-D'Aguilar's email address:
Ibd@gtclaw.com


Freeport Chambers
The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O.Box 42533
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242)351-7474, Fax: (242)351-7752
Erica Poine's email address:
ep@gtclaw.com


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GROUP MAJOR
MEDICAL & LIFE INSURANCES SERVICES FOR
EMPLOYEES & RETIREES

TENDER No. 576/04
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of group major medical and life insurances services for employees and
their dependants and retirees.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 16 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 576/04
"GROUP MAJOR MEDICAL AND LIFE INSURANCES PLAN"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005







I -unaMnUMY, r-conumnmrr UUOv, r-prc OD


THE TRIBUNE


Family Guardian 40 years ago.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)


Party (From page 1B)


Focusing on the broader
financial services industry, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that
Bahamians must have a stake
in its ownership to ensure future
development and growth.
Adding that Family Guardian
had "more than ably demon-
strated that Bahamians have
what it takes to lead in financial
services", Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said:
"If this sector is to achieve
maximum sustained growth,
Bahamians must have a stake
in its ownership and the insur-
ance industry is certainly lead-
ing the way in this regard."
The minister described Fam-
ily Guardian as "leading the
way" in an "exciting revolution"
that involved insurance industry
consolidation through mergers
and acquisitions, plus the "blur-
ring of lines of distinction"
between insurance and full-ser-
vice financial services institu-
tions.
Consolidation in the Bahami-
an life and health insurance
industry has been led by Fami-
ly Guardian's chief rival, Colina
Insurance Company, which over
the past three years has
acquired Global Bahamas,
Canada Life (Bahamas), Impe-
rial Life Financial (Bahamas)
and Sagicor's Bahamian port-
folio.
And life insurance compa-
nies, through their offering of
products such as pensions,
annuities and mortgages, have
moved into territory tradition-
ally dominated by the major
commercial banks.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson urged
Family Guardian to put their
policyholders before profits,
adding that success was


"inevitable" if it did so.
She said she expected to see
"a thoroughly revitalised insur-
ance sector" emerge, helped by
the passage of the Domestic
Insurance Bill that was current-
ly before Parliament.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the legislation was expected to
create "a more cutting edge,
well regulated industry; one that
adheres to the highest interna-
tional standards of profession-
alism while offering new oppor-


Thinking about
move?


tunities for growth of industry
participants and higher levels
of protection for policyholders.
"Going forward it is our hope
that the proposed new legisla-
tion will go far to address the
concerns of both insurers and
policyholders to achieve a bet-
ter regulated industry, and that
the entire industry will aspire
to even higher standards of pro-
fessionalism and ethics.
"What is the value of insur-
ance one may ask? We need


your next career


KPMG in Freeport, Bahamas has a vacancy for a
Senior Auditor in its Audit Services Practice.
Candidates for the position will hold an
undergraduate degree in Accounting, a professional
designation recognised by The Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants such as CPA, ACA or CA and,
have a minimum of 3 years work experience in a firm
of chartered accountants. Excellent opportunities
exist to broaden your professional experience in a
varied practice that offers competitive salaries and
employee benefits.

Applicants should submit a r6sume to KPMG, P.O. Box F40025,
Freeport, Bahamas or kpmg@(abatelnet.bs by February 4, 2005.

AUDIT = TAX a ADVISORY
2004. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a
Swiss cooperative.


only look to the name of this
company to find that answer.
Insurance provides protection
and security for families. It
guards them against financial
catastrophes that may be pre-
cipitated by disease, death, acci-
dents, natural disasters and oth-
er unexpected events. Insurance
also provides savings instru-
ments for happier anticipated
events, such as education and
retirement."


KINGSWAY ACADEMY

ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be holding
Entrance Examinations for students
wishing to enter Grades 2 through 6,
on SATURDAY, MARCH 5 AND 19.


Parents are asked to collect
Application Forms from the
Elementary School office before the
testing date from 8:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.


For further information contact the


school at telephone


numbers


324-5049, 324-2158, or 324-6269


GN 162

4-4





CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) is a multi-lateral development finance
institution that works in collaboration with its Borrowing Member Countries to
promote sustainable social and economic development within these countries and
economic cooperation and integration among them. The Bank is currently seeking
to recruit nationals from its member countries for the following positions:

Director, Human Resources and Administration
Director, Information and Technology Management Services
Research Economist
Consultant Programmer/ Analyst

Full details on each position and general information on CDB can be found on
CDB's website: http//:www.caribank.org. The Bank routinely places information
on career opportunities on its website.



GN-155





MINISTRY OF

LABOUR AND IMMIGRATION

NOTICE

SALE BY TENDER

The following motor vehicle will be sold by Public Tender, as is,
where is:-

LICENCE MODEL LOCATION

7 1996 Dawoo Racer General Post
1657 S/N B662948 Office Building
S 6East Hill Street

Vehicle may be inspected at the Western Parking Lot, General
Post Office Building, East Hill Street between the hours of 9:00a.m.
to 5:00p.m. Monday to Friday.

Tenders should be sealed and marked "Tender For Motor Vehicle
and addressed:

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Labour and Immigration
P.O.Box N-3008
Nassau Bahamas

Tenders will be accepted until noon, Friday 11th February, 2005.
The right is reserved to reject any or all tenders.

Thelma Beneby (Mrs)
Permanent Secretary


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

CONSTRUCTION OF 34.5 KV "ASH", AAAC THREE-PHASE
TRANSMISSION LINE
CROSSING ROCKS, ABACO, BAHAMAS

TENDER No. 563/04
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
construction of approximately 16.5 miles of 34.5 KV "ASH" AAAC 3-phase
transmission line with all associated hardware mounted on single wood poles from
CROSSING ROCK to SANDY POINT, Abaco, Bahamas.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
.Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 23 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 563/04
"LINE CONSTRUCTION CROSSING ROCK, ABACO"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


IBUSINES


I








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


Debate (Frompage1B)


to become a permanent feature
in the industry used to
improve co-operation between
the various participants.
In terms of the outcome of
discussions, Mr Francis said
there was a very useful and
interesting report presented by
PriceWaterhouseCoopers
(pwC) that gave an analysis of
the private banking business,
and which could be useful for
the Bahamas to consider when
deciding how to reposition
itself.
Newly -ppointed Inspector of
Banks and Trust Companies,
Michael Foot, was also a pre-
senter. While declining to give
specifics on his presentation, Mr
Foot said it focused on the


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, TAKEISHA AYANNA
LYNETTE CARTER the mother of LATOURE TYREE GEORGE
on his behalf intend to change his name to SHAWN LATOURE
FERGUSON. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.


GN-160







GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
The Securities Commission
of The Bahamas

NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 22(3) of the Investment Funds
Act 2003, Notice is hereby given that Beacon
Offshore Market Neutral Fund One, Limited is
Dormant and the Commission has suspended its
license for reasons of dormancy for a period of
oine year, effective November 24th, 2004.





NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE
KATE CLAUDE late of the Settlement
of Pinder's Point on the Island of Grand
Bahama one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas

deceased.


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 21st day of February, 2005, after
which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the
claims of which she shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
P.O. Box N-3247
Sandringham House,
No. 83 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Executor


FOR


RENT


* 1,819 4,866 sq.ft. office suites.
* Features a full standby generator.
* State-of-the-art telecommunications facilities.
* Excellent parking facilities.
Breathtaking sea/harbour views.


Mr Francis added that the
Retreat provided a practical
forum in which to bring togeth-
er industry practitioners with
regulators and government offi-
cials, and was an event he wants


desirability of increased co-
operation between regulators,
particularly in light of an evolv-
ing Bahamian economy that is
seeing the emergence of groups
such as Colina, which have mul-
tiple interests that fall under dif-
ferent regulatory bodies. Mr
Foot said further that there
were economies of scale to be
gotten out of greater regulatory
co-operation, some out of
necessity.
The report also summarised
cautionary points that he would
urge on the Government and
the private sector, and Mr Foot
advised that a solution to
strengthening the industry's
position has to be home grown
and tailored to fit the Bahamas
financial services sector, not
imported from another juris-
diction.
Also speaking at the retreat
was Franco Polloni, group head
of financial and fiscal planning
at Banca Del Gottardo, who
gave an analysis on the Euro-


PROPERTY MANAGER /

ELECTRICAL &

MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN
Required for large private estate, an enthusiastic,
hands-on, and hard-working team-player to maintain
all technical aspects of a new state-of-the-art facility.
Must have certified qualifications in electrical or
mechanical engineering, good communication and
computer skills, and be willing to learn and deal with all
aspects of estate management.
Position involves:
repair and maintenance of all plant and
equipment, including HVAC, RO, generator,
pools (heater and filtration equipment),
irrigation, automatic lighting, security and
audio-visual systems etc.
managing maintenance of grounds and
beachfront
supply ordering and inventory control
Experience:
at least 2 years in maintenance department of
large private estate, upscale hotel or similar.
Previous supervisory experience is preferred:.-
.. nnn's '
A good remuneration packages available'for the right'
candidate depending on qualifications adnd experience.
Interested parties please fax or email resume to M Antone
on 362-6704 magdyantone@yahoo.com.
Applications must be received by 11th February, 2005.






NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF ELKIN RENAL
STORR late of Stapledon Gardens in
the Western District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 7th day of March, 2005, after which
date the Executor will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims of which
they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
Sandringham House
83 Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor


Centreville House
Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


Julian Francis


NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that
JACKSON EMILE PHILIPPE of Fox Hill
Road, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
for Registration/ Naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted
should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within Twenty-eight
(28) days from the 3rd day of February
2005 to the Minster responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147 Nassau, The Bahamas."



NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that ELSIE
PHILIPPE of Fox Hill Road, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship for Registration/
Naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas
and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts
-wthin-Twenty-eight (28) days from the
3rd day of February 2005 to the Minster
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147 Nassau, The Bahamas."


pean Withholding Tax Direc-
tive regime, which is expected
to go into effect on July 1.
At the end of the retreat Vin-
cent Peet, minister of ILabour
and immigration responded to
discussions on immigration pol-
icy, making what Mr Francis
described as a useful and very
helpful set of comments.
"I thought it was very useful
and related directly to some of
the discussions. It gave fairly
clear indications as to where the
Government might proceed on
immigration issues that were
discussed. The minister said he
would consult with Cabinet on
the preparation and publication
of a much more explicit policy
document, which would provide
an enhanced degree of trans-
parency and clarity," said Mr
Francis.
Minister Peet was also said
to be willing to contemplate, as
a part of a policy document,
precise timeframes for the issu-
ing of a work permit.


I BUSINESS I








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 7B


Social security




reforms carry




risks for US




equity buying

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WANTED


A well established Media Company is looking for a hard working
| male to work as a Pressroom Assistant Qualified applicants should i
* be able to work night's between the hours of 7pm to 4am, be pre-
* pared to submit job references and a clean police record.
I I
interested persons should sent resume to:
c/o DA 13465 !
P.O. Box N-3207 I
SFax: 32-239 j


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #39 (2,500 sq. ft.) with house 1,104 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, 1 bathroom Englerston
Subdivision (Appraised Value $70,000.00)

2. Lot #65 (7,300 sq. ft.) with house 2,078 sq. ft. Eleuthera Drive and Gibson Ave,
Yamacraw Beach Eastates (Appraised Value $160,000.00)

3. Lot #214 (5,000 sq. ft.) with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms house and upholstery
shop Roosevelt Ave., Pyfrom Subdivision. (Appraised Value $83,780.00)

4. Lot #14, BIk #17 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment Key West St.
& Balfour Ave., Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $187,000.00)

5. Lot #171 (100'x100') with two story building East Street opposite Deveaux
Street. (Appraised Value $320,000.00)

6. Lot #109 (60'x70') with house 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms Craven Street, Ridgeland
Park. (Appraised Value $80,000.00)

7. Lot #785 (5,000 sq. ft.) with house 4 bedroomsss, 2 bathrooms and a 1 bedroom
efficiency Bay Geranium Ave. & Cascarilla St., Pinewood Gardens.
(Appraise Value $139,000.00)

8. Lot #210 (7,225 sq. ft.) with house Yamacraw Beach Estate drive pass the Fox
Hill Prison, turn left onto Yamacraw Hill Rd., take first comer on the right Yamacraw
Beach Drive then the fourth corner on th right Current Rd., then third corner on
the left corner property with house #18, pink trim white.
(Appraised Value $215,000.00)

9. Vacant property (18,644 sq. ft.) Situated on the western side of Carmichael Rd.

ANDROS

10. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 sq. ft.) in the settlement of Fresh Creek,
Central Andros. (Appraised Value $73,258.00)

GRAND BAHAMA

11. Lot #9 with hosue (3) Bedrooms (1) Bathroom and an incomplete split level
extension west Pinedale Road, Pinedale, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.
(Appraised Value $95,000.00)

ABACO

12. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco.
(Appraised Value $29,916.00)

13. Lot #51 (15,600 sq. ft.) with stone house Crown Allotments, Murphy Town,
Abaco. (Appraised Value $104,960.00)

14. Lot #55 (6,900 sq. ft.) with stone house Crown Allotments, Murphy Town,
Abaco. (Appraised Value $87,350.00)


;1.1v. .I ( z :t 'j,


iELEUTHERA


15. Propert 31 'x111' with house Lord Street in the settlement of Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $45,000.00)

EXUMA

16. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story building 4,160 sq. ft. apartment upstairs
and shop downstairs, George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value $468,000.00)

17. Vacant lot #11636 (10,000 sq. ft.) on the southeastern side of Lobster Cay Rd.,
about 500 ft southwest of Queens Highway, Exuma. (Appraised Value $15,000.00)

INAGUA

18. Lot #43 (40'x100') with house Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street.
(Appraised Value $120,000.00)

ELETRONIC EQUIPMENT

* CD Mixer Theater Pop 6 Popcorn Machine
* (1) Microwave
* (1) Compaq Persario Computer Monitor & Tower


BEAUTY SALOON EQUIPMENT MACHINERY


* (1) Styling Chairs
* (1) Shampoo Chairs



SEWING MACHINES

* (1) Fleet Wood Sewing Machine
* (1) New Home Sewing Mahcine



TABLES

* (2) Cocktail Tables (Square)
* (3) Green Patio Tables (Round)
* (2) Wood Tables (Round)
* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)


COOLERS/FREEZERS

* (1) Silver Chest Freezer
* (2) chest Freezers
* (1) Reach in Freezer
* (1) Reach in Refrigerator

GLASSES

* (18) Crates of Wine Glasses
* (1) Box of Wine Glasses


* (1) Air Condition No. WG 18000R
* (1) 20 gal Electric Water Heater
* (1) Digital Scale
* (1) Food Mixer

VEHICLES

* (1) 1997 Dodge Stratus
* (1) 1992 Toyota Coaster Bus
* (1) 1996 Ford Explorer
* (1) 1999 Ford Explorer/No Engine

VESSELS

* (1) 28' Vessel
* (1) 24' (2002) Chris Craft W/Engine
* (1) 29' (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece)
* (1) 53' (1998) Vessel (Pegasus)
* (1) 18' Vessel w/engine

STOVES

* (3) Deep Fat Fryers
* (1) 6 Burner Stove


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

UBS TRUSTEES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
MERGER NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.,
and ITK Trust Company Limited merged on 31st December
2004 with UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. being the surviving
company. The Registrar General Issued a certificate of Merger
dated 31st December 2004.



Cordelia Fernander
(Secretary)


*


*







PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


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PAE O, HUSAYSFBUAY3,00TRIUN POT


d e t *h



By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

YOUTH development
is a must to ensure that
cricket prospers in the
Bahamas in the next
three years, says presi-
dent of the Bahamas
Cricket Association
(BCA), Collin Dean.
Dean, who revealed a
drastic drop in Bahami-
an youth participation,
says the sport will
decline if the BCA does-
n't get the type of sup-
port they need from
youth.
Youth development is
not the only concern for
the BCA better facili-
ties and more fields are
also issues the associa-
tion is look at.

Fields
The sport was once
-played on three fields in
the Bahamas, however,
'the Haynes Oval is no
the only site one can see
the most popular sport
in the Caribbean being
played.
The decline in facili-
ties has caused the
Bahamas to "miss out"
on many golden oppor-
tunities, as far as sport-
ing-tourism is con-
cerned.
In 2004, 6,000 Aus-
tralians came to the
Caribbean to compete in
several cricket matches,
matches the Bahamas
played no part in.
During the same year
the Caribbean hosted
more than six test
.matches, not counting
the regular season
matches being played in
,the West Indies series.
"The Bahamas really
doesn't have the facili-
.ties to host a tourna-
ment of that nature, the
,Caribbean World Cup
series is a big event on
the cricket calendar and
':it will help boost the
economy but we need
more than one playing
field," said Dean.
"I don't know if you
-are aware, but one time
we were on top in the
.sport, meaning cricket
,was being played on
'more than one field.

Oval
S"We had at least three
to four fields which we
'used for cricket, but now
thiss is the only field,
-Haynes Oval.
"We can host the test
"matches, we have more
hotel spaces than any
other Caribbean Island,
but the facilities is our
problem."
With the International
Cricket Council deciding
to hold the 2007
;Caribbean World Cup
'matches in the tradition-
al West Indian venues
located in several of the
*Caribbean Islands, those
areas can expect a major
'tourism boost.
The eight venues,
Antigua, Barbados,
Grenada, Guyana,
Jamaica, St Kitts, St
Lucia and Trinidad and
Tobago, are set up
to host the 51
matches of the tourna-
ment.
"Cricket brings in
more visitors to the
Bahamas than any other
sport, we have teams
coming in from all over
to spend a week or two
with us, and we can hold


them in the hotels," said
Dean.
"The government
assists us, I can't say that
they don't, but we are
competing against some-
thing that we can't really
hide from.
"We have a lot of
Bahamians playing bas-
ketball in the states and
the other sports."
The BCA is expected
to open up its season in
March.


Let's find out who really





is the best of the best


T HERE'S a percep-
tion around town
that the private schools are
just "too soft" to play against
the government schools in
basketball.
The stigma might be true
to a certain degree, but there
are some private schools that
can certainly hold their own
against any government
school.
That's why there should be
some form of mechanism in
place that should allow the
best of both leagues to come
together and prove the critics
right or wrong.
It's definitely a good time
for the powers that be to sit
around the table and formu-
late a plan that would allow
the champions of the
Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary
Schools and the Government
Secondary Schools Sports
Association to clash in a
showdown for the New Prov-
idence title.
This has been a very com-
petitive season for the BAISS
and, judging from the way the
top teams have played so far,
I know none of them would
turn down the opportunity to
get in some more games.
I know when Edna Forbes
came in office as the GSSSA
president a year ago, she and
BAISS boss Sonia Knowles


STUBBS
.- BSih'


OPINION



discussed the possibility of
merging as one at the end of
the season.
It didn't happen for vari-
ous reasons.
I'm sure they can revisit the
idea and iron out the knits
that beset the merger.
Sure, you can say that the
private schools will get their


opportunity to play against
the government schools when
the prestigious Hugh Camp-
bell Basketball Classic rolls
around later this month at the
AF Adderley Gym.
But that tournament is
designed only for senior boys.
What about the senior girls
and junior boys and girls?
They could surely use a
season ending tournament to
prove who is the best as well.
The Temple Christian Suns
have been red hot in the
BAISS. Led by Staffica Bain,
the best female post player
in high school, the Suns
under coach Sharelle Cash
have dominated the league so
far this year.

T he GSSSA, on the
other hand, have the
defending champions CR
Walker Knights and explo-
sive guard Latoya Rolle in a
dog fight with the upstart CI
Gibson Rattlers, now
coached by Kevin 'KJ' John-
son.
The Knights defeated the
Suns during the Father Mar-
cian Peters Invitational Bas-
ketball Tournament in
December. But they lost to
the Rattlers when the GSS-
SA season opened.
So how would these teams
fare now once their champi-
onship series are over? It


would be interesting to see
the results.
The same could be said
about the junior boys divi-
sion.
The BAISS enjoyed one of
the tightest pennant races in


onship to watch.
Looking at they way they
all played, I'm sure that any
of them would be able to give
their GSSSA rivals a run for
their money.
The junior girls, with


"This has been a very

competitive season for the

BAISS and, judging from the

way the top teams have

played so far, I know none

of them would turn down

the opportunity to get in

some more games."


quite some time as three
teams emerged at the top
with an identical record.
But on the countback as
they calculated the points
scored against the points giv-
en up, the Big Red Machines
came out on top ahead of the
St John's Giants, who they
beat, and the Prince William
Falcons, who defeated them.
Who ever advances to the
finals should make it an even
more interesting champi-


Prince William leading the
way, are in the same predica-
ment as far as their post-sea-
son status goes.
It's a good thing that the
Hugh Campbell will provide
that opportunity for the
senior boys.
I think it's only fair that
these teams get a chance to
play against each other and
help to erase the myth that
they are "too soft" to match
up against the government.


IS lern heading



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
;E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com MIAMI HERALD SPORTS __:______._ _


j1SUFP'E :1 VV


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393-8000 361-8000 327-80 328-8000 393-8080 393-8300 Port Lucaya 373-8000


^^^^c^^I








THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Our role


'isn't about


eradicating sexism'


* By NICOLA PACIOTTA
About 76 million peo-
ple worldwide com-
priseC the Anglican
Communion. Each
province has self-gov-
erning authority and decides who will
be ordained into the priesthood.
Today, about one in five priests in
the Church of England are female.
Seventy years of discussion ultimate-
ly led to the decision at the General
Synod in November, 1992, that the
Church would vote in favour of
women in the priesthood. And in
1994, the first female priests of the
Church of England were ordained.
However, the very first female priest
in the Anglican Communion was
ordained in Hong Kong in 1944 Flo-
rence Lei Tim Oi.
In 1974, an irregular ordination of
11 women occurred in the United
States, followed by four more in 1975.
Twowyears later, the Episcopal Church
in the United States authorised the
ordination of women as priests and, in
so doing, regularised the ordinations
p f 15 women ordained in 1974 and
i9711
There are three orders of ministry
in the Anglican Church, where per-
sons serve as deacons, priests and
bishops.
In the Bahamas, there are three
female priests in the Anglican church
Rev Angela-Bosfield Palacious,
Assistant Curate of St Margaret's
Church; Rev Beryl L Higgs, Assis-
tant Curate of Christ the King
Church; and Rev Willish S Nottage-
Johnson, Assistant Curate of St
George's Church.
They affirm that, in spite of gen-
der, differences, there is a common
purpose between men and women in
the creation of God.
For them, the role of the woman
priest is not about improving women's
rights or eradicating sexism. It is
about having a responsibility to God
and His people.
Rev Higgs, ordained in 2000, said:
"After being in banking and invest-
ments for more than 20 years I felt a
void in my life, and the need to seek a
closer relationship with God; I
thought I must give more of myself to
the Lord. And after my own time of
bereavement I found it hard to get
counselling to get me through. I went
off to take counselling courses to help
fill the void. This is where it has all
led me."
While at seminary, Rev Higgs was
encouraged by two lecturers and two
women priests to consider joining the
priesthood. She later attended
Howard Divinity School in the Dis-
trict of Columbia.
"I do not identify the priesthood
with gender. I see it as offering your-
self as a person, using the gift God
imparted. He calls you as a person,
not as a male or female. Due to the
complex nature of our church mem-
bers, there is a need for males and
females in leadership. There must be
a partnership ... a sharing of roles,"
says Rev Higgs.
According to the priest, some
(men) are still traditionalists and have
a hard time with the concept of
women priests. "But a lot of the resis-
tance I experienced was from female
members of the church who looked
for the fatherly affection of a male


N REV BERYL HIGGS


person and would therefore want to
have a male priest instead of a
female."
Rev Higgs recalled her most mem-
orable experience: "By the time I
came onto the scene, one of the cler-
gy did not want a female priest to
preach in the church. He openly
admitted that he was fighting it for a
long time. But he was prompted to
make it happen and was pleased that
he did. He was big enough to admit
this."
Still, there are some who feel
threatened, but in her ministry, Rev
Higgs gives assurance that "there is no
need for this".
"I have not really been challenged
in that way, though. I try to keep
focused on my ministry and dismiss
anything else," she adds.
Speaking of her initial application,
she said: "In 1989, knowing they were
not ordaining women at the time, I
sent it in. The Holy Spirit told me to
keep going, it would happen in good
time. I remember Bishop (Michael)'
Eldon and a mentor from Howard
were both very encouraging, saying
it would happen in due time."
Rev Higgs would like to see more
women and men continuing to work
together as partners. "I would encour-
age the women to truly search their
hearts; if they're feeling called, to pur-
sue it. You should not be intimidated
- the church is a family of men,
women and young people."
Rev Palacious, the first female
Anglican priest in the Bahamas, was
also ordained in 2000. Since receiving
a call from God in 1980, she became a
member of the laity and eventually
attended seminary at Princeton The-
ological Seminary, receiving a mas-
ter's in divinity and theology. She
also attended seminary in New York.
"I knew within myself who I was
meant to be. I had been testing vari-


* REV W NOTTAGE-JOHNSON 0 REV ANGELA PALACIOUS


ous traditional vocations including
teaching, not knowing and just trust-
ing. The church canons were not
changed in 1980, so I knew I couldn't
be ordained at the time," Rev Pala-
cious told Tribune Religion.
Regarding the complementary
nature of priesthood and woman-
hood, Rev Palacious believes that love
is at the centre "of the way we relate".
Women in particular are in the nur-
turing role. A priest is taking care of
flock, healing persons' souls and


"I do not identify
the priesthood with
gender. I see it as
offering yourself as
a person, using the
gift God imparted.
He calls you as a
person, not as a
male or female ..."
Rev Beryl Higgs


teaching. When you become a priest
you take your existing service to
another level. The average woman
has some influence over many people
and it falls together very well. Not
that manhood is without these things,
but you associate women with sensi-
tivity, tenderness, caring, strength of
character and conviction," she says.
The initial resistance felt by Rev
Palacious was only that the laws of
the church were "not open to the idea
and it was not a part of the church's


reality before".
"If there was other resistance, it
was covert, in that I was not con-
fronted personally. Another thing
was, that as a priest's wife I was not a
stranger to the clergy; they knew me
on a first name basis."
Rev Palacious says that the public
has been very supportive of her call-
ing and she has not been challenged in
any way negative. "People were
moved by the ordination, especially as
it was broadcast on TV. Church mem-
bers accepted the Synod's decision,"
she adds.
Her daily challenge is making sure
she has enough time for private devo-
tions; keeping grounded; not becom-
ing over committed, by setting bound-
aries; also, recognising that family has
to have priority time, too.
Receiving support from different
denominations, Rev Palacious said:
"I've always been able to function in
ministry in the church.
"One of the most unforgettable
occasions was being greeted by a male
rasta who said, 'are you the female
priest? I support you all the way'."
Rev Palacious encourages "women
who think they have a call, they
should test it. Give yourself the
opportunity to be affirmed that God
is calling you".
She hopes that in the future,
women will work in every conceiv-
able area of the church; that they can
be creative in finding new ways to do
work; and, that the church will have a
good balance of men and women
doing God's work.
Ordained in 2002, Rev Willish Not-
tage-Johnson became the third female
Anglican priest in the Bahamas.
Currently working as chaplain at
St Anne's School, Rev Nottage-John-
son also serves at St George's Parish.
"Growing up, you would not see
very much to inspire a young female


to do this. But there comes a time in
everyone's life when they search for
meaning and purpose," says Rev Not-
tage-Johnson.
She began her search of self since
her time at the College of the
Bahamas, realising that she could not
be an accountant for the next 20 years
of her life and that she wanted to do
something "more meaningful".
"I said, 'Lord, I want to discover
your purpose for me'. So I got
involved in youth groups and youth
ministry. After personal devotion
and introspection, I had this debate
with God, that I'd never been partic-
ularly interested in leadership in the
church, but it seemed apparent that
this was where he was calling me,"
said Rev Nottage-Johnson.
While working alongside a priest,
she was encouraged to serve in the
church choir (altar) and familiarise
herself with ceremonials, gaining
more experience and exposure.
"Finally I said, let me submit my
letter. God, if you called me to do it
you will open the doors for me. So I
submitted to my rector to have my
vocation to the priesthood tested.
Two or three years later I came in
for an interview. By June of 1999, the
Bishop informed me that I would be
sent to Codrington College Theolog-
ical Seminary."
Rev Nottage-Johnson believes that
everyone has a calling to give some
service to God. "Those who are
called by Him are empowered by Him
to work for Him. The priesthood is
not about the person, but the call of
God's greater purpose."
She emphasised that for her it was
never about women doing the same
work as men. Each individual brings
special qualities to ministry . .
whether male or female, we do the
work of God. We were called into
partnership since the Garden of
Eden."
Compared to her fellow female
priests, Rev Nottage-Johnson
received a bit more resistance in her
call, when she went off to seminary
school.
"Some felt I had no business being
there. But by the time I left college we
had become very good friends and it
was said to me, 'Willish, because of
you I can see a broader perspective of
how God is working at this time'."
Her challenge every day is to recog-
nise that "God is so much bigger than
you are. You must be humble enough
to admit your shortcomings and inse-
curities . confess when we fall short
to Him and others we've hurt. And
every day we're faced with our
humanity, we're presented with God's
divinity."
Rev Nottage-Johnson does want to
see more women as priests, and also
to see men and women working
together in ministry. "I hope that we
could be accepting of our differences
and the uniqueness of our gifts. I hope
that Bahamians will never forget God;
in spite of our challenges, we should
remember to place Him first and in
the midst we will see His hand work-
ing in our lives."
Up for discussion at the General
Synod in London in February of this
year is the ordination of women bish-
ops in the Church of England. As of
October, 2004, there were 11 female
bishops in the entire Anglican Com-
munion.


Bible Bfoks#&'Gift Shop



1. COME TIlRSY MAX LUCADO
In WimMPEOHE JOHN C. MAXWELL


WTHP11

PE OP LE
X '0N P r1 0 VtpyIi


The Tribune


And it's not about improving

women's rights ... It's about having a

responsibility to God and His people


__ I_


I ,, ill I I I


II I I I -.


tf". ****-








PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARYE3,2005GTHEITONBUN I.


CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, February 6:
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Ser-
vice, 7:45 pm Men's Fellow-
ship Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI
Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Upcoming events
February 28-March 3 Men
With A Purpose Conference
March 28-April 3 WOI
Conference
March 27 Easter Sunday

CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
February 6, 9:15 am -
Church School, 10 am Divine
Worship Service with Pastor
Charles Lewis, 7 pm Divine
Evening Service with the men
First Monday of each month,
7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-
ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30
pm Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry


ZION BAPTIST
CHURCH
THE church at East and
Shirley Streets is pleased to
host The Institute In Basic Life
Principles Basic Seminar
scheduled for February 28 to
March 5. (Monday-Thursday -
7 pm to 10 pm, Friday and Sat-
urday, 9 am to 6:30 pm.
To secure your space, please
register by February 15. For
further information, call 341-
3009 or 457-0827 or 328-5776.


ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
February 6, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class,-7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins


and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL

THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week. Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East


Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY

THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

FIRST
HOLINESS

THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -


Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH

SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of February 6-12:
Sunday (Feast: Epiphany V),
9 am Family Eucharist, 6:30
pm Mass
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's,
Anglican Church Women
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 7:30 pm -
Anglican Church Men, Prayer
Group Meeting
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice, 7:30 pm Senior
Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass


and Breakfast, 7 pm Parish
Dinner and A.G.M (Commu4
nity Centre)
Saturday, 6 am Intercessco
ry Prayer Meeting, noon to
pm ACW Steak-Out, 2 pm -
Acolytes Practice (Rector Rev'
Fr S Sebastian Campbell) _

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday'
evenings. id
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope arid
Princes' Street, across from the'
Central Bank. Parking is avail.
able immediately behind the-
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com .'

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT.

THE church in the Summet
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 8 am Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,
10:30 am Divine Worship
Service (Live broadcast at 11
am on More 94.9 FM) ,
Morning Glory Prayer meet-
ing every Wednesday and Saki-
urday at 5 am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm'-
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
For further information, -
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949 '


Central Baptist Church members awarded


for completing


'Christian growth'


course


* PICTURED (1-r) are Sister Gwendolyn Cunningham, Marina Dames, Sister Angela Darville, Deacon Shirley Barr, Deacon Anthony Darville, lecturer and pastor of Central Bap-
tist Church, Alfred N Brown, Brother John Cunningham, Deacon Viola Butler, Deacon Audrey Darville, Sophie Darville, Dorothy Strachan, Estella Knowles (not shown), Pamela Granger,
Minerva Pickstock and Charles Dames.
*^


THE TRIBU


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 3C


aviisitationsemob


* By REV ANGELA BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS
As we start the second
month of the year, we
all have the chance to
evaluate our progress
so far. Have we been
pleased with our labour, our rela-
tionships, our many decisions which
will affect how the year unfolds?
Let us consider our position on
material possessions in light of the
fact that the hurricane season will
begin in a few short months. Are we
enjoying what we have with a view
to storing up eternal possessions at
the same time? Have we made deci-
sions-about financial matters with a
minc to be a good steward? What
have we learnt from the tragedies of
last year?
Our faith journey needs to be
examined on a regular basis to ensure
that we are maintaining the disciplines


that we promised ourselves would be
in effect by now. If we have been
reading our bibles daily, then we will
have been exposed to a number of
passages that will build character and
spiritual stamina. What has been your
planned approach? Are you reading
from Genesis through to Revelation
this year? Are you reading themes,
or selected passages from the lec-
tionary?
This year may become our best
year for growing in the area of prayer.
Daily devotionals offer a variety of
subjects for meditation, contempla-
tive groups provide an atmosphere
for more silence, and intercessory
groups invite us to pray for the myri-
ad of concerns that are present in our
homes, places of employment, neigh-
bourhoods, our country and the
world.
Opportunities to serve God's peo-
ple abound. An excellent workshop to
train lay chaplains was held recently,


MEDITATION
,


* REV ANGELA PALACIOUS


and more sessions are being planned
to provide a network of pastoral care
and counseling initiatives across our
land.
God's mandate that we should love
one another is truly fulfilled in this
particular ministry.


Whether we direct our efforts
towards the youth, the elderly, the
sick and institutionalised, or in pre-
vention through education, there is
so much rewarding work to do.
Parish nurses will be on the health
team as well as lay and ordained chap-


lains, and visitation seems to be
emphasised by every church.
The Bahamas Council of Volun-
tary Social Services is appealing to
all who desire to serve the communi-
ty in a structured manner to join their
ranks and access grants, pool ideas


Rev A B Palacious
and work together to address the
many social ills. We are linking arms
to walk in unity.
God is truly calling us all to make a
more concerted effort to protect our
children and support our adults. What
part are you willing to play?


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GOLDEN ,ATES ASSEMBLY WORLD
OUTREACH MINISTRIES

Celebrates



35th Church Anniversary

Under the Theme

"Inheritance of the Promise" Exodus 15:17
Sunday 13th February 2005 at 8:00am and 10:30am and
7:30pm
and Monday 14th February 2005 at 7:30pm.


Delivering the Word of God:


* Apostle Arthur Duncombe, The Lord's House of Faith.
* Prophetess Savaletha Fowler, Final Hour Ministries.
* Dr. Jennifer Deveaux, United Faith Ministries International.


Highlights


Recognition of the Elders Boar
Ecclesia Live Recording/ Variety Show


* Powerful Praise and Worship
* Selection by the Anniversary Choirs, and the Community
Band
* Liturgical Dance


For further information please contact the Church Office,
at 242-361-3347.


Host Bishop Ros & First Lady Althea Davis
Come and Let Us Celebrate Jesus!


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


RELIGIS


Sister C Albury


loving


and caring for elderly


M By CLEMENT JOHNSON
' After 47 years of
teaching children, I
have now taken up
the challenge of lov-
ing and caring for
the elderly."
These were the sentiments
of Sister Cecilia Albury, OSB,
when, on Monday, October 4
last year, St Joseph's Adult
Day Care Centre on Boyd
Road opened.
"I am pleased now to be a
part of the team dealing with
meeting the needs of our
seniors," said Sister Albury,
the Centre's first director.
The mission of St. Joseph's
Adult Day Care Centre is to
provide affordable day care
services for adults, which will
focus on the strengths and abil-
ities of participants, and on
health, rather than illness.
Services are provided by a
team of caring professionals
and para-professionals in a
structured, therapeutic envi-
ronment to assist the elderly
to manage and maintain con-
nections with the community
and use all of their related
skills.
The day care centre is locat-
ed in the old St. Joseph parish
church. The building is beauti-
fully designed and painted in
cheerful colours. According to
Mrs. Ironica Morris-Baker, a
retired nursing sister and direc-
tor of nursing, the Adult Day
Care brings new life to adults
who would otherwise have to
go into a nursing home.
"They can find new mean-
ing in their lives through enrol-
ment in the programme. The
elderly population is growing
as people live longer. They


retire from work at age 60
years and are at home. The
stimulus of the work environ-
ment is missing," said Mrs.
Baker.
In her article that appeared
in the Bahama Catholic, Octo-
ber/November vol.IV, Mrs.
Baker said that, according to
statistics, adult day care can
assist seniors through the pro-
visions of health, social and
related support services in a
protective setting to live ful-
filling lives in the community.
Mrs Baker said that in many
households, those persons who
are not a part of the national
work force or in the educa-











tional system are left at home
during the day, often to their
own devices. Loneliness, then
sets-in for them. Adult day
care can meet the supervised
needs for companionship
through a planned programme
of activities, both stimulating
and interactive which is nec-
essary for their continued
development and well-being.
The centre opens at around
8am and the day begins with
morning prayers and devo-
tions. The adults also partici-
pate in group exercising, which
includes movements and
stretching, Craft activities are
also a part of the daily routine.


St Joseph's Adult Day Care Centre carrying out its

mission of providing affordable day care services


Sister Cecilia says they love to
play bingo. Lunch and two
snacks are provided for the
senior citizens.
St. Joseph's Day Care Cen-
tre is now open to service any-
one who is interested and who
qualifies. There is a charge of
$30 for members of the parish,
and $60 for non-St. Joseph
parishioners. In order to enrol
one must be 60 years or older
and be able to move indepen-
dently. They must be able to
feed themselves; be in control
of their bladder and bowels
and be able to participate in
group conversations.
According to Sister Cecilia,
the director, a recent medical
examination is required when
the application is presented.
The centre is operated from 8
am to 6pm Mondays through
Fridays. It is closed on week-
ends and public holidays.
The project was spearhead-
ed by Fr. Martin Gomes,
priest-in-charge at St. Joseph's
Parish, assisted by an advisory
committee made up of Sister
Cecilia, retired nurses, Ironi-
ca Morris-Baker, Catherine
Brown, Alsada Thompson,
and Nurse Pamrica Ferguson
and Police Office Roger Mead-
ows, in dialogue with the min-
istry of social services.
The day care can be con-
tacted at 325-2740. They have
also started a group called
Friends of the Adult Day Care,
which will meet on Monday,
January 31, at 6.30 pm at the
Centre.


* SISTER Cecilia Albury (pictured) says she is pleased to be a part of the team at St
Joseph's Adult Day Care Cantre. Pictured at left are seniors at the centre on Boyd Road.
(Photos by Mario Duncanson)


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The Adventists__ _._
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists www.bahamasconference.org
I IIill I [[ I I[ IIII I I II I II I I !C OJI F ER' II


I


Above Photos: More than six hundred packed the Hillview Adventist Church for the first Adventist Prayer Conference. Presenter, Pastor Samuel Telemaque from Trinidad, spent]
time teaching and leading the congregation in active prayer. They also spent time on Saturday afternoon walking and praying in many communities.


Prayer Shock in the Adventist Church


Pastor Samuel Telemaque teaching during the Prayer
Conference at the Hillview Adventist Church
They came out in unbelievable numbers on
Friday night, January 28, 2005, for the opening
of the first Prayer Conference in Nassau. More
than six-hundred Adventists, visitors and friends
packed the Hillview Church with very little standing
room remaining. After the inspirational praise and
worship and short preliminaries, Pastor Samuel
Telemaque stood to his feet to lead the congregation
in a prayer conference experience. From that very
moment, spiritual electrical shockwaves permeated
every heart present. This was going to be a different
kind of conference, and it certainly proved to be.
Pastor Telemaque led the congregation in
scripture readings and inspirational hymns. He led us
to look upward to a great, merciful, loving God who
serves as our Mediator in heaven. During his presen-
tation, there were moments of silent scriptural medi-
tation, discussion between prayer partners, singing,
and prayer. It was certainly a meaningful experience.
After the service on Friday night, everyone left yearn-
ing for more. They left with their faces glowing, radi-
ant with the electrical shock of the Holy Spirit.
Having been electrified with God's power on
Friday night, more than six hundred packed Hillview
Church again on Sabbath morning, January 29, 2005
at 6:00 a.m. for the second heart-changing prayer
experience. With a blend of teaching and ministry,
Pastor Telemaque directed the congregation to a great,


healing God, who understands and hears all our pains
and sorrows. Many hearts were touched, and eyes
were filled with tears. The solemn, moving experi-
ence that early Sabbath morning was reflected idn the.
manner in which the congregation sang the hymns of
praise. The rising of the sun in the distant east and the
warming of the earth, seemed to be significant of the
increasing power of God in all of our lives on that
never-to-be-forgotten Sabbath morning. The service
ended about eight o'clock, allowing the members to
go home and get ready to attend their regular church
services and return at three o'clock for the third ses-
sion.
It was amazing! It was obvious that the
morning recipients of God's fulfilling power wanted
more. They all and many more, were unbelievably on
time to begin the three o'clock seminar. There was
only standing room when the praise and worship
ended at ten minutes pass three. Then Pastor
Telemaque stood to his feet to begin the seminar. That
afternoon he prepared the hundreds in attendance to
go on a Prayer Walk. After the training and informa-
tion, nearly all packed their cars and busses and head-
ed to the assigned areas all over Nassau. What were
they asked to do?
They were asked to walk the streets in pairs
praying as they walked. At times, they were to stop
and pray for those with whom they came into contact.
Those who participated in the prayer walk left the
church at 4:00 p.m. and returned at 5.00 o'clock to
share their testimonies. It was inspiring to hear the
heart-changing testimonies. This experience built an
even greater anticipation for what came next-The
Sunday morning anointing.
Once again, still in high spirit, hundreds of
Adventists and a few visitors, returned to Hillview
Church for the much awaited anointing service. It
was six o'clock on Sunday morning. The church was
packed. After two inspirational short messages by
Pastors Leonard Johnson and Jeremiah Duncomhnbe
who focused on God's promises, Pastor Telemaque
prepared the congregation for the anointing service.
While the pastors gathered in the pastor's study to fill


their cups with Olive Oil, the congregation read
silently Psalms 51. After a special prayer and instruc-
tions the anointing began. Hundreds came forward,
...-and-some pastors mingled among the crowd praying
for those they anointed on their foreheads with Olive
Oil. As the ceremony continued, the people sang,
"Anointing, Fall on Me." It was truly a moving expe-
rience. Undoubtedly, the electrifying power of the
Holy Spirit was turned up high. The final hour of the
Sunday morning experience was a seminar to prepare
the prayer warriors for ministry in evangelistic meet-
ings. We all left the conference filled with power to
go and teach, live and do for Christ. It was a prayer
shock that left the lights of the Holy Spirit glowing in
our hearts forever. We say, "Thank you Pastor Samuel
Telemaque."


Above: Pastor prepare for the anointing Below:
Pastor Lynden Willians anointing member during the
special Sunday morning service at Hiliview Church


Pasl
Reliaic


Pas
Per
Sabb
Mrs.
Women


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE- 7C


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005


1


ii: ii~':: ii : :iNATIONALI N MUNISTRIIVE
Evnels Hm CidensMitre

To bear witness for Christ and His truth by through Bible Teachings, Seminars, maturation of our children/youth.,MsoFi is
spreading the gospel throughout allof our Specialized Courses and Conferences. To accelerate our holistic outreach evangel-
ilandsinAllitsfullnessandpowertobring Tofully embraceplurality of leadership in isticefforts withaviewtoreachandtouch
peopl pe everywhere in our Bhaa to the 8 riigSeilPoet
about the rule of God in the hearts of men. all of its positive goodness. people everywhere in our Bahamas to the
o worship God in spirit, in truth and in To love God totally and our fellowmen as up building of the kingdom and to the
holne--,ss.ourselves&growth of the Church of God.
To train, develop and equip our people for To pay focused and specialized ministry To prepare our people for the return of the CrtEuiHsa&io
Godly Living and Christian Service attention to the growth, development and Lord.
: : :: : : i~~~~~~~i :=: :=.. . . . ..... . :: : : : ................"................ . . . . . . ..T.: :; our l for th





an son seenssin inisnenos




C et le biainiga "le1Vhalu of Vision




Celebrating "The Value o f sion"


Bnce Thompson moderates. anribbean iUstrict overseers teaa a tme or worship.


National Overseer- Bishop Rahming leads Bahamian delegation.


National Overseer- Bishop Clayton Martin & delegation in attendance. National Overseer- Bishop Ewing Dorsette delegation in attendance. Bahama Brass Band plays music with spirit.


National Overseer- Bishop Maurice Jones & delegation in attendance. National Overseer- Bishop Dorlean Jean Claude & delegation in attendance.


Inspired by the 93rd
International General
Assembly's theme, "Vision
Now, Victorious Future", and
choosing the theme, "Value of
Vision", hundreds of leaders, min-
istry workers and lay persons from
the Caribbean and the United
States of America assembled at the
Radisson Cable Beach Hotel for
the 9th Biennial Caribbean
Leadership Conference.
This Caribbean Conference which
the Bahamas hosted for the first
time opened Thursday evening,
January 27th with a colourful and


grand parade of nations' flags from
the Caribbean and the U.S. with
the Prophecy Troops and the world
famous-Bahama Brass Band.
The four-day conference which
was organized to instruct, inspire
and to share was indeed a tremen-
dous blessing as International and
Caribbean officials spoke and
made presentations on the confer-
ence's theme, Value of Vision.
Sessions highlights included:
*Bishop Robert Jones of Jamaica,
preached on the sub-theme, "Look
on the Fields"-Harvest Vision,
*Bishop Larry Duncan of the


International Headquarters, pre-
sented Relational Ministry
"Transformed to Walk in His
Glory"
*Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B.
Rahming, National Overseer of
the Commwealth of the
Bahamas, preached on "Obeying
the Heavenly Vision"
*Minister Nathaniel Beneby Jr.
of the Bahamas, presented on
"Financial Responsibility in
Leadership"
*Bishop Adrian Varlack of the
International Headquarters,
preached on "The Importance of


Unity Among Brethren"
*Minister Cathy Payne of the
International Headquarters, pre-
sented on "The Role of Women in
The Future Church"
Also sharing their hearts in the
Caribbean Leadership Conference
on the theme of Value of Vision
were Bishop Fred S. Fisher Sr.,
General Overseer and Bishop
Dr. Brice H. Thompson, General
Presbyter for the Caribbean and
Atlantic Ocean Islands and
Moderator of the 9th Caribbean
Leadership Conference.
Throughout the Caribbean


Conference delegates were active-
ly involved in sweet fellowship
and worship. Reports were made
by various National Overseers of
the Caribbean of their work in their
respective countries. At the start of
each session, spirited devotions
were done by selected Caribbean
countries, indeed this was a mighty
blessing. Report of the work and
conditions of numerous countries
was given by the Global Outreach
Director, Bishop Randy Howard.
Apart from enjoying this well
organized Caribbean Conference,
delegates from around the


Caribbean were taken on an excit-
ing tour of the Island. They got a
first hand look at places of tourist
and historical interest and sampled
our tasty Bahamian delicacies.
Many are looking forward to the
next Caribbean Leadership
Conference to be held in 2007 at
another Caribbean location. This
9th Caribbean Conference was co-
ordinated by Bishop Dr. Franklin
M. Ferguson and a dynamic team
of workers.


Joint historic Crusade experience
Continued from last week by Deborah Johnson


Stating that over 34 million people go to
hell every year, Bishop Wilson told the
congregation that the COG and the
COGOP want to make a dent in that
number. We want to bring people to a
saving knowledge of Jesus Christ. The
Bahamas, he stated, is a launching point
for this effort between the two move-
ments. He asked the people to pray for
the ministry so that the baton, which he
will take with him everywhere he goes,
will be passed from one area in the world
to the other.
Bishop Wilson's message on Wednesday
night centered'on the topic Today is the
Day for Supernatural Renewal. Basing
his sermon on the life of Job, he stated
that many persons are finding themselves
sinking in despair because of the troubles
and trials of life. However, Christians
can take comfort in the fact that we serve
a God of physical, family, relational,
directional, corporate and eternal rever-
sal. When the devil thinks that he has
destroyed us, the resurrection power of
Jesus is able to lift us up, make some-
thing beautiful out of the situation and
give us the victory. Hallelujah!


Today is the Day for Pentecostal
Repurposing was the message delivered
to the people on Thursday night. Bishop
Wilson asserted that "many who have
been touched by the power of Pentecost
in the past, find themselves searching for
purpose. Many spirit filled churches
have lost their way. They have forgotten
who they are and what God has called
them to do. If in this time of Pentecost,
we search for direction and purpose in
the wrong place and in the wrong way,
we will lose the very thing that made this
thing great and destroy the foundation of
who we are."
Bishop Wilson strongly feels that the
unity that God is affecting in the two
movements, not only in the Bahamas, but
all around the world, is "putting us back
in touch with the fire that birthed us in
the first place." In his final sermon on
Friday evening, he gave edification on
the topic, Today is the Day for Faithing
Forward. Here he declared that it will
take great faith to see God's work move
forward and that it is only those
Christians who move by faith who will
be the ones to effectively do the work of


God.
Sunday January 16, 2005 Friday
January 21, 2005 have been days of
tremendous blessings among the leader-
ship and members of the COG and the
COGOP. God's stamp of approval was
evident in the way His Spirit moved each
night. Something spectacular has been
reactivated deep within the hearts of
these two ministries that no devil will
succeed in aborting.
We extend sincere thanks to Bishop
William Wilson, International Outreach
Minister, for heeding the call and for
delivering such dynamic messages for
the church in today's world. Thank you,
Bishop Elgamet Rahming and Bishop
John Humes for bringing the vision to
life in the Bahamas. Thank you minis-
ters and members for joining in with the
call for unity between-the two churches.
In the words of Bishop Donnie Storr and
Bishop William Wilson, let us continue
to let the fire of Pentecostal unity "fuse
us together so that together, as one great,
big mighty army, we can hurt the devil in
Jesus' name."


Revival inthe NATIONAL FAMILY

Gr Nove MINISTRIES


Church of God of Prophecy Palm
Tree Avenue will host a
"REVIVAL IN THE GROVE"
Sunday, Feb. 6th Wednesday, Feb. 9th, '05
Sunday, Feb. 6th (5:00 p.m.) Monday
- Wednesday (7:00 p.m.) NIGHTLY!!

Speaker: Minister Dr. Barbara F.
Williams, D.D., J.P.
Bring the sick, the oppressed, the discour-
aged, bring all in need of a Blessing!!
Senior Pastor: Bishop Anthony T. Roker
Associate Pastor: Minister Gersham Pratt











.... MOUNT TABOR

cP FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
SWillow Tree Av, Pineo a PO rdxN P : 97195 Tel: (22) 392-2322- Fax:242 392-4343
:Webs te: ww~w mout-taborr- ,'ww nte!lism ,isrtriese om EmaiF : mtlabc @ba-e ne1bs


NEWS



NEW PASTORS & OFFICERS INSTALLED













NEWLY INSTALLED PASTORS
I n the 6th chapter of the book of Acts, the story is tc PASTOR ROCHELL Moss INSTALLED AS PASTOR OF CONGREGATION LISTENS AS LEADERS COMMIT TO
of the challenges and friction that arose in the ea INTERCESORY PRAYER SERVE.
church because of its rapid growth and shortage oversight and coordination is crucial; and that is what Minister Clinton Josey as a Minister f t
anointed help. As the Bible is replete with stori~be newly installed officers were charged to facilitat ospel and installed Pastor Alvin Moss as Pastor
designed to teach lessons; the above referenced text Y'.th, children, men, women, music, prison, sick .sa dia and Pastor Rochelle Moss as Pastor
clearly demonstrates the need to ensure that as a chf1in, meals on wheels and intercessory prayer wd rcessory Prayer of Mount Tabor.
grows; anointed, committed leaders must be identify a few of the areas to which leaders appointed fo During the service, Bishop Ellis commented .(
and appointed to address the needs of that growing .the fact that while Minister Josey came to Mount Tat
gregation. a number of years prior with credentials from anott
In keeping with this important Biblical principle denomination and an offer to pastor one of th
Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Senior Pastor of Mount Tabor F ~churches, he humbly and faithfully laid those aside E
Gospel Baptist Church recently appointed and instal sat in the congregation as a regular member of Mo
a number of anointed young men and women to s' Tabor in obedience to the leading of the Holy Spir
the needs of his rapidly growing congregation. Witt He aptly stated that this Christ like mind set, spe-
membership of approximately 7,000, and needs that volumes of the new Ministers character and willingne
varied and multitudinous; effective strategic leaders to obey God despite what may appear to be persona
backs.
Pastor Rochelle Moss is a saved, sanctified, sin
mother that has successfully weathered many storrr
her life. However, she is a living, walking, talking te
timony of the fact that nothing is too hard for the Lor
She too came to Mount Tabor with a Bachelors Deg
Mountin Theology, but sat in the congregation for many ye
before she was called forward. She was ordaine(
MIN. JOSEY RECEIV NG CREDENTIALS FROM FIRST Mount Tabor a few years ago and assigned the -esl
LADY ELLIS. sibility of leading the way in Intercessory Prayer. O
the years, she has exemplified unequivocally, that
is tremendously anointed of God in this area; and
one year tenure; thereby ensuring that they remtrl imnd o uson er tof coe in h itied t%
ibriedntW focse and come to o r te kind of focus on Prayer that exists within tl
vibrant, focused and committed to service.
,The growth of the Ministerial team in harmony with thihurch, Bishop Ellis felt the need to undergird a
.The growth of the Ministerial team in harmony with secure this area with Pastoral oversight. Thus, Pa
Moss along with Minister Natasha Williamson, a grot
of 120 intercessors trouble the throne and cover
BISHOP ELLIS PLACES PASTORAL SASH ON PASTOR Ministry and the Nation in prayer on a daily basis.
ALVIN MOSS. Pastor Alvin Moss is a veteran in television ai
broadcasting; having worked at The Broadcasti
is vital to the ongoing success of the church. Ever mi Corporation of The Bahamas for nearly 23 years E
ful of the fact that the greatest call of Christian lead risen through the ranks to the position of DepL
ship is the call to serve; Bishop Ellis is adamant ab Director of Television at the Corporation. Additionally
Mount Tabor remaining a sensitive, caring chur he is one of the countries best choir directors and Pr
despite its size. To this end, he is convinced that and Worship authorities and has traveled extensi\
only way that this can happen is to see to it that the n conducting music workshops both here in Ti
and concerns of the membership are constantly id Bahamas and in a number of cities in The United St,
fied and addressed, and in order to ensure that this of America. Pastor Moss, who takes the helm of
pens able, anointed persons must be in place. Media & Communications Ministry of Mount Tabor i,
because God is strategic and orderly in much of what a full time capacity, succeeds Pastor lisa Evans who
does, Bishop Ellis has discovered over the years, th..........-" been appointed to head a new area and now serves
God adds to the Church daily, He often brings in th Pastor of Special Projects and Public Relations. Th
additions, persons that are equipped and ordained t( BISHOP ELLIS ANOINTS NEW OFFICES. latest appointment, brings the full time pastoral tea
in the leadership and service Ministries of the Churcl,. Mount Tabor to nine and the Ministerial team to for
Thus, on Sunday January 16th 2005, over 1 erktthsree. Forty three anointed, appointed, excited, co
persons were installed as Officers of Mount Tabor awth of the leadership team is another key to the s ted spiritual leaders supported by over one hund
son Sunday January 23rid 2005, two new Pastors w s of the Mount Tabor Church. Because as officers leaders and over five hundred volunteers;
installed and a new Minister was licensed into tl tified to lead the way in practical service to th orking together to ensure that the needs of mem
membership and wider community, others must be ideMount Tabor and the wider community are met,
Sacred Gospel50 a Ministryi o n ,p ied and equipped to address the spiritual needs of i honor and glory of Almighty God.
With over 50 vibrant Ministries in operation, pr growing, congregation. To that end, Bishop Elli



MORE MEMBERS BLESSED!
S Church were blessed with new cars; one given by the As Mount Tabor continues to grow in size and
cripture teaches us that the Anointing flows fronDhurch and another given by a member of the Churdhfluence, Bishop Ellis remains focused on ensuring
the head down. In practical terms that means that ~h of the women that were blessed with the vehic~bturch never looses its sensitivity to the needs of
spirt, attitude and mindset of the leader flows to a tried, tested and proven in both their commitmentMembership or sight of the fact that it is still; Mor
becomes resident within and evident upon those that ~td and in their faithfulness to the Mount Tabdolessed to give, than it is to receive.
low him or her. Church; and both were desperately in need of trans-

Under the benevolent, visionary leadership of TOl GOD1"l BF THE GL ORYI


Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Senior Pastor of Mount Tabor; lit-
erally hundreds of persons within the Ministry have
been blessed with everything from homes, to cars, to full
college educations. Bishop Ellis believes, that true I
4'gives; For God so loved the world that He gay i
(Jn.3:16). Additionally, because He firmly believes
the Biblical model for Ministry; scripture teaches th
the Church, from its inception was an organi.
designed to meet the full needs of man physical
spiritual. And in the same way that the early chur
collectively pooled their resources and those that I
saw to it that those that were in need were helped
2005 Mount Tabor exemplifies that spirit of since
brotherly love and Christian charity.
BISHOP PRAYS FOR NEW CAR. Thus, on Sunday January 30th, Sister Charlene Gi
Sand Pastor Rochelle Moss both caught a ride to ch
This Biblical principlet a is very prominent amongth t t by the time they left they were driving new vehicl
-membership of Mount Tabor and on this past weelI.eady licensed, inspected and insured for them by
was powerfully demonstrated when two members of iurch. DESERVING MEMBER BLESSED WITH NEW CAR.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 9.;


THE TRIBUNE






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