• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Business
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Insight














Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00024
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 31, 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
        page A 15
        page A 16
    Section B: Business
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
        page B 13
    Section B: Sports
        page B 14
        page B 15
        page B 16
    Section C: Insight
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
Full Text








"DELUXE fY

SALADS"m lovin' It


HIGH 76F
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,- SUNNY


Volume: 101 No.57


The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


he BAHAMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


rilo-


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, -UUb




TOUGH


der sp ar


Residents claim

killing due to tensions


iii Fox Hill area


U


fears


Vehicles collide on Mackey Street


SBy PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE stabbing death'of a
Bernard Road man outside a
Fox Hill nightclub is the latest
-aurder in a violent feud in the
Sfrea. accoruing to iesidcnts.
In the early hours of yester-
day morning Philip Moss, 34,
was found on the steps of 'Da
Bing' nightclub in Fox Hill suf-
fering from multiple stab
wounds.
Witnesses say he was
attacked by three men who
appeared to have been waiting
for him outside the club.
According to residents of the
area, the killing may be the lat-
est in a string of violent inci-
dents, part of what one referred
to as a "tit-for-tat" feud
between gang members
from Bernard Road and Fox
Hill.
Residents, who would only
speak to The Tribune on condi-
tion of anonymity, said they
belie'.e the stabbing resulted
from tensions that surfaced dur-
irig. the Fox Hill Day celebra-
tibC in August last year.
Chief Superintendent Marvin
Dames said it was too early in
:the'investigation to positively
link the matter to earlier inci-
dents.
Residents told The Tribune
yesterday that they feel that ten-
sion is rising in the area, and
are afraid that a "war" is immi-
nent.
"bThey having a war around


tiere soon." one resident insist-
ed
Another said that men from
both areas% \ere threat-ning to
hold a shoot-out in, the Fox Hill
park area yesterday.
"They said they were gonna
have a iot.' -he s.aid
Police were on the scene after
receiving word of the incident
just before 4am yesterday.
"Officers met the body of a
male lying on the staircase on
his back with multiple stab
wounds about the body,"
Inspector Walter Evans said.
Mr Evans said the victim was
taken to hospital by ambulance,
but was dead on arrival.
"Police are following some
significant leads," he said,
adding that a suspect may
already be in custody.
The Tribune arrived on the
scene yesterday to find 'Da
Bing' closed and unattended.
One of the managers of the
establishment, who spoke from
his home, said he was present at
the time of the murder.
He said the three men who
attacked Moss seemed to have
been waiting for him outside
the club.
According to the manager,
who wished not to be named,
when Moss arrived in his car
around 3.30am, the men sur-
rounded him.
One struck him across his
head with.a piece of wood, and
another stabbed him, he said.
SEE page 10,


M By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
PORTRAYING last
week's Nassau Village riot as
a Haitian-Bahamian conflict
is a distortion of facts and will
do a great disservice to the
area and other depressed
communities of Nassau.
This statement was made
yesterday by FNM chairman
Carl Bethel while balling for
an official public inquiry into
the underlying causes which
led to the violent confronta-
tion between members of the
Nassau Village community
and police last Thursday, and
left three civilians in hospital
with gunshot wounds.


Mr Bethel said that numer-
ous disturbing suggestions
have arisen out of the inci-
dent, which will "do a great
di-.serice to the people of
Nassau Village, other
depressed communities in
Nassau, such as the Kemp
Road area and the Bahamas.
as a whole."
"The first disturbing sug-
gestion is that the riot was 'a
Haitian thing.' It must be not-
ed that government and police
spokespersons have done
nothing specifically to dispel
this suggestion," he said.,
He explained that in talk-
ing with the residents of the
SEE page 11


Father Pugh, leading

figure in Anglican

Church, dies age 84


ONE of the Bahamas' best-
loved priests, known to his flock
simply as Father Pugh, died yes-
terday morning at his sister's
home in South Wales. He was
84.
The Rev Canon David
Harold John Laurence Pugh,
founder of St Anne's High
School and a major figure in the
Anglican church in Nassau for
more than half a century, had
been ailing for some time.
But his death will sadden
churchgoers throughout the
Bahamas, for he was always
regarded as a man of deep faith
who gave selflessly throughout


his life.
Tribune columnist George
Mackey said last night: "He was
a father figure to me. He came
into my life shortly after my
own father died in 1953 and was
a guiding light.
"He was certainly one of the
best-loved priests in the
Bahamas and a leading figure
in the Anglican church for more
than 50 years."
Father Pugh arrived in the
Bahamas originally as an air-
craft mechanic during the war.
SEE page 10


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PAUOt e, Ivi..,vuAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


L AL


MAIN SECTION* ,
Local News 2.......... .P 2,3,5,6,7,8,9
Local New8s.,1.......... .. 1,12,13,15
Editorial/Letters. .........P4
Advt ..... .... .................P14,16
BUSINESS/SPOK i S SECTION
Business.......................... ..P1,2,3,4,5,6,10,11
Advt ..................................... .......P7,8,9,13
T. V. G uide.................................................P12
Sports............................................... .P14 15,16,1
INSIGHT SECTION
Insight....................................P1,2,3,5,7,8,9
Advt ......................... .............. ............ P4
Com ics............................... ... ...........P6
Weather................................. ...... ...P1

CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES

MIAMI HERALD SECTION
Mains............................../s s.12 Pages
Sports/Business....................... 2.. Pages


Three major




agreements t(




signed with Cl


* MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS Fred Mitchell


strength
in numbers
Family Guardian applauds the success of three
staff members recently awarded the prestigious
designation, Fellow. Life Management Institute,
(FLMI) by the Life Office Management
Association (LOMA) of Atlanta, Georgia.
Elizabeth Ferguson, RN, Clinical Coordinator
at BahamaHealin. has earned the FLMI designation
with Distinction. Mrs. Ferguson joined BahamaHealth
in 2001 and has also earned the designations,
Professional, Academy of Healthcare Management
and LOMA's Associate, Customer Service and
Associate. Insurance Agency Administration.
Nicole Turnquest, Care Advocate at BahamaHealth,
joined the company in 2001. She has also earned
the designations. Professional, Academy of Healthcare
Management and LOMA's Associate, Customer Service.
nest
Tamika Clare, Marketing Assistant in Family Guardian's
Financial Services Division. joined the company
in 1999. She has earned LOMA's designations,
Associate, Customer Service and Associate,
Insurance Agency Administration.
Established in 1932. the FLMI programme
is the focal point of LOMA's educational activity
and is the world's largest university-level education
curriculum in insurance.
Family Guardian congratulates these dedicated
professionals for their commitment to personal
S development and quality customer service.


E C FAMILY
GUARDIAN
K INSURANCE
f1 W COMPANY
TE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE BAHAMAS is
expected to sign three major
agreements with China this
week as part of the Caribbean-
China partnership initiative.
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, heading a Bahamian
delegation including Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell,
Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe, Trade and Industry
Minister Leslie Miller, and
Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin, is
scheduled to travel to
Kingston, Jamaica, on
Wednesday to join fellow
Caribbean prime ministers in
the meeting with Vice-Presi-
dent of China Zeng Quing-
hong at the first China-
Caribbean business confer-
ence.
Mr Mitchell told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the
Bahamas expects to sign a
trade agreement, a civil avia-
tion agreement and a tourism
agreement.
He explained that the civil
aviation agreement will focus
on the establishment of direct
flights from Beijing to the
Caribbean, but pointed out
that of the three agreements,
the one concerning tourism
will be of the highest impor-
tance.
Opportunity
"We are looking for China
to select the Bahamas as a
designated travel destination.
This would give us the oppor-
tunity to tap into a huge mar-
ket," he said.
He further noted that Mr
Wilchcombe has also reached
out to India to establish closer
tourism ties.
Trade Minister Miller yes-
terday said that the three
agreements between China
and the Caribbean, including
the Bahamas, are part of "a
very significant partnership."
He said the trade agreement
in particular will offer numer-
ous new opportunities for the
Bahamas in terms of manu-
facturing and producing more
goods in the country and sell-
ing them for the export mar-
ket.
Mr Miller explained that the
Chinese will assist Bahamians
in establishing training pro-
grammes for producing sou-
venirs and hand-crafts as as well
as training in the fields of agri-
culture and animal husbandry.
"We import $350,000 worth
of souvenir items every year,
this is a sad testament, we
should be able to learn how


Mr Miller said that the hope
is that the Bahamas will bei
able to sign contracts with
Chinese manufactures, which:
will lead to items either being
produced on-site in the!
Bahamas, or being imported!
directly from China, thereby;,
cutting out the US as the mid-'
dleman.
When the forum was first?
announced in November of,
last year, chargejd'affaires in
the Chinese Embassy, Bobeng:
Ni, described the forum as an;
excellent platform for
Caribbean government offi-
cials and businessmen tol
exchange ideas and make;
plans for future trade part-:
nerships in areas like tourism,:
agriculture, telecommunica-,
tion technologies and finance.1
Local businessman:
Franklyn Wilson, chairman of
the Bahamas Chapter of. the
World Presidents Organisa-'
tion, urged all Bahamians not;
to dismiss the forum or th6
opportunities presented by the
closer ties between the two
countries, and pointed out that
even the smallest businesses
can benefit from the partner-,
ship with the economic giant
China. -
Mr Mitchell added that thd
prime minister will also takd
this opportunity to engage iai
other bilateral talks with th.
Chinese vice-president. `


Share
your"
news
The Tribune wants to hear '
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
I you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the :,
area or have won an awarded
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




TROPIC' L







*i 6[ B
K=| ir


THE TRIBUNE -





or




) be







Bahamian

delegation

to head for

Jamaica

to produce our own items and
sell them to the US and
Caribbean markets," he not-
ed.
The minister also said that
the giant region-wide trade
fair, which will be held during
the China-Caribbean confer-
ence, will showcase the prod-
ucts of more than 120 Chinese
manufacturers.
"The Bahamas imports 93
per cent of its consumable
products, and the majority of
those are made in China," he,
said.
Hone i


^ *


4








MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie has revealed
that a substantial number of
major resort and other devel-
opment proposals estimated in
the billions of dollars are pro-
jected for west and east Grand
Bahama.
Mr Christie believes that the
developments will have a pro-
found economic effect on all
areas of the island over the next
decade, creating hundreds of
construction and permanent job
opportunities for Bahamians.
He disclosed that the gov-
ernment and The Gin Corpo-
ration are presently negotiating
to settle a Heads of Agreement
for a "massive" resort proposal
to de' elop 2,500 acres at West
End.
The prime minister was
speaking on Saturday evening
at the Grand Bahama Cham-
*ber of Commerce's annual
"installation banquet held at the
Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.
He stressed that the project,
which incorporates a hotel, golf
courses, second homes and a
marinaa, would result in a major
.economic transformation of
West End.
Mr Christie said there is a
tremendous advantage to doing
business in West End because it
is only 48 nautical miles from
-six million wealthy people in
-the Palm Beach area.

Successful
"The Gin Corporation, being
one of the most successful land
developers in the United States,
alreadyy have a substantial num-
ber of persons applying for the
rights to be included in the sales
of the properties," he added.
Mr Christie said the project
wouldd be compatible with the
.'Old Bahama Bay development
'rat West End.
-. The prime minister
announced that a $50 million
:development at Deadman's
Reef is also up for final negoii-
Saion and settlement of.a eadsz
po f a g e e m e n t ;,i.. . ' ..
SThe condo'marina develop-
nment, he said, -will pro% ide job
opportunities not only in con-
"'struction, but also permanent
"jobs for Bahamians.
'. 'In anticipation of these sig-
-nificant proposals in west
AGrand Bahama, Mr Christie
.said government through the
Ministry of Housing is negott-
aling the purchase of 200 acres
'of land near Bootle Bay to
'make land accessible to
: Baharmans for residential and
-;commercial use.
'" "I can tell you that the devel-
:;opments are projected to have
.this incredible mind-boggling
impact on the western end of
4 Grand Bahama and will feed
and take care of Eight Mile
"Rock, Holmes Rock and the
rest of it," he said.
,: Mr Christie assured that fur-
ther resort and timeshare
-idevelopments are also expected
,'to come on stream as well in
j east Grand Bahama.
~r


The Gin Corporation, he
said, has also entered into a
joint venture with the Grand
Bahama Development Compa-
ny (DEVCO) for a similar
resort development in the east-
ern part of the island.
Mr Christie noted that the
project is expected to provide a
10-year boom in the construc-
tion industry.
In addition to the Gin pro-
ject, there is also a strong inter-
est by the Marriott Corporation-
to build a 400-room timeshare
facility in the Barbary Beach
area, also situated in the eastern
part of the island.
The investment is estimated
at around $200 million and
would move to further diversify
the tourism product on the
island, Mr Christie said.
"Some time ago Grand
Bahama was a leader in this
region in the timeshare busi-
ness. We have lost our advan-
tage to places like Aruba, where
more than 30 per cent of their
visitors stay in timeshare facili-
ties.

Underway
"We aim to get it'back. Nego-
tiations are underway for the
Marriott brand hotel, and a 350-
unit timeshare resort in the area
known as Discovery Bay.
"We believe the Marriott will
lead the way and jumpstart the
way to our re-emergence in the
timeshare sector and our com-
mitment to get back to number
one," he said.
According to Mr Christie, the
government has also signed a
millionn agreement with Dis-
ney to shoot parts two and three
of the Pirates of the Caribbean
movies in Grand Bahama at the
Film Studio at Gold Rock
Creek in East Grand Bahama.
This 'would result in signifi-
cant room occupancies of about
1,600 rooms for Grand Bahama,
he said.
Mr Christie also talked about
the other potential develop-
ments such as the LNG projects
by Tractebel/El Paso.
He noted that many people
about the'LNG applicatiolis!'
that have pbren'sutbntted to the
government and were approved
in principle before the PLP gov-
ernment took office.
Tractebel had proposed con-
struction of an LNG terminal
and pipeline at Freeport 'Har-
bour, El Paso at South Riding
Point in East Grand Bahama,
and AES at Bimini. All of the
applications were subject to
environmental studies,
which were carried out by out-
standing globally-recognised
irms.
Mr Christie said the govern-
ment would be led by the
results of the environmental
studies, which have now been
submitted to the Ministry of
Health and Environment.
While the country stands to
benefit greatly from the pro-
jects, Mr Christie stressed that
should the projects be seen as
harmful to Bahamians and the
marine environment they would
not be approved.


, I 9 "


Government pursues contacts



fo! fnni ,ctinn nf oronv ilvei


-IU I tIAjUAI YIu UI VI 11 J vIkk )


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie announced
that the government is diligent-
ly pursuing contacts with sev-
eral hotel operators for the
acquisition of the "financially
strapped" Royal Oasis Resort
and Casino property.
His announcement came
after a week of persistent
demonstration by the laid-off
hotel workers in Freeport who
have been under enormous
strain to meet their obligations
to financial institutions and pay
their bills.
Speaking at the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce Installation Banquet on
Saturday evening. Mr Christie
said measures are being taken
toward the resolution for the
renovation, re-opening, and
payment of benefits, including
severance pay to staff.

Investors
"I have come to Grand
Bahama to impress upon you
that when people face a disas-
ter, when they lose their jobs,
when investors abandon their
properties, when there is uncer-
tainty and fear, there is no gov-
ernment in this country and no
political party who would not
engage in initiatives and employ
strategies to stand between
those victims and disaster."
He stressed that there is no
compromise, no hesitation,
when it comes to addressing res-
olutely the troubles that people
are placed in by acts of God.
Mr Christie said contacts are
being pursued with several hotel
companies in the United States
and elsewhere concerning the
acquisition of Royal Oasis
Resort and Casino.- ..._ ... ...,
He reported,that a Spanish .,
hotel chain and the Radisson
have both viewed the property
during the course of this week
and initiated discussions with
Driftwood and the Hotel


"When people
face a disaster,
when they lose
their jobs,
when investors
abandon their
properties,
when there is
uncertainty and
fear, there is no
government in
this country and
no political
party who would
not engage in
initiatives and
employ strategies
to stand between
those victims and
disaster."

Prime Minister
Perry Christie

Corporation.
Additionally, he noted that
three other notable hotel oper-
ators, including Leman's Broth-
ers, are also being diligently
pursued.
More than 1,200 workers at
the Crowne Plaza and Sunspree
resorts and casino were laid off
in September when the proper-
ty closed for reconstruction as a
result of extensive damage
caused by the hurricanes.
Although management had
announced that the resort
would reopen in April, work-
ers became ,increasingly con-
cerned .when ,c9nsiruction work
at the property ceased in
December.
As weeks went by without

SEE page 11


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ALONE IN THE DARK


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1Z~tBlljFT: V"' :-- ":I""x~"~'":~"`~I- ~3 ra ~







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


EDITORIA S T O EITOR


ON JANUARY 7 the Ministry of Agri-
culture confirmed that the 3,700-acre Bahama
Star Farm at Treasure Cay, Abaco had been
closed because an incurable bacterial disease
had infected its citrus groves.
Samples tested by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture confirmed that indeed the much-
dreaded citrus canker had been discovered in
the farm's extensive orchard.
Not only was the farm under quarantine,
but all of its trees, even its seedlings had to be
destroyed.
As the disease spreads easily and rapidly -
by wind, rain, landscaping equipment, birds
and even humans immediate action was
necessary to prevent it moving throughout
Abaco and eventually the rest of the
Bahamas. So far, according to Agriculture
Minister Alfred Grey, no other canker out-
breaks have been found in Abaco.
For the past three weeks South Abaco
MP Robert Sweeting has brought the urgency
of the matter to the attention of the House.
He was assured that government had already
moved quickly to get the problem under con-
trol.
On the second week, he was back to the
House with the same complaint. He said he
had been told the previous week that some-
thing was being done; but to date nothing
had started.
Then he added sarcastically that he hoped
that "urgent" would not in this case mean
what it meant in the Korean boats fiasco,
when a year after House members had been
assured that the Korean boats had been
ordered to leave "forthwith", the mother ship
was still in Freeport.
Last Wednesday Mr Sweeting was on his
feet again. He told House members that hav-
ing been told by Ministry of Agriculture staff
that destruction of the trees had started on
Monday (January 24), he decided to drive to
the farm the following day to monitor the
progress. With him was North Eleuthera MP
Alvin Smith, and FNM official Johnley Fer-
guson. When they arrived they expected -
-after what Minister Alfred Grey had said
about the farm being quarantined to be
stopped at the gate by security.
"There was absolutely nobody there," Mr
Sweeting told the House. "We had about
three different groups of people coming from
the farm; we passed a security gate; we drove
through the farm; we saw several immigrants
down along the rows of trees who appeared


to be harvesting, absolutely no security on
that farm as of yesterday (Tuesday, January
25)."
Mr Grey found it strange that no police
security was at the gate. It was his under-
standing that the police had been instructed
to guard the gate to "ensure that nothing
leaves the farm without inspection and noth-
ing goes in."
Coopers Town MP Hubert Ingraham
pointed out that it was impossible to expect
the police to guard a 3,000-acre farm for 24
hours.
"It just can't happen," he commented.
Mr Grey said a special machine, which
would uproot the trees, root and all, was
needed to do the job. Only one had been
located in Abaco.
"We are seeking to get a contract signed
shortly with someone who has the equipment
required," he said. He assured House mem-
bers that "as soon as we can get the equip-
ment and the financial settlement sorted out"
the destruction of the trees will start. This is
a lot of wasted time time in which the bac-
teria can spread.
It is said that in Florida, which has had
several outbreaks over the years, quick action
will eliminate the disease. However, accord-
ing to Mr Grey, government is "doing every-
thing within its power to ensure that the dis-
ease is contained on that farm and generally
on Abaco."
There is talk in Abaco that one of the
largest tomato farmers in Florida has offered
to remove and burn the trees and clean up the
land in return for being allowed to lease the
farm for large scale tomato farming.
Government has been left with almost
4,000 acres of fully prepared land on which
there are 1,500 wells.
About 100 Haitians already have work per-
mits to work the land.
The Florida offer, if genuine, would appear
to be the best solution. But decisions have to
be made and made quickly.
"God is good," is a favourite Bahamian
saying when things get tough, but many foot-
dragging Bahamians often push his goodness
too far.
Instead of getting up and doing for them-
selves, they sit down, yawn and leave it all up
to God's goodness.
We hope that with the help of God's good-
ness, the Ministry of Agriculture will start to
move more decisively. n


The trouble with




a business in




the tourist field


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Slow action on citrus canker


EDITOR, The Tribune.
AN EXCELLENT article
appeared in The Tribune
some time ago by Andrew
Allen entitled "Where we
are and where we could be
in tourism". It inspired me
to write this letter
addressed to the wannabe
Bahamian entrepreneurs
out there who might be
planning to set up tourist
service businesses here or
on the out islands.
As a small Bahamian
entrepreneur I have
endured almost 30 years of
discrimination by local
banks. In spite of more than
adequate collateral, because
my chosen business was
tourist related, I have been
told time and again by my
local (major) banking insti-
tution that I cannot have
loans for property improve-
ment or (amazingly) vehi-
cles, the reason given that
the bank does not support
tourism in any way shape
or form. Had I been a
young person making $250
a week or so, I could quite
easily borrow $20,000 or
more for a new car, but as it
is, I am unable to get a
$10,000 overdraft to tide me
over through such disasters
as 9/11 or hurricanes until I
can regroup, for a business
which, in season, can make
over $1,000 a day or more.
For many years I was
denied a credit card, which
is essential for buying,my
supplies from the US, while
seeing low paid government
workers using their cards at
will. If it was not for the
personal goodwill of indi-
vidual bank managers who
stuck their necks our for
me, I would have been
forced to close my doors a
long time ago. While this
may seem unimportant to
the general public, bear in
mind that there is precious
little to do in Nassau for
our visitors, and my busi-
ness is a one of a kind oper-
ation which cannot easily
be replaced.
While it is wonderful to
see investors open up big
resorts on the out islands
(Exuma, Bimini and San
Salvador spring to mind)
remember that once the vis-
itors get here, they have to
be entertained. Sun and
sand can only go so far -


after that they are looking
for activities which are in
very short supply in Nassau,
and almost non-existent on
the out islands. How else
are they going to leave
those American dollars with
us?
Instead of being able to
save and bank my profits, I
have had to take every
dime I have made over the
years to buy and maintain
my property and vehicles
and even replace almost
everything after one disas-
trous hurricane entirely out
of my own pocket. Once
again I am about to attempt
to replace the tour bus
which has to be done every
five years or so, and once
again I am being given the
run around for a $20,000
loan.
Can I add more to this
sorry saga? Young Bahami-
an entrepreneurs, read on!
My advice to those wishing
to open their own business
in the tourist field for-
get it. Unless you have a
small personal fortune or a
hefty-inheritance, you will
be on your own. The civil
servant/politician set seem
to be wearing blinders. The
road of discrimination
against local entrepreneurs
needs to be trodden to the
bitter end, it seems, for any
of them to open their eyes.
If you can survive the
banks and get started, you
have to next deal with the
tour companies! Mr. Allen
did not touch on this in his
article, but he should turn
his investigative talents to
this area. Oh, yes, the tour
companies! Straight off the
bat, the hotels will not
allow you to advertise your
business in their lobbies. No
way! No advertising. The
only way to get your
brochures to the attention
of the visitors is via the tour
companies' desks.
There are about four
major tour companies in the
country and one of them is
more major than the oth-
ers. They are a law unto
themselves. For the privi-
lege of leaving your
brochures with the reps,


DON STAINTON

PROTECTION

WE SELL OUTER SPACE
TELEPHONE: 322-8219322-8160



ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM


SWE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!


ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978


Calvary Deliverance Church
East Street South
Tel: 325-1802


Come and Worship


with us each Monday at


12:30p.m. during our









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STOREWIDE

SALE



















NO LAY-AWAYS
ALL SAI' ARE FINAL


JOHN'S
ROSETTA ST. 325-4944/323-7332 BAY ST. 322-3156


you will be charged 20 per
cent of your take (per per-
son). In addition, they will
take all your money at the
time of booking leaving you
to go looking for your
cheque at a later date. Thus
they destroy your daily cash
flow, and soon you are
bankrupt, and out of busi-
ness.
They will behave as
though this is somehow
their right by law (rubbish!)
and only strenuous efforts
on your part will prevent
them from making off with
your hard earned cash.
Some activities are paying
as much as 30 per cent to
some of these rip-off artists.
All this is condoned by the
hotels and the government.
The visitors, struggling to
spend their money on their
favourite activity, but being
blocked by tour companies
who are only selling certain
activities where they can
get the commission, are the
frustrated losers. If you
refuse to play the game,
you will be subjected to a
slander campaign. "We,
don't recommend this activ-
ity" is the favourite phrase
to discourage the tourist
from going on a tour not
willing to pay the 20 per
cent commission and sur-
render all monies until a
later date.
Some of the more savvy
tourists realise what is
going on (you can imagine
what 'imbeciles,, we must
appear to these people) but
the majority simply put
their money back in their
pockets. You cannot make
a diver go play golf or vice
versa. They know before
they come here what they
have in mind to do.
It is a great shame that
the general public does not
take more of an interest in
the progress of the coun-
try's number one industry.
If they did, this kind of non-
sense could not continue if
subjected to the cold light
of public scrutiny. But as
long as we all have our
heads buried firmly in the
sand, things will not change.
As the song says, Heaven
help us all!

* E. WILSON
Nassau,
January 27, 2005.








THET IBUINE MONDAY, JANUARY310I5, PWI


Family pays tribute to




novelist Arthur Hailey


Wife Sheila remembers


By JOHN MARQUIS
AS A "born again athe-
ist" with a cantankerous
streak, best-selling novelist
Arthur Hailey was clearly a
man who knew his mind.
But in his feisty wife
Sheila with whom he
enjoyed more than 50 years
of happy marriage before
his death last November -
he definitely met his match.
Both from humble origins,
but with a great love of
books and good writing, this
devoted couple formed a
partnership which propelled
them to unimaginable suc-
cess in every sense of the
word.
Material wealth and inter-
national acclaim did not
impinge upon their rela-
tionship, which Mrs Hailey
recalled with admirable can-
dour in her own book about
their lives together. Nor did
it undermine their strong
sense of family.
Whatever his achieve-
ments as an author, the
redoubtable Arthur admit-
ted towards the end, in
moments of lucidity amid
fading faculties and memory
loss, that marrying his
beloved Sheila was the best
decision he ever made.

Celebration
As Mrs Hailey recalled
among family and friends on
Saturday night, at a special
)- celebration of Mr Hailey's
life, marrying him was also
the best decision she ever
made.
For all his fastidious ways,
his eccentricities, his obses-
sive commitment to organi-
sation and preparation, he
was a man who gave and
received love in full mea-
sure.
And he never allowed his
phenomenal success as a
writer of blockbuster novels
to spoil his essential self, the
ambitious working-class lad
who grew up in a backstreet
in Luton, England, and con-
quered the world of popu-
lar fiction.
The couple's entire family,
including grandchildren and
great grandchildren, were at
the Lyford Cay Club to pay
tribute to .a man who -
against all known odds ful-
'illed his boyhood ambition
>f becoming a successful
writer at a time when people
f his background rarely did.
In her touching speech to
:ores of friends who gath-










MONDAY
JANUARY 31
2:00 Community Page 1540AM
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
7:30 Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:30 Immediate Response
1:00 Lisa Knight & The Round
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10:30 News Night 13
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11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540AM


-t~


I /


ered for the occasion, Mrs
Hailey retraced the mar-
riage which began in the
early 1950s and survived
right into the 21st century.
She spoke of her hus-
band's failure to get work as
a junior journalist on his
home town newspaper, their
early working life in pub-
lishing, his despair at his
lack of success in the writing
career he most wanted to
pursue, and the break-
through which was to
change their lives.

Broadcast
This was the broadcast of
his first play, Flight Into
Danger, in 1956 after which
the phone hardly stopped
ringing. It was, she said, the
best night of their lives and
the change of fortune which
led, ultimately, to a long
succession of bestselling
novels, including Airport,
Hotel, The Moneychangers,
The Evening News and
many more.
Buoyed up by his triumph,
Mr Hailey became the toast
of Hollywood as producers
bought his books and turned
them into box-office bonan-
zas. In the 1960s and 1970s
he was to become one of the
world's most acclaimed pop-
ular authors, having changed
the nature of storytelling.
In 1969, the Haileys came
to the Bahamas and made
their home at Lyford Cay.
It was there Mr Hailey died
in his sleep last Thanksgiv-
ing after suffering a stroke
two months before.
As a non-believer, Mr
Hailey wanted none of the
usual rituals associated with
death. The family made
their own arrangements for
private mourning.
On Saturday, they hosted
a splendid party in line
with Mr Hailey's own
request at which they cele-
brated his life with friends
made during their 36 years
in Nassau.
Mrs Hailey was cited by
the children as the "driving
force" behind the successful
union of her husband's two
families, including the three
sons he had with his first
wife Joan, who died at the
same age 84 only four
weeks before him.
In her tribute, Mrs Hailey
said of her husband: "He'd
had a fabulous life and was
always thankful for his good
fortune. After the shock (of
his death), I was thankful,
too. He had been spared the
continuation of a life which
had lost all quality.
"For the past three years
he had suffered from grad-
ual memory loss. He hated
not remembering friends'
names or faces, but there


strong man, he'd be the
most hen-pecked creature
on this planet.' We met our
match in each other."
Describing him as "a great
companion and my best
friend", Mrs Hailey said:
"He was not possessive or
controlling and he encour-
aged independence. He
made me laugh and his smile
lit up the room as well as my
life
"e had, a,, wonderfully,
successful life. His books
were published in 40 coun-
tries and we visited many of
them.
"My great regret is that he
did not know how much the
world mourned his death.
He would have loved all the
attention."
Reports of his passing by
Reuters and Associated
Press appeared.in more than
330 major ne-wspapers
worldwide.
As a poetry lover, MNr Hai-
ley would have appreciated
verse by Tennyson and
Kipling read by members of
his own family at Saturday's
celebration. And he would
certainly have identified
closely with two songs ren-
dered by a talented vocalist
from the Royal Bahamas
Police Force.
My Way, made famous by
Frank Sinatra, was an
appropriate anthem for one
who had defied fate by
climbing so far.
And The Impossible
Dream, from Man From La
Mancha, captured the
essence of his life. For
Arthur Hailey, writer and
family man, really did reach
the unreachable star.


was still a sweetness to life
and he could cope.
"Then came the stroke on
September 27. The frontal
lobe of his brain was severe-
ly impaired. He could not
use his computer, or read or
watch TV with any under-
standing. It was heartbreak-
ing to see him struggle to try
to say what was on his mind.
Then he'd get angry and say
'Oh, forget it! I-t doesn't
niitti'.04I was the worst-
cse "ce-iarii fof someone
who had`'pent his life using
his mind to create stories."

Lucid
She was grateful he had
some lucid moments
because several times he
said: "The best thing I ever
did in my whole life was
marry you."
Mrs Hailey recalled to
loud laughter: "Each time I
answered 'You're damned
right!' Then I would tell him
the best thing I ever did in
my whole life was marry
him."
Of their earlier life, she
said: "Arthur was not an
easy man to live with. He
was preoccupied with his
writing a lot of the time. He
could be cantankerous and
unreasonable. That goes
with the territory of a
writer's make-up.
"We were both strong and
feisty and argumentative, so
it was no wonder we had our
moments of drama. I used
to say 'If you had married a
less strong woman, she'd be
ground into the earth by
now.' And he'd reply: 'Yes,
and if you had married a less


* BEST-SELLING novelist Arthur Hailey


NOTICE


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INTELLIGENT BUSINESS
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Please be advised that we are experiencing
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325-8666 and 323-3294. We can be contacted
at 326-4173, 328-4329, 356-0056 and 356-
0054 or via email address info@flameless.com
until further notice. We do apologize for the
inconvenience caused.




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Contact numbers are as follows:


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Nassau Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 394-8866/7

Fax: 394-5922

Honlisticu HealthrCare


'a great companion'


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


An environment




to prime minis'


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in,.
'4
in,

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ance on a recent radio talk show.
This is the first in a three-part
series.)


C lna.


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presents a culinary
Greek Festival

January 25th to February 6th
in the Portofino Restaurant
Join us for dinner and discover the cuisine of
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For reservation or infonnation please call 322.3301 e\t. 4045.

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* By SAM DUNCOMBE
WHY is it that when a per-
son defaces a building it is
called vandalism, but when
one obliterates nature it's
"progress"? That was one of
many thoughts running
through my mind as I listened
to Prime Minister Christie
speaking on 102.9 FM on Sun-
day, January 9.
Host Charles Carter opened
the show by congratulating Mr
Christie on his "embracing as
many strands of opinion" to
build a better country, I sat
bemused listening to the "I's",
the "My's" and the
"me's"emanating from the
prime minister.

Vision
It has been a little more
than two-and-a-half years
since the Prime Minister
talked about the inclusive gov-
ernment he would lead if
elected. "Our vision for the
Bahamas will constitute a
covenant with the people, is
inclusive of all
Bahamians", the Prime Min-
ister proclaimed in "Our
Plan." I speak from my own
experience as.one who has
systematically been excluded


Ticket Prices
50.00 reserved
35.00 & 25.00 (Students)
Tickets Available at:
The Palm Court,
(old Madamoiselle) Bay
St. Madamoiselle Palm
Dale & Marathon Mall,
Travellers Rest. Cable
Beach, Femme Boutique
Rosetta St, Indulgence
Shoe Boutique, Rosetta
St. Candy's Variety Store,
East St. South,
Space Kindly Donated by
Arawak Homes


I:


set's reaction




s comments


from most environmental dis-
cussions. The latest set of
betrayals has come as no sur-
prise.

"After riding
the wave of
enormous
sentiment
expressed by
the public to
save Clifton,
the PLP
government has
conveniently
forgotten and
ignored the
people and the
promise they
made."

After riding the wave of
enormous sentiment
expressed by the public to
save Clifton, the PLP govern-
ment has conveniently forgot-
ten and ignored the people
and the promise they made.
The continual dismissal of the


(The following is a response to
comments made by Prime Minister
Perry Christie during his appear-


Prime Minister and his Cabi-
net of issues and concerns
regarding the environment
flies in the face of reason and
belies and belittles the enor-
mous challenges our environ-
ment faces.
I would have hoped that this
Government would have been
astute enough to realise that
they should follow the pub-
lic's wishes, as they did with
the Clifton issue. I would have
hoped that they might have
kept that lesson firmly before
them and continued to gain
the people's trust and admi-
ration.

Impact
In the disappointing two
hours on Island FM's Parlia-
ment Street, the prime minister
never spoke of any initiatives
his Government was taking to
protect the environment.
What he did speak about at
length was the various pro-
jects his government had given
permission to proceed with,
the majority of which most
Bahamians know nothing
about, but which will impact
their lives forever.
LNG and Fairy Dust
On Earth Day last year Mr
Christie was quoted in Parlia-
ment Square by the Nassau
Guardian saying, "We are just
not another country looking
for revenue opportunities. We
are another country, whose
primary industry is tourism,
and therefore we cannot
afford to mistakenly and inap-
propriately agree to develop-
ments and industries that are
inimical or inconsistent with
the best interest of our
tourism industry."
On the Parliament Street
show the prime minister said:
"I've indicated previously and
clearly with the,mintention of. if
.he environmental studies
indicated that those facilities
can be safely and securely
placed in the Bahamas, the
Bahamas will stand to gain
from a significant amount of
revenue each year from their
presence here in the
Bahamas." What miracle of


NOTICE OF SALE

Crown Life Insurance Company
invites offers for the purchase of:-

"Plaza on the Pond" situated on
the corner of East Bay Street
and Ernest Street approximately
500 feet east of Church Street
and the New Paradise Island
Bridge.

Crown Life Insurance Company will
sell as mortgagee under power of sale
contained in a Mortgage dated 16th
January 1990 and recorded in the
registry of records in the city of


Nassau in
to 268.

Term:


volume 5384 at pages 241



Ten percent (10%) of the
purchase price at the time
of contract and the balance
upon completion within.-
thirty (30) days of contract.


Crown Life Insurance Company
reserves the right to reject any and all
offers.

Interested persons may submit writtenri
offers addressed to the office manager,
P.O.Box N 272, Nassau, Bahamas to;
be received not later than the close of
business on Friday the 25th February;,
2005.


science or fairy dust sprinkling
has occurred in less than a
year that has now made all
these concerns disappear?
The fact that the following
environmental and social
issues have never been
addressed or explained by the
government demonstrates that
this project should not be
allowed to proceed:
There has been inadequate
access to the Environmental
Impact Assessments (EIA).
To date, the EIA for AES was
open to the public for 20 days
in Bimini and New Provi-
dence. The Tractebel EIA was
only available in Grand
Bahama. As'a Bahamian I
want to look at any develop-
ment anywhere in this country
and it should be made avail-
able to anyone that wants to
review it. The Bahamas is a
signatory to Agenda 21 which
requires the government to
ensure that the public is
involved and integrated in the
environmental impact process.

Concerns
reEarth submitted more
than 130 questions to the
BEST Commission regarding
environmental concerns. To
date there is no way of know-
ing if any of our concerns have
been addressed, as there has
never been a response to let-
ters written to the Ministry of
Health and the BEST Com-
mission.
The prime minister was also
asked why we should allow
this industry when we don't
have the regulatory structure
or the expertise to deal with it.
He responded: "With
respect to our capacity to reg-
ulate and monitor it well, it
goes without saying, you
know,,I mean there has to be
a beginning somewhere.; We
didn't have the capacity to do
all. sorts of .things, when we
became independent. People
were sayings you can't become
independent 'cause you can't
govern yourself, you can't
regulate yourself. Well that's a
simple matter of having regu-
SEE page 11


The 47th Annual


t r A



2004/2005 --
Sponsored by lP.' l
PILOT CLUB OF
NASSAU BENEFIT OF:


R.E.A.C.H. and Pilot,
Scholarship fund: C.O.B. ,
Whyndham Hotel and
Casino Resort Rain Forest
Theatre
Wednesday February 2.
2005, 8:00pm


I I I I II


'~ ~:ld






THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 7


IO AL


Grenadians in the



Bahamas thanked



for their donation


FRIENDS of Grenada in
the Bahamas received a
special letter of thanks
from Grenada's health
minister for their "gener-
ous donation" to help
rebuild that island's hurri-
cane-damaged hospital.


Grenadians, their fami-
lies and friends living in
the Bahamas, well wishers
from Belize, Barbados and
Toronto, sent Grenada's
Minister of Health their
"widow's mite" of
US$6,000 to assist with the


B the


neighbourhood
WHEN beginning your home search, you should have a
good idea of the features you want the number of bedrooms
and baths, a large or small yard, modern kitchen or office
space. Even more important, however, is where it will all be
located. The community in which you will live will determine
your whole way of life.
Do you have or plan to have a family? Consider proximity to
schools and how many other children are in the neighbour-
hood.
Have a job in town? Think long and hard about your com-
mute. What shoppingand dining options are close by?
Even if you don't have a family, it's still wise to select a
neighbourhood in or near a district with good schools. No mat-
ter what your plans, you should always be considering the
potential resale value of your home. Future buyers will likely put
good schools near the top of their priority list.
Be aware of how much homes in the area have appreciated
over the last few years to get a good indication of the quality of
the neighbourhood. Of course, a real estate professional in the
area will be very familiar with all the communities that interest
you their character and strengths and weaknesses. Aside
from driving around and talking with residents, the agent is your
best source of information for making this all-important ddci-
sion!


hospital's rebuilding.
With the donation went
the hope that in some small
way it would "help to ease
the pain and suffering of
our fellow Grenadians and
anyone who might have to
use the facilities."
Difficult
The Friends of Grenada
told Health Minister Ann
David-Antoine that the
Bahamas had a double
blow hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne and so it was
difficult for them. "to solic-
it funds."
However, as a member of
the International Cultural
Committee they were able,
to raise US$3461.83 at the,
October cultural weekend,
where their group placed
third in the Caribbean
region section,.
Personal
The difference was made
up from personal donations
from Grenadians, friends
and well wishers.
Writing on December 21,
2004 to thank the Grena-
dians in the Bahamas, Min-
ister David-Antoine said
that it was particularly
gratifying "to see the
results of a seed sown only
10 months ago.
This truly shows that
every little counts, that we
each have a contribution to
make and we can make a
difference.
Please convey our thanks
to allconcerned and God
bless you all."


THE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY
is offering limited Bursaries
for Bahamian-Music Students
(voice or instrument)
for
September 2005.
These Bursaries are available
For either The College of The Bahamas
Or other Approved Colleges.


MUSIC BURSARY

Application forms may be obtained from the.
Music Department of The College of The Bahamas
Or by post from The Nassau Music Society,
P.O. Box N-1129, Nassau
(include self-addressed stamped envelope)

Applications must be submitted
No later than 31st, March 2005


PUBLIC CONSULTATION
on
Proposal by the Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited to reduce international and
domestic long distance rates

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is pleased to invite comments
from members of the public and interested parties on its consultation
document on an application by the Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited (BTC) for permission to provide reduced international and domestic
long distance rates ("Interim Rates").
On the 20 January 2005 BTC submitted to the PUC a rate rebalancing
proposal designed to more closely align its retail rates with the underlying
costs of providing the services. As it will take some time to consider the rate
rebalancing proposal BTC has applied to the PUC for approval for interim
rates which will remain in effect until a determination has been made on the
rate rebalancing proposal. The rate rebalancing proposal contain complex
issues of network engineering, economics and finance, and at this time the
Commission is not in a position to say when its assessment and evaluation
'of this document will be concluded.
This means that any proposed changes to the prices for price regulated
services which is time linked to a determination on the rate rebalancing
proposal is likely to be in effect for some time. For this reason the PUC has
decided to hold a separate consultation on the proposed Interim Rates.
Section 6(4) of the Telecommunications Act, requires the Commission
to act in a timely, transparent, objective and non-discriminatory manner and
consistent with the objectives of the Telecommunications Act.


The Public Consultation Document can be obtained from the PUC's office
located in the Agape House at 4t Terrace East, Collins Avenue or downloaded
from the PUC's website at www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs. Written comments
should be submitted by 8th February 2004 via post, hand delivery, facsimile or
e-mail to:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
P. 0. Box N4860, Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax: (242)323-7288
Email: info@pucbahamas.gov.bs




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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 200!,


LOANW


Giving New Year's thanks at





Princess Margaret Hospital


8 By KRYSTAL KNOWLES
Bahamas Information
Services
THE Princess MNargirct Hos-
pital (PMH) celebrated its fourth
annual New Year's thanksgiv-
ing service in the Pharmacy
court yard on Wednesday, Jan-
uary 26.
In attendance were Coralie
Adderley, Chief Hospital
Administrator; Pastor Leonard
Johnson, president of Bahamas
Conference of Seventh Day
Adventists; Fr James Palacious,
chaplain of Princess Margaret
Hospital; Fr Laish Boyd, Rec-
tor of lHoly Cross Anglican
Church; senior executives of the
Public Hospitals Authority
(PHA); members of the PMH
Executive Management Com-
mittee and staff.
In her address, Mrs Adderley
repeated the challenge she made
to PMH staff during the annual
visit of Governor General Dame
Ivy Dumont, in December, 2004.
Mrs Adderley said: "Be
impeccable with words. Say only
what you mean.
"Do not take anything per-
sbnal. What others say and do
is a projection of their own real-
ity, their own dreams. Do not


make assumptions. Communi-
cate with others as clearly as you
can to avoid misunderstandings,
sadness and drama. Always do
one's best. Under any circum-
stances, simply do your best, and
you will.avoid self-judgement,
self-abuse, and regret," said Mrs
Adderley.
Pastor Johnson's sermon
focused on the theme, "Walk-
ing in Wisdom."

Time
"Procrastinators feel they have
a whole lot of time. Procrastina-
tors feel they can put off time
and when we procrastinate we
fail to succeed," said Pastor
Johnson.
"Now is the time to do some-
thing with your life.
"God blessed each and every-
one of us with a gift but what
will you do with the gift is the
question to ask ourselves," he
noted.
He also quoted a personal
motto: "Stop stewing and start
doing", from Dennis Wakley's
"Being the Best".
Pastor Johnson urged the
staff of PMH "to seize the
moment and walk in wisdom in
2005."


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I PASTOR Leonard Johnson. president of The Bahamas
Conference of Seenth-Da3 Adventists. delivering the sermon
at Princess Margaret Hospital's fourth annual New Year's
thanksgiving service on Wednesday, January 26 in the court
yard of the hospital pharmacy.
(BIS photo: Raymond Bethel)



Share your news
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you are raising funds for a .
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area or have won an 4.,.
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and share your story.


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The Bahamas expected to host



Caribbean's first crime forum


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
AS PART of the continu-
ing fight against crime in the
Caribbean diaspora, the
Bahamas is expected to host
the first crime forum for the
region.
In an effort to further edu-
cate Caribbean professionals
in the fields of law enforce-
ment and criminology, and
update and train them in the
advancements of crime fight-
ing, the forum will focus on
criminal activities inherent to
this part of the world.
Criminologist Dr Elliston
Rahming, special assistant to
the prime minister, told The
Tribune that it is expected that
Nassau will serve as the venue
for the region's crime confer-
ence in the coming months.
"I have already been in talks
with my counterpart." in
Jamaica, Trinidad and Farba-
dos," he noted. .,'
Workshops
Yesterday Dr Rahming left
for New Orleans, where he
has been invited to lead two
workshops at the National
Conference on Breaking the
Cycle: Violence, Illegal Drugs
and Youth Crimes in Urban
and Rural Communities.
During the three-day con-
ference at New Orleans'
Southern University, Dr Rah-
ming is scheduled to present
papers on the subjects of
"Rehabilitation Programmes
for Youth Offenders" and "Re-
entry Programmes for Young
Offenders."
The forum will offer the 400
or so participants, made up of
criminal justice students,
scholars and practitioners
throughout the US, talks with
experts on gang culture, vio-


Nassau set to

serve as venue


lence protection and correc-
tional institutions.
The event is jointly spon-
sored by the Criminal Justice
Graduate Programme at the
Southern University in New
Orleans and the Nelson Man-
dela School of Public Policy
at the Southern University in
Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
The conference is also being
sponsored by the Atlanta-
based Institute for Social Jus-
tice, which provides technical
assistance to criminal justice,
law enforcement and commu-


nity-based agencies through
research, training and confer-'
ences.
This group of sponsors is
expected to host the proposed
crime forum in the Caribbean.
Dr Rahming added that the
topics of the Caribbean con-
ference would be tailored to
the needs of the region and
feature workshops and talks
on subjects such as youth vio-
lence, drug abuse and traf-
ficking, gun use, illegal immi-
gration, rehabilitation and
crime prevention.


* TAMPA, Fla.
ABOUT 230 people aboard a cruise ship fell ill with a gas-
trointestinal illness while on a Caribbean voyage, forcing the trip
to end early, according to Associated Press.
About 200 of the 1,220 passengers aboard the Holland Amer-
ica ship Veendam got sick on the voyage, which ended Friday
evening in Tampa, about 13 hours early.
About 30 of the ship's 572 crew members also became sick.
Sick passengers were quarantined to their rooms while crew
members scrubbed banisters, elevator knobs and other areas to
eliminate the virus, which spreads easily in close quarters.
Passengers said they were warned of the virus after about 70
other people became ill aboard the same ship on a two-week
cruise that returned Jan.-15. Passengers-arriving for the next
cruise were offered a refund if they wanted to cancel.
Passengers who took the trip will get partial refunds ranging
from $125 to $250, Holland America spokeswoman Rose Abel-
lo said.


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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. wishes to inform
its valued customers that technicians will conduct an equipment
up-grade in the Fire Trail Road area beginning Thursday, January
20 to Thursday, February 3, 2005 between the hours of 9:00am and
4:30pm daily.

As a result, subscribers residing in the following areas may experience
a disruption in service:

Fire Trail Road (East of Faith Avenue)
All Side Corners on Fire Trail Road as far as I lamster Street

BTC apologizes for any inconvenience, and assures the public that
every effort will be made to complete the upgrade in the shortest
possible time.


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


L N


Father Pugh,



dies age 84


Murder sparks 'feud' fears


FROMypage one
Moss, in an attempt to escape his attackers, ran
through the club, stumbling and falling to the
floor on the rear balcony, the manager said.


"Everyone thought he was drinkk"
he explained, saying it was only when, they
turned on the lights and saw that the victim was
covered in blood, that anyone realized hb was
injured.


FROM page one
After training for the priest-
hood, he settled in the
Bahamas in 1949 and stayed
until the summer of 2003,
when his sister Rita took
him home to South Wales,
where she cared for him
until his death over the
weekend.
Mr Mackey said he
phoned Father Pugh every
week. It was clear, however,
that he was gradually weak-


TWYAMHEIHT


ening when he last spoke to
him.
In his column on Saturday,
Mr Mackey recalled Father
Pugh's contribution to edu-
cation in the Bahamas after
his appointment as priest-in-
charge of St Anne's in 1954.
Classes
Moved by a Bahamian
boy's deep shame at not
being able to read or write,
Father Pugh began classes
with six students in the
church garage. This humble
effort was, in essence, the
forerunner of St Anne's
High School.
Recognising the need for
schooling in Fox Hill, Father
Pugh used the old parish
hall. There were 26 students


and four teachers under his
control as principal.
As the school flourished,
he became chairman of its
board of governors.
Over the years, St Anne's
held its own and built up a
reputation for academic
excellence, producing a long
line of religious leaders and
professional people.
Father Pugh's sister came
to the Bahamas to care for
him and remained for sever-
al months before deciding
him to take him back to
Britain in June, 2003.


See tomorrow's Tribune
for a full story by George
Mackey about Father Pugh's
life in the Bahamas.


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

A professional construction company has a contract
position for an Executive Assistant. Working closely
with the Sr. Construction Manager, you must be
confident, friendly, dedicated capable of multi-tasking
in a fast pace environment have, a thorough knowledge
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First homicide




of the year in




Grand Bahama


mBy DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama Detectives are in es-
tigating the island's first homi-
cide for the Near that occurred
over the weekend when a 35-
year-old man was gunned,
down and killed in the drive-
way of his residence in the
Montgomer) Subdivision.
Supt Basil Rahming report-
ed that Carl Hamilton. alias,
"Car Frazier" and "Don Car-'
los", a resident of No 99,
Alexandria Court, died Fri-
day evening of gun shot
injuries about the body.
Gunshots
He said a young man wear-
ing a grey sweater and a tam
was seen running from the
area of the residence shortly
after gunshots were fired.
According to reports, police
initially received a call around
9.10pm from an unidentified
woman, who reported hear-
ing about eight gunshots being
fired somewhere in the Gren-
fell Avenue area.
Several units were dis-
patched to the area to investi-


gate but were unable to locate
the scene, Mr Rahming said,
until a second call was
received around 9.15pm from
a woman identified as Shirley
Hamilton.
Mrs Hamilton told police
that someone had just shot
and killed her husband, who
was lying in the driveway.
When police arrived at the
scene, they found Hamilton"
lying face down in a pool of
blood. He was wearing short
blue jeans, a black short sleeve
pullover and \white bobb\
socks. '
Supt Rahming said the vic-
tim had suffered gunshot
wounds on the right side of
his chest, right collar bone and
left arm.
Several spent casings were
retrieved from the driveway
by scene-of-crime officers to,
assist police with their inves-
tigations.
Anyone with information
that may assist police are
asked to call the Central
Detective Unit at (242) 352-
9774/5 or the crime hotline at
(242) 352-1919.
* HOTEL FIRE
THE Xanadu Beach Hotel
suffered about $1 million in


damage on Friday when fire
destroyed the entire third
floor of the northeastern sec-
tion of the resort.
Supt Rahming said the fire
erupted shonly after 4pm Fri-
day on the third floor of the
Hibiscus Wing adjacent to the
Marco Polo dining room and
the swimming pool.
Safely
He reported that five visi-
tors and a number of employ-
ees of the Grand Bahama
Shipyard were safely evacu-
ated from the resort as fire-
men battled the flames.
With the assistance from
Airport Crash/Rescue and
BORCO, fire fighters were
able to extinguish the flames
within two hours with no dam-
age to the main building and
lobby area.
In addition to damage. to
the third floor, the first and
second floors sustained con-
siderable water and smoke
damage.
Supt Rahming said prelimi-
nary investigations by fire offi-
cials revealed that the fire was
caused by material igniting on
the roof, where workers were
'doingrepairs.., .


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THE TRIBUNE MONDAYJANUARY 312005,LOCPAGEE11


r JxmIv pageo uc

Area, many of whom he used to
I._ represent when he was MP for
the Kennedy constituency, he
,has learned that although the
initial dispute involved individ-
p ,uals of Haitian descent, "it was
,w .Bahamians who acted to defend
their Haitian neighbours who,
they thought, were being unfair-
ly treated by the police."
F- -- Mr Bethel said that talks with
I witnesses and youth group leaders
confirmed that "the vast majority
'if the participants in the unrest
\ere Bahamians.
V "We, as Bahamians, would be
tooling ourselves if we allow an
untrue aspersion against Haitian-
Bahamians to persist.
"It is a false comfort and a
great distortion of facts to accept
the untrue suggestion that the riot
was in any way, shape or form a
Haitian-Bahamian conflict," he
said.
The Nassau Village incident
escalated, according to residents,
when a police officer
allegedly gun-butted a 16-year-
.old girl and shot a man in the face
awhile he was holding his small
zhild.
Witnesses further said that the
riot was sparked at least partially
by the use of ethnic slurs against
3I'people of Haitian descent by
Lipolice officers.
-e Minister of Immigration Vin-
cent Peet told The Tribune on
s~ynFriday that the hostility between
j Bahamians and Haitians is a seri-
s,,ous and growing problem in the
i country and that an effort should
Lbe made in understanding that




FROM page six

-: latory laws put in place, a
-5' regulatory regime put in
place and having people
,' working for the Bahamas
government who will assist
us in monitoring it."
So we are going to be
b- importing labour to do
these jobs? How do
o Bahamians benefit
b from this industry?
_, Certainly not because
of of job creation. It is
not as simple as
-hi putting a regulatory
-if system in place The
as Bahamas can barely
nc develop relatively
'r "benign" tourist
resorts without severe-
-_. ly. impacting the envi-.
ronment now this
-- government is suggest-
ing that we should
boiler plate laws and
the environment will
be safeguarded? The
government's lack of
S ability and/or desire to
involve its citizenry in
6"N the public process of
I` development does not
bode well for its ability
to implement and mon-
L. itor the laws needed to
develop and monitor
these industries.
[.- The prime minister
continued: "So, yes,
w hen approval is given
there will be a regula-
tory regime in place.
\\e will be able to gov-
ern, monitor and regu-
late what is taking
place."
Approval should not
be given without sig-
nificant public review
being made to these
laws the government is
suggesting, and the
LNG terminals cannot
be given the green
light until this process
has been completed.
If these plants are so
benign why don't they
put them on American
soil? Across America,
from California to
Florida, from the US
borders of Canada and
Mexico, LNG termi-
nals are being chal-
lenged and their citi-
zens are rejecting
them. Why then is the
Bahamas accepting
them with open arms?
American companies
should not be destroy-
ing our country for
American energy
needs, especially when
they have natural gas
supplies of their own


which they choose not
to exploit.
- Sam Duncombe is
the founder of the envi-
ronmental organisation
reEarth. reEarth is a
nonprofit, environmen-
tal watch group, found-
ed in 1990, dedicated to
increasing public
awareness and under-
standing of environ-
mental issues. See
tomorrow's paper for
the second installment.


INmVI chairman


"there has to be a meeting, and
an appreciation by all of us that
live in the Bahamas, of the need
for us to build the Bahamas
together."
However, attorney Eliezer
Regnier said that the Nassau Vil-
lage riot was not a symptom of
increasing hostility between
Haitians and Bahamians, but
rather a sign of hope for improv-
ing relations.
He explained that the residents
showed "solidarity with people
of international origin" by rising
up in defence of their Haitian
neighbours.
Police assured the public that
there will be a full investigation of
the matter.
The FNM chairman yesterday
commended Deputy Prime Min-
ister Cynthia Pratt for her visits to
Nassau Village in an attempt to
begin the reconciliation process,
but pointed out, that "such
promises and actions are not
enough."
"Televised visits by the Deputy
Prime Minister and promises of a
full police inquiry are exactly the
same things that occurred after


the Kemp Road riot two years
ago," he said.
Mr Bethel said the underlying
causes of the Kemp Road riot.
which led to the death of one man
in 2002, were never addressed.
"What is clear is that the viru-
lence and sustained violence in
Nassau Village, over two days,
greatly exceeded that in Kemp
Road," he said.
Mr Bethel said gang-related
activities among some Bahamian
youths in depressed communities,
the drug culture, and the activi-
ties, attitudes and methods
employed by the police should be
fully investigated by an impartial
commission composed of distin-
guished Bahamians who are able
to fearlessly and accurately diag-
nose the underlying social prob-
lems which have contributed to
disturbances such as that in Nas-
sau Village."
He further called for the pro-
posed public inquiry to empha-
sise "reviewing the internal police
complaints procedures in place
to review and punish alleged
human rights abuse and brutality
claims made against police."


ROAM imaimm -r-iL Ar


Government


FROM page three
any word from management
regarding the status of the
resort, they staged demonstra-
tions at the resort and at the
government complex to press
for answers, as well as financial
assistance from the government.
Prior to the storms, Mr
Christie noted that it was no
secret that the resort was finan-
cially strapped and struggling to
stay in business.
In the interest of the Freeport
economy and the welfare of the
employees, he noted that both
of the previous FNM adminis-
tration and PLP governments,
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and other creditors
provided assistance in the hope
of turning the situation around.
"The hurricanes, which struck
Grand Bahama last September,
only served to further aggravate
the situation," Mr Christie said.
In an effort to bring some res-
olution to the troubles at Royal
Oasis, the prime minister said
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe met last Saturday
with David Buddemeyer of
Driftwood concerning the sta-


tus of the resort.
Mr Christie said it was
revealed that the intentions of
the owners were not to reopen,
but rather to sell the resort for a
sum equal to the resort's mas-
sive liabilities and to collect
insurance proceeds.
The resort has accrued mil-
lions in liabilities, including mil-
lions in unpaid National Insur-
ance contributions for employ-
ees, and additional millions to
the Port Authority and other
local creditors.
Driftwood Venture Inc, a
hotel management company
based in West Palm Beach,
Florida, bought the resort in
Freeport in May, 2000, for $25
million. The company also owns
and operates two other resort
properties in the Bahamas.
Mr Christie said the deputy
chairman and managing director
of the Hotel Corporation and
the corporation's financial advis-
er were sent to Florida last
Monday for a further meeting
in Florida with the Driftwood


Price (Busters


name brands& sE





fflkB~~2: 9s *^^^.





'*D^BH i> 'Y^ *HV
.t


I


Zof

3 1a


Savings and a Smile

in every Aisle!


Wong's Plaza, Madeira Street
Robinson Rd.
Independence Shopping Ctr.
Bay St.
East St. South
Nassau St.
Prince Charles Dr.
The Mall at Marathon
Carmichael Rd.
Soldier Rd
Thompson Bvid.
Soldier Rd. (HQ)


Group.
The meeting, he said, was
aimed at obtaining a fuller and
current update on the financial
position of Driftwood Freeport
Limited.
Following the report to Cab-
inet, Mr Christie said he, along
with the Minister of Tourism
and the sub-committee, met
with representatives of the
employees of Royal Oasis to
bring them up to date on the
initiatives being taken by gov-
ernment.
Mr Christie said the govern-
ment plans to travel to New
York and take with them two
representatives of the workers
to meet with the principals of
Leman Brothers regarding the
acquisition of the resort.
"They will be there present
with us in the board meeting as
we engage in discussions," he
said.
The Tribune has been told
that Mr Christie, Mr Wilch-
combe and the employees left
for New York yesterday.


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 11


A AL


' *-.if-sssV


THE TRIBUNE


cb:-


&61






THE TRIBUNE


pDAnr 19 MONDAY. JANUARY 31. 2005


INERATIOALNW


EU urged to link Cuba ties




to human rights reforms


* BRUSSELS, Belgium
HUMAN Rights Watch
on Monday urged the
European Union to hold
off normalising economic
relations with Cuba until
Fidel Castro's regime
releases dozens of dissi-
dents and introduces legal
reforms, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
"Cuba's recent release of
some of the dissidents is a
welcome step, but, it does
not signal a meaningful
change in the government's
repressive policies," said
Jose Miguel Vivanco,
Americas director at the
New York-based human
rights watchdog.
In a statement, Human
Rights Watch said it
expected an EU foreign
ministers' meeting Monday
to consider dropping
restrictions imposed on
relations with Cuba in 2003
following a crackdown on
dissidents.

Agenda
However, the issue was
not on an agenda for Mon-
day's talks released by
Luxembourg, which was
chairing the meeting.
Relations between Cuba
and Europe chilled after
Havana cracked down on
the opposition in March
2003 sentencing 75 dissi-
dents to prison terms
ranging from six to 28
years.
European nations were
also troubled by the firing-
squad executions around
the same time of three men
who tried to hijack a ferry
to the United States.
EU nations reduced
high-level governmental


visits and participation in
cultural events in Cuba and
invited dissidents to
embassy gatherings.
The Cuban government
responded by freezing
diplomatic contacts
with European emb-
assies.
In recent weeks, contacts
have gradually resumed,
following the release of 14
of the 75 dissidents.
Human Rights Watch
said the EU should press
for human rights reform
and hold back from a com-
plete normalization of rela-
tions until there is more
progress.

Pawns
By releasing a few of the
dissidents, Vivanco said,
Cuban President Castro
was using human
beings as pawns in a politi-
cal game aimed at
improving relations with
Europe."
The 2003 dispute also
saw the EU defer a request
by Cuba to join the EU's
trade and aid pact with
African, Caribbean and
Pacific nations, member-
ship of which could have
granted easier access to
European markets.
Havana withdrew its
request after the EU linked
it to human rights improve-
ments.
Cuba also refused to
accept further assistance
from the EU's aid budget,
which had allocated
US$11.3 million to the
island in 2002.
The 25-nation EU is
Cuba's biggest trading
partner, with two-way com-
merce totaling US$2.09 bil-
lion in 2003.


01


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CHAIRMAN'S REPORT
L N AUDITED RESULTS FOR THE FIRST QUARTER ENDED
OCTOBER 31, 2004


FREEPORT OIL HOLDINGS CO. LTD
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET


(B $000)


October 31,2004


July 31,2004


On behalf of the Board of Directors, I am pleased to announce that
despite the recent hurricanes the first quarter financial results of
Freeport Oil Company Limited are very encouraging.


Assets
Liabilities
Total shareholders' equity


$ 25,525
7,139
18,386


$ 25,618
7,989
17,629


The unaudited net income for the three months ended October 31,
2004 was $1.557 million up from $1.512 million for the same
period last year. Earning per share for the period ending October
31st, 2004 increased to 19 cents compared to 18 cents for the same
period last year.


- .-.. $ .....- 25,525


$ 23,618


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
(B $000)


Year ended October
31,2004


Year ended October
31,2003


While we encountered many operational challenges during the
hurricanes our staff and company faired well. la.inagimnt is
continuing to review our business activities to ensure optimal
financial results going forward.


Sale & revenues
Cost and expenses
Income from operations
Other income (expense)


Net Income


$ 17,595
16,016


$ 13,145
11,598


1,579 1,574
(22) __(35)

$ 1,557 $ 1,512


I would like to thank Management, and Staff for their unselfish
efforts in restoring full services to our customers immediately
after the hurricanes.


Earnings per share

Dividends per share


0.19

0.11


0.18

0.11


Copies of a full set of the audited financial statements can be obtained from
Stephen Adderley, Finance Manager at the Freeport Oil Company located on
Queens Highway, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday from
8:30 AM TO 5:00 PM.


Sir Albert J. Miller
Chairman & President


SANPIN MOTORS LTD.

Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377,326-6464/5,326-0013/4,326-6382 Fax: 326-6315
Email: sanpin@hotmail.com


I


--~--PI~--~--







MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


. Carnival time in Haiti


LEFT: Haitian men play instruments during a celebration of the National Carnival in
Jacmel. 110 miles southeast of Port-au-Prince in Haiti, Saturday, Jan 29, 2005.
(AP Photo/A riana Cubillos)
.. -BELOW-LEFF: Volel Robert family are painting hats for sale during this weekend carni-
val celebrations in Jacmel.
(AP Photo/A riana Cubillos)


FMW


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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT





The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. wishes to advise that
it will -commence disconnecting services for all accounts with
overdue balances, and ceasing services to accounts with no activity
for three or more months beginning Monday, February 14, 2005.

Customers whose services are disconnected will have their security
deposits applied to the outstanding charges, and will be required
to apply for a new account and pay a new deposit and reconnection
fee.

As a result, both cellular and landline subscribers with outstanding
balances on inactive accounts are urged to safeguard their services
by contacting the Credit & Collections office, JFK Drive to make
payment agreements.

Payments may be made at any BTC cashier counter as well as any
branch of Royal, Scotia, British American and First Caribbean
Banks, as well as Finco Bank Line. Subscribers are also reminded
that for their convenience, BTC's Mall at Marathon office is open
oni Saturdays to facilitate bill payment during the hours of 10:00am
to5:00pm.










BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BSI Overseas (Bahamas)' Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently seeking a
Bahamian national for the position of

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP OFFICER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Officer must have banking or financial
degree and at least 7 years private banking experience in the offshore banking sector,
be fluentjn __Spanish &/or Portuguese, have knowledge of international investment
instruments & money markets', ability to partner with team members, must be confident
regarding customer relations, investments & portfolio management and have thorough
knowledge of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international
banking practices.

Personal qualities:-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
:Commitment to quality and service excellence
.Able to work independently with minimal supervision
Financial and analytical background
Able to lead and supervise
Interest in development of PB products and marketing
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers
Supervise account relationships in Latin America
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors or agents
-- Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking professionals
Meet deadlines on timely basis

Deadline for receipt of applications is February 21, 2005.

Resumes should be faxed to #702 1253 or mailed or delivered to the offices of BSI,
addressedJo :-
Personnel Officer
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P. OBox-N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.


'i


e C I ~I ---- I~~y__


.. I -~--


00





THE TRIBUNE


PAGF 14. MONDAY. JANUARY 31. 2005


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THE TRIBUNE


The 2005 Cacique Awards

All smiles at the Regency Theatre in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday


N MR HINES from Discover Cruise Line accepts the International Award from Grand Bahama
tourism board exec David Johnson.


* THE International Award travel agent award went to Neil Henderson (Banana Travel).


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MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


SECTION


business@l00jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


-Ndca
aiato


Mayaguana


investors


to

By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Report
,T he develop
$12 m
Mayagu
investment
T, Boston-bas
Group, will construct an
foot airport runway on
island to support landing
Boeing 737 jets, with this
set to be completed by D
ber.
Junaid Yasin, project


build.

ager for I-Group's Mayaguana Bosi
investment, said the goal was
ter to have an airport facility capa- y
ble of handling direct flights
-r of a from New York, Boston and wi
million the entire eastern seaboard of
a n a the US. The company has
t, the entered into a joint venture with
sed I- the Hotel Corporation -)f the
11,000 Bahamas for the project, also in ti
n that Mr Yasin said the terminal Mobili
ngs by will be expanded and upgrad- tourism i
project ed to accommodate commer- project,
)ecem- cial and international traffic to received
and from the US. An industrial began in
man- park surrounding the airport is the consi


new


runway


ton-based I-Group to complete airport project
December, with hopes tourism development
11 attract other investors and expand island's
population to size of Turks & Caicos


the plans.
station of the I-Group's
and island development
, which has already
approval in principle,
October and includes
truction of a desalina-


tion plant by the end of 2005. A'
formal ground-breaking cere-
mony in Mayaguana is expected
to take place by April, following
an anticipated March signing of
a Heads-of Agreement with the
Government.


Mr Yasin said the group's
environmental impact study, is
substantially completed, though
he failed to indicate when the
document would be turned over
to the Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology


(BEST) Commission.
Addressing the second annu-
al National Tourism Confer-
ence, held at the Westin at Our
Lucaya in Grand Bahama, Mr
Yasin said the developers were
also looking to increase the pop-
ulation size of Mayaguana from
its current 400 residents to one
that rivals the Turks and Caicos,
or some 20,000.
The joint project will involve
the construction of a 25-room
boutique resort, a 300-lot sec-
See ISLE, Page 3B


Forum to produce follow-up


Immigration report by
By NEIL HARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor


Pirates of the Caribbean deal
signed with Disney; Royal
Oasis owner seeking a buyer
rather than re-opening


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The $76 million Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises film studio
investment in Grand Bahama
"appears to be a go", The Tri-
-bune was told late last night,
with the company having signed
a contract with Disney to film a
substantial part of Pirates of the
Caribbean 2 and 3 in this nation.
'Paul Quigley, one of the three
principal investors behind the
Gold Rock Creek venture, said:
"In essence we are a go."
He confirmed that work had
started on the water tank that
will be situated at Gold Rock


Creek's Grand Bahama studios,
and which will be used to film
many of the water and ship-
based scenes for the Pirates of
the Caribbean 2 and 3 movies.
Mr Quigley added that the
company had "signed with Dis-
ney" the multi-million contract
for the films.
The Tribune understands that
Gold Rock Creek has received
most of the necessary govern-
ment approvals, and is only
waiting on the last few permits.
Meanwhile, Prime Minister
Perry Christie confirmed what
most had suspected that Drift-
See FILM, Page 2B


The Financial Services Con-
sultative Forum will publish a
follow-up to its controversial
Immigration report before the
2005 second quarter ends,
making further recommenda-
tions and drawing upon find-
ings fron lu:i'hcr consultation
iithi industry bodies and the
general public.
Brian Moree, the Forum's
chairman, told The Tribune


Q2 end
that the Government had
reviewed the body's mandate
for another year, and it hoped
to use last weekend's Finan-
cial Services Retreat in Exu-
ma as a pad from which to
launch public debate on the
Immigration report.
Mr More, who is senior
partner at the McKinney, Ban-
Scroft & Hughes law firm, said:
"We anticipate that we will be'
preparing and submitting to
See FORUM, Page 3B


Bahamas-based

software firms


'bypassed' on


public contracts


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tbune Business Editor
::Bahamian software develop-
eri. and IT consultants believe
th-ey have been "effectively
bypassed" by the Government
in the awarding of public sec-
tor contracts, with requests for
proposal (RFPs) and the time-
Slines in which to submit bids
weighted in'favour of large for-
eign suppliers.
;,An experienced Bahamian
software and IT consultant, who
requested anonymity, said in a
letter to The Tribune that while
transparency appeared to have
'improved recently through the
advertising of government con-
Stracts and RFPs, their "actual
wording" seemed to indicate
,there was no intention of
'awarding the work to Bahamas-


owned entities.
In the letter, which was
sparked by The Tribune's reve-
lation that the Ministry of
'Finance was preparing to put
out to tender bids for an inte-
grated software system that will
permit "electronic processing"
of all Road Traffic Department
services, the developer said:
"Those of us who have been
struggling for many years to
make a living in the software
and IT consultancy field appear
to still be effectively bypassed
by our own government when it
comes to getting a piece of the
pie.
"After all, if the Bahamas is
to develop locally-provided IT
services, government must pay
more than lip service to the con-
See IT, Page 2B


www.mlcronet.bs
.s Since 1983


BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Sales Rentals Supplies Services

Uewriz onutn


Micronet's commitment
in providing our customers
with the best service and
support is reflected in
our large staff of qualified,
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email: info@imcronet.bs
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Nassau, N.P. Bahamas


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By Fidelity


Capital Markets


12




qu


Bahamas stock market
Findex: 420.14
Unchanged: 0.00 points
Percentage Change: 0.00 per cent
Market Capitalisation: $2.10 billion
Change: -$3.3 million
Volume Traded: 71,106
Volume Leaders:
Volume % of Volume
BOB 6,300 8.86%
CBL 8,350 11.74%
CHL 49,806 70.04%
Major Market Movers:
Closing Price Price Change
BOB $5.55 -$0.20
BAB $0.87 -$0.08
FCL $7.95 -$0.05


International Markets
FX Rates
Wkly % Change
CAD $1.2390 1.41
GBP 1.8878 0.54
EUR 1.3041 -0.04
Commodities:
Wkly %Change
Crude Oil $47.18 -2.78
Gold $425.80 -0.26
International Stock Market Indexes:
Wkly %Change
DJIA 10,427.20 0.33
S & P 500 1,171.36 0.30
NASDAQ 2,035.83 0.08
Nikkei 11,320.58 0.73


exportss this year are likely to cent on signs that the Organi- debt.
bound, aided by a weaker dol- station of Petroleum Exporting A budget actually creates
ir, economists said. Countries (Opec) will postpone extra money for you to use on
Consumer and: business additional production cuts after things that matter to you.
pending, which continued to prices rallied to almost $50 a A budget helps you sleep
how strength in the fourth barrel this week. better at night because you do
quarter, will also underpin the Energy ministers from OPEC not lie awake worrying about
upansion. members Kuwait, Libya, Iran, how you are going to make
Indonesia, Venezuela and the ends meet.
Crudf Oil Falls ... United Arab.Emirates.this... .. ...
Crude"6il fell almost 3 per weeksaid,;the group should-. Dividend/AGM Notes:, ,.;.
S leave output Unchanged ata; a BSL to pay dividends of $0.24
January 30 meeting. on February 2, 2005, to share-
Oil has risen on concern that holders of record as at Novem-
OPEC would restrict supplies ber 2, 2004.
or that Iraqi exports would be
slowed by violence ahead of the FCL to pay dividends of $0.11
elections there, also set for Jan- on February 15, 2005 to share-
uary 30. holders of record as at.January


Investors Tip of the Week
Ways that a budget can
improve your life:
A budget can keep you out
of debt or help you get out of


21,2005.
ICD to pay dividends of
$0.135 on February 17,2005, to
shareholders of record as at
February 3, 2005.


IT (From page 1B)


cept of the Bahamas becoming
a centre for e-business and must
.actively encourage local talent
and enterprise in the field of
information technology by
involving them in publicly-fund-
ed projects, even if only in part-
nership with offshore suppliers.
"Do you think it possible that
some of us locals may be able to
participate in at least part of the
proposed new Road Traffic Sys-
tem?"
The letter said the advertising
of recent government IT con-
tracts was a "welcome exercise
in transparency", as several pre-
vious tenders, including those
for work at the Ministry of
Tourism and Registrar Gener-
al's Office, appeared to have
been awarded without any pub-
lic process.
However, the developer
questioned why government
departments felt it necessary to
advertise such contracts local-
ly, "when it is obvious upon
reading the actual wording of
the documents that there is no
intention whatsoever that this
work will be given to any local
entity".
The letter cited advertise-
ments for the RFP to provide
an IT system for the Post
Office. The RFP devoted a


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great amount of pagination "to
specifying rules and conditions
to an almost ridiculous degree
that the prospective supplier
must adhere to id order to even
be considered, and most of
which automatically eliminate
any Bahamian supplier".
The conditions included the
stipulation that the IT supplier
show it had implemented at
least three other Post Office sys-
tems.
And the deadline for all
responses to be submitted is
February 4, 2005, "a period of
just two weeks".
The letter added: "A slightly
different example is the pre-
qualification request for an IT
security risk assessment as
advertised by BEC...... on Tues-
day, January 11, with replies
required by Friday, January 14,
a matter of a few days."
In the event, the deadline was
extended until the following
Tuesday. "While such a time
constraint might be considered
reasonable by some, I myself
feel it is unreasonable and have
gained the impression that, in
the circumstances, the whole,
exercise is just so much wallpa-
per designed to appear to fulfil
recent guidelines on corporate
governance," the letter said.


Flim (From page 1B)
wood Hospitality, operator of the Royal Oasis Crowne Plaza and
Golf Resort and the property's ultimate owners, the private equi-
ty arm of Wall Street investment bank Lehman Brothers, had
decided to sell the resort for a sum that would wipe out its massive
$20-$30 million liabilities.
The current owners, he told the Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce Installation Banquet, had decided not to reopen the
Royal Oasis but instead seek a buyer and collect the insurance
monies for hurricane daamge.
This effectively leaves the 1300 hotel employees in limbo until a
buyer can be found, and it is unlikely that any prospective purchaser
will want to pay the $25 million that Lehman Brothers, through
Driftwood, purchased it for in 2000 due to the property's troubled
history.
Mr Christie said a Spanish hotel company and the Radisson
had both viewed the Royal Oasis this week and opened discussions
with Driftwood about a potential purchase, while three other hotel
operators were alos being viewed as prospective buyers.
The Bahamas is this week set to sign a trade agreement, civil avi-
ation agreement and tourism agreement with China at the first
China-Caribbean business conference in Jamaica.


nurn_


BUSINESS


I investors were pretty
active in the Bahamian
market this past week,
as 71,000 shares
changed hands. This
marked the largest trading week
thus far for 2005.
The market saw nine out of
the 19 listed stocks trade, of
which one advanced, four
declined and four remained
unchanged. Volume leader dur-
ing the week was Colina Hold-
ings (CHL), with 49,806 shares
changing hands and accounting
for 70 per cent of the total
shares traded.
The big mover in the market
last week was FINCO (FIN),
whose share price rose by $0.05
to close at its 52-week high of
$9.75. On the down side, Bank
of the Bahamas (BOB) share
price lost $0.20 to end the week
at its new 52-week low of $5.55.
US ECONOMIC NEWS
US GDP growth slowed in
Quarter Four 2004
The US economy cooled to
a 3.1 per cent growth rate in the
final three months of last year,
hindered by a record trade
deficit.
The slower-than-expected
increase in fourth-quarter gross
domestic product (GDP) fol-
lowed 4 per cent growth in the
third quarter, according to the
Commerce Department in
Washington.
Even so. the economy
expanded by 4.4 per cent in
2004, the most since hitting a
4.5 per cent rate in 1999.


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, JANUARY 31,2005, PAGE 3B '


THF TRIBUNE


Family Island development





needs radical airlift reform


By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter

RADICAL aviation reforms are required if
the Bahamian tourism industry, particularly Fam-
ily Island destinations, are to grow and develop,
an industry analyst said.
Richard Asper, chairman of the US-based Avi-
ation Professionals Group, suggested there were
legitimate alternatives to providing "destination


Out Island" air service, and outlined four condi-
tions necessary to eliminate the "mess" that is
Family Island air transportation; political will,
the modifying of national pride, an embracement
of capitalism-lite and the reallocation of national
tourism dollars.
Hitting on a problem already identified but
not solved, Mr Asper said Bahamasair must
essentially run two airlines. While noting that
the national flag carrier does as well as most oth-


er government-owned airlines saddled with the
responsibility of trying to sell 'two sizes fit all', he
said that unlike privately-owned airlines such as
Southwest, Bahamasair did not have the ability to
only embrace markets that fit its equipment.
Mr Asper said the Government should stop
all "open skies" negotiations, particularly with
the US, and should signal the International Civ-
il Aviation Organisation (CAO) that it intended
to apply for and grant rights to foreign airlines to


operate within the Bahamas.
He added that the Government should also
secure a cabotagee waiver', which permits the
domestic operation within and between one coun-
try's airports by the airline of another country.
He admitted that following this recommenda-
tion might create international aviation market-
place controversy, and would initially but tem-
See CHANGE, Page 4B


Forum (From page 1B)


the Government a follow-up had also caused "considerable Mr Moss said: "They had put
report before the end of the sec- concern" among Bahamian pro- the cart before the horse and
ond quarter that will summarise fessionals in the financial ser- this serves to prove the point.
these consultation, provide our vices sector, and the Forum They're now trying to save face
views on the issues and what- would "certainly be speaking by saying we'll discuss this and
ever further recommendations further with them". submit a supplementary report.
and findings we make in that However. Mr Moree said If they intend to do it right, that
regard." much criticism of the report had has to be the primary report."
The Forum was aiming to stemmed from people misun- However, Mr Moree said the
stage "two major public meet- derstanding its aims, content debate on the report now had to
ings" on the Immigration and terms of reference. He has focus on how the Bahamas
Report during the 2005 first received backing on this from struck the right balance
quarter, with further consulta- Dr David Allen, the Urban between the advancement and
tion set to take place with finan- Renewal Commission's chair- promotion of Bahamians in the
cial services industry organisa- man, who agreed that the report financial services industry "and
tions within the next three to was not advocating the aboli- the need for outside specialist
four months. tion of 'Bahamianisation'. expertise in specific designated
Among the bodies the Forum However, Paul Moss, man- areas".
will consult are the Bahamas aging director of Dominion He added that advancement
Bar Association, the Bahamas Management Services, said the of either one of those agendas
Institute of Chartered Accoun- move to produce a supplemen- at the expense of the other
tants, the Association of Inter- tary report to the original "would not be productive and
national Banks and Trusts, the "serves to prove the point" that would impair the future devel-
Bahamas Financial Services the first document was opment of the industry".
Board and the Clearing Banks "flawed" and the Forum was "What we've got to discuss
Association. "trying to save face". and review is what is the best
The Immigration Report He told The Tribune: "By way of achieving the correct bal-
aroused considerable contro- their admission the first report ance," Mr Moree said.
very when it was released, with is flawed. It's a glaring admis- "A large part of the debate
Bahamians both inside and out- sion. They still don't get it." will focus on just how we
side the financial services indus- Mr Moss claimed the Forum achieve that and we hope to
try interpreting it as advocating sub-committee had gone about reach further recommendations
the "abandonment of'Bahami- compiling the Immigration on that in our supplementary
anisation'" and threatening the report in the wrong way, and report."
advancement and promotion of should have consulted with the Mr Moree described as "a
Bahamians in the sector. professional bodies in the sector false concern" fears that the
Mr Moree acknowledged to and Bahamians before publish- Immigration report was advo-
The Tribune that the report had ing the first document. eating that foreigners would
produced a "mixed reaction", He added that the sub-corn- take Bahamian jobs and
but said the Forum was intent mittee, in the 30 interviews con- Bahamians would not be able
on generating further dialogue ducted for the report, should to pursue a career in their own
and felt it was "vitally impor- have paid more attention to country. "That is not going to
tant we at least revisit the exist- these concernsrather than, happen and no oneSjisg ,.pc
ing immigration' poilicyias'iti4L focusing. on"people from multiu ing-that position," hesaid. .
relates to the financial services national corporations" 'wh-o&;r "What wei have to do is
industry". would not express opposing, recognize that while we base a
The Forum chairman views because to do so would considerable amount of exper-
acknowledged that the Report "bite the hand that feeds them". tise in many areas, we do not


Isle (From page 1B)


ond home community, a 60-slip
marina, which is expected to be
completed by 2006. and the
implementation of infrastruc-
ture that will support large scale
development and other resort
and second home communities,
including a golf course, while
maintaining the environmental
integrity of the island.
With no fresh water on the
island, the I-Group is also look-
ing to build a reverse osmosis
plant and a sewerage treatment
plant that will be available to
residents. Ecologically sensi-
tive areas will be set aside for
preservation with the creation
of parks and other community-
based initiatives.
According to Mr Yasin, with


no generational property on the
island, there is room for wide-
spread development by both the
I-Group and other in% estors to
assist in the development of the
country's tourism industry and
economy.
The selection of Mayaguana
for the project, Mr Yasin
explained, took place because
investors were looking for a
large, long-term project near
the US.
They also wanted a destina-
tion that had a warm climate
with beautiful, natural features,
a stable government, a safe and
secure environment where they
could partner with both the
Government and people, and
had the possibility for follow-


up investment vehicles.
Identifying some of the chal-
lenges ahead for investors, Mr
Yasin said the island's remote
location and unfamiliarity of the
target market with the location
were two key' problems that
would need to be addressed.
He noted that the poor infra-
structure, with no marina, air-
port, poor existing roads and
lack of fresh water, would have
to be overcome.
While the Government is said
to be a partner in the project,
the I-Group will be absorbing
the equity financing, hey have
also committed to using the
maximum amount of indige-
nous materials for construction
and for landscaping.
The Mayaguana population
is also expected to benefit by
the construction of a laboratory
at the school in Abrahams Bay
and upgrades to the existing
clinics.


have all the expertise to service
international business.
"We have to try at the same
time to cultivate our existing
expertise to provide training
and advancement for Bahami-
ans in the sector and use for-
eign expertise in specific areas
appropriately to develop our
industry."
In its report, the Forum's
immigration sub-committee
found from interviewing more
than 30 unnamed sector profes-
sionals that there were "not suf-
ficient numbers of attorneys in
the Bahamas experienced in
financial sector products that
can respond in a timely man-
ner to the fast-paced demands
of the industry.


"In addition, they .also
observed that the closed nature
of the profession has led to a
lack of sophistication and expe-
rience at the Bahamas Bar in
key growth areas."
The Immigration report con-
cluded: "We are of the view
that it will be impossible for the
Bahamas financial services sec-
tor to grow beyond its present
level if the Bahamian; attor-
neys/law firms are unable to
hire foreign lawyers who are
capable of offering greater
depth of legal expertise....... than
is presently available.
"The Bahamas must have a
pool of lawyers with the exper-
tise and depth in financial
instruments and products in


order to rapidly respond to the
needs of the time sensitive
financial services sector......
"The fact that both Cayman
and Bermuda permit foreign
attorneys to practice in those
jurisdictions has significantly
contributed to their ability to
surpass the Bahamas and attract
and serve robust capital and
financial sectors.
"We are of the.view that the
expertise that foreign attorneys
will bring to the Bahamas will
inure to the benefit of the entire
Bahamian legal community.;
Foreign attorneys will bring
spin-off business and vital net-
working capability with other
international financial services
providers."


SBAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGER
SAFETY & ENVIRONMENTAL DEPARTMENT
ENERGY SUPPLY DIVISION
A vacancy exists in the Energy Supply Division for a Safety and Environmental Manager.

The Safety and Environment Manager is responsible for implementing and maintaining best practices in Safety
and Environmental Administration and Operations within the Corporation. The manager will also advise line
managers on safety and environmental procedures and policies, focus on minimizing accidents, and injuries,
organize .safety training, and monitor the safety and environmental practices of the Corporation.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Developing and managing Corporation-wide safety and- environmental programs,
* Dew'loping.tgte*Wide p ies and procedures on fire prevention -i -,
*Assisting and advising line tM agers in developing departmental plans on fire extinguishing and controls
y.Liaising with Insurance Compani.es.. nO arranging .sfe.t inspection. by Insurers Inspectors
Performing safety audits of all Corporation faciuiies I
* Maintaining and updating Corporation-wide policy on employee safety rules and practices
* Advising on suitable methods of measuring corporate safety performance
* Directing and evaluating Contractors performing environmental work and projects
Assisting and advising line managers in safety training and other safety matters
* Planning, organizing and conducting seminars and courses on safety topics
* Serving on special committees investigating major industrial accidents
* Coordinating the preparation and the updating of the hurricane precaution plan
* Monitoring pre-hurricane season preparations and reports for Management
* Establishing goals and objectives for environmental compliance for the Corporation
* Ensuring that ALL Divisions comply with environmental regulations by defining environmental problems,
performing site surveys. inventor) and record keeping control, secure relevant permits. Environmental audits,
contingency, planning pro% ide recommendations for environmental compliance and evaluation of progress
* Identifying hazardous matenals and establishing safe handling methods to minimize risk to workers and the
environment
* Maintaining and updating company policies and procedures related to Safety and the Environment within
the Corporation

Job requirements include:

* A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Occupational Health & Safety, Environmental Health or in a related
discipline
A minimum of 5 years post-tertiary experience in an industrial safety and environment position
Excellent leadership and management skills
Strong Project Management skills
Good interpersonal skills
Strong judgement and sound reasoning ability
to interpret technical reports and drawings
Sound knowledge of safety and environmental regulations, practices & procedures

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application Form to
The Manager, Human Resources & Training, Head Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Roads,
P.O.Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas, on or before Friday, February 14, 2005.


w sOColina
Pricing nrmai Asl Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
28 January 2005
X ULSTU D TRADEB dW 'TSI VI9T WWWWISXBAHAMAS.COM PO R MORE DATA & FORMATIONN
SIX AU. u I W-St 8 CCNLOENM040. IOHN %00.071 %CHOM 00.011 YTD 171.76 I YT13% 1,8t
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Prevlous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS S DIv S PIE Yield
1.39 1.10 AbacoMarKeLs 1.10 1.10 000 0197 0.000 NiM 0 00."
7.50 7.30 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 5.55 5.55 0.00 1,754 0.152 0.330 10.8 5.95%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.95 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.87 British American Bank 0.87 0.87 0.00 0.007 0.040 11.8 4.60%
7.25 6.30 Cable Bahamas 7.20 7.20 0.00 300 0.510 0.240 14.1 3.33%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.17 6.58 Commonwealth Bank 7.15 7.15 0.00 8,000 0.632 0.390 11.3 5.45%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.99 3.99 0.00 400 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.26%
9.75 8.05 Finco 9.75 9.75 0.00 0.649 0.480 15.0 4.92%
7.50 6.30 FirstCaribbean 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 7.95 Focal 7.95 7.95 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.2 6.29%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J.S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.27 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.72 5.87 0.15 1,000 0.245 0.000 23.3 0.00%
1000 1000 Prem;er Real Estate 10 00 10 00 000 0694 0350 144 350%
Fidelity Otr-The-Cqunter Seourities
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid S Ask S Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S Div S PI/E Yield
13.00 13.00 Bahamas SupermarKets 13.00 14.0u ir:, 0' ,1 328 0 960 10.5 686%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
060 0 40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
S"O l oa rIvr-ThCounter Securitlp ....
4300 28 00 ABD-AB 4100 4300 41100 2220 0000 19.4 000%
1600 13 00 Bahamas Supermarels 13.00 1-400 13 00 1 105 0810 14.6 693%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
SIBSX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD'o Last 12 Months Div S Yield %
1 2060 1 1509 Colina Money Markel Fund 1 205953"
20536 1 8154 Floellty Bahamas G & I Fund 2 1191"'"
10.2148 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648."".*
2.1746 2.0012 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.174583**
1 0848 1.0823 Colina Bond Fund 1.084821*"**
PIFNDBtC L.OaSifE 420:140 /YTD O12.s-29 I 2003 .594%
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19 Dec 02= 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamingt FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 100
AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ *- AS AT DEC. 31,2004
AS AT JAN. 14. 20051** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/*** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
TOI T4A CAU1 4COIA EA -4W-1 I /I 2420-7M74 a-w?- "


PROPERTY MANAGER /

ELECTRICAL &

MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN

Required for large private estate, an enthusiastic,
hands-on, and hard-working team-player to maintain
all technical aspects of a new state-of-the-art facility.

Must have certified qualifications in electrical or
mechanical engineering, good communication and
computer skills, and be willing to learn and deal with all
aspects of estate management.

Position involves:

repair and maintenance of all plant and
equipment, including HVAC, RO, generator,
pools (heater and filtration equipment),
irrigation, automatic lighting, security and
audio-visual systems etc.

managing maintenance of grounds and
beachfront

supply ordering and inventory control

Experience:

at least 2 years in maintenance department of
large private estate, upscale hotel or similar.
Previous supervisory experience is preferred.

A good remuneration package is available for the right
candidate depending on qualifications and experience.

Interested parties please fax or email resume to M Antone
on 362-6704 magdyantone@yahoo.com.

Applications must be received by 11th February, 2005.


'''- BUSINESS


I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B. MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


$672


million


contract


to operate Andros


ABACOM KETS
^ll. M |TE
Financial Controller
POSITION AVAILABLE
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Responsibilities to include

Financial management of several accounts
Preparation of financial statements and other
reports as required
Focus on Internal Audit
Monitoring of control procedures (with the ability
to recommend and implement new systems)
Annual budget preparation
Reconciliation of all General Ledger Accounts
Inventory Reconciliation
Management of accounting team.

Qualification to include:

CPA or CA qualifications
Minimum of three years working experience in
same or similar position.

Interested persons should send r6sum6 to

P.O. Box SS-6322
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Human Resources
Re: Financial Controller
or Fax: 242-356-7855



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CHITAFA LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of CHITAFA LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

Elvira Lowe
(Liquidator)



Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


UBS TRUSTEES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

MERGERNOTICE


Notice is hereby given that UBS Trustees (Bahamas)
Ltd., and ITK Trust Company Limited merged on 31st
December 2004 with UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. being,
the surviving company. The Registrar General Issued a
certificate of Merger dated 31st December 2004.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INGOMAR GROUP LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of INGOMAR GROUP LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis


(Liquidator)


The US Navy has awarded DynCorp
Technical Services, a subsidiary of Com-
puter Sciences Corporation, a contract to
operate and maintain the Atlantic Undersea
Test and Evaluation Centre (AUTEC) base

Change (From page 1B)


porarily leave hundreds of
Bahamian employees out of
work. But Mr Asper said that
regardless of which Bahamasair
union might be affected by the
radical rethinking of the avia-
tion product, once the new
strategy was accomplished,
union members and thousands
more Bahamians would have
much better and more secure
jobs in a profitable airline mar-
ketplace.
"The success of literally a
dozen or more new airlines
operating into and throughout
the Bahamas should newly
employ all of these former
Bahamasair employees and
many more, but a factor of two
or three, in my view," Mr Asper
said.
He further suggested that
Bahamas law and precedent be
modified to permit foreign own-
ership of Bahamian airlines and
charter services by up to 75 per
cent, and that the Bahamas rat-
ify the Geneva Convention and
Cape Town Convention Inter-
national aviation treaties relat-
ed to aircraft rights and recog-
nition.
Like the US government,
which continues to provide the
hundreds of millions of dollars
per year to route subsidies,


known as "essential air ser-
vices", the Bahamas govern-
ment would likely get low-cost
carriers, such as Jet Blue, Spir-
it and Southwest, to agree to
provide semi-subsidised service
to thinner Bahamian markets
in exchange for near exclusivity
on certain Bahamas routes,
where they could carve out their
own niche and focus their
resources.
Mr Asper said airlines could
promise short-term (perhaps
one year renewable based
upon performance) exclusivity
in exchange for lift and fair
input from the government.
Many of the regional 50 pas-
senger jet operators are also
looking for winter contra-sea-
sonal use of the equipment they
need in full force during the
summer in the US.
Mr Asper said Bahamas-
owned airlines can and should
be beneficiaries of these "exclu-
sive", or semi-exclusive routes,
where the Bahamas provided
economic incentives for them
to be licensed in the US in order
to provide direct service by -
and between Florida airports
and Family Island destinations.
The airlines should be able to
take on non-Bahamian part-
ners, retain up to 75 per cent


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TYCHY PLUMET CORPORATION


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of TYCHY PLUMET CORPORATION,
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CABBOT COVE LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of CABBOT COVE LIMITED, has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has bebn issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

YYC HOLDINGS LTD.
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of YYC HOLDING LTD., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)



Elvira Lowe
(Liquidator)


ownership, but still fly the
Bahamas flag.
And because some Family
Island markets will never sup-
port their own air service eco-
nomically with subsidies, the
Government could allocate a
$5 million budget for a Minister
of Aviation, whose sole respon-
sibility.would be to reinvent air
transportation.
Mr Asper said: "The current
critical status of Bahamas air-
line support, particularly to the
Out Islands, cries out for a
senior member of government
with but one responsibility. This
minister can retain all the Out
Island airport service, encour-
age even more flights and pro-
vide the pure oxygen of afford-
able and dependable air trans-
port, utilising modern air trans-
port equipment."
The budget would enable the
Minster to promote Out Island
destinations by providing essen-
tial air service subsidies to air-
lines willing to operate to these
'narrow gauge' destinations.
The $5 million would be the
sole economic annual contribu-
tion form government.
Touching on the issue of pri-
vatisation for Bahamasair, Mr
Asper said the Government
should look to support such a


base

lion, which includes four options. If all these
options are exercised, the contract could
be worth up to $672 million.
Work on the initial contract is set to be
completed by April 2008.


move even if 75 per cent for-
eign ownership is needed to
accomplish the privatization
structure.
He warned, however, that if
privatization can only be accom-
plished by the Government
being saddled with all the debt,
or the sovereign guarantee of
the debt surviving the privati-
sation, it should turn it down.
A debt settlement should be
negotiated by the new Minister
of Aviation at $0.20 on the dol-
lar as part of the suspension of
Bahamasair's financial support.
"When the lenders and other
debt holders know that the
Bahamas is getting out of the
airline subsidy business, and
into the route merchandising
business, they, will settle, for
they will have little choice," Mr
Asper said.
Mr Asper's presentation to
the second Annual National
Tourism Conference, which was
held at the Westin Resort at
Our Lucaya, Grand Bahama,
was part of a paper that confer-
ence planners had invited.
Selected from a number of
other entrants, his paper, on
Family Island Transportation:
Challenges and Unique Oppor-
tunities, was recognized as the
best conceptual study


PRIVATE COMPANY SEEKING

CONSULTANT

on foreign franchise and business development.
Applicant must possess:
Graduate degree in Business or Related Field
Ability to speak French and Spanish fluently.
ABSOLUTELY
no telephone inquiries will be accepted.

Please fax resume to 242-328-3094.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CHITAFA LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of CHITAFA LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.

Elvira Lowe
(Liquidator)



Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

EVERBEST ENTERPRISES INC.
I
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of EVERBEST ENTERPRISES INC., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


on Andros that could ultimately be worth
$672 million.
The US Navy said in a statement on Fri-
day that it had awarded DynCorp Technical
Services an initial contract worth $137 mil-


I _


BUSINESS






MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


. I I -M. -1 -- -


Pat Bain. president
of the Bahamas
Hotel Catering &
Allied Workers
Li n i o n
i BHCAWLl), has called for the.
implementation of Total Qual-
ity Management (TQM) pro-
grammes, where all in the work-
place are challenged to do a lit-
tle more by focusing more on
customer satisfaction.
Mr Bain said companies use
the process because it improves
internal operations, adding:
"The Total Quality Manage-
ment process improves a com-
pany's competitive position and,
equally importantly, customers
demand it."
In partnering toward success
and implementing TQOM pro-
gramme. he said all social part-
ners must demonstrate a com-
mitment to quality service.
In this approach to partner-
ship, the union and all employ-
ees must be included at every
level. Mr Bain said it "as also
important for companies to
look inside for home gro wn
ideas to assist in problem solv-
ing. and that every effort be
made to promote team-%work.
avoiding tunnel vision and
encouraging supervisors and
managers to learn the basics of
delegation. Insecurity, he said.
must be eliminated.
Ptrhap_ one of the biggest
challenges facing the hotel
industry vas the mo'e towards
promoting employee owner-
ship, an avenue that must be


Pat Bain


Share your news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are m
making news in their *->
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the'
area or have won an
award.' .
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BELLMUND LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 27th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Shavonne
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BLUE SHOWERED CO. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,, 2000,
the dissolution of BLUE SHOWERED CO. LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingird Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CHALDEES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of CHALDEES INC., has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.


Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NEDDLE ROCK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of NEEDLE ROCK INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Shavonne Davis
(Liquidator)


FOR


RENT


* 1,819 4,866 sq.ft. office suites.
* Features a full standby generator.
* State-of-the-art telecommunications facilities.
* Excellent parking facilities.
* Breathtaking sea/harbour views.


ermenl.
Mr Bain said the TOMQN pro-
gramme, used by thousands of
companies, was a revolutionary
step forward in business effi-
ciency and, at the same time.
provided for a return to some of
the most fundamental ideas of


owners and operators of the
tourism product and industry
partners, which was based on
mutual respect and trust, must
be implemented if the sector
was to see real growth and sus-
See TRAIN, Page 6B


J.S. JOHNSON & CO. LTD.

It comes u-ith everery policy


J.S. JOHNSON &
COMPANY LIMITED


NOTICE TO

SHAREHOLDERS

J.S. Johnson and Company Limited hereby
notifies all its shareholders that based on
unaudited results for the quarter ended 31st
December, 2005 the Board of Directors has
declared an interim dividend of fourteen cents
(14o) per ordinary share to be paid on llth
February. 2005 to all shareholders of record
as of 7th February, 2005.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

DUNE-PENDOM LTD. ,


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of DUNE-PENDOM LTD., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Cheryl Rolle
(Liquidator)


Elvira Lowe
(Liquidator)


LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE

GRACIOUS GROWTH CORPORATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of GRACIOUS GROWTH
CORPORATION, has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.

Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


Centreville House
Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL

CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


BUINS


Union leader



calls for Total



Quality plan
By YOLANDA travelles. Mr Bain said, if the management effectiveness.
DELEVEAUX industry %was to boost morale The union president said true
Tribune Business Reporter and support employee empow- partnership invol ing labour,






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


Airport security problems


could hurt Family


Islands


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GROUP MAJOR
MEDICAL & LIFE INSURANCES SERVICES FOR
EMPLOYEES & RETIREES

TENDER No. 576/04

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of group major medical and life insurances services for employees and
their dependants and retirees.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852,
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 16 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 576/04
"GROUP MAJOR MEDICAL AND LIFE INSURANCES PLAN"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.






It t /" '2",/1 "ual








"Changing The Face Of Healthcare

Through Education & Partnership"


Balmoral Room

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Cable Beach, New Providence, Bahamas


Cost: $175


E)?hibit i

- Credit Hours.
- Free Giveaways
- Raffle


App-r--':ning Iho Coil Without Comnpromising The Quality



rt~~& P fissinalsm n InHeathore

H- C,, i b r Who o 1 VV pa o 1 vP Al i qnpi ig Tr am

In!Disuss5iop. T-he Nlational-H-ealth I-ns-urance Progra-m

Aworg':;)theri'


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
Maintaining proper security
measures at Family Island air-
ports continues to be a grow-
ing concern for the Bahamas
Hotel Association (BHA), said
BHA president Earle Bethell,
who suggested that any break
down in procedure could
impede the industry's push to
create more entry points into
the Family Islands for flights
originating out of the United
States. It would also likely
impact the ability of travelers
to fly direct into the destination
of their choice resulting in
increased delays and hiccups
during travel.
Addressing the final day of
the National Tourism Confer-
ence, held at the Westin Resort
at Our Lucaya in Grand
Bahama, Mr Bethell, speaking
on the topic "Succeeding Thru
Partnerships Making Tourism
Better in the Bahamas Again",
told conference goers that
despite the successes seen in the
industry, such as Grand
Bahama receiving its 4 millionth
cruise visitor on Discovery
Cruises, the Bahamas is over a
half century in the tourism


game and still struggles with the
fundamentals of moving for-
ward in a more organized and
cohesive manner: "We are at a
critical juncture in our nation's
and industry's development and
the biggest walls, the biggest
obstacles are ones which we can
overcome."
In the area of communication
and engagement, Mr Bethell
said the,Bahamas needs better
dialogue between all sectors of
the community and govern-
ment. He said further that the
Bahamas needs to better man-
age and coordinate its improved
efforts and, perhaps the biggest
impediment to sustained growth
and development, the issue of
'ego management'. All too
often the industry finds itself
stymied by egos, he said, adding
that it is imperative that egos
be set aside so the industry
could move forward
BHA has expanded its role
in' the tourism industry and now
represents the private sector
voice for tourism. With twice as
many allied members from all
sectors of tourism, Mr Bethell
said the. Association added 22
new allied members in Decem-
ber from such areas as attrac-
tions, airlines, tour operators,
retailers and industry suppliers,


both locally and abroad.
"Our partners are taxi dri-
vers, vendors, operators of
motorized watercraft, ferry boat
operators....increasingly we are
looking at ways to engage. a
number of these sectors in our
programmes and activities.
"Today we are working with
Jet Ski operators, the insurance
industry and others to bring
some order to the motorize
water sports industry. Our
tourism task force for educa-
tion includes representatives
from the hotel, attractions,
tourism retail and service indus-
tries."
Mr Bethell said BHA is mov-
ing to broaden its involvement
with non-government organiza-
tions and is working closely with
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce on issues such as
research, trade liberalization
and reviewing government leg-
islation.
BHAis also working to
strengthen ties with strategic
partners, the three promotion
boards, the Bahamas Employ-
ers Confederation (BECon),
the Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association (BHEA). He said
also that as part of BHA's ini-
See FLY, Page 10B


Train (From page 5B)


tainable development over the long term.
Addressing the second Annual National
Tourism Conference, held at the Westin At Our
Lucaya in Grand Bahama, Mr Bain said "The
trade union movement believes fundamentally
that no amount of mere talk will seriously address
issues relating to the fair treatment of workers by
owners or operators; the question of skilled work-
ers, where individuals are brought in without
genuine attempts to identify an appropriately
experienced, trained or trainable Bahamian; nor
the impact of legislation, immigration or otherwise
on employees and workers."
He added that it remains the view of the trade
union movement that training continues to be a
priority for its members. Mr Bain noted that
workers representative.organisations have com-
.p. ' I !" t '. '0'1*


mitted both their resources and energies in pro-
'viding opportunities for education and training of
members
Union leaders maintain that in a service based
economy and industry success is based more on
product or service quality and labour versatility,
than on mass production carried out by cheap
labour under low quality standards.
A longtime advocate of the establishment of a
'productivity-council', Mr Bain said in such an are-
na, the labour movement, along with social part-
ners could collectively address critical issues,
including putting modern labour legislation in
place and constructing policies to be adopted
where productivity gains in the workplace will
be compensated by performance based incentive
schemes..


* VACANCY NOTICE


A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of New Providence, is
presently seeking the follow ing:


Position:


Brewer


Duties Include:

Manage the brewing process from start to finish:
Identify deviations from standard;
Beer filtration.
Perform quality control analysis as required.
Clean and sanitize all equipment.
Work with v various types of chemicals;

Minimum Requirements:

Associates Degree: Biology. Chemistry or Technical area;
Three years experience in a technical environment;
Strong communication, administrative, time management skills and
reporting skills:
Excel spreadsheet usage at an intermediate level a must;
Proficienc. in Word applications required;
Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong commitment
to detail and good analytical skills.

The Ideal Candidate:

Must be a team player that is willing to support the efforts of the
team or an\ team member.
The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative w ith little supervision.
Must have good communication skills.
Must be able to function in a shift system.

A competitive salar_. performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitie employee benefits package are all available to the
successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to the
address below no later than January 31st, 2005.

Human Resources Manager
Common\ wealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau. Bahamas

or

Fax: 1-242-362-4793


For additional information or to reserve seating
Tel: 502-7801/502-7871
or Email us at: bahamashls@yahoo.com


~ ____ I


. i


-:~b~B~i~t~-7fl_


BUSINESS


~Pic~ Inrlodc:








TH UINVESSPOR UNDTY





A*I," T SEL


CARMICHAEL MEADOWS SUB-
DMIVISION Lot #22, contains 3 bed, 2 bath,
living, dining & kitchen. Land size 5,743 sq.
ft.

DAISY MANOR Lot #12, 2 bed, 1 bath,
living, dining rooms and kitchen.

FRELIA SUB-DIVISION Lot #24, Single
family residence, 3 bed, 2 bath, living, dining,
kitchen, 4 years old.

FORT FINCASTLE vacant land 23,317
square feet.

FOXDALE SUBDIVISION Lot #104
multifamily split level residence 25 yr old,
consist of four one bed room efficiency apt,
downstairs and 1 three bed unit upstairs.

GARDEN HILLS ESTATE #3 Lot #1036
lot size 5,988 sq. ft. vacant land 52.96 x
101.19 x 65.50 x 101.01.

GOLDEN GATES #1 Lot No. 154 Sisal
Road & Bamboo Court single storey duplex,
each apt consisting of 2 bed, 1 bath, living,
dining and kitchen.

GOLDEN GATES #2 Lot #66 & 67 totaling
11,914 sq. ft.containing 25yr old Multi Family
Residence (2) 1 bed, 1 bath, and (3) 2 bed,
1 bath apt.

GOLDEN GATES #2 Lot #1490 with
single family residence 2,480 sq ft, 5 bed, 2
bath, living, dining and kitchen. Lot size
6,000 sq ft,

GREATER CHIPPINGHAM #24 Baldwin
Avenue, 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining & kitchen.

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION Lot #5 with
single dwelling 21 yr old, 3 bed 2 bath home.

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION Lot #21, 10
year old single storey house, 3 bed, 2 bath.

MCKINNEY DRIVE 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom, private dwelling.

MILLER HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION 7,500
sq. ft. Lot 7, Block 7 consist of a seventeen
(17) year old single storey duplex. Each apt
has 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining and kitchen.

MILLERS ROAD Vacant Land, 19,684
sq. ft.

NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION Lot #2
Block #4 vacant land, 8,000 sq. ft.

PINEWOOD GARDENS Lot #1906
consisting of a 19 yr. old single storey home,
4 bed, 1 bath, living, dining, kitchen and
utility room.

SEAum.Ib, ESTATE Lot #23 block, #8
consisting of a 10 year old, 3 bed, 2 bath,
living, dining, sitting room and kitchen approx,
2,423 floor area.

SOUTH OCEAN VILLAGE Lot #1-4 13,
137 sq. ft., 3 bed, 2 bath, living, dining,
kitchen and laundry room.

TALL PINES 34 yr old, 3 bed, 2 bath home
on lot 5,625 sq. ft.

TWYNAM HEIGHTS Lot #386. Vacant
Land 12,000 sq. ft.

VALENTINE EXTENSION OFF
JOHNSON TERRACE 19 yr. old 1 1/2
storey fourplex, with a floor area of 3,621


sq. ft., (1) 3 bed, 2 bath, (1) 2 bed, 1 bath
and (2) 1 bed, 1 bath efficiency.

VENICE BAY Lot #6 Block 6,11,190 sq.
ft. 2 year old, 3 bed, 2 bath, living, dining,
family room and kitchen.

DEVONSHIRE WESTWOOD VILLAS- Lot
#4, 3 bed, 2 bath, living, dining, kitchen.

YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES #19 Cat
Island Avenue Lot #63, 3 bed, 1 bath five









year old house.

YELLOW ELDER GARDENS Lot #273
consisting of 4 bed, 2 bath, living, dining
and kitchen.

LOT #11 BLOCK 10 Unit 3 Derby -
Vacant Land 15,210 sq. ft.

CORAL GARDENS SUBDIVISION Lot
#20 Peridot Place, unit 2, 5 plex apartment
building.

GREENING GLADE Lots #3, 3A block
13 unit 2 Vacant land situate on a cul-de-
sac 17,409 sq. ft.

LUCAYAN KNOTT SUBDIVISION Lot
#4, Block #11, Royal Tern Drive, 2 beds, 1








bath, Wooden House and an incomplete
foundation for single family residence.

PONCIANNA GARDENS SUBDIVISION
- Lot #25, split level duplex 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom.

ROYAL PALM BAY Lot 9, block 23, vacant
land 39,843 sq. ft.

DUNDAS TOWN One acre property, 4
bedrooms, 2 bath, two storey. Downstairs
living, dining, kitchen and family room.

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT
#21 Vacant land 10,810 square feet, Bootle
Drive.

DUNDAS TOWN Lot No. 18B, 3-2 bed,
1 bath triplex, 9,000 sq. ft.

MURPHY TOWN Crown Allotment #70
single storey wood 7 concrete Commercial
Building approximately 758 square feet.

MURPHY TOWN Lot No. 67, Hill Top
structure 12,000 square feet, 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom living and dining rooms, kitchen.
MURPHY TOWN Lot No. 60 with a
structure lot size 60 x 115, Duplex partly






finished 60 x 30, 6,900 square feet.

MURPHY TOWN Vacant Land, portion of


Lot 78B comprising portion of Lot #78 of
Murphy town crown allotment.

MURPHY TOWN Vacant Land lot #78 108
x 104.

LOWE SOUND Parcel of land next to the
New Mt. Freedom Baptist Church with 3
bed, 2 bath wooden single family house.

ALICE TOWN Lot #115, 16 year old 3
bed, 2 bath, living, dining, kitchen, laundry
room.

BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION Lot No.
7, commercial property 80 x 125, 2 bedroom,
1 bathroom. 10,000 square feet.

EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE Lot #7 11,200
sq. ft. Incomplete 2 storey, 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath,
living, dining, kitchen and TV room.

ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES Lot #6
block, #48 vacant land, 9,600 sq. ft.

LOWER BOGUE -Lot #121 on East Street
in Lower Bogue vacant land 8,109 sq. ft.

LOWER BOGUE Lot #62, 34,210 sq. ft.
of land with single storey, 4 bed, 3 bath
house.
NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS
SUBDMSION- Lot #20 vacant land, 11,200
sq. ft.
RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION Lot #44
Block 5, approx. 10,800 sq. ft. This site has
a two storey block of two apts, each one
has 1 bed, 1 bath, living, dining and kitchen.

RAINBOW SUBDIVISION Lot #3,
block 27, section B, vacant land,
14,052.59 sq. ft.

ROCK SOUND Lot #153,150 x 15 and
100 x 250. Northern side of Fish Street





TARPUM BAY Commercial building on
flat land. Building 690 square feet. Eleuthera
Highway towards Rock Sound.






HAMILTON, QUEEN'S HIGHWAY -
Approximately 25,500 sq. ft. land with single
storey, 3 bed, 1 bath, single family residence
and a wooden shop.
FLAMINGO BAY Lot #102., Vacant Land
size, 12,896 sq. ft. Palm Hill.

BAHAMA SOUND #8 Lot #6625. 10 yr.
old duplex, 2 bed, 1 bed, Land size 10,000
sq. ft.

BAHAMA SOUND EAST Lot #7088,
section 10 east, lot size 10,000 sq. ft.


FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND OTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
DELORES JOHNSON @ 502-3038 or Delores.Johnson@Scotiabank.com,
PANSY BRAHAM @ 502-3015 or Pansy.Braham@Scotiabank.com,
HARRY COLLIE @ 502-3034 or Harry.Collie@Scotiabank-com


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


COB FUN WALK
Theme: "WALK FOR HEALTH & LIBRARIES"
Saturday, 5th February 2005
6:00 A.M.

Route: SHTS Parking lot, north on Thompson Boulevard to Poinciana Drive, East
on Poinciana Drive to Baillou Hill Road, North on Baillou Hill Road to Bay Street,
West on Bay Street to Nassau Street, onto Thompson Boulevard returning to SHTS.


ENTRY FEE: $10.00
Entry deadline: 5:00 p.m., 4th February 2005
Funds raised have been earmarked for the new COB library
Name:


Date of Birth
[] Male


[] Female


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

& EXTENSION SERVICES

Personal Development Spring Semester

COMPUTER OFFERINGS

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Description:This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not
understand how it works. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice.
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii)
Microsoft Access Database Management.


Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Monday, 7 February 2005 6:00pnr --9:00pii
Saturday, 12 February 2005 10:00am 1:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Section 01 (CEES)
Section 02 (CEES)
Tuition: $450.00


EMERGENCY CONTACT:
H WL
Do you suffer from any medical condition that we should know about?
[] Yes [] No If yes please explain (if necessary use additional paper)



Check one of the following categories:


[] Under 20
[] 51 60


[] 21-30


[] 61 & over


[]31 40


[] 41 -50


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description:This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various
software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I Begins:Thursday, 10 February 2005
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm Duration: 12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Pre-requisite:None
Time:9:30am 4:30pm


Begins:Thursday, 3 March 2005
Duration:l day Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$160.00


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description:This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training
in the following areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System
Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.


Signature:
PLEASE RETURN REGISTRATION FORM TO
THE OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OAKES FIELD
CAMPUS, "A" BLOCK
TELEPHONE: 302-4306 OR 302-4454


Pre-requisite:None
Time:6:00pm- 9:00pm


Begins:Wednesday, 9 February 2005
Duration:12 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$450.00


PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting
and Repairs.


Centre For Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES)
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
BAHAMAS LOCATION- Nassau
Starts: 29th January 2005
Since its debut, the Becker CPA Review Programme has consistently
delivered superior exam preparation. Becker students pass at twice
the rate of non-Becker students. Clearly, Becker offers distinct
and unparalleled advantages that no other CPA review course can
deliver.
The Certified.Public Accountant (CPA) examination is the leader
and grandparent of all professional accounting examinations. The
benefits include higher salary. increased confidence and competence.
and recognition as a member of an elite group;of prdfessionals.
Opportunities available to CPAs are positions in a government or nor-for-protit organization, public or
private companies, or an accounting firm. As a CPA you could specialize in Information Technology Services,
Financial Planning, Auditing, Estate Planning, Management Accounting, Public Accounting, Tax Administration,
International Accounting and much more. We can help you to chart a course for a successful and rewarding
career in professional accounting!
* Tuition is same as in United States: $2,100 Ask About Our Easy Payment Plan!
Financial Reporting (F): $650
Accounting & Reporting/Regulation (R): $520
Law/Business Concepts (L) $455
Audit/Attestation (A) $455
FEES: Registration: $40. Library & Computer Fee: $100 Insurance: $25
Books: Available at COB Bookstore
* Repeat Candidates: 50% Discount on Tuition
* Tuition Free Continuing Help Available to Qualified Applicants
CLASSES MEET: Saturdays: 8:30am-5:30pm

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Tel. (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Centre For Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES)
Fees and Tuition may be paid by cash, credit card, or bank certified cheque to The College of The Bahamas
Business Office, Oakes Field Campus, Poinciana Drive.



SIXTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

OF COT INSELLORS

Hosted by COB's Counselling & Health Services
Department
February 24 & 25, 2005
British Colonial Hilton
THEME: "ONE VISION, ONE VOICE"
Registration fee: $130.00

Fees include lunch, coffee breaks, conference
material and parking
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? School counsellors, church
counsellors, grief counsellors, community counsellors, social
workers, nurses, police officers and persons who counsel
during times of disasters and crisis.

For more information, please contact Teorah Ferguson,
conference chairperson
Phone: 302 -4449 Fax: 302-4448
Email: tferguson@cob.edu.bs


Pre-requisite: None
Tuesday and Thursdays


Begins: Tuesday, 8 February 2005 Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm
Duration: 12 weeks Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees:$500.00


QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that
20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students
will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.


Pre-requisite: None
Duration: 6 weeks


Begins: Tuesday, 1 March 2005
Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Time: 6:00pm -900pm
Fees: $330.00


WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will
cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics,
Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins: Thursday, 24 February 2005 Time: 9:30am- 4:30pm Duration: 2 days
Venue; CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/328-1936 or e-mail
nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time payment).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, course Schedule and Course materials.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
COURSE NO. SEC. NO. COURSE NAME TIME DAY START DURATION FEE
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8-OOpm Mon/Wed 14-Feb 10weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6-00-8-OOpm Tue/Thur 15-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 15-Feb 10 weeks $300
ANIMAL CARE
ANIM800 01 DOG GROOMING 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 10 weeks $355
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01 CREDIT& COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar weeks $225
BUS1904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 8 weeks $225
MKTH900 01 MARKETING 6:00-9:00pm Thur 28-Feb 10weeks $225
CUST900 01 SUPERIOR CUST. SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 24-Feb 1 day $170
COMPUTERS
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 7-Feb 12 weeks M450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10:00-1:00pm Sat 12-Feb 12 weeks M50
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 10-Feb 12 weeks ,550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 9-Feb 12 weeks 450
COMP960 01 EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 3-Mar Iday :160
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tueffhurs 8-Feb 12 weeks $500
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 6 weeks $330
COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thurs&Fi 24-Feb 2 days %550
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 28-Feb 8 weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE I 600-9-OOpm Tues 1-Mar 8 weeks 1";
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN I 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs 28-Feb 6 weeks $500
COSM805 01 SCULPTURED NAILS I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 2-Mar 6 weeks $250
DECORATING
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pmn Thur 3-Mar 10 weeks $275
DEC0800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 2-Mar 8 weeks $225
DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 8 weeks $250
ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 8 weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS ASECOND LANGUAGE I 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Fri 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
ENG 803 01 WRITING & PUBLISHING WORKSHOI 930am-3:30pm Sat 5-Mar 1 day $170
HEALTH & FITNESS
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 3-Mar 10 weeks $465
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS 11-6:00-9OOpm Tue 1-Mar 10 weeks $620
LANGUAGES
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:3opm Tue/Thur 1-Mar 10 weeks '225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6-00-7-30pm Mon/Wed 28-Feb 10 weeks '250
SPA900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 1-Mar 10 weeks $225
SPA901 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPE 900 01 PUBLIC SPEAKING I 6:00-9'00pm Mon 28-Feb 10 weeks '250
LANG900 01 SIGN LANGUAGE I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 28-Feb 10 weeks $250
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT I 6:00-9:30pm Thur 10-Feb 12 weeks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT II 6:00-9:30pm Mon 7-Feb 12 weeks $300
MGMT902 '01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT W/S 10am-4pm Thurs&Fri 3-Mar 2 days $350
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 24-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I 6:00-9.00pm Mon 28-Feb 10weeks $225
SEW 802 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 3-Mar 10 weeks $250
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 1-Mar 10 weeks $225
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email nlacrolx@cob.edu.bs All fees an
Included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.


HE


COLLE GE


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(D/M/YR.) --eL6~


D~ncs







MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2004. PAGE 9 B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


STAFF & FACULTY


VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following post of
Assistant Vice President, Academic Affairs in the Office of Academic Affairs, which
oversees the administration of academic services at The College, including the development
and implementation of curricular activities, academic policies and regulations. The
successful candidate must possess a terminal degree in a relevant area, have moved
up the academic rank to the Senior Lecturer level, have relevant work experience including
appropriate supervisory level exposure, having served in various capacities such as Dean
and Chair. Excellent analytical, organisational, report writing, presentational and
interpersonal communication skills are required for this position.

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
The Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs is a new position that will serve a
leadership role at The College, ensuring that the education objectives of The College are
attained and its policies are maintained. In assisting with the execution of the responsibilities
of the Office of Academic Affairs, the Assistant Vice President Academic Affairs reports
directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and undertakes duties that entail:
Responsibility for the Summer Sessions offerings, including full academic
programmes and those offered through Continuing Education Extension Services;
Focusing on strategic faculty development, a specific focus on new and adjunct
faculty;
Coordinating with the academic deans, facilitating the development of and support
for faculty research and creative activity efforts;
Continuing revision of the curriculum, assessment of student learning, advising
across the institution, the experiences of first-year and transfer students, liaison
with student affairs;
Stimulating collegial processes for further development of undergraduate majors,
general education implementation and assessment, and interdisciplinary
opportunities;
Providing leadership in the creation of a proposed Honours Programme which will
offer courses in advanced study to challenge highly motivated students;
Promoting creative use of instructional technologies to provide quality instruction;
Coordinating with other campus offices on regular and ad hoc campus-wide issues;
Resolving student academic complaints, appeals, etc.;
Coordinating curriculum assessment, including programme reviews of undergraduate
majors (in cooperation with the academic deans and the Director for Research and
Grants), general education, technology-mediated instruction, and other curricular
initiatives across The College;
Coordinating the new programme approval process with the Academic Affairs
Office;
Representing Academic Affairs on College committees, as assigned;
Representing the interest of undergraduate graduate education in strategic planning,
enrolment management, and policy development;
Assuring the highest standards for undergraduate education and the quality and
integrity of the undergraduate curriculum in collaboration with the academic deans;
Working closely with the Deans Council and the existing Academic Board to
enhance undergraduate education;
Fostering and seeking out external support for mission-related research and
outreach initiatives that are College-wide, including support from national and
international agencies; in this regard, he or she will work closely with the Director
of Research and Grants; and
Working with the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement to produce
brochures for all majors and centres of excellence (Institutes).
The initial term of appointment is three years, with eligibility for renewal of the appointment.
Salary Scale SM4 $39,300 $56,300
The application deadline is February 11, 2005. To ensure full consideration, interested
candidates should submit a College of The Bahamas Employment Application, a
Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts. To expedite the appointment
procedure, applicants are advised to request three referees to send references under
confidential cover directly to the address listed below without waiting to be contacted
by the College.
Please visit the College's website to obtain more information about the institution and
to access the College's Employment Application Form.
Applications should be forwarded in confidence to:
Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Facsimile: (242) 302 4539
Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs


The College of The Bahamas invites applications from suitably qualified
individuals 'for the following positions to be filled for the 2005-2006
Academic Year:

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION AND CREATIVE ARTS

Lecturer in Music (2)
1. The successful candidate must be able to teach traditional theory and harmony,
piano skills, music history and analysis up to the bachelor level. Candidate must
also possess some skills in choral work and have at least a Master's degree. A
teaching certificate is preferable but not necessary. The ideal candidate must have
at least three years teaching experience at the tertiary level and some professional
experience
2. The successful candidate must be able to teach strings, preferably through the
Suzuki method. The ideal candidate will be able to formulate string programmes
for tertiary level students and members of the wider community. Candidates should
be able to teach other aspects of music as required. A Master's degree is required;
a teaching certificate is preferable but not necessary. The ideal candidate will
have at least three years teaching experience in a string programme at
the tertiary level and some professional experience.
Salary Scale: $29,600 $47,800
Interested candidates should complete a COB Application Form, available
on the- website www.cob.edu.bs; and submit along with a detailed
curriculum vitae and cover letter of interest, giving full particulars
of qualifications and experiences and three work references no later
than February 25, 2005 to:


Mail:



Email:


The Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
hrapply@cob.edu.bs


Facsimile: (242) 302 4539


BA1 jiji lJ /1 5


Applicants are invited to join a dynamic team in building the College of The Bahamas


Applicants are invited to join a dynamic team in building the College of The Bahamas
into a University System. The College seeks to employ the following:

CAMPUS ARCHITECT
A Campus Architect is required to meet the challenge of coordinating the initial
designing of new buildings and the renovation projects for existing buildings and
facilities as the College expands. The successful individual will work with the Special
Assistant to the President and the President on overall policies concerning architectural
design and construction of the new and existing campuses. Other duties will be
assigned.

Qualifications:
The successful candidate must have a Bachelor's degree in Architecture from
an accredited college or university and a professional-license with the Bahamas
Architects Board; at least 10 years of supervisory professional work experience
particularly with institutional projects; good communication skills; thorough
knowledge of programming, design, construction, budgeting and scheduling
of projects. A basic knowledge of contracts, purchasing and bidding requirements,
codes and statutes relative to construction and design is required. Must be
skilled in both manual and computer aided drafting. Competence in Microsoft
Word and Excel is also required; Knowledge of Microsoft Project and PowerPoint
are desired.

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, BENEFITS
The Human Resources Department seeks applicants who will be responsible for the
maintenance and administration of the College benefit programs. This individual will
act as a liaison between employee/insurance providers; provide administrative support
to human resources function as needed; and ensure that programs are administered
in accordance with policy and procedure guidelines.
The successful candidate must have a strong customer focus; be able to work in a
dynamic, highly sensitive environment; possess excellent oral, written and interpersonal
communication skills. Good organizational skills and attention to detail are necessary
and proven ability to set work-priorities is expected.
A Bachelor's Degree preferably in Human Resources Management or a related area is
required and at least 5 years of progressively responsible human resource management
experience that include administration of benefit programs including Group Health and
Life Insurance and Pension. This position requires a discreet, mature and tactful
individual. Must be able to use the Microsoft Office Suite.
Salary Scale: AS-2 $23,380 $35,980
Interested candidates should complete a COB Application Form, available on the
website www.cob.edu.bs; along with a detailed curriculum vitae with a cover letter of
interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience and three work references
no later than February 25, 2005 to:
Mail:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs
Facsimile: (242) 302-4539


School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies

",INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES SPRING SEMESTER

COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR. DAYS TIME TUITION RESOURCE Venue Max. Enrol
& FEE MATERIALS

1. Bahamian Cuisine: COOK806. Feb.10. 6.weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$12perweek SHTSMain Kitchen 15
2. GourmetCookingI COOK823 Feb.7 weeks Mon. 6:00:0000pm $200.00 $20perweek SHTSMain Kltche 15
3. Gourmnnet Cooking II COOK824 Feb.7 weeks Mon. 60-9:00prnm $225.00 $20perweek SHTS Main Kiftchen 15
4. Asian Cooking COOK800 Feb.8 weeks Tues. 600-9:00pm $225.00 $20 perweek SHTS Main rKtcher 15
5. French Cooking COOK 820 Feb. 9 weeks Wed. 600-9.00pm .$225.00 $20perweek SHITSMait KKto 15
6. Heath Conscious Cooking COOK827 Feb.9 weeks Wed. 600-9:00pm $200.00 $20per week SHTSMain Kitchen 15
7. VegetarianCooking COOK831 Feb.10 weeks Thurs. 600-9:00pm $200.00 $20perweek SHTS Main chlen 15
8. Cake&PastyMaking I COOK813 Feb.8 10weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTS leader Kihee 15
9. Cake&Pasty Makingll COOK814 Feb.8 10weeks Tues. 6.00-9:00pm $250.00- $10-$15pe week STS Pastry Klche 15
10. BreadMaking COOK810 Feb.10 weeks Thurs. 600-9:00pm $200.00- $5-$10perweek SHTS Lader Kitchen 15
11. CakeDecorating COOK817 Feb.9 10weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 t10-$15 perweek SHTS lader kitchen 15
12. Cake Decoration l COOK818 Feb.9 10weeks Wed. 6,:0-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSPastyKitchen 15
For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804,323-6804 or fax 325-8175


APPLICATION DEADLINE
Application deadline for all new applicants interested in attending The College of The Bahamas
this Fall (September) 2005 semester, are reminded of the following:
Application deadline: February 4, 2004 at 4:00 pm
Application fee: $40.00

Note: The following supporting documents must accompany application form
* One copy of pages 1-4 of a valid (not expired) passport or certificate of identity
* One official College/University transcript if previously attended a College/Universitv


* One official High School transcript if still in high school or graduated less than
three years ago
* One copy of all academic certificates (BJC's, BGCSE's, CXC's, GCE's Etc.)
For more information, call the Office of Admissions at 302-4499.


GRADUATION MEETING
There will be a graduation meeting for all
July and December 2004 graduates and prospective
April 2004 graduates on Thursday, February 3rd at 6:00 pm
in the Student Union Building.




COlBCAF Il


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


vn( B


__ ___~






THE TRIBUNl


PAGE 10B. MONDAY. JANUARY 31, 2005


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GRAHAM,THOMPSON & Co.



COUNSEL? ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW NOTARIES PUBLIC


is pleased to announce that

Erica Paine (Freeport)

and

Linda Beidler D'Aguilar (Nassau)

have joined the Firm as Partners.


Nassau Chambers
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O.Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas
Tel: (242)322-4130, Fax: (242)328-1069
Linda Beidler-D'Aguilar's email address:
Ibd@gtclaw.com


Freeport Chambers
The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O.Box 42533
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242)351-7474, Fax: (242)351-7752
Erica Poine's email address:
ep@gtclaw.com


p I


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a t. d -40D 1 -


'"Copyrighted.Material



-Syndicated Content-


Fly (From page 6B)
tiative to maximize expansion
of the tourism product and to
allow its role as a support enti-
ty to mirror the evolving needs
and changes seen within the
industry, BHS is partnering
with regional and internation-
al counterparts, including the
World Travel and Tourism
Council, and the Caribbean

Hotel Association by sharing
information, research and help-


p m Wm














ing to shape regional and inter-
national policies and pro-
grammes to preserve, protect
and develop the industry.
"'We are partnerng with
groups like the InterAmerican
Development Bank. the Euro-

gramme and the Multi-Lateral
investment Fund to leverage
our resources to improve our-
touris to product."
tourism. product."


ABCD


Thinking about your next career
move?

KPMG in Freeport, Bahamas has a vacancy for a,
Senior Auditor in its Audit Services Practice.
Candidates for the position will hold an'
undergraduate degree in Accounting, a professional
designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants such as CPA, ACA or CA and
have a minimum of 3 years work experience in a firm
of chartered accountants. Excellent opportunities
exist to broaden your professional experience in a
varied practice that offers competitive salaries and
employee benefits.

Applicants should submit a r6sum6 to KPMG, P.O. Box F40025,
Freeport, Bahamas or kpmg(lbatelnet.bs by February 4, 2005.

AUDIT TAX a ADVISORY
0 2004. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a
Swiss cooperative.


BUSINESS-


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Looking at the Associatio's







Mr Behell said BHA is a








paonerng wit the Ministry
Education, the College of tlt
Bahamas (COB) and oth .
learning institutions to creav
new approaches for the dev
opment of the human resour.
factor. ,-
Increasingly, BHA is alsb
working with non-traditionl
stakeholders, the Ministries pt
Transport, Public Works a t)
Labour and Immigration, tKfe
police and the Air and Po
Authorities.
Looking forward, Mr Bethel
said following a meeting of the
executive committee to plan thd
LAssociation's activities for the
year, it was felt that to improve
the organization, the industry
and the nation's economy, they
would have to look at improv-;
ing education, delivering more
customer service training, fori
mulate and promote industry
and employee certification,
build a more sustainable, envi-
ronmentally sound and cost
effective industry and stepping
up the disaster readiness and
response efforts.
He notedalso that BHA coni
tinues to playanongoing advo"
cacy role for the business com-
munity by providing research,
and views to government oa
legislation and issues whicl
could impact the future of the

said further that BHA appreciB
ated the opportunity to provide;
the input and he urged govern-
ment to continue to draw on
the expertise of the industry
when considering legislation
policy and regulations.


MVUST SELL














Two Storey Commercial Building 4025 sq. ft.
Comprising a Motel with eight 1 Bed/ 1 Bath units and Two commercial stores on the ground
floor
Lot No. 151 8,704sqft. Bay Street, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
Interested persons should submit written offers to be received no later than February 28, 2005 to:
Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P.O.Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas or
For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact.

The Manage (242) 335-1464 or (242) 335-1400 North Eleuthera or
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit Phone: 356-1686, 356-1685, 356-1608
Financing available for the qualified purchaser
Serious enquiries only


Available from Commercial News Providers"__


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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

CONSTRUCTION OF 34.5 KV "ASH", AAAC THREE-PHASE
TRANSMISSION LINE
CROSSING ROCKS, ABACO, BAHAMAS

TENDER No. 563/04

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
construction of approximately 16.5 miles of 34.5 KV "ASH" AAAC 3-phase
transmission line with all associated hardware mounted on single wood poles from
CROSSING ROCK to SANDY POINT, Abaco, Bahamas.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 23 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager-
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 563/04

"LINE CONSTRUCTION CROSSING ROCK, ABACO"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.













SBahamas-based software





supplier makes new hiring


.NET and ASP development,
and most recently held soft-,
ware analyst positions at Veri-
zon Communications and Mar-
riott International.
He is a Microsoft Certified
Solutions Developer and will
be responsible for designing,
leading and implementing
.NET projects at IPBS, the for-
mer Data Systems Interna-
tional (DSI).
IPBS plans to have complet-
ed the entire product migra-
tion to .NET and ASP.NET by


:Share your news

',The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
makingg news in their
vneighbourhoods. Perhaps "
liyou are raising funds for a
Good cause, campaigning
i1or improvements in the
a 'area or have won an
award. .
If so, call us on 322-1986
4mand share your story.





2 NOTICE
:NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL MOMPREMIER,
.WARWICK HOUSE, OFF SHIRLEY ST., NASSAU,
,,BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
;Jationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
ia citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of JANUARY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.














? NOTICE


FINCO INVITES TENDERS


, Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
._, for the purchase of the following:
'0
,1 ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 30,
-:, Avacardo Gardens situated in the South Western District
-k of one of the Island of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
g9 Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment, consisting of two
br(2) Bedrooms, one (1) bathrooms in each unit.
Property size: 6,600 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,350 sq. ft.
, This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
SAll offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
5) addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
-;i Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
r "tender 0294". All offers must be received by the close
'of business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.




NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 1858,
Pinewood Gardens Subdivision situated in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single-family residence consisting of (2) Bedrooms,
(2) Bathrooms.
Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 914 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 0811". All offers must be received by the close of
business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.


mid-2005. The company said
client demand had driven the
move, and IPBS/Investments
has already been migrated,
which allows it to offer order
entry, to dealing, to settlement
in one application. This means
clients now only have to input
a transaction once.
In a statement, Mr Baley
said the migration to the .NET
platform would enhance the
"flexibility and scalability" of
IPBS' software products.
Bruce Raine, IPBS' founder


and managing director, added:
"We are on target with our
growth strategy and Kyle
brings with him development
skills that are vital to our .NET
strategy. Many of our clients
require access to systems by
any number of remote users
and it presents quite a chal-
lenge for them. By helping to
minimise IT overhead, stream-
line systems within a secure
environment. our ASP.NET
strategy is proving to be a win-
ning solution."


NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS


Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 9,
Westglade Subdivision situate in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence. Situated thereon is Vacant
Land.

Property size: 9,467 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 0867". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday 11th, February, 2005.



NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finmapce i tprporatio q"' 4haras Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the folowihg:
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #1500,
Misty Gardens situated in the Southern District on one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is Duplex Apartment consisting of (2) Bedrooms,
(1) Bathroom.
Property size: 5,520 sq. ft.
Building size: 1,934 sa. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box-N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 8009". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday llth, February, 2005.



q UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd, a leading international Wealth Manager,
is looking for a

Head Business Management

This senior management position is open to candidates
with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications:

* Degree in Banking or Business;
* At least ten years experience in Private Banking;
* Excellent knowledge of Operations, Controlling and
Management;
* Extensive experience in Project Management;
* Fluency in English, German and French is essential;
* Good interpersonal skills;
* Computer literacy

Responsibilities:

* Banking related Project and Process Management;
* Support CEO in management activities;
* Marketing, Public Relations, Communications;
* Professional Association relationships, Corporate
Secretary;
* Coordination with all departments within the location
and with the Head Office in Switzerland.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals only should
be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757,
Nassau, Bahamas


international Private
l Banking Systems
s (IPBS), the Nassau-
w based supplier of
II,'; wealth management
software for the global private
banking industry, has hired
k'yle Baley as its senior devel-
(pment lead, as part of the
36mpany's strategy for migrat-
fig its product portfolio on to
the .NET and ASP.NET plat-
form.
'>"Mr Baley is an expert in


NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #32, Blk
#6, South Beach Estates situated in the Southern District
of the island of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of (4)
Bedrooms, (2) Bathroom.
Property size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building size: 2,009 sa. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 6291". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday 11th, February, 2005.



NOTICE

FINCO INVITES TENDERS
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited invites tenders
for the purchase of the following:
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 1730
in the Subdivision called and known as "Pinewood Gardens
Subdivision" situate in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providenve one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single family
Residence, consisting of three (3) Bedrooms, one (1)
bathroom.
Property size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 980 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under our Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Credit Management & Recovery
Centre, P.O. Box N-3038, Nassau, Bahamas and marked
"tender 4998". All offers must be received by the close
of business 4:00 pm, Friday 11th, February, 2005.




ABACOM AKETS
1. 1 M 1 1 ) 7>

ACCOUNTS CLERK

POSITION AVAILABLE
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco
This position requires individual with general
accounting experience whose main responsibilities
will be the auditing of cash in retail locations.

Qualification to include:

Associate Degree in accounting
Previous experience in same or similar position.


Skills to include:

Microsoft Word and Excel
Excellent communication (both written and
verbal) skills
Strong organizational skills.

Please send resume
Attention: Human Resources
Accounts Clerk
P.O. Box SS-6322
Nassau, Bahamas

Or Fax; 242-356-7855


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 11 B


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


MONDAY EVENING


JANUARY 31, 2005


7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 1 9:30 1 10:00 10:30
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Deco Drive Trading Spouses: Meet Your New 24 "Day 4:1:OOPM-2:OOPM" Terror- News (CC)
B WSVN Mommy "Lambe-LevyFarrell" (N) ists target nuclear plants across the
(I (Part 1 of 2) (CC) United States. (N) (CC)
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Coronation Rick Mercer's The Tournament The Passionate Eye (N) (CC) The National (CC)
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CNBC Conan oBion Kathy Griffin. (N)
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CNN ooper 360 (CC)
'* *, ORANGE COUNTY (2002, Comedy) Colin Hanks, Jack Black, South Park A Blue Collar TV Reno 911! Dys-
COM Catherine O'Hara. A teenage writer goes to extremes to get into Stanford. magician tricks You Might Be a functional sher-
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FSNFL stars Tournament Finals (Live) (CC)
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(:00) Walker, Touched by an Angel Monica helps * k FOLLOW THE STARS HOME (2001, Drama) Kimberly Williams,
HALL Texas Ranger a bitter woman overcome the secret Campbell Scott, Blair Brown. A single mother draws strength from the
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** THE DISAPPEARANCE OF CHRISTINA (1993) ** SEX, LOVE AND LIES (2004, Comedy-Drama) Scott Cohen, John
LIFE John Stamos, Robert Carradine. A wealthy business- Stamos, Annabeth Gish. A predatory lawyer sets off a sexual chain reac-
man is accused of killing his wife. (CC) tion. (CC)
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MSNBC c I mann
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OLN stinct "Fangs" to. From Del Mar, Calif. Lemond. counters takes
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Car Search Car Search Garage Garage
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TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) -(CC)
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(:00) In a Fix The Next Wave: Science of Tsunami Surviva Stories Incredible Medical Mysteries
TLC Tsunamis (CC) "Growing Up Old" Progeria ages
children s bodies.
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TNT der Fools for found floating in the Hudson River. Green think a husband had a role in other is accused of murdering a Cau-
Love" n (CC) (DVS) his wife's shooting. (CC) (DVS) casian police officer. )
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TOON (CC) Next Door Old score. (CC) ception" "Static Shaq"
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TWO tion (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) La Mujer Rubi Amor Real Cristina Cuernos descarados.
UNIV de Madera
S (: 00)JAG "Dog Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ** REPLICANT (2001, Science Fiction) Jean-Claude Van Damme,
USA Robber" (CC) A strict coach is suspected in the Michael Rooker, lan Robison. A retired detective and a clone team up to
murder of a gymnast. (CC) catch a killer. (CC)
HI *** PURPLE RAIN (1984) Michael Jackson's Secret Childhood Embarrassing Moments n
VH1 Prince, Apollonia Kotero. ,
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WGN Scott Glenn. A Soviet nuclear submarine heads toward the coast of Maine. n (CC)
Everybody 7th Heaven When Lucy invites Everwood "The Perfect Day" Nina WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond guests to see the baby, which wor- learns Andy and Amanda are having Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
(CC) ries Annie. (N) (CC) an affair. (N) (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Half & Half "Big The Road to Stardom With Missy Dr. Phil Makeovers. (N)
WSBK (CC) "Goodbye, Mr. All Bets Are Off Elliott A hopeful must decide
Chips" (N) (CC) Episode" (N) whether to leave the competition.
(6:00) **x Real Sports 0 (CC) Deadwood "Bullock Returns to the Deadwood "Suffer the Little Chil-
HBO-E STUCK ON YOU Camp" Bullock returns to camp a dren" Riders arrive with a vaccine.
(2003) 'PG-13' changed man. l (CC) C (CC)
(6:00) *** Carnivale "Old Cherry Blossom Unscripted The Unscripted *** BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM
HBO-P BOX OF MOON- Road" Ben's relative reveals dark class welcomes a Krista endures an (2002, Comedy) Parminder Nagra,
LIGHT (1996) secrets. (CC) new student. audition. Keira Knightley. 'PG-13' (CC)


(6:30) * SEABISCUIT (2003, Drama) Tobey * STUCK ON YOU (2003, Comedy) Matt Damon, Greg Kinnear, Eva
HBO-W Maguire, Jeff Bridges. Three men lead a racehorse to Mendes. Conjoined twins star on a TV show with Cher. 0 PG-13' (CC)
glory in the 1930s. 0 'PG-13' (CC)
(:15) **'A DELIVER US FROM EVA (2003, Ro- MARRIED TO THE MOB (1988, Comedy) (:45) The Making
H BO-S mance-Comedy) LL Cool J. A legendary Lothario is Michelle Pfeiffer. A federal agent becomes involved Of: Stuck on
hired to romance a meddling woman. 0i 'R' (CC) with a mobster's widow. n R' (CC) You 0 (CC)
(6:00) *,* I * SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE (2003, Romance-Comedy) Jack (:15) *** IDENTITY (2003) John
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'PG' (CC) er of his young girlfriend. 0 'PG-13' (CC) late hotel die one by one.
(:15) * ANALYZE THAT (2002, Comedy) Robert De ** GATTACA (1997, Science Fiction) Ethan (.45) Best Sex
MOMAX Niro, Billy Crystal. A mobster is released into the cus- Hawke, Uma Thurman. An outsider poses as a geneti- Ever "Sexy Pic-
tody of his ex-therapist. n 'R' (CC) cally superior citizen. n 'PG-13' (CC) tures" A (CC)
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SHOW NAISSANCE Lee. iTV. A beautiful bounty hunter must choose sides Eckhart, Hilary Swank. iTV. Earth's dead core must
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(6:00) * $ * DANGEROUS MINDS (1995, Drama) Michelle (:45) * JUST A KISS (2002, Romance-Comedy)
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1971) 'R' a class of educational misfits. 'R' (CC) Yorkers play a sexual round-robin. 0 'R' (CC)


JANUARY 31, 2005


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$


City Markets Lyford Cay
City Markets Harbour Bay
Super Value Cable Beach


Super Saver Stores
Lowes Pharmacy
United Book Stores
Island Merchant Stores
News Cafe


1
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Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug


MUNNUAY, JANUAriT a 1, 4VD,, rA- 100


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TRIBUNE SPORTS "


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


Third time lucky for





Angels against Caribs


FROM page one

war with him because even-
tually he's going to get bet-
ter," Roberts said. "When
I started playing, I dropped
five to six passes in a game.
It happens.
"But I would like to see if
he can play better then next
game and .not get timid. If
you step up and learn from
your mistakes, then you
become a better player.
Then I can respect him for
that."
While Roberts gave the
Jets a lot of credit for their
defence, he admitted that
lack of practice was a prob-
lem.
"If these guys don't come
out to practice, this is what
you get on the field: fum-
bles, drop balls, intercep-
tions, guys out of position,"
he said.

Fumble
In what turned out to be a
real defensive battle, the
Pros stuck first when their
defensive end got a fumble
recovery and returned it 38
yards for a 6-0 lead in the
second quarter.
But the Jets would make
it a game when running
back Mark Clarke scooted
inside on an eight-yard run
to tie the score.
Both teams missed their
extra count conversion, and
neither was able to score on
their opponent's turnovers.
In the third quarter,
Sybrean Kelly, who had a
fumble recovery in the sec-
ond quarter, got another
one as he broke loose and
ran down the other end of
the field.
As he did, he began limp-
ing and was caught by
Roberts as he reached their
three-yard line.
* "If I didn't catch a cramp,
he wouldn't have caught
me," said Kelly. "I wanted it
bad. I didn't figure anyone
was behind me after I made
it all the way up there."
What Kelly failed to do,
his quarter-back Drameko
Clarke did when he even-
tually ran in for the TD to
extend their lead to 12-6.

Heart
"I think in this game,
from the get go, the Jets
showed heart," Clarke
reflected. "We came out
here short handed and we
had to wait for a lot of our
players to show up. Yeah,
we had a lot of breakdowns,
but I think our team is start-
ing to mesh.
"Give the Pros all they
do, they had a few break-
downs. But given a play or
two, they could have won.
But I think we're getting
together as a team. We will
defensively play better in
our next game."
Jets' assistant coach Jim
LaRoda, who called most
of the shots from the side-
lines after head coach
Lawrence Hepburn went on
the field to play defence,
said they were overdue for
win.

Working
"The guys have been
working hard. We haven't
been working hard
enough," LaRoda admitted.
"We still have to polish off
our offence a lot more
because a lot of the players
are sloppy.
"But to hold the Pros to
just six points is a signifi-
cant defensive effort. They
have really stepped up to
the plate. The offence needs
more to get in sync. With a
little more practice, they will
get the plays down."


Pros' assistant coach
Sherwin Johnson said it was
just a mental breakdown
that resulted in their defeat.
"We had a breakdown on
the sidelines. We weren't as
organised as We should have
been and we made too
many mistakes," he admit-
ted.
"We turned the ball over
too many times, four or five
times. Anytime you turn the
ball over that many
times, you can't expect too
much."


RAN=

WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
Esso On the Run Angels
v COB Caribs
80-75



* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Esso On the Run
Angels have found a way to beat
the College of the Bahamas
Caribs, not once but, three times
this year in the New Providence
Women's Basketball Associa-
tion.
Defending champions the
Angels got forward Kimberly
Rolle to foul out with under five
minutes left to play and they
took advantage of the first-year
Caribs' inability to stop them in
the post as they pulled off a 80-
75 victory on Saturday night at
the DW Davis Gym.
Esso on the Run improved
their front running record to 8-1
and rejoiced when Rolle went
to the bench with her fifth foul,
including two technical fouls,
with four minutes and 25 sec-
onds left on the clock.
"We started off a little, slow,
but we got it together," said
Angels' point guard Varel
Davis. "Defence was our key
tonight. We knew we had to
play better defence. We know
the offence will always come.

Difference
"But whenKim went out, it
made a big difference. She nor-
mally snags through the middle,
so when she left the game, we
were able to go through the
middle without any problems."
Suzette McKenzie was one of
the main culprits in the low post
as she connected on 22 points
with nine rebounds and seven
assists. She led their 15-10 spurt
down the stretch with seven
straight points.
Keisha Richardson worked
her way inside to finish with 15
points and seven rebounds,
while Sharelle Cash was opened
outside for 15 points.
Davis chipped in with 11.
For the Caribs, who dropped
to 5-4 to remain in second place,
Kimberly Rolle was working on
a huge game with a game high
23 points, 15 rebounds and six
assists. Alexis Russell had to
take over in the low post and
ended up with 16 points and
eight rebounds and point guard
Christine Sinclair added 13
points and nine assists.
"I thought we played well,
very well. We played without
one of our starters, so I think
we played a very good game,"
said Russell referring to guard
Adina Knowles, who sat out the


game on the bench with an
injury.
Russell, however, dismissed
the fact that Rolle was the key
reason for their third straight
defeat to the Angels.
"I think we played well. We
played a great defensive game.
We just had a couple of silly
turnovers. But overall, I still
think we played a great game,"
she insisted. "We could have
used Kim because we she played


in the middle, but we didn't step
it up when we had too."
Rolle, who was probably hav-
ing her best game in leading the
Caribs to their best showing
against her former team, admit-
ted though that she may have
hurt their chances for the upset.
"I thought it was a vicious
elbow and the referee didn't call
anything. I told him about it and
he called a tech. I said 'well, call
your tech' and he gave me


another one," Rolle noted.
"I thought by the rules, I
should have been out of the
game. I'm very grateful that he
didn't throw me out of the
game. I was just disappointed
in the way he allowed number
eight (Richardson) to throw her
elbow in the game."
But Rolle didn't take all the
credit.
"The Angels played well
down the stretch than we did


Grafton gives new





university an Ifill


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT DIDN'T take sprinter Grafton Ifill
III too long to establish himself at the
University of Pennsylvania.
The Bahamian transfer student from
Clemson State (after he took a year off)
clocked 21.57 seconds on Saturday at
the Penn State National Open to break
the Quakers' 11-year-old school record.
He finished second in the race behind
Tennessee's Rubin Williams, who won
the race in 21.20, going under the pro-
visional qualifying time of 21.23 for the
NCAA National Championships.
Williams also pulled off the double by
winning the 60.
"I was happy. I was happy to be able
to break it, especially in my first 200
metres out," said Ifill, who ran 6.94 to
finish tied for 12th in the 60 on Friday
night. "It definitely shows that the 200 is
my event and I'm really confident run-
ning it."
Going into the race, Ifill admitted that
he wasn't at his best, having to endure
the cold, but he braved it out.
"To be doing this in Janumiary, I think
I'm right where I need to be," he insist-


ed. "Going into the outdoors, I think I
will be ready to run really fast."
Meanwhile Derrick Atkins just missed
posting another sprint double victory
over the weekend to lead the Bahamian
charge for Dickinson State at the Dave
Little Invite.
The meet was held at the Youth Cen-
ter at the Black Hills State University.
Aktins easily won the 55 metre final in
6.30 seconds after running 6.45 for the
fastest qualifying time in the prelimi-
naries.

Close
But in the 200, Atkins had to settle
for second behind his Bahamian team-
mate, Aaron Cleare, who won the race
in 22.23. Atkins, who ran 21.7 last
weekend, finished close behind in
22.24.
"I wouldn't say it was one of my best,
but I'm happy with the results," said
Atkins, the top sprinter for Dickinson
State. "This was just my second meet
for the year, so I'm pleased with my per-
formance."
Despite not getting the double as he
did in his season opener, Atkins said it


was a good testing ground for him to
see exactly where he stands.
"It's not something that I can look at
being really big," said Atkins, who
admitted that he may have eased up a
little instead of running straight through
the tape. "There are some small steps.
You have to creep before you walk.
"This is just my second meet, but this
is two times better than I was last year
when I competed in my second meet.
So I guess it's good so far. It shows that
I am making some improvement."
Cleare, who ran on the men's 4 x 400
metre relay team that finished sixth at
the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens,
Greece, decided to skip the 400 and just
concentrate on his speed, running in the
200.
Also at the meet, Trevor Barry,
another Bahamian, stayed unbeaten in
two outings when he cleared 7-feet, 1-
inch in the high jump. His nearest rival
was Matt Anderson from Northern, who
cleared 6-6.
Speaking on behalf of the Bahamian
connection at Dickinson State, Atkins
said: "We work very well together, in
practice and when we go on the track to
compete," Atkins summed up.


and they won," she summed up.
Russell, however, said, despite
the loss, she's convinced that
they played their best game so
far this year and if they can con-
tinue in that trend, they could be
looking forward to beating the
Angels when it counts the most
- in the championship.
The game was a sea-saw bat-
tle from the start.
The College of the Bahamas
had the Angels on the run *,
throughout the game.
In fact, the Caribs surprised
the Angels when they took a 18-
16 lead at the end of the first
quarter when Sinclair shake and
baked Cash for a lay-up with
just five seconds left.
In the second quarter, Esso ";
on the Run established their "'
presence behind the 1-2 punch ,
from Suzette McKenzie and ',"
Sharelle Cash. But it was Kim "'-
Rolle and the College of the
Bahamas who had the last laugh
at the half with a 38-35 lead.

Asserted
It was a different situation in 'i
the third as the Caribs asserted ^
themselves early, going up 42-
35. But Rolle was hit with her K
pair of techs and McKenzie .'
canned three of the four charity
shots to cut the Angels' deficit to ^,
46-44.
Rolle, however, made up for ^
her mistake by helping to keep
the College of the Bahamas out
front, 57-55, at the end of the
period.
And in the fourth, Esso on'
the Run went on the run and
were able to surge ahead 64-62..
The College of the Bahamas, ,
however, got a three-pointer
from Rolle for a 67-65 lead '
before she eventually fouled out ',
on the next play..
The Angels then took over
the game the rest of the way. -;
"It's a good win because both' '
teams are very talented and
every game is a good game
between the two of us," Davis
stressed. "So we always look for-
ward to playing against them."
The two teams have one more -
meeting before the regular sea-
son is over.


t


I I ON


SPORTS
1'.,





MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005, PAGE 15B


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I SECTION





Fa= (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


-tt--- -, r %Yrriflrr-,.-- -r r,.n"D~p~SIr A -l


U ANTON ROBERTS struggles to make any headay3 against an on


U By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE John Bull Jets knew sooner
or later they would put up a great
defensive game.
On Saturday it came, as they
pulled off a stunning 12-6 victory


to hand the Orry J Sands Pros their
first loss in the Commonwealth
American Football League.
Julian Saunders. who led the Jets'
defence, said he didn't go to prac-
tice all season long, but he knew
what "as needed up the middle and
he provided it against the Pros.
"We tried to come out and be
determined to win this game and it
paid off." said the tackle., ho also


played guard in the game. "We let a
lot of the rookies pla% \ ho wanted
to play. W\\e ere here for the tun.
But we played our best. Win. lose or
draw", we are happy."
The Jets, however, were more
than happ\ with theit effort and
they got into a huddle after the
game to celebrate
"They came out here claiming
that the, are the best team, but ,e


-, -,t'-


i-form John Bull Jets' defence.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff) :
,ere determined to stop them," said play the Nassau Sunburners. ,
Snundeis, who led the attack in the The Jets forced the Pros to fum-
last two minutes as thel\ ended the ble the ball twice down the stretch. ;'
Pros' final hid to get back in the but they weren't able to recover the *'
end zone. ball.
The Pros hhd to concert wide "We ha\e a rookie at centre and
receiver Antoine Roberts at quar- he's learning the game. He's going '
terback alti Mike Foster was elect- to take his licks. but I'd still go to
ed Iron the game for unsportman- 14B
like conduct. Foster will no" hae SEE page 14B
to sit out Saturd.\ wlien the Pros
-. ,- ; ,.i '. .- -e ,' '. ." -,,_.... ;,4' "


V 777 1
"riDu-ne,


i











MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


F TiheFmm
BHBBBB^^BB T rib u ne^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


The stories behind the news


I LCEU


Marathon MP Ron Pinder apolo-
gised in the House of Assembly last
week for breaching security at Nassau
International Airport on January 18.
Mr Pinder was flying to Washington to
attend the inauguration of US Presi-
dent George Bush. Mr Pinder boarded
the flight for Washington through the
VIP lounge unaccompanied by proto-
col officers, bypassing security, and the
US Customs and immigration boarding
area. This was a violation of the air-
port's security rides and regulations ...


The big news last week was also
the most disturbing. A riot erupted
in Nassau Village on Wednesday
night when a traffic accident in the
area escalated out of control.
Three civilians received gunshot
wounds A second riot erupted
the following day when tempers
flared over the police's handling
of the previous night's melee. The
atmosphere remained tense on |
Friday ... .


Victims


of


A consultancy firm has been contracted for $1 million
to start what is expected to be the first step in the long-
awaited privatization of Bahamasair, Minister for Works
and Utilities Bradley Roberts announced last week.
Government has approved McKinsey and Company,
the largest management consultancy firm in the world, as
the consultants to perform this task in conjunction with a
privatization committee, which will be comprised of pro-
fessionals from the airline and related industries, includ-
ing the Ministry of Tourism, the Minister of Finance, the
Hotel Corporation and the Airport Authority. This firm
has served more than 30 airlines worldwide over the past
five years...


neglect


It's time to get tough with those who destroy New Providence's heritage


*By JOHN MARQUIS
SW T- est Hill Street is
i I potentially one of
-. j J ^the most pic-
turesque byways of
V, V Nassau. Flanked by
colonial buildings, and positioned on a
ridge, it enjoys both the aura of a gen-
tter past and stunning views across a
patchwork of rooftops to the sea.
At one end is Graycliff, the former
hbme of the Earl and Countess of Dud-
ley which now serves as one of Nas-
sau's most stylish restaurants. At the
6oher is the beautifully restored Villa
'qoyle, relishing its new role as the
National Art Gallery of the Bahamas.
- Ifbetween is a quaint street redolent of
a colourful past, when donkey-carts,
pony traps and horse-drawn wagons
were the only modes of transport to be
seen.
For tourists who. shoot video footage
from the surreys that trundle along this
thoroughfare there are but two jarring
features...a once beautiful home called'
Sunningridge, now a splintered wreck,
and the former Sisters of Charity Con-
vent, which was gutted by a developer
and left exposed to the elements. Both
are now ruinous eyesores brought to
their knees by appalling neglect.
Like Cascadilla, the once elegant
home of Sir Harold Christie in East
Street, and a collection of other derelict
historic buildings known by conserva-
tionists as "The Dirty Dozen", these
properties are the victims of their own-
er, whose failure to maintain them has
created a scene of dereliction which
blights the area.
For whatever reason, they have been
left to the mercy of the weather, their


TO make Nassau work as a living
heritage attraction, there has to be
genuine political will and an end to
anti-colonial prejudice.
: American revolutionaries
destroyed colonial Williamsburg in
man effort to extinguish the past. Then
they rebuilt it againrwhen they reciog-
nised this was an important part of
their history. It is now one of the
great tourist attractions of the United
States.
In Nassau, many of the old colonial
buildings are still in place. But it
needs real desire and money, of
course to capitalise on its historic
',assets. Architect Anthony Jervis told
"INSIGHT: "Money is undoubtedly


paintmoirk cracked hby -n. ihcu
root, and %%indi"ws unhingLd I'N hurri-
cane', and Iiii.ir Cciihno2' Iel[ 'j'ooing
troin ihe LL'hI of 'e neti alinc da.-mp-
1krN
Woi I a niwi'Ler pI.ir n.-,\%b~irI. prLe


one of the obstacles, but so is the car.
A good bus system and good parking
structures are needed. Then you will
see the city."
There is no doubt that some politi-
cians dislike the colonial past and
want rid of all symbols of what they
see as an unpalatable part of Bahami-
an history.
There is also a school of thought
that feels the Bahamas needs to built
itself a new identity. But conserva-
tionists feel a new-look Nassau would
have little appeal for visitors and
squander the city's unique allure.
Rigorously enforced regulations,
they say, are the key to a properly
preserved Nassau.


pared for redevelopment of N.assau's
"ati rtront. and returbishment of the
domn i niare[a.. .1 firm stradie%\ is
ilequLied or diahni itnh errant prop-
ei t o\~ne lsi \\iio \ ilfulhl allow build-
Ilg i to rot and, tltiminatell.collapse into
a .'Lilt o tiotl dil apidalion.
Tile oc -riliniimil hai.is to decide" can
willul dct.,ncc b\ an unconcerned
[i-inh.olIt\ bI .ilm\\Cd Lit put Nassau's
.icliicectural he iitae at risk? And
should ne\\ la\\s be implemented to
thrash them into line?
The preservation of Nassau's historic
buildings is far more- than a whimsical
obsession of die-hard conservationists.
It is absolutely fundamental to the city's
future as a tourist resort. For Nassau's
colonial heritage, whatever its negative
political connotations for some, is
undoubtedly its strength as a place to
visit. Americans, in particular, just love
that Royal connection.
Restoration of its colonial buildings is
not, therefore, a matter for protracted
contemplation over a number of years.
It is an urgent priority in need of bold
decisions. With every day that passes,
homes like Cascadilla and Sunningridge
bend and buckle under the weight of
their wilting beams. Time is not on their
side.
The plight of Sunningridge and the
former convent is now prompting
extreme irritation among those who see
their deterioration as an affront to
Bahamians and a poor reflection on the


nation's will to preserve its past. People
in neighboring properties regard the
buildings' decline as scandalous.
Describing the situation as a disgrace,
one reader said: "These eyesores across
the street from the National Art Gallery
are viewed on a daily basis on the car-
riage and walking tours.
"They lead tourists to believe that
this is the way Bahamians preserve their
heritage when it is, in fact, a Canadian
speculator operating in complete dis-
regard for this historic area."
The "speculator" in question is a
banker called Jeff Waterous. In 1997
he gutted the convent as part of a com-
mercial development scheme which was
never completed. According to news-
paper reports of the time, he was
ordered to restore the building to its
former state. This did not happen.
One reader asked: "As we are in the
process of trying to restore and beauti-
fy the downtown area, how is it that no


pressure has been brought to bear on
Mr Waterous? Is Mr Waterous above
the law of this land?"
These are questions INSIGHT was
eager to put to Mr Waterous himself.
Alas, all six numbers in the phone book
bearing his name are out of service.
And when a reporter tried to interview
him some time ago in a bid to find out
what made him tick, he politely declined
to comment.
A former business contact told
INSIGHT: "As far as I know, Mr
Waterous is now in Malta. When he
acquired the properties, his idea was to
develop and expand them. But he met
objections from government and aban-
doned the project.
"I believe that several people are now
keen to buy the properties, but it's not
yet known whether he will sell. How-
ever, it's unlikely these buildings will
be restored. They are in a state of near
collapse and one big hurricane would
sweep them away."
However, Mr Waterous is merely one
of several owners whose properties are
being allowed to fall into the streets of
Nassau. With new initiatives on the
drawing board to make the historic city
into a tourist gem, is it not time to take
an aggressive line against those whose
neglect of property works against the
nation's 'interests?
For some buildings, such an approach
is already far too late. Over the last 30
years, a succession of old and often
beautiful buildings have succumbed to
the demolition gangs.
Sandsholme, on the corner of
Princess and Market Streets, fell to the
bulldozers in the early 1990s. The old
Moseley residence at the junction of
Shirley and East Streets was flattened to
make way for a parking lot. The ele-
gant Sawyer home in Victoria Avenue is
now the site of a car sales firm. The Pri-
ory, built in 1786 by Lord Dunmore,
was dismantled in 1986 after two cen-
turies as a Nassau landmark.
Each in its own way added appeal to
the city scene, but all were sacrificed
for no purpose that makes any sense
today. What we know for sure is that
Nassau was diminished by their loss,
and there is no chance of ever getting
them back again.
Happily, growing concern among dis-
cerning citizens has saved buildings like
the old Moore home on Shirley and
Parliament Streets (now the law office
of Dawson Roberts) and Balcony
House on Market Street. But Malcolm
House, built in 1790, was felled by Hur-
ricane Floyd in 1999 and others have
given way to development over the
years. The most notable loss of all was
the Royal Victoria Hotel, a hub of gra-
cious living which reflected the pros-
perity of the blockade-running era of
the 1860s. Nassau is undoubtedly the
poorer without these priceless echoes of

See HISTORIC, Page 2C


w Hne


Plans are in hand for the restoration and revitalisation

of historic Nassau, with emphasis on the city's quaint

colonial past. INSIGHT nominates some severely

neglected sites in need of urgent attention...
1v &--.0e,;w s m -


N PICTURED are derelict buildings in the West Hill Street area.


Making Nassau

'work as a living

heritage attraction'





1: R z 1 1:












P 0 DN3TT


When good news




is bad for business


ood news has
brought bad
news for the
160-year-old
Guardian, which has seen its cir-
culation slip another 12 per cent
over the last year. Its decision
to promote the good and bury
the bad has done nothing to
stem what can only be described
as a calamitous decline in sales.
Seven years ago, the Guardian
was claiming to sell nearly 18,000
copies a day. Now the figures
have plummeted to a little over
10,000 on most weekdays, with
seemingly no relief in sight for its
long-suffering owners and staff.
In some respects, the
Guardian's fate is little different
from that of many broadsheets
around the globe. In the US and
Britain, the newspaper market
is contracting, and even
esteemed titles like The Times
of London are feeling the heat as
television, the Internet and com-
puter madness take their toll.
The difference is that the Nas-
sau Guardian is in freefall in a
market where its main rival, The
Tribune, is gaining sales at a
steady rate, reeling in new read-
ers every week and increasing
its outlets to meet demand. In
Nassau, the market is not con-
tracting, but its allegiance are
shifting. And the Guardian is
the loser.
Hence, the paper's bosses can-
not point to an overall market
trend as justification for its
plight. The consensus within the
industry is that the Guardian is
losing ground because it is failing
to do its job. It's as simple as
that.
"The decision to promote
good news at the expense of the
bad sounds very high-minded
and moralistic, but in journalistic
terms it is hogwash," said one
media, analyst.
"People do not buy newspa-
pers to be bamboozled into
behe ing life's vonderftil. They
want the news real news'-how-;
ever unpleasant it turns out to
be."
As a Tribune editorial pointed
out a few weeks ago, a newspa-
per's job is not to polish the
news to make it more palatable.
Its primary role is to tell the
truth. And if the truth hurts,
that's life...
In Britain, a wide variety of
desperate measures have been
taken by newspapers over the
last decade to halt falling sales.
The national tabloids have
become almost entirely celebri-
ty-led, with editors delving into


the private lives of TV soap stars
and sports personalities to
attract younger readers. News
of all kinds good and bad has
taken a back seat while the friv-
olous kiss-and-tell yarns of the
"famous" have been given
prominence.
The more serious broadsheets
have also undergone a long
"dumbing down" process, ape-
ing the tabloids more and more
in an effort to keep sales figures
looking rosy. With the accent on
bolder, more colourful presen-
tation, and a heftier diet of
human interest stories and
revealing profiles, the old sober-
suits of British journalism have
been battling for a bigger share
of the middle market, alienating
highbrow reactionaries among
their readers in the process.
However, all are too wise to
fall into the "good news" trap,
which niost true journalists
regard as the preserve of dilet-
tantes and amateurs. The histo-


news breaks and more concen-
tration on analysis. This is
because television, inevitably,
has cornered the "news break"
market. The events of Septem-
ber 11, 2001, were a case in
point. When it came to on-the-
spot coverage, there was little
newspapers could do to counter
television's all-seeing eye. The
evenings made a bold stab at it,
but morning papers found
themselves having to pursue
angles that television had
missed. It was not an easy task
when cable stations and the
main networks had been on air
for the whole of the previous
day exploring every nook and
nuance of the story.
In Britain and America, news-
papers have tried hard to com-
pete with the strong visual
appeal of television by making
their pages more attractive. This
has been achieved by exploring
the potential of colour and more
imaginative design. Bolder use


years ago. Whether quality has
kept pace with quantity is a mat-
ter for debate, but in value-for-
money terms there is now little
to beat a daily newspaper, which
still generally sells for less than a
can of soda.
One need only go back to the
1960s to see the huge changes
in The Tribune and Guardian.
Then, The Tribune was a 14-
page single-section paper with
little but sports news and fea-
tures after page three. The
Guardian was a thin, tatty
tabloid with blotchy type. Today,
both are much bigger multi-sec-
tioned packages with clearer
type and lots of colour, though
their approach to news and fea-
tures is quite different. Whatev-
er critics of the press say, news-
paper readers have reaped a
good deal over the years.
The Guardian's current wor-
rying predicament is made worse
for its new owners, a group of
attorneys and financial consul-
tants, by their knowledge of its
recent past. During the Pindling
government's reign, the paper
was wallowing in riches, having
been granted all government
gazette business at The Tribune's
expense. Its circulation was not
only flying high, but also
appeared to be solidly rooted,
with an apparently immovable
bedrock of support in the over-
the-hill communities.
However, times have changed,
with The Tribune gaining the
upper hand in many of the
Guardian's old stamping
grounds, reasserting its creden-
tials as a paper for all. The latest
figures suggest that many read-
ers who once took both the main
dailies now take only one and
that, more often than not, is The
Tribune.
"There is now only- one real
paper in the.Bahamas," a media
observer said last week, "The
Tribune is the one we look to
for everything. When it comes
to the crunch, we know we get a
fair appraisal of what's really
going on in The Tribune because
it is beholden to no-one and has
a thoroughly professional
approach.
"While The Punch is good for
a laugh and a bit of scandal, it's
The Tribune that really covers
the ground and keeps its readers
in the know. The Journal, mean-
while, is sometimes a useful
dessert to follow the main
course, but I doubt it will ever be
more than that."
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmarquis@tri-
bunemedia.net


ry of journalism is littered with
good intentions gone bad, and
the demise of a string of sancti-
monious publications deter-
mined to publish only good news
is one of its more dominant fea-
tures.
One such newspaper total
lifespan six weeks was so intent
on pursuing its "good news"
,agenda.that it splashed.a.tqry of-
San enjoyable coach trip to the
.,seaside for a group of sR.ioners
on its front page, leaving readers'
to search for the back-page
punchline, which was that sev-
eral of them died in a crash on
the return journey.
Another doggedly reported a
cricket match without mention-
ing that four players vanished
suddenly when a massive hole
appeared in the pitch.
Certainly, newspapers in first
world nations have changed
their focus over the last 50 years,
mainly because they have had
to adapt to reader demand.
There is less emphasis on big


of pictures and graphics has been
another element in the process.
Media pundit Roy Greenslade
put it this way: "Editors grew
increasingly concerned about
how to broaden their audiences.
Throughout the century the key
ingredients of broadsheets had
been news, analysis and com-
ment. All gradually widened
their scope to incorporate fea-
tures, but this trend accelerated
during the early 1990s with every
title using colourful Iront-page
blurbs to sell material that would
never have been previously pub-
lished in what was regarded as
the 'serious' or 'quality' press."
Nostalgia buffs reflected on
'better' days, when newspapers
were stolidly monochrome with
smaller headlines and inter-
minable reports of parliamen-
tary proceedings and foreign
news. The truth is, though, that
modern newspapers offer much
greater value, with more pages
and more of everything else than
their predecessors of 40 or 50


Historic (From page 1C)


insi

FEEDBACK


STRONG words continue
to flow into The Tribune's
office about the INSIGHT
article on rape, with one
woman reader claiming to be
"horrified" by its content.
"I have enjoyed your
columns every Monday for
the past few months," writes
Alison Hamilton, "and
though I may not always
agree with everything you
say, I generally respect your
views and certainly appreciate
your writing skills...until now,
that is.
"I was horrified at your
recent commentary on the
alleged rape of a woman by
one of our government min-
isters. I can in no way give an
opinion as to whether or not
it happened because I don't
know and I am unwilling to
judge a person without know-
ing all the facts and seeing
the evidence.
"However, that is not the
point here. The fact that you
have automatically grouped
this woman with a small per-
centage of women who inten-
tionally set out to destroy
men by crying rape just
amazes me.
"I have not seen or heard
in any media that she with-
drew the accusation because
she lied, that she had fabri-
cated the whole story. Maybe
you have seen or heard some-
thing that I have missed.
"There are many reasons
why women, and men, who
are also often raped (do you
feel they, too, make it all up?)
would retract their com-
plaint...fear of reprisal, per-
ceived shame and embarrass-
ment...so many reasons other
than it was a concocted accu-
sation.
"After all this and particu-
larly after your insensitive
article, there will be many
genuine victims who are in
need of assistance but who
will decide it is too frightening
to make a report. ,2:.
"I entreat you to revisit this
issue. As I said, none ,of us
knows what happened, if any-
thing, but until such time as
we do, we have no right to
condemn either party.
"All we can do is look at
our own moral behaviour and
try to instil in our children
and those around us values
that will ensure that they treat
others with respect, loyalty,
dignity and decency."
A male college lecturer
took a different view, claim-
ing the article was "very bal-
anced" and fair.
"Relations between human
brings are subject to inter-
pretation and sometimes
these interpretations carry


you right into the bedroom.
"Anyone who says other-
wise has got to go and check
themselves. This woman
maintained for 21 days that
she was raped. Then she with-
drew the claim."
The Bahamas "political
body" came under fire for
adopting sanctimonious atti-
tudes during the "rape" con-
troversy.
A reader said: "Many if not
most of our politicians are les-
bians, gays and womanisers
with no right to moralise."
******
INSIGHT'S half-term
report on. the government
and opposition continues to
attract reaction.
"It was hard and some-
times cutting, but no-one can
deny the conclusions were
true," said one reader who
wanted to be known only as
Lightbourne.
"The PLP is a dead-duck
government with no ideas of
its own," he said, "It hopes
enough new investments will
be in place by 2007 to justify a
second term.
"But there is more to gov-
ernment than attracting
investment. The prime minis-
ter has allowed too much to
slip through his hands over
the last two years. His minis-
ters are running wild and he
can't catch up with them.
"At this point in his gov-
ernment, he badly needs a
shake-up, but I don't see one
coming. I guess if you move
garbage around it's still
garbage. And there's no use
tossing out one load of
garbage to bring in more
garbage."
******
Last week's article on Nan-
cy Oakes astonished some
young Bahamians whose
knowledge of the famous tri-
al of Count Alfred de
Marigny is sketchy to say the
least. "I never knew the
Bfahamas iiiadbeen the loca-
tion of such world-renowned
events," wrote Lee Pinder.
"It is disturbing to think that
de Marigny was the victim of
a frame-up. Was his acquit-
tal the result of his wife's tes-
timony?"
In fact, the crooked Miami
cop James Barker under-
mined the prosecution case
by planting a false fingerprint
on a Chinese screen in the
bedroom where the body of
Sir Harry Oakes was found.
Barker was later shot dead
by his own son after a family
argument. A court ruled the
death was "justifiable homi-
cide".


a bygone age.
In Cascadilla, Nassau possesses an
1840s mini-mansion with an architect'
tural style instantly recognisable as a
throwback to old Virginia and the Car-
olinas. There is a "Gone with the Wind"
quality about this majestic building. But
.* its structure, though interesting, is less
so than its associations.
It was here, amid scented tropical
gardens, that Sir Harold and Lady
Christie entertained the glitterati of yes-
teryear. Earl Mountbatten, actor
Richard Harris, holiday camp king Sir
Billy Butlin and a phalanx of lesser
lights all found a welcome in the cool
oasis behind Cascadilla's walls.
Though only a few. yards from the
bustle of Bay Street, the house was a
soothing shrine to everything Sir Harold
* loved: antiquarian books, antique arte-
facts, period furniture and, most impor-
tantly, the genteel if unostentatious
lifestyle he had cultivated during a suc-
cessful career as a realtor.
The present owner, Raymond Wong,
has admitted in the past that the build-
ing has been badly neglected on his
watch. There have been plans to convert


the building into an upscale restaurant,
but an estimated $2 million is said to be
needed for a full refurbishment of the
house and its two-acre grounds.
More recently, the restaurant idea
was resurrected, but nothing has been
done so far to halt the quickening
decline of this handsome building,
whose balconies now hang precariously
from its walls as tropical vegetation
strangles what's left of its louvres, shut-
ters and disintegrating window-frames.
In 2003, a welcome sign of govern-
ment resolve was witnessed in relation
to Cotton Ginny House on East Bay
Street, an undistinguished building
which has occupied its site for well over
a century.
This protected structure, owned by
the Kenning family, has been the sub-
ject of controversy for years. Unloved
and unoccupied, it was allowed to fall
into disrepair before being daubed with
garish crosses to make it even more of
an eyesore. There was a strong feeling
that the building was being allowed to
deteriorate for business reasons, and
that its owners hoped its dire state
would eventually spark calls for demo-


lition.
A prolonged stand-off between the
owners and the Ministry of Works cli-
maxed with an official notice demand-
ing action within 60 days. At first, noth-
ing happened. Now, it seems, the build-
ing is to be restored as office accom-
modation, making a crucial point to all
those inclined to defy conservation
orders: whatever the commercial case
for a building's destruction, there is a
wider picture to be considered. When
old buildings vanish, vital pieces of Nas-
sau's heritage go with them.
Cotton Ginny House, Cascadilla,
Sunningridge, the old convent and a
down-at-heel colonial pile in Cumber-
land Street are but a few of the build-
ings now in urgent need of protection
and restoration. Their survival will con-
tribute greatly to the energetic promo-
tion of historic Nassau as a tourist
attraction, if that laudable aim ever
reaches full fruition.
While Las Vegas style casino devel-
opments are money-spinners and job-
creators, it is the essential character of
Nassau that really makes it a place to
remember. Casinos can be built any-


where, but recreating a past with so
many intriguing facets from Crown
loyalists to privateers, blockade-run-
ners to bootleggers is an impossibility.
Whatever the evils of colonialism, it
certainly left the Bahamas with a story-
book past.
However, Nassau's natural historic
charm is almost criminally under-
utilised at present. Properly upgraded,
with the right mix of shops, nightspots
and eateries, the entire downtown area
could rival old Charleston or the French
Quarter of New Orleans. With a. par-
liament pre-dating the American and
French revolutions, and a history fea-
turing three of the major European
powers of old, the Bahamas has as much
to offer as any small nation in the New
World.
Unfortunately, all this is inadequate-
ly represented in the Bahamas tourist
product. What we have in Bay Street
now is a limp assortment of liquor out-
lets, perfume shops and jewellery stores,
all of which shut down early and leave
the heart of Nassau after dark to loi-
terers and potcakes, its gutters strewn
with paper cups and takeaway plates. If


its many cultural and ethnic influences
were exploited fully, this could be one
of the major heritage attractions of the
Caribbean.
By revitalising Nassau's nightlife,
restoring its architectural legacy, and
capitalising tastefully on its history, the
government could make the city more
than just an off-shore gambling resort
with attractive beaches. It could become
a living museum, its buildings treasured
exhibits in a handsome tableau of 17th,
18th and 19th century life.
As one of the very few old colonial
cities in the Caribbean area that is still
intact, with a string of stone forts to
remind historians of its long-recognised
strategic worth, Nassau has much to
offer those who require more of a hol-
iday than a bottle of Bacardi and a week
on the beach.
But to make it work, those property
owners who undermine its beauty and
historic appeal need to pay the price.
The kind of price that will make them
flinch and think again.

What do you think? Fax 328-2398
or e-mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


CHEESE PI Z..ZA S



& CHEESY BREAD


Newspapers around the
world are fighting to hold
circulations steady as the
electronic media takes its toll.
But Nassau, with three morning
titles, has a different tale
to tell. INSIGHT reports...


TI I V'N1P


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 2005


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