• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Business
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Religion
 Section C continued














Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00021
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 27, 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
        page A 15
        page A 16
        page A 17
        page A 18
        page A 19
        page A 20
        page A 21
        page A 22
        page A 23
        page A 24
        page A 25
        page A 26
    Section B: Business
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B: Sports
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C: Religion
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
    Section C continued
        page C 10
Full Text







"DELUXE. -\

SALADS" i.

HIGH 76F
LOW 63F

SUNNY AND
PLEASANT


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.53 THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 PRICE 500


sections inside


Il


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bflCw


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Bahamas tourism


record in 2004


Two dead as residents and police clash


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT The Bahamas
exceeded the five million visitor
mark in 2004 for the first time in
its history, despite two major
hurricanes last year, it was
announced on Wednesday at
the opening of the second.
adlnlUdal itional Tdurism Con-
feicnce.
Colin Higgs, permanent sec-
.retary in the Ministry of
Tourism. reported thai there is
no other destination in the
region that comes close to the
country's visitor total.
He was speaking on behalf of
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe, who was unable
to attend the opening in Grand
Bahama, one of the islands
hardest hit and ravaged b. Hur-
ricanes Frances and Jeanne.
Under the theme, "Making It
Better in the Bahamas', about
400 tourism delegates packed
the Convention Centre at the
Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.
Keynote speaker Jeffrey Ray-
port, Chairman and CEO of
Marketplace LLC, stressed that
customer service and satisfac-
tion is the most important ele-
ment for success of an) busi-
ness, especially in the business
of tourism.
Mr Higgs said the five mil-
lion visitor mark was achieved
despite the interruption caused
by two hurricanes that forced
the closure of three principal
airports for several days in Sep-
tember and October, as well as
the long term closure of several


resort properties throughout the
country.
He noted that passing that
"significant threshold" makes
the conference much more
urgent and important if the
country is to sustain its success.
"Congratulations to all of the
people of the Bahamas, both
within and outside the tourism
industry who helped us to
accomplish thlit feat. .
"What %e clearly need now is
to find and sustain the tech-
niques and processes that will
ensure that those five million
visitors so enjoy themselves that
they go away singing our prais-
es and selling our country to
their family and friends," he
said.
"We have the product, we
have the numbers and all we
need is the passion and perfor-
mance for sustainable success,"
said Mr Higgs.
Although still recovering
from the devastation, Willie
Moss, president and deputy co-
chairman of Grand Bahama
Port Authority, is confident in
the island's ability to bounce
back.
The Our Lucaya and Royal
Oasis Resorts, the two major
hotel properties on the island,
sustained extensive damage and
were forced to close and lay off
thousands of workers.
While Our Lucaya has
reopened for business, the Roy-
al Oasis remains closed with
more than 1,300 hotel workers
unemployed.
Despite the tragedies that
SEE page 12


SHOTS rang out in Nassau Village last
night as residents and police clashed.
Two men, one in his mid-twenties, and
the other believed to be a police officer,
were shot and killed. An 18-year-old is in
hospital, critically injured. A police car
was also destroyed by fire. As wreckers
removed the car from the scene the crowds
cheered.
Fire engines were also present.
One police officer described the scene as
a repeat of the Kemp Road riot of a few
years ago.
It was unclear what started the unrest at
7pm at the basketball court on the corner
of Alexander Boulevard and Sampson
Street in Nassau Village. A pool of blood,
starting at the comer of Alexander Boule-
vard and flowing west into Sampson Street,
continued for at least 200 yards. It indi-
cated that after the victim had been shot he
continued to run. There was a large pool of
blood where it is believed he fell. It was
not far from his home on Sampson Street.
Some persons said he died at the scene;
others that he died in hospital.
It is also reported that the dead police
officer lived in the Nassau Village area.
It is believed that he died after being tak-
en to hospital.
First reports said that police were called
SEE page 14


'First step' in

privatization

of Bahamasair
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
A CONSULTANCY firm has been
contracted for $1 million to start what is
expected to be the first step in the long-
awaited privatization of Bahanmasair, Min-
ister for Works and Utilities Bradley
Roberts announced yesterday.
Government has approved McKinsey
and Company, the largest management
consultancy firm in the world, as the con-
sultants to perform this task in conjunc-
tion with a privatisationcommittee, which
will be comprised of professionals from
the airline and related industries, includ-
ing the Ministry of Tourism, the Minister
of Finance, the Hotel Corporation and
the Airport Authority.
This firm, said Mr Roberts, has served
more than 30 airlines worldwide over the
past five years and has completed more
than 340 engagements within the industry
SEE page 14


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
INTEGRITY, fairness and pub-
lic service should be the hallmarks
of political leadership, Bahamas
Christian Council president William
Thompson said yesterday during
his speech at Parliament's annual
church service.
"Power in the hands of leaders
should not be reckless, nor should it
be arrogant," Dr Thompson said,
encouraging the assembled parlia-
mentarians to "do some ego-slay-
ing" and be mindful that they are
servants of the public.
"Justice will not have double
standards," he warned, reminding
parliamentarians that they are
called on to show integrity, and at
all times "call a spade a spade."
"I encourage you to find the
truth," he said.
The service, held at the Bethel
Baptist Church on Meeting Street
yesterday morning, was well attend-
SEE page 12


Course runs from February 28 to March 4, 2005.
Registration Deadline is February 11, 2005.
To register, call (242) 325-2638.
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Pt-H c, I I..O V oL)AY, JANUARY 27, 2005


LOCAL NEWS


Capriccio Ristaurante

is open for business


CAPRICCIO RISTAU-
RANTE at Cable Beach is
open for business, owner
Emmanuel Tsakkos has
confirmed, contrary to a
report in last week's Tri-
bune.
Court dockets last week
indicated that the restaurant
was charged with 12 counts
of failure to comply with the
Public Health Order.
Mr Tsakkos is refuting
the claims, stating that his
business is of the highest
quality with international
patrons making reservations
year-round. He has plead-


ed not guilty to all
charges.
Magistrate Susan
Sylvester has adjourned the
matter to February 10 and a
site visit is planned to
decide whether the prose-
cution will continue.
Mr Tsakkos said Capric-
cio was not shut down by
the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services.
Rather, it was closed dur-
ing Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne and that is why cer-
tain things were in a state
of disrepair when inspectors
made their visit.


The Tomlinson



Scholarship



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McMaster University
Queen's University
University of Guelph
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
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Undergraduates only ,

Applications must be in by
March 31st, 2005

Application forms may be obtained by writing to the Tomlinson
Scholarship, P.O. Box CB 10975, Nassau, Bahamas
& also from COB Financial Aid Office

The Tomlinson Scholarship is funded by High Tor Limited in
memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson


Bahamian thil


tank 'reinvents i


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BAHAMIAN think tank that
began more than two decades ago
yesterday announced it has rein-
vented itself in order to offer con-
ceptual solutions to key issues facing
the country today.
A think tank is a commonly used
phrase that refers to independent
research centres that study and advo-
cate social, economic and political
policies.
More than 20 years ago, psychia-
trist Dr David Allen met weekly
with individuals who required a
forum to discuss their views on
the country's pressing matters at the
time.,
Radio
"The Bahamas was not as open
then," explained Dr Allen, "we did-
n't have talk shows and we only had
one radio and television station. So
back then, it was more like a talk
show atmosphere. This time how-
ever we are moving to a think tank
perspective."
Dr Allen, who has returned to the
Bahamas after spending 12 years in
Washington, now chairs a non-par-
tisan group of successful Bahamian
professionals who are aiming to
research and analyze a number
of contemporary issues including


immigration, domestic violence, rela-
tionships, and subjects affecting the
country's youth.
While living in Washington, Dr

"Back then it
was more like
a talk show
atmosphere.
This time
however we
are moving to
a think tank
perspective."

Allen had the opportunity to moni-
tor a number of prominent think-
tanks and has returned to the
Bahamas determined to implement
a similar type of organisation.
"We are starting small but we
have plans to grow bigger," said Dr
Allen.
He added that his future plans
include looking at ways to establish
a national fund to help create a "real
Bahamian forum thinking institute
that can provide insight solutions to


governmental agencies, students, and
any member of the public that
requires it."
Dr Allen said that his work will
one day be turned over to young
bright Bahamians who he believes
are building a new society.
"This new Society is inter racial,
international and inter-aged," Dr
Allen continued. "More than that,
the Bahamas is moving to the glob-
al village. If we really come together
and put our heads together, not in
just the talking way, but to write con-
ceptual frame work. We can provide
conceptual solutions which can be
used for people to follow up on."
Committee
Dr Allen and Nicole Fair Bhatti,
co-chair of the Bahamian Forum
Committee, meet weekly with the
committee to prepare for a free
monthly public discussion session
held the first Tuesday of every
month at 5.45pm at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.
"This new Bahamian forum is
going to have a two-pronged
approach," explained Ms Bhat-
ti. "We want to create a space as
neutral as possible, for people to
come together and to talk about real
problems that we are having in the
Bahamas. Secondly for every meet-
ing we have, we will be putting


-p


STEPPING STONE Q UILTERS-

Janr.y .2- -t o Fbu2ay5,2




January 29 to February 5, 2005


Trinity Church Hall

Frederick Street

10am to 4pm


Donations Welcome:


MEMBERS of Parliament were in fine voice yes-
terday at Parliament's annual church service at Bethel
Baptist Church.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


your news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighborhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.


Free Admission


THE TRIBUNE)





Ilk




tself'

together a paper, with scholars, stu-,
dents, researchers, anyone who is,
interested in the topics who can.
come to the Bahamian forum and
use it as a library and research."
The first discussion is scheduled
for February 1, under the topic "The
Mudd and Pigeon Pea: A Challenge
for Bahamian-Haitian Relation-
ships."
In March, Chief Psychologist of
the Centre for Renewing Relation-
ships Dr Wayne Thompson will
speak about "The Psychodynamics
of Sweethearting in the Bahamas -
the Pros and Cons," and April's dis-
cussion will surround the issue of
"Education and the Neutron Bomb:
A Learning Focused Society,"
addressed by Dr Gilbert Morris of
the Landfill Centre.
The forum is aiming to encour-
age Bahamians to become more
informed and more involved in
shaping the development of their
country.
Committee member Keva Bain
said the forum is important to
address underlying concerns people
have in the Bahamas.
"Unless we address these things in
a systematic intelligent way and mat-
ters are properly researched," said
Ms Bain, "we cannot get to the root
cause of the problem and arrive at
solutions that are just, fair and equi-
table."


fQR P31 POOIIM








THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


* By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THREE men
appeared in Magis-
trate's Court yesterday
charged with unlawful
sexual intercourse with
a minor.
Stephen Anton New-
bold, 23, of Yamacraw
Shores, Tavonne Grego-
ry Cash, 23, of Reeves
Street Fox Hill, and
Ricardo Keno Rahming,
30, of Johnson Terrace
were accused of having
sexual intercourse with
a 14-year-old girl some-
time during July 2004 in
New Providence.

Sensitivity
Because of the sensi-
tivity of the matter,
Magistrate Linda Virgill
cleared the courtroom
of all people not directly
connected with the case.
Lawyer Fayne Thomp-
son represented all
three defendants.
Magistrate Virgill
advised them that they
were not required to
enter a plea as the
charges were read to
them. Each was granted
$15,000 bail with t% o
sureties.

Advised
The defendants were
advised that on Monda\,
Wednesday and Satur-
day of each welbthebe
'u1t repodrat 7pi 1O
the.eoHillpolicesta-
tion, and that they must
not have any contact
with the complainant.
"'If either of the stipu-
lations are violated or if
there is any contact, or
reported contact with
the complainant," she
said "then your bail will
be taken from you."
The matter was
adjourned to March 1 at
10am when it will be
brought before the
courts again.


*Man missing at sea is





now 'presumed dead'


0 By PAUL G. body," said Chris Lloyd, oper- Then I saw this thing floating BASRA officials explained the surface. If you drop a dead
TURNQUEST nations manager at BASRA. that looked like a jacket so I that hopefully by tomorrow a fish it will sink. In a couple of
Tribune Staff Reporter All three persons were got that and tied that to the body will be found as it would days it will float because as the
uar ~e I~r as u~Lh~uu U~Uipua LL~


MITCH ROLLE, an elderly
resident of Acklins, who disap-
peared at sea at the beginning
of the week, is now presumed
dead. Rescue efforts w ere sus-
pended yesterday by BASRA
officials.
Mr Rolle went missing along
with Ethlyn Hanna when they
capsized in Mr Rolle's boat try-
ing to rescue 66-year-old
Leonard Roker, who had cap-
sized only moments earlier. Ms
Hanna, 52, has since been
found dead by divers.

Weather
BASRA officials said that
although there are much better
weather conditions in the area,
they had called off their search
yesterday stating that they are
only searching for a body,
which they believe will be
found shortly.
"With the time he's been in
the water, and the activity of
the seas, we have had to extend
the search area. We will
exhaust all assets if there was a
chance of survival, but right
now that chance is really unre-
alistic. Right about now we are
really just searching for a






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returning irom Plana ay,
which is about 40 miles south
east of Acklins, where they
were collecting cascarilla bark
when their boats overturned in
Attwood Harbour.
Speaking with The Tribune
Mr Roker, the only survivor of
the incident, recounts that it
was by keeping a cool head,
and conserving his energy that
allowed him to survive the
waves.
"I listened to this programme
how these 'rip tides' work only
two days earlier. I was there
floating and I saw Mitch swim-
ming and swimming in to shore.
And it look like he was making
some headway so I ask him
'Mitch,.Mitch!
"What you using' to swim
with over there?" and he said,
"Nothing".
"I looked around and saw
Ethlyn floating back there so I
swam over and gave her the
cooler that was floating nearby
and I told her to make sure and
hold on good to it. I then start-
ed swimming for the land. But
all the swimming and swim-
ming I was doing it looked like
the land was only getting fur-
ther away," he said.
"I didn't have a jacket, but I
found the gas tank and held on.


tank for oatation. 111 was just
floating in the water bare like
that I would have never passed
the reef.
"I was swimming like hell
and the land still was getting
farther away. So I started swim-
ming parallel to the land. I said
to myself that I will let the tide
take me where it wants and
when I see I have a chance,
then I'll try and make a break
for the land," he said.

Tide
Mr Roker mentioned that
once he had cleared the reef,
the tide slackened, allowing
him a chance to make for the
shore.
"That's what saved me, cause
if I would have kept trying to
swimming for the shore I would
have tired myself out. So when
I would have had a chance, I
wouldn't even have had any
strength to help myself," he
said.
"All I could say is that God
must not have been calling me
home that day. I'm still going to
head out along the shore where
I think the body might turn up
because all of us out here now
know that that's all we are
looking for now," he said.


MAIN SECTION
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, ditorial/Letters........ .......... P4
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Sports ..................... .................... P10,11,12
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Religious News.......................P1,2,3,6,7,8,9
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have ueen tmree uays sice tme
incident occurred.
"You see bodies sink for
three days and then float up to


UoUUy Uecomposes,: .1 creates
gases and bloatss up" allowing
the body to float," said Mr
Lloyd.


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PAGE 4, THU RSDAY, JANUARY 27 ,O205EHETRIUN


HARBOUR ISLAND is both blessed and
cursed. Blessed because it is still benefiting
from the reputation of being the ideal vaca-
tion spot for second home owners. 'Brilanders
- or so the story goes are friendly, the
island is safe, and the visitor is welcome.
But on the flip-side of the coin, the island
has been cursed. It has been cursed by a small
group of Fagan's Artful Dodgers whose pil-
fering and break-ins are fast turning the
island's reputation for safety into a myth.
Long-time foreign residents are now ques-
tioning the wisdom of maintaining their win-
ter homes at the island.
Bahamian homeowners are also concerned.
Their homes are no longer safe, and, of
course, they fully understand what it means to
their island's economy if visitors and long-
time second home residents decide not to
return.
"While the island seems to be enjoying a
real estate boom with unprecedented prices
for homes," said one Bahamian, "it is a mat-
ter of time before the bubble bursts despite
the best attempts of some of Harbour Island's
business and homeowners to bring it to the
attention of persons who can do something to
bring it into the open and address how it
should be tackled ... it never seems to get
very far for one reason or another."
In Nassau the police are aware of the sit-
uation. Officers from the Central Detective
Unit and the Intelligence Unit have been
sent to the island to assist 'Briland's local
police in inesugating the complaints, Last
year a group ot Nassau oftkfers spent two to
three vceks in Harbour Island, investigat-
ing the complaints and making arrests.
'Brnlanders consider the situation so seri-
ous that they not only want undercover police
officers, but also foot patrols with officers
who will get to know the people. In turn it is
hoped that the people will learn to trust them
enough "to open up to them" and help in
the fight against local crime.
But Harbour Island is losing its charm.
We were sitting in the waiting room of a Mia-
mi office last week. Americans around us
were talking. One was either a homeowner,
or a regular visitor to Harbour Island, and
from the drift of the conversation must have
been there recently. They discussed the crime.
They also talked about the attitude of some of
the locals. One of them could not get over the
fact that no matter how much was done for
them, when some of them went to the States
they expected everything free if you were a
visitor to their island. The island's lack of
cleanliness was another issue.
But, the "Artful Dodgers" are the ones
who are going to eventually determine the


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island's future if their "business" is not shut
down, and if they are not put behind bars in
Her Majesty's grim guest house in Nassau.
According to the island's locals, break-ins
have been occurring about twice a week since
November. "It seems to be happening on the
first night of everybody's visit," we were told,
leading 'Brilanders to suspect that someone
hangs out at the dock to check new arrivals
and pass the word along, to their "business
partners".
Many stories are told. For example, a
home in which a visiting couple was staying
was broken into on their first night. They
were so frightened that they flew home the
next day.
On another occasion a security guard had
to be hired to make a visitor comfortable in
his rented vacation home.
In another incident a home's security lights
were unscrewed before the break-in. "This is
now how they are making a living," remarked
a local resident. "For them it's quick and
easy cash."
A long time winter resident has reported
that in the last year he has witnessed an
increase in break-ins, starting in November.
One resident had been robbed twice. His
own house was robbed within 24 hours after
the arrival of a member of his family and
$900 and jewellery stolen, despite the fact
that the house was not only securely locked,
but also padlocked.
Just a few days ago a second guest arrived,
and \nithm six hours of his arrival, a thief
used a screwdriver to rip off the door, entei
the house and steal $2000.
"My concern," commented one home-
owner, "is that Harbour Island is the jewel of
the Bahamas. Tourism and investment on
the island has increased dramatically since
Hurricane Andrew. Investors who may be
Swiss, Bahamian, German, Canadian or
American are now concerned about their
investment and the local economy. Every
house owner spends thousands of dollars a
year maintaining their property and putting
hundreds of thousands into the local econo-
my.
"When visitors feel their personal property
is at risk and do not see any action to break
the cycle of crime, especially breaking and
entering, they do not come back. Then home-
owners decide to sell and leave.
"There are non-Bahamians who have
strong roots on Harbour Island and desper-
ately do not want to walk away. The local
economy can only suffer from these break-ins
- news travels fast."
Harbour Islanders now have to take their
island back from the criminals.


No '




PMe




time


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352


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EDITOR, The Tribune.
AS AN acute observer and
analyst of Bahamian politics
and the socio-economic psy-
chology involved, it is my con-
sidered opinion that no white
Bahamian, man or woman, will
be able, any time in this gener-
ation, to become leader of a
major political party, much less
Prime Minister of the country.
The declared intentions of the
Hon Brent Symonette are but .a
pipe dream (and I am not talk-
ing, necessarily, about the
Kamoke) on his part. Here is
why.
The racial overtones of the
1960's are still fresh in the minds
of persons over 40 years of age.
Until the vestiges of this gen-
eration have crossed the Jor-
dan, white Bahamians, sadly,
will have to mark time before
they can emerge as a definitive
force in our political promised
land.
This generation, like Moses,
cannot cross into the land of
milk and honey.
The rapid creation and culti-'
vation of the black middle class
by the "old" PLP back in the
1970's is, in itself, an almost
insurmountable barrier which
people of Brent Symonette's
colour and social background
will have to overcome. The
political loyalty of this black
middle class lies squarely with-
in the bosom of the "old" PLP,
despite the noise in the market.
Not even the FNM, with its
diversity of membership, is seen
as a real challenge to this pos-
tulation. Tommy Turnquest will
never be elected Prime Minister
in our life time. Brent, in addi-
tion to being a white man, is
perceived by many to be too
smug. If the FNM were to elect
a white leader, as true as the
Sun will shine tomorrow, the
PLP will be returned to office in
2007 with the Hon Obie Wilch-
combe as leader and Prime
Minister. Christie's days, alas,
are numbered. In a short 21/2
years, he has taken us from the
sublime to the absurd with his
slack and visionless leadership.
Few blacks from the inner
city areas of New Providence
or Grand Bahama would ever
vote for a white person to
become their representative.
This may sound racist and dis-
criminatory but history has
demonstrated this, time and
time again. The collective psy-
chology and mind sync of a vast
majority of black Bahamians
are still, unfortunately, seeped
in the subtle memory banks of
'Roots'; 'Raisin In The Sun' and


'Porgy & Bess'.
All of those movies portrayed
whites in a bad light viz-a-viz
blacks.
In addition, the white
Bahamians, like Brent Symon-
ette and Rick Lowe of Nassau
Motors Company Limited, are
perceived by black Bahamians
as mere businessmen, without
any semblance of a social con-
science or affinity It appears to
be "all 'bout money". Yes, you
can bank at Commonwealth
Bank or work a job at Bahama
Hot Mix, but when does one
see Brent, in a social setting, in
the inner city areas?
Yes, he drives through in his
truck (with the windows up) but
how often does he stop to chat
with the black, dread locked
boys on the blocks? I wonder
if he even knows where Choke
Neck Alley is ?
Companies like Nassau
Motors and Symonette's Ship-
yard have been around for a
long time and jobs have been
and are being made available
for blacks but who owns the
company or makes the deci-.
sions?
White Bahamians who are
motivated, almost solely, by
profit. Lowe can walk into a
bank and get a business loan
for millions with a handshake.
Brent and his fellow white
Bahamians own their own bank,
bursting with dollars saved by
black Bahamians. The average
black man who wants to get
such a loan had better check
with the police or his doctor
before he dares to walk into a
bank and ask for a business
facility. Either he would have
to be half crazy or extremely
optimistic.
How is it that Nassau Motors
and other white owned busi-
nesses have not expanded into
the inner city areas or spon-
sored technical scholarships at
COB or BTVI?
Symonette is reputed to be a
millionaire but he has yet to
fund a business scholarship say
in memory of his late father, Sir
Roland T Symonette. How
come?



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talking about free enterprise'
and laissez-faire, as if they are'
the panacea for generations ofi
unfair business advantages'
which have accrued to the white;
Bahamians but not a single ven-,
ture capital fund to promote:
and encourage a level econom-.
ic playing field. No one, least:
of all Ortland H Bodie Jr, is
suggesting charity, but we want,
to see more financial empathy:
and equitable allocation of cap-s
ital.
I am not a racist and some of:
my best friends are white peo-:
ple. The average white man or,
woman, however, seems to have,
an ingrained sense of superior-:
ity towards the black person.:
Having lived in places like the;
southern USA (Atlanta); Cana-:
da (Montreal) and Europe;(.
Belgium and England), believe,
me, I have experienced the'
good, the bad and the ugly, 9f
racism. Of course, our slavery;
background inculcates in us and
them a warped sense of one's,
own worth or lack of it. .
Since I am not formally'
trained in psychology, I will not
even attempt to speculate as to'
the reasons for this. Even some
blacks, once they would have
been adopted as "favouritle,
house negro" in institutions like
banks; insurance companies and
hotel properties, soon start to:
act like the thing with the short.
tail, in. an effort to please white ,
management. In such amnt
attempt, they will roll over their,
own mothers, with no remorse.
And so, Brent Symonette1
may as well divest himself of-'
the foulih and almost childish-,.
notion that he or any other so-,
called white e Bahamian caiT
become PrimeN Minister an')y'
time soon.
He would make an excellent;
Minister of Finance or Works,
but he will never be able to
overcome the negative percep-
tions which a vast majority of
black Bahamians have towards
his social and racial class. It is as
simple as 1+1=2.
Only Jehovah Rafa does not
discriminate. To God then, m
all things, be the glory.

ORTLAND H BODIE JRk,
Nassau, I,
January 19, 2004.








.ay


THE TRBUNE..


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


v







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


e*Community leader calls for Freeport




Environmental Health Department

SBy KARIN HERIG 1 1 "In law it does not exist. It mental, health and safety mat-


THE TRIBUNE has
always n best for news
and views. Now it's better
than ever, with the coun-
try's top columnists mak-
ing it a "must buy" all
through the week.
ON MONDAY, read
"INSIGHT, the section
"with something to say on
"the main topics of the
'day, and INSIGHT Feed-
:,ack, your chance to
,speak out loud. And
don't miss Andrew Allen,
whose PERSPECTIVES
/column has a growing fol-
lowing.
ON TUESDAY,
there's TO THE POINT
.by journalist-politician Sir
Arthur Foulkes, whose
.mature view is based on
- experience of the
,Bahamian political scene
:that is second to none.
, ON WEDNESDAY,
read Larry Smith's'
TOUGH CALL, the col-
limn that goes right to the
heart of important
-national issues.
ON THURSDAY, it's
STRAIGHT-UP TALK
,ly Zhivargo Laing, giving
,one man's incisive view of
the Bahamas political
scene.
1', And ON
,SATURDAY, enjoy the
;quaint, serene style of
:George Mackey, whose
'reflective VIEWPOINT
--column gets you in the
'right mood for the week-
'end.
- No wonder more peo-
-ple are buying The Tri-
bune, the paper with
"news and views for every-
one.




THURSDAY
JANUARY 27


_2:00am
; 1,1:00
1A2:00
'2:05

1i:00
'1:30
2:00
3:00
3:30
4:00

4:30
i4:58
;5:00
5:30
16:00
'6:30
.7:00
:00

,9:30
.1:0 i
,11 130

;:30am
;,o


Community Pg./1540.
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Tourism Conference
Special
Ethnic Health America
CMJ Club Zone
Gospel Video Countdown
Treasure Attic
This Generation
Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
Kids On The Move
ZNS News (Update Uve)
Cybernet
Holy Hip Hop
One Cubed
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Da' Down Home Show
The Darold Miller Show
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Pg,/1540


Tribune Staff Reporter
AS THE industrial capital of
the Bahamas, Freeport should
have its own environmental,
health and safety department,
according to a Grand Bahama
community leader.
The appeal to create by-laws,
which will help establish a sep-
arate Environmental Health
Department to tend the needs
of Freeport was made by lawyer
and Grand Bahamas Human
Rights Association (GBHRA)
president Fred Smith.
Addressing the members of
the Grand Bahama Sunrise
Rotary Club yesterday morn-
ing, Mr Smith raised the ques-
tion of "who is responsible for
the environment" in Freeport.
He said that "the peculiar
jurisdictional challenges created
by the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment" in Grand Bahama have
caused some confusion to the
application of environmental
laws, which are needed for the
proper management of the
expanding industrial city of
Freeport.
He said that as Freeport has


Fred inut aaaresses


Rotary Club members


evolved into a city with "vigor-
ous industrial and maritime
economies, a healthy real estate
and second home economy," as
well as "a first class touristic
infrastructure," environmental
management has become
increasingly challenging.

Issues
"As development in Freeport
has increased, so have manage-
ment challenges, both for the
Port Authority and the Gov-
ernment. Issues regarding the
management of environment
health and safety matters in
Freeport have become more
pressing and sophisticated," he
said.
Mr Smith added that in the
"absence of a growth manage-
ment plan and adequate envi-


ronmental, health and safety
safeguards and regulations
capable of enforcement" the
Freeport environment "was in
jeopardy of being and in some
instances was adversely impact-
ed."
The GBHRA president reit-
erated that the government of
the Bahamas, in facing envi-
ronmental concerns and chal-
lenges throughout the rest of
the country, created the
Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology Commission
(BEST) operating with an
Ambassador to the Environ-
ment to address these chal-
lenges.
He pointed out, however,
that BEST has "no statutory,
regulatory or enforcement pow-
ers. It is strictly consultative,
investigatory and advisory."


Ron Pinder





apologises for




security breach


MARATHON MP Ron Pinder apologised
in the House of Assembly yesterday for breach-
ing security at Nassau International Airport on
January 18th. Mr Pinder was flying to .Wash-
ington to attend the inauguration of US Presi-
dent George Bush.
Mr Pinder boarded the flight for Washington
through the VIP lounge unaccompanied by pro-
tocol officers, bypassing security, and the US
Customs and immigration boarding area.
This was a violation of the airport's security
rules and regulations.
When US Air discovered it had an undocu-
mented passenger on board, it returned to the
terminal, where Mr Pinder was taken off the air-
craft. He took a later flight to Washington.

Distress
"I wish to express my deep distress and unre-
served apology to the Prime Minister, to this
House, my colleagues, US Airlines, my con-
stituents and to the country at large for how
this matter was handled by me. This incident
caused inconvenience and embarrassment,
which I deeply regret. I accept full responsibil-
ity and I can assure that it will not occur again,"
said Mr Pinder.
The MP said that recently he has reflected on
the general sense of lawlessness and the appar-
ent disregard for "the process" prevailing in
the country and upon reflecting, wondered how,
as people, Bahamians would come to remedy
this malaise and turn the tide of things.
"When in the course of events one is in error
or when one is up against a challenge, the prin-
ciples of leadership mandate that one does not
look to the east nor the west, but one must
meet it squarely and face to face. I say, let the


has no jurisdiction." he noted.
Further, he said, that almost
all developments of investors
from abroad, "including the
major industrial projects which
occurred in Freeport, have
come under the initial scrutiny
and supervision of BEST.
"Regrettably any new pro-
jects, or ongoing businesses or
activities either by Bahamians
or otherwise" were not regulat-
ed by BEST, he noted.
Mr Smith said although gov-
ernment, during the 1990's,
enacted several pieces of legis-
lation, which concern the
preservation, protection and
management of the environ-
ment, there remains "a matter
of some debate whether any or
all of such regulatory legislation
applies to Freeport."

Jurisdiction
"There are several Supreme
Court decisions which pro-
nounce Freeport is a separate
jurisdiction. Each Act would
have to be separately consid-
ered to determine whether it
applied in Freeport in whole or
in part," he explained.
The GBHRA president
emphasised that the govern-
ment recognized the "pivotal
role" of the Port Authority on
environmental issues under the
Freeport, Grand Bahama Act
1993.
He explained that in consid-
eration of the extension of sev-
eral tax exemptions under ihe
Hawksbill Creek Agreement,
the Port Authority was required
to fulfil several responsibilities
concerning the protection and
preservation of the environ-
ment, including the implemen-
tation of measures to stop the
beach erosion in Grand
Bahama as well as the upgrad-
ing of Freeport into a garden
city, in keeping with the gov-
:ernment's 'Beautiful Bahamas
Programme.'
"With the jurisdiction comes
the responsibility and duty
to be responsible for environ-


ters.
"Thus, in order to fulfil its
mandate under the agreement,
avoid the difficulties and chal-
lenges which arise from uncer-
tainty as to who is responsible
for environmental matters in
Freeport," he said.

Laws
Mr Smith called on the gov-
ernment to protect "the Port
Authority's flexibility to prop-
erly manage Freeport" and
encouraged the Port Authority
"to create an Environmental
Health and Safety Department,
and the Government to enact
laws under the Freeport By-
laws Act."
He further recommended
that the Port Authority
should attempt to define the
jurisdiction in which it should
exercise.
"All businesses and activities
in Freeport should be answer-
able to the Port Authority,
which should work closely with
BEST to ensure that in
Freeport at least, national stan-
dards are adhered to," he
added.
The GBHRA president con-
cluded by saying that "when the
government passes legislation
to create its own National Envi-
ronmental Protection and Reg-
ulatory Agency, provisions
could be crafted whereby
Freeport is acknowledged as
being under the jurisdiction of
the Port Authority yet requiring
the Port Authority to meet at
least minimum national stan-
dards as to health, safety, and
environmental matters and to
work in co-operation with the
National Regulatory Agency
once established."



FR3INI LW EVC


* U APOLOGY: Marathon MP Ron Pinder

turning of the tide begin with me because this is
what principled leadership demands. This is
what principled leadership dictates.
"1 wish to say to my contemporaries and even
the younger generation of our nation that we
must be careful and guard against knowingly by-
passing rules and regulations because of cir-
cumstances, situations and exigencies. Our chal-
lenge, is that we must guard against concluding
in the heat of the moment that rules and pro-
cedures can simply be set aside because nothing
justifies this," said Mr Pinder.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


--, -oTaking heart in courage




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Iraqis were liberated from
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polls to take the first deci-
sive step toward building
the free, democratic soci-
ety that the vast majority
of Iraqi's desire.
In polling stations across
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Iraqi citizens will be able
to cast their ballots and
make their individual con-
tributions to Iraq's democ-
racy. The people of Iraq
will begin taking charge of
their own lives and future.
From start to finish,
these elections are being
run by Iraqis, for Iraqis.
The Independent Electoral


Commission of Iraq has
certified over 100 parties
and coalitions whose can-
didates will compete for
the 275 seats on the Tran-
sitional National Assembly.
This Assembly will in turn
choose a president and two
vice presidents, who will
then select a Prime Minis-
ter.
Polls
The Transitional Nation-
al Assembly will also draft
a constitution, which will
be put to a public referen-
dum in October 2005. By
December 2005, Iraqis will
return to the polls to elect
a new national government
under the auspices of their
newly enacted constitution.
In the January 30 elec-
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for representatives to
Iraq's 18 provincial coun-
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democracy even deeper
into the fabric of Iraqi soci-
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process through car bombs,
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Violence
As Election Day
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this violence is likely to
intensify. But the threats
and oppression of -those
who seek to undermine
Iraq's future will not deter
those working to move
their country forward.
People everywhere can


take heart in the courage
shown each day.by ordi-
nary Iraqis. They are the
ones who continue to get
up and go to work each
day.
Dangers
They are the people who,
despite the dangers, stand
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officers and national
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They are the Iraqis who
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, and teach in schools.
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


great need for



professional people ii


MANY of the more
than 100,000
households in The Bahamas
have them. Regrettably too
large a percentage of our
160,000-plus work force con-
sist of them. Untold num-
bers of businesses and
organizations in this country
yearn to get rid of them. The
public service has suffered
far too many of them from
its inception.
Who are they? They are
unprofessional people. They
are those uninspired, unin-
structed and undisciplined
people who reduce produc-
tivity, mistreat customers,


raise expenses and con-
tribute significantly to busi-
ness and organisational fail-
ure. They are in all organi-
sations, from the govern-
ment to the golf club, and
they are in all ranks of
organizations, from the CEO
to the custodian.
Our homes, schools,
churches, businesses, gov-
ernment and civic organisa-
tions are in desperate need
of professionals. Profes-
sionals are inspired, instruct-
ed and disciplined people


STRAIGHT UPTALK


Z H I VA R G 0


who do whatever must be
done and can be done, with-
in the bounds of sound
morals, to achieve the goals,
objectives and mission of the
organizations to which they
belong. They do what they
do with all their bodies,
minds and spirits.
Professionals benefit their
homes, businesses, work-
places and communities.
Indeed, they are great assets


LAI NG


sional, will always live well
because their value attracts
prosperity and breeds fulfil-
ment.
Inspired people are those
who have been injected and
infected with a spirit of "I
CAN", "I WILL" and "I
FEEL GOOD ABOUT IT".
They are animated by a
sense of possibility, creativi-
ty and conquest.
The instructed are skilful
users of information. We all
come to life uninformed and
unskilled. This makes us
dependent, weak and vul-
nerable.

W ith time and
effort, we
become more and more
informed and more and
more skilled. This makes us
less dependent, less weak
and less vulnerable. Only
those who seek maximum
information and skills, how-
ever, become independent,
strong and protected. They
even become liberators,
those who empower, and
protectors.
Disciplined people faith-
fully and consistently apply
the universal laws of life to
their thoughts, actions and
behaviour. Their reward is
long life, peace of mind and
prosperity that is, treasures
in excess of their needs.
The inspired, informed
and the disciplined do not
SEE page 10


to their nation.
Professionals believe in a
perpetual process of profes-
sional development. Profes-
sional development is about
inspiring, instructing and dis-
ciplining so that the value of
the human potential can be
unearthed and used for the
good of the person and the
communities to which that
person belongs. The fact is
that the inspired, the
instructed and the disci-
plined, that is, the profes-


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4


-- - ---- i ----- i


Mond





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Burdensome re


THE Christmas strike
by LP gas dealers not
only threatened our turkey
dinners, it re-opened an argu-
ment that has raged since the
government slapped price
controls on a range of goods
and services more than 30
years ago.
The Prices Commission sets
the selling price of 25 food
items and 11 over-the-counter
drugs, while markups are
restricted on automobiles,
parts and accessories. Fixed
margins on gasoline and diesel
are re-calibrated whenever
new shipments arrive. And
propane margins are adjusted
periodically.
Why do we still have these
archaic, burdensome regula-
tions, when any economics
primer will tell you that -
though tried since biblical
times they just don't work?
Well, if you ask Chief Price
Inspector Sidney McKenzie of
the Ministry of Trade &


ly revoked by 1974. Our price
control act was passed in July
1971, and remains in force
today.
Nixon's controls on oil and
natural gas prices remained in
place until 1981, when they


I


chances by checking runaway
inflation caused by massive
US military and social spend-
ing.
Back then, inflation and
unemployment were rising,
productivity was dipping and
the stock market fell 36 per
cent between 1968 and 1970.
This period of low growth and
inflation ended the postwar
economic boom. And in 1973
the Arab oil embargo capped
it off by triggering a global
recession.
Economists view the Great
Inflation of the 1970s as the
most dramatic policy failure
since the Great Depression of
the 1930s. Nixon's wage and
price freeze went info effect
in August 1971, and was most-


Industry's Consumer Division,
he will dutifully tell you that
controls ensure that "essen-
tial items are sold at a price
which would be affordable to
all, despite economic capabil-
ity."

But the real reason has
little to do with eco-
nomics. Three decades ago,
then Prime Minister Lynden
Pindling was playing the same
kind of political games here
that President Richard Nixon
was in the United States.
Both Nixon and Pindling
were facing general elections
in 1972, and they both
imposed price controls in 1971
to improve their electoral


AL-LKE-THE

hREV


tions

the energy sector, but they led
to shortages and lower invest-
ment in oil exploration.
When the Progressive Lib-
eral Party came to power here
in 1967 it was deeply suspi-
cious of the white merchant


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were abolished by President
Ronald Reagan. Analysts say
their continuation was due to
concerns about monopolies in


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class which, until then, had
controlled every aspect of life
in the country. As inflation
grew, a group of middle class
black intellectuals led by
Pauline Allen formed the
Consumer Protection Agency
to promote "militant price
control."
She was later replaced by
Dr Earl Cash, who con-
demned merchants for having
no social conscience. With a
knack for the obvious, Dr
Cash complained that "when-
ever price ceilings are raised
on breadbasket items, those
items will very quickly be sold
near those ceilings.
"It seems that every time
the grocery shelf is restocked,
the markers place a higher
price on the item...Eastern
Airlines has increased its fare
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"Clearly, the whole price
control system is a political
farce. And one that supports the
tax-funded employment of at
least a dozen civil servants and
adds unnecessary costs and
burdens to local businesses that
are inevitably passed on to
consumers in other ways."


I r


just

Theatre and the Sunshine
Twin have upped admis-
sions...The Prices Commission
needs to hold the line on these
disgraceful increases."
However unrealistic this
commentary was, it reflected
the views of many thoughtful
Bahamians. In 1990, for
instance, former Prices Com-
mission Chairman Anthony
Kikivarakis said removing
controls on gasoline would be
like handing our economy
over to foreign companies.
"Our mandate is to ensure
that there are sufficient essen-
tial goods and services avail-
able to all members of the
public at reasonable prices,"
he declared. "The theory that
competition will effectively
cure all ills is just that theo-
ry."
His argument was that as
there are so few major players
in our economy, competition
is a sham: "There is one large
bakery in Nassau," he
explained. "A classic example
of the need for price control to
keep an essential item like
bread available at a reason-
able cost."
A few years later former
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham called price control a dis-
credited policy that no sensi-
ble government would rely on:
"Only fools and demagogues
argue for it...It serves no useful
purpose." But he made no
move to dismantle the system,
not wanting to create a politi-
cal storm in a teacup we sup-
pose.
More recently, Troi Fergu-
son of the Bahamas Agricul-
tural & industrial Corporation
said that if price controls were
lifted, poor Bahamians would


m





THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


do not work!


be unable to afford basic items
,and we would be faced with a
-social disaster.
( Pauline Allen Dean (now
,retired from a 40-year banking
career) still thinks price con-
trols should be vigorously
[enforced, although she allows
That competition is enough to
keep the banks in line. She
objected, in particular, to the
,practice of raising prices on
,shelf items in anticipation of
Future price hikes.
But this is standard proce-
dure in industries where mar-
ket prices fluctuate from pur-
-chase to purchase: "You have
_to sell at tomorrow's price,
'which is your buying price,
,otherwise you will make a
Losss" one large food whole-
saler told Tough Call. "And
-by the same token if prices go
down and you don't adjust
,accordingly, you will be stuck
,with inventory that you will
,have to write off. That's com-
petition."
Years ago, local auto deal-
,ers told the government they
,would stop importing parts
.because the allowed markup
.didn't take account of the true
cost of storage, obsolescence
-and shrinkage (read theft).
They had to hire one of the
.big three accounting firms (at
-great expense) to support
their arguments, and eventu-
:ally the markup on parts was
raised.
But year after year we have
to go through these pointless
-exercises between the gov-
ernment and the private sec-
tor..furious little battles that
-take up a lot of time, energy
.and newspaper space and that
,inconvenience consumers no
end. But in the final analysis
(prices go up...as we have just
seen in the recent propane cri-
sis.
The futility of applying
price controls to imported
goods should be clear to
everyone. While they may
restrict the local markup on
certain items, any uneconom-
ic pricing levels will quickly
be made up for by higher
prices on uncontrolled items,


or cost cuts in other areas.
And the bureaucratic paper-
work involved adds unneces-
sary burdens.
"We have to submit forms
to the Prices Commission
breaking out costs every time
goods are landed at a different
rate," one wholesaler
explained. "But there is only
one civil servant who can
process them, so we can have
inventory tied up for a month
or more. Dated products are a
big concern in this regard, and
storing freezer items makes
the process even more expen-
sive.
"On breadbasket items like
rice, flour, sugar, and grits
(which are all duty-free), we
are allowed a 13 per cent
markup," he added. "These
are only a handful of items but
they are all high volume prod-
ucts. And you just can't oper-
ate profitably on a markup
like that...you have to make
up for it in other ways"
A pharmaceutical whole-,
saler agreed: "Our operating
costs run at 18 per cent and
we are one of the more effi-
cient companies in the busi-
ness. That's why we try to
avoid price controlled items.
Or if we do carry them, we
consider it a kind of loss
leader."
And one has to ask if it is
likely that corned beef and


grits will suddenly become
luxury items out of reach of
the poor if price controls
are lifted? Will car dealers -
who already find it hard to
compete with individuals buy-
ing used vehicles in Miami -
rush to hike their sticker
prices?

C clearly, the whole
price control system
is a political farce. And one
that supports the tax-funded
employment of at least a
dozen civil servants and adds
unnecessary costs and burdens
to local businesses that are
inevitably passed on to con-
sumers in other ways.
If controls were ended, fuel
prices may go up to reflect
market conditions and the
rates of return demanded by
distributors and dealers. But
since Bahamians use their cars
the way they use phones, that
may be a good thing. And
since government taxes make
up a third of the price per gal-
lon of gas, there's plenty of
leeway to keep a lid on prices
if that is the objective.
But making this Alice in
Wonderland tale even more
unreal is the fact that Bahami-
ans have no problem paying


SEE page 11


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A great need for professional people


FROM page seven

react in fear; they act with
purpose and resolve.
They use powerful forces
of change such as globalisa-
tion, international trade lib-
eralisation and political inte-
gration to advance them-
selves and their communi-
ties.
Meeting our national chal-
lenges in economics, politics,
culture or society at large
and seizing opportunities is a
matter of developing profes-
sionalism within a larger seg-
ment of our population.
(An excerpt from a speech
delivered by this writer to
The Rotary Club of Lucaya
on Tuesday, February 18,
2003, on the Mission and,


Objective of Professional
Development)

WHEN I WAS
A YOUNG MP

When this writer
was elected to
the House of Assembly in
March, 1997, I was 29 years
old, the youngest elected
Member of Parliament at
that time. I was the same age
when I was appointed a cab-
inet minister.
Being the youngest person
in my various positions
placed an extra burden upon
me to be careful about how I
conducted myself. It com-
pelled me that much more
to be a professional.
In my efforts to conduct


myself properly, I received
good sound advice from
many of my colleagues, most
particularly former Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham.
I will never forget some of
the earliest pieces of advice
he gave to me. He said:
"Vargo, drive with your win-'
dow down at all times, espe-
cially when moving through
your constituency. If you
must use a driver, ride in the
front seat and not in the
back."
He told me: "When you
travel on official business,
unless otherwise impossible,
always take your permanent
secretary or a ministry offi-
cial with you."
He would constantly warn
me to avoid the trappings of
office, and would admonish
me not to abuse the power,


authority or privileges of my
office.
Armed with Mr Ingra-
ham's advice and that of any
number of my colleagues, I
tried not to presume on my
office. For example, when-
ever I went to Bahamasair
to travel, officially or other-
wise, I stood in line and
waited my time to be served.

O n occasions, a
Bahamasair official
would come to assist me spe-
cially and on occasions I
would avail myself of that
special assistance if pressed
for time. However, there
were also times when I
would politely refuse.
In one instance, my family
and I were travelling on
Bahamasair and on


approaching the ticket agent
I asked for tickets for my
wife, my two boys and
myself. The agent did not
ticket my youngest son, pre-
suming, I believe, that he
was too young for a solo
seat. We did not know this
and assumed that his ticket
was lumped in with all the
others in the one Bahama-
sair jacket.
Soon we got on the flight
and took our seats; it was
open seating. Just before
take-off a passenger
approached to get on board
but all of the seats were tak-
en. Upon checking, it was
discovered that the seat
count did not include my
youngest son. Even though
the flight attendant insisted
against it, I volunteered to
give up my seat and travel


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later so that the displaced
passenger could have her
seat. It was no bother to me
and it was the right thing to
do. There was no fuss about
me being a "minister". In
fact, while two of the flight
attendants debated my deci-
sion to disembark, one of
them told the other, "if he
says it's not a problem, it's
not a problem; he is like
that."
What I did for domestic
travel, I also did during my
international travel, just as
I had been advised.
Although often, as was cus-
tomary, I had the courtesy
of a ministry of foreign
affairs official to assist, I
always went through the
required security, immigra-
tion and customs checks.

For the most part, I
found that while
both national and interna-
tional agents did their jobs,
having some regard for my
status, they did try to expe-
dite things as quickly as pos-
sible and the whole process
was no bother.
In the end, it served me
well to follow the advice of
my colleagues and to remain
grounded about the position
that I held. The advice did
not keep me from losing
office, mind you; in fact, that
was never its intent. The
intent of the advice was
twofold.
First, it was to help me
avoid embarrassing instances
of overstating my impor-
tance and in the process
keep my dignity. Second, it
was intended to make it pos-
sible for me to experience
something Mr Ingraham
often reminded us of, which
was, "to do in office what
you could live with when
you are out of office."
When I travel now, I feel
precious little difference
than when I travelled as a
minister. The truth be told,
sometimes I feel as if I am
treated better now.
THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK, ,
Positions are fleeting; they
come and go with the wind.
Never forget, a small man
with authority in a particu-
lar situation is more powerful
than a big man with none in
the same situation.
www.pldsystems.com
zhivargolaing@coralwave.com











* SYDNEY, Australia
A LAWYER for Aus-'
tralian Guantanamo Bay
detainee Mamdouh
Habib alleged Wednes-
day that U.S. interroga-
tors told him falsely that
they had killed his fami-
ly, according to Associat-
ed Press.
Egyptian-born Habib,
48, will soon be released
from the U.S. military
camp where he has spent
more than three years
after being detained at
the Afghanistan-Pakistan
border following the
Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks in the United
States.

Pictures
Speaking at a public
forum on Wednesday,
Habib's Australian
lawyer Stephen Hopper
alleged that his client's
interrogators at one
point showed Habib pic-
tures of his wife and their
four children that had
animal heads superim-
posed over his family's
faces.


Hopper said the claim,
and others he made in
the remarks Wednesday,
were based on informa-
tion he received last year
from former British
inmates at Guantanamo.
It was not clear if the for-
mer inmates witnessed
the alleged abuse.


__


I I~___ = _sl_ __


- -~ --e I=


I I I-I--- I


- --II


lLiA


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


AAA,


f ,-


CLL-


!gl, Ag.-







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 11
. .


FROM page nine Burdensome


outrageous prices to govern-
ment utilities and agencies for
lousy, yet essential, services.
So why do we complain cease-
lessly about fuel prices?
Trade & Industry Minister
Leslie Miller was the propri-
etor of a tax-subsidised busi-
ness called Sunburst Paints.
And although this company
received double-dipping tax
breaks (in the form of duty-
free imports of raw materials
and equipment as well as pro-
tective tariffs on competing
products), it was not price-
controlled.
That meant Mr Miller
could charge whatev-
er he liked for his products.
And when he was president
of the Light Industries Devel-
opment Council he wanted
the government to force dis-
tributors to carry his products.
But recently Minister
Miller felt justified in shutting
down propane dealers who
had suspended operations
because the government
refused to allow them to earn
a sufficient return on their
investment. Consumers should
not be held hostage by busi-
ness, Mr Miller declared
grandiloquently.
As one anonymous com-
mentator on the Bahamas B2b
message board asked incred-
ulously: "I am wondering how
a Cabinet Minister can threat-
en to take a business licence
from gas companies on day
one, then he is going to press
charges against them for
hoarding on day two, and then
makes a deal with them on
day three. Can someone
please explain this to me?"
Former cabinet minister
Tennyson Wells put it more
bluntly: "When you have
these kinds of statutory con-
trols, you must behave respon-
sibly and not use them to
bruise people," he told Tough
Call. Mr Wells is a major
shareholder of Caribbean Gas,
which claims about a third of
the local wholesale propane
market.
"It costs me about half a
million dollars to bring in a
tanker of gas and-the new.
rules let me make just 13 cents
a gallon, or $130 for every
thousand gallons;. But the
retailer selling a thousand gal-
lons a day with no risk or
exposure whatever makes
$1,150 because of the higher
markup he is allowed. That
can't work. You can't run a
business on a 13-cent
markup."
So Mr Wells set up his own
retail company and now buys
propane from himself.
Shell Gas supplies about 48
per cent of the country's 14
million gallon a year propane
market. About half of those


Begin the
New Year


regulations


sales are to bulk customers
like hotels, which earn a high-
er margin. NMeanwhile. Island
Gases. owned by Alphonso
Elliot, brings in container
loads of propane from the LUS
. but is still classified as a
retailer with the ability to
charge higher markups.

uch ludicrous inconsis-
tencies are all that
should be needed to prove
that price controls must be
scrapped. But man\ say the
reason they aren't is that with-
out all these crazy regulations.
politicians and officials would
have less leverage with the
business community.
Governments often impose
price controls in response to
pressure from a segment of
the population that is upset
about the rising cost of a good
or service. But selective con-
trols usually end up harming
the very constituencies the
politicians say they are trying


Y2 Our Stod


to help.
For example. long-standing
rent controls destroy incen-
tives to build and maintain
low-income housing, resulting
in less housing for the poor.
Controls divert economic
activity and investment into
other sectors. And they also
encourage black markets and
bribery.
So despite their superficial
appeal, economists are gener-
ally opposed to price controls,
except perhaps for brief peri-
ods during wars or emergen-
cies.
As C. Jackson Grayson,
who headed Nixon's price-
wage control experiment,
warned Congress when it was
considering capping medical
costs: 'Price controls will
make things worse. Believe
me. l'\e been there...Controls
ha\e not worked in 40 cen-
turies. They will not work
now."
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


STUDIO

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FROM page one
have struck in past four months,
Ms Moss said Grand Bahama
has proven to be stronger than
the greatest adversity.
"Those who are familiar with
Grand Bahama I believe you
will notice that we are a bit bare
and the trees that have been
spared look a little bit fatigued.


"You may also find that cer-
tain buildings, which were vari-
able landmarks have disap-
peared, especially when you
travel to the west. But I want
to assure (you) that what we
may have lost in foliage and in
structure, which was blown
away in the wind, we have more
than made up with the spirit
and in love for our neighbours


Please be Advised of the relocation of


and sense of community, which
has proven stronger than the
greatest adversity," she said.
Mrs Moss also praised Minis-
ter of Tourism Obie Wilch-
combe for his unquestionable
commitment to grow tourism in
the Bahamas in the wake of the
two devastating hurricanes.
"I say special thank you to
our visionary ministry of
tourism...he has been the dri-
ving force behind our achieve-
ment and for this we are indeed
truly grateful," she said.
Mrs Moss also acknowledged
the late Edward St George,
chairman of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, for his contri-
butions to the development of


Freeport.
Mr St George, who died on
December 20, 2004, she said,
was indeed "one of the greatest
benefactors in the history of the
nation."
"His contributions to the
development of Freeport along
with his partner and long friend
Sir Jack Hayward, have made it
possible for this conference to
be held here in Freeport today,"
she said, observing a moment
of silence in memory of the vital
role he played.
The three-day conference
comprises 13 sessions and ends
on Friday with closing remarks
by Prime Minister Perry
Christie.


The Natural

Health Center


Dr. Michael John Ingraham has
moved to the Harbour Bay
Shopping Plaza, East Bay Street,
inside of the GNC Store.


Contact numbers are as follows:


P.O.Box N-7776,
Nassau Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 394-8866/7
Fax: 394-5922

Hoiti eat ar
Bi~ergntcmeiin AULU~~lC- oept' aml eia


Parliament service
FROM page one
ed by both members of the government and the opposition.
Prime Minister Perry Christie was joined by Cabinet min-
isters and other House members, as well as by Senators,
including opposition leader Tommy Turnquest.
Passages of scripture were read by Senate President Sharon
Wilson.and House of Assembly Speaker Oswald Ingraham.
Dr Thompson said the Church "applauds all you parlia-
mentarians who have come to this service.
"By your coming you are saying to this nation and to your-
selves that you acknowledge that you need the guidance of
almighty God in your decision making," he said.
Just before the service, Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt spoke with The Tribune about its significance as an
annual event.
"It's a sense of unity and goodwill. Everyone goes if they
want to go; it isn't mandatory, but it's something that is a
good gesture for parliamentarians to show the public that
we believe in God and we indeed are a Christian nation,"
she said.
Mrs Pratt said that it is important for parliamentarians of all
political persuasions to make such an acknowledgment col-
lectively,, so as to demonstrate that "even though we fight
among ourselves when it comes to issues, at the same time we
know how to put those issues aside and come together and
worship God."
"I think that is the bottom line," she said.


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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005






THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005. PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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FROM page one

during this period with clients
ranging from national flag car-
riers in Europe to Asia, Latin
America, the Middle East and
Africa.
The firm began its work last
week.
The intention of the exercise
is to attract a foreign partner
* who will own less than 50 per
cent of the equity in the nation-
al flag carrier while Bahamian
individuals, corporations and
government will own the major-


ity of the equity.
In the PLPs pre-election plat-
form the national flag carrier
was to reduce its losses, out
source unprofitable Family
Island routes, expand its net-
work internationally and priva-
tise the airline.
The process of out-sourcing
the Family Island routes is con-
tinuing. All of the Andros
routes have been out-sourced
to local charter operators who
are now adequately serving that
market, said Mr Roberts.
Currently, the minister said,
there is a proposal to address
the southern islands of the
Bahamas.
"This would mean more air-
lifts for these islands than
they're already getting and it
will also reduce the cost," he
said.
Mr Roberts said that govern-
ment is well on the way to
achieving its mandate with
respect to restructuring the
national flag carrier. Losses for
fiscal year 03/04 were reduced
by almost 60 per cent compared
to 02/03.
As for the airline's interna-
tional expansion plans, Mr
Roberts said that the hurricanes
have slowed down this part of
the government's mandate but
discussions are currently under-
way to contract with the
Freeport Hotel and Casino
,operators to provide a seat
guarantee service between
Grand Bahama and various US


Eastern Seaboard and Mid-
western states to replace similar
services provided for Driftwood
Resort prior to its closure.
As for the future of employ-
ees of Bahamasair after the pri-
vatisation, the minister said that
government plans to wait for
the report from the consultants
and be guided by what their rec-
ommendations are, but he
added that he is certain that the
employees are not naive to the
current realities of the airline
business.
Mr Roberts pointed out that
regionally, Air Jamaica and the
Trinidadian BWIA and Liat air-
lines are teetering on the finan-
cial edge. Air Jamaica will lose
more than $100 million this year
and BWIA will lose in the
neighbourhood of $30 million.
"From what I have read
about the airline business it is
going through a (drastic) change,
and Bahamasair is no exception
and we have to cut the suit to fit
the cost," said Mr Roberts.
Mr Roberts said that before
the airline can be privatised
there must be a credible busi-
ness plan; you must have iden-
tified prospective investor part-
ners; you must identify sources
of funding for capital and you
must be able to launch a sell-
able initial public offering.
"We are very optimistic that
we will find a buyer for
Bahamasair by summer. We
will go the usual route and our
consultants will advise us that


BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST

The RETREAT

GARDEN Manager
Primary Responsibility: To manage and maintain The
Retreat Garden, on Village Road in Nassau. This
property is owned by the Bahamas National Trust and
contains one of the largest private collections of palms
in the world.
Reports to: Director of Education and Communications
Primary Tasks:
* Develop and oversee the maintenance and expansion
of the Garden following the directions of The Retreat
Committee
* Coordinate volunteer activities in the garden
* Supervise staff working in the garden
* Organize logistics and preparation of the Garden for
special events and parties
* Assist in developing short and long-term strategies
for the Garden maintenance and expansion
* Write letters and reports
Primary Skills Required:
* Enthusiasm for gardens and working with people of
all ages
* Demonstrated knowledge of horticulture, palms and
native vegetation
* Minimum five years work experience
* Exceptional interpersonal communications skills
* Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse
activities, meet deadlines and pay attention to details
* Proven administrative skills
* Willingness to organize and motivate volunteers.
* Demonstrated commitment to natural resource
conservation in the Bahamas
* Willingness to occasionally work long hours including
some weekends
* Positive attitude
* Desire to do hands on work
* Mechanical ability, including working with water
systems, pumps and chippers as necessary
To apply for the position, email or send cover letter,
resume, three references including telephone numbers
and email addresses by Wednesday, February 9, 2005
to:
Bahamas National Trust,
P.O. Box N-4105 Nassau, Bahamas
Email: bnt@batelnet.bs


they know the people out there
who are interested. We have ;.
several people who have
approached us about purchasing v
the airline," he said.
The minister said that gov-
ernment has not placed a price
tag on the airline but is relying
on the consultant's advice.
"The intention is not to
advise an airline with any major
liability that would be a disaster
to start off with," he said.



Clash

FROM page one

to a traffic accident in the
area around 7pm. It was
after they got there that
shots were fired, and the .;
young man shot. Angry per-
sons then charged the police
and shooting on both sides
followed. Armed police
reinforcements, in riot gear
carrying bullet proof shields,
moved in. High ranking .,
police officers were at the .
scene as the street was cor-
doned off, and traffic divert- '
ed. Persons living in the area ij
could not get to their homes.
Crowds gathered around
the dead man's home.
It was reported that angry
residents threw gas on the
police vehicle and set it
afire. The police car's win-
dows were smashed and
only a burned frame sat on !
the tyres.
Stones were thrown at
the police and several homes
were damaged by the rocks. '4
Police squad teams were .s
still arriving,, persons were '
running up and down side .
streets and all sorts of -'
rumours were being spread. 4
Marathon MP Ron Pin-
der and-Kennedy MP Keny-
a ta Gibson, MP for the
aia, arrived on the scene. ,.
They were surrounded by
persons wanting to know
what had happened-and,
why.
At 9.45 pm tempers flared ^
anew as angry residents
wanted to go through the ,.
cordoned off area to get K
back to their homes. As our
deadline closed at 10pm ,
police were still at the scene
with angry crowds milling
around.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 \
and share your story.


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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


THE TRIBUNE.








THL TIBUNETHURSAY, ANUAR 27,205, PGEW1


THIS delightful young lady
is as beautiful as the city she is
named after: Paris.
She is a grey and brown tab-
by with flecks of gold in her
colouring and she has
gold/green eyes.
Paris is a small and slender
cat, oriental in build.
She is one year old and
friendly and affectionate, with
people she knows, but can be
rather shy and timid with
strangers.
She is, however, becoming
more confident and will make
a wonderful pet.
Paris doesn't really socialise
with other cats in the cattery,
but is tolerant of the other
four cats in her cage.
She is playful and curious,
quite independent and deter-
mined; a very engaging and
endearing character.
She has been vaccinated
and was spayed on November
19, 2004.
Paris is thoroughly deserv- .
ing of a permanent loving
home. A, f
(Photo: Mario t (A
Duncanson)" ",-


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your' story.


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First timers are all dressed up


for Boxing Day Junkanoo Parade


NAVARDO Gray was
awarded a second place finish in
the Boxing Day Junkanoo
Parade for the Tile King Enter-
prises sponsored individual cos-
tume on January 1, 2005. The
first time sponsors wowed the
crowd with their brilliantly
coloured rendition of the Tile
King on his throne made of
boxes of tiles from around the
world with the slogan "Tiling
the Bahamas"
Navardo & Sammy McKin-
ney made a great impression on
young and old by handing out
Tile King Enterprises pens and
pencils to the crowd along the
Bay and Shirley Streets route.
Having only been involved in
the making of a costume three
months earlier, Mark Roberts
founder and owner of Tile King
had a lot to learn.

Shack
"Meeting at the shack every
few days gave me a lot to look
forward to after the daily grind.
There is an amazing 'cama-
raderie' in the shack. It is all
about the process and everyone
is always willing to teach the
younger and less experienced
costume makers the trade,"
Navardo Gray was the true
float maker. He spent countless
hours in the shack with numer-
ous other friends to really make
the costume a reality. Zack
Mackey, Charles Munnings,
Francis Noell and Arnold Bain
all had their hand in the making
of the costume.
It is hardly a one man band
and requires many hours of
work and co-oidinated effort to
take a small drawing and make
it a float.
; The eight by ten by sixteen
foot high costume started out
as a drawing on a scrap piece
of paper. Navardo Gray turned
it into a second place finish and
work of art for the Boxing Day
Parade.
'-Navardo and the Tile King
are looking forward to next
year's parade and hoping to
enter a full group into the C or
B class category.
"Junkanoo has always been
a party time for me and now it
is becoming a planned event at
the level of participation and
I still get to party all night
lfog."


Doctor testifies that 'tear-gassed family turned to refrigerator for air'


* MIAMI
A FORMER Cuban doctor
who lived next door to Elian
Gonzalez's Miami relatives tes-
tified Wednesday that his family
turned to the refrigerator for
fresh air after tear gas filled their
neighborhood during the armed
federal raid to return the Cuban
boy to his father, according to
Associated Press.


Cristobal Peraza's wife, moth-
er-in-law and a house guest are
among 13 people suing the fed-
eral government for injuries and
emotional distress that they
blame on biased agents bearing
shotguns and gas guns in the pre-
dawn raid in April 2000.
Nine people in neighboring
homes and four women at police
barricades are seeking up to
$250,000 each in the non-jury tri-


al expected to finish Friday
before U.S. District Judge K.
Michael Moore.
He has given no indication
when he would announce his
verdict.

Agent
Peraza testified through a
Spanish translator that a black-
clad agent gassed the three


- women;ahead of himonthe path
between their kitchen door and
their sidewalk, and all of them
headed back inside.
"Inside my house, you could
hardly breathe practically," he
said. "We had to take refuge in
the air coming from the refriger-
ator."
The neighbors have testified
-that the agents did not identify
themselves or warn the


bystanders before spraying the
tear gas.
More than 90 other people
were dropped earlier from the
suit claiming the 151-agent raid
team used excessive force in the
three-mintue raid. The judge
ruled ihe government was enti-
tled to immunity for people at
the, Gonzalez house, anyone who
jumped the barricades and peo-
ple living beyond the barricades.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 17'


TH~E TRIBUNE


,dvcr era !














Twenty-two Bahamians step




to it in Toyota Gator Bowl


THE Bahamas Majorettes
and Marching Auxiliaries sent
an entourage of twenty two
girls ranging in age from 13 to


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT





The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. wishes to advise that
it will commence disconnecting services for all accounts with
overdue balances, and ceasing services to accounts with no activity
for three or more months beginning Monday, February 14, 2005.

Customers whose services are disconnected will have their security
deposits applied to the outstanding charges, and will be required
to apply for a new account and pay a new deposit and reconnection
fee.

As a result, both cellular and landline subscribers with outstanding
balances on inactive accounts are urged to safeguard their services
by contacting the Credit & Collections office, JFK Drive to make
payment agreements.

Payments may be made at any BTC cashier counter as well as any
branch of Royal, Scotia, British American and First Caribbean
Banks, as well as Finco Bank Line. Subscribers are also reminded
that for their convenience, BTC's Mall at Marathon office is open
on Saturday to facilitate bill payment during the hours.of 10:00am
to 5:00pm. .-.


20-years-old to perform and
compete in the 2005 Toyota
Gator Bowl which was held
in Jacksonville, Florida, USA.


* WASHINGTON
PRESIDENT BUSH on Wednesday ordered his Cabinet
secretaries not to hire columnists to promote their agen-
das after disclosure that a second writer was paid to tout an
administration initiative, according to Associated Press.
The president said he expects his agency heads will "make
sure that that practice doesn't go forward."
"All our Cabinet secretaries must realize that we will not
be paying commentators to advance our agenda. Our agen-
da ought to be able to stand on its own two feet," Bush
said at a news conference..
Bush's remarks came a day after syndicated columnist
Maggie Gallagher apologized to readers for not disclosing a
$21,500 contract with the Health and Human Services
Department to help create materials promoting the agency's
$300 million initiative to encourage marriage.
Contract
Bush also said the White House had been unaware that the
Education Department paid commentator and columnist
Armstrong Williams $240,000 to plug its policies. That con-
tract came to light two weeks ago.
Bush said there "needs to be a nice independent rela-
tionship between the White House and the press, the admin-
istration and the press."
And he noted that "we have new leadership going into the
Department of Education."
Education Secretary Margaret Spellings started this week,
replacing first-term Education Secretary Rod Paige. Paige
had ordered an investigation into whether Williams should
have disclosed the deal to produce television and radio ads
promoting the No Child Left Behind Act.
Williams has apologized, calling it a mistake in judgment
to not disclose that he was being paid by the administration
but insisting he broke no laws.
Gallagher apologized to readers in her column Tuesday,
saying that she was not paid to promote marriage but "to
produce particular research and writing products" articles,
brochures, presentations. "My lifelong experience in mar-
-riage. research, public education and'advocacy is the reason
HHS.hired me; she wrote -. ..


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The event ran during the:
period Wednesday December i
29, 2004 to Sunday January 2.",
2005. The girls took part in,
the annual Winn Dixie Street
Parade and the annual Gatorz
Bowl Dance Drill Team Com-
petition and half-time game
performance.
The Bahamas Majorettes
and Marching Auxiliaries suc-
cessfully competed and won
1st place in dance/drill group
performance heating out over
thirteen groups from over the
United States.
In addition, two members
of Bahamas Majorettes and
Marching Auxiliaries were
placed in key positions of the
Gator Bowl half-time perfor-)
mance. ,
One member Shacoya Far-
rington was the only black and
only Bahamian colourguard.
Captain
The other one Laticia Cun-
ningham, team captain, was
chosen as the only black and
-only Bahamian Majorette to
lead the colourful and presti-
gious parade and half-time
performance.
The Gator Bowl half-time
performance was held for,
nearly half an hour at the All-
Tell Stadium, Jacksonville,
Florida, USA in front of
nearly 80,000 seated guests
and seen on NBC by
millions.
The Bahamas Majorettes
and Marching Auxiliaries is a
professional dance and drill
team of teen girls and young
women. Recruitment for
potential members begins Jan-
uary 10, 2005.
Interested persons may con-
tact the STRAW Incorporat-
ed Centre for'Youn'g
Women.


THE ThWUNdll


1* -, .,,,rSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


------ ------- --- --
arl.inn At.


- -- -- 01 -1 19


. i


6f


Bmself # Broyhwlll












Team effort rewarded at




British Colonial Hilton


FROM left: Michael Hooper General Manager of the British Colonial Hilton, Nathan Dun-
can Asst Chief Steward, Debbie Ferguson Human Resources Manager & David Ferguson.


BRITISH Colonial Hilton
boasts of its great team mem-
bers and uses many incentives
to encourage them to continue
to excel in every facet of the
hotel.
One such way is the Team
Member of the Month recogni-
tion programme, which high-
lights two team members each
month, and one supervisor/man-
ager each quarter, where
team members vote for the win-
ners.
The programme has proven
to be successful over the last
five years, and team members
look forward to the Team
Member of the Month presen-
tation, where all team members
are treated to fine Hilton Cui-
sine; and fun.

Positive
The programme is a means
of giving positive recognition
and rewarding .the right work
ethics, encourages a positive
and productive environment
and maintains high moral
among team members.
During its Christmas Party
themed 'Happy People', the
General Manager announced
the Team Members of the Year
for Guest and Support Services
and Team Leader of the Year.
Christelle Sturrup, Catering
Sales Co-ordinator was this
year's winner in the Support
Services Department. Christelle
joined British Colonial Hilton
in 2002, and has demonstrated
initiative and dedication in her


duties. Christelle wins a round
trip ticket for two to Chicago
with accommodations and
spending money.
Sylvester Jean, Bellman at
the Concierge won for Guest
Services. Sylvester has been
with the Hilton since it's open-
ing in 1999. He has consistently
gone the extra mile and created
many Hilton moments at the
front door. Sylvester wins a
round trip ticket for two to
Toronto with accommodation
and spending money.

Skills
Nathan Duncan, Assistant
Chief Steward was this year's
Team Leader of the Year.
Nathan has constantly shown
impressive skills in leadership,
he wins a round trip for two to
New York with accommodation
and spending money.
Anthony Thomson and
Lakeisha Smith both of the
Security Department walked
away with the Mr and Ms Pop-
ular awards.
The names of the team mem-
bers of the month and supervi-
sors of the quarters are listed
below.
January Guest Services:
Beatrice Knowles, Support Ser-
vices: Donnie McKenzie.
February Guest Services:
Patricia Hamilton, Support Ser-
vices: Tanya Johnson.
March Guest Services:
Sylvester Jean, Support Ser-
vices: Paul Stroud Team Leader


of the Quarter: Nathan Dun-
can.
April Guest Services: Ger-
ard Knowles, Support Services:
Sophia Hanna
May Support Services: Van-
drea Babb
June Guest Services: Prince
Wright, Support Services:
Lovinia McDiarmid, Team
Leader of the Quarter:Eduardo
Estevez.
July Guest Services: Her-
bert Kemp, Support Services:
Tina Swain.
August Guest Services: Ken
Moss, Support Services: Janice
John.
September Guest Services:
Suzette Dean, Support Services:
Marice Jbsey, Team Leader of
the Quarter: Thomas Sands.
October Guest Services:
Jerome Sears, Support Services:
Christelle Sturrup
November Guest Services:
Marguerite Charles, Support
Services: Lucian Bullard, Team
Leader of the Quarter: Raphael
Deleveaux.
The Team Member Recogni-
tion Programme continues in
January 2005. For further infor-
mation contact Debbie Fergu-
son, Director of Human
Resources or visit our website at
www.hiltoncaribbean.com/nas-
sau.
British Colonial Hilton is a
luxury four-diamond hotel
located in the heart of com-
merce in the Nassau, Bahamas.


Anglican Central Education Authority
i 4> In Celebration our 50th Anniversary |


St Anne's School
presents

A Musical in Two Acts





I Rock nRoll


Music Arrangement by
Darrel Hurston

5 ~Directed by _
Karrolann Jervis
Barbara Dundas-Luard


27th (matinee),
28th, 29th January 2005 '
Curtain 7:30pm
St Anne's School
Auditorium
S.
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VISIT OURWEBSITE:. friendlyrmotorsbahamas.com


Thursday
27th

-1


Friday
28th


Saura


1 111 q: 4


All Tracks Lead -To
The Mail at Marathon's
Sidewalk Sale


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 19


Come and see the full line of all your
favourite 2004 Ford Vehicles TO:DAY ]


---


ANEW,





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005
SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
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REVIVING
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BLUE & YELLOW
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33 oz
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WINN DIXIE
PLAIN & IODIZED
SALT
26 OZ
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CHEK
ASST'D SODAS
REGULAR OR DIET
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THRIFTY MAID
LARGE SWEET
PEAS, CUT &
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15.5 OZ
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$4919- GAL
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30 12- OZ


1


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PRINGLES
THRIFTY MAID
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NESTLE
CONDENSED MILK e- oz........3/$1.79
CITY MARKET
ASSORTED FRUIT
DRINKS a oz........................4/.99
CRACKING GOOD
BIG 60 ASSTD PIES 24-oz.........$2.39
CRACKIN GOOD
GEORGIA CRACKERS OR
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LIBBY'S
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PRESTIGE TYSON GWALTNEY
CHOICE BONEIN TWIN PACK 1/2 SPRIAL
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799 799 s79
$LB PAK LB


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SLICE HAM PRE MADE LIBERTY
&TURKEY ASSOKi uRAGOI
$299 2/$=500
$2 LB 4. 6-PK
WHITE & YELLOW TOUFAYAN
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CHEESE ALL VARIETY
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PURINA
BENEFULL DOG
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17.6 LBS
$1 999


JERGEN'S
ASSTD LOTIONS, ORIGINAL, ULTRA
HEAL, ALOE & LONOLIN VITAMIN
E & LANOLIN, SKIN FIRM LOTION,
SOFT SHIMMER LOTION, ASH
RELIEF LOTION AND SKIN
SMOTHING LOTION
400 GR
0$Ap a9


LIBBY'S
VIENNA

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5- OZ
2/.990

KRAFT
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7.25 OZ
2/$ 1 69

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$a 99


CARNATION,
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MILK
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CHEF BOY ARDEE
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$449


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CAMPBELL'S CHUNKY SOUPS
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 21


W/D




27-40 COUNT




BLANCO

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BLEACH
1 28 OZ




QUAKER
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S5 LB

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PACK
6 00 ML

$729






JUICE
IT H4mOZ




SCHEK

SOADS 2 LITER

ALb FLAVORS
l- 2 -. ILT
(.iaS & *


,r


Report says rich



countries poaching



doctors and nurses


WINN DIXIE





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48 OZ

$269e


CHAIRMEN
BATHROOM
TISSUE
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$219

'THRIFTY MAID-
CATSUP
SQUEEZE
BOTTLE
24 OZ

$149


WINN DIXIE





24- OZ

$289


Poor nations spending

'millions on training'


* ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia
RICH countries poach doc-
tors and nurses that poor
nations spend millions to train,
taxing already underfunded,
over-stretched hospitals in
Africa and elsewhere, accord-
ing to a report released
Wednesday, according to
Associated Press.
The International Organi-
zation for Migration, a private
group that often works close-
ly wvith the United Nations on
immigration and refugee
issues, also said in its report
that the practice means
Europe and the United States
get health workers at a bar-
gain.
The IOM estimated it
would have cost rich nations
about $184,000 to train each of
the estimated 3 million pro-
fessionals educated in poor
countries now working in the
developed world, for a "stag-
gering" total savings of $552
billion.
Impact
Poor nations, meanwhile,
spend $500 million a year
training health workers,
according to the report pre-
sented at a two-day meeting
to discuss the impact of the
migration of Africans.
"Emigration of health care
professionals is a cause of par-
ticular concern for Africa with
developed countries deliber-
ately recruiting health per-
sonnel from the region, partly
to offset domestic shortages,"
said the report, by Ndioro


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Many more nurses also left,
some going to the Gulf States
and others to Europe and
America, he added.
"It is usually the most
skilled and experienced who
leave. We lose their skills and
there's no one to train new
people," said Adebowale.
For those health profes-
sionals left behind it means
more work. More than 80 per-
cent of Nigerians live on less
than $1 a day and can't afford
expensive privately run, hos-
pitals providing relatively bet-
ter service. They flock to gov-
ernment-subsidized hospitals,
such as Lagos Island Hospi-
tal, where over-stretched staff
barely meet overwhelming
demand.
Ndiaye told The Associat-
ed Press that the IOM is work-
ing to have rich countries pay
for professionals from poor
countries to return home and
work there for an unspecified
time each year.
Arrangement
She said Belgium already
has such an arrangement with
its former colonies Rwanda
and Burundi.
Ethiopia's Prime Minister
Meles Zenawi said the "brain
drain" affects all countries, but
hits Africa harder.
"The fact that we have lim-
ited resources also increases
the relative cost of education
and training.
"So when skilled profes-
sionals migrate we are doubly
affected," Meles said.
It is estimated that by 2025
one in 10 Africans will work
outside their own country.
Many professionals from
poor countries migrate to
work in rich countries because
of better pay offered for their
skills, better work conditions
and to flee political oppres-
sion.


BRUNSWICK


SARWNI1S IN 1Ol
3.75 OZ

3/$1 79
J


LrP~a~~


THE TRIBUNE


Ndiaye, deputy director gen-
eral of the International Orga-
nization for Migration.
The International Organi-
-zation for Migration said
21,000 Nigerian doctors are
working in the United States,
and more doctors from Benin
work in France than in their
own country.
In all, the report said, 23,000
African health professionals
emigrate every year, "leaving
their own stretched health ser-
vice in dire straits."
Corrupt
In Nigeria, health workers
blame mismanagement by a
succession of corrupt military
and civilian regimes for the
economic woes of the past two
decades that have continued
to force them abroad.
Poor salaries are paid late
and overworked doctors have
to work with outdated equip-
ment, leaving most dissatis-
fied and eager to leave, said
John Adebowale, a general
practitioner at the Lagos
Island Hospital in Nigeria's
commercial capital, Lagos.
"Last year we lost two of
our best surgeons who went
abroad and nobody has been
able to do the things they did,"
said Adebowale.






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22. THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY EVENING


JANUARY 27, 2005


7:30 | 8:00 8:30 9:00 1 9:30 10:00 10:30
E d Fd iusRoadshow'St.Paul'St.NewFlor A Scientific Amel- Nova "NOVA scienceNOW The im-
B WPBT Stuffed chicken. Paul, Minn.; fishing lures; carved can Frontiers pact of advancements in science
n (CC) fish decoys. (N)l(CC) Advanced cars. and technology. (CC) (DVS)
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K WFOR n (CC) of Art" (N) n (CC) Grissom is haunted by the return of disappears in the midst of the pub-
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WTVJ wood (N) (CC) Michael's book their own motels on the Jersey shore. (N) ft (CC) (CC)
club. n (CC)
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Newport Beach. (N) ,0 (CC) death and destruction.
Jeopardy (N) In Style Celebrity Weddings (N) Saving Kids Like Me St. Jude's PrimeTime Live (CC)
B WPLG (CC) (CC) Children's Research Hospital's life-
saving mission.

American Jus- Cold Case Files "Mark of Cain; Death on the Freeway; One Night on the The First 48 Probing the slaying of
A& E tice "Payback for Bayou; Buckeye Mi" A Florida man vanishes. (CC) a store worker documented on video
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CNBC Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Clamar. Dennis Miller Evan Wright. (N) The Big Idea Wth Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan 'Brien
(:00) CNN Specia Report "Iraqi Elections" Iraqi elec- Larry King Live (CC) CNN Presents "Under Fire: Stories
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dercover. (CC) bowling. (CC) skiing in Aspen. visits. (CC) ies (CC)
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COURT Coast" ,f (CC) A Life Stolen death-row inmates endure a harrowing ordeal.
That's So Raven NOW YOU SEE IT... (2005, Adventure) Alyson Michalka, Johnny Pacar, Sister, Sister Even Stevens
DISN Raven gets a job. Frank Langella. A teenager meets a magician whose powers are real. Ray's surprising "Sibling Rivalry"
(CC) 'NR'(CC) opponent(C (CC)
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EWTN Lady Still Teach Sienna
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HALL Texas Ranger hopeful gets her chance as an un- Amy Davidson. A widow and her granddaughter journey cross-country.
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Dream House Holmes on Homes "Windwow Well Real Renos Weekend War- Mission: Organi- Hot Property
HGTV The house slowly Hell" n (CC) "Falling Behind" riors nation Attic proj- "Edinburgh" )
emerges. ,,- (CC). ect. (CC) (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Inspirational
(CC) : (CC) day Programming
Yu-GI-Ohl Big Sabrina, the The Fresh Everybody Will & Grace Frieiids Raihel's Everybody
KTLA Three plays by Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air Loves Raymond Grace suspects surprise birthday Loves Raymond
his own rules. "You Say Me" (CC) (CC) Val is a thief. party. (CC)
** A MARRIAGE OF CONVENIEhCE (1998) Jane WIDOW ON THE IILL (2005, Drama) Natasha Henstridge, James Brolin,
LIFE Seymour James Brolin. A boy's adoptive mother and Jewel Staite. A woman accuses a nurse of murdering her wealthy father.
biological father marry. (CC) (DVS) (CC)
MSNBC :00) Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- MSNBC Reports Scarborough Country
NICK The Fairly Odd- SpongeBob Nick News Spe- Full House Full House n Murphy Brown Murphy Brown
NICK Parents f, (CC) SquarePants t clal Edition (N) "Baby Love" (CC) "Retrospective" "Retrospective"
NTV Will & Grace n Complete Sav- The Apprentice "Motel1666' The teams fix upand run News (CC) News
S (CC) ages (N) (CC) their own motels on the Jersey shore. (N) (CC)
OLN (:00) Killer In- Hunting 201 Buckmasters The World of Best & Worst of Snowboarding USSA Exhibit
(0 stinct Beretta Tred Barta Slope. From Bachelor, Ore.
SPEED (:00) Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction From Scottsdale, Ariz. (Live)
Fulton Sheen Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop TD. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Ross Friends Ross * SUGAR & SPICE (2001, Comedy) Marley Shelton, James Mars-
TBS Loves Raymond has a bitter fight has a disturbing den, Mena Suvari. Cheerleaders turn to larceny to support a pregnant
"Pants on Fire" with Rachel. secret. (CC) member.
(:00) In a Fix Overhaulin' "Lucky Star" Reinvent- Jump London Sports Disasters: Danger Zone
TLC Living Breathing ing a 1991 Ford Explorer. (CC) (CC)
Room (CC)
(:00) NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Indiana Pacers. From Conseco NBA Basketball Sacramento Kings at San Antonio
TNT Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. (Live) (CC) Spurs. From the SBC Center in San Antonio. (Live)
(CC)
mOON Ed, Edd n Eddy Ozzy & Drix ,t Yu-Gi-Oh! (CC) Codename: Kids Mucha Lucha Teen Titans "Af- Static Shock ,
T O | (CC) Next Door n (CC) tershock" (CC)
VTV AVANIM (2004) Asi Levi, Uri Gabriel, Florence Bloch. Une femme porte Des marelles et des petites filles TV5 Le Journal
TV5 seule le deuil d'un amant. (SC)
(6:00) PM Edi- StorinWeek: Earthquake (N) (CC). Evening Edition CC)
I VV^ tion (CC)
(:00) La Muier Rubi Amor Real Aquiy Ahora
UNIV de Madera
S(:00) Medical In- Law & Order: Special Vilctims Unit 'A QUEEN OF THE DAMNED (2002, Horror) Stuart Townsend, Aaliyah,
USA vestigation ,t Two famous singers ignore their Marguerite Moreau. Lestafs rock music awakens the queen of all vam-
(CC) children's well-being. (CC) pires. (CC)
V 1 (:00) I Love the I Love the '90s: Part Deux "1996" I Love the '90s: Part Deux "1997" I Love the '90s: Part Deux Oprah
V 1 90s: Part Deux Winter Olympic games. Paula Jones' makeover, talks about Mad Cow disease. ,t
Home Improve- **s ANGELS IN THE ENDZONE 1997, Comedy) Christopher Lloyd, America's Funniest Home Videos
WGN ment f, (CC) Matthew Lawrence, David Gallagher. A sports-loving angel helps out a (CC)
struggling football team. f, (CC) .
Everybody ** HOME FRIES (1998, Comedy) Drew Barrymore, Luke Wilson, WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond Catherine O'Hara. A pregnant fast-food clerk encounters a psychotic fami- Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
f (CC) ly. f (CC) &Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) WWE SmackDown! (N) ft (CC) Dr. Phil


(:00) Real Sports Inside the NFL f (CC) DIRTY WAR (2004, Drama) Alastair Galbraith, Paul Unscripted The
H BO-E (CC) Antony-Barber, Fuman Dar. Terrorists detonate a dirty class welcomes a
bomb in London. f 'NR' (CC) new student.
(:00) Carnivale *** THE RUNDOWN (2003, Adventure) The Rock. (:45) *** FACE/OFF (1997, Suspense) John Tra-
HBO-P Ben searches for Premiere. A bounty hunter must find his boss's son in volta, Nicolas Cage, Joan Allen. An FBI agent and a vi-
the next link. the Amazon. A 'PG-13' (CC) olent terrorist switch identities. ft 'R' (CC)
(:00) The Wild **s WILD AMERICA (1997, Adventure) Jonathan Taylor Thomas, De- Real Sports ft (CC)
H BO-W Ride to Super von Sawa, Scott Bairstow. The story of nature filmmaker Marty Stouffer
Bowl I, (CC) and family. f 'PG' (CC)


(:15) * RES )IRO (2002, Drama) Valeria Golino. ** ALONG CAME POLLY (2004, Romance-Come- ** SHE'S THE
HBO-S A woman with mood swings runs away from her hus- dy) Ben Stiller. A jilted newlywed finds solace with an- ONE (1996) Jen-
band. (Subtitled-English) ft 'PG-13' other woman. f 'PG-13' ( C) niferAniston.
(6:30) ** s (:15) *' CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Comedy) Steve Martin, GOTHIKA (2003) Halle Berry.
MAX-E SPARTAN (2004) Bonnie Hunt, Piper Perabo. A man must handle the chaos surrounding his Strange events plague a confined
'R' (CC) 12 children. f, 'PG' (CC) psychologist. ,f '' (CC)
(6:45) * BIG FISH (2003, Drama) Ewan McGre- ** THE RULES OF ATTRACTION (2002, Drama) James Van Der
MOMAX gor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup. Young man investi- Beek, lan Somerhalder, Shannyn Sossamon. Privileged collegians wallow
gates his father's tall tales. t 'PG-13' (CC) in drugs and sex games. ft 'R' (CC)
(6:00) **x *** STARSHIP TROOPERS (1997, Science Fiction) Casper Van (:15) **s BARBERSHOP (2002,
SHOW ROCKY V (1990) Dien, Dina Meyer, Denise Richards. iTV. Young soldiers battle a vicious Comedy) Ice Cube. iTV. t 'PG-13'
'PG-13' army of gigantic bugs. ft 'R' (CC) (CC)


TMC


516:( ) As THE WA THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE (1994, Comedy) Anthony
(1997) A 'R' unusual medicine. A 'R' (CC) Palance. A 'PG' (CC)


EnRNTR FORLESS!


UI~~~br d U B"lsb*arl


_ __ _____


I -




THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2004


Old I- li


Caribbean


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Style of Architecture and Cuisine


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United Book Stores
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Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug


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,iI







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 25
E I i ol, 1 V



p "





"Copyrig hted Material


Syndicated Content

Svaiilable from Commercial News Providers"
ICXI II' qrJ

















AW Guyana

SINGER Eddy
Grant wants to use his
music to help victims
of floods that killed at





least six people and
displaced thousands
of residents in his
native"Guyana'
his spokeswoman
& said Wednesday,
F, according to Associat-
ed Press.
Grant, best known
for the 1980's hit
"Electric Avenue," is
planning to donated I
proceeds from upcom-
ling music projects to




a relief efforts in the
South American coun-
try, said Josanne
Leonard, the singer's
spokeswoman.

One year of artist
royalties from Grant's
4






















upcoming album,
"Reparation," will go
to relief efforts, as
well as half the pro-
ceeds from the sale of
four Grant commemo- t
rative stamps.
More than 40 inches





(101 centimeters) of
rain have fallen a in
Guyana since Dec. 26,






including more
Leonarf the 9in0es hit
Prceedseterso pco






One aveare of aris
-anines proj cnts to

relief efforts ias the
tRys sai e sJosaen






-. Mreeding 4 incthespia
Lf1eonr c ethesinger's




rif ae is lletuningo
spokeswoman.
One yaothr oarista




"owns avrae sof.8n
I /royaltfin rm Gantde 's
uepce form albm rashi,
wellns halfte pro-pe





dsaromand others aleo
Menthre ana 4 tinhes
(101Gentimeters)loodo
rainfae falletuningt
including ore
m tonthe alone. a
Aons avrae ofil 8n
treainche (20cntime-sb
ters)e normal alskinrahs
adiare flod wathers are-
Smlierits relturin toth
,.. orflo d .


S-r DELUXE SALADS


I









PAGE 26, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


The Trbumnw


SECTION


business@l00jamz.com


BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


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Mandatory pensions seen






as best retirement option


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ahamians believe
mandatory pri-
vate pensions
provided the best
, -option for fund-
ing their retirement, a survey
by the Social Security Reform
Commission has discovered,,
with some 85 per cent viewing
the current National Insurance
Board (NIB) pension as inade-
quate to sustain living standards
and quality of life in old age.
i The Commission had pre-
sented three options for ensur-
ing Bahamians had enough
funding upon- which to retire,
with 80 per cent of pre-retire-
ment income considered neces-
sary for maintaining living stan-
dards during retirement.
The options included enlarg-


ing the NIB and introducing
higher contribution rates and
ceilings that would provide
greater pension benefits, with
some investments managed by
the private sector.
Apart from making it manda-
tory that all employers provide
a private pension scheme for
their workers, the other option
proposed by the Commission
was a public-private partner-
ship, where the NIB collected a
higher contribution rate based
on full earnings. Part of the con-
tributions would be used to pay
current benefits, with the bal-
ance transferred for manage-
ment by the private sector.
The survey, carried out in the
period up until October 6, 2004,
found that 44 per cent were in
favour of private pensions as
the preferred option, with 33
per cent in favour of enlarging


Resounding support for

immediate NIB reforms in

public survey, although

findings hit by low response


the NIB and 15 per cent back-
ing the public-private partner-
ship. The remaining 8 per cent
did not back any of the choices.
Although hardly a resounding
vote in favour of making pri-
vate pensions, which currently
only cover about 30 per cent of
the Bahamian workforce,
mandatory, the survey results
are likely to push the Govern-
ment in favour of this option.
However, the fact that just
123 people had responded to


the survey by October 6 dilutes
the impact of its findings some-
what, and it is unclear who the
people responding to the sur-
vey are. 1
Still, none of those surveyed
believed that the NIB pension
was sufficient to sustain them
in old age, although it currently
provided about 60 per cent of
low and middle income earn-
ers' retirement funding. Only
15 per cent 'sat on the fence'
on this issue, with 85 per cent


saying 'No'.
There was substantial back-
ing for reforming NIB and the
Bahamian social security sys-
tem, with 83 per cent of respon-
dents in favour of such a move
and only 17 per cent 'undecid-
* ed'.
In response to a question ask-
ing when NIB should make
; changes, 89 per cent were in
favour of enacting reforms now.
Some 9 per cent believed NIB
reforms should begin in 10
years' time, and 2 per cent felt
they should start in 20 years'
time. However, NIB's reserves
are expected to be exhausted
in 24 years' time by 2029.
There was also strong sup-
port for investing a portion of
NIB's assets abroad to increase
investment diversification and
generate higher returns, with 78
per cent in favour of such a


move. Only 12 per cent of those
surveyed were opposed, with 10
per cent undecidedd.
The Commission' has said it
would set up a sub-committee
to develop a way forward for
NIB's investment policy.
Those surveyed were split,
though, on what would be the
best changes to prevent the NIB
Fund from becoming exhausted
by 2029. The most popular idea
was to improve compliance,
with 31.9 per cent in favour of
this.
The NIB admitted in its 2003
annual report that ensuring
compliance in paying NIB con-
tributions from workers in the
construction sector and domes-
tic industries, plus self-
employed persons, "continued
to be a challenge".
See SURVEY, Page 4B


Sumrs n arg~get fo

Bahaasi privatsatio


Trade unions baulk at




insurance regulation


By YOLANDA
DELEVEALUX
Tribune Business Reporter
TRADE UNION leaders
yesterday told The Tribune
they will vigorously oppose the
introduction of regulation over
their health insurance and pen-
sion schemes if adequate con-
sultation fails to take place and
the regulations introduce an
additional cost burden upon
members.
President of the Trade
Union Congress (TUC), Obie
Ferguson, said the TUC has
taken the position that the
labour movement should be
consulted in regard to any leg-
islation that impacts the work-


i ers of tire Bahamas.
- He added that if the Gov-
ernment would engage in a
broader consultation process
with union officials, many of
the industrial relations prob-
lems that seem to be constant-
ly raising their head would sub-
side.
"We understand the specific
concerns of the members of
the union, and we would only
be putting forward those con-
cerns that our members have,"
Mr Ferguson said.
In her address to the House
of Assembly, Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, minister of finan-
cial services.and investments,
acknowledged that the Domes-
tic Insurance Bill does howev-


er allow for the regulation of
trade unions, who are said to
run "substanliail insurancee
schemes for their members.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson told
NIPs that because such
schemes are specifically exclud-
ed from regulation in the exist-
ing Insurance Act, and because
no discussions were ever held
with the trade unions and
friendly societies about the
matter, the new Bill main-
tained their exclusion.
"While it is argued that cer-
tain of our trade unions now
operate health and pension
schemes that rival many of the
licensed insurers in size, with
millions of dollars and thou-
sands of participants, and that


such schemes should now be
regulated and fall under the
purview of this Bill, such a
change cannot be made with-
out full discussions with he
entities to be impacted," she
said.
The Financial Services and
Investments minister went on
to tell Parliament that the Reg-
istrar of Insurance had been
instructed to initiate discussion
with the trade unions about the
matter and, if any changes
were to be made following con-
sultation, they would be made
via amendments to the new
Act.
Declining to comment on
See VIEWS, Page 4B


Bradley Roberts announced that McKinsey & Company was hired to
make the right steps to privatise Bahamasair.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)
See story on Page 7B


Bahamas First


'totally against'


direct selling


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Bahamas First's group presi-
dent and chief executive yes-
terday said the company was
"absolutely against" direct sell-
ing of general insurance prod-
ucts, adding that he did not
believe premium rates would
come down if this was permit-
ted.
I Speaking as the company
today prepares to officially open
its new $4.6 million headquar-
ters, Patrick Ward said
Bahamas First was heavily com-
mitted to maintaining its cur-
rent business model and agency
network, as it allowed the car-
rier to specialise in the areas it
was good at with the agents


focusing on customer service.
Mr Ward said: "We are
absolutely against direct selling.
As a group we have determined
we are in the business of risk
taking."
He explained that Bahamas
First's strength and specialisa-
tion lay in assessing and under-
writing risk, finding the correct
reinsurance if necessary, and
the administration, processing
and servicing of claims.
Describing Bahamas First as
a "heavy supporter" of its
agency network, which is 15-
strong and extends to sub-
agents and brokers, Mr Ward
said agents "had a place in the
market" for customer service,
See INSURE, Page 8B


Ansbacher lawsuits dismissed
Ansbacher's description of a lawsuit filed against its Bahamian
subsidiary last year in relation to the failed Imperial Consolidated
group as "nonsense" appears to have been born out after the
Supreme Court threw out three civil lawsuits against it.
. Three separate actions brought against Ansbacher (Bahamas) by
former investors in Imperial Consolidated's IC Mutual mutual
fund have been dismissed by Justice Hugh Small.
Ansbacher (Bahamas) had categorically denied the allegations
against it, although it admitted providing "various fund adminis-
tration services" to IC Mutual from August 1999 to 2001.
' The cases had alleged that Ansbacher (Bahamas) breached cer-
tain statutory duties towards the plaintiffs.


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Nassau, Bahamas
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Fax: (242) 323-3581
www.bbsl.com


(7~5~ ~ Soluilous LAd,


Queens Highway
P. O. Box F-40731
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Phone: (242) 352-7022
Fax: (242) 352-7619
www.bbsi.com


I I







IBUSNES ,,U[


Marking


out your


patent


4SUBS
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd, a leading international Wealth Manager,
is looking for a

Head Business Management

This senior management position is open to candidates
with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications:
* Degree in Banking or Business;
* At least ten years experience in Private Banking;
* Excellent knowledge of Operations, Controlling and
Management;
* Extensive experience in Project Management;
* Fluency in English, German and French is essential;
* Good interpersonal skills;
* Computer literacy

Responsibilities:

* Banking related Project and Process Management;
* Support CEO in management activities;
* Marketing, Public Relations, Communications;
* Professional Association relationships, Corporate
Secretary;
* Coordination with all departments within'the location
and with the Head Office in Switzerland.
Written applications by Bahamian nationals only should
be addressed to:
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
RO. Box N-7757,
Nassau, Bahamas


T he B
Trade Ma
1906 an
Trade
Rules 194
Rules") govern the regi
of trade marks in the B.
A trademark is defi
Section 2 of the Act, as
used or proposed to 1
upon or in connect(
goods for the purpose
eating that they are the g


terri

ahamas (or services) for which the trade Tyr
irks Act mark is registered (for exam- hers o
id the ple, a manufacturer, importer, Nota
Marks retailer, business establish- rega
8 ("the ment). Once the proprietor reg- future
istration sters the trade mark, he has the may C
ahamas. exclusive right, under Section Olde
ned, by 39 of the Act, to use the trade 111
"a mark mark in connection to the goods
be used (or services) for which it was sist of
on with registered. lowing
of indi- Under the Act, the registra- lowing
,oods of tion of trade marks is initially ,di id


Legal Ease



by

Tyrone

Fitzgerald


the proprietor of such trade
mark by virtue of manufacture,
selection, certification, dealing
with or offering for sale."
Put simply, a trade mark is a
distinctive symbol that identi-
fies particular products (or ser-
vices) of a proprietor of the
trade mark to the public.
A proprietor may be any per-
son, company or firm that has a
trade connection with the goods


for 14 years. However, it is
renewable for a further 14 years
on expiration of the original,
registration or last renewal of
registration, upon application
by the proprietor to the Regis-
trar General of the Bahamas.
Under Section 7 of the Act, a
registrablee trade mark" (a
trade mark capable of being
registered under the provisions
of the Act) must contain or con-


in a sp
ner.
2. Th
cant fc
predec
3. A
invented
4. A


For these and more fantastic World Traveller offers, including flights from
Freeport, please call British Airways at 1-800-AIRWAYS, book on-line at
ba.com or call your travel agent by 5 February 2005.






BRITISH AIRWAYS
For sale until 11 February 2005 for outbound travel from 28 January 2005 until 13 June 2005. Minimum stay: 5 days,
maximum stay: one year. Tickets must be purchased 3 days after the booking is made, but no later than 11 February 2005. No
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Weekend surcharges apply. This fare attracts additional taxes and fees, and bookings made via 1-800-AIRWAYS will be
charged an additional $10 fee. Other conditions apply.


tory

'one L. E. Fitzgerald is a practising attorney in the Cham-
fFitzgerald & Fitzgerald, Counsel, Attorneys-at-Law, and
aries Public. Should you have any comments or enquiries
rding the content of this article or recommendations for
articles appearing in this FORTNIGHTLY column, you
contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite 220, Island Lane Building,
e Towne Mall at Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-
173, Nassau, Bahamas or at 327-3347 (telephone) /327-
3348(fax)/ tyrone@tlefitzgeraldgroup.com.


at least one of the fol-
essential particulars:
he name of a company,
ual or firm represented
ecial or particular man-
le signature of the appli-
or registration or some
essor in his business.
in invented word or
id words.
word or words having


no direct reference to the char-
acter or quality of the goods
and not being, according to its
ordinary signification, a geo-
graphical name, or surname.
5. Any other distinctive mark,
but a name, signature, or word
or words, 'other than one that
falls within the descriptions in
the foregoing clauses, which by
See PATENT, Page 3B


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
ELEMENTARY
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION


Kingsway Academy will be holding
Entrance Examinations for students
wishing to enter Grades 1 through 6,
on SATURDAY, MARCH 5 AND 19.
Application Forms MUST be collected
from the Elementary School office,
before the testing date.


APPLICATION


FORMS


ARE


AVAILABLE AT THE ELEMENTARY
OFFICE FROM 8:30 4:00 P.M. For
further information contact the school
at telephone numbers 324-5049, 324-
2158, or 324-6269.




Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Requires the services of a

MANAGER COMPLIANCE/
RISK MANAGEMENT

Following are the minimum requirements and
competencies the applicant must have:
A degree in Finance or Accounting.
Work experience in risk management in a financial
institution.
Good knowledge of business activities undertaken
by local financial institutions.
Knowledge of the regulatory/ supervisory structure
of the local financial markets, current banking
regulations and industry standards.
Knowledge of emerging business activities, corporate
governance and compliance risks and risk
management tools to ensure the appropriate mitigation
of risk in emerging areas for which policies do not
yet exist.
Sound knowledge of financial policies, procedures,
internal controls, corporate governance, risk
management, compliance processes and techniques
gained through practical experience.
Strong written and verbal presentation skills, including
the ability to express findings concisely while
retaining accuracy and clarity.
Strong analytical, organizational and interpersonal
skills, professional judgement and tact in dealing
with contacts inside and outside the bank.
Must be able to conceptualise and demonstrate a
high degree of original creative thinking with limited
reliance on precedent.
Please apply in writing to:
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited,
Human Resources Department,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas,
only Bahamians need apply.


* 4J







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5-7








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 3B


Patent (From page 2B)


order of the Supreme Court, is
deemed to be a distinctive mark
('distinctive' means adapted to
distinguish the goods of the pro-
prietor of the trade mark from
those of other persons).

Under Section 10 of the Act,
any person claiming to be a pro-
prietor of a trade mark and
who is desirous of registering it
- must apply in writing to the
Registrar, Industrial Property
Department, Registrar Gener-
al's Office, as prescribed by the
Act and Rules. The Registrar
does have the discretion to
refuse an application for the
registration of trade marks, or
to accept the application sub-
ject to certain conditions,
amendments or modifications.
The proprietor/applicant
must complete Form No.1 in
the First Schedule of the Rules,
and every application for the
registration of a trade mark
must contain a representation
of the mark affixed to it in the
square, which is provided on
Form No.2 in the First Schedule
of the Rules. The mark must fit
exactly within the square pro-
vided.
If such a representation
exceeds the size of the square, it
may be mounted on linen, trac-
ing cloth, or any other material
that the Registrar may consider
suitable. However, at least part
of the mounting must be affixed
within the space provided and
the rest folded over.
Every application for regis-
tration of a trade mark must be
accompanied by four additional
representations of the mark on
Form No.3 in the First Schedule
of the Rules. However, the
mark must correspond exactly
with that affixed to Form No.2,
and noted with all such particu-
lars as may from time to time be
required by the Registrar.
All representations of the


mark must be of a durable
nature. The relevant forms
(and the required copies) may
be completed by an agent
appointed by the proprietor.
Application may also be made
for the registration of the same
mark in different classes of
goods.
Upon receipt of the applica-
tion for registration, the Regis-
trar will give the applicant an
acknowledgement of the appli-
cation. The Registrar will then
conduct a search of the exist-
ing registered trade marks and
pending applications for regis-
tration in order to ascertain
whether there are any trade
marks on the Register of Trade
Marks that are for the same
goods or description of goods
identical to the trade mark
being registered by the appli-
cant.
After the search, the Regis-
trar may accept the trade mark
absolutely or subject to condi-
tions, amendments and modifi-
cations, with which he will noti-
fy the application in writing.
Once accepted, the Registrar
will advertise the trade mark in
the Official Gazette (local
newspaper), during which time
any person may, within one
month from the date of the
advertisement in Gazette, give
notice, in writing, to the Regis-
trar's General's Office of his
opposition to the registration.
At the expiration of the one-
month period for the advertise-
ment, the Registrar may, sub-
ject to any opposition to the
registration and the payment of
the Government fee for regis-
tration, enter the trade mark on
the Official Register of Trade
Marks.
The entry will include the
date of registration, the goods in
respect of which the trade mark
is registered, all particulars
named in Section 3 of the Act,


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MAXISOND DECIUS, HOPE
TOWN, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
fromrn the,,27th; day of-JANUARY, 2905 to thl.Miigtprr.
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,"
Nassau, Bahamas. -' '.


and the trade, business, profes-
sion or occupation of the pro-
prietor and any other particu-
lars that the Registrar may
deem necessary. Upon the reg-
istration of the trade mark, the
Registrar will issue a Certificate
of Registration to the applicant.
Once registration has been
completed and a Certificate of
Registration issued, all regis-
tered trade marks are kept at
the Registry of Records in a
Register of Trade Marks, which
contains the names and address-
es of their proprietors, notifica-
tions of assignments and trans-
missions, disclaimers, condi-
tions, limitations and other mat-
ters relating to the registered
trade marks. The Register of
Trade Marks is kept under the
control and management of the
Registrar General and is open
to inspection by the general
public.
The proprietor of a trade
mark may assign it or allow oth-
ers to use it. However, if a per-
son uses a registered trade mark





Pricing Information As Of:
26 January 2005


without the proprietor's per-
mission or uses a mark that is
likely to be confused with the
registered trade mark, the pro-
prietor can sue that person for
infringement of trade mark and
initiate court action for an
injunction and/or damages, or
an account of profits.
Unregistered trade marks
that may be readily identified
with particular goods and ser-
vices through established use
may be protected by passing off
(for example, conducting one's
business in such a way as to mis-
lead the public into thinking
that one's goods or services are
those of another business) at
common law. It should be not-
ed that an intention to deceive
is not required by common law
in a case of passing off. There-
fore, innocent passing off is
actionable.

@2005. Tyrone L.E. Fitzger-
ald. All rights reserved.
NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not


constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons reading
this article and/or column, gen-
erally, are encouraged to seek
the relevant legal advice and
assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate
to the information presented.

In two weeks' time: Adven-
tures in Cyberspace: E-Com-
merce Legislation in The
Bahamas.


NOTICE


The public is hereby advised that effective
immediately Miss Latoya Paulette Smith
is no longer employed by the law firm of
Ayse Rengin Dengizer Johnson &
Company and is not authorized to conduct
any business on the Company's behalf.


- Colina
SFinancial Advisors Ltd.


)FIDELITYp


BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURTliES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA-& INFORtiATI-ON'
BISK ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.041.22 1 CHG 00.00 I%C4G 00.00 / YTD 172.-92YT/ iaai -.
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS S DIv S PIE Yield
1 39s 1 1'.' ac.:. r.arkeis 1 10 1 10 000 0.197 0000 NiM 0.00%
7 sC 7 30' Bahamas Properrt Funa 8 00 8 00 000 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.75 Bank of Bahamas 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.2 5.74%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.95 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000- 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.87 British American Bank 0.87 0.87 0.00 0.007 0.040 11.8 4.60%
7.25 6.25 Cable Bahamas 7.20 7.20 0.00 0.510 0.240 14.1 3.33%
2.20 1.35 Collna Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.17 6.15 Commonwealth Bank 7.15 7.15 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.3 5.45%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.99 3.99 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.26%
-9.75 8.05 Finco 9.75 9.75 0.00 100 0.649. 0.480 15.0 4.92%
7.50 6.20 FirstCaribbean 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 7.95 Focol 7.95 7.95 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.2 6.29%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete O 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550: 10.5 6.81%
6.27 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.60 5.67 0.07 0.245 0.000 22.9 0.00%
1000 10 00 Pram-er Reali Estate 1000 1000 000 0694 0.350 144 3.50%
Fidelity Ovr-The-Counter Seourttes .: ..
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask S Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S DIv $ PIE Yield
1300 1300 Bahamas Superrr.arkets 1300 1400 1600 1.328 0.960 105 6 86%
10 14 10 00C' Ca'irnbean Crossings (Pref) 1000 1035 1000 0000 0.800 NM 780%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdinas 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
Collar Over-The-Counter 5curwles .
.1300 28 00 -80AB 41 00 43.00 4100 2220 0000 194 000%
16 00 13 00 Bahamas Supermarkets 1300 1400 1300 1.105 0810 14.6 6.93%0
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Usted Mutual Funds : ,
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% LasI 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1 quIn 1r1 RnQ M-- r.yvr.et Mina


1.2060UU
2.0536
10.2148
2.1746
1.0848


1.IOU1509
1.8154
10.0000
2.0012
1.0823


Colina Money ivMarket Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund


2.1191"**
10.2648****
2.174583**
1.084821****


FINDEX: CLOSE 42B.140 / YTD 12.259% 2003 -0.5949% . .
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02= 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit "
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fldellt
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 months
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Clo-n5.lnr5 it-:ri.o..a -. L,'1hts lal12 mdrtlh earning FINDEX Tr.e Flderltr Bahamas Sloak Index January 1 1994= 100
"- AS AT DEC. 31. 20041 .... AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
SAS AT JAN 14, 20051 --AS AT DEC 31. 20041 """ AS AT DEC. 31. 2004
v.^'-,'. *^Or~^DE^LLc~l~^

NOTICE
Will the following persons please contact The Public Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited at 323-6594 as soon as possible.


ADDERLEY
ADDERLEY
BAIN
BARNES
BASTIAN
BASTIAN
BENEBY
BETHEL
BETHEL
BOOTLE
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN-BOWE
BROWN
BROWN
BURROWS
BURROWS
BURROWS
BUTLER
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL
CAMPBELL
CLARKE
CLARKE
CLEAR
COAKLEY-THURSTON
COCKBURN
COLLIE
COOPER
CRIER
CULMER
CUMBERBATCH SR
CUNNINGHAM
CUNNINGHAM
CURRY
CURTIS
DAVIS
DAVIS
DEAN
DEAN
DEVEAUX
DUNCOMBE
FARQUARSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON


MONIQUE
THELMA
GENIEVE
BARBARA
DEBORAH
LATHAN
KERVAMAE
BARRY
BRIAN JAMES
WILLIAM
AUDREY
DAVID
DWAYNE
RICO
SARAMAE
SHARON CT
PETER
GLADYS
LEONARD
WILLITTEE
SAMUEL
ELIZABETH
WALTER
ZOEY
ANDREW
PORTIA
STEPHANIE
JANNIFER
DELLAREESE
STEPHANIE
BECKYW
KENDAL
BARRY
PAUL
SEAN
SHEMICKA
WHITNEY
DOROTHY
PATRICK
PHILIP
BETSYMAE
CYRIL
FREDERICK
WILLIAM
MONIQUE
ANASTAYSA
REV CEPHAS


FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERNANDER
FERNANDER
FORDE
GAY
GIBBS
GIBSON
GIBSON
GILBERT
GRAY
GRAY
GREENE
HALL
HANNA
HENDERSON
HEPBURN
HEPBURN
HUTCHESON
JOHJNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON-SANDS
JOHNSON
JONES
JONES
JOSEY
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
KNOWLES
LAING
LAMM
LAWRENCE
LEWIS
LIGHTBOURNE
LINDSAY
LOCKHART
LUCAS
MACKEY
MACKEY
MACKEY-MOSS
MAJOR-BAIN


DAWSON
DERRICK
KEITH
MICHAEL
YVETTE
CLAYTON
PAUL
EVANGELINE
SAMUEL
SANDRA
OLIVE
PATRICK
EUGENE
CECIL
PATCINA
SHERELLE
STEPHAN
CYNTHIA
CARLA
BRENDA
JOSEPH
LINDA
ISAAC
NATASHA
PHILIP C
PHYLIS
SHIARON
SHEVA
GODREY
KATHRYN
MALFALDA
DONNA
GINGER
SAMUEL
VALENTINE
BERYL
HENRIETTA
ALBERTHA
LEONARD
MICHAEL
VINCENT
VERDELL
JERRY
MADGE
MALCOLM
SANDRAMAE
GENEVA


MAJOR
MCKENZIE
MCKENZIE
MCPHEE
MCPHEE
MICKLWHITE
MISSICK
MITCHELL
MONCUR
MORE
MORLEY
MORGAN
MORTIMER
MOSS
MOTT
MOULTRIE
MURPHY
MURRAY
NIXON
NIXON
NOTTAGE
PARKER
PAUL SAINT
PRATT
QUINTYN
RAHMING
RAHMING
RAHMING
RILEY
ROBERTS
ROBERTS
ROBERTS
ROBERTS
ROBINSON
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLLE
ROLE
RUSSELL
SANDS
SANDS
SANDS
SANDS
SAUNDERS
SCOTT-DEMERITT]


WENDY
PATRINELLA
THERE
GARCIE
LEILA
ANGELA
MAXINE
PHILIP
REGINALD
GENEVA
CRESTINA
RICHARD
LUCILLE
MARILYN
DORAL
RICARDO
GRANVILLE
GEORGINA
HARVEY
KING
ALEXANDER
LEWELN
LESLIE
SYANN
KENNETH
CLARENCE
DAVID
RUVINA
LINDA
GLADYS
GLENDA
LEONARD
PATSY
TREVOR
FLOSSIE
GLEN T
LESSIAH
MELODY
RENNY
VICTOR
HILRON
ELINE P
GLADYS
MARK
RUSSELL
MARIA
E MIRIAM


SEALY
SEYMOUR
SIMMONS
SMALL
SMITH-ADAMS
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
SMITH
STEPHENS
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STRACHAN
STUBBWS
STUBBS
SWAIN
SWAIN
SWAIN
SWEETING
SWEETING
TATE
TAYLOR
TAYLOR
THOMAS
THOMPSON
THURSTON
THURSTON
TUCKER
WHYMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS
WILLAMSON
WILSON-KEMP
WILSON
WOODSIDE
WRIGHT-FORBES
WRIGHT-RAY


LILLIAN
MAXWELL
PATRICIA
CECIL
SYLVIA
CONNIE
DEBORAH J
EDITH
JULIUS
LEOMA
MICHAEL A
PETE
ROSEMARY
VERNELL
WESLEY
MARK
IAN
MARIO
THADDEUS
LUCINE
MARIO
AUSTIN
ESTELL
OLIVE
CHRISTINE
SHELLY
BERTRAM
CHRISTOPHER
ELIZABETH
BEULAH J
NEYMOUR CLAIRE
DWAYNE
SHOWN
GENEIVE C
PRINCE
LESLIE
VALDERINE
VERONICA Y
REV NEWTON
DENISE
SHIRLEY
HERBERT
DEBBIE
SHARON


I BUSINESS


Master Sean
DA'A Testin-
FREF FREE, FREE
Call: 380 8188
Sponsors \\c1comcd
necdcd L-ct',, licip pcopic.
help thelliscl \ C,
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11111S OLIt.









P BUAA22H R


Views (From page 1B)


the impact of the Bill on union
schemes, Mr Ferguson said he
would first need to see a copy of
the draft legislation and con-
duct a cost/benefit analysis to
determine whether it would be
beneficial to workers. He said if
it were found to be beneficial to
the workers he would support it.
Mr Ferguson noted further
that during an upcoming con-
clave for union officials, expect-
ed to be held on February 4, if
they receive a copy of the legis-
lation then the leadership and
members would have an oppor-
tunity to discuss the matter at
length. To date they have not
been invited to participate as a


labour movement.
Robert Farquharson, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Commu-
nications and Public Officers
Union, said the National Con-
gress of Trade Unions, for
which he is general secretary,
and the TUC will vigorously
oppose any regulation that
would attempt to impose addi-
tional costs on members in
regard to either their pension
or medical funds.
He added that union officials
had expressed their concern
regarding the lack of consulta-
tion to both the Minister of
Labour and Immigration, Vin-
cent Peet, and the Prime Min-


Temple Christian High School
Where Excellent Learning Takes Place


ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Grades 7 -10



Entrance Exam for students wishing
to enter Grades 7 10 for
September, 2005 is
scheduled for
Saturday, February 12th, 2005
9:00 am to 12:00 noon.


Registration deadline is
Friday 28th, January.
Students may register at
Temple Christian High School
9:00 am to 4:00 pm.


Students must bring with them the
following:
Pen Pencil Geometry set
First two pages of their Passport.

"Teach Me, 0 Lord, Thy Way"
Psalm 119:33


ister.
Mr Farquharson said the
tabling of the Domestic Insur-
ance Bill was initially brought to
the attention of the NCTU's
executive board yesterday, and
no consultation had taken place
with the either the NCTU or
the TUC.
Most of the larger union bod-
ies, including the Bahamas
Hotel & Catering Allied Work-
ers Union, the Bahamas Union
of Teachers and the Bahamas
Public Services Union, have
some form of pension or med-
ical plan that they operate for
the exclusive use of the union
members.
Mr Farquharson said: "We
have the authority to operate
these funds under the provision
of the Industrial Relations Act.
Section 36 of the Act and union
constitutions gives them the
right to operate these funds,
which have contributed signifi-
cantly to the growth and devel-
opment of unions and the social
development of the member-
ship.


"We have been able to,pro-
vide a much=needed service at
reduced cost so members can
maintain a good standard of liv-
ing. We are deeply concerned
and regret the Government's
attempt to put impediments
that may or may not cause enti-
ties to continue to function as
they do today. The insurance
schemes are optional, members
enter voluntarily, and they are
managed efficiently and prof-
itably."
Not having reviewed the Bill,
Mr Farquharson said the Gov-
ernment should not attempt to
regulate union insurance
schemes, adding that if mem-
bers have a problem or a dis-
crepancy arises, the matter can
be brought to court.
He said further that union
officials will review the speech
made by the Minister of Finan-
cial Services and Investments
and the Bill, and will send com-
ments to the Government.
Meanwhile, Mr Ferguson said
he would not support Minister
of Labour Vincent Peet's


Survey (From page 1B)


To overcome some of these
issues, the Commission has sug-
gested that NIB improve its
links with other government
agencies such as the Business
Licence Office, with companies
not up to date with their contri-
butions seeing their Business
Licences withheld.
This proposal received strong
support from the 123 people
surveyed, with 75 per cent
agreeing that only employers
and self-employed persons who
were current with their NIB
payments should have their
business licences renewed. Only
16 per cent objected to this.
If enacted, such a proposal
would currently impact major
businesses such as the Royal
Oasis Crowne Plaza & Gold
Resort, which is $2.5 million in
arrears, plus the government-
owned Bahamasair, which did
not pay.$5 million worth of con-
tributions between October
1990 and October 1997. Both
companies would face not hav-
ing their Business Licences
renewed.
The next most popular
reform for NIB as reducing
administrative costs, which in
2003 accounted for more than
10 per cent of total benefits and


contributions.
The seventh Actuarial
Review of the NIB Fund noted
that operating costs remained
too high, accounting for 19.2
per cent of contribution costs
in 2001. The Commission itself
said the NIB should target
reducing this to 10 per cent of
contribution income by 2014,
with the most effective way of
achieving this seen as staff cuts
and efficiency improvements.
The third most popular
reform for NIB was increasing
contributions, with 23.7 per cent
in favour of such a move.
In addition, some 49 per cent
of those surveyed supported the
introduction of an unemploy-
ment benefit, with 26 per cent
opposing this and 25 per cent
undecided.
The Commission is recom-
mending that a "modest" unem-
ployment benefit scheme be
introduced, with the NIB pro-
viding administration. However,
a separate Unemployment
Fund would be established, and
the contribution rate would be
different from to NIB.
The move to' .create an
Unemployment Benefit is being
opposed by employers, who
have pointed out that the
Employment Act already
includes provision for redun-
dancy pay.


attempt to amend the Industri-
al Relations Act. He said he
would not support any position
that would have a retroactive
clause included in the Act.
He added: "We have a prob-
lem with the way the depart-
ment is functioning, that is the
reason why the relationship we
have with the minister is
strained. It does not make
sense to have a Department of
Labour that does not serve as a
buffer between the employer
and employee."
Referring to Aquapure's ter-
mination of 11 persons, Mr Fer-
guson said that when a situa-
tion develops that has that
many people terminated both
employer and unions are mak-
ing accusations, but the Depart-
ment of Labour is treating it as
a normal dispute then there is
a problem. He said the purpose
of the Industrial Relations Tri-
bunal was to deal with such
matters expeditiously.
Mr Ferguson said: "You can't


take 11 persons and treat them
normally for the next 12 or 24
months. The system is not
working for the employer or for
the employee. Everybody
wants the matter to be dealt
with as quickly as possible and
all of the parties expect the
Department of Labour to be
proactive to get them to where
they need to be. The Govern-
ment should advise the Tribunal
that it is their duty to hear those
matters."


To advertise in

The Tribune
call 322-1986


Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL TURKMENISTAN
(OFFSHORE) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000, notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 21st day of December A.D., 2004.

Dated the 25th day of January A.D., 2005.


By: (2C
G.R. Huff, Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL TURKMENISTAN
(OFFSHORE) LIMITED


Michael,


Need to save?


Cable Beach: 327-5170
Frederick Street: 325-8591
Mackey Street: 393-8270
Paradise Island: 363-4225
Wulff Road: 323-7459
Freeport: 352-6676


Michael saves with British American Bank
because they give the highest rate available.
Michael gets more interest on his savings
than savers with other banks.

Whatever your savings goals, reach them with
British American Bank. We offer several high
interest paying savings accounts and CDs.
Call or visit British American Bank today.

We WANT to help you save money.
We give you STRAIGHT talk.
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WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

British American Bank. A Fidelity Company
-x 01111n


NOTICE


Committed to Growth, Committed to Quality


REDUCED WATER

SUPPLY


The Water and Sewerage Corporation

advises customers throughout New

Providence that reduced water supply

continues.



Customers are asked to continue to store

water during peak periods 5am to 10am

and 4pm to 10pm daily.



The Corporation apologizes for the

inconvenience caused and thanks

customers for their patience.


t








<)
FLFL












L*


Questions or complaints, please call 325-0505 (days)

and 325-4504 (nights).


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THF- TI NEU D JU Y ,0P E


Bahamas First eyes




overseas possibilities


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
I an Fair, Bahamas
First's chairman, yes-
terday said this
nation's largest gen-
eral insurance carrier
had considered expanding
beyond the Bahamas, although
it had not identified any acqui-
sition opportunities yet and
such a move was not a priority.
"We've talked about this
and it's certainly something we
should look at," Mr Fair said
yesterday. Adding that an
overseas move was "not
beyond the realms of possibil-
ity", he added: "Don't be sur-
prised if we do look at some
sort of expansion."
The Bahamas First chair-
man said the company, which
last year acquired the portfolio
of Colina General Insurance,
was "certainly in acquisition
mode if the right opportuni-
ties are out there".
Any moves towards inter-
national expansion, though,
lay in the future, but Bahamas
First continues to examine
both domestic and foreign pos-
sibilities.
Mr Fair added that
Bahamas First would also sup-
port amendments to the
exchange control regime that
would allow the company to
invest a portion of its insur-
ance reserves and assets out-
side the Bahamas.
Restricted to just investing
in the Bahamas, the company
was "not getting the returns
we would like to see" and was
unable to achieve the level of
portfolio diversification it
desired.
Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First's group president and
chief executive, said that the
average increase in hurricane
insurance premiums for 2005
was 25-30 per cent "across the
board", although these would


be higher for clients in hurri-
cane-prone areas.
He added that he was
unsure whether there would
be any impact if the Govern-
ment reversed its policy on
Bahamian-only ownership of
insurance agencies and bro-
kers, as many clients were par-
ticularly loyal to a specific
agency, making it hard for for-
eign agents to enter the mar-
ket.
Bahamas First, which has
held its A- (Excellent) finan-


cial strength rating from the
A. M. Best insurance agency
since 1999, and dealt with
3,000 claims resulting from the
September hurricanes, said
dissatisfaction on the part of
some clients over the speed
with which claims were paid
was due in part to the fact that
loss adjusters were extremely
stretched by the region-wide
damage.
The company's new head-
quarters, which officially opens
today and houses 45 staff, is


expected to boost customer
service and operational effi-
ciencies by moving all
Bahamas First's operations
into one location.
The complex includes a cov-
ered vehicle inspection area
complete with a hoist for dri-
ve-in claims. New computer
systems will be installed later
this year.
Bahamas First is also unveil-
ing a new brand: 'Bahamas
First. First in Insurance.
Today. Tomorrow.'


is seeking to employ a

CLIENT ACCOUNTANT
to work within our organization. The candidate should be young,
energetic and successful at achieving corporate goals with little supervision.
Understanding of Spanish or Portuguese will be favoured.

The candidate should be an advanced student OR have solid
accounting knowledge supported by formal education/examination
passes. Sound knowledge of Microsoft Office applications, with
particular aptitude in Excel and Outlook.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience and education.

All CVs should be addressed to the Assistant
Vice President Banking & Finance and should be sent to:
nassau@winterbotham.com
or fax #242 356 9432.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, YVONNE E. ADDERLEY -
PRATT of Elizabeth Est., P.O.Box EE 17070, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to YVONNE ELAINE STORR. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.




ABACO IKET S


ACCOUNTS CLERK

POSITION AVAILABLE
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco

This position requires individual with general
accounting experience whose main responsibilities
will be the auditing of cash in retail locations.

Qualification to include:

Associate Degree in accounting
Previous experience in same or similar position.


Skills to include:

Microsoft Word and Excel
Excellent communication (both written and
verbal) skills
Strong organizational skills.

Please send r6sum6
Attention: Human Resources
Accounts Clerk
P.O. Box SS-6322
Nassau, Bahamas

Or Fax; 242-356-7855


Niagara Christian Collegiate


am\I-I


Share our hope for a new generation!


* Safe, supervised, family-like environment
* New residences for boys and girls
* Caring and dedicated faculty, small class sizes
* 360 students: 2/3 Canadian, 1/3 international from 20 countries
* Beautiful campus on Niagara River, a short drive from Niagara
Falls & Toronto
* Private Middle School (grades 7 & 8) and High School
(grade 9 to 12/pre-university)
* Comprehensive co-curricular and residential programs
* Distinguished university placement rate
* Established in 1932... rich tradition & heritage


Diane Kon, Director of Enrollment Management at NCC, will be hosting
personal family visits at the Comfort Suites Paradise Island on Tuesday, February 1, 2005.


Please contact Mrs. Kon directly by email (dianek@niagaracc.com) or by phone (905-871-6980) to schedule
your private visit where you will discover for yourself exactly what it is that sets NCC apart from the rest!


Niagara Christian Collegiate 2619 Niagara Parkway, Fort Erie, Ontario, CANADA Phone 905-871-6980 www.niagaracc.com
----- --- ------.. . .. .. .. ... ... .... ....... .... .. .. .. ... . . ... .... .. .. .. .. .. .... -- - - - -


II1 I ........


"


BUSINESS


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


\









P B5 TRIB


Holiday Inn gets




new name and




$ l/2m facelift


PROPERTY MANAGER /

ELECTRICAL &

MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN
Required for large private estate, an enthusiastic,
hands-on, and hard-working team-player to maintain
all technical aspects of a new state-of-the-art facility.
Must have certified qualifications in electrical or
mechanical engineering, good communication and
computer skills, and be willing to learn and deal with all
aspects of estate management.
Position involves:
repair and maintenance of all plant and
equipment, including HVAC, RO, generator,
pools (heater and filtration equipment),
irrigation, automatic lighting, security and
audio-visual systems etc.
managing maintenance of grounds and
beachfront
supply ordering and inventory control
Experience:
at least 2 years in maintenance department of
large private estate, upscale hotel or similar.
Previous supervisory experience is preferred.
A good remuneration package is available for the right
candidate depending on qualifications and experience.
Interested parties please fax or email resume to M Antone
on 362-6704 magdyantone@yahoo.com.
Applications must be received by llth February, 2005.


hotel will commit $500,000 to
guestroom and public space
improvements at the 185-room
property. All improvements
will be made with minimal
impact to the guests' experi-
ence during their stay.
Managed by Driftwood Hos-
pitality Management, LLC, a
decision was made to operate
the hotel independently. To
mark the change, the property
was renamed.
Driftwood is also expected


EarthLink to expand

in telecoms services


By BILL HUSTED
Cox News Service
ATLANTA A $440 milli
on partnership between
EarthLink and SK Telecom will
sell wireless data services along
with the eventual ability to
deliver music, games and video
to high-end cellular telephones.
Oh, and you'll be able to
make cellular voice calls, too.
The partnership, announced


Monday, created a joint ven-
ture called SK-EarthLink. It
gives South Korea-based SK
Telecom a foothold in the
American market, and the
Atlanta-based Internet provider
gets a strong partner to enlarge
its presence in telecommunica-
tions.
The goal isn't to compete
with mass-market cellular giants
like Cingular or Verizon, said
Brent Cobb, EarthLink's vice
president of wireless.
The venture will target two
market segments: professionals
who are already heavy users of
voice and data services, and
what Cobb called the "vanity
market" of customers who one-
up each other with advanced
cellphone features. Cobb said
such customers should be will-
ing to pay a premium price.
EarthLink already has a toe-
hold in the cellular voice and
data business, offering a service
mostly to owners of BlackBerry -
,devices that combines voice .
See PHONE, Page 9B


to continue to upgrade the
operations while maintaining
the current policies and part-
nerships as enjoyed with the
Holiday Inn brand.
"We are very excited to have
this opportunity to make these
capital improvements and we
look forward to a stronger
product for our valued guests"
says Larry Williams, the
resort's general manager.
Driftwood Hospitality Man-
agement is based in Jupiter,


Florida.
It owns and/or manages 26
hotels comprising approxi-
mately 7,200 rooms through-
out the US, Caribbean and
Latin America.
Many of the company's
hotels are affiliated with
recognized hospitality fran-
chises, including Crowne Plaza,
Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn
Select, Holiday Inn Sunspree,
Doubletree, Radisson, Shera-
ton and Wyndham.


LEADING LAW FIRM
invites applications for attorneys for our Freeport
,Office.

Applicants must have a minimum of 4-6 years
experience in Litigation and Conveyancing,
demonstrate an ability to work independently and
possess a thorough working knowledge and technical
competence in the areas mentioned. (Applicants with
experience in only one of the mentioned areas may
also apply).

Successful applicants can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits.

Apply in confidence to:

Vacancy
P.O.Box N449
Nassau, Bahamas -


"COMMITTED TO COMPLIANCE"








Invites you to attend it's










Friday, February 4th, 2005
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
Bay Street

Cocktails: 7:00 pm
Dinner: 8:00 pm

Dress: Semi-Formal
Price: $75

For tickets contact:
Denora Butler @ 356-1936
Marsha Ferguson @ 502-3142


At this premier event the award for Compliance Professional of The Year 2004
will be presented. This year, in order to ensure the widest representation of the
Compliance Profession, we have broadened the category, which is evidenced by
the substitution of Compliance Officer with the words Compliance Professional.

This award recognizes the Compliance Professional who has distinguished him/herself
by enhancing the areas of anti-money laundering and/ or compliance, within his/her
respective financial institution and/ or has a general commitment to the promotion
of Compliance within the Bahamas' Financial Services industry.

The Award ceremony is also an opportunity the BACO to enhance awareness of
the compliance function and to encourage membership in BACO. This will mark
the third year of the awards ceremony.

The award recipient will receive a fully-paid scholarship to attend the tripartite
BACO/INTERNATIONAL COMPLIANCE ASSOCIATION/ BAHAMAS
INSTITUTE OF FINANCIAL SERVICES compliance and anti-money laundering
international diploma course or (for those who are already enrolled in the programme),
an award of up to $2000 for attendance at an international compliance/ anti-money
laundering conference during 2005 (winner's choice).


MUST SELL


i. ..^,A.. N.
h AWib "" t .... : B,--.-B., ..








Two Storey Commercial Building 4025 sq. ft.
Comprising a Motel with eight 1 Bed/ 1 Bath units and Two commercial stores on the ground
floor
Lot No. 151 8,704sq.ft. Bay Street, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
Interested persons should submit written offers to be received no later than February 28, 2005 to:
Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P.O.Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas or
For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Manager (242) 335-1464 or (242) 335-1400 North Eleuthera or
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit Phone: 356-1686,356-1685, 356-1608
Financing available for the qualified purchaser
Serious enquiries only


The Holiday Inn Nassau at
Junkanoo Beach is set to
undergo a name change and a
$500,000 renovation and refur-
bishment exercise, Driftwood
Hospitality officials announced
yesterday.
Renamed the Nassau Palm
Resort and Conference Cen-
tre, in a move to capitalise on
its location on the New Provi-
dence waterfront, and to
increase its market position
among mid-level resorts, the


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

CONSTRUCTION OF 34.5 KV "ASH", AAAC THREE-PHASE
TRANSMISSION LINE
CROSSING ROCKS, ABACO, BAHAMAS

TENDER No. 563/04
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
construction of approximately 16.5 miles of 34.5 KV "ASH" AAAC 3-phase
transmission line with all associated hardware mounted on single wood poles from
CROSSING ROCK to SANDY POINT, Abaco, Bahamas.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
SBlue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 23 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 563/04
"LINE CONSTRUCTION CROSSING ROCK, ABACO"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













Bahamasair consultant


granted $lm


contract


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
Bradley Roberts,
minister of works
and public utili-
ties, yesterday
reiterated the
Government's commitment to
privatising Bahamasair by sum-
mer's end 2005, adding that it,
along with public and private
concerns, would maintain a con-
trolling stake in the airline as a
foreign partner is brought on
board.
Mr Roberts was speaking
during the official announce-
ment that the Government had
retained the services of McK-
insey and Company as the pri-
vatisation consultants to
Bahamasair for $1 million. At
the end of a four-month con-
sultation period, McKinsey and
Co will have identified prospec-
tive partners, sources of funding
and capital, and prepared a
framework for an initial public
offering (IPO).
"The intention of this exer-
cise with McKinsey and Co is
to attract a foreign partner who
will own less than 50 per cent of
the equity in a national flag car-
rier, while Bahamians and the
Government will own the
majority of equity," Mr Roberts
said.
"To qualify as a national flag
carrier with all of the attendant
benefits and advantages rela-
tive to route and gate rights, the
airline would have to be major-
ity owned and effectively man-
aged by locals. We are confi-
dent that sufficient local capi-
tal exists to invest in a well-func-
tioning, low cost profitable
national flag carrier."
He further indicated that the
Government is more likely to
be willing to negotiate with
potential partners to reach an
hamicable-position, saying thai


unlike the privatization process
involving the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC), where the government
declined to undersell one of its
biggest assets, Bahamasair was
a liability.
Bahamasair's total liabilities
of $120 million exceed its assets
by almost $90 million, with
long-term debt totaling some
$45.5 million.
Mr Roberts further suggested
that Bahamasair's union, the
Airport, Airline and Allied
Workers Union (AAAWU),
would not be allowed to stand
in the way of the privatization
process, saying union members
were not naive and pointing out
that employees of US-based
legacy carriers have had to
engage in significant compro-
mises to maintain their jobs
and keep their airline afloat.
On Tuesday, Bahamasair's
managing director, Paul Major,


said no further discussions have
taken place.with union officials
since their refusal to accept a
reduction in salaries and bene-
fits as part of the airline's plan
to reduce the $22 million loss it
faces incurring in fiscal 2005.
Mr Roberts said also that
along with McKinsey and Com-
pany, a privatization committee
comprising of knowledgeable
professionals from the airline
and related industries, includ-
ing the Ministry of Tourism, the
Ministry of Finance, the Hotel
Corporation and the Airport
Authority, has been formed to
move the process forward.

To advertise in
The Tribune
call 322-1986


LEGAL NOTICE
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000)

EUR CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), EUR
CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in
Dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution is
23rd day of December, 2004.
N J M Bell
of Malzard House,
15 Union Street, St. Helier, Jersey,
Channel, Islan& ,,,
Liquidator m .,


VACANCY NOTICE


A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of New Providence, is
presently seeking the following:


Position:


Brewer


Duties Include:

Manage the brewing process from start to finish:
Identify deviations from standard;
Beer filtration.
Perform quality control analysis as required.
Clean and sanitize all equipment.
Work with various types of chemicals;

Minimum Requirements:

Associates Degree: Biology, Chemistry or Technical area;
Three years experience in a technical environment;
Strong communication, administrative, time management skills and
reporting skills;
Excel spreadsheet usage at an intermediate level a must;
Proficiency in Word applications required;
Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong commitment
to detail and good analytical skills.

The Ideal Candidate:

Must be a team player that is willing to support the efforts of the
team or any team member.
The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative with little supervision.
Must have good communication skills.
Must be able to function in a shift system.

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available to the
successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to the
address below no later than January 31st, 2005.

Human Resources Manager
Commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas

or

Fax: 1-242-362-4793


I U


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF GROUP MAJOR
MEDICAL & LIFE INSURANCES SERVICES FOR
EMPLOYEES & RETIREES
TENDER No. 576/04
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of group major medical and life insurances services for employees and
their dependants and retirees.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Demeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 16 February 2005 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 576/04
"GROUP MAJOR MEDICAL AND LIFE INSURANCES PLAN"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.






CONTRACTOR

PRE-QUALIFICATION

College of The Bahamas Performing Arts Centre


Building Contractors are invited to PRE-QUALIFY for the
Modification of The College of The Bahamas Auditorium, and
its conversion to The Performing Arts Centre, to be situated
at Thompson Boulevard, New Providence, Bahamas.

The Project will comprise part demolition and modification
of the Existing 2 storey Auditorium approximately six
thousand two hundred square feet in area (6,200 sq. ft.), and
the construction of some twelve thousand square feet (12,000
sq. ft) on new space incorporating a fifty-six feet (56 ft.) high
Stage House, Dressing Rooms, Workshops, Foyer and
Entrance Walkways, Toilets and Administration space.

Interested contractors may collect pre-qualification documents
at:

Office of the Vice President, Research, Planning &
Development
The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-4308

There will be a non-refundable Fee of $100 for each document,
(cash or certified cheque made payable to The College of
The Bahamas.)

Sealed pre-qualification submissions will be received until
4:00 p.m., Thursday 27th January 2005 at the office of the
Estates Manager, 2nd Floor Portia M. Smith Student Services
Centre, The College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive.


,o, E COLL EGE OF TIHE BA AMAS
'o-- our wbiiJt f kwrohted


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


. 2 %- LJ, I I IV I I, -l IMVI -%JFlI r- /, r uuc)


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLY JOSEPH OF #150
FAWCETT LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20TH day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085,
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.


Legal Notice


NOTICE


POMORE DEVELOPMENT INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
POMORE DEVELOPMENT INC., is in dissolution, as of
January 25th, 2005.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.


Legal Notice


NOTICE


TRAPMORE MANAGEMENT INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
TRAPMORE MANAGEMENT INC., is in dissolution, as of
January 25th, 2005.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.


Insure (From page 1B)


Allyson Maynard-Gibson



.. ,. :
51:" ... '**'~ S '^ a a
..
r :. ,^ :




.^ ...


:ad\tsing chenti on the policies
best-suited to their needs".
Direct selling was one of the
'three sticking points' for the
Domestic Insurance Bill cur-
rently being debated by Parlia-
ment, with the Government
eventually deciding to maintain
the status quo and prohibit this
in regard to general insurance
products.
Security & General was the
one general insurance carrier
that lobbied heavily in favour
of direct selling. The carrier cur-
rently writes 35 per cent of its
portfolio direct, and also works
with 24 intermediaries who
write policies and collect pre-
miums for it.
Marc Shirra, Security & Gen-
eral's general manager, told The
Tribune last year that permit-
ting direct selling would
enhance consumer choice and
market competition.
However, Mr Ward yester-
day said he did not "buy into
the notion" that permitting
direct selling would reduce pre-
mium rates for consumers.
Although carriers would not
have to pay the 15-17 per cent
commission agents and brokers
normally received, they would
have the added burden of cre-
ating their own distribution net-
work and building an "infra-
structure" normally provided
by agents. As a result, costs for
general insurance carriers would
rise, meaning that any saving
on commissions would be wiped
out.
Mr Shirra last year said many
insurance agencies were effec-
tively 'tied agencies', and either
through a strategic alliance or
because a general insurance car-
rier had a stake in their busi-
ness of vice versa, wrote busi-
ness for just one company.
He added that this was a form,


of direct selling withoutt the
agencies involved taking on any
risk, and added: "The phrase
that describes this is 'substance
over form'. In other words,
except for the fact that the
agent doesn't take any risk,
these entities are effectively
writing direct."
Mr Ward yesterday agreed
that tied agencies was effec-
tively a form of direct selling,
but said "it proves the case"
about carriers having to estab-
lish their own infrastructure if
they sold direct.
He gave the example of Nas-
sau Underwriters Cole Albury
(NUCA) and Moseley Burn-
side, both agencies owned 100
per cent by Bahamas First, hav-
ing to be absorbed into the
company's operations.
"I'm not sure if there are any
savings from that," he added.
Ian Fair, Bahamas First's
chairman, said the agency sys-
tem had "worked very well for
the Bahamas" and was "a very
fair way of doing business".
Mr Ward described as "a lit-
tle bit of a red herring" com-
ments by the minister of finan-
cial services and investments
that all changes to policy forms
and rates would have to be
approved by the newly-created
Insurance Commission going
forward.
The Tribune reported earlier
this week how Allyson May-
nard-Gibson had caused confu-
sion in the industry by telling
the House of Assembly: "Insur-
ers will have to obtain approval
from the [Insurance] Commis-
sion for new forms and rates. It
will not be possible in the future
for insurers to make changes in
policy wordings or premium
rates without having to justify
proposed changes to the Com-
-mission.",


Mr Ward said the industry
Working Group had discussed
the issue of changes to policy
forms having to be approved by
the regulator. However, he
understood the minister's
remarks on rates to "relate to a
much more narrow product
range than has been implied" -
certain life nd health insurance
product lines.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson was
asked to clarify this in the
House of Assembly yesterday,
but responded that this would
have to be sought from the Reg-
istrar of Insurance.
Mr Ward said that requiring


general insurance companies to
receive regulatory approval,-
before changing their rates ,
would make it "cumbersome" -
to conduct business in the,.:
Bahamas, and could drive some ;
businesses away because it',i
would increase administrative ,,
costs that this nation, unlike
Florida, could not absorb
because of the market size. ,
The Bahamas First president, ,i
though, said the Government ,*
and the insurance industry now ,
had to concentrate on getting -
the regulations that will support
the Domestic Insurance Bill in
place.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 ,
and share your story. 0


VACANCY NOTICE

BAHAMASAIR EMPLOYEES
PROVIDENT FUND

Is seeking candidates for the position of
Receptionist

The successful candidate should have:-

A high school diploma or equivalent, with
a focus on business and three (3) years
related work experience.
Effective communication skills, and the
ability to work comfortably and successfully
with the public
Proficiency in using Microsoft Office.

Please forward resumes to:

Fund Administrator
P.O.Box N-4050
Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: providentfund(a)coralwave.com


-st l ,.,. .... .- A,,/ .,. \. ."

Changin- .Tht' Fare Of Healthca

Through Education& Partner,5hip


Balmoral Room N

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Cable Beach, New Providen(: Bahamras

Cost: $175 iOp' ide


..j.~vqTieclov




f', 1I V ': a ow 'a n1rcj jHkIEA.WI ini n. T.

SDibussion: Trehe Na-tion-aI H;- a Ith In slu:an.ce hP! ran


- f vie


..Among Othels


For additional information or to reserve seating
Tel: 502-7801/502-7871
or Email us at: bahamashls@yahoo.com


Cititrust (Bahamas) limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a
leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries and
over 100 million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of

APPLICATION SUPPORT

FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION
Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore
trust companies servicing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas,
Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and
Singapore. Products target wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.
The Technology Department supports all locations and local applications
of the business.
MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES
Production support of software for key application.
Provide application support technically to the business which
includes the detection and resolution of issues.
Assist application support Project Managers where
necessary.
Interfacing with the information security management
structure,
Management of risk and assist in coordination of audit.
KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED
SQL and Oracle programming and/or DBA experience, Visual
Basic, Citrix, Crystal Reports, Net, Win2K, Web technologies,
MS Office applications, DBMS knowledge, programming skills
in a windows environment.
Strong oral and written communications skills.
Interfacing with the business, internal and external vendor
management, and bug tracking.
Influencing and leadership skills.
Historic programming experience with languages and web
applications
2-4 years DBA hands-on programming experience.
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR
Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com
Deadline for application is February 6, 2005.


~~1


































I













V
V
V

V


BUSINESS


Fevlw il.


i~nmmunl~drlrt: t~iioctively








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 9B


Phone (From page 6B)
calling with the ability to use U.S.
the Internet. The 30,000 cus- "under,
tomers for that service will oriented
immediately be served by the said.
joint venture. The first of the But
new services should be avail- compare
able by year-end. data s,
By 2009, the two companies Kagan,
expect the venture will have a telecom
nationwide business with 3 mil- "The
lion customers still a drop in tuning t
the bucket compared with the video, T
approximately 49 million sub- ing acr(
scribers to Cingular, the largest said.
U.S. cellular provider. "Ho
SK-EarthLink expects those 3 they (th
million customers to produce use exi,
revenue of $2 billion by 2009. so if this
That's a significant boost for these se
EarthLink, said Michael Grossi, ers can
senior vice president at the Kaga
Adventis analyst firm in New fact tha
York City. not ow
"If you assume that (Earth- Instead
Link's) core Internet business vices.
will be about $1.5 billion in 2009 Eart
... then the $2 billion in revenues declined
will basically mean that it dou- it will u
bles the size of the company in relation
just five years," Grossi said. and Spi
"That's why this is so attrac- Earth
tive." have 5i
The venture plans to eventu- Each c
ally offer music that can be three n
downloaded and played on the Link's s
phone, downloadable videos, or The v
even telephones that can pin- ly 70 ei
point the locations of nearby have 10
friends. Spok
Those features are why the where i
joint venture will succeed, said located.
Garry Betty, EarthLink's chief Cobb
executive, senior


wireless customers are
served by existing voice-
d wireless operators," he"
conventional cellular
nies already offer many
services, said Jeffrey
a Marietta, Ga.-based
u analyst.
major networks are all
up their speed, pictures,
V, with everything com-
oss the phone," Kagan
w is this different? And
he venture) are going to
sting wireless networks,
s new company can offer
services, the actual carri-
offer it, too."
an was referring to the
at the joint venture will
n the networks it uses.
, it will buy network ser-
hLink spokesmen
d to identify the carriers
se, but Kagan said past
ships suggest Verizon
tint are likely suppliers.
iLink and SK will each
0 percent ownership.
company will appoint
members to SK-Earth-
six-person board.
enture already has near-
mployees and plans to
0 by year-end.
esmen declined to say
ts headquarters will be
b, who will become a
executive with the ven-


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

PEACHES N'CREAM HOLDING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 25th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are .Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


NOTICE



Notice is hereby given that ELSIE
PHILIPPE of Fox Hill Road, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship for Registration/
Naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas
and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts
within Twenty-eight (28) days from the
3rd day of February 2005 to the Minster
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
RO.Box N-7147 Nassau, The Bahamas."




ABACOMARETS

Financial Controller
POSITION AVAILABLE
in Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Responsibilities to include

Financial management of several accounts
Preparation of financial statements and other
reports as required
Focus on Internal Audit
Monitoring of control procedures (with the ability
to recommend and implement new systems)
Annual budget preparation
Reconciliation of all General Ledger Accounts
Inventory Reconciliation
Management of accounting team.

Qualification to include:

CPA or CA qualifications
Minimum of three years working experience in
same or similar position.

Interested persons should send r6sum6 to

P.O. Box SS-6322
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Human Resources
Re: Financial Controller
or Fax: 242-356-7855


ture, said about $180 million in
cash came from EarthLink and
$220 million from SK Telecom,
with $40 million of the invest-
ment non-cash.
He said the venture will go
after the "BMW side of the
market ... we will charge more
than most of the carriers."
Cobb said a typical monthly
bill for voice and data services
might be $50 from other carri-
ers. He speculated it might be
around $70 from SK-EarthLink.
He said the convenience of a
bundled Internet and cellular
bill, along with EarthLink's
experience in stopping spami e-
mail, viruses and spyware, will
help make the premium palat-
able.


Despite Kagan's reservations,
he noted that while the 3 million
customer target "is a small num-
ber for a telephone company,
but as an add-on service to
an ISP it is respectable, espe-
cially if they (subscribers) are
big spenders."
Kagan said "traditional ISPs
are not going to grow unless
they expand into places like
phones and television. Cell-
phones are a natural addition
for a certain customer seg-
ment."
Sky Dayton, EarthLink's
founder, will be the chief exec-
utive of the joint venture.
EarthLink's stock closed at
$10.43, up 15 cents in Wednes-
day's trading.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VERLINE LOUIS, LIFEBOUY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice


NOTICE

GETHEN CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at
Bleicherweg 58, CH-8027, Zurich, Switzerland as sole Liquidator
on or before the 9th day of February, 2005. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the
Liquidator.

Dated the 25th day of January, 2005.

RYAN RUDOLPH
LIQUIDATOR





NOTICE



Notice is hereby given that
JACKSON EMILE PHILIPPE of Fox Hill
Road, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
for Registration/ Naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted
should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within Twenty-eight
(28) days from the 3rd day of February
2005 to the Minster responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147 Nassau, The Bahamas."



TRADEINVEST ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD.
A private Wealth Management Company and medium-sized
Family Office
Has an opening for an
ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT ADMINISTRATION
Applicants must:
Be a qualified attorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders
will also be considered.
Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in
any of the areas of trust, banking or investments.
Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents
relating to special projects and to confidently communicate with
overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.
Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project,
coordinating its various parts and managing the team associated with
the same.
Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary
structures.
Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic
understanding of investment and financial transactions.
Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant
supervisor.
Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Successful candidate will work directly with the President of Tradelnvest
in the management of complex private fiduciary arrangements.
Responsibilities include regular contact with overseas affiliates, associated
trust, banking and investment professionals, as'well as legal counsel and
advisors.
Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and
Confidential to:
The President,
TradeInvest Assest Management Ltd.,
West Building,
Lyford Manor, Lyford Cay,
P.O. Box N-7776 (Slot 193),
New Providence, Bahamas.,
Applications must be received by 28th January, 2005.


NOTICE



Notice is hereby given that WALLES
EMILE PHILIPPE of Fox Hill Road, is
applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship for
Registration/ Naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted
should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within Twenty-eight
(28) days from the 3rd day of February
2005 to the Minster responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-
7147 Nassau, The Bahamas."



LEGAL SECRETARY

A commercial law chambers invites applications for the
position of Legal Secretary for a corporate and commercial
attorney.

Qualifications:

Bachelors or Associate of Arts Degree in
Secretarial/Administrative Studies, or equivalent
professional qualificationss.
Five (5) years secretarial/administrative experience in
a law firm or financial institution.

Skills and Personal Qualities:

Superior knowledge and experience of MS Word, MS
Outlook, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint.
Knowledge of conveyancing, mortgages, company
formation and administration, commercial transactions
and anti-money laundering and compliance legislation
and regulations.
Effective leadership, interpersonal, and communication
skills. ,
Strong time-management and organizational skills.
High initiative and motivation.
Team player.

Benefits:

Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications, group medical and life insurance, and
excellent vacation package.

Interested persons should apply no later than Friday, 28th
January, 2005 to:

Law Chambers
P.O. Box CB-11173
Nassau, The Bahamas

email: LegalSecretary_@msn.com


S
S
S
S
.5

S
-SS
-S
S
S
-S
-S
S
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I BUSINESS


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

CORAL ISLAND HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 12th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice

NOTICE

GETHEN CORPORATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) GETHEN CORPORATION is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
24th January, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr Ryan Rudolph
of Bleicherweg 58, CH-8027, Zurich, Switzerland as sole
Liquidator.
Dated the 25th day of January, 2005
H & J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company







TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


Bahamas is set for some




first class sporting action


LET'S bring them on.
First Class Promo-
tions' first promotional box-
ing show can't come any
sooner than when it's sched-
uled for February 25, right
around the same time that
the annual Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic for senior
boys is being staged.
It's going to be an exciting
time for sports in New Prov-
idence.
I don't know which one
will take more of the spot-
light. But at least there will
be more than enough action
to tickle the fancy of both set
of avid fans.
Promoter Michelle Minus
and her match-making hus-
band, Ray Minus Jr., could-
n't have pit two greater box-
ers to square off for the
vacant Bahamas light-mid-
dleweight title in the main
event.
'Bahamian Bronze
Bomber' Jerome Ellis has
been the biggest name to sur-
face between the two. But
Wilson 'Kid Wonder'
Theophile has been slowly
building a reputation of his
own.
So who has the edge?
It's going to be hard to say
right now because none of
the fighters have been tested
by going past six rounds in a
fight. They will both need to
step it up, if they are going to


STUBBS


ler. Granted that Butler lost
his debut in a bloodied deci-
sion, but Tynes has not last-
ed long against any other
quality fighter he faced
before he retired.

First Class Promotions
should be commend-
ed for taking the sport back
to the hotel. The Wyndham
Nassau Resort & Crystal
Palace Casino has been
the ideal place for some
top notch boxing in the
past.


Look for this to be just the
beginning of great things to
come in the future, especial-
ly with some of the plans that
First Class Promotions have
lined up.
The anticipated bout
between challenger Jermaine
'Cho-Cho' Mackey against
champion 'Marvelous' Mar-
vin Smith for the Bahamas
welterweight crown should
be looked forward to just as
much as the hyped up heavy-
weight showdown between
challenger Sherman 'the
Tank' Williams and champi-


on Renaldo 'the Terminator'
Minus.
It's one of those fights that
you can't wait for.
The same can be said
about this year's Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic.

If the hype continues
the way it's going, the
road to the final four in the
February extravaganza for
senior boys basketball teams
should be one that no bas-
ketball fanatic would want
to miss.


Can a New Providence
team repeat as champions or
will the title go back again
to Grand Bahama?
The 32 teams invited to
participate in this year's
Classic have been released.
But it's still too early to
make any predictions on who
could win it all without look-
ing at the four pools where
they will be stacked when
they play from February 21-
28 at the AF Adderley Gym.
We just have to wait until
all the action unfolds next
month.


OPINION


survive the late rounds.
But this is what the fisted
sport is all about.
Except for the matchup
between Jerry 'Big Daddy'
Butler and James 'Kid
Freeport' Tynes, the under-
card seems to be a pretty
good one.
I just don't think that
Tynes has the ability to stand
up against a fighter like But-


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CUBIER VILLAGE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 24th day of
January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and
Ingrid Davis, of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

RUDE AWAKENING INVESTMENTS
LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 21st day of
January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and
Ingrid Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


AL ANZ CO. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 21st day of
January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and
Ingrid Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BEALTO MOUNTAINS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 24th day of
January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and
Ingrid Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

NORTHERN NATION LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 21st day of
January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and
Ingrid Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


MUn I td thehtw'


*=am .0 ow f "w 4m 4
*:E !*____ _o_


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROBEN ETIENNE, NORTH
PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


ZINDER HOLDINGS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 21st day of
January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and
Ingrid Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)

Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)





-- - - - - - - - - - - - --------.-.,- ....-- ---


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GN-158

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

TENDER NOTICE -

MARINE INSURANCE

1. Tenders are invited from all qualified Marine Insurance Brokers for
the provision of "Marine Insurance Coverage for vessels of the Port
Department, Ministry of Transport and Aviation, Nassau, The Bahamas
for the period 27th February, 2005 to 26th February, 2008 as detailed
below.


Tug Amber Jack
Tug Snapper
Tug Turbot
27' Boston Whaler
25' Wellcraft


0 41b -ag N40 011
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WANTED

Well established Media Company is looking for a hard working
male to work as a Pressroom Assistant, Qualified applicants should I
be, able to work night's between the hours of 7pm to 4am, be pr-
, pared to submit job references and a clean police record.

i Interested persons should sent resume to: j
, c DA 13465
I P.O. Box N-3207 I
SFaxx: 3M2239-
L .n ma 4 u mum 3m, 1 I n um I m i n I I I i ma. i E I I J


$3,900,000.00
$2,500,000.00
$1,754,000.00
$ 80,000.00
$ 55,000.00


2. Insurance coverage quotations on the above named vessels must
include:
Hull and Machinery (inclusive and exclusive of war risks etc)
With and without increased value cover
Protection and Indemnity
Profit Commission
Premiums quoted:
Must cover the named vessels while enroute to and from
foreign ports and while at foreign ports;
Must be on a fixed premium basis
3. Tenders must be submitted in a plain sealed envelope with no indication
on the cover of the name of the tenderer. The envelope should be
endorsed "TENDER OF MARINE INSURANCE-Port Department"
at the top left hand comer and hand delivered to the following address:
Tender's Board
Ministry of Finance
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach
4. Specifications for the above named vessels may be obtained from the
Port Department, Prince George Wharf, Monday Friday 9:30am -
4:30pm telephone (242) 322-8832, (242) 326-5677, and fax: (242)
322-5545.
5. Closing date for all tenders is Monday, 14 February, 2005 and the
Tenders will be opened on 15 February, 2004.


10-A-SIDE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 29th STARTS at 1.30

BAILLOU RFC YOUTH FUNDRAISER TOURNAMENT

10 A SIDE Round Robin FORMAT

* All welcome!!
* At least 5 over 21 players per team and up to 8 under 21 players
* Rolling substitutions
* Each match will consist of two ten minute periods.
* Prizes for winning team and 'Player of the Tournament '
* Fastest man race!!
* Food and Drink on sale.
* Funds raised to help Baillou Youth Team travel.

Gate Raffle Prizes Include :
> 2 Round Trip tickets to Fort Lauderdale
> 2 Round Trip t tickets to any destination serviced by
Bahamas Ferries


.. .. -^ *- -0 '6.1 1. -









THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


E FANS will pack the Sir Kendal
Ssaacs Gymnasium (below) to watch
teams such as Kingsway and Aquinas
(bottom).


mIIIi


41


- 4- .


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-, ~ .-~*
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THE country's biggest basketball tournament
for senior boys has become a victimm of its own suc-
cess, with supporters being turned away in their
droves in previous years due to seating limitations
and safety regulations.
Now Hugh Campbell Invitational Classic
Chairperson Alfred Forbes says that the com-
mittee will meet today hoping to find some solu-
tions to alleviate the situation.
The AF Adderley school gymnasium was orig-
malls the main venue for the eight day event but,
as of late, semi-final and championship games
are played in the national gymnasium. Sir Kendal
Isaacs.
AF Adderley gym has a seating capacity for
0ll'Y hile the Sir Kendal has 3000 seats


Speaking to The Tribune this
said: "This problem has just not c
are all aware of the problems an
committee have to do is find ways i
resolve it.

Problem


~. *:-



A, J


- l ,-,"


144


"In all actuality this problem
resolved if we don't have a bigger g
can't move the tournament from th
gym. AF Adderley and %we really
thing until a bigger gymnasium
"We hold the semi finals an
onship games in Sir Kendal. bec
and the fan base that the tourn
cannot fit in the high school gyt
v numbers can't fit in the nation
either."
Forbes revealed that he will r
opening several rooms at A-F Adde
big games that are over sold, to th
He has even suggested the idea
eral big screen televisions in the
'where enthusiasts can sit outside
game.
"We try to please every fan, we
idea of turning persons a'way be
high school event," said Forbes.

Sacrifice,
"We have to do something to p
we have loyal fans who make sac
out and watch their child or fr
they all want to enjoy the game
"-If we ha'e to arrange wh
put televisions on the outsi
room we 'will ha' e to cha
these areas % ill also be
"No%' the sad part
persons in the gym i
control the seating
and 'we'%e had cas
sons get up to go
stand or the ba
"hen they return
gone.
"We do nee
seating, this
the AF Add
the task si
easier
Kend


A'.


week, Forbes
ome about, we
d what wae the
n which we can

I
will never be
gymnasium. We
he host school's
N can't do any-
is built.
id the champi-
ause it is bigger
lament attracts
m. but the large
nal gymnasium
*un the idea of
erley school, for
he committee.
of putting se% -
schools yard.
and enjoy the
e don't like the
cause this is a


S
'lease our fans,
infices to come
iend pla,. and
es.
ere "ve have to
de or in a class-
rge a small fee.
protected.
about having
s that w'e can't
arrangements.
ses where per-
the concession
th rooms and
their seats are
d a systematic
will be hard in
derley gym. but
should be a little
in the Sir
al."
nlike the AF
dderley gym.
he Sir Kendal
Isaacs gymnia-


sium has a systematic seating order, which is not
implemented during events like the Hugh Camp-
bell.
Forbes added: "In order for us to organise the
seating system in the gym we will need to issue
tickets with a section, row and seating number.
This can be done and we are looking forward to
doing this to provide a better viewing for the
fans.
"Our student-athletes and fans are biggest con-
cern so we hale to protect them as best we can."


THE annual Keva Bethel Basketball Clas-
sic is shaping up to be the best one in its 12
year history. The Classic, which features the
open male and high school male categories,
has a two fold purpose.
The first of which is to bridge the gap
between COB and community through
sports and, secondly, to promote higher edu-
cation to more young men. According to
Sean Bastian. coordinator of this year's Clas-
sic. the competition should be keen.
"We expect a very good competitive Clas-
sic this year." noted Bastian, a former bas-
ketball stand out w ho now coaches COB's
male basketball team. "We have some good
local talent from the high schools all the
way up to the Division one level. But a new
aspect that I'm really excited about is the fact
that we will be introducing higher educa-
tion to many of these young men."
Bastian said that COB's Office of Admis-
sions will set up a booth with information on
the College of the Bahamas and what oppor-
tunities await them as a result of higher edu-
cation.

Scholarships
"The message we want to present is that
athletics and sports go together and even
though some of these athletes may not
obtain scholarships in the United States.
they can still pursue their academic goals at
our country's leading tertiary institution, the
College of the Bahamas."
Headlining the participants in the open
male category is the three time defending
champions The Real Deal Shockers and,
last Near's runners up, the Harbour Island
Panthers. Other teams in the open male cat-
egorN are COB Caribs. Cable Bahamas
Entertainers. Success Training College. Fox
Hill Sharks. Bahamas Baptist Communiti
College and Big Dogs. Leading the way in
the high school male category will be defend-
ing champions the GSSSA the C R Walker
Knights. CC Sweeting Cobras. Doris John-
son NMarlins. G H S Magic Men and C V
Bethel Stingrays.
Acuon kicks off on Friday, January 28th at
4:00pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
and continues until 9:00pm that evening.
Action resumes at 9:00am until on Satur-
day evening. The classic is a double elimi-
nation and will be governed by the FIBA
rules.
For teams interested in participating, the
entry deadline is Thursday. January 27th.
For more information, please contact Sean
Bastian at 302-4591.


"
,,, i i


r ~


- .4 . -.


F


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter


. .


--


`~"~,"~L~~









,THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


SThe Tribune


:SECTION


Sermons, Church. Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Magazine proclaiming


God's


Word via media


SBy PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
new magazine,
The Christian
Trumpet, is
proclaiming
the Word of
God via the media, and it
seems that readers are paying
attention.
"It's really like a herald
because 'trumpet' means
sounding the alarm unto the
nations (Joel Chapter 2). And
that's what Chnrsnan Trumpet
does, and has been doing since
its first issue," says Stephanie
Davis, CEO of the magazine.
Mrs Davis says that the mag-
azine now joins the many
gospel media tools in the coun-
try that promote the Kingdom
of God. This bold approach to
evangelism came about from a
direct vision given to her by
God some time ago, she told
Tribune Religion.
But it was not until one year
after receiving this vision that
the first issue of the magazine
was put into print.
,, In October 2004, The Christ-
ian Trumpet finally moved from
vision to reality when the first
issue hit newsstands in Nassau.
And even in its "infancy",
the magazine is creating a ,
'%buzz" in the religious arena.
according to Mrs Davis.
Since the first publication,
many Bahamians have been
contacting her, she says,
applauding her effort and com-
menting on the quality of the
magazine. And they have also
responded by purchasing
copies.
The magazine was also dis-
tributed in Atlanta, New
. Orleans and Jamaica, but was
sold out before requests for
Germany and Trinidad could
be filled.
That issue featured articles
on the life and ministry of Bish-
op Neil C Ellis, pastor of
Mount Tabor Full Gospel Bap-
tist Church; and Creflo Dollar,
pastor of World Changers
Church International, College
Park, Georgia, which also
broadcasts the TBN pro-
gramme, "Changing Your
World". A wedding story "It's
-Best to. Get it Done in Par-
adise" various inspirational
articles and testimonies com-
pleted the first issue.
While the CEO says that
Christian issues are the corner-
stone of her magazine, and will
continue to be, practical advice
for life is also a major part of itg
ministry. It 'is not your "typi-
cal" Christian magazine, she
says, pointing to topics that
assist in everyday life. Articles
on money management, hearty
recipes, as well as Christian
jokes are also featured in the
magazine.
In the second issue, to be
;released in February, the Trum-
pet is "taking it up a notch",
says Mrs Davis. Two issues will
be combined into one.
The quarterly magazine will
take on a "flip format". Youth
Dilemma, a magazine for


SSTui lIisnop till M-las -Firm 10 I ne iaviour


.. .. .
I I^


* THE cover of the August/September 2004 edition of the new magazine, The Christian Trumpet.


teenagers, will be printed at the
back of the Trumpet and upside
down, ,both in glossy format.
February's articles will focus
on entrepreneurship, make-up
tips from John Bull, moving
from renting to owning your
own home, and instructions on
how to get out of debt.
"I don't want it to look like
only a Christian magazine, but
I want to attract different types
of people from Christian to
non-Christian where some-
body will not be intimidated to
just pick it up and read. These
are issues that edify, and not
only spiritual stuff, but things
that can build you up moral-
ly," Mrs Davis explains.
A special feature with Pas-
tors Randy and Paula White of
Without Walls International
Church in Tampa, Florida will
also be included in that issue.
With no compromise, the
Trumpet will follow the Biblical
teachings that have been
"bestowed" upon Christians.
The magazine, Mrs Davis
hopes, will set an example -
that Christians do not have to
sacrifice their moral standing
and belief in God to gain read-
ership.
"We are not going to sell out.
I don't promote anything that is
against God. So, someone who
wants to advertise a gambling
company, I don't care if they
offer me a million dollars, I will
not take it because it does not
promote God," she says
adamantly.
While Mrs Davis tempers
this by saying that the maga-
zine will not "knock" those
who do gamble, her belief sys-
tem does not encourage.the
practice.
She explains: "Our main
vision is to uplift. Based upon
my belief, we are against gam-
bling. I will only promote some-
thing that can enhance and
uplift other people, and gam-
bling doesn't enhance or uplift.
It tears you down by spending
all your money foolishly."
Through every article, every
story that is shared, every fea-
ture, even down to the Christ-
ian jokes, says Mrs Davis, the
Trumpet is about bringing inspi-
ration to the body and soul.
Currently, the magazine
comes out quarterly, but she
hopes to eventually publish
every month.
Mrs Davis feels that The
Christian Trumpet has broken
down barriers with articles one
would generally find in Ebony
and other magazines, and .has
become a "stepping stone" for
other Bahamians who wish to
advance into publishing.
"Actually, they see that they
can do whatever they want in
publishing, because what I
realise is that a lot of people
have the idea to do it but they
don't know how to go out there
and get it done," she says. "But
because of The Christian Trum-
pet, a lot of people are out there
publishing another magazine,
maybe a book something to
give inspiration to other peo-
ple."


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PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


RELIGION


TH
U


Lafayette University students


join professors at St Matth


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


* By CARVEL FRANCIS
M embers of
Lafayette
University
soaked up
some sun,
sand and sea in the Bahamas
recently. During their stay,
they joined LU professors Dr
John McCartney and Dr
Samuel Hay at historic St
Matthew's Anglican Church.
The 10 students also took part
in the Junkanoo celebrations
on Bay Street. Some liked the
action so much that they
rushed with one of the C cate-
gory groups.
Rector Father James Moul-
trie welcomed the students to
our shores and in particular to
the home parish of Dr McCart-
ney.
Lafayette University locat-
ed in Eastern Pennsylvania was
established in 1870 and is
known as one of the top Lib-
eral Arts Colleges in the US.
The College has a student
body of some 23,000 and an
endowment fund of over


C>


.4


M DR Samuel Hay (far left) and addressing the host family Dr McCartney thanked Rector Father James Moultrie, The St
Matthew's Parish family and in particular the Francis family for the excellent evening buffet and warm hospitality to the
students.


$700million. LU is also known
for having a strong Engineer-
ing programme.
Dr McCartney expressed
appreciation for the warm
treatment of the students by
the St Matthevw's family. St
Matthew's has hosted the
group for four years now.
"The students love the
atmosphere and the warm and
friendly Bahamian people,"


said Dr McCartney.
The professor also told of an
international symposium that
his department would be stag-
ing later this year. The sympo-
sium, 'The Great Black Amer-
ican' is attributed to Paul
Robeson who died in 1976.
This African-American was an
actor, a guitarist, an athlete
and political activist. A grant of
$100,000 has been given to Dr


Hay and Dr McCartney to host
the symposium, which will
acquaint the world community
of Robeson's achievements
that were downplayed for so
many years.
Following the 10.30am mass,
the students were hosted to a
special treat, 'Bahamian Style'
by the Francis Family of the
parish. Father Moultrie, Dr
Hay and Dr McCartney joined


in the afternoon lunch of peas
and rice, turkey, ham, cran-
berry sauce, potato salad,
tossed salad with beets, stuff-
ing, skillet potatoes, coconut
and pineapple tarts.
Dorothy Davis who spoke
on behalf of the family told the
students that the luncheon was
to express appreciation for
them choosing our shores, the
Bahamas, and in particular his-


* FATHER JAMES
MOULTRIE


toric St Matthew's Church.
The students thanked the
host family and Father Moul-
trie and the parish for the
wonderful stay and kind hos-
pitality.
This article was originally
published in The Christian, the
Anglican newspaper.


Church Notes


THE REMNANT
TABERNACLE
OF PRAISE
IN the spirit of unity, Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort associates
are invited to worship with
Pastor Kendal Stubbs, officers
and members of the church
during its 3rd Annual Service
of Thanksgiving.
The event is scheduled for
10:30 am January 30 on church
grounds at Carmichael and
Golden Isles Roads.

CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, January 30.
(Speakers: Minister Jason
McPhee, Elders Sean Gardiner
and B.M. Clarke
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day


Praise and Deliverance Ser-
vice, 7:45 pm Men's Fellow-
ship Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI
Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Upcoming events
February 28-March 3 Men
With A Purpose Conference
March 28-April 3 WOI
Conference
March 27 Easter Sunday

CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
January 30,9:15 am Church
School, 10 am Divine Wor-
ship Service with Pastor
Charles Lewis, 7 pm No
evening service
First Monday of each month,


I ANNOUNCING THE
GRAND OPENING OF



at their NEW LOCATION!
MONTGOMERY STREET, PALMDALE
North of Commonwealth Fabrics
Phone: 325 6044 Fax: 325 6045
Regular Store Hours: 9:30a.m. to 5:00p.m.
Saturday: 10:00a.m. 2:00p.m.

DATE: Saturday, January 29, 2005
10:00a.m. 3:00p.m.
SPECIAL GUEST
MAJOR DONALD V. GOODRIDGE
THE SALVATION ARMY
THE BAHAMAS LAUNCHING
AND
SIGNING OF HIS NEW BOOK
"THE FAMILY OF GOD -
FROM RELIGION TO DIVINE
RELATIONSHIP"




Opening Day Only!
Free pen to the first 30 who purchase the book!
Free author's bookmark to all present
(While Supplies last)

Suppliers of Church supplies, Clergy robes, Shirts,
Collars, Mini Fronts, Rabats & Stoles, Pastors
Jackets, Books & Bibles, Gifts, Pastors books and
supplies, Cassocks, Surplices, Albs, Choir robes,
Graduation & Judicial Attire
MANY ITEMS CUSTOM MADE!


7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-
ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30
pm Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
January 30, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-


ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
' Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
Youth Alpha (every third.
Saturday), 3:30 pmtooA4pm.-
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4.pm
Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions


Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN


EAST ST GOSPEL KIRK


CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second


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YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

CANAAN
BAPTIST
CHURCH
YOU are invited to the fol-
lowing services at the church in
Nassau Village:
Sunday, 11 am and 7:30 pm -
Divine Worship Service
Rev Eugene Bastian is the
senior pastor.

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following


services:
Sunday, 9:45 'am Sunday,,
School, 11 am Morning Wor- I
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship )
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayeri
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm --
Bible Study ;
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise.
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30e
pm Youth Meeting i
Second.Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults ,
Living Triumphantly), i .. t
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Ourc
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day '
2nd Sundays Youths:
Day/Dedication of Infants .i
3rd Sundays Mission',
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day ,'
Service .

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES
THE church in the Summer.'
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road, is ,
scheduled to hold the following >
services:
Sunday, 8 am Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,,,
10:30 am Divine Worship c
Service (Live broadcast at 11.;
am on More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer meet-.'
ing every Wednesday and Sat-,"
urday at 5 am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir,
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm -
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet- ,,
ing -
For further information, e-.,
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs i.
or call 328-3737/328-6949 ,

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
SERVICES and meetings to .-
be held at the church on All'-
Saints Way, South Beach, ford
the week of January 30 to Feb-3
ruary 5: Sunday (Feast:
Epiphany IV), 7 am Sung,9
Mass and Sermon, 10 am -;
Family Eucharist & Sunday Q
School, 6:30 pm Evensong ,
and Teaching "
Monday, 7 pm Education .
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's, Evan-
gelism Team Meeting b
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at',
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess*
Margaret Hospital, 7 pm -
Vestry Meeting :'
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and '
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band -
Practice, 7:30 pm Seniorc
Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass t
and Breakfast, 7 pm Parish v
Dinner and A.G.M (Commu-'"
nity Centre)
Saturday, 6 am Intercesso-
ry Prayer Meeting, noon to 6"
pm ACW Steak-Out, 2 pm -
Acolytes Practice (Rector: Rev
Fr S Sebastian Campbell)


TRIBUNE











v's


I


I







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 3C


R I


-- ..

..*'. ae.. :.- .,.; ;< .
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Where have all the





young boys gone?


Remember the
days when men
from every sec-
tor of society
flocked to
Christ Church Cathedral to
become members of the
Cathedral's Men and Boys'
Choir? When parishioners anx-
iously awaited the annual Nine
Lessons and Chorale service?
So where have all the young
boys gone? What have they
grown up to be?
They have become produc-
tive citizens of the Bahamas
and indeed workers in God's
Kingdom.
Some have become Rev-
erend gentlemen, such as-
Father Colin Humes and Peter
Scott; notable singers and com-
posers such as Bryan Thomp-
son, Cleveland Williams and
Cleophas Adderley. They have
become bankers, doctors,
teachers and entrepreneurs, to
name a few.
You name a sector of society
and you'll be sure to find a for-
mer Cathedral Chorister.
"A Men and Boys' choir is
more than just another unit of
a music ministry. It's about
character building, it's about
the advancement of Christ's
Kingdom among males, and
this requires the help of every-
one," said the newly appointed
director, Dexter Fernander.
During the summer of 2004
the Cathedral restructured its
music department under the
leadership of Antoine C Wal-
lace, and with this came the re-
formation of the Men and
Boys' Choir.
Christ Church Cathedral has
three choirs: a men and boys'
choir, a youth choir and an
adult mixed chorale.
Strangely enough, the Men
and Boys' Choir comprised a
majority of individuals who
either did not attend the
Cathedral initially, or in some
cases, were not of the Anglican
faith. They came from all walks
of life.
The Men and Boys' Choir
was founded in 1965 during the
tenure of Dean Leslie Weath-
erhead. In those days, boys'
choirs were a rarity in the
Bahamas and they still are.
But the Dean, an English
priest, preferred to follow the
tradition of English cathedrals,
which tended to have all-male
choirs. This choir of men and
boys replaced the men and
women's choir, which was then
in existence at Christ Church
Cathedral.
The burden of the actual
development of a good male
choir fell on the shoulders of
David Fysh, also an English-
man, who was the organist and
choirmaster for the Cathedral
at that time. Boys selected
from St John's Preparatory
School (Anglican) were put
through a probationary peri-
od. They were taught to read
music, the pointing of the
psalms and all the other rudi-
ments necessary for the cre-
ation of a good cathedral choir.
At the end of this probationary
period they were formally
inducted into the choir.
Today, the boys are selected


* DEAN WEATHERHEAD,
founder of the Men and
Boys' Choir

from various. schools in. Nas-,
sau and are required to under-
go the same rigorous prepara-
tion prior to formal induction.
"The structure of Men and
Boys' Choir has drastically
change since the (19)60s and
this will cause for greater
efforts for this entity to sur-
vive in the 21st century," said
Mr Fernander.
The Cathedral, at that time,
had a preparatory institution
and it was easy for those males
to be enrolled in the choir.
Similar structures exist with
elite boys' choirs today.
For example, the St Thomas
Boys Choir of New York, the
Harlem Boys Choir and the
Vienna Boys Choir have estab-
lished excellent educational
programmes. All costs from
board, clothes, tuition are
borne by these institutions, giv-
ing scholarships to their cho-
risters. This is one feature that
would have to be addressed in
terms of Anglican Education
and sustaining the youngsters'
"... It's about
character building,
it's about the
advancement of
Christ's Kingdom
among males, and
this requires the
help of everyone."

Dexter Fernander
interest in choir. A thorough
education, with special atten-
tion paid to the theory and
practice of singing, as well as
instruction on one musical
instrument.
Compared with other boys'
daily timetables and schooling
practices, a choir boy's normal
day is far from routine. Every
day some boys will be missing
from class perhaps at a dress
rehearsal in the Opera House -
so teachers have to be flexible
about hours to blend in with
the youngster's regularly
scheduled lessons, practice ses-
sions, meal times, play time,
and of course, sleep.
Much of the credit for this
growth evidenced by the choir
is attributed to Reverend
Father Frederick Fleischer. His
first period of tenure began in
1973 and lasted four years. He
was faced with the task of
rebuilding the choir, because
until that time there had been
a frequent turnover of organ-
ists. These breaks in continuity


had wreaked havoc on both
the morale and musical integri-
ty of the group. His hard work
and dedication was rewarded;
however, in 1981 he returned
to the Cathedral after a four-
year break, to find that the
foundation of the bass and
tenor sections comprised many
of those who had been boy
sopranos during his earlier
tenure. Some of those people
are still with the Cathedral's
music department today.
Father Fleischer is also cred-
ited with installing the current
German-built pipe organ from
the firm of Oberlinger. This is
one of the finest 6rgans'in the
Caribbean' today.
The choir has had a number
of directors whose great impe-
tus is derived from the fact that
they see the choir as an evan-
gelical instrument, which is
properly used to further the
work of the church through
excellence in song.
Julian Foulkes, since 1981,
has been strongly supported
by Bryan Thompson, founder
of the Youth Choir, and Adri-
an Archer. For a short period
premier English organist,
Matthew Steynor directed the
boys' choir. They all have
spent much time and effort
working with this choir. Who
can forget the able assistance
of Yvonne Foulkes who
became the choir's rehearsal
accompanist.
"Times have definitely
changed," said a former cho-
rister. "There was a period in
the Cathedral's history where
the Men and Boys' Choir was
the only group that, without
question, sung at all services.
The boys developed a bond
and a sense of pride. Indeed, a
part of history and culture was
stopped.
"I remember on one occa-
sion when Father Fred Fleis-
cher was supposed to have
choir practice on a Saturday
morning and all the boys who
were members of the choir
were playing a sporting game
at St John's College. Dean
Granger drove to that func-
tion, stopped the game imme-
diately and every last member
of the Cathedral Choir was in
his vehicle heading back to
practice. I guess that exempli-
fies the support the organisa-
tion received from the then
clergy."
But where have all the
young boys gone? Have they
stopped to remember those
days and say thanks for the
training, mentoring that has
molded them into what they
are today? It's probably safe
to say that they remember the
good days and are eager to
ensure that other young men
have the same experience. In
retrospect, they are saying
thanks to the many conduc-
tors, to the financial supporters
and patrons, to the wonderful
accompanists and well wishers,
and lastly, for the memories.
The choir has been reformed
and has now opened its mem-
bership to all males on the
island of New Providence who
are seriously and interested in
developing their musical tal-
ents.


.00 *;








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* ACCOMPANIST Robert Kennedy, Adrian Archer and Bryan Thompson of the Cathedral
Youth Choir, Julian Foulkes and Rev Fleischer.


Pastor Ben Bailey
Program Organizer
The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518


First Focus
Text I Kings 17:1-16:18:41-45
Problems began when Ahab married Jezebel; who influenced him to turn
aside from worshipping Israel s national God; and eventually replaced
Yahweh with Baal. God judged the nation because they went whoring
after foreign women, and foreign gods; specifically forbidden in their
Covenant.
The Prophet Elijah sought an audience in the king s palace, and made
this bold declaration, The heavens will neither produce dew, nor will
rain fall to the earth, except I speak it. This bold statement was a direct
challenge to the abilities of Baal, the impostor; given credit for producing
the early rains associated with the planting period; the latter rains necessary
for nourishing and maturing the fruit; focusing the sun to ripen the crop
during the summer month; and controlling good and bad weather. In
essence, the Prophet said, I represent God as Ambassador; speaking
with His Authorization I cancel all dew and rain transactions leaving the
Kingdom of Heaven. Until I speak again, shop is closed, no more dew
or rain!


Nassau, Bahamas Three years after Elijah spoke these words to Ahab, As the Lord God
of Israel lives, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, except at my
word: The Lord instructed him to show himself to Ahab; and promised to send rain upon the earth.
Elijah met with Ahab, who addressed him as The one that troubles Israel. The Prophet advised the
king to eat and strengthen himself; stating There is the sound of abundance of rain, even though
there were no clouds in the sky. The Prophet s servant was instructed to look toward the sea; and
the seventh time he reported there is a cloud, but disappointedly described it as small as a man s
hand: The servant is sent to warn the king to prepare to leave at once.
Amazingly, the appeafnce of things as small as a man s hand; may conceal its potential in the
beginning, but if we learn to trust and obey the Lord, its magnitude is eventually revealed. The Word
of God reminds us to look beyond the appearance of a thing, and see instead its revealed potential.
Galatians 5:9 tells us, A little leaven leavens the whole lump. Whilst on the other hand, Matthew
13:31-32 paraphrased, The mustard, is the least of all seeds; but grows greater than the herbs and
becomes a great tree.
Solomon: God commanded Solomon to make God his first focus, and he would be established in
the same manner his father David was established. Solomon apparently obeyed, ruling peacefully
for forty years; exactly as his father David before him, and then passed the throne to his son.
Rehoboam forsook God, the throne was eventually destabilised, and the captivity of Israel resulted.
Joshua received renewed assurance of the promise to .possess the land of inheritance. God
encouraged Joshua to display physical courage, promising the same support extended to his mentor
Moses. God stated physical courage was required; and spiritual strength necessary to perform the
requirements of the Law, God s Secret for Success, enabling successful conclusions to every
endeavour.
The consequences of failing to love God is demonstrated in Jude verse 5 we learn that Once saved
always saved is not a term recognized by scripture. God brought the Israelites out of Egypt with
great signs, wonders, and miracles; but when they became disobedient and rebellious, and refused
to enter the place assigned to them, all died in the wilderness, and were replaced by their children.
In case you think God is a respecter of persons; Jude verse 6 in paraphrase tells us, Angels who
were rebellious and failed to remain in their assigned places; are reserved in chains of darkness, to
face God s judgment. There is a place assigned to each person in the scheme of God s plan; and
enabling power is assigned through the Holy Spirit, to provide successful conclusions, if we remain
focused, and in the place of our assignment.
In John s Revelation, Jesus warns the Church of Ephesus; to return to the place where they belong,
otherwise they would receive the same sentence visited upon disobedient Israel and the rebellious
angels. The warning given here was designed to help them remain spiritually focused on God. In
John s vision on the Isle of Patmos, the Lord Jesus appears to establish His Divine Supremacy
among gods, and men. He announces, There was none before Me, and none can take My Place.
Finally, the Lord Jesus tells His Disciples, If you focus on God s interests first and foremost in your
lives, all your future needs are guaranteed. Simply put, it says take care of God s business first, and
God will take care of your business.
We must seek after the One who will establish and sustain us first: then all the other things are an
added bonus.


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PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005
oua AKE CARE OF YOUR

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VL nW A n in the Financial and Physical Health Fair at Super Value,
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THE TRIBUNE .


PAGE 6C. THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


... .. IO




Grace Community Chur0




toc0brateK0Rers


race Commu-
nity Church,
Palmetto Vil-
lage, will kick
off its 60th
Anniversary celebrations with
a service of thanksgiving in cel-
ebration of a lifetime of Chris-
tian Ministry of Associate Pas-
tor, Marcel Lightbourne.
The service will take place
on Sunday, January 30 at
3.30pm, and will also mark the
retirement of Pastor Light-
bourne as an Associate Pastor
of Grace Community and his
elevation to the position of
Pastor Emeritus.
Senior Pastor Emeritus, Dr
Rex Major, d long-term min-
istry associate of Pastor Light-
bourne, will deliver the ser-
mon.
Saviour
In April of 1964, Marcel
received Jesus Christ.as his
personal Saviour and Lord.
This was at the Central Gospel
Chapel, on the corners of
Christie and Dowdeswell
Streets, which held a Gospel
Crusade with Tom Skinner, a
young evangelist from New
York, as the speaker. This
commitment by Marcel led to
a whole new world of experi-
ences.
Marcel immersed himself in
Bible Studies, Sunday School,
Youth Meetings and consistent
church attendance. He was
also fortunate, at that time, to
be a part of a discipleship
group led by Rex Major -
mostly converts from the Skin-
ner Crusade.
It was also during these ear-
ly discipleship days that Marcel
gained the nickname, "Doc".
This was because on many
occasions the group was
impressed with his Bible
knowledge and ability to
explain basic Biblical concepts,
even as a young Christian.


Service will mark associate pastor's retirement


FULL-TIME -
CHRISTIAN
MINISTRY
EXPERIENCE
As Marcel grew in his Chris-
tian life he also became
involved in the life of his home l ... .
church, Central Gospel
Chapel, chiefly as a Sunday '"-.
School teacher and youth
leader. He preached his first S -
sermon in the youth group at
Central Gospel'Chapel. In
1966 Marcel moved to Grace
Gospel Chapel, then located
on East Shirley Street, now
Grace Community Church
presently located in Palmetto
Village. This move provided
Marcel with greater opportu-
nity for preaching and other 1
aspects of Christian service,
because as a small church _
Grace needed preachers and
teachers. .


In 1966 Marcel served on a, 3
part-time basis in the ministry i
of Inter-Insular Evangelistic
Crusades. He also assisted in
the production of the radio I L
programme "Gospel Bells". PASTOR MARC
Edward Allen and Rex Major'
pioneered this ministry in 1960.
Eventually, he became the pro- by correspondence as persons
ducer/announcer for this inter- wrote-in expressing their
national and highly acclaimed needs, which resulted from the
broadcast, which at this time extensive coverage of the radio
was aired on Trans World broadcasts.
Radio, Bonaire, Dutch West In 1967 Marcel was invited
Indies; ELWA in Liberia, to join the Gospel Bells staff
West Africa; and Radio Mon- on a full-time basis. After
sterrat in the West Indies. In much prayer and consultation
addition to the above duties, with the elders of Grace
Marcel also handled the gen- Gospel Chapel, Marcel left his
eral management of the secular employment as a clerk
Gospel Bells office. He assist- at the Outboard Marine Inter-
ed with spiritual counseling 'national.'Bay-Street,.-Nassau.


\2'-i
A41
4 ~ ,'.

t~


Grace,
CO MIM MUMIYC LI1


Marcel Lightbourne




Grate (Community Church
invites you to


A Service of Thanksgiving

celebrating a lifetime in Christian Ministry
The Retirement of Associate Pastor Marcel Lightbourne
On
Sunday, 30th January, 2005
at 3:30 p0m.
Palmetto Village Nassau, Bahamas


in February 1968 to go into the
ministry on a full-time basis.
Surrender to the call to full-
time ministry was not a diffi-


cult thing for Marcel. God had
already worked the desire into
his heart to make Him Lord
of his life. Only one family
member suggested that he
should consider the possibility
of giving more money rather
than to commit his life to full-
time service.
This move by Marcel even-
tually led to a greater involve-
ment in itinerant ministries to
Brethren Assemblies in Nas-
sau; the Family Islands and
other areas such as Jamaica,
Bermuda and the US.
While Marcel enjoyed the
Commendation of Grace
Gospel Chapel and the wider
fellowship of the Assemblies
of Brethren in the Bahamas,
the official ordination did not
come until Sunday, September
12, 1976. The service was held
at Grace Gospel Chapel in Pal-
metto Village.
Programnme
He originated the Grace
Chapel Presents radio broad-
cast, which is still being heard
as the Radio Voice of Grace
Community Church, and host-
ed several of the TV specials of
the church with special refer-
ence to four one-hour specials
which followed the 1987 Reach
Out To Live Crusade. He also
developed an "Al Adult
Educational Programme" for
the church.
As a commended worker of
Grace community Church,


IN a service of praise and
thanksgiving, citizens of
Grenada living in the
Bahamas, along with their
families and friends, will gath-
er at Life Ministries Church
on Soldier Road to celebrate
Grenada's 31st anniversary
of independence.
The service will be held on
Sunday, February 6 at 11am.
This celebration of inde-
pendence is particularly sig-


nificant for the people of
Grenada, Carriacou and Petit
Martinique, as it will be the
first one since Hurricane Ivan
devastated the islands last
September.
Cynthia Blackman, one of
the service organizers who
recently returned from
Grenada says that life is slow-
ing returning to normal.
The natural vegetation is
starting to return, roofs dam-


Marcel served in a wide variety
of ministry functions and min-
istries. He has served as a
Counsellor of marriage and
family life, a local and region-
al missionary, a Church planter
in Columbia, South Carolina,
evangelist, Bible teacher and
in broadcast ministries.
On January 21, 2001, Mar-
cel was installed as an Associ-
ate Pastor of Grace Commu-
nity Church with responsibili-
ties for Christian Education
and Counselling. During that
time he has continued the
growth of the education min-
istries of Grace.
Grace
Marcel has been greatly
assisted in ministry by his wife
Leila who will also be recog-
nised for her many contribu-
tions to the life and ministry
of Grace.
This service will mark the
beginning of a number of
events planned to celebrate
Grace's 60th Anniversary. The
Church will celebrate under
the theme "Fulfilling God's
Purposes in This Generation".
A number of outreach
events are planned for the
Community and during the
months of February through
April, the Church will conduct
surveys in the Palmetto Vil-
lage and Marathon communi-
ties to see how it can be of bet-
ter service to the people in its
community.
This article was provided
by Grace Community Church.


aged in the storm are now
covered with tarpaulin and
students have returned to
school.
Farmers are also planting
new nutmeg trees, and some
of the hotels are already open
for business.
The local community is
invited to attend next Sun-
day's special service. Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell is expected to attend.


TSUNAMIRELIE


FOR SRI LANKA
Natural disasters can't be prevented, but the effects can be more
manageable with YOUR HELP.
Friends of Sri Lanka Invite Individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
one of the following ways:
I. Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas -
Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas
Main Branch
The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank..

2 If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

3 Simply call us at 502-7094 and we will arrange to
collect it from you.
Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment.

:~~ Arr ". 4* O0 ,


Marking 31 years


of independence


.








T H TE LIUN E T H U, J


The Adventists
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists


ww. bahamasconference.org


/


Pastor Samuel Telemaque




at


,~.


If


"onerence
S/in l ar-/ 28-30, 2005




'x' ore till11g0 are ,wrought
7 1,1/ p rafcf. il/n this
i'',oddrht i'rams oI"/


Register For



LOGOS



BIBLE


Software


Training


February 7 & 8, 2005
For pastors, church
leaders, and Bible
students of all faiths
CALL 341 4021


Convention In Crooked Island. Pastors Barrington Brennen and Leo Rolle went to Landrail Point. Crooked Island, on Wednesday, January
19 for weekend Convention 2005. It \\as power-packed with inspirational preaching and family seminars. Pastor Rolle presented two sermons on
God's goodness and effective witnessing. Each evening before the preaching service, Pastor Brennen conducted seminars. He conducted a mar-
riage. parenting, and teenage seminar. Nlany visitors came from the various communities o-n the island, including a few Adventists from Acklins.
There were also visiting ministers from other faiths. Those in attendance were blessed by the Christian fellowship and spiritual presentations.


Local And International News


"-.1 I "
PRAYER CONFERENCE 2005
The Long awaited Prayer Conference will
begin on Friday, January 28 at 7:00 p.m. at the
Hillview Adventist Church, Harrold Road. The
main presenter will be Pastor Samuel
Talemaque, Prayer Ministries Coordinator of
the Caribbean Union Conference of Seventh-
day Adventists with headquarters in Trinidad.
The local coordinator for this conference is
Pastor Jeremiah Duncombe, former conference
president and current pastor of the Breath of
Life and Gambier Churches.
Although this conference is organized
and sponsored by the Adventist Church, it is
opened to peoples of all faiths. The purpose of
the Prayer Conference is to encoruage people to
have a greater prayer life and to establish an
more vibrant prayer ministry in the Adventist
Churches.


TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: PRIME
MINISTER SAYS RELIGION
SHOULD NOT DIVIDE PEOPLE
"Religion can be the most powerful
force for liberty in society," said Prime Minister
of Trinidad and Tobago, H.E. Patrick Manning,
at a Jan. 19 International Religious Liberty
Association conference on the island of
Trinidad. The gathering brought together 320
leaders of both society and faith communities
across the Caribbean region and beyond.
"However, religion can also be one of the root
causes of division -- with intolerance of others,
belief in the monopoly of sacred knowledge,
and the incapacity to see alternatives," Manning
continued.
Manning said he has pride that "we can
discuss these matters with candor and freedom
in Trinidad and Tobago," noting that the coun-
try's constitution guarantees religious freedom.
However, "practice may differ from ideals," he
said. "History has taught us that states have
unfortunately been party to the suppression of
religious liberty ... we must work against such a
tendency and mitigate this factor."
"We are delighted at such a strong
endorsement of religious freedom ... from the
prime minister," commented John Graz, IRLA's
secretary-general and director of the Adventist
world church's Public Affairs and Religious
Liberty department.


"We trust that the outcome of our meet-
ings here will be an increased recognition of the
vital importance of supporting -- in very practi-
cal ways -- religious freedom and tolerance in
every part of the world," Graz said.
Local IRLA representative and primary
event organizer Clive Dottin noted that the con-
ference was the first of its kind in the country.
"In bringing together [these leaders], we hope
that we can develop wider support for freedom
of conscience and mutual respect," he said.
The IRLA is a non-sectarian organiza-
tion, established by the Seventh-day Adventist
Church more than 100 years ago, to promote
and defend religious freedom for all people.


CHUR
;.a.



Farrlngton Road 323
341 f16 .;7,
Marenatrvilla:



Prin Tce Chac e
Gr324an 454




EI;zabeth Eslates "'
324 6939
New Pfovidenca
Soldier Road 393 607
Real Harveston
Pine Wood Gand e
Prince Bahamas le s
Now Providenca


Old rie Road 3993
Pin Ae tod are


Carmahsel Road
Road 323




oBreath ofund
Karshal B |y^g
Livengased
Old trail Road ?;i




PaDriggat.HiiAndm
BaefotuAvu '. ,:'
Bethel a '
Fox F79 .
CarmPia"el Rood


e HIve's f ',wa




Ken Bumoay
onThe BlesaedH ,
D Exg a H N
StavtewCirch ,To
Bennetts Harbor. Cat.
Devirs Point Churohl .:!;
Devil's PoinrC. cal Si,'I
Crooked ',..l ."*;":'
Gregory.Tom..C



Mount Thomp1on
Moss Town Chtirt *
Stevens Long; I's c r/.
Cockburn Town :
San Salvador : _
Matthew Town Chul r tl
Inagua


Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, H.E. Patrick
Manning (I) and John Graz, Internal Religious
Lliberty Association's secretary-general and a
leader for the World Wide Adventist Church. [Photo:
Jonathan Gallagher/ANN]


Digital Ltbraty
Sysivirn


.'


LC'I~


Adventists Making A Difference


Watch Adventist

Spotlight
Tuesday 8:00 P.M., Cable Bahamas Channel 12


-- - - - -- -- -


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 7C


rFf


~li


I






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


RELIGIONS


4^burij of ^ of

.l 1I NATIONAL PUBLIC
I RELATIONS MINISTRY


I / ~wi7< ~J,
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L.


MATTH/ EW 5:
MATTHEW 5:16


BISHOP DR. ELGARNET B.
RAHMING. D.D..J.P.
National O erseer


30/22 Fx,3223079.EAST& ASP0BOXN3041uBahama


- NLJR asrATaOI.OAfL .BVI SIOE/ C LJMR OBJEC To bear witness for Christ and His truth hy through Bible Teachings. Seminars. maturation of our children south .


spreading the gospel throughout all of our
islands in all its fullness and power, to bring
about the rule of God in the hearts of men.
* To worship God in spirit, in truth and in
holiness.
* To train, develop and equip our people for
Godly Living and Christian Service


Specialized I ourses and onferences.
* To fidl. embrace plurality) of leadership in
all of its positive goodness.
* To lose God totally and our fellowmen as
ourselves.
* To pay focused and specialized minister
attention to the growth. development and


* 1o accelerate our nholistic ountracn an~.il-
islic efforts with a \ie% to reach and touch
people eler3yhere in our Bahanma to the
up building of the kingdom and to the
growth of the Church of God.
* To prepare our people for the return of the
Lord.


NATIONAL MINISTRIES
,Evangelism & Horne Children's Ministries
Missions Family Ministries
L ad ship Development Public Relations &
Training Special Projects
,-,,Women's Ministries Free Literature
Radio &,Television Music & Fine Arts
Christian Education Hospitals & Prisons
Youth Ministries Prayer & Intercession
Men's Ministries


I


CRUSADE REPORT BY
DEBORAH JOHNSON
Co-Chairperson -Public
Relations (Church of God)














CONTINUED FROM LAST WEEK
O n Tuesday evening at the
Church of God of Prophecy's
East Street Tabernacle, the fire
burned a little brighter and the atmos-
phere was a little more charged as
Minister Timothy Johnson and the
COGOP's National Praise Team,
fueled by the session of prayer and
consecration led by the joint National
Prayer Ministry, ushered us into a
heavily anointed time of worship. The
Tabernacle choir's rendition of "Praise
is What I Do" and the joint crusade
choir's stirring selection, "Come, Holy
Spirit", took us up another notch in the
anointing.
National Directors of Evangelism,
Bishop Charles Gardiner (COG) and
Min. Dr. Barbara F. Williams
(COGOP), warmed our hearts with
their remarks.
Bishop William Wilson, crusade
speaker, continuing with his "Today"
theme, spoke on the topic Today is the
Day for Prophetic Preparation, Telling
the congregation that we are on the
precipice of prophetic fulfillment as
never before, Bishop Wilson explained
how biblical prophecy is being ful-
filled in the world today. It is a time,
he stated, in which the church must be
ready. The Holy Spirit is calling us to
prepare for what He is about to do -
today. We must humble ourselves, put
the past in the past, forgive one anoth-
er and get rid of sin so that we cannot
miss the visitation of the Holy Spirit.
As he prayed at the beginning of his
message, Bishop Wilson mentioned
that he had a vision of a mighty release
of anointing and empowerment that
would take place in the service that
night.


THE BATON EXCHANGE- After a powerful Welcoi
Church of God, a baton which was used to demonstr
of this Historical Joint Crusade to carry around the w
Prophecy will gather in a cooperative effort of World
from left to right, Bishop Dr. Brice H. Thompson
Rahming, National Overseer -COGOP, Bishop Dr. Jo
Johnson, Former National Overseer -COG and Bi
Outreach for both Church of God and Church of Gok


... That vision came alive at the end of
St the sermon. Words cannot describe,
E .- ,' Dwhat took place after the word of God
U: was preached. One just had to have
off the: a inbeen there. There was a tremendous
outpouring of the Holy Spirit that was
felt in every corner as ministers laid
hands on those who sought salvation
or the baptism of the Holy Ghost or
S.. for the ministry God had placed in
their hearts to be birthed. Heaven
-" .. surely came down and God's glory
S. filled the place.
WEDNESDAY -FRIDAY
*.,' ,'. The joint island wide evangelistic
crusade moved to the Church of God's
convention center on Joe Farrington
.".... 'Road. The 7:00 p m praNer and con-
secration sessions, led b) ihe joint
"",.'.:z -'" prs.ier ministrie.. continued each*
.- '- night and prepared the way for the
worship experience.
S' Oer the course of the three nights,
S.he COG's and the COGOP's National
'. ..Praise Teams led the congregation in
S.periods of spirit-filled praise and wor-
ship. We enjoyed great singing by the
W .joint crusade choir and by Sharlene
'Smith and the Vision Brothers
'"" ", -' Bringingr greetings were Bishop.
William M. Johnson, former National
Overseer (COG), Bishop Timothy
J w Harper, Michiana Regional Overseer
i. GC BCOGOP) and Bishop C.N. Williams,
"".Overseer (COGOP).
Hu s Both national overseers, Bishop
John Humes and Bishop Elgarnet
Rahming, expressed gratitude to the
Steering committee, to the other sub-
.': ...committees and to all who participat-
ed in the services each night. It was
the combined efforts of all these per-
sons which helped to make the cru-
sade the success that it was. Bishop
Rahming encouraged the new con-
verts to join the COG/COGOP of their
choice as in any of these churches they
7 Iwill find "an environment conducive
to acceptance and to spiritual growth
and development". He encouraged
the congregation to keep the fires of
.. the revival burning throughout the
Bahamas.
Bishop Humes told the people that
in the spirit of cooperation, we have
map=better days ahead and that we must
embrace these days when they,come.
me Address by Bishop Victor Johnson of New Dimension, This spirit of cooperation will once
ate a Track & Field Relay event, will be used in symbolic again see the two churches coming
'orld where the Church of God and the Church of God of together in their national conventions
min March (COGOP) and April (COG).
Evangelism. THE INSET PHOTO WITH THE BATON- Both overseers will speak at each
, General Presybter -COGOP, Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Other's convention: Bishop Humes on
Dhn N. Humes, National Overseer -COG, Bishop William March 18, 2003 at the COGOP and
Bishop Rahmning on April 5, 2005 'at
shop William (Billy) Wilson, International Minister of the COG.
d of Prophecy. TO BE CONTINUED


NATIONAL FAMILY MINISTRIES


"Relationships..."


We often feel alone in one rela-
tionships that should provide
the greatest companionship.
The Church of God of
Prophecy National Family
Ministries in conjunction
with Dr. Ron & Doris
Warford Trainers
from Great
Commandment/Intimate
Life Ministries
invites you to join them
February 5, 2005 Radisson
Cable Beach as they host a
More than Married workshop.
In this workshop you will build
on relational skills dedicated to
enriching marriages and deep-
ening your intimacy.
Topics covered include:
Top Ten Intimacy Needs
How to resolve painful emo-
tions
,


*How to. Respond with True
Care
*Cultivatingg Romance and
embracing a healthy perspec-
tive on sexual intimacy
*The hindrances to healthy
relationships and relational
intimacy and
* Leaving Father and Mother
This workshop will enrich a
strong marriage, and can bring
healing to a wounded marriage.
Please contact Bishop Ghaly or
Angela Swann at 242 328-1181
or email pastorghaly @coral-
wave.com. Cost is $50.00 per
person (includes lunch and
Intimate Encounter
Workbook). Childcare is avail-
able on reservation basis,
SPACE IS LIMITED RESERVE
YOUR SPACE EARLY


1


9th Caribbean Leadership Conference

Begins Tonight at the Radisson Cable Hotel

Thursday, January 27th- Sunday, Januaryv30th 2005

theme: "The Value of Leadership"
Speakers to include: .


MA.
tHtiio Frend S. Fisher
((k;ealOveI P '


.055


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I







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, PAGE 9C


THE TRIBUNE


MOUNT TABOR
o i FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Ri 1 Willow Tree Ai, PR noav. n Gardenr P.O Box N.-9735 TaI :242) 392-2322 Fax: 242; 392-4343
'hWebsite: ww mounttat r IErg Av Tv,.nelel smI 'striP-es :o Email. rn r .b n 'n 1 .



NEWS





F females and a costs for her
considerable home, but she
S. U number of i .: also blessed
them are sin- with thousands
Sn gle parents. of dollars worth
This truth, of furniture and
coupled with appliances for
a God given her new home.
S'mandate to. In touring her
preach, pro- beautiful new
mote and home and
demonstrate thanking herfel-
Sthe message low Mount
SEN. PAULETE ZONICLE \ HO HEADS t Taborites for
MT. TABOR'S MIOUSING COMMITTEE, of prosperity
B ELLIS BLESS NEW HOME OF FAITHFUL ALONG WITH MR. GRAFTON IFILL, and integrity their assistance
SINGLE MOTHER. SHARES BRIEF REMARKS AS THEY PASS to believers; in making her
KEYS TO NEW HOME OWNER. has resulted in : dream a reality,
For many, home ownership is one of their biggetunique and dynamic approach to ministry at Mo Ms. McClain
dreams and one of their greatest accomplishmentsryfbor. Under Bishop Ellis visionary and insightftAtated that she is blessed that she and her kids now
life! And for many others, particularly single parents', leadership, a place
it s something they. can only hope and pray for. And Mount Ta bor that the
Sunday January 16th 2005, one blessed, faithful sir has undertak- can truly
mother s dream became a reality as her prayers v en the mission call home
answered when she was presented with keys for. en the mission call home
brand new home in Pastel Gardens. Nicole McClai of empower- She sai
long time ing its entire that botl
member of membership this year
Mount Tabor to position s lo gan
Full Gospel themselves to and them
Bap t i s t actually pos- h a v e
S. Church was sess the many Iready :
the picture of promises \of become- .
pride and joyGod outlined reality in
as Senator MT. TABORITES BRAVE INCLEMENT G ned realit. y
as Senator WEATHER TO in scripture, her life;
Sa u I e t t e CELEBRATE WITH NEW HOME OWNER. In this regard because she had High Expectations and Intensi
Zonicle and
Mr. Grafton however, he has developed a particular passion h a Prayer life and has now Realized her Dream
Ifil coordina- deliberate focus toward seeing the members secure tst she is living manifestation of dn answered pra
tors of the own homes and an even greater burden for seeing si because
FIRST LADY PA.RICEL ELLIS CUTS RIB- c h u r c h s mothers realize the dream of home ownership. o d
BION AS NEW HOME OWNERLOOKS ON. Mo r t g a g e In December of 2003, Bishop Ellis instituted a camp i n d e e d
Ass st a n ce within the church to assist as many members as pos t i I
Program presented her with the keys to her very oWture their own homes in 2004. Well aware of the hears and
home. Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Senior Pastor of the churt at most people can afford mortgage payments, but answers
pointed out the fact that while the church assisted eifte a struggle securing the down payments and in prayers!
families to qualify for homes in 2004, Ms. McClainosts necessary to buy a home, the Mortgage Assist
was special because she is a single mother that has ram raised funds to help members that could q
with God and has strived to maintain her integrity a for home loans with their down payment
Christian woman in the midst of phenomenal odds. with
hung in there and is now a living example of the faith -itionally, during the year they hosted a Mortga
fullness of God and a rmajorfocus of Mount Tabor. hair, at which the entire membership was able to g
Bishop Ellis pointed out the fact that most churches pful insight and information to assist them wi -
predominantly populated with females. And while tlfeparing themselves financially for home ownership ll[,
male / female ratio varies from church to church, soW-. McClains blessing was tremendous because she not TO GOD BE THE GLORY!
of the most committed, diligent church members a ly received the necessary down payments and initial


Pirnewood-our JerusalemI

T of its exis-' first of which i
esus tence. And the formation b
directed while the a Pinewoo
.the disci- church has Communit
ples tostart always been M arcc
the work a proud and Band, as map
of the good neigh- parents atresse
Church in bor, Bishop the need fo
Jerusaler n Ellis and the positive activi
( their entire ties for their
immediate Mount children t
communi- Tabor mem- b
ty), then bership is involved wit
BISHOP ELLIS PRAYs FOR PINEWOOD COMMUNITY take it to MIIN. GIBSON AND BISHOP ELLIS RELEASE committed BISHOP ELLIS & 11urN. ALLi SON in the commu
AND NEW UPGRADES TO THE PARK. J udea, FISH INTO NEW LAKE. MAYNARD-GIBSON M.P. FOR
Lto becom- PINEWOOD CELEBRATE DONATION OF nity.
Samariang an even greater, more aware and sensitive neighbor_ -EW MARCHING BAND INSTRUMENTS. Having per
and the uttermost parts of the world. Ever mindful of t Ifurch than ever before. sonal awareness of the positive impact that such an en
need to follow Biblical models and concepts, Mount Tabor To this end, when the newly upgraded Pinewowi can have on young people, Bishop Ellis got to work r
has undertaken the mandate to take their focus on trFk was completed, Bishop Ellis and his pastoral staf~yay and in conjunction with the Member of Parliament
Jerusalem Pinewood Gardens, to the next level. BislbJnded and participated in the Rededication ServiceRinewood, the Hon. Allyson Maynard-Gibson will.
Neil C. Tuesday January 11th, 2005. Bishop Ellis, who was aslnahching the a Pinewood Gardens Community M(cl
Ellis, Senior to lead in the prayer of Re-dedication; also took the oppBand in a few weeks. On Sunday, January 16th d in(
Pastor indi- tunity to highlight the importance of all of the entities withS:30am Divine Worship Service, Min. Gibson and h te
:- .- .._ coated that in the community working together for the overall good efymbolically presented Bishop Ellis with 2 of 96 brand r


A wj hiethe the residents. The Pinewood Park, which now has a waletrurnents that they have secured for the start of the E
Lord has ing / running path, a mini basketball court for the kids, ndishop Ellis has also held the first of two meeting with
bl essed swings and recreational area and a beautiful new lakqoaisents of Pinewood at 6:30pm in the upper room ofMV(
&rMo 0u n t now one of the best on the island. Min. Gibson also staTedbor on Monday January 24th, where they discussed I
Tabor to in her remarks that the accomplishment further highliglfts the band. Pinewood parents were invited to come
have grow- the importance of the community and the church workingriirake their inputs, as the band is being designed to
w *ing interna- harmony and diligence for the overall good and advandeeir kids.
tional pres- ment of its people. Pinewood residents can look for 'ard to the band ps juE
ence and This next level Pinewood Focus for Mount Tablcteginning of Mount Tabor s recoumitment to ensuring
PINEWOOD COMMUNITY MEMBERS POSE influence, however, got off the ground in October of 2004, when jLWery resident of Pinewood Gardens, knows that as-p
WITH MIN. GIBSON & BISHOP ELLIS BY he feels an under 500 of Mount Tabor s members took to the street representatives of Christ in their community, that t
NEW LAKE. even greater conduct an needs assessment for the community. They in greater ways to demonstrate the love,g
nee'i to cited every home in Pinewood Gardens, presented the ..r.iveao in greater ways towdemonstrate the love, gi
ensure that the needs of the residents th God has l Pinearns pen t heart of Almighty God towards them like never Il
ensure o n thahe needs o ae resiens ha nGas pc with a gift, conducted a brief survey of needs and con- ned
around the church are being addressed. cerns and prayed with the respondents. Subsequent tdrfh many ways as is needed.
Mount Tabor has been a landmark in the Pinewotitation, the data was compiled and a number of initiatives TO GOD BE THE GLORY!
Gardens Community for approximately 16 of the 17 year being developed to address the points of concern. The











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