• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Business
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Insight














Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00018
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 24, 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
        page A 15
        page A 16
    Section B: Business
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B: Sports
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C: Insight
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text



I 1

"DELUXE

SALADSF" in w it.

HIGH 66F
LOW 58F

44 COOLER
4 WITH SUN


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.50 MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005 PRICE- 500

I, s O


Minister to set up

task force after claims

of abuse at detention

centre and prison


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
IMiviitGRATION Ministert
Vincent Peet said yesterday he
is to set up an inter-ministerial
task force following the latest
allegations of abuse of detainees
and prisoners at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre and
Her Majesty's Prison.
Mr Peet said he was disap-
pointed with the "unbalanced
reporting" published in an arti-
,cle on the front page of Sun-
"day's Miami Herald that
recounted the alleged torture
claims by migrants and prison-
ers.
The article, titled "Migrants'
Torment" will again bring the
treatment of detainees and pris-
oners held in the Bahamas
under international scrutiny.
The article follows exclusive
reports carried by The Tribune
last year detailing the alleged
accusations of brutality and tor-
ture at the detention.centre.
One Cuban detainee, 33-
year-old Alexi Leon Ortuota,
told The Miami Herald: "They
beat us like dogs. They don't
give us soap or drinking water.
They give us nothing."
The article says that detainees
also claimed that some guards
in the past forced several people


to eat off the ground, raped two
women and subjected two
Cubans to mock executions. In
addituii they Ja.n,'d ihui. L was
poor food, rancid bathrooms,
and a lack of proper bedding
and medical treatment.
Yesterday, a statement from
the government said: "The arti-
cle in The Miami Herald of
Sunday 23, January 2005 is not a
proper description of what hap-
pens at the Detention Centre,
nor at the prison. The govern-
ment is to convene an inter-
ministerial task force to consid-
er a proper response. The alle-
gations are not new, but will be
the subject of further study by
the task force. The task force is
to include representatives from
the Department of Immigra-
tion, the country's security
forces, the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs and the Attorney Gen-
eral's office."
Mr Peet said he was disap-
pointed that after personally
speaking with The Miami Her-
ald reporter and working to
grant him access to the facili-
ties, he would then turnaround
and write a report that was
unbalanced.
"I told him the Bahamian
government had nothing to
SEE page 10


'School gang

situation' needs

'to be addressed'


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A GROUP of concerned
Grand Bahama residents has
formed the environmental
group Save the Island! to help
protect the island's environ-
ment.
The group says its members
prefer to remain anonymous
so they are not victimised by
the "Grand Bahama Port


Authority and their lawyers,
greedy businessmen and
politicians whose agendas may
only be motivated by money
and none of which have any
respect for the environment -
or for Grand Bahama."
In a press release yesterday,
Save the Island! said it will:
"Try to restrict any more
industrial development in
Grand Bahama to Freeport's
SEE page 10


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
GANG culture is still highly
prevalent in Bahamian schools,
the director of the Youth
Against Violence programme
Carlos Reid, claimed yesterday.
Mr Reid, a former gang
member himself, said the nation
is denying there is a problem
with gangs inside the country's
schools and the situation needs
to be addressed as soon as pos-
sible.
His comments follow the
stabbing of a pupil two weeks
ago at a school and the arrest


last week of a student for car-
rying a machete inside his
school's premises.
Mr Reid's organisation states
that there are presently 54
recognized gangs in the
Bahamas, with 48 based in New
Providence. Females are also
joining gangs at an increasing
rate, he said.
"Gangs still run through the
school, it's at a high level. Just
like in the streets they still sell-
ing drugs in school," said a 17-
year-old from CI Gibson, and a
former member of the Nike
SEE page 12


N assau6and Bahama Islands'6LeadingNe wsp


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


he BAHAMAS EDITIraON
BAHAMAS EDITION


I


Residents form
0
environmental group
,.aiming to protect


Grand Baha'ma


Pe


Pe ol













Baptist minister: local government




system can reduce violence S1apital
Y S* 4SS1-^ 1 Wa .-ll


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
THE local government sys-
tem should be introduced in
New Providence to reduce the
levels of violence currently
experienced in the capital,
prominent Baptist Minister
Bishop Simeon Hall said yes-
terday.
Bishop Hall said that in his
opinion the empowerment of
Bahamian people at all levels
would lead to a significant
decrease in violence. Violence,
he said, will continue to grow


"I believe if local government
were initiated in New
Providence there would be a
sharp decrease in violence,
apathy and indifference to
community buildings."

Bishop Simeon Hall


unless people have the feel-
ing that they have more of a


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Local News........................ P10,12,14,15,16
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Advt ............. ................................. P11 ,13
BUSINESS/SPORTS SECTION
Business ....................................... P1,2,3,4,6
A dvts................................................... P5,8,9
T. V. G uide................................................ P7
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INSIGHT SECTION
Insight ....................................... P1,2,3,5,6,7
C om ics..................................................... P4
W eather.................................................... P8

CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 28 PAGES

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Main ....................... 12 Pages
Sports/Business..... .12 Pages


say in their lives.
"I believe if local govern-
ment were initiated in New
Providence there would be a
sharp decrease in violence,
apathy and indifference to
community buildings," said
Bishop Hall in a press release
issued over the weekend.
Bishop Hall pointed out
that violence is symptomatic
of a despairing community
and a major way to curb vio-
lence is to empower people.

Distance
"The growing distance
between those who make laws
and those who live at the
ground level is far too wide.
Since the average person has
very little connection to the
power brokers in our county,
they are not apt to participate
in positive things necessary for
community building," he said.
The bishop said that if
despair and apathy are going
to be reduced those in posi-
tions of power must be
inclined and willing to allow
more people to share in the
decisions that impact the
country.
"Participation is a basic soci-
plogical urge. Find a way to
allow persons, especially
young black males, to be
involved in the growth and,
development of their commu-


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased
to invite applications from suitably qualified individuals to fill the
position of Associate in its Project Accounting Unit, a division of
its Cost & Investments Department.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

* Prepare a monthly Receivable and Contributions Analysis report.
* Prepare a monthly Deferred Income Amortization Report.
* Prepare monthly journal entries for completed projects.
* Monitor all development project expenditures and make necessary
adjustments.
* Updates and maintain individual "D" project expenditure files.
* Prepare monthly reconciliations showing all movements entered
into the general ledger and CIP modules for D100 accounts.
* Prepare a monthly Closure and Expense Reports for D100 accounts.
* Record and set up NEW and CLOSED Projects in the ROSS System,
and spreadsheet on request, in accordance with the policies and
procedures.
o Conduct site verification on all projects to assess the extent to which
project plan were achieved, and the impact of cost and overruns if
any.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. Bachelors Degree in Accounting or Finance with three (3) years
experience OR,
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3. Must be proficient in the use of Microsoft Excell and Word
4. Must possess strong Analytical skills
5. Excellent written and oral presentation skills required.

All applications should be recieved at BTC's Head Office, 21 John
F. Kennedy Drive, no later than Wednesday, January 26th, 2005, and
addressed as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

Re: Associate Project Accounting Unit


nity and we will see a serious
decrease in crime and
anti-social behaviour," he
said.
The Local Government Act
1996 created 23 districts in the
Family Islands, New Provi-
dence was not part of the dis-
tript structure. In 1999, the
Minister for Family Island
Affairs, under authority of the


Cuban and

Argentinian

relations 'scarred'
* HAVANA
RELATIONS between
Cuba and Argentina
remain scarred after the
Caribbean island's govern-
ment's refusal to let a
prominent Cuban doctor
travel to Argentina to visit
her family, according to
Argentina's outgoing
ambassador, according to
Associated Press.
Raul Taleb, who
resigned from his post
because of the spat, told
journalists late Friday that
he asked for a meeting
with Cuban Foreign Minis-
ter Felipe Perez Roque to
say goodbye more than a
week ago but was denied.
"So I don't think rela-
tions are very good," said
Taleb, who added he felt
like the scapegoat.

Refused
Dr. Hilda Molina, a
brain surgeon, who was
once a friend of Cuban
President Fidel Castro, but
is now considered an oppo-
nent of his communist gov-
ernment. Cuba has repeat-
edly refused her requests
for permission to travel to
Argentina to visit her fami-
ly.
In early December,
Argentine President.
Nestor Kirchner wrote a
letter to Castro asking him
to let Molina come to
Argentina for the holidays
to visit her son and grand-
children.
Castro declined and
instead invited the family
to come visit Molina in
Cuba.


Local Government Act 1996,
created eight new districts.
This development of local.
government changed the sys-
tem of government put in
place for the Family Islands
90 years ago.
Local government was seen
as an acknowledgment by the
then government that a cen-
tral government distant from



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NO Blood
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many communities particular-
ly in the Family Islands, can-
not adequately respond to the
daily needs of Fanily Island
communities in a timely fash-
ion.
This form of local govern-
ment, if it was set up on New
Providence could be the
answer to reduce crime, Bish-
op Hall said.


Ald



IJ 71. 1.
Iii


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


THE -1R!R-I-INE









MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOANW


Director of School Security hits


out at some public school guards


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT Director of
Schools Security Stephen
Plakaris has claimed that some
security guards who patrol pub-
lic schools in Grand Bahama
are guilty of "insubordination,
alcoholism, and lack of profes-
sionalism."
Of the 45 officers, he said
that three have a repeated his-
tory of missing an average of
60 to 70 days a year without
good reasons while collecting
full salaries. Mr Plakaris' state-
ment came on the heels of the
recent firing of a security officer
at St George's High school,
which drew opposition from
some teachers, union officials
and the school administration
last week.


He was one of 14 security
officers contracted to the two
public schools in Freeport.
Chief Councillor Marva
Moxey of the City of Freeport
claims that the security officer
was not given due process
because the proper procedures
were not followed.

Responsible
She also criticised Mr
Plakaris, claiming that a "myr-
iad of problems" arose in the
school system since his appoint-
ment. She also alleges that he is
responsible for "the traumatis-
ing of our (the council) employ-
ees."
Mr Plakaris challenged Ms
Moxey to identify the problems
she referred to and to provide
medical proof that he has trau-
matised employees.


--7




FUNERAL services for :I
Nancy Oakes von Hoyningen-
Huene will be held on Friday,
January 28 at 4pm at Christ
Church Cathedral, George i
Street. Following the service,
she will be buried in the ceme-
tery at St Mary The Virgin
Anglican Church on Virginia
Street.
She had been ailing for
sometime and died in London
on Sunday, January 19. She
was 80.
Nancy Oakes was the eldest
daughter of the late Sir Harry
Oakes, who was bludgeoned
to death in his Cable Beach
home in the early morning
hours of July 8, 1943. Books
are still being written about the 0 NANCY OAKES VON
unsolved murder for which her HOYNINGEN-HUENE
husband, Count Alfred (Fred-
die) de Marigny was charged,
but later acquitted.
After her divorce from Count de Marigny she married Baron
von Hoyningen-Huene in a ceremony at St Mary the Virgin
Church, Virginia Street. Patrick Triton was her third husband.
This marriage also ended in divorce.

Daughter
She is survived by her daughter, Mrs Patricia Oakes Leigh-
Wood, and a son Alexander (Sasha) von Hoyningen-Huene,
three grandchildren, John Alexander Roosevelt and Shirley
Alice Leigh-Wood, a son-in-law, Robert Leigh-Wood, a broth-
er and sister-in-law, Mr and Mrs Harry Oakes, Jr of Lyford Cay,
many nieces and nephews, and her ex-husband Baron Lyssardt
von Hoyningen-Huene.
She was predeceased by her parents, Sir Harry Oakes and
Eunice, Lady Oakes, her brothers, Sir Sydney and Pitt Oakes,
and her younger sister, Shirley Oakes.
Nancy Oakes had a life-long interest in the arts, particular-
ly ballet. At one time she was a director of the Martha Graham
Company, having studied with Martha Graham in the early
forties. It was through her association with Martha Graham that
she met Merce Cunningham, one of the world's foremost chore-
ographers. They remained life-long friends, and she became a
director of the Merce Cunningham Foundation. *
She first went to Mexico with her father, Sir Harry, before
World War II and remained a constant visitor throughout her
life. She has owned a house there since 1952. She was the
attach for the Bahamas Olympic Committee in Mexico during
the 1968 Games.
Her son recalled the memorable party she gave for the
Bahamian contingent on that occasion when the "Royal
Bahamas Police Band played Goombay into the wee hours of
the morning."













IIIIO-










S. E I


He said his position was
appointed by Cabinet, which
means that his jurisdiction and
authority is not local, but
national.
According to Mr Plakaris,
the 45 security officers sta-
tioned in Grand Bahama were
hired to provide 24-hour secu-
rity protection in eight-hour
shifts on school campuses.
Although the council pays
the salaries of the public school
security personnel, he noted
that their salaries are paid out
of the budget provided by the
government.
"Since the money provided
the council comes from the
public treasury, one can logi-
cally conclude that the citizens
of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas pay the salary. There-
fore they are accountable to
the people," he said.
Mr Plakaris pointed out addi-
tional deficiencies in the per-
formance of some of the offi-
cers, including the practice of
leaving the premises for hours
without permission, insubordi-
nation, alcoholism, and lack of
professionalism.
Mr Plakaris stressed that the
rules and regulations which
apply to all government
employees also apply to the
14 officers, with the exception
of certain contractual


modifications.
He said failure to abide by
the rules may result in
dismissal in accordance with
the law. According to Ms Mox-
ey, School Superintendent
Hezekiah Dean and the princi-
pals met with Mr Plakaris and
put forth a process that ought
to happen before any employ-
ee was dealt with.
She said that in the instance
of the security officer at St
George's the system that they
had been put in place did not
happen.

Decision
"He did not get due process
before the matter was taken to
the council for a decision to be
made. The principal nor Mr
Dean knew of the report that
was given to the Island Admin-
istrator. It was done single-
handedly by the security staff of
Mr Stephen Plakaris," she
said.
Ms Moxey said while she is
not in a position to dispute the
report of tardiness and absen-
teeism in regard to the fired
officer, the proper system ought
to have been followed.
Ms Moxey said she certainly
would not condone any
employee being paid when he
was not working.


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Price Charles Branch





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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


3 *k 6 3 **TERS TO THE EDITO


ALREADY almost three years into their
first term and seven months after the brouha-
ha over US airport security asking Prime Min-
ister Christie to take off his shoes, there is still
a member of the Christie government who
has the brass to plead ignorance about proto-
col for boarding an international flight from
Nassau International Airport.
The matter was raised briefly in the House
of Assembly last week when Lucaya MP Neko
Grant asked Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell if he was aware that Ministry of,
Health Parliamentary Secretary Ron Pinder
had breached security at Nassau Internation-
al Airport (NIA). Mr Pinder was on his way to
Washington to represent the Bahamas at Pres-
ident George Bush's inauguration.
Mr Mitchell said he did not want to describe
it as a breach of security, but a "miscommu-
nication on what the protocol is for Members
of Parliament accessing the tarmac" at NIA.
When contacted in Washington for his
explanation, Mr Pinder told a Tribune reporter
that he thought Mr Mitchell had "cleared this
up, it was just a miscommunication."
We think that although Mr Mitchell appre-
ciates the gravity of the matter, Mr Pinder
does not.
This matter is far too serious to be swept
under the carpet as a mere "miscommunica-
tion."
Mr Pinder denied he drove his car onto
the tarmac to board the US Air plane.
It really doesn't matter how he got there.
The. very fact that he boarded an aircraft,
made himself comfortable in an unassigned
seat with his seatbelt securely fastened, only to
be caught by the flight attendant when she
did her head count and found she had one
too many on board, shows that NIA security is
not what it should be. If Mr Pinder could get
on the aircraft so easily checking his ticket
at the counter, then avoiding all security check
points, both Bahamian and US to the aircraft
- what is to stop another unauthorised per-
son doing the same? The thought is frighten-
ing.
Mr Grant asked whether Mr Pinder was
refused permission to reboard the aircraft. "I
would not say that he was not allowed to board
the plane, but rather that he did not board
the plane," replied Mr Mitchell as he tried to
skirt the issue.
We have been told that although there
were those who would have reboarded Mr
Pinder, the captain refused to have him on
his flight.
And the captain, who is in charge of his air-
craft, is the one who has the last word. Mr
Pinder took a later flight.
Mr Mitchell confirmed that because of the


incident the flight was delayed, and had to
return to the gate.
We wonder if any of them realise the enor-
mity of what the consequences of Mr Pinder's
so-called "miscommunication" could have
been had the flight attendant not stopped the
flight.
Already the flight delay had not only incon-
venienced the airline, but also its passengers,
especially those with connections to make in
Washington. It is understood that Washington
was not the final destination of US Air and so
the passenger inconvenience continued to its
final destination.
It is fortunate that Mr Pinder's presence
was discovered before the aircraft was air-
borne.
Had it taken off the cost of turning back
would have been substantial. Firstly, with
tanks full for the long flight to Washington, it
would have had to have jettisoned fuel to
lighten its load for landing at NIA.
An airline source estimated the cost to the
airline, taking into consideration the crew's
time, the engine time and the offloading of
fuel, could conservatively have been anywhere
between $5,000 and $10,000.
Nor did Mr Pinder, strutting forth as the
big-shot from the Bahamas, give any thought
to what his arrogance could have meant to
the airline and its staff if US Air had arrived in
Washington with an undocumented passenger.
"Not only would a heavy fine have been
slapped on the airline, but heads would have
rolled,", said an airport source. "Since 9/11
they don't suspend, they fire. He put the jobs
of all the staff of that aircraft at risk. And we
are yet to hear a public apology."
Mr Pinder has no excuse for being confused
about protocol for MPs.
He should know, after the incident with the
Governor-General and then the Prime Min-
ister, that he has to make arrangements
through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which
in turn has to notify the American Embassy.
He also should know that if he expects security
to be laid on in the US, the Americans require
72 hours notice.
It is mind-boggling to think what would
have possessed Mr Pinder to do something
like this, especially since 9/11. Maybe this will
teach him that he is just an MP, a servant of
the Bahamian people, who should be setting
an example, not acting as though he is some-
one separate and apart and above the rules of
other mortals.
It is about time that Mr Christie opened
night school for his government members to let
them know what is expected of them. At pre-
sent the behaviour of some of them is causing
too much embarrassment.


'Anxiety'




over Bimini




Bay project


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352

MP puts US airline in jeopardy


EDITOR, The Tribune.
ALTHOUGH the $100
million Bimini Bay devel-
opment has been revised,
there is still nagging anxi-
ety about environmental
degradation on an island
whose mangroves and
unspoilt natural habits con-
servationists want to pro-
tect.
The head butting between
the Government of The
Bahamas and critics who
are concerned about an
impending environmental
catastrophe is well known.
In a new development,
the international activist
group Mangrove Action
Project (MAP) is petition-
ing Prime Minister Perry
Christie, several other cabi-
net ministers and officials
in the Bahamas Environ-
mental Science and Tech-
nology Commission, urging
them to halt the destruction
caused by an "unsustainable
development plan."
"The whole purpose is to
try to protect what's there,
preserve it for the future
generations and it's being
tossed away for one person-
's short lived plan and his
life will end one day with
money in his grave and we
will be poor on this planet
earth and our children will
be angry at us for being so,
stupid to let these kinds of
developments progress,"
said Alfredo Quarto, exec-
utive director of MAP.
According to Mr Quarto,
his organisation is prepared
to wage a consistent and
sustained campaign against
the development underway
in Bimini and others like it
that are a travesty.
"The whole issue is basi-
cally tearing apart a viable
and important eco system
that produces huge amounts
of benefits for the local peo-
ple and the local coastal
environment and turning
that into what's called a
mega resort for one person-
's benefit....We think that
unique forms of life will
actually be extinguished
from this Earth because of
these kinds of developments
which I think are really
short-sighted," Mr Quarto
said.
Earlier this year, the gov-
ernment, in signing a
revised heads of agreement


with developer Gerado
Capo branded the project
as economically viable and
environmentally sustain-
able. Phase I of the plan, in
which RAV plans to pump
$70 million, is now under
construction.
It calls for a 410-room
luxury hotel to include a
small casino, 1,080 condos
and 440 single family
homes. There will also be
an 18-hole Links golf course
and a marina designed to
accommodate 150 pleasure
vessels.
Originally, the agreement
had provided for 930 rooms,
3,200 condos and 611 single
family homes.
But what still concerns
environmentalists, including
those in the MAP and the
Bahamas Reef Environment
and Educational Founda-
tion (BREEF) is that the
island has no room for such
a project.
In a letter addressed to
the prime minister, MAP
pointed out that worst of all
the golf course will be built
on what is now a mangrove
wetland adjacent to North
Sound which .will be
dredged and the sea bottom
destroyed.
"The surrounding land
will be sacrificed and filled,"
the letter said. "In short this
development is a disaster
waiting to happen. Please
take steps now to halt the
further loss to this impor-
tant and beautiful place."
The warm clear waters of
Bimini flow from the Gulf
Stream up onto the Great
Bahama Bank. These waters
have made Bimini a world
famous destination for Big
Game Fishing, Scuba Div-
ing, and Shark Research.
Bimini has the only man-
grove estuary in the north-
west Great Bahama Bank
and serves as a fish nursery
for thousands of square
miles of sea bottom.
Dr Samuel Gruber of the
Bimini Biological Field Sta-
tion has conducted a com-
prehensive study on the
project's environmental
impact, claiming that there
was evidence the conditions


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in North Sound and Bimini
lagoon had seriously dete-
riorated.
The report attributed this
deterioration to a massive
excavation of the lagoon
substrata causing greatly
increased sedimentation
rates, increase in nutrient
levels and possibly release
of heavy metals.
He denied that the new
heads of agreement that was
signed with the Christie
administration would' allow
a substantially scaled down
version of the original pro-
ject.
He argued that the agree-
ment would still allow Mr
Capo to develop property
from Bailey Town to North
Sound as originally envi-
sioned except that the
development itself is only
slightly smaller.
"The wetlands must
remain intact and man-
groves must not be
destroyed and you must not
dredge and that has all been
rescinded he can dredge and
he can take out the man-
groves and he can develop a
golf course where there is
now our wetlands," he told
the Journal.
The people opposed to
the scale of the RAV pro-
ject are backing another
plan to make a portion of
the island, on which over
1600 people call home, a
Marine Protected Site.
The former Free National
Movement Government had
declared north Bimini one
of five such sites that made
up a network of reserves
throughout The Bahamas.
The plan was said to have
five key benefits; to support
fisheries and fisheries man-
agement, protect the ecosys-
tem structure, enhancement
non-extractive human activ-
ities such as sightseeing and
scuba diving and increase
scientific understanding.
The Journal contacted the
Ambassador for the Envi-
ronmerit Keod Smith but
was told that he is out of
town as was the Member of
Parliament for West End
and Bimini and Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe.

TAMEKA LUNDY
Bimini,
December, 2004.







MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


NASSAU Harbour enjoyed a hus, weekend with no less than six
cruise ships %isiling the capital on Salurdai.
Tourists enjoyed fine weather r at the start of the weekend before
it turned cooler )eslerda).
S "(Phoo: ,Ilario Duncanson)
.w ~..*W, -.. .. .*^ -f S ^


CARICOM ambassador: Bahamas





may benefit by joining CSME soon


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
ALTHOUGH the Bahamas
may be allowed to defer entry
to the Caribbean Single Mar-
ket Economy for as "long as
they are comfortable", it may
benefit the county to join soon
so that it can take a more
active role in the early deci-
sion making processes of
regional trade agreements.
CARICOM ambassador
Leonard Archer explained
yesterday that the Bahamas
was a part of several



MONDAY
JANUARY 24
2:00 Community Page 1540AM
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
7:30 Community Page 1540AM"
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:30 Immediate Response
1:00 Lisa Knight & The Round
Table
1:30 This Generation
2:00 Gospel Video Countdown
3:00 Treasure Attic
3:30 CMJ Club Zone
4:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
4:30 Kids On The Move
4:58 & 30 ZNS News update LIVE
5:00 Cybernet
5:30 Cinema, Cinema, Cinema
6:00 Holy Hip Hop
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Teacher's & Salaried Co-op
Credit Union
9:00 Black College Talent Hour
10:00 Sports Lifestyles
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540AM


Caribbean countries which
signed The Treaty of
Chaguaramas upon its entry
to CARICOM. He explained
that the document which orig-
inated in 1973 had two com-
ponents: The community and
the common market. While
the Bahamas joined the
Caribbean community, up to
now, it has deferred from join-
ing the common market.

Commission
"In 1989, the governments
in the region decided that in
light of what was happening
in the rest of the world, the
treaty did not go far enough.
A commission was set up and
drafted nine protocols which
were fashioned into the
revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mas," he explained to host
Anthony Delaney and Fayne
Thompson while a guest on


Parliament Street yesterday.
He said that to date all of
the original signatories of the
initial documents have signed
the revised treaty except the
Bahamas.
He explained that under the
new treaty, no .provision is
made to sign on one issue and
not the next. Therefore, he
said the Bahamas has to
decide if they will accept the
treaty in its revised entirety.
However, he said that while
the Bahamas can remain on
the sidelines as long as it and
the other members are com-
fortable "the question is
whether that is in our best
interest?"
He said that the ground-
work for laying the CSME is
due to be completed this year.
"Since the common market
is in operation, it is in the
Bahamas' interest if it is to,
join to get,in fairly quickly


A DOZEN business executives from the Bahamas
returned from Southwest Florida this weekend as a part of
an effort to build closer business, investment and tourism
partnerships.
The delegation from Grand Bahama wanted to find out
how to operate a tourist hot spot.
They visited shopping centres, schools and
hospitals.
Their hosts, the Lee County Visitors and convention
Bureau, has been fostering partnerships with other vacation
destinations.
There's already a Southwest Florida tourism office in
Puerto Rico.
Plans are in the works for a direct flight from Grand
Bahama to Fort Myers when the new terminal opens at
Southwest Florida International Airport.


because as decisions are taken,
if we are not there, then it
becomes a little difficult when
you do come in, conditions
and decisions are already set.
"The other reason for think-
ing we ought to join this year
is because the revised treaty
is important when it comes to
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and the Free Trade
Agreement of the Americas
(FTAA) because if the
Bahamas joins now it becomes
a beneficiary of whatever has
already been agreed in terms
of tariffs and concessions.
Membership of the CSME
allows the Bahamas to retain
its status as a developing coun-
try.

Concessions
He said that would entitle
the Bahamas to anm benefits.
or concessions that came \ ith
that distinction.,
Mr Archer said. one of the,
major fears thecountry has
was the perception that the
country would be inundated
with foreigners through the
free movement of labor. How-
ever, Mr Archer reiterated
government's position that the
Bahamas would not sign on to
anything which would not be
beneficial to the Bahamian
people.
A document outlining the
CSME will be released by the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
this week. It addresses the
issues raised by Bahamiiians on
the matter.


Fire suspends



church services

EARLY morning services at Bethel Baptist Church on West
Street were temporarily suspended as firefighters spent almost
an hour battling a blaze in a nearby building yesterday.
According to Fire Department official Sgt Derrick Knowles,
fire officers received a call at 9:35am reporting that a two-
storey stucco building was ablaze.
The team needed two fire trucks and a human water relay
team and took more than forty-five minutes to get the blaze
under control.
Sgt Knowles said that based on the amount of flames, it
appeared that the fire had been burning for "at least a half hour
to an hour" before firemen got the emergency call.
He said this often occurs because people see a fire but believe
that someone else has reported it or think the fire team is on the
,way.
SlHowe\ xer, he cautioned that that is not always the case.
"Ift )ou see a fire, you need to report it immediately because
we cannot respond uniil we get the call."
He explained that an investigation has been launched to
determine the cause of the fire.


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THE construction site of the Caribbean Community | ,!',I
(CARICOM) Convention Center, funded by the Chinese Gov- -I
eminent, is shown surrounded by water on Sunday, Jan. 23, 2005
in Georgetown, Guyana. Guyana's president Bharrat Jagdeo '
appealed for more flood relief, saying some international donors 'Iil i
have yet to deliver on pledges after the heaviest rains in a cen- -.-. .
tury killed at least six people. (AP Photo/Ken Moore)
:' ., _2/ .' .". z ,,- j- "p, .


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January 25th to February 6th
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1 ,-A I....-. .- .. I ...,t I-,.... . .. I. I ..


Appeal for flood relief.




as heavy rains kill six


* GEORGETOWN, Guyana
GUYANA'S president appealed
for more flood relief Sunday, saying
some international donors have yet
to deliver on pledges after the heav-
iest rains in a century killed at least
six people and displaced thousands
of residents, according to Associa-
tion Press.
President Bharrat Jagdeo said
most international aid agencies and
donors have been sending assess-
ment teams before approving aid,
forcing officials to use scarce local
resources.
"We have pledges, but ... some-


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times the international agencies have
their own way of working," Jagdeo
said. "They insist on coming down
and doing an assessment."
Jagdeo said Brazil has delivered
two truckloads of food, while a
planeload of blankets, hygiene kits
and medical supplies has come from
the International Committee of the
Red Cross, based in Geneva. Aid
agencies have been stretched thin'
because of the massive relief effort
underway to help victims of last
month's tsunami in Asia that killed
more than 157,000 people.
Jagdeo's remarks came a day after
the United States said it would send
in drainage pumps, food and other


Although its sturdy frame and
box-body structure alone puts
the Sorento ahead of its
competition, Kia's pursuit of
safety does not stop there.
Intelligent safety systems used
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de-pob~k d'dual alfbags 'and
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relief supplies, possibly by this week.
Local authorities, meanwhile, hur-
ried supplies of drinking water to
residents trapped in their homes by
high flood waters and set up mobile
water tankers in some of the worst-
hit areas. Water access points have
also been opened in 29 affected com-
munities.
Troops have been feeding up to
8,000 people a day while the gov-
ernment is buying meals from restau-
rants for flood victims, some of
whom have lined up along highways
begging for help.
Guyana's Defense Force is also
standing by to evacuate as many as
20,000 people from towns east of the
capital, Georgetown, according to
Brig. Gen. Edward Collins, the army
chief.

Television
Meanwhile, authorities on Satur-
day shut down a privately owned
television station that had criticized
the government's relief efforts. CNS,
Channel Six, owned by opposition.
politician Chandra Narine Sharma,
remained off, the air Sunday after
armed, police entered the'statlo'lrs
Georgetown office'and seized tranis-'
mission equipment.
Jagdeo's spokesman, Robert Per-
saud, accused the station of inciting
.people to block main highways to
protest the government's relief
efforts.Sharma has denied the
charge, saying his station only
exposed inadequate relief efforts in
city and coastal districts where rains
have left up to 30 inches (76 cen-
timeters) in some homes.
Sunshine peaked through mostly


overcast skies Sunday, but meteo-
rologists predicted more heavy rains'
early next week. ,
The heaviest rains in a century 1
already have forced thousands of
people from homes in Georgetown.,
and coastal villages. Most are staying
with friends or relatives, though ;at
least 5,000 are sheltering in schools,
churches and public buildings.

Rain
More than 40 inches (101 cen,,
timeters) of rain have fall n i the
former British colony since Dec 20.
including more than 27 inches (6Ai
centimeters) this month alone. An%
average of 8 inches (2 ccmnuimeiers)l
normally falls in January.
Thousands of people have been
forced from their homes in George-
town, staying with relatives or taking
shelter at schools, churches and pub-
lic buildings. The government hand-
ed out hot meals, mattresses, dried
rations, water and other relief sup-
plies.
Jagdeo has said the floods have
.ialecIcd im..Ic than half the popula-
ti6onof 750,000..Most Guyafiese live
'on thi l 1 iIg ic:'aIl He' has
appealed t.: tlc Li S S .ouiherm Co m-
mand to have U.S. troops bring in
power generators and small boats.
Hundreds of angry residents wait-
ed for hours outside shelters or gov-
ernment buildings for handouts of
food, water and other supplies Sat-
urday.
At least six people have been
killed, including three people whose
bodies were found floating outside
their homes Saturday and a six-year-
old boy who drowned Thursday.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005












Beenie Man offers


millionn reward for


capture
DANCEHALL deejay was shot de
Beenie Man has posted a $1 Jamaica, at
million reward for the capture Thursday.
of the men who killed dance- The police
hall personality, Gerald Levy, four other pe
popularly known as "Bogle", in his Ford
according to the Jamaica chasing gas
Observer, armed men
The reward, according to F4 motorbi
Beenie Man, whose real name sprayed the
is Moses Davis, will be lets.
increased over subsequent
weeks until the murderers are 111n
caught, The Observer report-
ed. All five w
"If they are not caught after Kingston I
two weeks, we will increase it where B o
to $2 million," Beenie Man injuries. A 1
said. "And every three weeks two men ai
after that it will be raised by $1 woman we
million." woman wa
Bogle, regarded as a leader released whi
of the Black Roses Crew, persons wer
which was once led by Will- ous conditic
liam "Willie Haggart" Moore, Persons cl


of murderers


ead in Kingston,
about 2.35am last
e say Bogle and
people were sitting
F-150 truck pur-
soline when two
on a grey Honda
ke rode up and
vehicle with bul-

uries
xere taken to the
Public Hospital
gle died of his
6-year-old youth,
nd a 19-year-old
re injured. The
as treated and
fle the other three
e admitted in seri-
on.
aiming to be eye-


Share the love

..




YOU'VE heard it a mil-
lion times, but it's a cliche
because it's true First "
Impressions Count. And
even though "Don't judge
a book by its cover" is also
a popular cliche, buyers tend to ignore that one when
comparing potential home purchases.
Put yourself in the buyers' shoes and step out to
the curb to take a look. See anything that might not
make the impression you desire? Consider the fol-
lowing "first glance" improvements.
The front door should be inviting paint or stain the
entrance if it shows signs of chipping or peeling. Have
a front porch? Dress it up with container gardens
and sweep regularly, making it an attractive "outside
room."
Check for other signs of peeling paint around the
exterior and touch up where needed. Remember that
buyers will be comparing your home to other similar
homes, and every little detail that makes yours more
appealing will pay off.
Of course, your landscaping makes an obvious first
impression, so remove any dead or dying debris, fer-
tilise the lawn and plant some flowering bushes if you
need a little colour.
Finally, your home looks great, so make sure it's
well lit for the show! Don't overdo it, but do offer a
well-lit doorway and walkways, and even uplightt"
your better landscaping elements. If you show buyers
"We love this home," then so will they!



RBC ROYAL, BANK OF CANADA
is considering applications for


Manager of Customer
Service,
Prince Charles Branch
The successful candidates should possess the
following qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in Banking (or a related field)
At least 10 or more years banking experience.
Demonstrated ability in the area of Customer
Service, Operations and Supervision would be
an asset.
Strong communication and interpersonal skills
Strong leadership, problem solving, people
management and confidentiality skills
Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)
A competitive compensation package (base salary
& attractive variable compensation) will be
commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications.
Please apply before January 28, 2005 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
P.O. Box N-7549
Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

RBC
Royal Bank
"*Sfa > lf3of Canada-


witnesses say Bogle was
involved in a dispute with per-
sons at the popular Weddy
Weddy Wednesdayz dance at
Stone Love headquarters on
Burlington Avenue.
As a result of the dispute he
left the dance.
Hours after the shooting,
the 12 Dillon Avenue home
of another dancehall person-
ality, John "John Hype" Pren-
dergast, which is about
two blocks away from
Lincoln Avenue, was fire-
bombed and completely
destroyed.
A neighbour told the
Observer that eight men
invaded the premises and tried
unsuccessfully to smash in the
door of the house where John
Hype lived.
The fire spread quickly, and
although five fire units
responded, persons who lived
in another house in the yard
were forced to remove their
furniture and other belong-
ings.
Rivalry
For more than a decade
Bogle was the leading dance-
hall choreographer and was
involved in a professional
rivalry with John Hype, who
has made a name for himself
as a dancer for over a
year now by creating new
moves.
Recently Bogle recorded a
single titled A Whe Dem Did
Deh? which pokes fun at his
rivals. The single has been
receiving heavy rotation in
dancehalls.
In an apparent response,
John Hype recorded a
single which is also proving
popular among dancehall
crowds.
On Saturday police theo-
rised that John Hype's house
was firebombed because he
figured in the dispute which
took place before Bogle's
death.
John Hype was adamant
that while he and Bogle were
involved in friendly rivalry,


there was never any threat of
violence or bad blood
between them.
According to John Hype,
both dancers performed
together at a number of recent
events.


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PUBLIC


ANNOUNCEMENT


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. wishes to inform
its valued customers that technicians will conduct an equipment
up-grade in the Fire Trail Road area beginning Thursday, January
20 to Thursday, February 3, 2005 between the hours of 9:00am and
4:30pm daily.

As a result, subscribers residing in the following areas may experience
a disruption in service:

Fire Trail Road (East of Faith Avenue)
All Side Corners on Fire Trail Road as far as I lamster Street

BTC apologizes for any inconvenience, and assures the public that
every effort will be made to complete the upgrade in the shortest
possible time.


LOCAL NEWS


BOOT & BAG SALE














Brave civilians rewarded for


assis

* By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services
COMMISSIONER of Police
Paul Farquharson has com-
mended two residents of North
Eleuthera for their bravery in
helping law enforcement offi-
cers capture suspects in a bank
robbery on Spanish Wells last
year.
During the Royal Bahamas
Police Force annual press con-
ference on Tuesday, January 11
at Police Headquarters, the
Commissioner presented
plaques to Family Island Chief
Councillor Abner Pinder and
pilot Rosemary Mitchell.
They were awarded for "ded-


in suspects'


COMMISSIONER of
Police Paul Farquharson pre-
sents plaque to Family Island
Chief Councillor Abner Pinder,
who assisted in the capture of
suspects in the armed robbery
of the Royal Bank of Canada
in Spanish Wells, Eleuthera, last
December. The presentation
took place January 11 during
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force annual press conference.
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)
icated services to the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and the
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, for the preservation
of law and order and the appre-
hension of offenders," follow-


BAY STREET


SERVICE AND PARTS DEPARTMENT WILL BE



CLOSED

FOR

STOCKTAKIHG

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

JANUARY 28 & 29
Sorry for any inconvenience caused ,


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ing the robbery of the
Royal Bank of Canada in Span-
ish Wells on December 1,
2004.
"This very, very brave
woman, miles away in her plane
also heard the police transmis-
sion and with her skilfulness,
was able to manoeuvre her
plane over the boats (as the sus-
pects attempted to make their
get-away). She was able to steer
them in and kept vigilance over
the boat until the police
arrived," said Commissioner
Farquharson.
Attitude
In her response, Mrs Mitchell
said: "I guess they did not
expect an airplane with an atti-
tude that day. But I'm glad we
were able to do something to
help in steering them off and
let them know that they can't
come to the out islands and do
that."
"We all have to participate
in trying to cut the crime. It's
escalating and it's going to run
the tourists out of the country.
So anything, anybody can do;
I'll be there again if you need
me."
The Commissioner said he
was just about to leave office


for a function on December 1,
2004, when his secretary noti-
fied him of a very important
phone call. On the other end
was Chief Councillor Pinder,
who said: "Commissioner, you
would not believe this, but
we are in the middle of a rob-
bery."
Scene
The Commissioner said while
he spoke with Mr Pinder, Assis-
tant Commissioner in charge of
Crime Reginald Ferguson was
able to dispatch officers to the
scene, where the suspects were
eventually captured.
Mr Pinder said he was proud
to have assisted the police not
only in this instance, but also
over the past 15 years in fighting
crime in the Bahamas.
"Unless the public gets
involved to help the police, they
can only do a certain amount.
It's time the people are serious
about fighting crime and the
public has to become involved
in helping the police to do their
job and put an end to crime in
this country, where it can be a
safer place for my children and
grandchildren to gro\L up and
live." said Mr Pinder.


capture


COMMISSIONER of Police Paul Farquharson presents a
plaque to pilot Rosemary Mitchell, who assisted in the capture of
suspects in the armed robbery of the Royal Bank of Canada in
Spanish Wells, Eleuthera, last December. The presentation took
place January 11 during the Royal Bahamas Police Force annual
press conference.
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)

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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 24,20605


~: -- ,











Share your news
Mitchell ..The Tribune wants to hear,
from people who are
IfllC F* making news in their
calls for neighborhoods. Perhaps


THE Ministry of Foreign
Affairs has announced that
the Government of Mexico
has offered 20 scholarships it
Bahamians students who hae c
completed high school, to pur-
sue undergraduate courses in
schools in Mexico, beginning
August, 2005.
The scholarships will co\ -
er enrollment and tuition fe sL
housing, a monthly living
stipend, medical insurance
and return airfare. The schol-
arships are granted for four
to five years.
The scholarships arc
offered for studies in the fol-
lowing areas: Public Admin-
istration, Environmental Sc i -
ences, Communication Sci-
ence, Political Science, For-
eign Trade, Economics, Nurs-
ing, Agricultural Engineering
Environmental Engineering.
Forestry Engineering, Livc-
stock Engineering, Hydraulic
Engineering, Industrial Eng i -
neering, Systems Engineer-
ing, Linguistics Pedagog%
International Relations.
Tourism and a Diploma for
Training Spanish Professor,
for non-Spanish speaking
individuals.
Selection
Prospective candidate.
must be high school gradu-
ates with a GPA of 8.0 on a 1 -
10 scale or its equivalent; ha\ e
some proficiency in Spanish.
and must obtain a high grade
in the selection interview i'-
be conducted in Nassau in lare
February, 2005. Spanish lan-
guage training will be given
to provide candidates with the
required level of language
proficiency.,
Application forms arc
available at the Ministry ol
Foreign Affairs, as well as
additional information on thi
terms and conditions of the
scholarships.
Interested students ma\
contact the Technical Assis-
tance and Cooperation Unit
of the Ministry of. Foreign
Affairs at telephone: 322-
7624, 302-9348 or 302-9345,
or by fax: 328-8212.
Deadline for submission ,if
applications to the MinistrN
of Foreign Affairs is Febru-
ary 3, 2005.


you are raising funds tor a
good cause, campaigning f
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. .....
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Requires the services of a

MANAGER COMPLIANCE/
RISK MANAGEMENT

Follow ing are the minimum requirements and
competencies the applicant must have:
A degree in Finance or Accounting.
Work experience in risk management in a financial
institution.
Good knowledge of business activities undertaken
by local financial institutions.
Knowledge of the regulatory/ supervisory structure
of the local financial markets, current banking
regulations and industry standards.
Knowledge of emerging business activities, corporate
governance and compliance risks and risk
management tools to ensure the appropriate mitigation
of risk in emerging areas for which policies do not
yet exist.
Sound knowledge of financial policies, procedures,
internal controls; corporate governance, risk
management, compliance processes and techniques
gained through practical experience.
Strong written and verbal presentation skills, including
the ability to express findings concisely while
retaining accuracy and clarity.
Strong analytical, organizational and interpersonal
skills, professional judgement and tact in dealing
with contacts inside and outside the bank.
Must be able to conceptualise and demonstrate a
high degree of original creative thinking with limited
reliance on precedent.
Please apply in writing to:
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited,
Human Resources Department,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas,
only Bahamians need apply.
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MONDAY, JANUARY, 24,2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE







rt e e t IU, IVIIUIJ, JMIutn r -'- Vua t r e ......





Peet hits back at report


tion launched and the findings
of that investigation were laid
on the table of the House of
Assembly.


FROM page one
hide." He said the allegations
were made and a full investiga-


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to
invite applications from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position
of Information Systems Business Analyst in its Human Resources
Division.

POSITION SUMMARY

The Company is implementing a new Financial/ Human Resources
Application System, which will require the creation of a team of Business
Analysts. Candidates for this team should currently be employed in a
Human Resources role and should be able to demonstrate a sound
understanding of the procedures, policies, and internal controls in a Human
Resources Department. Additionally, these candidates should be able to
demonstrate an aptitude for software applications. This team will be at the
centre of a dedicated cross functional implementation effort and is expected
to form the core post implementation application support. Applicants will
be expected to demonstrate enthusiasm and motivation to see this project
through the successful implementation by creating or assisting others in
developing processes, user acceptance testing (UAT), reporting,
documentation, and training.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Become intimately familiar with all the modular features, functionality,
workflows, related internal controls and interfaces for system modules
assigned.
Research and document usr requirements and specifications, conduct
business and technical studies, design, develop and implement information
systems business solutions, and provide imput on service delivery.
Working with the vendor implementation teams, BTC Consultants, and
super users to develop system test plans and associated test data and
execute User Acceptance Testing (UAT) for system modules assigned.
Ensure results of the conducted tests are well documented and failed
items are tracked for follow-up to completion.
Become familiar with all available standard reports for the system modules
assigned.
Develop proficiencies with report writing tools to perform specified data
analysis and studies as requested on system modules assigned; develop
and present as hoc reports in support of various initiatives.
Assist with the creation of training materials and the user training itself
for the system modules assigned. Training materials includes business
processes, system features, functionality, technology capabilities and
limitations, ect.
* Develop post implementation documentation to assist with the support
of users and the daily maintenance and management of the system.
Documentation includes but is not limited to screen shots, process
diagrams, system enhancement requests, standard operating procedures,
etc.
* Provide on-going post implementation systems support for end users as
directed.
* Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned by Management.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

* Bachelor's Degree or equivalent experience in a Human Resources
Department.
* Demonstrate aptitude in the use of Microsoft office suite plus database
driven application software.
* Ability to create, compose and edit written materials; proven analytical
communication, research, and writing skills.

All applications should be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F.
Kennedy Drive, no later than Wednesday, January 26th, 2005, and addressed
as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas

RE: Information Systems Business Analyst Human Resources


ing unwelcome strangers. We
try to be as humane as we can...
Can there be sensitivity train-
ing? Yes."
The Cuban detainees also
denied that they started last
month's fire at the Carmichael
Road facility which occurred
just a day after government
released its findings that inves-
tigations into alleged torture
claims were unsubstantive.
"We are not crazy," said
Omar Gonzalez, who is now at
Her Majesty's Prison.
"We are not going to light a
fire where we are trapped."
The Cubans claim that they
were staging a peaceful hunger
strike, when Defence Force offi-
cials stormed in, firing rubber
bullets. They said that they used


SSP6*4t*0*@SSS*USSO6000000660060


a foam mattress, to fend off the
bullets but the shooting was so
intense that the foam caught
fire.
More than 40 Cubans
believed to be involved in the
blaze were transferred to Her
Majesty's Prison accused of set- *
ting fire to the barracks. Twen-
ty-two of them remain there,
but are yet to see a lawyer
according to the article.
Yesterday, Tourism Minister
Obie Wilchcombe, noted that
any negative press has the
potential to damage the coun-
try's tourism product particu-
larly when it contradicts what
the country tells the world.
However, he said, it is an iso-
lated incident that is still being
investigated.


He said the story was unfor-
tunate as the Ministry of
Tourism has made a huge effort
in trying to tap into the Florida
market and its very large
Cuban-American community.
He added that the Herald is a
well known and respected paper
and as such readers will put a lot
of worth into its words not just
in Florida, but throughout the
US.
He said his public relations
department will launch an
investigation to see if the nega-
tive press had any effect on
tourism and what steps should
be done to counter it. He added
that because of the proximity
of the Bahamas and Florida, it
is necessary to enforce close and
friendly relations.


Mr Peet said he wished that
those persons who constantly
criticised the country for the
conditions at Carmichael Road
and Fox Hill would "put their
money where their mouths is"
and provide some assistance in
helping the country with much
needed repairs and improve-
ments.
He said the Bahamas has
been placed in the middle of a
migration problem not of its
own doing, but has tried its best
to deal with the situation. How-
ever, he said the problem has
drained the country of much
needed resources which should
have gone toward national
social issues instead. In addi-
tion, he said, the country has
just suffered the ravages of two
hurricanes further stretching the
country's budget. He said the
Bahamas should be receiving
sympathy rather than criticism.
According to the article,
although government officials
escorted the reporter, they did
not understand Spanish or Cre-
ole and so the detainees spoke
openly about the alleged abuse.
The reporter said: "The high-
ly charged situation in this rela-
tively affluent and peaceful for-
mer British Colony reflects a
growing fear that the islands'
300,000 residents will be over-
run by illegal immigrants."
Mr Peet told The Miami
Herald: "We are accommodat-


FROM page one
industrial zones; save, preserve and protect
the rest of our creeks and wetlands; our endan-
gered Caribbean Pine forests; the natural flo-
ra and fauna and our unique cave systems."
In addition, the group said it will try to stop
further habitat destruction, unbridled and
destructive real estate developments, and the
poisoning of the water table.
The group said it will become an environ-
mental watch dog by promoting clean air prac-
tices, environmentally sensitive development
parks and quality of life for Bahamians "that is
in tune with preserving nature for future gen-
erations of Grand Bahamians."
While the group feels that there has been
massive destruction already on Grand Bahama,
they say there still remain areas which are
untouched and have diverse habitats.
"Much of our island is still unspoiled, and
although we have to live with what has been
done already, STI! and Grand Bahamians can
make sure that future growth respects the envi-
ronment and that it is in the control of Grand
Bahamians, because Grand Bahama is for
Grand Bahamians."
The group added that the. control should
not be given to politicians based in Nassau.


They also called on the Bahamas Environ-
mental Science and Technological Commis-
sion to investigate the proposed Ginn project.
"It is destroying mangrove wetlands and
burying them under piles of limestone," the
pressure group claimed. "These mangroves
are so important to our ecosystem and they
should be protected. They need to be made to
develop without destruction. It can be done.
It's just more expensive to do it right."
The group also criticised the proposed LNG
pipeline on that island. They claimed that such
a pipeline should not be built under busy
Grand Bahama streets or along reef and
marine habitats.
"The sensible plan for the future of our
island is to restrict all future industry to the
Freeport industrial zone at the harbour. If
there has to be an LNG factory on the island it
should be where we understand they already
have a licence from the Port Authority -
Freeport Harbour. Why destroy, pollute and
tear up more of the island?"
"The government in Nassau must look at
Grand Bahama and think it is so big and they
can just use and abuse any part of it for nation-
al development projects. Well not in our back
yard.
"Grand Bahamians will not permit it," a
release from the group said.


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PAGE 2, MODAYJANUAY 24,2005THE TNBUN


FROM page one

Dogs gang.
An 18-year-old Haitian/
Bahamian and former mem-
ber of the Rebellion gang told
The Tribune yesterday of his
foray into gang life.
"In Junior High School I
wanted to be accepted
because I came from primary
school where teachers would
be dissing me because of my


'School gang situation'


heritage so I wanted to be
known and feel big. Being a
Raider was a difficult task
because when you were in
class you would have to come
out because you have rival
gang members come to your
class," he said.


Now, it seems because of
the alienation of some Hait-
ian/Bahamian students, they
have banded together to form
gangs of their own, the biggest
one called Zoe Pound.
"Some Haitians got sent
back to the Bahamas and


that's how this got started,"
another gang member said.
Also emerging is the preva-
lence of female gangs like the
Blood Line Daughters, Trip
Out Daughters, the She-bel-
lions, and She-Halks.
"You'll find if a girl's boy is
in a gang they want to be
accepted, they'll link up their
crew with the boy's gang.
The catalogue of weapons
used by some of these school
age gang members' include
knives, screwdrivers, pens and
compasses.
One Government High stu-
dent said that one boy was
expelled from her school ear-
lier this year for carrying a
gun.
"At our school they have
these elderly guards, no young
adults who can run after the
boys," she said.
Despite the wall around
Government High and four or
five security guards, the


school, she said, is not ade-
quately protected against
those within the school
attached to gangs.
"Once or twice we had a
bag search but that still did-
n't work because a lot of the
boys stash their stuff because
they know before they get to
school there's going to be a
bag search," she said.
According to Mr Reid some
officials have allowed them-
selves to fall into a state of
complacency when it comes
to cracking down on gang
activities because they no
longer see the evidence of
gang paraphernalia on young
men and women.
"A lot of the old gangsters
now are not the ones wearing
paraphernalia, what you have
is a lot of the wannabees wear-
ing the paraphernalia because
they want to be respected and
they're looking for stripes but
the older ones don't have to


,. ...

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prove that they are a Raider
or they are a Dog. If police
have broken the back of. the
original gangs 'my question is
why are the same old names
being brought up," he said.
The activities of these gangs
do not limit themselves to
after school fights but branch
out to gambling and selling
drugs in school, Mr Reid
added.
Gang members who spoke
to The Tribune said that more
often than not if the public
hears news of a stabbing it
originated from a fight
between gang members.
"The police would not say it
is a gang related issue because
they just don't know, but if
you look deeper you would
see that it was," said another
former gang member.
Each gang has a turf and an
originating area, like the
Hoyas originating out of
Kemp Road or the Gun Dogs
originating out of Bain Town.
"All you have to do is hang
out with the boys who are in
it. Start wearing what they're
wearing. Some of them beat
you to get into the gang. The
Nike would beat you to get in
the gang. If you go to the same
school and hang out with them
they'll accept you," said a 16-
year-old.
"You join for protection
and stripes. If you get into a
fight you know you have boys
who would help you," he said.
"When you leave school,
that's where the real thing
starts. the real gun shooting.
and hard drugs playing andj
robbing, and you get deeper'
and deeper into criminal activ-
ities. I'm only 18 and I lost
friends 16 years old into:
gangs." said the former Raider
member.
Mr Reid said that this is the
reason why more attention
needs to be paid to this issue.
"W'here we are as a nation as
it relates to gang violence, if;
something is not done, we are
on the \ erge of a national sui-'
cide among our young people.,
More young people are,
becoming pawns inside this!
war. more of them are being;
used as pushers fQr some of'
these older gangsters so they.
take 2rass to.school to sell..'
We as a nation Have ben,
denying this thing foi too,
long," he said.






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THE TRIBUNE E


PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005






MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


LOCAL NEWS


MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR
STHE LATE


Real estate firm appoints




in-house mortgage broker


REV. SYLVIA E. BUTLER MILLER


A special memorial service to honour the
memory, life and ministry of the late Rev.
Sylvia E. Butler Miller will be held at Bethel
Baptist Church, Meeting Street on Tuesday
January 25, 2005 at 10:00a.m. Rev. Melvin
Grant and Rev. Dr. Jackson Miller, along with
President Joseph Blyden, the officers and
members of Bethel's Senior Saints will conduct
the service. Friends and members of the general
public are cordially invited to attend. Left to
treasure her memories are five children; Andrea
and Donna Miller, Collas Miller Pinder, Rev.
Dr. Jackson Miller and Sylvia Miller Knowles;
four grandchildren; Christy and Crystal Pinder
and Ashley and Shaquille Knowles; one sister,
Rosemarie Burke and a host of other relatives
and friends.


COLDWELL Banker
Lightbourn Realty has
become the first full service
real estate company to
appoint an in-house mortgage
broker, adding a new dimen-
sion to the industry.
Richard Cartwright, 48, will
get pre-bank loan approvals
for persons who qualify at
no cost to the client.
Mr Cartwright said he will
use his 30 years experience in
banking and finance to take
the hassle out of the bank pre-
qualification process. The ser-
vice will be provided from
Coldwell Banker's new
premises at 18 East Shirley
Street.
'It's a perfect marriage,' Mr
Cartwright said.
Mr Cartwright started his
career as a teller at Royal
Bank of Canada. He rose
steadily up the job ladder,
spending many years in resi-
dential and commercial loans.
He later joined Citibank NA,
becoming manager of the
Frederick St branch. More


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to
invite applications from suitably qualified individuals for the position of
Information Systems Business Analyst in its Financial Division.

POSITION SUMMARY

The Company is implementing a new Financial/ Human Resources
Application System, which will require the creation of a team of Business
Analysts. Candidates for this team should currently be employed in a
finance role and should be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of
the procedures, policies, and internal controls in a Financial Department.
Additionally, these candidates should be able to demonstrate an aptitude
for software applications. This team will be at the centre of a dedicated
cross functional implementation effort and is expected to form the core
post implementation application support. Applicants will be expected to
demonstrate enthusiasm and motivation to see this project through the
successful implementation by creating or assisting others in developing
processes, user acceptance testing (UAT), reporting, documentation, and
training.

DUITES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Become intimately familiar with all the modular features, functionality,
workflows, related internal controls and interfaces for system modules
assigned.
* Research and document user requirements and specifications, conduct
business and technical studies, design, develop and implement information
systems business solutions, and provide imput on service delivery.
- Working with the vendor implementation teams, BTC Consultants, and
super users to develop system test plans and associated test data and
execute User Acceptance Testing (UAT) for system modules assigned.
Ensure results of the conducted tests are well documented and failed
items are tracked for follow-up to completion.
* Become familiar with all available standard reports for the system modules
assigned.
* Develop proficiencies with report writing tools to perform specified data
analysis and studies as requested on system modules assigned; develop
and present as hoc reports in support of various initiatives.
* Assist with the creation of training materials and the user training itself
for the system modules assigned. Training materials includes business
processes, system features, functionality, technology capabilities and
limitations, ect.
* Develop post implementation documentation to assist with the support
of users and the daily maintenance and management of the system.
Documentation includes but is not limited to screen shots, process
diagrams, system enhancement requests, standard operating procedures,
etc.
* Provide on-going post implementation systems support for end users as
directed.
* Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned by Management.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

* Bachelor's Degree or equivalent experience in a finance role specifically
relating to control of the general ledger, and financial reporting and
analysis.
* Demonstrate aptitude in the use of Microsoft office suite plus database
driven application software.
" Ability to create, compose and edit written materials; proven analytical
communication, research, and writing skills.

All applications should be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F.
Kennedy Drive, no later than Wednesday, January 26th, 2005, and addressed
as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas

RE: Information Systems Business Analyst Human Resources


"I'll be able to facilitate
the process without the
client experiencing any
inconveniences. I'll take them
through the entire process.
They won't see the banker
until they get the approval.
This will take away a lot of
stress and save time."

Richard Cartwright


recently, he was in charge of
the investment unit and prop-
erty management at Crown
Life Insurance.
He holds an MBA in busi-
ness from the University of
Miami.
Mr Cartwright is recognized
by the major lending institu-
tions in the industry.
"Richard has all of the
ingredients for the job,' said
Mike Lightbourn, president
of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty.
'Besides his experience in
banking, he has spent three
years in sales in the insurance


industry. Richard understands
that buying a home is the most
important investment the
,average person will make in
a lifetime and he is commit-
ted to helping them realise
their dreams.'
Mr Cartwright said he will
act as a client's designated
bank negotiator, obtaining the
best deal available in terms of
rate, terms, and deposit
requirements.
"I'll be able to facilitate the
process without the client
experiencing any inconve-
niences.
'I'll take them through the


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are .
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the Ci. .,'
area or have won an 4P;"-, !
award. .
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


A leading boutique Law Firm with
operations in two cities in The Bahamas
is looking for a suitably qualified
Attorney-at-Law.


The successful applicant should have
already completed pupilage.


Interested applicants are asked to
forward their detailed Resume's to the
following address:

Managing Partner
P.O.Box SS-6836
Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas



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entire process. They won't see (
the banker until they get the
approval,' he explained.
"This will take away a lot
of stress and save time.'
Mr Cartwright said he will
help clients who do not pre-
qualify for a bank loan and
help them structure their
finances so they may be able -
to do so at a later date.
Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty (formerly Mike
Lightbourn Real Estate) spe-
cialises in sales, rentals and
appraisals. It has offices in
Nassau, Bimini, Abaco and
Harbour Island and represen-
tatives in Eleuthera, Long
Island, the Berry Islands and
Exuma.
It is part of an international
network of more than 3,600
companies and over 113,800
sales associates,-which gener-
ate an enormous amount of ,
lead activity.












N SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican
Republic
AUTHORITIES
detained four
Venezuelan nationals
and two Colombians
after allegedly inter-
cepting their boat and
finding a shipment of
marijuana aboard, the
Dominican navy said
Sunday, according to
Associated Press.
A Dominican naval
vessel intercepted the
30-foot boat Saturday
night after a brief
chase about 180 miles
(290 kilometers) south-
east of Santo Domingo,
the capital, navy
Capt. Felix Pimentel
said.

Operations
Dominican anti-drug
agents and U.S. Drug
Enforcement Agency
officials participated in
the operation,
Pimentel said, without
giving details.
Authorities allegedly
seized a package con-
taining 100 kilograms
(220 pounds) of mari-
juana, but said the six
men tossed another
suspected shipment
into the sea before
being caught.
Officials were trying
to recover the rest of
the shipment, which
they believe originated
from Venezuela's Mar-
garita Island.
The men, ranging in
age from 24 to 47 years
old, are being held in
Santo Domingo pend-
ing their arraignment
on drug trafficking
charges.


1 1'(( 11 1 -"






MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 15


Full access for the Bahamas




to benefits from UN's SIDS


* By LINDSAY
THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services
THE Bahamas is eligible
to access a full range of
negotiated benefits made
available by the United
Nations (UN) for Small
Island Developing States
(SIDS) without restrictions,
Senator Dr Marcus Bethel
Minister of Health and Envi-
ronmental Services said
recently.
Dr Bethel's announcement
was made during a media
briefing on the outcome of
the International Meeting to
review the implementation
of the Programme of Action
for the Sustainable Develop-
ment of Small Island Devel-
oping States (SIDS) held in
Port Louis, Mauritius from
January 10 to 14.
Recommendations for fur-
ther and successful imple-
mentation of the Barbados
Programme of Action
(BPOA), which was adopt-
ed by the UN in 1994, was
discussed during the meet-
ing. The BPOA outlines spe-
cific measures at the nation-
al, regional and internation-
al levels in support of the
sustainable development of
SIDS.
"The meeting reached suc-
cessful conclusions on a wide
range of issues critical to the
sustainable development of
SIDS," Dr Bethel said.
Climate
Agreements were reached
on climate change and adap-
tation, natural and other
environmental disasters,
waste management, manage-
ment of coastal and marine
resources, fresh water
resources; land use manage-
ment, energy resources,
tourism management, biodi-
versity, and the development
of capacity for sustainable
development and related
education needs.
"Following the adoption of
this strategy for the imple-
mentation, the UN bodies
and the world's governments
have given a commitment to
provide assistance and spe-
cial treatment for SIDS in
achieving these goals," Dr
Bethel said.
"The agencies of the UN
will be instructed to develop


SENATOR Dr Marcus Bethel, Minister of Health and
Environmental Services on Wednesday, January 9, briefed the
media on the International Meeting on Small Island Develop-
ing States (SIDS) which he attended in Port Louis, Mauritius,
January 10-14. From left are Dr Baldwin Carey, Director of
Public Health, Ministry of Health and Environmental Services;
Dr Donald Cooper, Under-secretary in the Ministry of Health
and Environment; and Dr Bethel.
(BIS photo: Derek Smith)


work programmes to imple-
ment areas of the strategy
that fall under their purview.-
Governments will utilise the
documents as the basis of the
assistance they provide t1o
SIDS and any concessions
granted to that group of
countries," he added.
Dr Bethel also said the
Bahamian delegation was
able to ensure that the blue-
print for the development of
SIDS did not exclude the
Bahamas and that its special
needs were taken into
account.
He noted that the
Bahamas co-hosted one of
the "most successful" meet-
ings on the sidelines of the
conference on the Pro-
gramme of Work on Island
Biodiversity in conjunction
with the Secretariat of the
Convention on Biological
Biodiversity. This pro-
gramme of work will facili-
tate the implementation of
the biodiversity components
of the Strategic Document
and have the financial back-
ing of the Global Environ-
ment Facility (GEF).
"The Bahamas participat-
ed as a key speaker at the
high level event hosted by
The Nature Conservancy for
the announcement of a new
initiative of managing marine


and coastal parks," Dr
Bethel said. "The Bahamas
was identified as a nation
that has achieved major
advances in this area and a
model for the rest of the
world.
Funds
"As a result of this partic-
ipation it has been estimated
that over $1 million will be
available for the Bahamas to
manage its marine and
coastal parks. These funds
will be available to both gov-
ernmental and non-govern-
mental organizations."
The Bahamas was also giv-
en $25,900Q,by the govern-,.,
ment of,.M uitiusto assist
with hurricane recovery;
efforts. He said the Bahamas
is also able to access some
$40 million Euros from the
Italian government for the
establishment of a work pro-
gramme to implement the
strategy for SIDS.
The Bahamas also held bi-
lateral meetings with the
government of Croatia on a
mutual co-operation and
support package and with
the British government
which expressed its contin-
ued support for The
Bahamas and its pro-
grammes and explained the


reasons for the closure of its
High Commission in Nassau.
Dr Bethel was accompa-.
nied by Miss Paulette Bethel,
the Bahamas representative
to the UN in New York; Dr
Donald Cooper, Under-sec-
retary, Ministry of Health
and Environmental Services;
Earlston McPhee, Director
of Sustainable Tourism, Min-
istry of Tourism; Tischa Fra- I
zier, Senior Counsel, The
Bahamas Mission to UN;
Rochelle Newbold, Senior
Environment Officer,
Bahamas Environment Sci- (
ence and Technology Com-
mission (BEST); Eleanor
Phillips, Manager, Nature
, Conservancy and four
Bahamian youth.' .'...
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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT





The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. wishes to advise that
it will commence disconnecting services for all accounts with
overdue balances, and ceasing services to accounts with no activity
for three or more months beginning Monday, February 14, 2005.

Customers whose services are disconnected will have their security
deposits applied to the outstanding charges, and will be required
to apply for a new account and pay a new deposit and reconnection
fee.

As a result, both cellular and landline subscribers with outstanding
balances on inactive accounts are urged to safeguard their services
by contacting the Credit & Collections office, JFK Drive to make
payment agreements.

Payments may be made at any BTC cashier counter as well as any
branch of Royal, Scotia, British American and First Caribbean
Banks, as well as Finco Bank Line. Subscribers are also reminded
that for their convenience, BTC's Mall at Marathon office is open
on Saturday to facilitate bill payment during the hours of 10:00am
to 5:00pm.


Theailataat


V


,-
THt" TRIBUNu


Thursday
27th


Friday
28th


29th


I Saturday
: I


R






I flr I IDUPIu


rtAuc I1, MUNUAY, JANUAMY 24, ZUUO


SAL


Summit aims to


'change


the face of healthcare'


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
TRAINING and partnership
are key components for sur-
vival in the healthcare indus-
try, Coralee Adderley, chief
hospital administrator at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH), has said.
Miss Adderley, co-chair of
the Healthcare Leadership
Summit Planning Committee,
was announcing plans for the
second annual Healthcare
Leadership Summit to be held
February 3-4, 2005.
The summit, under the
theme: "Changing the Face of
Healthcare Through Educa-
tion and Partnership", will be
held at Sandals Royal Bahami-
an Resort and Spa on Cable
Beach.
The Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, Doctors Hospital, the
Ministry of Health and other
branches of the Public Hospi-
tals Authority, will host the
two-day event.
The major goals for the sum-
mit, said Miss Adderley, are
to provide a vehicle for
exchange of ideas and to pro-
vide a forum for dialogue on
issues relevant to healthcare
within the Bahamian context.

Answers
"Additionally, it is envi-
sioned that this conference,
which caters to the health ser-
vice executive and manager,
will 'provide participants with
pertinent, timely, and creative
answers to addressing chal-
lenges facing health service
and sector leaders within the
country," Miss Adderley said.
"One of the things we decid-
ed from the very first summit
and we challenged ourselves
this year is to make sure that, if
not all, most of our topics are
very practical in nature so that
the attendee can leave with
something tangible that they
can implement when they go
back to their areas at work.
"We try to emphasise that
with our speakers to make
sure persons leave with a list of
things or something very tan-
gible that they can use. I think
we were very successful in that
with the very first summit and
already we know from the
speakers we have lined up this
year that we are expecting
even better than last year," she
added.
Jessica Rolle, also co-chair
of the planning committee,
said participants will be drawn
from the Ministry of Health,
the Public Hospitals Authority,
Doctors Hospital private
healthcare sector, insurance
agencies, and international
vendors.

Interest
"We have asked for and are
opening it up to senior man-
agers, senior executives,
department heads, future lead-
ers and persons who have an
interest in becoming a leader
within their various professions
and disciplines within health-
care," said Mrs Rolle. "We've
opened up to a large cadre of
persons, and we're hoping they
take advantage of it."
Mrs Rolle said persons who
attended the first summit came
away motivated, and v th
information they were abl to
use within their various der irt-
ments.
"We were also advised that
persons went back and trained
their staff on what they
learned. The session notes in
particular went a longway to
empowering staff that were
unable to attend," she said.
Topics to be covered at the
summit include communicat-
ing effectively, appreciating the
cost without compromising the
quality, satisfying the cus-
tomer, the power of the writ-
ten word, ethics and profes-
sionalism in healthcare, and
how do you know when you
have a winning team.
Planning committee mem-
ber Mary Walker, said will also
be two panel discussions, the
first on the National Insurance
programme and the se, d on
disaster mitigation.
"This is not just deal ; with
hurricanes," said Mist Nalk-
er. "We're talking about all
types of disasters. It could be
crowd control or major acci-
dents. It could be a crashed


plane or anything like that. We
want to be able to give or
empower our leaders with


i ~~i i~


THE Healthcare Leadership Summit planning committee
Thursday (January 20) announced that the second annual Health-
care Leadership Summit will be held February 3-4, 2005. The two-
day summit, under the theme: "Changing the Face of Healthcare
Through Education and Partnership", will be held at Sandals Roy-
al Bahamian Resort and Spa, Cable Beach. The Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH), Doctors Hospital, the Ministry of Health
and other branches of the Public Hospitals Authority, will host the
event. Committee members seated from left are Carolyn Sey-
mour, PMH; Michelle Rassin, Doctors Hospital; Ms Adderley;
Jessica Rolle, PMH and committee co-chair; and Dr Catherine
Conliffe PMH; Standing from left are Barbara Lloyd, PMH; Char-
lotte Johnson, Doctors Hospital; Jill Bain, PMH; Marie Dean,
PMH; Mary Walker, PMH; Carol Bischof, PMH; Sharon Turn-
quest, PMH; Thelma Rolle, PMH and S Anthony Brown, PMH.
(BIS photo: Lorenzo Lockhart)


information and practical skills
to be able to deal with these
things, these calamities that
can happen at any time."
Doctor's Hospital represen-
tative Michelle Rassm, who is
also a member of the planning
committee, urged health care
professionals to take advan-
tage of "this opportunity for
learning, networking and pro-
fessional development".

Standards
The summit, she said, will
"increase the standards in
quality and in patient health-
care services in the health care
industry for the Bahamian
community."
Miss Rassin said Doctors
Hospital recognizes the impor-
tance of continuing education
an i being proactive in the con-
st nt changes within the
althcare industry.
"The summit will provide
.ne latest information in recog-
nising the importance of
improving and expanding lead-
ership skills and knowledge,
by focusing on business rela-
tionships and partnerships
among all health care
providers," she said.
A professional development


exhibition will also be held
alongside the summit, and is
designed to allow participants.
to view and purchase techno-
logical equipment and other
products or obtain information
to assist with enhancing their
professional development.
The exhibition also seeks to
expose delegates to the latest
in technology, business acces-
sories, financial investment
information and educational
opportunities. Vendors from
various sectors, including the
insurance/investments indus-
try, real estate, beauty and
health, and computer technol-
ogy, will participate in the
exhibition.





-I o





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MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


up p ribu


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Insurance Bill Page 6B


Property tax blunder






costs Treasury millions


sByYOLANDA
DlELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
millions of dol-
lars in unre-
I coverable tax
Revenues
S have been
lost to the Bahamian Govern-
ment because real property tax
officials failed to perform man-
dated regular property re-
assessments over the past 25
years, a senior official in the
Ministry of Trade and Indus-
try's Real Property Tax Valua-
tion Department told The Tri-
bune.

Bank to

roll out

e-banking

by Q2 start


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SCommonwealth Bank
plans to fully roll-out its
Internet and telephone bank-
ing services bythe beginning
of the 2005 second quarter
as it moves to fulfil its aim of
becoming the Bahamas' lead-
ing institution for personal
banking services.
SThe iniative follows the
bank's eighth consecutive
year of record profits, with
net income for fiscal 2004 up
,'by 10.2 per cent or $2 million
See BANK, Page 2B


Under the Real Property
Tax Act, property values are
expected to be reassessed every
five years, but no such exercise
has taken place in'the past 25
years.
However, beginning in Octo-
ber, government officials began
an evaluation exercise in New
Providence that is expected to
take some two to three years to
complete.
According to the official, who
spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty, the department does not
have the resources to evaluate
properties in the Family Islands.
However, because properties
valued at $250,000 or under


Failure to carry out five-year
reassessment over 25-year period
costs government, as minister
admits revenue loss 'considerable'


have been exempt from real
property tax since the 2003-2004
fiscal period, a significant num-
ber of residential and commer-
cial properties in the Family
Islands arew also no longer like-
ly to be liable for the tax.
Foreign owners of property
in the Bahamas were said to


generally be up to date with real
property tax payments.
Minister of State for Finance,
James Smith, told The Tribune
it was likely that revenue fore-
gone as a result of the under-
valuation of properties in New
Providence was considerable.
Refusing to speculate on why


the evaluation' process had not
been undertaken at five-year
intervals as the Act provided
for, Mr Smith said that depend-
ing on what the Government's
policy was at any given time, it
might have been decided not to
follow through with the process.
He said it was not clear cut
that, if re-evaluated taxes had
been applied, whether it would
have meant some businesses on
the edge would have failed to
made it through bad times.
Going forward, the strategy
will be to try to bring all rev-
enue due to the Government to
record. "This exercise is an
important one and we'rd look-


ing to carry out the legal
requirements more aggressive-
ly," said Mr Smith.
During the 2003-2004 fiscal
year, the Government yielded
$44 million from property tax,
but the exemptions put in place,
along with a greater push for
compliance, should impact the
final intake, making budgetary
estimates for 2005-2006 signifi-
cantly different from previous
years.
Mr Smith said that with the
numerous exemptions allotted
owner-occupied properties, the
bulk of revenue received will
come from commercial enter-
prises.


15,000 passengers


hit by airport delay


Former Registrar to launch legal
action seeking reinstatement


Following the controversial
dismissal of former registrar-
general Elizabeth Thompson
earlier this month, three
employees of the Registrar
General's Department on Fri-
day received letters notifying
them of transfers out of the
department, citing their support
of the ousted Ms Thompson as
the reason for the move.
The workers, who spoke to
The Tribune on condition of
anonymity, said government
officials wanted to remove them
from the Registrar General's
Department immediately fol-
lowing their show of support for
Ms Thompson.
The department is also
expected to undergo a major
shake-up today, with key indi-
viduals who demonstrated on
behalf of Ms Thompson follow-
ing initial efforts to remove her
from office late last year, either
transferred to different depart-
ments or reassigned to new
duties within the office.
One of the three employees
said: "They're not thinking
about the need to train persons:


-Government set


for Cable Beach

|announcement
The Government is likely to announce this week whether the
$1.2 billion Baha Mar project to revitalise the Cable Beach strip
will go ahead, sources have told The Tribune.
.' Although it is unclear which way the Government will move,
.most people are expecting a positive outcome, with the view
'being that Prime Minister Perry Christie cannot let a deal of this
magnitude slip through his fingers with a general election less than
three years away.
The Tribune previously revealed how the Baha Mar consor-
tium, headed by Lyford Cay billionaire Dikran Izmirlian and
his investment banker son, Sarkis, were becoming increasingly
concerned that the project might "blow up" due to the Govern-
'ment dragging its feet on a purchase agreement for the Hotel Cor-
poration's Radisson Cable Beach Resort and a Heads of Agree-
ment.
They felt this was going to jeopardise them meeting the Feb-
'ruary 19 deadline for completing the $150 million acquisition
of Philip Ruffin's Nassau Wyndham Resort and Crystal Palace
casino and the adjacent Nassau Beach Hotel.

www.micronet.bs
Since 1983


BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Sales Rentals* Supplies Services
ro~n^^^^B^^HMBHH^HE!!-*^^
Computers Copiers PrinteBrs-Fax Machins^^^
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they are just movingUis. We
know a lot of things that went
down we know the ins and
outs of the political appointees,
See MOVE, Page 6B


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
The Bahamian tourism
industry has suffered what
* could prove to be a major jolt,
as officials at Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA) admitted
that during the three-day New
Year's weekend Some 15,000
passengers were mishandled
as they moved through the air-
port, with long lines and mas-
sive delays likely to impact


. ." -




IL **A*A' '*
IJdlade Road
STel '242 502 6600 Fax 242 393 1710
56 Collins Avenue
Tel 242 502 9400 Fax 242 328 0536
www.colina.com


their impression of the
Bahamas as a vacation desti-
nation.
"In the New Year we really,
really mishandled about 15,000
passengers moving through.
The busiest part of the holi-
day is the New Year weekend
and one day there were 5,700
people and the other two there
were just under 5,000 people.
Especially the period between
11am and 2 pm, it was really
bad," president of the Airline
Operators Committee, Reg


Grant, told The Tribune.
Despite the fiasco, all indus-
try stakeholders the Airport
Authority, Ministry of Tourism
and Ministry of Transport, the
airlines, the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) and the
Nassau Tourism and Develop-
ment Board are continuing
to work on a number of solu-
tions, with informal talks also
involving the US Customs and
Immigration Department.
See FLY, Page 6B


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Be safe! Make the call today.

Colina...
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our large staff of qualified,
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e-mail: Info@micronet.bs
56 Maderia Street Palmdale
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L









PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


By Fidelity


Capital Markets


Trading was pretty
brisk in the
Bahamian mar-
ket last week,
with more than
29,000 shares changing hands.
The market saw seven out of
the 19 listed stocks trade, of
which two advanced, one
declined and four remained
unchanged.
Volume leader for a second
consecutive week was Doctors
Hospital Health Systems
(DHS), with 15,000 shares
changing hands and accounting



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for 65 per cent of total shares
traded. The big mover in the
market last week was Kerzner
International BDR (KZLB),
whose share price rose by $0.04
to close at $5.84. On the down
side, FINCO's (FIN) share price
fell by $0.05 to end the week at
$9.70.

COMPANY NEWS
Kerzner International (KZL) -
It was announced this past
week that KZL has partnered
with CapitaLand, one of the
largest listed property compa-
nies in Asia, to submit a joint
proposal to the Singapore Gov-
ernment for the development
of an integrated entertainment
resort complex at Sentosa
Island in Singapore.
Commenting on the joint pro-,
posal, Butch Kerzner, Kerzner
International's chief executive,
said he believed their resort
model could successfully be
applied at Sentosa Island, and
looked forward to submitting
the joint concept for this desti-


Junior Accounting Clerk


Computer skills must include Microsoft
Excel and Microsoft Word.
Excellent oral and written
communicational skills.
Ability to work on own initiative.
Interpersonal skills.
Ability to work with cash.



Junior Office Clerk

Receptionist skills.
Excellent client interaction by telephone
and interpersonal skills.
Ability to work on own initiative.
Interpersonal skills.
Ability to do messenger work.
Ability to do filing task.
Male or female, age 18 to 21.



Experienced Receptionist/Clerk

Must be courteous and versatile.



Please submit resumes to Confidence
Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd., Shirley
Street, Standard Services Building or
P.O. Box SS-6253.


Bahamas stock market
Findex: 420.14
Unchanged: 0.00 points
Percentage Change: 0.00%
Market Capitalisation: $2.10 billion
Change: -$817,000
Volume Traded: 29,377
Volume Leaders:
Volume % of Volume
CHL 5,306 18.06%
DHS 15,000 51.06%
FIN 2,700 9.19%
Major Market Movers:
Closing Price Price Change
FAM $3.99 $0.03
FIN $9.70 $0.05


nation.

Commonwealth Bank Limited
(CBL) -
CBL's financial results for fis-
cal 2004 not only surpassed its
2003 figures but marked the
bank's eighth consecutive year
of record-breaking profits.
Net income stood at $25.6
million, representing an increase
of, $2.3 million or 10 per cent
over net income of $23.3 mil-
lion posted in 2003. Total assets
grew by 9 per cent to total
$765.9 million, while Return on
Equity increased by 0.1 per cent


to total 28.8 per cent.
Earnings per share (EPS)
rose by $0.07 to total $0.64,
while total dividends paid to
shareholders for the year
increased from $0.34 per share
to $0.39.

US Economic News
US Consumer Confidence
declines
US consumer confidence
unexpectedly dropped for the
first time in three months in ear-
ly January as stock prices fell, a
private report today showed.
The decline reflected falling


International markets
FX Rates
Wkly % Change
CAD $1.2218 0.53
GBP 1.8777 0.39
EUR 1.3046 -0.46 -

Commodities:
Wkly % Change
Crude Oil $ 48.53 0.31
Gold $426.90 0.92
International Stock Market Indexes:
Wkly % Change
DJIA 10,392.99 -1.56
S & P 500 1,167.87 -1.41
NASDAQ 2,034.27 -2.57
Nikkei 11,238.37 -1.75


optimism about the future
course of the economy.
Consumers may also be
strapped after going on a buying
binge in the second half of 2004
that left them with the lowest
savings rate ever.
Falling stock prices and the
prospect of more interest rate
increases by the Federal
Reserve may dampen their
enthusiasm and cause spending
to slow early this year.

Investors Tip of the Week
Ways that a budget can
improve your life:
A budget helps you prepare


for emergencies or large or
unanticipated expenses that
might otherwise knock you 2
back financially.
A budget can improve your
marriage. A good budget is not
just a spending plan; it is a com-
munication tool. Done right, a .
budget can bring two, persons
together as you identify and
work towards common goals
and reduce arguments about
money.
A budget reveals areas
where you are spending too
much money, so you can refo-
cus on your most important
goals.


Bank (From page 1B)


at $25.6 million, compared to
the previous year's $23.6 mil-
lion.


vices, which would be fully
rolled out "certainly at the end
of the first quarter/beginning of


LEGAL SECRETARY

A commercial law chambers invites applications for the
position of Legal Secretary for a corporate and commercial
attorney.

Qualifications:

Bachelors or Associate of Arts Degree in
Secretarial/Administrative Studies, or equivalent
professional qualificationss.
. *,Five (5) years secretarial/administrative experience in
a la\\ firm or financial institution.

Skills and Personal Qualities:

Superior knowledge and experience of MS Word, MS
Outlook, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint.
Knowledge of conveyancing, mortgages, company
formation and administration, commercial transactions
and anti-money laundering and compliance legislation
and regulations.
Effective leadership, interpersonal, and communication
skills.
Strong time-management and organizational skills.
High initiative and motivation.
Team player.

Benefits:

Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications, group medical and life insurance, and
excellent vacation package.

Interested persons should apply no later than Friday, 28th
January, 2005 to:

Law Chambers
P.O. Box CB-11173
Nassau, The Bahamas

email: LegalSecretary_@msn.com


In an exclusive interview with the second quarter".



COlinRI
.^ MFinancial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
21 January 2005
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VFSIT WWW.BSXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX* CLOSE 1,041.661 I CHG 00.00 %CHG 00.00 YTO 173.35/ YTD% 19.986
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS S Div S PIE Yield
I -1: 1 10 Ac,aco ilarkeis 1 10 1 10 000 0 197 0000 NIM 0.00%
7.50 7.30 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.75 Bank of Bahamas 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.2 5.74%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.97 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.91 British American Bank 0.95 0.95 0.00 0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
7.25 6.25 Cable Bahamas 7.20 7.20 0.00 0.510 0.240 14.1 3.33%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 5,306 0.259. 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.17 6.15 Commonwealth Bank 7.15 7.15 0.00 321 0.632 0.390 11.3 5.45%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.96 3.99 0.03 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.26%
9.75 8.05 Finco 9.70 9.70 0.00 0.649 0.480 14.9 4.95%
7.50 6.20 FirstCaribbean 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 8.00 Focol 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.3 6.25%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9189 9.89 0.00 550 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.27 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.84 5.80 -0.04 0.245 0.000 23.8 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
FPdelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask S Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S Div S PIE Yield
13 00 13 00 Bahamas SuoermarKels 1300 1400) 16 00 1 328 0 720 105 5 14%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 60 0 40 RND Holairngs 0 29 0 54 00 -0 103 0000 NM 0 009
Colina Over-The.-Counter Securities
43100 2800 ABDAB d41 O0 4300 41 00 2220 0000 194 0 00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds ': .
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div S Yield %
1 2014 1 1491 Collna Money Marsel Fund 1 201423-
2.0536 1.8154 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.1191***
10.2148 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648"****
2.1746 2.0012 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.174583**
1.0848 1.0823 Colina Bond Fund 1.084821"***
FINDEOX CLOSE 420.140 I YTD 12.259% I 2003 -0.5948%
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidellt)
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day, to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
- AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ ** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
* AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/1 -* AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
TO TRADIq CAJ.L COQLMil E2.Oa.701G I FIDELITY 242-3a.&7764 .,


relating to Commonwealth
Bank's SunCard and Master-
Card would also be "rolled out
some time early in the New
Year", as the institution target-
ed its objective "of becoming
the best personal bank in the
Bahamas".
Mr Donaldson said "not too
many" companies in the
Bahamas and the world- could
point to eight successive years
of record profits. At year-end
December 31, 2004, total assets
were 9 per cent ahead of the
previous year at $765.9 million,
the first time they had exceeded
$750 million.
Earnings per share increased,
by 12.3 per cent to $0.64 from
$0.57, while the bank's return
on equity rose by 0.1 per cent to
28.8 per cent. Shareholders
received dividends of $0.39, a
14.7 per cent increase upon the
previous year's $0.34.
Mr Donaldson said he was
"fairly optimistic" about both
Commonwealth Bank's and the
wider economy's prospects in
2005, with tourism seeing "some
buoyancy" and hopes that the
construction sector was primed
for expansion.
Commonwealth Bank, he
added, saw ordinary Bahami-
ans as its key market rather
than high net worth individu-
als, "and as long as those people
prosper, we will prosper".
The Commonwealth Bank
chairman said the bank would
also be branching further into
mortgage lending in 2005 in a
"more sustained" fashion, as it
continued to balance its lend-
ing portfolio, which has been
heavily weighted towards con-
sumer loans. Mr Donaldson,
though, reassured that the bank
was "not unduly exposed" on
consumer lending.
He acknowledged that the
Central Bank of the Bahamas'
guidelines on limiting borrowers
total indebtedness to a certain
proportion of their monthly,
income and requiring a mini-
mum 15 per cent equity down-
payment on all consumer loans
had been "challenging".


Mr Donaldson said it was dif- -
ficult to enforce and monitor
these debt service ratios, as
there were lines of credit and
loans now available to con-
sumers outside the banking sec-
tor, but added that if the Cen-
tral Bank had not set guidelines
it would have imposed its own.
Mr Donaldson explained that
it was not in a bank's long-term "
interests for its customers and
borrowers to take on too much '
debt, as they would be unable to
service those loans and this '
would hit profitability.
The Commonwealth Bank
chairman said the bank had-' ._
been able to "contain" any
issues arising from the econom-
ic devastation inflicted upon
Grand Bahama and Abaco by
the September 2004 hurricanes.
He added that the bank's
exposure to the problems at the
Royal Oasis was "relatively
small" compared to the sector's
total exposure.
Mr Donaldson said he did not
expect the bank to increase its
loan loss provisions in 2005 due
to the aggressive provisioning
over the previous two to three
years, while its dividend policy
was not expected to change. If
there was any movement on
dividends, it would be in an
upward direction.
Mr Donaldson said Com-
monwealth Bank's own inter-
nal guidelines prevented it from
paying out more than 61-62 per
cent of annual earnings as divi-
dends to shareholders, mean-
ing that at least 40 per cent of
profits went into retained earn-
ings every year.


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Navios shows




the way on


S* COMFORT SUITES PARADISE ISLAND

Immi'r nation is the ideal choice,
the last whether you are planning

In the last of his two articles on the Navios a corporate meeting, hosting out of
Corporation, established in Nassau half a century
ago, Roger Jones looks at how the company balanced town guests or just need a weekend get-a-way
the need for expatriate specialists with the Located next to the ATLANTIS, with 228 beautifully appointed Junior Suites
employment and advancement of Bahamians, and meeting facilities to accommodate up to 70 people.
suggesting that it serve as a model for current policy


Perhaps relevant to
the Financial Ser-
vices Consultative
Forum sub-com-
mittee study now
being widely discussed and pub-
licised, relating to expatriates
being brought in and allowed
to work in the Bahamas, was
Navios's practice and experi-
ence in this regard.
Even in the earliest days,
Navios did have some problems
getting work permits for expa-
triate employees. In all cases,
the expatriate employees
brought in were highly trained,
experienced specialists in vari-
ous fields involving the opera-
tion of ships, ocean transport
of bulk commodities, or famil-
iarity with US steel account-
ing/financial practices.
Some came from other US
Steel subsidiaries, but most
were hired after intense inter-
viewing and screening in
Europe, the US and Canada. It
was true, however, that the
longer Navios was here and
Bahamin employees became
trained and experienced, the
need for foreign expatriate
employees lessened. '
There would still be problems
with immigration from time to


time, as work permit require-
ments would suddenly tighten
and/or an immigration officer
would hold up, delay or even
refuse permits, even when
Navios desperately needed to
bring in some essential special-
ist. Although never openly stat-
ed, it was quite probable that
one of the secondary reasons
Navios moved out of the
Bahamas was due to the uneven
- sometimes unrealistic immi-
gration policies
Even today, this continues to
remain a problem in the
Bahamas. Probably some objec-
tive, independent body (instead'
of immigration personnel) capa-
ble of analysing and judging the
requirements, qualifications and
uniqueness of technical, highly
specialised and management
personnel that companies are
seeking work permits for should
be set up.
One or more individuals on
the panel should have good,
overall knowledge of the likely
availability locally of the tal-
ents, specialisation and experi-
ence required. Immigration
would then refer to this panel:
for a decision on'ahny work per- "
mit application fh'ey thought
was questionable or might be


filled by Bahamians.
There are other major pluses
to having foreign offshore com-
panies here, in addition to hir-
ing, training and promoting
Bahamian employees. First,
there are substantial side bene-
fits (fallout) from an offshore
company headquartering here.
Rental of office space and
homes, the retention of
Bahamian law firms and
accounting/audit firms, the need
for computer and telecommu-
nication services, expatriate per-
sonnel employing maids and
gardeners, coverage of corpo-
rate and personal insurance
locally, the purchase of business
and household items here.
Certainly, in the area of char-
ity volunteer work and contri-
butions, expatriates often led
the way. A second big plus is
the many visitors that come to
the Bahamas as the result of a
See WORK, Page 4B
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* Caring and dedicated faculty, small class sizes
* 360 students: 2/3 Canadian, 1/3 international from 20 countries
* Beautiful campus on Niagara River, a short drive from Niagara
Falls & Toronto
* Private Middle School (grades 7 & 8) and High School
(grade 9 to 12/pre-university)
* Comprehensive co-curricular and residential programs
* Distinguished university placement rate
* Established in 1932... rich tradition & heritage


Diane Kon, Director of Enrollment Management at NCC, will be hosting
personal family visits at the Comfort Suites Paradise Island on Tuesday, February 1, 2005.


Please contact Mrs. Kon directly by email (dianek@niagaracc.com) or by phone (905-871-6980) to schedule
your private visit where you will discover for yourself exactly what it is that sets NCC apart from the rest!


Niagara Christian Collegiate 2619 Niagara Parkway. Fort Erie. Ontario, CANADA Phone 905-871-6980 www.niagaracc.com


"'


MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


TRADEINVEST ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD.
A private Wealth Management Com(i any and medium-sized
Family Of/fice
Has an opening for an
ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT ADMINISTRATION
Applicants must:
Be a qualified attorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders
will also be considered.
Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in
any of the areas of trust, banking or investments.
Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents
relating to special projects and to confidently communicate with
overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.
Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project,
coordinating its various parts and managing the team associated with
the same.
Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary
structures.
Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic
understanding of investment and financial transactions.
Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant
supervisor.
Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.
Successful candidate will work directly with the President of TradeInvest
in the management of complex private fiduciary arrangements.
Responsibilities include regular contact with overseas affiliates, associated
trust, banking and investment professionals, as well as legal counsel and
advisors.
Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and
Confidential to:
The President,
Tradelnvest Assest Management Ltd.,
West Building,
Lyford Manor, Lyford Cay,
P.O. Box N-7776 (Slot 193),
New Providence, Bahamas.,
Applications must be received by 28th January, 2005.


THE TRIBUNE


WOrk (From page 1B)


company being here. There are
relatives and friends of expatri-
ate employees that come but,
more importantly, the individu-
als who come that have busi-
ness with the company. These
may be parent or affiliated com-
pany personnel, customers, sup-
pliers, competitors, joint ven-,
ture partners anyone who has
a business reason.
When Navios was here they
had a steady stream of visitors -
US Steel executives, Norwe-
gian, Dutch, German, Swedish,
UK, Canadian, Hong Kong,
Chinese, Greek the owners of
ships Navios had under long-
term time charter. Then there
were the Danish, Belgium, Ital-
ian, Mexican and Brazilian ship
owners who wanted to charter
ships to Navios. Also, shipbro-
kers, bunker suppliers, ship
agency firms from ports that
Navios ships traded to, execu-
tives of steel companies (non-
US Steel) which Navios had
contracts to deliver ore to.
There was almost always one
or two "visitors", or groups of
visitors, in Nassau resulting
from Navios being here and
they, of course, stayed at a hotel
and entertained frequently at
the top restaurants.
But Navios worked very hard
to train and bring along
Bahamian employees to replace
expatriates. Clyde Bethell, who
was to become, the individual
who would be responsible for
scheduling the entire fleet, was
sent to Puerto Ordaz in


WANTED,
. .. . .......-. . ...






A well established Media Company is looking for a hard working
Sale to work as a Pressroom Assistant. Qualified applicants should
be able to work night's between the hours of 7pm to 4am, be pre-
pared to submit job references and a clean police record.

interested persons should sent resume to: j
S/o DA 13465
P.O. Box N-3207
-Fax: 328-2398

L A .v .....MOW..... . .




CONTRACTOR


PRE-QUALIFICATION


College of The Bahamas Performing Arts Centre



Building Contractors are invited to PRE-QUALIFY for the
Modification of The College of The Bahamas Auditorium, and
its conversion to The Performing Arts Centre, to be situated
at Thompson Boulevard, New Providence, Bahamas.


The Project will comprise part demolition and modification
of the Existing 2 storey Auditorium approximately six
thousand two hundred square feet in area (6,200 sq. ft.), and
the construction of some twelve thousand square feet (12,000
sq. ft) on new space incorporating a fifty-six feet (56 ft.) high
Stage House, Dressing Rooms, Workshops, Foyer and
Entrance Walkways, Toilets and Administration space.


Interested contractors may collect pre-qualification documents
at:


Office of the Vice President, Research, Planning &
Development
The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-4308


There will be a non-refundable Fee of $100 for each
(cash or certified cheque made payable to The
The Bahamas.)


document,
College of


Sealed pre-qualification submissions will be received until
4:00 p.m., Thursday 27th January 2005 at the office of the
Estates Manager, 2nd Floor Portia M. Smith Student Services
Centre, The College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive.


THE .j..


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Venezuela to ride the ore carri-
ers up and down the Orinoco
River and become familiar with
all the loading port facilities and
practices.
Other Bahamians were sent,
at Navios' expense, to attend
the New York Sate Maritime
Academy. There was a high
turnover in expatriate employ-
ees and it was costly to go over-
seas or bring them here to be
interviewed and then, if they
were hired, to have their fami-
lies and possessions transported
here. Navios did everything pos-
sible to train, "bring along",
prepare and eventually replace
expatriate employees with
Bahamians.
Since Navios left Nassau in
1980, it has gone through sev-
eral changes of ownership. US
Steel was the sole owner of
Navios from the date it was
founded in Nassau in 1954 until
it sold a 50 per stake in the com-
pany to Fednav Limited (a
Canadian shipping company) in
June 1982. US Steel then sold
the remaining 50 per cent to
Fednav in August 1986, at
which time Fednav became the
sole owner of Navios.
Fednav, in turn, sold slightly
less than 50 per cent to Citibank
Capital Investors in the spring
of 1989, and there was a small
management shareholding.
Fednav, however, owned a
controlling stake in Navios until
1999. In 1999, the current pres-
ident, Anthony Whitworth, and
Bruce Hoag, the chief financial
officer, led a management buy-
out of Navios. They were sup-
ported in their efforts by the
Leventis Group of Greece and
SaltChuk Resources of Seattle.
The Leventis Group is a very
substantial Greek family with
interests in bottling, hotels,
tourism, soap, manufacturing
and a variety of other business-
es.


SaltChuk have a number of
maritime investments but all are
American flagged tugs, barges
and Ro-Ro's (Roll-on-Roll-off
ships).Today, the shareholding
in Navios is: Leventis about 60
per cent, management 35 per
cent and SaltChuk five per cent.
Presidents of Navios when
the company was headquar-
tered in Nassau were:
1954-1957 Vice Admiral
Glenn B. Davis, USN (Retired)
1957-1964 William H. Yost
1964-1975 James Martin
1975-1976 Giuseppe "Pino"
Colombari
1976-1979 Robert Goldbach
1980 ------ Jose Elverdin
Due to Navios once being
headquartered in Nassau, two
former Navios presidents -
Goldbach and Colombari now
retired, own condominiums in
Nassau and spend part of each
year here.
Three of the original Navios
expatriate staff who arrived in
1955 still live in Nassau -
William E. Bardelmeier,
William Braithwaite and Roger
M. Jones.
Braithwaite now has Bahami-
an citizenship and is the resi--
dent manager of the Islands
Club on Cable Beach, while
Jones and Bardelmeier estab-
lished a world-renowned ocean
bulk shipping consulting com-
pany, Jones Bardelmeier and
Company Ltd, in Nassau in
1963, and operated it here very
successfully for more than 35
years. Both, retired, continue
to live here.
Bill Bardelmeier and ex-
Navios vice-president Dudley
Martinborough are on the
board of the Bahamas Maritime
Authority. The late Clyde
Bethell, who died in 2003, had
been on the Maritime Authori-
ty Board.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL MOMPREMIER,
WARWICK HOUSE, OFF SHIRLEY ST., NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a.citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th day of JANUARY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationalityiand Citizenship,
RO.Box N- 7147, Nassaui, iahamas.


The present owners of
Navios held a big. 50th
Anniversary celebration of the
company's founding in Nassau
at their headquarters in South
Norwalk, Connecticut, in May
last year. Additional Navios
50th Anniversary celebrations
were scheduled to be held in
August in Montevedeo,
Uruguay, Athens in Septem-
ber, and in Tokyo, Japan in
October.
Even though Navios is long
gone, there are today several
major ship-owning entities
with very large fleets that have
their principal executive
offices in Nassau. The Clipper
Group, with 240 ships (and
presently 33 new buildings on
order) is one of the largest
shipowners in the world, and
Dockendale Shipping Compa-
ny, also with a sizeable fleet,
are also headquartered at
Dockendale House overlook-
ing the Nassau harbour
entrance.
Teekay Shipping, one of the
larger tanker owners, has
offices in TK House, Bayside
Executive Park, at West Bay
Street and Blake Road. Ele-
ments of the Greek Goulan-
dris Shipping Group have had
some of their shipping inter-
ests located here for upwards
of 40 years. Presently, this enti-
ty has an office in Lyford Cay
Manor an office building just
outside of Lyford Cay.
The indications are that all
these companies are pleased
with Nassau as a base for some
of their shipping interests.
Although all their business is
not carried out from here, the
senior management who
reside here say they are more
than pleased. They find this a
good country in which to oper-
ate-their business, and do not
hesitate to recommend the
Bahamas to other shipping
entities that might be interest-
ed in locating all or a part of
their shipping
management/operations here.

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THE T


Monday, January 24th @ 10:00 am
Official Opening Ceremony, Main Library Oakes Field Campus

Tuesday, January 25th
Library Open Houses -All Day
Main Library, Thompson Boulevard
Hilda Bowen Library, Grosvenor Close
Law Library, Thompson Boulevard

Wednesday, January 26th
Library Open Houses All Day
School of Hospitality and Tourism Studies Library
Northern Bahamas Campus Library

Thursday, January 27th @ 12:30 pm
Meet The Writers Programme
"Potcakes: Dog ownership in New Providence, The Bahamas"
By
W.J.Fielding, Jane Mather, and Dr. Maurice Isaacs
British Colonial Hilton ,1 Bay Street
(By Invitation)

Friday, January 28th
Staff Training Workshops / T-Shirt Day
.................................................................... ........


COB FUN WALK
Theme: "WALK FOR HEALTH & LIBRARIES"
Saturday, 5th February 2005
6:00 A.M.

Route: SHTS Parking lot, north on Thompson Boulevard to Poinciana Drive, East
on Poinciana Drive to Baillou Hill Road, North on Baillou Hill Road to Bay Street,
West on Bay Street to Nassau Street, onto Thompson Boulevard returning to SHTS.


ENTRY FEE: $10.00
Entry deadline: 5:00 p.m., 4th February 2005
Funds raised have been earmarked for the new COB library

Name:


f-
/


Date of Birth


Male


[] Female


EMERGENCY CONTACT:


Do you suffer from any medical condition that we should know, about? ,

[] Yes [] No If yes please explain.


**The College of the Bahamas will not be responsible for any injuries incurred**

Check one of the following categories:


[] Under 20

[] 51 60


[] 21 30

[] 61 & over


[] 31-40


[] 41 50


Signature:

PLEASE RETURN REGISTRATION FORM TO
THE OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OAKES FIELD
CAMPUS, "A" BLOCK
TELEPHONE: 302-4306 OR 302-4454
............................................................................................

Centre For Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES)
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
BAHAMAS LOCATION- Nassau

Starts: 29th January 2005
Since its debut, the Becker CPA Review Programme has consistently
delivered superior exam preparation. Becker students pi i at ri n ic .
the rate of non-Becker students. Clearly, Becker offers adistinc
and unparalleled advantages that no other CPA review, course can
deliver.
The Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination is Lme leader
and grandparent of all professional accounting examinations The
benefits include higher salary, increased confidence and competence.
and recognition as a member of an elite group of professionals. m
Opportunities available to CPAs are positions in a government or not-for-profit organization, public or
private companies, or an accounting firm. As a CPA you could specialize in Information Technology Services,
Financial Planning, Auditing, Estate Planning, Management Accounting, Public Accounting, Tax Administration,
International Accounting and much more. We can help you to chart a course for a successful and rewarding
career in professional accounting!


* Tuition is same as in United States: $2,100
Financial Reporting (F):
Accounting & Reporting/Regulation (R):
Law/Business Concepts (L)
Audit/Attestation (A)


Ask About Our Easy Payment Plan!
$650
$520
$455
$455


FEES: Registration: $40. Library & Computer Fee: $100 Insurance: $25
Books: Available at COB Bookstore
* Repeat Candidates: 50% Discount on Tuition
* Tuition Free Continuing Help Available to Qualified Applicants
CLASSES MEET: Saturdays: 8:30am-5:30pm

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Tel. (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
SCentre For Continuing Education & Extension Services (CEES)
Fees and Tuition may be paid by cash, credit card, or bank certified cheque to The College of The Bahamas
Business Office, Oakes Field Campus, Poinciana Drive.


STAFF VACANCIES

VICE PRESIDENT OF FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION

The Vice President of Finance and Administration (VPFA) reports to The President and is responsible
for ensuring the financial well-being of the College; providing visionary leadership and sound management
for the College's administrative and financial operations including the establishment of policies, controls
and procedures. This individual will be a member of the President's Cabinet.
The College of The Bahamas has an annual budget of $34 million. The VPFA has oversight over all financial
matters including the bookstore, cafeteria, business centre, human resources, security and facilities.
This is a position of significant visibility and influence. It requires an experienced professional whose
background is characterized by initiative, achievement; leadership and proven expertise in the field of higher
education finance and administration.
The College of The Bahamas is the national institution of higher education in The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. The institution grants Associate and Bachelor and some joint graduate degrees to nearly 4,000
students located around the Bahamian archipelago. It has extensive links with higher education institutions
in the Caribbean and North America and its credits are accepted by colleges and universities in those
regions and in Great Britain. It is poised to embark aggressively upon a major expansion of its programme
offerings, research activities, and physical facilities, .all with a view to seeking a charter as a university by
2007.
This position requires an advanced degree in an appropriate field and a strong background related to finance
and budget development, facilities master planning, business, human resources; an effective, proactive
and collaborative leadership style with a proven record of managing technological and organizational change;
and an ability to understand the mission, goals and objectives of a young and growing College which is
moving towards a tradition of shared governance.,
The College of The Bahamas is a quasi-government organization. As a result it is necessary to have an
understanding of the government's budget processes and be able to effectively communicate with external
agencies.
Demonstrated knowledge of critical issues in higher education, including collective bargaining and accreditation
would be an asset.
The successful candidate should possess a minimum of a Master's Degree or equivalent professional
qualification in an appropriate business/financial discipline and at least ten years of senior level management
experience preferably in an institute of higher education.
The Application Process:
Please submit the following:
1. A letter of interest
2. A complete resume that includes a chronological work history.
3. The names, current addresses, email and telephone numbers of at least five work related references.


Please submit your complete application to:


Mail:


Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field & Thompson Boulevard
RP. 0. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Patricia Ellis
Facsmile:
(242) 302 4539
Email:
hrapply@cob.edu.bs
Applications must be received no later than January 27, 2005.


Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following post of Assistant Vice President,
Academic Affairs in the Office of Academic Affairs, which oversees the administration of academic services
at The College, including the development and implementation of curricular activities, academic policies
and regulations. The successful candidate must possess a terminal degree in a relevant area, have moved
up the academic rank to the Senior Lecturer level, have relevant work experience including appropriate
supervisory level exposure, having served in various capacities such as Dean and Chair. Excellent analytical,
organisational, report writing, presentational and interpersonal communication skills are required for this
position.

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

The Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs is a new position that will serve a leadership role at The
College, ensuring that the education objectives of The College are attained and its policies are maintained.
In assisting with the execution of the responsibilities of the Office of Academic Affairs, the Assistant Vice
President Academic Affairs reports directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs,,and undertakes
duties that entail
Responsibility for the Summer Sessions offerings, including full academic programmes and those
offered through Continuing Education Extension Services;
Focusing on strategic faculty development, a specific focus on new and adjunct faculty;
Coordinating with the academic deans, facilitating the development of and support for faculty research
and creative activity efforts;
Continuing revision of the curriculum, assessment of student learning, advising across the institution,
the experiences of first-year and transfer students, liaison with student affairs;
Stimulating collegial processes for further development of undergraduate majors, general education
implementation and assessment, and interdisciplinary opportunities;
Providing leadership in the creation of a proposed Honours Programme which will offer courses in
advanced study to challenge highly motivated students;
Promoting creative use of instructional technologies to provide quality instruction;
Coordinating with other campus offices on regular and ad hoc campus-wide issues;
Resolving student academic complaints, appeals, etc.;
Coordinating curriculum assessment, including programme reviews of undergraduate majors (in
cooperation with the academic deans and the Director for Research and Grants), general education,
technology-mediated instruction, and other curricular initiatives across The College;
Coordinating the new programme approval process with the Academic Affairs Office;
Representing Academic Affairs on College committees, as assigned;
Representing the interest of undergraduate graduate education in strategic planning, enrollment
management, and policy development;
Assuring the highest standards for undergraduate education and the quality and integrity of the
undergraduate curriculum in collaboration with the academic deans;
Working closely with the Deans Council and the existing Academic Board to enhance undergraduate
education;
Fostering and seeking out external support for mission-related research and outreach initiatives that
are College-wide, including support from national and international agencies; in this regard, he or
she will work closely with the Director of Research and Grants; and
Working with the Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement to produce brochures for,
all majors and centres of excellence (Institutes).
The initial term of appointment is three years, with eligibility for renewal of the appointment.
Salary Scale SM4 $39,300 $56,300
The application deadline is February 11, 2005. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should
submit a College of The Bahamas Employment Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date
transcripts. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants are advised to request three referees to
send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed below without waiting to be contacted
by the College.
Please visit the College's website to obtain more information about the institution and to access the
College's Employment Application Form.
Applications should be forwarded In confidence to:
Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Facsimile: (242) 302 4539
Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs


APPLICATION DEADLINE
Application deadline for all new applicants interested in attending The College of The Bahamas
this Fall (September) 2005 semester, are reminded of the following:


Application deadline:
Application fee:


February 4, 2004 at 4:00 pm
$40.00


Note: The following supporting documents must accompany application form
* One copy of pages 1-4 of a valid (not expired) passport or certificate of identity
* One official College/University transcript if previously attended a College/University
* One official High School transcript if still in high school or graduated less than
three years ago
* One copy of all academic certificates (BJC's, BGCSE's, CXC's, GCE's Etc.)
For more information, call the Office of Admissions at 302-4499.


I C.. LLEGE tb H 13AHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs _41___f.S


MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 50


THE TRIBUNE


(DMN/R.) --/L







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective
immediately Miss Latoya Paulette Smith
is no longer employed by the law firm of
Ayse Rengin Dengizer Johnson &
Company and is not authorized to conduct
any business on the Company's behalf.


LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000)


LINDEN INVESTMENTS LIMITED.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, LINDEN INVESTMENTS
LIMITED has been dissolved and struck of the Register
according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by
the Registrar General on the 13th of January, 2005.

NJ M BtMl,M
I lird House,
15 Union Street.
St. Helier, Jersey,
Channel Islands
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000)


CIRCASSIA LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, CIRCASSIA LIMITED has been
dissolved and struck of the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 1st of December, 2004.

John Manzies Scarborough,
P.O. Box 218,
43 La Motte Street,
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands, JE48SD
Liquidator


Door not closed on




Bill's 'sticking points'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government has not
completely closed the door on
the three 'sticking' points that
remained over the Domestic
Insurance Bill, the minister of
financial services and invest-
ments has indicated, as she
warned that the restriction on
general insurance carriers doing
business directly with policy-


holders might be challenged in
the evolving free trade climate.
In her presentation to the
House of Assembly in the sec-
ond reading of the Domestic
Insurance Bill, Allyson Mayn-
rad-Gibson said that while the
Government had decided to
maintain the status quo on the
three issues the insurance indus-
try itself was unable to resolve,
the Registrar of Insurance had
been mandated to form a new


Move (From page 1B)


that's why we're being trans-
ferred."
The three employees are
expected to be placed in the
Ministry of Education in about
two weeks.
According to one of the
workers, during the administra-
tion of former registrar general
Sterling Quant some two years
ago, the three put in a request
for transfer, but at that time
were told there was no one to
fill their posts. "Now overnight
they are facilitating our transfer.
The Minister wants us out, but
it's not hurting us; it will hurt
the department".
Meanwhile, Ms Thompson
has instructed her attorneys,
Milton Evans and Desmond
Bannister, to pursue court
action to have her reinstated. If
that fails, she wants the courts
to force the Minister of Finan-
cial Services and Investments,
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, to
reveal the reasons for her ter-
mination.
Speaking out against the
treatment of her former staff,
Ms Thompson said: "There are
a number of transfers happen-
ing to people perceived to be
loyal to me, and there have also
been, I understand, the issuance
of job descriptions for the oper-
ations team who were a prob-
lem to the staff, much of it deal-
ing with human resource and
personnel matters, and which
should be left to non-contract
workers. There is some trepi-

Fly (From page 1B)


dation about this."
Calling her dismissal an
attack on the ranks of profes-
sional women in the Bahamas,
Ms Thompson said women of
intelligence were clearly not
being respected if the head of a
government department could
be unceremoniously dismissed
and nothing done by those in
authority to address the matter.
"If you are willing to express
yourself, if you're intelligent,
bright, you are not being
respected at this time in the
Bahamas," Ms Thompson said.
"Women have to realise what
this means. It's not about me,
but a head of department being
unceremoniously dismissed
because she was willing to speak
up for what is right. This means
we are to be silenced."
According to Ms Thompson,
she was hotly pursued by Mrs
Maynard-Gibson and persons
working for the minister to fill
the post of Registrar General,
which was becoming vacant due
to Mr Quant's retirement.
She was already employed,,
but the Minister encouraged her
to be a part of the Registrar
General's department, saying it
was the hub of the financial ser-
vices sector. Deciding to
embrace the challenge put to
her, Ms Thompson said she
soon found out she was not part
of the 'team' and was expected
to just follow instructions.
"In hindsight there was no
real motivation. o-hire me to


Working Group that would
conduct town meetings and
hold public debate on the top-
ics.
Apart from maintaining the
bar on general insurance carri-
ers conducting business with the
public directly, the other two
sticking points are whether all
technical representatives of
insurance firms that provided
advice to policyholders should
be licensed by the newly-creat-
do the job. I was hired to be a
rubber stamp. I was offered the
world a good salary, car, but
nothing panned out. I was still
a team player, loyal to the post
and not the person, but she (the
minister) wanted loyalty to the
person and I don't work that
way. I had a job to do and I did
it," Ms Thompson said.
During a recent interview on
radio talk show Issues of the
Day, Ms Thompson said she
was told her three-year contract
was being terminated with
effect from January 10, 2004,
and that she would be given one
month's pay in lieu of notice.
"She (the Minister) just woke
up one morning and decided
she wanted me gone. I was nev-
er told that I was impertinent,
but I did have one occasion
where I was told that if I did
not show up to a five o'clock
meeting on a Friday afternoon,
and this is when I had a sick
child at home, that they no
longer wanted me as registrar. I
decided that if that was the cri-
teria for which I would be ter-
minated then so be it," Ms
Thompson said.
Since her dismissal, Mrs May-
nard-Gibson has not spoken
with Ms Thompson, nor has any
effort been made to explain to
her why she was terminated.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson previ-
ously said Ms Thompson would
be transferred to another gov-
ernment department. While she
admitted that there was some
discussion of this, Ms Thomp-
son said no contract or written
,offer had been made in regard


ed Insurance Commission, and
whether brokers and agents
who placed insurance business
outside the Bahamas with
unregistered carriers could be
held liable if a problem devel-
oped with a claim.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the decision to maintain the bar
on the direct selling of insur-
ance products "might have a
negative impact on only one
company".
to a transfer to another govern-
ment department.
Ms Thompson said she does
have a strong personality, but
did not think that should be a
reason to be unceremoniously
fired in the 21st century.
Adding that this was not the
first time she had been in a
leadership position, Ms Thomp-
son said she tried to ensure
things ran smoothly in the Reg-
istrar General's Department.
She admitted that initially there
were some criticisms from the
staff, but those she disciplined
developed a strong rapport with
her that was evident when they
demonstrated on her behalf.
Ms Thompson said she was
warned by Mr Quant that the
Registrar General's Depart-
ment was under a certain
amount of pressure before she
took the job, but added that she
could not imagine what would
occur.
Following Ms Thompson's
official termination, the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments announced the
appointment of Shane Miller,
former chief counsel in the
Office of the Attorney General,
to act as Registrar General until
further notice.
Ms Thompson said: "I was
too no nonsense, too direct for
them and I was committed to
doing my job, but that was not
what they wanted from me.
Now they have removed a
woman, who had responsibili-
ties, and put a single man in
place giving him the perks that
I was supposed to get."..


VACANCY NOTICE


A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of New Providence, is
presently seeking the following:


Position:


Brewer


Duties Include:

Manage the brewing process from start to finish:
Identify deviations from standard;
Beer filtration.
Perform quality control analysis as required.
Clean and sanitize all equipment.
Work with various types of chemicals;

Minimum Requirements:

Associates Degree: Biology, Chemistry or Technical area;
Three years experience in a technical environment;
Strong communication, administrative, time management skills and
reporting skills;
Excel spreadsheet usage at an intermediate level a must;
Proficiency in Word applications required;
Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong commitment
to detail and good analytical skills.

The Ideal Candidate:

Must be a team player that is willing to support the efforts of the
team or any team member.
The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative with little supervision.
Must have good communication skills.
Must be able to function in a shift system.

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available to the
successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to the
address below no later than January 31st, 2005.

Human Resources Manager
Commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas

or

Fax: 1-242-362-4793


With the peak tourism sea-
son of mid-February to April
upcoming, the need to imple-
ment a solution that can be
completed in the shortest period
of time has become critical.
Mr Grant, who was speaking
on behalf of the airlines operat-
ing out of the NIA terminal,


said once all parties concerned
have an opportunity to consider
any solutions, a feasible plan of
action will be developed that is
expected to assist in resolving
the matter.
Described mainly as a design
problem, Mr Grant said much
of the delays and long lines at


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

EAGLE WINGS NEST INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 20th
day of January, 2005. The Liquidators are Ingrid Davis and
Cordelia Fernander of P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEADING LAW FIRM

invites applications for attorneys for our Freeport
Office.


Applicants must have a minimum of 4-6 years
experience in Litigation and Conveyancing,
demonstrate an ability to work independently and
possess a thorough working knowledge and technical
competence in the areas mentioned. (Applicants with
experience in only one of the mentioned areas may
also apply).


Successful applicants can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits.


Apply in confidence to:


Vacancy
P.O.Box N449
Nassau, Bahamas


NIA are the result of a terminal
that was built for one purpose,
but has since seen its role
expanded. NIA was not
designed to accommodate the
pre-customs security screening,
but because of the security envi-
ronment for airline travel today,
airport officials find themselves
having to add processes that do
not lend themselves to the struc-
ture of the building.
The final result has been that
NIA cannot accommodate the
level of pre-clearance, equip-
ment and personnel required
for travel to the US without
causing overcrowding in peak
periods, Mr Grant said.
"We're looking at ways to
restructure the building to
accommodate it. That is the
only thing that can really help us
now," he added.
Declining to give specific
details about any proposed solu-
tion, Mr Grant said industry
stakeholders are considering
issues related to cost, timing,
equipment and even minor con-
struction and design wori to the
terminal, with the hope of hav-
ing an answer in place as soon
as possible.
The BHA has also offered to
lend technical assistance to help
come up with suggestions on
how they could possibly
improve the situation.
Several of the airlines have
also offered to help by possibly
providing more screening sta-
tions, including x-ray machines
so the queues will be shorter,
"because right now it's a night-
mare".
In addition, Mr Grant said he
would like to pu.t a concierge
programme in place that would
make it more comfortable for
passengers moving through.
The concierge would help direct
passengers moving through the
departure terminal, providing
information, answering ques-
tions and helping to ensure that
the last impression of the
Bahamas was a good one.
Mr Grant said: "The long
lines and delays have hurt the
tourism product in the past and
it's a damaging situation that
has to be solved. All the hotels
are behind us because they
recognize that the process is
really hurting them, and they've
really been supporting us with
technical people.
"I think we are far underway
in terms of finding a solution,
but until all principals have seen
the suggestions and had time to
review them it would be pre-
mature to put them in the pub-
lic realm."


" ;~


BUSINESS








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

MONDAY EVENING


MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 7B


JANUARY 24, 2005


7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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U WPBT show FYI 1 aha, Neb.; steam-powered tractors; son Jackson took the first cross-country trip by automobile in 1903. l
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B WFOR F (CC) "Still Looking for Gift ofthe Ton-l" Loves Raymond Men / (CC)
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B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) underwater for their partners to dive a visit to Ed, but her presence puts Sandoval that they are looking for
in and free them. (N)(CC) everyone in danger. N) the wrong man. (N) ,1 (CC)
Deco Drive Trading Spouses: Meet Your New 24 Jack races to save Heller and News (CC)
B WSVN Mommy "Hammond/Howard" 1F Audrey before the terrorist camp is
(Part 2 of 2) (CC) bombed. (N) /1 (PA) (CC)
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B WPLG (CC) How'd They Do That? "Sears Fam- lor go on a date to Harlem's Cotton hausted Colorado couple deal with
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(00)American Airline "F Ba- Airline Blind man Growing Up Growing Up Caesars 24t7 The wedding depart-
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in society. (CC) cause trouble. (CC) All" (N) (CC) birthday bash. in a single day. (N) (CC)
Hardtalk BBC World Click Online BBC World Earth Report BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News News News
BET.com Count- * CLASS ACT (1992, Comedy) Christopher Reid, Ciristopher Martin. Club Comic View
BET down A nerd reluctantly swaps identities with a paroled felon.
Coronation Rick Mercer's The Tournament The Passionate Eye Anti-racism The National (CC)
CBC Street (CC) Monday Report (N) (CC) expert Jane Elliot. N) (CC)
Late Night With CNBC on Assignment "Rebellion in Dennis Miller Bob Oschack. (N) The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Conan O'Brien the Magic Kingdom" (N) (N)
(:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN Cooper 360 (CC)
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COM Evans, Jaime Pressly. A football player bets he can turn a nerd into a "Rainforest Japanese cook- DA's probe cli-
prom queen. (CC) Schmainforest" ing; family dog. maxes. (CC)
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DISN Parties at the Shadia Simmons, Holly Fulger. The 21st-century gid helps out some Housing prob- Raen fends off a
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ESPNI Gles de Italia Tennis Australian Open-- Quarterfinals. From Melbourne, Australia. (Live)
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FSN L Tournament From Las Vegas. (Live) (CC)
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HALL Texas Ranger HIV-positive teenage girs make a Robert Sean Leonard. A boy experiences a life-changing summer in
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LIFE Jasmine Guy, Nick Searcy. A military intelligence officer Jewel Staite. Premiere. A woman accuses a nurse of murdering her
nails a Marine for murder. (CC) wealthy father. (CC)
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L (:00) Killer In- Motorcycle Racing AMA SuperMo- SAS Desert: Are You Tough Auto Racing 2005 Dakar Rally.
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SPEED Car Crazy Driver of the Year (N) Dream Car Dream Car MotorWeek (N) My Classic Car
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a rape suspect. n (CC) Thomasson squares off against neo-Nazi cadets. (CC)
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WGN ment A (CC) Lawrence. Four pals lie and cheat their way through high school. F (CC)
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WPIX Loves Raymond while stuck in an elevator, forcing rescue when his girlfriend arrives Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
F (CC) Matt to test his medical skills. (N) unexpectedly. (N) n (OC) & Mr. G (CC)
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WSBK (CC) naz tums to his Dee's found the is distracted by Around The
father for help. perfect man. her mother. Dinner Party"
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HBO-E Damon, Claire Danes. A rookie lawyer goes up against Antony-Barber, Fuman Dar. Premiere. Terrorists deto- TRANSPORTER
a big insurance company. n 'PG-13' (CC) nate a dirty bomb in London. n 'NR' (CC) (2002) 'PG-13'
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A 'PG-13' (CC) her wrath, new student.
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HBO-W 2002) Eddie dy) Ben Stiller. A jilted newlywed finds solace with an- Claire Danes. A rookie lawyer goes up against a big in-
Murphy./n other woman. / 'PG:13' (CC) surance company. / 'PG-13' (CC)


(6:45) *** LOVE ACTUALLY (2003, Romance- A Rape in a Sma I Town: The Flo- (:15) Making the *** FLIRT-
HBO-S Comedy) Alan Rickman, Bill Nighy. Various people deal rence Holway Story Af (CC) Life and Death ING WITH DIS-
with relationships in London. R' (CC) of Peter Sellers ASTER (1996)
THE HAND ** THE BIG BOUNCE (2004, Comedy-Drama) Chaperone * NO ESCAPE (1994) Ray Liot-
MAX-E THAT ROCKS Owen Wilson, Gary Sinise. A woman asks a drifter to (CC) ta. A Marine convict is sentenced to
THE CRADLE help her con a developer. n 'PG-13' (CC) a deadly island prison.
(:00) *** THE DEVIL'S OWN (1997, Drama) Hard- ** YOU GOT SERVED (2004, Drama) Marques (:35) EXPOSED
MOMAX son Ford, Brad Pitt. A New York cop unknowingly shel- Houston, Omad Grandbeny. Street dancers work to- (2002, Adult) Fl
tears an Irish terrorist. Fl 'R' (CC) gether to win a competition. 0 'PG-13' (CC) NR' (CC)
(6:15) ART- ** EXTREME MEASURES (1996, Suspense) Hugh Grant, Gene Hack- *** TUPAC: RESURRECTION
SHOW WORKS (2002) man, Sarah Jessica Parker. iTV. An ER doctor investigates a homeless (2003) iTV. The life and music of
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(64 ** ** **HOW TO LOSE A GUY IN10 DAYS (2003, Romance-Comedy) ** PERFECT (1985) John Travol-
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(1978) 'PG' (CC) can seduce a man and then drive him away. F 'PG-,3' (CC) pose on health clubs. 'R'


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SUPREME COURT


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 27, 2005

No. 10/2005

Whereas DORIS KNOWLES of Rupert Dean Lane,
on the Island of New Providence, one of the Island
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of MELVERN STURRUP late of Rupert Dean
Lane, on the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 11/2005

In the estate of HORST BAUER, late of the City of
Toronto, Province of Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by HARTIS EUGENE PINDER of
Mareva House, No. 4 George Street, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for Resealing of a Grant of Certificate
of Appointment of Estate Trustee with the Will in the
above estate granted to WAYNE G. TRAINER, sole
Executor, by The Superior Court of Justice in the
City of Toronto in the Province of Ontario, Canada,
on the 7th day of April, A.D., 2003.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 12/2005

In the estate of DOLORES BOUCHARD BARKEY
aka DOLORES BARKEY aka DELORES BARKEY
aka ANNE-MARIE DOULDA DOLORES
BOUCHARD, late of Bridgepoint Medical Centre,
14th Street, Matthew's Road in the City of Toronto
in the Province of Ontario, Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by STEPHEN J. MELVIN of No. 1
Ashford Villas, Chaplin Road, Cable Beach in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attomey-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for Resealing of a Grant of Probate
in the above estate granted to MICHELINE
LEFEBVRE, Estate Trustee by The Superior Court
of Justice in the City of Toronto in the Province of
Ontario, Canada, on the 9th day of February, A.D.,
2004.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 13/2005

In the estate of JACKIE AIKEN, late of the County
of Kershaw in the State of South Carolina, USA,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by C. YVETTE McCARTNEY of
Skyline Drive in the Western District of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for Resealing of a Grant of
Probate in the above estate granted to FLOSSIE
BREWSTER and HORTENSE EDWARDS, Personal
Representatives, by The Circuit Court for Kershaw
Coun ty, South Carolina Probate Division, on the 17th
day of October, A.D., 2001.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 27, 2005

No. 14/2005

Whereas ISELIN MARINA LINDEN AND RUDOLPH
LINDEN both respectively of Parker Street on the
Island of New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration the Real and Personal
Estate of OSWALD ALEXANDER FOSTER late of
Parker Street, on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 15/2005

In the estate of DERRICK ERNEST GLADWIN, late
of 22 White Walk, Kirkella East Yorkshire, England in
the United Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for Resealing of a Grant of Probate in the
above estate granted to BABARA BECK, Executrix,
by The High Court of Justice, The District Probate
Registry at New Castle Upon Tyne and Administration
on the 12th day of May, A.D., 2002.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 16A/2005

In the estate of THOMAS DOBBINS KENDRICK,
late of 1920 Ebenezer Road, York County in the City
of Rock Hill, in the State of South Carolina, USA,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by HAL OSCAR TYNES of The City
of Freeport on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for Resealing of a Grant of Certificate of
Appointment of Personal Appointment in the above
estate granted to WILLIAM SAMUEL KENDRICK,
Executor, by The York County Probate at South
Carolina, USA on the 28th day of February, A.D.,


2003.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RO. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 16B/2005

In the estate of JAMES MUIRHEAD, late of Palm
Beach County in the State of Florida, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by ARLEAN P. HORTON-
STRACHAN of Cateret Street in the Southern District
on the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for Resealing of a Grant of an Order of Summary
Administration in the above estate granted to ELAINE
R. COLE, by The Circuit Court for Palm Beach County,
Florida, Probate Division, on the 4th day of March,
A.D., 2004.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 27, 2005

No. 17/2005

Whereas ROLAND LAMBERT ALBURY of
Carmichael Road, New Providence, The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the Real
and Personal Estate of LAURA AGNES ALBURY
late of Carmichael Road, New Providence, The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN. 27, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 18/2004

In the estate of STASIA HARRIS, late of Norfolk
County in the State of Massachusetts one of the
State of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on
its Probate Side by PERICLES ALEXANDER
MAILIS of Fort Nassau House, Marlborough Street
in the City of Nassau, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
Resealed Grant of Probate of Will/Without Sureties
in the above estate granted to MIRIAM HARRIS, the
Executrix by The Trail Court, Probate and Family
Court Department, Commonwealth of Massachusetts,
Norfolk Division on the 25th day of June, 2002.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 27, 2005

No. 19/2005

Whereas JOHN CASH of Spice Street, Pinewood
Gardens, New Providence, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of GEORGIANA CASH late of Pinewood
Gardens, New Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


24, 26 Jan.05





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FREEPORT:
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L.M.R. Drug








TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B. MONDAY. JANUARY 24, 2005


All-Stars failto sparkle




against the COB Caribs


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Junior All-Stars are
slowly improving, but they're
finding it even more difficult to
crack the win column in the New
Providence Women's Basketball
Association.
With the College of- the
Bahamas Caribs reshuffling their
line-up, the Stars came close to
pulling off their first victory on
Saturday night at the DW Davis
Gym.
But too many stray passes
enabled the Caribs to hold onto
a 50-42 decision and remain in
second place at 5-2, while the
Junior All-Stars dropped to 0-7
in the standings.
"I think our team played excel-
lent today, compared to the pre-
vious games we played," said All-
Stars' shooting guard Sasha Fer-
guson, who lit the nets up for a
game high 17 points. "I think our
only problem was that coming
down in the second half, we got
fatigued."
The Caribs took advantage of
the All-Stars' inability to finish
off their shots by packing it


* NPWBA Standings
W L Pct. GB
Jap's Auto Angels 6 1 .857 -
College of the Bahamas Caribs 5 2 .714 1
Lady Warriors 3 4 .428 3
Junior All-Stars 0 7 .000 6


inside, grabbing the rebounds
and running the outlet for the
fast break shots.
Christine Sinclair led the
charge with 15 points, while
Alexis Roberts had eight, Geo-
vanni Rigby seven, Adina
Knowles six and Tamar Bodie
five in a balanced scoring attack
the rest of the way.

Contributed
Along with Ferguson's game
high, Natishka Silver chipped in
with 10 and Staffia Bain con-
tributed eight.
Assistant coach Annastacia
Sands-Moultrie, who came in to
provide some leadership on the
court, said the All-Stars played a
lot better, but they will only
come up victorious if they are
more consistent with their shots


and they can get more girls out to
their programme.
"I know for sure that there are
some coaches who are not allow-
ing the girls to come out, even if
it's just a weekend practice," said
Sands-Moultrie, who is assisting
head coach Sharelle Cash.
"They're not only holding the
girls back, but they are also hold-
ing the Bahamas back because
we're trying to build a national
team programme."
Sands-Moultrie said although
they have not gotten all of the
players they would like to see
out, they are pleased with what
they have and what they are get-
ting from the players.
"We're lacking in just about
all areas, but we really need a
strong point guard, one who can
take control of the game and run
the floor and we need better post


Jets scorched by Sunburners


players because if you notice, I
have to come in to calm them
down," she stressed.
"We have tall players, but we
are still working on a lot of the
fundamentals with them."
The College of the Bahamas,
also in a development stage, did-
n't have as much problems as the
Junior All-Stars. They had Sin-
clair, who controlled the tempo
of the game and got their other
players in the flow.

Experienced
Forward Kimberly Rolle, their
most experienced player, played
sparingly but, when Sinclair and
Adina Knowles didn't pack it
inside to Alexis Russell, they
connected with Tamar Bodie or
Geovanni Rigby.
And to experiment a little,
Knowles played centre, putting
Russell on the wing when Rolle
wasn't in the game. And it
worked, as Knowles was able to
contain Bain a couple times
when she went in the post. I
"We were sloppy, but I gave
everybody a chance to play," said
Caribs' head coach Linda Davis.
"We didn't start all of our starters
and we tried not to put the best
five on at the same time.
"I wanted to see how far I can
go with my bench.
"So it was a game for us to test
our depth."
Although they came from a 6-
0 deficit to take a 14-9 lead
before they posted a 14-13 mar-
gin at the end of the first quarter,


the Caribs never trailed in this
game.
The Caribs were able to hold a
26-15 advantage at the half and
surged ahead 35-28 at the end of
the third. And in the fourth, they
withstood the All-Stars' final
charge in the final two minutes
when they cut the deficit to six,
46-40, to hold on for the win.
"I think they have some good
talent there. They have been
playing together for a while, so
they are getting to know each
other better," coach Davis noted.
"The more you play, the better
you get. We are playing a 13-
game series, so it gives them a
chance to hone their skills and
get some organised play in."
While the College of the
Bahamas have had the All-Stars'
number, they have struggled
when they play the front-running
defending champions Jap's Auto
Angels.
But coach Davis said she's
confident that, when the right
time comes, they will prevail.
"I would like to see a couple of
the younger players hone their
fundamentals. They're still a lit-
tle bit shy under the basket, espe-
cially my big girl, Alexis," Davis
stated. "But she has a lot of tal-
ent.
"The guards are playing well,
Kim has been in and out. She
hasn't come around to the earli-
er games in the season. But I
think we will put it all together in
the playoffs and the champi-
onships and be right in the mon-


FROM page one

space to walk, which showed
that the people were dying
for sailing events on the
island and we didn't have
one incident over the week-
ends we sailed."
As a result of what they
experienced, McPhee said
the BBOSA is looking
forward to staging some
type of regatta competi-
tion in Montagu just
about every other month
to keep the enthusiasm
alive.
"It looks very good. It
went well beyond our
expectations," McPhee
stressed. "We've had big
crowds every day we
sailed.
"So we want to thank
God for good weather,
the Ministry of Youth for
their support, Burns
House for going over
board with their sponsor-
ship, Tony Knowles and
the CSA (Commonwealth
Sailing Association) for
their support and the boat
owners and sailors for an
exciting regatta."
Ali Ferguson served as
the race coordinator.
While there were some
talk of a boycott prior to
the start of the regatta,
McPhee said there were
no such actions during the
entire series.
"I think those who were
on the outside are now
knocking to come in,"
McPhee noted. "So we
welcome them back. We
have no problem with
that.
"We want unity in the
sport and we want to give
them their rightful posi-
tions in the sport again."


Stingers' relay good showing


FROM page one

pace for the remaining teams.
For the Knights, a clean exchange of the
baton would have given them the win, however,
Knights' first exchange cost them a title.
Knights, who posted the exact same time as
the Crusaders, could not stand as they were
disqualified after the first exchange was made
out of the zone.
"It feels great to know that we are doing
something correct within the school's pro-
gramme," said Einsworth Beckford, Crusaders'
head coach.
"It is always a difficult task putting the team
together, since they all train with different
coaches.
But we have had success in it, coordinating
the team so we can have the maximum speed to
win such race.
"It isn't that hard bringing them altogether,
they are mature young men, co-captains of the
team. They've accepted their responsibilities
and I am very confident that they are able to
pull of a three-peat without much instruction."
Crusaders' 43.10 seconds is the fastest time
posted thus far by any senior team. After two
disqualifications in the event, the Big Red


Machines was second in 43.42 seconds, and
Doris Johnson Marlins third in 44.04. Knights
and Pacers were both disqualified.
Beckford added: "The only thing we have to
do now is to sustain and peak at the right meets.
"The guys are running some fast times, their
biggest task will be the.BAISS and the nation-
als.
"There is na doubt in my mind that these
gu\ s won't be able to make the Carifta team,
they are dedicated athletes, who train very
hard."
For the Knights, the loss was a difficult one to
swallow, but their head coach Floyd Armbrister
stated that, with practice, they will be able to
perfect their mistakes.
"CR Walker has an excellent team, I am not
taking anything from the other teams and any-
time you have the three top schools going head-
to-head you will have stiff competition," said
Armbrister.
"You have us, RM Bailey, NCA, CV Bethel
and Doris Johnson all wanting to win the event
for bragging rights, the athletes, they all
talk among themselves, saying who's school is
better.
"On any given day a team can win so, we
won't make any excuses we have to go back
and work on the things that went wrong."


MIN.,=


BRIAN ANDERSON. quarterback lor the Sunburner, in action against the John
Bull Jels at the weekend.
Sunburners turned up the heat iith a 28-12 icono.
(Photo: Felipe l.ajovr/Tribun' ,iffl) -




Dr. Keva Bethel Basketball Classic
Sponsored by COB's Student Activities Department


Friday, January 28th

4:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.


S Saturday, January 29th 9:00 a.m. until
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium



Divisions:
Open Male $100.00
High School Male & Female $70.00



DOUBLE ELIMINATIONS
Registration deadline is Thursday, January 27th, 2004


FOR SRI LANKA
Natural disasters can't be prevented, but the effects can be more
manageable with YOUR HELP.
Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
S oe of the following ways:
I Deposit your contribution into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas -
Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas
Main Branch
SThlie deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.

2 II you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

i3 Simply call us at 502-7094 and we will arrange to
collect it from you.
Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment.

SCUT A


r ~SPORTS


0


~i~P~si~





MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAGE 11B


TRIBUNE SPnRTS


SCopyrighteMateria

South AfriS yndicater'Cintent
Available from Commercial'News providers"


weathr takes hold


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MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


--p, 2" -. i- -j---i l~;*h~i~S~.~T-7* *.* -u- 2. ?:TjrM'b r 'ulim- .*N..--


N By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
SUNLAND Lutheran
Stingers were clearly the
dominant school in the High
School relays on Saturday;
winning three of six divi-
sions, while the Nassau
Christian Academy Cru-
saders senior boys claimed a
third consecutive relay title.
The Stingers, who hail
from Freeport, Grand
Bahama cleaned house, tak-
ing the under 15 girls and
boys divisions and the under
17 girls division, with a com-
bined score of 70 points.
They finished up third in the
under 17 boys division with
14 points.
Winning the under 17
boys division were the Big
Red Machines with 23
points, followed closely by
CR Walker Knights with 17
points.

Defeating
Stingers accumulated 21
points in the under 15 girls
division, defeating their clos-
est opponent, CH Reeves,
by three points St
Augustine's College were
third with 16 points.
They finished with one
gold, three silvers and one
bronze to help them win the
division.
Three golds, a silver and a
bronze secured the under 15
boys division for the
Stingers while it took them
four golds and silver for the
under 17 girls division.
Head coach Valeska
Brown said: "We expected
to do well, but winning three
divisions was a surprise to
me.
"They came here, they
ran well and they left every-
thing out there on the track.
I expected them to perform
their best, but winning? No,
I didn't expect that.
"The season is still young;
I am expecting several of
them to qualify for the
Carifta games and to do well
throughout the season."
The Stingers didn't bring
any under 20 boys or girls
to compete in the meet.

Secured
In the under 20 girls divi-
sion, the 19 points secured
by the RM Bailey Pacers
was sufficient to nip the Big
Red Machines, who partici-
pated in all but one relay,
by one point. Both the
Knights and visiting Catholic
High Crusaders finished up
with 13 points.
The under 20 boys divi-
sion went to the Knights,
who accumulated 17 points,
CC Sweeting Cobras and
the Pacers were tied for sec-
ond with 16 points.
Knights' dominance in the
senior boys division would
have stopped a Crusaders
three-peat in the 4xl00m
relay if they hadn't been dis-
qualified.
Crusaders, who ran in the
first heat of the 4xl00m,
won the heat in a time of
43.10 seconds setting the
SEE page 10B


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter


THE Red Stripe, skippered by
Lundy Robinson, emerged as head of
the A Class in the Bahamas Boat
Owners'and Sailors Association New
Year's Day Regatta in Montagu
Beach over the weekend.
Robinson put a cap on a complete
sweep of all three classes of the regat-
ta that had to be spread over a three
weekend period because of the delay
in the junkanoo parade.
"We had a pretty good perfor-
mance. There wasn't that much


breeze. We stood the boat up and we
showed them that we are still on top,"
said Shawn Newbold, one of the crew
members.
Prior to this weekend, Robinson
skippered the Crazy Partner to vic-
tory in the C Class and then he came
back and sailed the Eudeva to tri-
umph in the B Class.

Best
Newbold, a pry man on the boat,
said Robinson was indeed the best
skipper on the water this time around.


"Lundy is a great skipper. I will sail
with him any day," said Newbold, who
sailed with Robinson on the three vic-
torious boats. "We knew what they
were capable of.",
On Saturday, the defending cham-
pion Southern Cross got off to a great
start, winning the first race of the A
Class series with the Red Stripe com-
ing in second. *: r'
Who Dat got third and the Sea Star
was fourth.
But on Sunday, Red Stripe came
back and swept the final two races.
She was followed by Southern Cross,


leach.
(Photo: Felipe Major)
Who Dat and the Sea Star in the two
races.
That was also the same position
they ended up in the total points accu-
mulated with Red Stripe taking first
with 11. Southern Cross got 10, while
Who Dat collected six and Sea Star
rounded out the field with three.
"This has been ihe best New Year's
Day Regatta we've had in a long
time," said BBOSA commodore the
Rev. Dr. Philip McPhee.
"Every weekend, you couldn't find

SEE page 10B


Y-Care Destroyers finish





strong as Rockets crash


E dy BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Y-Care Destroyers
may not be playing at their
best, but they are still finding a
way to win down the stretch in
the men's division of the New
Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation.
"I guess it's just fatigue set-
ting in because in the fourth
quarter, my guys just get care-
less with the ball," said Wreck-
ers' coach Donnie Culmer
after they wrecked the Top
Shotters Rockets 74-69 in the
feature game on Saturday
night at the AF Adderley
Gym.
"We are getting too care-
less with the ball in the fourth
quarter. But the good thing is
only good teams know how to
win ball games down the
stretch."
Despite playing poorly, the
Wreckers managed to
improve their record to 5-1
and had four players in double


figures, led by Ian Pinder's
game high 25 points.
In the final two and a half
minutes of the game, the
Rockets surged to a 66-63
deficit on a three-pointer from
Alfred Delancy, who scored
a side high 21 in the loss.

Possession
On the next possession,
Delancy was fouled as he
landed on another three-point
attempt. He missed the pair
of charity shots.
But, within 52 seconds,
Delancy canned a basket to
keep them within three, 68-
65.
However, the Wreckers got
a pair of free throws from
Meko Rahming and'John
Rolle drove inside for a lay-up
with 19.7 seconds left on the
clock as they went on to hold
off the Rockets.
While Ian Pinder came
through with a couple of slam
dunks as he worked his way


inside for his game high hon-
ours, Y-Care's also got 12
apiece from Meko Rahming
and Breston 'Horsey' Rolle,
who was just as relentless in
getting to the basket.
John Rolle finished with 10
and Dexter Cambridge, the
former NBA player turned
high school coach, came off
the bench and also fought his
way inside for six. Brandon
Ingraham chipped in with five.
For the Top Shotters,
Alfred Delancy darted inside
and outside for a side high 21.
When he couldn't get around
a defender for a lay-up, he
stayed outside and launched
the jumper.
One of them was the three-
pointer that brought them
back in the game in the fourth
quarter.
Top Shotters also got 15
from Mario Knowles, 13 from
DeMario Minus and 12 from
Pernell Kelly.
Top Shotters played
extremely well in the first


quarter as the defensive battle
ended up with Y-Care's hold-
ing a slim 14-13 advantage at
the end of the period.
The game stayed close in
the second quarter as the
Wreckers managed to take a
31-29 margin at the halftime
break.

Midway
But coming off the break,
Y'Care's turned it up a notch,
pulling away 47-31 midway in
the period. By the time the'
third period ended, they were
in control 57-42.
Ian Pinder came out red
hot, canning nine of their first
11 points, including a three
pointer, to push their lead to
40-31. John Rolle then got in
the act by connecting on two
back-to-back lay-ups to extend
the lead to 49-33.
The Wreckers, however,
seemed to have ran out of
steam as the fourth quarter
opened. The Rockets went on


a 16-7 spurt to start the
period to trim the margin to
64-58.
Mario Knowles opened the
frame with three straight bas-
kets and Delancy ended it
with a pair of free throws.
With 2.27 left, Breston
Rolle came up with a two-
handed slam dunk for a 66-58
lead, but he was hit with a
technical foul for kicking
his feet while holding on the
rim.
Delancy converted the pair
of charity shots and he canned
his three-pointer to continue
the comeback.
But it was a little too late as
the Wreckers tightened up
their defence down the stretch
to pull off the win.
"We're the best team at
pulling it off down the
stretch," said coach Culmer.
"We know how to win the big
games like that.
"That's why we're one of
the best teams in the league
this year."


* THE Red Stripe crew celebrates victory in the New Year's Day Regatta in Montagu B










MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


The stories behind the news


I PL~*ACE


.,W. Marathon MP Ron Pinder (left)
caused a US Air flight to abort its
scheduled course and return to Nas-
sau International Airport after he failed
to follow correct security procedures, it
was revealed last week.
The flight bound for Washington
DC was forced to return to the
Bahamas after it was discovered that
Mr Pinder, who is also the parliamen-
tary secretary in the Ministry of Health,
had failed to pass through pre-flight
clearance and US Customs...


Curtain falls on


The disturbing trend in violence among school-age
children continued last week when a 15-year-old R M
Bailey High School student came to the campus wield-
ing a machete.
In response, teachers at the government school held a
sit-in to draw attention to what they said is a crisis of vio-
lence in public education. The incident follows the stab-
bing of another 15-year-old at the school on Tuesday the
previous week. Teachers said they are now living in fear
of their own students.
Minister of Education Alfred Sears met with the teach-
ers and pledged to address the security situation at the
school immediately ...


one of the


great courtroom dramas


By JOHN MARQUIS
n those dark days of war 62
years ago, Nancy Oakes was
a pretty teenage bride, a wil-
ful but attractive character in
love with a handsome count.
She was a feisty, energetic person-
ality with a mind of her own. And
she was devoted to her parents, Sir
Harry and Lady Oakes, wealthy tax
exiles who had made the Bahamas
their home.
From the time they arrived in Nas-
sau in the late 1930s, the Oakes fam-
ily was seen as a gilaed presence, rcom-
bining unimaginable wealth with the
common touch in a colonial society
where status counted rather more
than it does today.
Unlike many of the arrogant white
Bahamian minority of the time, or
the haughty colonial officials brought
out from London to help run govern-
ment business, the Oakes family was
,generous, accessible, unprejudiced
and kind.
"They were different from other
whites," said one black Bahamian-
who has befriended them over the
years. "They treated everyone as
human. It was a rare attribute in those
days, when the racial and social divide
was so pronounced."
This ability to mix easily with peo-
ple of all shades and social grades was
almost certainly due to the family's
dominant father, the irascible but
magnanimous Sir Harry, whose days
as a gold prospector had laid the foun-
dation for the family's fortune.
Sir Harry has been described by a
Nassau associate as "the most bad-
tempered man I have ever met" but
beneath the prickly veneer lay a heart
as golden as the nuggets he stock-
,piled from his highly productive
mines.
Most days this short, broad and
often brusque character could be seen
striding along Bay Street, decked out
in battered hat and mining boots. He
was not a man for fashion statements
or sartorial flourishes. What you saw
was what you got.
His face had been coarsened during
his prospecting days by extreme cli-
mates in both hemispheres, producing
a countenance which could flash from
wintry scowl to sunny smile in sec-
onds.
But, deep down, he was a man who
could empathise with the scorned and
downtrodden. And that was because
he had, in earlier days, often felt
scorned and downtrodden himself.
The French writer Balzac once
wrote that behind every great fortune
is a great crime, but Sir Harry had
good reason to question that con-


The death of Nancy Oakes, whose name was inextricably
connected with the Bahamas of a former age, breaks one
of the last direct links with the 20th century's most
compelling murder mystery. INSIGHT reports ...


tention. His money was the product of
unremitting toil.
Like quite a few very rich men of
his day, his wealth was built on hard,
back-breaking work, a clear vision
and an unquenchable spirit. For years
he had picked and shovelled in the
world's harshest environments to dis-
cover that elusive mother lode. From
the Yukon to the Australian outback,
he had laboured for his fortune, com-
peting with the hardest and most bru-
tal of men for the lucky break he
craved.
By the time he found it, his per-
sonality had already been fashioned
by disappointment and adversity. A
deep core of resentment and suspi-
cion gave him a disconcertingly abra-
sive edge. As a result, not all his asso-
ciates were his friends, but covert ene-
mies waiting to waylay him.
Appalled by the Canadian govern-
ment's perceived persecution of him,
and its unconscionable tax demands
on his burgeoning mining revenues,
Oakes began during the 1930s looking
for a place to hide and protect his
money.
Nassau, his chosen exile, was to
prove both his salvation and, alas, his
doom. On a hot, thundery summer
night in 1943, he was brutally mur-
dered at his home, Westbourne, on
West Bay Street, in circumstances
which have had a lasting impact on
Bahamian life. For his killer was nev-
er found and justice never served in
the troubling aftermath of this grue-
some crime.
For Nancy Oakes, barely more than
a schoolgirl, the event was traumatic
for more than one reason. Losing her
beloved father was bad enough, but
seeing her young husband the flam-
boyant Count Alfred de Marigny -
charged with the murder drove her
into a near demented frenzy.
The famous trial of de Marigny in
Nassau's Supreme Court during the
fall of 1943 was to spark eager interest
around the world, and 19-year-old
Nancy was to become one of its star
witnesses.
In many respects, the ordeal of that
year, when the free world was under
threat from Hitler's Nazi tyranny, was
to define much of Nancy's life. Like
the rest of her family, she never real-
ly got over it.
Count de Marigny, a Mauritian
playboy with a defiant maverick


NANCY OAKES when she was
Bahamas attache to the Olympics
Organising Committee in Mexi-
,co City in 1968.

streak, was eventually acquitted,
though there are still some inNassau
today who believe he was a likelier
killer than realtor Sir Harold Christie,
whose presence at Westbourne on
the fateful night left him under suspi-
cion for the rest of his life.
Nancy stood by her man through-
out the proceedings, waving at him
from the court portico as he was led
from his cell every morning, and
almost fainting when the time came to
speak out in his defence from the wit-
ness-box. The count's arrest, and the
odds stacked against him, left her
fragile and scared. The thought of
him facing the gallows was a lasting
torment.
However, the marriage her family
had so bitterly opposed did not last
long after the trial was over. She and
de Marigny who was ordered to
leave the colony after his acquittal -
headed for Cuba, where the strain of
their joint ordeal began to take its
toll.
Years later, de Marigny reflected
on the age difference he was 33 at
the time of his trial which aggravat-
ed the growing friction between them.
At root, he was a mature man and
she little more than an adolescent.
Early reckless passion soon gave way
to disillusionment.
In his book, A Conspiracy of
Crowns, he wrote of his mounting
irritation with Nancy as the implica-
tions of his plight began to sink in.
While he was being ostracised and


abused as "the suspected killer of Sir
Harry Oakes" she, according to him,
appeared to be enjoying the notoriety
the case had brought.
For the first time, it seemed, the
infatuation he felt when he asked her
to be his bride was beginning to evap-
orate. Finally, the.marriage was
annulled and the, couple went their
separate ways.
For de Marigny, the ignominy and
indignity of being charged, acquitted
and then deported had a powerfully
detrimental effect on his life. His fate
had been tracked by major newspa-
pers around the world, and it was
hard for him to escape the reputation
that went before him.
Maintaining that the Duke of
Windsor, Governor of the Bahamas
during the war years, was using his
connections to thwart his progress in
life, he stumbled from country to
country in search of a future. But the
Oakes case blighted his life.
It was a depressing time during
which be began to despair of ever get-.
ting his existence back on track. Even-'
tually, he found happiness with the
daughter of a Roosevelt aide, raising
a family in Texas. Oddly enough, he
retained a genuine fondness for Nas-
sau in spite of the anguish he suffered
here.
For Nancy, life also took an uncer-
tain course. As daughter of a baronet
and wife of a count though a some-
what dubious count by most estimates
she apparently acquired a fascination
for titles. She married Baron Lyssardt
von Hoyningen-Huene in a ceremony
at St Mary the Virgin Church in Vir-
ginia Street and later Patrick Tritton,
a union which also ended in divorce.
At the time of her death in Lon-
don earlier this month at the age of
80, Nancy retained the name Oakes
von Hoyningen-Huene. She had been
ailing for some time.
Throughout her life, she had been
troubled by the inconclusive nature of
the Oakes murder inquiry, and the
fact that the family had been obliged
to endure decades of uncertainty and
strain.
In 1960, after colourful Bahamian
MP Cyril Stevenson had raised the
matter in the House of Assembly, she
felt moved to issue a statement calling
for a new inquiry into the case. She
wanted an end to the speculation and
the shame.


Her view was that, because of the
Duke of Windsor's calamitous han-
dling of the case, her father's death
had never been properly investigated.
Her plea provoked no official
response, confirming the widely-held
view that the ruling elite of the day
was determined to keep the lid on a
potentially explosive issue with enor-
mous political, economic and even
social implications. The Oakes mur-
der was extremely difficult for the
Bahamas to live down.
Meanwhile, the Oakes family
plunged into a spiral of tragedy which
left Sir Harry's% %ido\ bereft.
Nancy's brother Pitt. \ ho seemed
permanently affected by his father's
demise, died prematurely. So did
brother Sir Sydney Oakes, a sports
car enthusiast who was killed in 1966
when his vehicle struck a utility pole.
Younger sister Shirley was also a road
crash victim, dying some years after
the accident in which she was severe-
ly injured.
When Eunice, Lady Oakes, died in
1981, Bahamian lawyer Eugene
Dupuch paid tribute at her funeral to
the Oakes family's contribution to
the Bahamas over many years. He
remarked on their generosity and
popularity, and said they had arrived
in the colony at a time when it was in
need of an economic boost. He
praised their remarkable contribution
to the Bahamas' success.
Count de Marigny, having been
banished in 1943, eventually returned
to the Bahamas on a visit in 1990 to
proihote his book. In it, he accused
the Duke of trying to destroy him and
laid bare his suspicions about the mur-
der of Sir Harry. Nine years later he
'died aged 89 at his Houston home
after a long illness. He and his wife
Mary had three sons, one of whom
predeceased him.
Although born in Mauritius and
educated in England, de Marigny
found solace and peace in America.
He carved out a successful business
life and finally achieved the stability
and serenity he was seeking. He
became a US citizen in 1970.
Since 1943, when the prosecution
tried to hang de Marigny for a crime
he always claimed he did not com-
mit; the protagonists in the trial have
died off. The judge, Sir Oscar Daly,
prosecutors Eric Hallinan and Alfred
Adderley, defence attorneys Godfrey
Higgs and Ernest Callender, and the
crooked Miami cops who investigated
the case, James Barker and Edward
Melchen, have all passed on. So has
Sir Harold Christie, whose name will

See MYSTERY, Page 3C


i ne
The Ir nu


1 Mle1-


/"1:, 7 n7


roarF








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, IvivivuAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


insi

FEEDBACK

LAST week's INSIGHT
suggesting a change in the
rape laws received a mixed
response including an attack
by a professional woman
appalled by the alleged "bias,
tone and erratic journalistic
quality" of the article.
Aggrieved, as she wanted
to be called, defended the
woman who made and then
withdrew accusations of rape
against Cabinet minister
Bradley Roberts and chal-
lenged the idea that rape
should be "graded" in terms
of severity.
"Please! Let's have classes
of burglary, classes of armed
robbery, classes of common
assault, also.
"I mean, those people who
flaunt their bling, those busi-
nessmen who exhibit their
stocklblatantly in their shop
fronts and people who exhib-
it their material wealth by liv-
ing in large houses are surely
contributing to their poten-
tial loss of property, life and
limb.
"Rape is not an act of 'sex
gone bad'. It is an assault and
a violent crime. I can safely
say that every man (men and
boys are raped, too, you
neglected to mention) who
has been raped has also been
emotionally harrowed by
your article.
"But then I doubt you have
any interest in them. Your
professed concern is with the
feelings of one specific
alleged perpetrator. Perhaps
your energies would have
been better focused on
approaching this person indi-
vidually and offering them
your boundless solace."
Aggrieved said she was dis-
appointed in INSIGHT
"especially as I have previ-
ously respected and lauded
your output."
However, Helen Astarita
took a different line. "I read
your article with great interest
and fully agree that it is time
for a change in those laws.
You may add my name to a
petition if you planon one.",
A Nassau businessman also
concurred with the article's
conclusions.
"While rape is a terrible
crime, and must never be tak-
en lightly, there is no doubt
that many women have taken
advantage of their anonymity
in the past to wreck the repu-
tations of men they hate for
some reason.
"While women must
always have the protection of
the law, it is important that
men are given due considera-
tion, too."
A foreign woman resident
said: "It's a shame that some
women shout 'rape' at the
drop of a hat. No-one dis-
putes that genuine rape is an
awful crime, but it is also a
crime with lots of grey areas.
"I think it's a pity that
some women are prepared to
devalue the severity of gen-
uine rape by using the term
loosely in reference to con-
sensual sex that turns ugly for
whatever reason."
A former businessman who
saw an employee unfairly
accused of rape also agreed
with the article's conclusions.
The employee involved
was accused by a woman who
then changed her mind and
wanted to withdraw the
charges.
However, the police would
not allow this to happen. The
accused had to attend court
on several occasions over a
two-year period to protest his
innocence, wasting a great
deal of police time.
Eventually, the magistrate
grew fed up with the fact that
the woman never appeared
and struck the case off the
register.
"I would assume that since
the woman pressed charges
against Bradley Roberts with-


out any validity she should be
charged with an offence. That
does not seem to have hap-
pened. Does this mean there
is one rule for the goose and
one for the gander?"

INSIGHT'S half-term
report on the government
and opposition also stirred up
strong feelings. But most writ-
ers agreed with its findings.
Kelly Burrows of Freeport
thought our appraisal of the
government was "right on tar-
get", adding: '"The whole
bunch are a tsunami waiting
to happen."
The only answer for the
opposition, she said, was
Hubert Ingraham. "Despite
his leadership style, he got
things done. Leaders are sup-
posed to make decisions, right
or wrong.
"The present leader seems
to be happy so long as he
wakes up in the morning and
that his long-time ambition
(of being prime minister) is
intact."
Ortland Bodie Jnr of Nas-
sau wrote: "As usual, I enjoy
reading your insightful
columns in The Tribune.
Your recent comments about
the government's half-term
report were timely and to the
point.
"Yes, I did vote for the new
PLP with my eyes wide open.
I cannot and will not support
Tommy Turnquest as leader
of the official opposition
forces. Having been born
with a golden spoon in his
mouth, through no fault of
his own, Turnquest has been
foisted on the people who
may oppose the Christie
administration.
"If I did not know better, I
would have believed that his
election as leader was engi-
neered by Machiavelli him-
self. Christie is weak and vac-
illating. Tommy is, apparent-
ly, the same way but more so
than Christie."
Mr Bodie added: "It is
doubtful that he (Mr Christie),
ever really believed that he
would have climbed the
greasy pole to become prime
minister. Now that he is, it is
clear, even to a blind person,
that he does not have a clue
as to how to run a successful
government."
He said six Cabinet minis-
ters are out of control or out
of their depth. Bradley
Roberts, in particular, had
become a "lame duck" min-
ister whose credibility had
been totally compromised, he
added.
"Christie has had to admit
that his flaunted .code of
ethics is not worth one Hait-
ian gourd," he said.
Alfred Sears was a "disas-
ter" as Minister of Education
and Attorney General. "Our
schools are in a bad state of
repair and have been for
years, yet Sears blames their
condition on the 2004 hurri-
canes."
He added: "As AG, ordi-
nary Bahamians only hear
about him or see him when
cases like Bradley Roberts
crops up or he is pontificating
about his book club. Several
inquiries have been going on
for donkey's years and can-
not be brought to a qlear con-
clusion."
These two posts, he said,
had been messed up by Paul
Adderley in the Pindling gov-
ernment. "Ever since, the
average Bahamian student
has been getting a D or
worse."
Mr Bodie felt that Melanie
Griffin, Leslie Miller, Alfred
Gray and Allyson Maynard-
Gibson should all be reshuf-
fled along with Glenys Han-
na-Martin. "Obviously, they
are not competent to run the
ministries which Christie has
saddled them with," he wrote.


2005: Ringing





in the Caribbean





Single Market?


By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a former Caribbean diplo-
mat, now corporate executive, who publish-
es widely on the small states in the interna-
tional community).

system of regional gover-
nance of CARICOM's eco-
nomic arrangements
remains an unsettled ques-
tion amongst govern-
ments. But, the establishment of such a sys-
tem is vital to the successful operation of the
Caribbean Single Market and Economy
(CSME).
The governments of Barbados, Jamaica
and Trinidad and Tobago are scheduled to
start off the Caribbean Single Market at a
ceremony "marking compliance" on 19th
February 2005 in Guyana.
The prospect is that ten of the remaining
twelve CARICOM countries will join by
the end of the year. The Bahamas and Haiti
are not expected to be part of the new eco-
nomic arrangement.
But, already, there are signs that vested
interests have begun to undermine the pro-
ject.
In some circles, particularly those com-
panies that have benefited from protec-
tionist barriers, there is resistance to the
idea that companies in one CARICOM
country could seek to establish themselves
in other CARICOM countries either by
acquiring 'native' businesses or by compet-
ing directly with them.
Yet, this is precisely what the CSME is
about. As the West Indian Commission put
it in 1992, "the Single Economy must be a
regional economy closely approximating a
national economy". There should be free
movement of goods, services and capital
across the area.
In other words, companies have to erase
from their minds the idea that there are
borders that either prohibit them from sell-
ing in CARICOM markets or protect them
from competition from other CARICOM.
S firms. in ; r -j
The Caribbean Single Market enlarges
the space for both sales and competition. It
also allows for mergers and acquisitions
within the CARICOM space, permitting
companies to become larger, to invest in
new technology, and to attract more capital
and even to look beyond the CARICOM
market for exports. It is the first measure
toward overcoming the 'smallness' that has
plagued the economic growth of CARI-


PART TWO,


*., .A. J, ': \ -


N SIR RONALD SANDERS


COM states.
How this arrangement is to be governed
is a question that has occupied CARICOM
Heads of Government since 1989 when they
agreed the notion of the CSME
In 1992, the West Indian Commission
had suggested the creation of a Caribbean
Commission comprising a President and
two Commissioners to exercise full time
executive responsibility for implementation
of Community decisions and to initiate pro-
posals for community action.
This proposal was not accepted by Heads
of Government at the time. Instead, a
Bureau of the Heads of Government Con-
ference was created.
The Bureau consists of the existing
Chairman of the Conference, the outgoing
Chairman and the incoming Chairman, and
it was charged with managing the affairs of
CARICOM in between Conferences of the
Heads.
In fact, the Bureau while a useful mech-
anism for consultation was never empow-
ered to take decisions on behalf of Heads of
Government and it could not bind mem-
ber cop4prie" of CAR ICOM.
Decisions affecting CARICOMN
remained within the ambit of the Heads of
Government Conference and Ministerial
Councils where 'national' interests tend to
dominate. The result was that the regional
movement could only advance as fast as its
slowest member was willing to proceed.
Then,.in February 2003, the CARICOM
Heads of Conference held a consultation
in Trinidad on the 'Options for governance


Nasty surroundings lower


* By DR DESIREE C T COX
Consultant to the Urban
Renewal Commission

'And do not be conformed to this world,
but be transformed by the renewing of your
mind, that you may prove what is that good
and acceptable and perfect will of God'.
Romans 12:2

'Cleanliness is next to Godliness'. And,
cleaning our surroundings indoor and out-
door environment is an important part of
creating sacred spaces in our communities.
Numerous lots have been cleared since
the urban renewal commission began its
work in June, 2002. About 100 abandoned
buildings have been demolished over the
last two years to make room for more pos-
itive use of the land and, as I mentioned
last week, over 1,600 derelict cars from the
neighborhoods of Farm Road, Englerston,
St Cecelia, Bain and Grants Town, Fort
Charlotte, by police and environmental
health officers.
More recently, just a month ago (in
December, 2004), urban renewal task forces
partnered with municipal authorities, private
businesses and civic groups to conduct an
island-wide clean-up of Grand Bahama.
Groups of 20 or more local residents from
each constituency of Grand Bahama were
paid a small stipend to participate in an
island-wide clean-up campaign which ran
between December 6, 2004, and December
21,2004.
These are excellent demonstrations of
successful partnerships between urban com-


SUSTAINABLE LIVING

munities, government agencies and ordi-
nary citizens, but creating healthy commu-
nities in urban areas with sacred spaces for
people to think, breathe, work and play will
take more than this.
It will take practical steps such as making
large bins more easily accessible, ensuring
that garbage is efficiently and regularly
cleared from these areas and, critically, it
will take a public and community commit-
ment to recycle garbage and other waste
throughout the country. And it will involve
public education campaigns.
Filthy surroundings lower self-esteem,
and low self-esteem can be reflected in not
caring about your environment. Some,
Bahamians even see themselves as 'natu-
rally nasty'. Littering is a learned behav-
iour, and this behaviour can be modified.
It's worth noting here that Canada, a
country known for its clean streets, and
parks, and environment, was not always
clean. Canadians, like Bahamians, threw
trash from their car windows onto the street,
and polluted their natural resources with
rubbish.
It took some 30-odd years, or public edu-
cation campaigns, fines (which were
enforced across the board) to change the
mind-set of Canadian citizens from "it's
okay to throw your trash wherever you
want, whenever you want", to "it's 'lower-
class' to drop litter in public places'.
More rash steps were taken to produce


to deepen the Integration Process'. An
expert group was appointed, chaired by the ,
Prime Minister of St Vincent & The .,
Grenadines, Dr Ralph Gonsalves.
The group made an initial report to ,y
another Heads of Government Conference
in Jamaica in July 2003. There, the Heads
agreed 'in principle' to the establishment s
of a Commission or 'other executive mech-
anism' and asked Prime Minister Gonsalves'
expert group "to elaborate its recommen-
dations" with the assistance of a technical
group.
In fact, two technical groups were
appointed and, in the course of the follow-
ing months, submitted reports to Prime 3
Minister Gonsalves who has been a cham-
pion of deeper integration. Since then,
CARICOM leaders have not, collectively, 2
considered the matter again. -
But, with the Single Market being start-
ed next month by three CARICOM coun-
tries and the expectation that ten others
will join by year-end, the issue of how it is to
be managed is one that requires urgent
attention.
The European Union established a Euro-
pean Commission with Commissioners
appointed by Heads of Government to
implement the decisions of Councils of Min-
isters and to initiate policy actions on behalf
of their member countries as a whole.
The Europeans recognized that if they
were to manage both their regional econo-
my and their joint external economic affairs,
they required joint machinery that was ded-
icated to doing so. It has worked for them,
and should work for CARICOM.
One thing is for certain: the Single Mar-
ket and Economy will not advance at the
pace that it should to benefit the people of
the Region, if decisions have to await the
slowest member of CARICOM, and if
implementation of such decisions does not
have devoted and effective machinery.
Of course, the fear in some quarters is
that a CARICOM Commission or what- ,
ever the machinery is called would become .
a supranational body dictating to national .-
governments the actions these oiuli'ratke'
If this fear-continues to exist even-
despite the European Union example -
there is no reason why CARICOM cannot
structure the Commission so that it is
accountable to Heads of Government, meet-
ing in Council, and to other Councils of
Ministers.

See CARICOM, Page 3C




% self-esteem

the same result in Singapore, and retrain i
the people of that nation. Question is, do we -
value ourselves and our country enough to
make cleanliness being next to Godliness
reality rather than something we pay lip-
service to.
Sustaining a clean environment certainly ,
helps people create healthy communities
which are sacred spaces for people to live, "
thrive and be creative. But sacred spaces
are more than just clean spaces, they ate
high energy spaces.
So what can you do to raise the energy of
your clean space?
We raise our own energy levels, our lev-
els of operating, and our ways of thinking.
What do I mean by this? How do you raise
your energy?
Everything that is life pulsates with ener-
gy. As human beings, we are no different.
All we are is energy, and our life energy, like
the energy of all other living things, carries
information. Where does our energy go?
How is it directed? Energy follows thought.
In other words: 'As a man thinketh so is
he'. Our human bodies generate electricity
because living tissue generates energy. We
consciously, and unconsciously, use this
energy in all kinds of ways, all day, through-
out out day, and our thoughts direct its path.
We can't help thinking. Our minds, our lit-
tle human minds, constantly produce
thoughts, some of them we let pass, some we
don't notice, some we give meanings to.
Practitioners of energy medicine believe

See LIVING, Page 3C


I'm lovin' lt


DELUXE SALADS


I 1INSIGHT


1






MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005, PAULE 3(


THF TRIRI IN


INSEIGHT


The disturbing trend in vio-
lence among school-age
children continued last
week when a 15-year-old
R M Bailey High School
student came to the campus wielding a
machete.
In response, teachers at the govern-
ment school held a sit-in to draw atten-
tion to what they said is a crisis of vio-
lence in public education.
The incident follows the stabbing of
another 15-year-old at the school on
Tuesday the previous week.
Teachers said they are now living in
fear of their own students.
Minister of Education Alfred Sears
met with the teachers and pledged to
address the security situation at the
school immediately.
Officers, armed with automatic
weapons, patrolled the R M Bailey
campus last Thursday as the minister
took'questions and comments from the
teachers.
Teachers pointed to issues such as
the growing lack of interest in educa-
tion shown by parents, deficiencies in
the curriculum, and the lack of basic
skills as the root of worsening violence
in schools.


MARATHON MP Ron Pinder
caused a US Air flight to abort its
scheduled course and return to Nassau
International Airport after he failed to
follow correct security procedures, it
was revealed last week.


The flight bound for Washington DC
was forced to return to the Bahamas
after it was discovered that Mr Pinder,
who is also the parliamentary secretary
in the Ministry of Health, had failed to
pass through pre-flight clearance and
US Customs.
The incident occurred on Friday, Jan-
uary 14, but Neko Grant, MP for
Lucaya, raised the issue in the House of
Assembly last Wednesday when he
asked Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell if he was aware that Mr Pinder
had breached security at NIA.
Mr Mitchell said that he would not
describe it as a breach in security but a
"miscommunication on what the pro-
tocol is for Members of Parliament
accessing the tarmac" at NIA.
Mr Pinder, who was on his way to
attend US President George Bush's
inaugural ceremony, had to disembark
the plane and go through the proper
security clearance.
He took another flight to Washing-
ton for the inaugural ceremonies held
last Thursday.


THE forced closure of the Royal
Oasis hotel, which has more than $22
million in outstanding expenses, has
caused "nothing short of a quagmire" in
the nation's second city, the House of
Assembly was told last week.
The 1,200 laid-off resort workers are
now in a situation where their demands
and needs are far greater than the assis-
tance they receive..


Not only did the Grand Bahama
resort make deductions from employ-
ees' salaries without sending them to
the National Insurance Board (NIB),
but employees discovered that deduc-
tions which were to go toward paying
bank loans and retirement contribu-
tions were also not made.
Minister of Tourism Obie Wilch-
combe said that Royal Oasis and its
parent company Driftwood are "in a
bad financial situation".
Driftwood owes the Port Authority
and its gr6up of companies some $2.7
million, the employee's pension fund
$4.1 million, National Insurance $2.5
million, $13 million in casino taxes and
$55,000 to vendors in Grand Bahama.


THE hearing to decide whether the
bankruptcy ruling against embattled
MP Sidney Stubbs can be annulled was
last week adjourned until his creditors
can be approached to sign an agree-
ment allowing the ruling to be struck
off.
If the ruling is not annulled, Mr
Stubbs will have to resign as the mem-
ber of parliament for the Holy Cross
constituency. According to Chief Jus-
tice Burton Hall, the ruling will be
annulled if a specific agreement is
signed by the creditors in the case, and
it receives the approval of the court.
Chief Justice Hall said that such an
agreement was the only way under the
Bankruptcy Act that an annulment
could be attained.


* MURDER ACCUSED David Cooper-
Cunningham outside of court last week.
(The Tribune archive photo)


DEVELOPERS of Abaco's Bahama
Star Farms, wiped out by the citrus
canker disease, appear to have aban-
doned the farm, removed the equip-
ment from the island and "have not
dispatched their responsibilities to the
government, workers at the farm and
the general public", it was claimed last
week.
Minister of Agriculture IV Alfred
Gray said the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs will be seeking government-to-
government assistance with the US to
pursue the owners of the farm.


On December 29 last year the Unit-
ed States Department of Agriculture
(USDA) informed the Ministry of
Agriculture that there was a positive
identification of citrus canker on cit-
rus leaves originating from Bahama
Star Farms in Treasure Cay.
Bahama Star Farms has 3,700 acres
of land under cultivation in Abaco. The
land is owned by the Bahamas govern-
ment but is developed by way of lease.
One hundred workers on the farm lost.
their jobs when the disease was con-
firmed just before the new year. The
operators of the farm are not Bahami-
an.


Living (From page 2C)


that our physical bodies being
made of living tissues generating
energy are surrounded by elec-
tro-magnetic fields, an energy
field, in other words.
This human energy field con-
tains and reflects each individu-
al's energy. So when we vomit
our angry and critical thoughts,
and spread gossip words we
bring negative energy into our
space, the space of persons we
spoke negatively of, and this
lowers the energy of our sacred
space, and that of our commu-
nity.
You might say, well, I don't
walk around with my brain on


speaking phone, pumping its
noise into the atmosphere I
don't just 'running out', I keep
my thoughts to myself. Or you
might even think no-one knows
your thoughts, that your
thoughts are private.
You may not be publicly shar-
ing your thoughts, but they cer-
tainly are not private. Your
thoughts and experiences often
produce emotions, feelings that
all pass through you and, as neu-
robiology shows, your body pro-
duces special chemicals (neu-
ropeptides), chemicals triggered
by emotions, in short, thoughts
converted into matter.


Every thought that passes
through you leaves a trace in
your biological system. Fixing
your mind, or setting your mind
on a particular set of thoughts,
and actions, affects your biolog-
ical system. Eventually, biogra-
phy becomes biology. Choose
your thoughts, choose your
body. So what does this have to
do with raising the energy level
of your surroundings, your com-
munity, your space? Everything.
One of the most powerful things
you can do to raise the energy
level of your sacred space is
meditate.
Meditation is the art of clear-
ing the mind of all mundane
thoughts, feelings, and the gen-
eral 'noise' of day-to-day living.
It is a state of relaxation and
peace, a state where you can
control what you deal with and
which thoughts and feelings you
"-: allbw6 tv 6p tl bugh your con-
' ciousfiss" '


It takes regular practice,
patience, and it takes time but
the benefits can be positively
life-saving. Not only will you be
healing yourself, you'll also be
bringing positive energy to your
surroundings, and raising the
energy level of your environ-
ment your sacred space.
Last week raised some ques-
tions about planting more trees,
and creating more green spaces
in urban renewal areas of Farm
Road, Bain and Grants Town,
Englerston, St Cecelia, and Fort
Charlotte. Since then a small
group of community-minded cit-
izens associated with these
urban areas have come together
to work with people in these
communities to plant trees, and
create green spaces in these
neighborhoods.
The group has had one meet-
'inig so far, and will be meeting
again shortly in one of the-
neighbourhoods. If you wish to


work with people in urban areas
to create green spaces, nurture
native trees, plant native plants
and nurture those plants please
contact us at the address below.
If you meditate regularly, or
on your own or in a group and
would like to find out about oth-
er ways of stilling the mind and
relaxing the body, or if you'd
like to be involved in some way
in the urban renewal initiative
you can also contact us at the
address. and phone numbers
mentioned below.
Sacred sounds-whether as
prayer, music, song, incanta-
tions, chanting is a vital life
force. Not only is sound a direct
link between humanity and the
divine, certain sounds, tones can
have particular healing, and
energy raising effects on your
environment, your communities,
your sacred s pce and your life
force for that matter. .
Join me next week for more


about sound, sacred sounds, and
their role in sustainable living,
and the renewal of the minds of
people living in our urban areas,
and in communities throughout
the Bahama islands.
Until then, be still, and God
bless.
For more about the energy
medicine, the interaction between
mind, spirit and its effect on
human biology see Pearce, J.C.,
The Biology of Transcendence:
A blueprint of the Human Spir-
it (Park Street Press, Vermont)
If you would like the oppor-
tunity to participate in urban
renewal self-empowerment pro-
jects please contact Dr Desiree
Cox at the Transformation and
Research Unit (Urban Renewal
Commission), 14 Collins Avenue
(Bahamas Law Enforcement
and Credit Union Building),
Nassau, Bahamas, Telephone:
242-328-1728/9: o0i e-mail idct-'
coxChouniail com '


Caricom (From page 2C)


"



>




* ALFRED de MARIGNY and his wife Mary when he visited
Nassau in 1990 to launch his book, A Conspiracy of Crowns.


Mystery (From

forever be associated with the
Oakes mystery and whose
tremulous performance in the
witness-box will always be the
subject of conjecture. All that
remain are one or two bit
players in one of the great
court dramas of the 20th cen-
tury. The death of Nancy
Oakes has, in every meaning-
ful sense, finally brought the


page 1C)

curtain down on a tragedy that
will always have a prominent
place in the annals of crime,
not only in the Bahamas, but
around the world.

BLOOD AND FIRE, a
book by John Marquis about
the Duke of Windsor and the
Oakes murder mystery, will
be published later this year.


But, the Commission should
not be structured so that any
one member of CARICOM
could exercise a veto or delay
the implementation of decisions
.except in clearly defined areas
such as taxation. If decisions
have to be unanimous, nothing
would have changed.
There should be criteria for
weighted voting by member
countries as applied to each area
of the Commission's work. The
weight of the vote could be
applied in some cases, though
not all, on size of population or
particular resources.
Deciding on the criteria for
weighted voting will not be
easy. This is why it should be
tackled now, so that due con-
sideration could be given to it
and consensus achieved. If it is
left to the end, it may well
become acrimonious and divi-
sive, destroying otherwise well
thought-out machinery.
Certainly two areas of region-
al integration now cry out for a
CARICOM Commission devot-
ed to doing nothing else. They
are the Single Market and exter-


nal economic negotiations.
It should be recalled that
unlike any other region in the
world, CARICOM is engaged
in three sets of difficult negoti-
ations simultaneously the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreements
with the EU, the Free Trade
Agreement of the Americas,
and new trade rules in the
World Trade
Organisation. These negotia-
tions require an agreed CARI-
COM strategy and strong
machinery for implementation.
The Regional Negotiating
Machinery (RNM) has served
CARICOM well so far, but the
machinery for negotiating has
to be more greatly empowered
with both authority and
resources.
Again, something can be
learned from the Europeans. It
is the European Commission
that conducts the external trade
negotiations. The presence of
Peter Mandelson, the EU Trade
Commissioner, in Guyana in
early January to meet CARI-
COM trade Ministers on the
vexed question of the EU's cut


in the price paid for Caribbean
sugar, spoke volumes.
Europe had one representa-
tive; CARICOM had sever-
al. The European message was
delivered with clarity and
authority. The presence of Min-
isters representing several indi-
vidual CARICOM countries
made no difference.
It is time that CARICOM
too speaks with one collective
voice and through one authori-
tative voice to the rest of the
world.
A CARICOM Commission -
or a similar executive unit ded-
icated to overseeing the Single


Market, preparing for the Single
Economy and managing exter-
nal economic negotiations
should no longer be deferred.
The Bahamas has, so far,
stood apart from the plans for
the CSME. But, the Bahamas
alone cannot face up to the rest
of the world. Both the Bahamas
and the rest of CARICOM
should begin to study ways in
which the Bahamas can be
accorded 'special and differen-
tial' treatment within the Sin-
gle Market and Economy. It
would serve both the interest of
the Bahamas and the cohesion
of the Caribbean Community.


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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005


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