• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section B: Business
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Religion
 Section C: continued














Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00015
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 20, 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
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Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
        page A 15
        page A 16
        page A 17
        page A 18
        page A 19
        page A 20
    Section B: Business
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B: Sports
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C: Religion
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
    Section C: continued
        page C 10
Full Text








"DELUXE Ix1

SALADS" J;

HIGH 72F
LOW 62F
PARTLY
*hb. SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.47 THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005 PRICE 500
-. -J.. .r- - - -


nlew


sections inside


ses f reuPP


Ron Pinder fails to


follow correct


security procedures


N By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
A MEMBER of Parliament
caused a US Air flight to abort
its scheduled course and return
to Nassau International Airport
- after he failed to follow correct
ecuriN procedures, it was
r ealed yesterday.
The [light bound for Wash-
ington was forced to land back
in the Bahamas after it was dis-
covered than Marathon MP
Ron Pinder had failed to pass
through pre-flight clearance and
US Customs.
Neko Grant, MP for Lucaya,
raised the issue in the House of
Assembly yesterday when he
asked Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell, if he was
aware that Ron Pinder, the Par-
liamentary'Secretary in the
Ministry of Health, breached
security at NIA.
However Mr Mitchell said
that he would not describe it as
a breach in security but a "mis-
communication on what the
protocol is for Members of Par-
liament accessing the tarmac"
at NIA.
Speaking from Washington
last night, where he was repre-
senting the Bahamas at Presi-
dent Bush's inauguration, Mr
Pinder said: "I think Mr
Mitchell has cleared this up, it
was just a miscommunication."
He denied reports of driving
his car onto the airport's tar-
mac before boarding the plane
last Friday.


Teen charged with rape


(Photoi,


N is shown
yesterday.
bune Staff)


Mr Mitchell said that the
flight was delayed and the plane
had to return to the gate fol-
lowing the discovery of what iK
had occurred.
Mr Grant asked whether Mr
Pinder was refused permission
to.re-board the plane.
"I would not .-i that hli was
not allowed to boArd the plane,
but rather that he did not board
the plane," Mr Mitchell told the
House of Assembly,
Chief Political, Economical
and Public Relations officer for
the US Embassy Mike Taylor
would not officially say that Mr
Pinder had caused the plane to
be turned around, but said that
an incident occurred involving a
"passenger".
"My understanding that a
passenger entered the plane and
the plane took off and it was
only while they were in the air
that they discovered that a pas-
senger who had entered did not
go through the proper security
clearance and so following secu-
rity regulations, the plane was
forced to turn around and land,
because they would riot have
been allowed to land at a US
airport with a discrepancy
between the number of passen-
gers processed for the flight and
the number of passengers actu-
ally on board," he explained.
Mr Taylor said at that point
the passenger disembarked the
plane and returned to the air-
port where he underwent the
SEE page 10


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
A TEENAGER accused
of raping a 25-year-old
woman and robbing her of
her luxury vehicle was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate's Court on Tuesday.
He faced two counts of
rape for allegedly attacking
the woman before taking off
with her money, cellular
phone and Camry vehicle.


Gregory Dion Johnson, 18,
a resident of Wellington
Street, off Blue Hill Road,
was also arraigned before
Magistrate Linda Virgill on
five other counts of armed
robbery and three counts of
receiving.
Police allege that the rape
occurred on Monday,
December 20. Johnson, it is
alleged, used a handgun to
force the woman into sexu-
al intercourse. She told
police that he and others


took her 1993 Prominent
Camry, registration number
115377; a Motorola V60 cel-
lular phone, and cash, alto-
gether valued at $5,803.
He was arraigned on the
rape charge in the afternoon
and the armed robbery
charges during the morning
sitting.
He was not required to
plead to the charges of
armed robbery, which are
SEE page 10


'Quagmire'

in Freeport

after resort

closure
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
THE forced closure of the
Royal Oasis hotel in Grand
Bahama with more than $22
million in outstanding expenses
has caused "nothing short of a
qi'.,nmire" 'n the'nation's sec-
'ond citN, the House of .'".sem-
bly was told yesterday.
The 1,200 laid-off resort
workers are. now in a situation
where their demands and needs
are far greater than the assis-
tance they receive.
Not only did the resort make
deductions from employee's
salary without sending them to
the National Insurance Board
(NIB), but employees discov-
ered that deductions which
were to go toward paying bank
loans and retirement contribu-
tions were also not made.
Obie Wilchcombe, the Min-
ister of Tourism, expressed
strong views on the way Royal
Oasis employees have been
treated since the hurricanes
while addressing MPs in the
House.
The minister said that Royal
Oasis, and its parent company
Driftwood, are "in a bad finan-
cial situation".
Driftwood owes the Port
Authority and its group of com-
panies some $2.7 million, the
employee's pension fund $4.1
million, National Insurance $2.5
million, $13 million in casino
taxes and $55,000 to vendors in
Grand Bahama.
Mr Wilchcombe said that the
workers are not looking for a
hand out and are demanding
nothing more than respect.
He said that the employees
have had to contend with the
"unusual and unprofessional
practices" of Driftwood which
have caused the employees to
lose confidence in their employ-
er.
The minister said that he has
heard a myriad of horror sto-
ries that are "frightening, sad,
but true."
"Copld.you imagine the
anger and the hurt felt by the
employees when they learnt
that money deducted from their
weekly salary that were to be
sent directly to banks to service
SEE page 10


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, I H-iSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


Sidney Stubbs hearing adjourned


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE hearing to 'decide
whether the bankruptcy ruling
against embattled MP Sidney
Stubbs can be annulled was yes-
terday adjourned until his cred-
itors can be approached to sign
an agreement allowing the rul-
ing to be struck off.
If the ruling is not annulled,
Mr Stubbs will have to resign
as the member of parliament
for the Holy Cross constituency.
According to Chief Justice
Burton Hall, the ruling will be
annulled if a specific agreement
is signed by the creditors in the
case, and it receives the
approval of the court.
Chief Justice Hall said that
such an agreement was the only
way under the Bankruptcy Act
that an annulment can be
attained.
He said it had to be facilitat-
ed through the Registrar of the
Supreme Court, which is serving
as the trustee in the case:
"Accordingly, I rule that the
judgment debtor must first seek
to galvanise the trustee into
action under the said section 26
as the next step in his efforts to
have the extant order
annulled," the Chief Justice
said.
Section 26 of the Bankruptcy


_E x


Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale Tel: 393-7111 Fax: 393-0440


I-


Act specifies that: "The trustee
may, with the sanction of a spe-
cial resolution of the creditors
assembled at any meeting of
which notice has been given
specifying the object of such
meeting, accept any composi-
tion offered by the bankrupt,
or assent to any general scheme
of settlement of the affairs of
the bankrupt, upon such terms
as thought expedient".

Application
This, however, is subject to
the consideration of the court,
which "if it approves of such
composition or general scheme,
shall annul the adjudication on
an application made by or
on behalf of any person inter-
ested," according to section
26.
Mr Stubbs was declared
bankrupt in March of 2004 by
Justice Jeanne Thompson.
His application for appeal
was rejected by the Court of
Appeal, and he has expended
the entire 150 day extension
allowed by parliament to have
the matter resolved.
The House of Assembly then
passed a resolution allowing Mr
Stubbs an additional six month
extension to get his affairs in
order. If he fails be forfeits his
parliamentary seat.
Since first being declared
bankrupt, Mr Stubbs has come
under fire by the FNM, which
.made repeated calls for a by-
election in Holy'Cross.
Lawyers for the FNM also
announced that they would file


a petition questioning whether
Mr Stubbs is qualified to con-
tinue representing the con-
stituency, if the bankruptcy rul-
ing is upheld.
Before making his ruling yes-
terday, Chief Justice Hall heard
submissions from both Thomas
Evans, who represents Mr
Stubbs, and Wayne Munroe,
counsel for creditor Gina Gon-
zales. '
Both men discussed ambigu-
ous areas of bankruptcy law in
the Bahamas, including the'
wide definition allowed for the
term "creditor" and the lack of
a clear specification as to
whether an annulment is
retroactive or not.

Reading
Chief Justice Hall said that
while he shares "the apprehen-
sion voiced by both Mr Munroe
and Mr Evans of the absurd
consequences attendant upon
the unadorned reading of that
section, it is not for me ,to say
that Parliament in enacting it
did not intend to provide what it
in fact provided."
He said he would neverthe-
less direct the Registrar to make
the transcript of the submissions
by Mr Munroe and Mr Evans
available to the office of the
Attorney General, "with a view
to this considering whether he
should advise the government
that it should invite parliamen-
t's early consideration of mod-
em bankruptcy legislation bet-
ter suited to the needs of mod-
em business"..


HOLY Cross MP Sidney
Stubbs leaving Supreme Court
yesterday.

(Photo: Felipi Major/
Tribune staff)


-U-











By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Senior Staff Reporter
DRAFT legislation is to be
brought to the House of
Assembly to replace the 1965
Police Act -with modem and
progressive legislation, which
is expected to bring greater
accountability and trans-
parency to the police force.
No time-scale was given
for the draft legislation to
come before the House.
Deputy Prime-Minister
Cynthia iPratt, Minister of
National Security, made the
statement at yesterday's sit-
ting of the House of Assem-
bly during a communication
on the performance of the
police in 2004.
This legislation. Mrs Pratt
said, will incorporate the new
service ethos of the police
department.
"The environment in
which the police operate
today is far different from
that of 40 years ago. Today,
for example, the numbers of
the police must necessarily
be increased to support the.
developmental projects
throughout our Family
Islands," NMs Pratt said.
In Exuma, for instance, fol-
lowing the opening of the
Four Seasons Resort and'oth-
er developments'on that
island, the police presence on
Exuma has doubled and is
expected to triple in the near
future.

Projects
"As other developmental
projects take hold in the oth-
er islands we expect to see a
corresponding increase and
expansion of police presence.
There is also a need for fur-
ther decentralisation of spe-
cialised services of the police
throughout the islands and
already the commissioner has
established local detective
units in several Family
Islands," Mrs Pratt said.,
However, the minister
pointed out that the commu-
nity will have to assist the
police by bringing social con-
trol to its members.
"That is why we need to
increase the number of vol-
untary police reservists and
also local and district consta-
bles who under the new leg-
islation will be termed com-
munity peace officers," said.
Mrs Pratt.
In order to improve the
benefits to police officers gov-
ernment is now in the final
stages of considering propos-
als to improve the insurance
coverage of police officers
and other officers in the secu-
rity agencies.
Mrs Pratt said that her gov-
ernment is firmly committed
to this measure and expects
that improved coverage will
be adopted in short order.











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LOCAL NEW







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 3


US policy on Cuba 'won't change





mn relationship with the Bahamas


By KARIN HERIG tinent: in Cuba and Burma and of the United States, but we are obviously have different views
Tribune Staff Reporter North Korea and Iran and also a friend of Cuba. on the system in Cuba and we
Belarus and Zimbabwe," she "We are at the table with also have a different approach
THE United States' contin- said. both and speak frankly with than US on how to approach
ued aggressive policy towards Dr Rice fiirther said she both. Our relations with both change in Cuba" the two coun-


* By TIFFANY GRANT
THE Bahamas Disaster
Relief Fund reported yester-
day that it has received mil-
lions of dollars in donations
from over 280 entities.
The relief fund, reactivat-
ed in the aftermath of Hurri-
canes Frances and Jeanne
which tore through the
Bahamas last year, was given
$4,732,323.58 in donations as
of January 10 this year, the
Ministry of Finance con-
firmed yesterday.
Out of the money collect-
ed $2.145 million was sup-
plied to various Family
Islands with $1.3 million
going to Grand Bahama to
pay the direct expenses relat-
ed to hurricane recovery
efforts.
Additionally, $1.71 million
was used to purchase sup-
plies, which were disbursed
to hurricane victims. To pay
for the direct expenses relat-
ed to recovery efforts in the
various islands $672,000 was
used.
These amounts collected
and disbursed do not include
contributions made to non-
government organizations
such as the Red Cross, Salva-
tion Army and the church.
These organizations are said
to still be playing a leading
role in the reconstruction
effort.

Donations
The Fidelity group of
companies was the first cor-
porate citizen to donate to
the fund and as the months
passed more donations, from
individuals in every walk of
life, came forward to assist.
The statement also noted
that steps are being takenlto
prepare a comprehensive
report to be issued in April
2005. The report will contain
a list of all donors, including
those individuals or entities
which donated goods and a
list of all beneficiaries.
Under the Emergency
Relief Guaranteed Fund to
date loans to businesses
totalling $969,476 have been
approved subject to certain
conditions being met. Also
there have been approval for
guaranteed loans to residents
totalling $676,444. Their
approval is also subject to
meeting certain conditions.
In September of last year,
Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne passed through the
islands leaving parts of the
Bahamas in a state of devas-
tation where thousands of
homes were either damaged
or destroyed.
In the House of Assembly
in November it was stated
that due to the hurricanes,
more than 6,000 homes were
damaged and more than 600
destroyed nationwide.

Generator
During Hurricane Frances
it was reported that two peo-
ple died. In New Providence
a young man died while
repairing the family genera-
tor and in Grand Bahama a
man drowned while trying to
swim to safety after a tidal
surge.
In November 2004 it was
reported in The Tribune that
due to damage to businesses
caused by the storms, it was
believed that more than
4,000 workers on Grand
Bahama were left unem-
ployed.
Government has also suf-
fered a loss. It was reported
that the Central Bank of the
Bahamas-noted that govern-
ment lost $6.6 million in rev-
enues during the 2004-2005
fiscal year's first quarter
compared to last year.
James Smith, Minister of
State for Finance and co-
chairman of the Disaster
Relief Fund said: "On behalf
of the Disaster Relief Fund
and persons who benefited, a
profound gratitude is
expressed to the organisa-
tions, businesses, civic
groups, sporting organisa-
tions and individuals who
generously assisted hurricane
victims."
He added: "Even though
the hurricanes have long
passed, the damage is still
there and the repair and
restoration effort continues
and there is still a need for
additional resources to help
with that effort."


,Cuba is not expected to haye
any impact on the Bahamas'
relationship with both countries,
Cuban charge d'affaires Felix
Hernandez-Wilsonayjdyester-
day.
While the Bahamas increases
its diplomatic ties with Cuba,
upgrading the Cuban consulate
to embassy status, the US
remains firm in its anti-Cuba
stance with the government's
next Secretary of State naming
Cuba one of the world's "out-
posts of tyranny."

Nomination
In the hearing for her nomi-
nation to Secretary of State, US
National Security Adviser Con-
doleezza Rice suggested that
the US administration should
be more forceful in dealing with
goernmments that take an unde-
mocratic turn.
Adding to President George
Bush's "axis of evil," Dr Rice
named her own list of "outposts


N SECRETARY of State-
designate Condoleezza Rice
responds to questions during
the second,d4y of her confir-
mation hearing.

of tyranny."
"To be sure, in our world
there remain outposts of tyran-
ny, and America stands with
oppressed people on every con-


would support uS efforts to
bypass Cuban government jam-
ming of Radio and TV Marti to
Cuba and would pay "very close
, attention to the implementa-
tion" of tougher sanctions
against the communist govern-
ment announced by the Bush
administration last year.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell said he
does not expect Dr Rice's com-
ments will have any implications
on the US/Bahamian friendship.

Existing
"I don't think there will be
any changes in the existing rela-
tionship between the Bahamas
and the United States," he not-
ed.
Mr Mitchell said that :the
Bahamas, through Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, has spoken
with President Bush on the mat-
ter.
"We said that we are a friend


Husband of traffic





accident victim





testifies in, court


i* ,

* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT American
tourist Charles Powell testified
on Wednesday in Magistrate's
Court that the taxi-bus that he,
his wife and several other fam-
ily and friends were in on the
night of January 23 last year
when his wife was killed, over-
turned about eight to ten times
after it was hit by a speeding
car.
Mr Powell, a resident of Pick-
erington, Ohio, was on vacation
in Grand Bahama with his 54-
year-old wife, Dottie. She died
instantly after being thrown
from the vehicle and landing on
an iron rail on a wall.
Cheryl Cooper, a resident of
Pioneer Way, who has been
charged with killing Ms Powell
in the course of dangerous dri-
ving is on trial in Magistrate's
Court One before Magistrate
Franklyn Williams.
Sgt David Thompson is the
prosecutor and lawyer Ntshon-
da Tynes is representing Ms
Cooper.
Court

Mr Powell told the court that
he and Dottie and several
friends travelled to the
Bahamas on January 21, 2004
to gamble and play golf. They
were guests at the Royal Oasis
Resort.
According to the evidence,
on January 23 Mr Powell, his
wife, Dottie, Linda and David
Garrett, Vicky and Dave Ben-
nett, and William Russ Miller
went to dinner at Luciano's at
Port Lucaya on January 23.
After dinner they caught a
taxi-bus and were heading back
to the resort around 8.30pm
when the accident occurred at
the intersection of Sea Horse
Road and Shearwater Drive.
Mr Powell said a car
approaching at a high rate of
speed hit the taxi bus on the
right side on the .driver's door.
"I heard a bang and I lost my
seat. I closed my eyes and we
were rolling over and over," he
said.
When the vehicle came to a
stop, Mr Powell looked around




TROICA


and took note of t er) one, but
did not see his wife in the vehi-
cle.
After managing to get out of
the bus, he saw his wife hanging
on a fence.
He went over to try to and
assist her but she was already
dead, he said.
Mr Powell went back to the
bus to assist the other passen-
gers. He said a crowd of onlook-
ers had assembled in the area
and some people started assist-
ing them.
An ambulance came they
were taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital.
Police officer Rio McPhee
testified that he proceeded to
the scene after receiving infor-
mation around 9pm at Crimi-
nal Records Office from the
Police Control Room.


While at the 'scene, he said,
he observed a taxi bus GB158
and a grey Hyundai Accent
licence 14799 and took pho-
tographs to reflect the scene.
Officer McPhee said he also
took personal items from the
deceased, which were handed
over to Corporal Woods at the
Traffic Division.
He compiled 59 negatives and
five photo albums, which were
both exhibited as evidence.
During cross-examination by
Ms Tynes, Mr Powell said he
and none of the other passen-
gers were wearing seatbelts
because they were not readily
available to use.
He said the cabdriver was
alert and driving in the right
SEE page 11


countries is good, ne said.
The foreign affairs minister
pointed out that although "we


SEE page 11


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ARE WE THERE YET? NEW 1:20 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:15 10:40
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PHANTOM OF THE OPERA NEW 1:30 4:30 'N/A 7:20 N/A 10:15
ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 NEW 1:00 3:20 N/A 6:00 8:10 10:40
HOUSE OF FLYING DAGGERS T 1:05 3:35 N/A 5:55 8:15 10:45
RACING STRIPES A 1:15 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:15 10:35
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MEET THE FOCKERS T N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:20 10:40

ARE WE THERE YET? NEW 1:00 3:40 6:10 8:20 10:30
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COACH CARTER T 1:00 3:50 6:30 N/A 10:00
RACING STRIPES A 1:10 3:30 6:00 8:15 10:25
ELEKTRA T 1:30 3:40 6:15 8:30 10:35
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


F The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Bush legacy: Is Jeb next?

SARASOTA, Fla. When Florida Gov- second term come in. If Bush has fumbled his
ernor Jeb Bush flew off for a high-profile domestic agenda, the economy is sagging and
tour of the tsunami devastation in southeast an unending war in Iraq is increasingly
Asia with Secretary of State Colin Powell, unpopular, Bush fatigue may be overwhelm-
he set off a storm, of political speculation in ing. That would not be a good time for the
Florida that he is preparing to seek the pres- Republicans to field their third Bush.
idency in 2008. There is also the question of Columba, the
Bush, 51, says that he won't run, at least not reclusive Mexican native who is Bush's wife.
in four years. But of the dozens of people I She lends her name to charities for the arts,
talked to here, no one of either party took children's welfare and anti-drug crusades.
'that statement very seriously. The governor (Their daughter, Noelle, has been through
cannot run again for the statehouse when his drug rehab.) But she is seldom at the gover-
second term expires in 2006, and it's his turn nor's side, never makes speeches and is not
at the big time. socially active. Floridians gossip that she
Not to follow in his older brother's foot- might resist a presidential campaign.
steps goes against the very nature of what it She also got into trouble a few years ago for
means to be a Bush. not listing on a required customs declaration
The sense of dynasty and entitlement in form some $19,000 in clothing and jewellery
the president's family is unmistakable, even she had purchased in Paris. When exposed,
though the elder George Bush, his father, she was forced to pay $4,100 in duty and
has publicly tried to discourage the notion. penalties. The governor said his wife "knew
But if he wanted to convey false modesty, what she did was wrong; she made a mis-
is disavowals haven't worked. The Bush take." She said nothing in her own defence.
family is constantly on patrol to present a Yet Jeb Bush has always been more inter-
favourable image and a monarchy does not fit ested in the family business of politics than
that picture. It is not the American way. any of his three brothers, including George
President Bush said he asked his brother to W.
join Powell because of his experience in deal- After Jeb announced he would run for the
ing with the aftermath of the extensive hur- Florida governorship in 1994, he was said to
ricane damage in Florida last fall. For.all the be irritated that George also decided to run
pa*Hhey inflicted, the hurricanes, however, for governor the iame year inrTexas; Jeb
did not cause the incredible chaos of the Bush lost his race to incumbent Democrat
tsunami, which wiped out whole villages, Lawton Chiles, but George won his race and
killed more than 160,000 people and left a moved ahead of Jeb on the family power lad-
million or more homeless without food, water der.
or any means of earning a living. Their parents used to say they thought Jeb
Florida received $15 million in federal post- would be the one to carry on the political,
hurricane aid from the federal government. It legacy. He is more serious-minded and curi-
is Gov. Bush's responsibility to see that mon- ous about public issues than the president.
ey is well-spent. Yet as the governor flew to But he is just as conservative, displaying what
southeast Asia, Congress was launching an he calls a "healthy disrespect for govern-
investigation into possible misallocation of ment."
those funds and local criticism was rising While chair of the Dade County Republi-
about the slow pace of recovery efforts. can Party in 1986, Jeb called his father, then
The governor repeatedly insists that he has vice president, and announced he wanted to
no interest in seeking the White House in run for Congress. His mother, Barbara, told
2008, when his brother cannot be on the bal- him to wait because his father deserved to
lot again. And in an interview on ABC, the have his day first. Too many Bushes might
president said of his brother: "I don't think look greedy for power, like the Kennedys.
he's interested in running." When his own So Jeb Bush will bide his time. And then
term is over in 2006, Jeb Bush says, he will we'll see. But don't forget his guiding phi-
"go back to Miami and figure out what I'm losophy: "We were taught never to sit on the
going to do. But it isn't going to be running sidelines."
for president. I promise." (This article was written by Marianne
Actually, it makes good political sense to sit Means of the Hearst Newspapers c.2005).
back until the reviews of President Bush's


'Humiliation and




degradation' at




Nassau Airport


EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE allow me a small
section in your periodical to
express my displeasure at a
recent occurrence which I am
all but certain amounts to dis-
crimination and victimisation.
I arrived at Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA) from
Jamaica on Air Jamaica on
Monday, January 3rd, and I was
very displeased at the humili-
ating and discourteous way in
which it would appear that per-
sons arriving on this flight were
treated. Let me hasten to say
that this was not the first time
that I have experienced and/or
observed such treatment met-
ed out to passengers travelling
from Jamaica on Air Jamaica. I
have had the pleasure of trav-
elling from various parts of the
world and never would I have
to wait for my bags while police
dogs are allowed to sniff every
bag. It is correct to say that once
the police/authorities have rea-
sonable cause for suspecting an
individual of being in posses-
sion of some illegal substance,
then they do have the power to
stop and search that individual.
However, it cannot be that
every person travelling on Air
Jamaica must be a suspect and
therefore subject to a search of
their bags. I could probably
have no objection if all flights
arriving at NIA were subjected
to such scrutiny. But it would
appear that there is a concerted
effort to subject persons, might
I daresay of Jamaican origin, to
such inspection.
As I stood and observed the
waiting crowd I observed a
familiar face in the person of a
Supreme Court Judge of
Jamaican origin. I observed the
, all too familiar facade of dis-
content. I approached and i
asked the fine gentleman how it
made him feel to have to under-
go such treatment. His response
encapsulated what he felt and
how I, a Bahamian, felt meted
out to me in Barbados during a
student demonstration. And it
was rather thought-provoking,
not shocking, considering some
of the things that occur in this
country that Bahamians would
deliberately treat a group of
persons with such contempt and
disrespect. And I can only
deduce that the fine gentleman
was humiliated because one just
does not treat persons in that
manner.
My response to what I think
is a systematic problem is that
persons in authority had better
move quickly to solve this vex-
ing problem. Because it cannot
be that in 2005 in the shadow of


the implementation of the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) and after the
1984 decision of the Supreme
Court of The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas in Smith (Fred-
erick) v Commissioner of Police
(50 WIR 1) that this practice
should be allowed to prevail. In
that case Georges, CJ, articu-
lated that "it should be noted
that article 25 (Constitution of
The Bahamas) requires that no
one may be hindered in his free-
dom of movement". One does
not have to be "deprived" of it.
"Hindering" is enough.
Georges, CJ, also adequately
dealt with the police powers of
search on "reasonable
grounds", enough said. It may
also be of some use to persons
in authority to have a read of
Madam Justice Dame Joan
Sawyer's considered and pellu-


cid exposition in the case of
Tynes v Barr (45 WIR 7) on the
law in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas as it relates to the
concept of reasonable suspicion
and the taking of fingerprints,
palm prints, and other personal
information.
It cannot be justified in a sup-
posedly "democratic society" to
target every person arriving on
board an Air Jamaica flight as
possibly being in possession of
some illegal substance. I am all
but certain that if an objective
investigation were to be con-
ducted at NIA one would
almost certainly find that what
may be occurring at NIA is the
profiling of persons of Jamaican
origin. This practice is wrong.
It is degrading, most certainly
humiliating" and cannot be jus-
tified in a "democratic society."


ELSWORTH N
JOHNSON
Nassau,
January 6, 2005.


Opportunities in Haiti

EDITOR, The Tribune.
I READ a story in The Tribune in the November 17,2004 edition
with the title "Ambassador: Haiti can be 'bread basket' for
Bahamas". I found it very interesting. Dr Eugene Newry, The
Bahamas Ambassador to Haiti and Dominican Republic, expound-
ed on the latent, potentially burgeoning economic opportunity for
The Bahamas with reference to industrial agricultural products
being produced in Haiti for sale and consumption particularly
within The Bahamas and the Caribbean, but as well as other parts
of the world.
Dr Newry informed his audience that Haiti's history was pagi-
nated with documentaries about the country supplying some Euro-
pean countries with food. He said much, more. I encourage your
readers to read the (Tribune) story.
In my humble opinion, a mind like Dr Newry'sshould be vigor-
ously tapped by the, government of The Bahamas with a view to
working in conjunction with him in the exploration of his ideas to
cause The Bahamas to establish a workable symbiotic relationship
with the Haitian people in agricultural production.
Notwithstanding Haiti's political challenges presently, my belief
(based on Dr Newry's assessment) is that Haiti presents to the
Bahamian people sound investment opportunities (particularly in
agriculture). And my advice to Bahamians with means to do so,
would be to extensively investigate Dr Newry's claims, and if the
results prove to validate said claims, then let the investing begin!
The Bahamas could only benefit by
(1) Making a dent in our food importation bill
(2) The economic benefits that would be derived from Bahami-
an ownership in these Haitian based farms and packaging and
processing plants
(3) Providing jobs for Haitians in their homeland, thereby cur-
tailing illegal migration to The Bahamas
(4) Assisting a fellow CARICOM nation. And there may be
more.
How can you say "no" to that?

MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
January 5,2005.


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EDITORIAULETTERS TO THE EDITOR









TUD0.,


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff
Reporter

THE Department of
Labour has certified
the results of the
Bahamas Taxicab
Union's emergency
election, which was
held on Monday, Reg-
istrar Harcourt Brown
told The Tribune on
Wednesday.
BTU President Leon
Griffin made his way to
the Department on
Thompson Boulevard
after 5pm yesterday to
collect the letter of cer-
tification for the execu-
tive board.

Board
Officially voted off
the BTU board are:
Vice President Cheryl
Ferguson; First Vice
President Sigmund
Bethel; Trustee Daniel
Cleare; and executive
member Mark Sawyer.
Seventy-nine of about
156 financial members
of the union eligible to
vote turned out to
participate in the
poll, which was a reso-
lution asking for the
removal of the four
officers.
The results as given
by the BTU board are:
Cheryl Ferguson 71-8;
Sigmund Bethel 60-12;
Daniel Cleare 61-16;
and Mark Sawyer 63-
13.

Opportunity
These members will
only have the opportu-
nity to regain their
posts if they are nomi-
nated to run in the next
BTU elections in
August. However,
when the executive
board meets on January
20, a decision may be'
made to begin the
process ofexpelling the
officers, which would
permanently remove
them from the organi-
sation.
Meanwhile, Ms Fer-
guson and Mr Bethel
still face preliminary
inquiries into charges
of stealing by reason of
employment brought
against them by the
BTU.
Just days before the
elections, the two were
taken before the courts
where they pleaded not
guilty to stealing almost
$4,000 during the time
that Mr Griffin was
away on vacation.

Bff.jf '



-HI'215.


Bahamians set to be Assistance will be sought

Sto pursue farm owners

tM By RUPERT MISSICK Jr stems and fruit. It causes the
00Senior Staff Reporter trees to die. Even though the
THE Attorney General's urn, it is harmless to humans.
trftOffice and lawyers working for However, humans can spread
the Bahamas in the US are the disease on their clothing and
being asked to pursue the on their bodies.
MD VA RIN M -I- nla nn tariff arrangements he levedoners of B lahama Star M r Glr made the s t tatemnt


E D Iy i tnlIl I 1,.I11
Tribune Staff Reporter
IN A further step towards the
Bahamas joining the Caribbean
Single Market Economy
(CSME), Cabinet has autho-
rised the preparation of a posi-
tion paper on the trade bloc and
it.is hoped that the consultation
process with the Bahamian pub-
lic on the issue can be concluded
in the first part of this year.
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell yesterday
announced that government has
embraced the idea of commit-
ting itself to a six to eight-month
consultation programme with
Bahamians throughout the
country.
"In fact in an ideal world, I
would wish this concluded by
the time the prime minister goes
to the Heads of Government
meeting in July," he said.
To this end, Minister Mitchell
yesterday presented the Rotari-
ans of the Southeast Nassau
Club, during their weekly lun-
cheon, with a booklet prepared
by Ambassador Leonard
Archer, High Commissioner to
CARICOM.

Questions
The booklet, Mr Mitchell
explained, contains 38 questions
and answers concerning the
Bahamas joining the CSME.
"(Ambassador Archer) is the
country's foremost expert on
CARICOM matters. This
should answer any questions
which you may have on the
CSME and it's potential impacts
for the Bahamas, he said.
S To increase public awareness
of CSME, some 10,000 copies
of this booklet will be printed
and widely distributed.
The information will also be
accessible on the ministry's web
site.
Mr Mitchell further said that
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
hopes to have "the greater, and
what I hope is the final debate-
on the CSME''with the Civil
Society consultation forum, next
month.
He said that he is still sur-
prised that there is anxiety



THURSDAY
JANUARY 20
2:00am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:30 Immediate Reponse
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 CMJ Club Zone
2:00 Gospel Video Countdown
3:00 Treasure Attic
3:30 This Generation
4:00 Usa Knight & The Round
Table
4:30 Kids On The Move
4:58 ZNS News (Update Live)
5:00 Cybernet
5:30 Holy Hip Hop
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 News Night 13'
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8:00 Native Stew
8:30 Da' Down Home Show
9:30 The Darold Miller Show
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Pg./1540


f-u /'!'






* MINISTER of Foriegn
Affiars Fred Mitchell speak-
ing at the weekly luncheon of
the southeast Rotary Club.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)

among the Bahamian popula-
tion about CSME.
"Yes there is no doubt that
this is a serious move by the
Bahamas, but the gravity of it
should not paralyse us. This
debate has simply gone on long
enough and it should be patent-
ly clear for all to see that there is
nothing at all to fear, he noted.
Mr Mitchell reiterated that
the government has taken the
public's concerns and reserva-
tions into consideration and has
therefore decided on a treaty
arrangement which stipulates
that the Bahamas is exempt
from the provisions on the free
movement of people.
! "Our CARICOM partners
have accepted that," he added.
The minister said that all
countries in the region are eager
for the Bahamas to fully join in
'the Caribbean Community.., .
"The factis that they all want
'us in. They are prepared to
negotiate our various positions
on the Caribbean Court of Jus-
tice, on free movement of peo-


said.
Mr Mitchell emphasised that
"we need to be in, and not half
in and half out."
"It simply makes good
geopolitical sense to do so," he
said.
He further dismissed the dan-
ger of the Bahamas joining the
CSME being a misstep, as min-
imal.
"I think such a danger is min-
imal, and one of the ways we
ought to approach this is to low-
er the temperature on this and
not build it up which such drama
that we frighten the wits out of
the people," he said.

Effects
The minister pointed out that
the short term effects of the
Bahamas signing on to the full
CARICOM provisions "will not
immediately make any change
in the lives of the Bahamian
.people, but in the long term we
will have positioned our country
to take advantage of increased
trade opportunities, access to
capital, and to skills that we do
not now have."
"Any government in 2005 in
the Bahamas must think and
plan for the future, and I think
that it is clear that CSME must
be part of that future. I do not
see any down side," he noted.
The minister reiterated that
the CARICOM alliance is the
Bahamas' "most important rela-
tionship save except for that
between the United States and
ourselves."
Mr Mitchell further said that
the public should now realise
that the Bahamas "has to cut its
own way in the world."
He said that the closing of the
British Embassy, Which is sched-
uled for 2006, "clearly shows
that nations do not act out of
sentiment but what theN per-
ceive to be in their best inter-
ests."
"We may soon face a similar
decision' with the question of
our final Court of Appeal. It is
clear that Britain. is more and
more Euro-centric, and the
Privy Council may not contin-
ue forever," he said.


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Farms in Abaco, the property
infected by the citrus canker
disease.
The House of Assembly was
told yesterday that the devel-
opers appear to have aban-
doned the farm, removed the
equipment from the island and
"have not dispatched their
responsibilities to the govern-
ment, workers at the farm and
the general public".
Agriculture Minister V
Alfred Gray said the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs will be seek-
ing government-to-government
assistance with the US to pursue
the owners of the farm.
"I have asked the office of
the Attorney General not to
restrict 'their remedies to civil
remedies, but to investigate any
possible criminal wrong-doing,"
said Mr Gray.
On December 29 last year
the United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA)
informed the Ministry of Agri-
culture that there was a posi-
tive identification of citrus
canker on citrus leaves origi-
nating from Bahama Star Farms
in Treasure Cay.
This was confirmed by fur-
ther testing on December 30.
All shipments of citrus to 'the
US from Abaco were immedi-
ately suspended.
Bahama Star Farms has 3,700
acres of land under cultivation
in Abaco. The land is owned by
the Bahamas government but
is developed by way of lease.
The operators of the farm are
not Bahamian, Mr Gray con-
firmed.
The disease affects the leaves
of the mature plant, young


yesterday during what is expect-
ed to be the first in a series of
communications to the House
on how his ministry will be
addressing the problem.
"I cannot over-emphasise the
seriousness of this outbreak and
the potential which it has to
destroy the entire industry in
the Bahamas. I am therefore
appealing to the farming com-
munity, especially in Abaco and
the public at large in Abaco and
throughout the Bahamas, to
assist the ministry in seeking to
contain this disease," said the
minister.

Protocols
The ministry's initial survey -
shows that the disease is con-
fined to Bahama Star Farms in
Abaco but the protocols are in
place to survey farms through-
out the country and concern has
been expressed about the three
other groves in Abaco.
Mr Gray said currently his
ministry is supervising the -
immediate ploughing and burn-
ing of. all the trees on Bahama
Star Farms and will do so at
other farms if they are found to
be infected.
The destruction will include
the seedlings and the trees
just outside the infected .
areas.
"Some 100 workers at the
farm are now unemployed. I
have instructed that their order-,
ly departure from the farm must
be arranged with the necessary
balance between sensitivity to
their human needs and the
necessity to contain the dis-
ease," he said.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 20,2005, PAGE 5W--.


THE TRIBUNE


bF









PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


Delegation returns with million dollar pledge




for management of marine and coastal parks


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamian delegation
attending the Small Island
Developing States Conference
in Mauritius has returned with a
million dollar pledge for the
management of its marine and
coastal parks.
Minister of Health Dr Marcus
Bethel, who headed the 12-per-
son 'delegation, made the
announcement yesterday while
giving an update on the confer-
ence.
The conference, held in Port
Louis, Mauritius, gave delegates
an opportunity to review the
implementation of the pro-
gramme of action for the sus-
tainable development of small
island developing states.
In 2002, the UN called for a


Bahamas is 'model


for rest of the world'


comprehensive review of the
Barbados Programme of
Action, (BPoA) which was
adopted in 1994. The BPoA set
out specific actions and mea-
sures at the national, regional
and international levels in sup-
port of the sustainable devel-
opment of the Small Islands
Developing States (SIDS).
Dr Bethel explained that the
Bahamas has been hailed as a
nation that has achieved major
advances in the area of conser-
vation management and is a


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model for the rest of the world.
He said several countries
made the million dollar pledge
that will be handled through the
Nature Conservancy.
According to Dr Donald
Cooper, under-secretary in the
Ministry of Health, the funds
are already in place with the
country to receive an initial half
million dollars to begin the
implementation of the pro-
grammes and then the remain-
ing half will be given at a later
date.
He said the grants are for
government and non-govern-
ment organizations that have
existing conservation and
parks. He explained that to
qualify for the funds, the pro-
grammes have to be already
operating and registered and
must be prepared to work with
the community and the govern-
ment. He said the purpose is
not to establish a conservation
park but rather to help with the
management of the facility.

Success
Dr Bethel said the conference
was "quite a success", and as
predicted quite a lot of time was
devoted.to how countries can
prepare themselves against nat-
ural disasters such as hurricanes
and tsunami, wjiich resulted in
the loss of so much life and
property last year across Asia.
He said the conference
focused on early warning sys-
tems and proactive measures in
the oceans and said the coun-
tries all committed to putting
.those measures in place as soon
as possible. ,
The group discussed a num-
ber of factors in becoming sus-
tainable countries, which includ-
ed economic, social and envi-
ronmental development, includ-
ing climate change, waste and
tourism management, and bio-
diversity resources.
"Following the adoption of
this strategy for the implemen-
tation, the United Nations bod-


Annie Bethel



dies at the



age of 106


* DR MARCUS BETHEL
ies and the world's governments
have given a commitment to
provide assistance and special
treatment for SIDS in achiev-
ing these goals.

Strategy
"The agencies of the United.
Nations will be instructed to
develop work programmes to
implement areas of strategy that
fall under purview. Govern-
ments will utilise the document
as the basis of the assistance
they provide to SIDS and any
concessions granted to that
group of countries," said Dr
Bethel.
The representatives
also accepted a cheque of
$25,000. donated by the
Government of Mauritius to
assist with the hurricane relief
efforts.
Dr Bethel was accompanied
by Paulette Bethel, Bahamas
permanent representative to the
UN, Dr Donald Cooper, under-
secretary at the Ministry of
Health, Earlston McPhee, direc-
tor of sustainable tourism in the
Ministry of Tourism, Tischa
Frazier, senior counsel at the
Bahamas Embassy to the UN
in New York, Eleanor Phillips,
manager of the Nature Conser-
vancy in the Bahamas. Four
youth representatives of the
UNESCO and Youth Path Pro-
gramme also took part in the
trip: Linda Hammerton, Fred-
erick Arnett, Valentine Lloyd
and Mr Airky.


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Daughter


remembers

'good mother'


BOILED chicken and
the outdoor life were 106-
year-old Annie Bethel's
recipe for longevity.
This loving mother-of-
seven toiled in the fields
for years to raise her fam-
ily after her husband
Benjamin died.
Yesterday, mourning
her mother's death,
daughter Lula Bethel
said: "She was,a good
mother who, after dad
died, brought us up alone.
She kept house and
farmed the fields."
Right to the end, Mrs
Bethel was a sprightly
character with vivid mem-
ories of her girlhood on
Long Island, her birth-
place.
And sh'e never wanted
to live anywhere else but
the Bahama isle where
she went to school and
raised her children.

Wishes
In line with her wishes,
she died at home in Burnt
Ground. Even at her
advanced age, she passed
away happy that all seven
children survived her.
Her daughter said: "I
don't know whether my
mother was the oldest
person in the Bahamas,
but she was certainly the
oldest resident of Long
Island.
"Her favourite food
was boiled chicken and
she always liked to be
outdoors. This was prob-
ably the key to her long
life."
In addition to, raising
her children, Mrs Bethel
worked long and hard on
her property, growing
corn, peas and potatoes.
One of her great joys was
to see seed grow into
nutritious crops.
Apart from occasional
trips to see her brother in
the United States, she
rarely wandered far from


* ANNIE BETHEL


Long Island.
Sometimes she trav-
elled to Nassau, .but she
was always eager to
return home.
Mrs Bethel's life was
remarkable in that it
spanned three centuries.
She was born in 1898,
three years before Queen
Victoria died, and lived
through one of the most
exciting eras in the histo-
ry of mankind.
Her lifetime saw the
birth of aviation, nuclear
power, television and the
computer age. She lived
through two world wars
and the reigns of six mon-
archs.

Transport
When she was a girl,,
motor cars were in their
infancy and space travel
was unheard of except in
science fiction books.
Horse-drawn carts were
the preferred mode of
transport.
Her parents, Thomas
and Emily Adderley,
raised eight children.
Only one survives today
Irene Adderley, who
still lives in Burnt
Ground.
The funeral service for
Mrs Bethel was held on
Saturday at St Mary Mag-
dalene Anglican Church,
Glintons, Long Island.
Interment was at Glin-
tons cemetery.


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Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005; PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


PLP is plagued by scandals


ERTAIN columnists
.C in this country used
considerable energy to pro-
mote the cause of the PLP
leading up to the general elec-
tion of 2002, not so much by
writing about any good the
PLP represented but by bash-
ing the FNM at.every oppor-
tunity possible. .
In many of their writings,"
they were inaccurate, unfair
and totally unbalanced in their
treatment of the FNM. They
vilified former PM Hubert
Ingraham and everyone asso-
ciated with him, almost as if


embracing or living any lie to
satisfy those whose pretense
at being apolitical needs sup-
port by those who have gained
credibility with the reading
public.
What is happening in this
countrytoday .as no compar-
ison in the term of the FNM.
In the time of the FNM no


"As government ministers we
caught a lot of hell for false
claims spread by our opponents,
including vindictive columnists,
regarding our policies. We did
not catch hell for obvious
failures in personal conduct
,as is the case with so may
members of the current
blundering administration."


they had an ungodly hatred
for him and his Bahamian col-
leagues.
The venom spewed by one
particular columnist was far
from principled but rather it
seemed personal and sank to
Gutter levels. The reasons for
the writer's scorn were a mys-
tery to many but it was clear
to all that, whatever the rea-
sons were, they were personal
rathef-than professional.
Curiously enough, these
writers got what they wanted,
the PLP won the government,
but they seem so unhappy and
for good reasons. The PLP has
performed 'poorly since
assuming office and all The
-Bahamas is talking about it.
SWafit is' w irV6- t.b6id1lthese
Writers is that lheV'-nnot only.
S'ani to continue bashing the'
FNM asifthe party being out
of office is not .enough for
them, they want those who
support the FNM to agree
with them in their unreason-
able bashing
They want writers, like me,
to show a balance in my writ-.
ing that they did not and could
not show in their writing
becatise of their unbridled
spite and venom. It is not
enough for them that we have
th, right to write as we choose
just as they do. Still, we do not
write with' the cruelty of per-
sonal attacks with which they,
Write.
These hypocrites want us to
agree with them that what the
Bahamian people and we see,
hear and feel in our own coun-
try every day under the pre-
sent government is not real
because what they pretend'
happened im the term of the
FNM was more real.
'Well, I was there under the
FNM and I am here now
under the PLP and I am not


MP was' declared bankrupt
and could not occupy his seat
in parliament. In the time of,
the FNM, ministers did not
openly argue with each other


and no minister accused the
chairman of a corporation
over which he exercised over-
sight of impropriety.
In the term of the FNM
government ministers did not
have Harajchi calling them
rats and claiming to have
financed them all politically.
In the time of the FNM gov-
ernment ministers were not
accused of trying to rent their
premises to government cor-
porations.

In the time of the FNM
no government minister
was accused of rape and then
had the rape claim withdrawn.
In the time of the FNM no
government senator resigned
calling the government inef-
fective and alleging an attempt.
on' the part of government
officials to defraud the gov-
ernment.
In the time of the FNM gov-
ernment ministers did not
intimidate private sectors per-
sons into uninviting their
guests speakers because they
were afraid to be on the same
platform with them. The list
could go on and on.
No, matter how the PLP


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ZHI VA R G o L A I N G


"apologist writers" stealthily.
pretend that what is happen-
ing in this country today hap-
pened under the FNM, they
will not be able to convince
anyone but themselves and
those who share their irra-
tionally jaundiced point of
view.
Truthful people know that
the FNM did not in its nine-
plus years in office have the
rapid succession of scandals
plaguing the PLP and certain-
ly did not have the severity of
scandals now seen.
In fact, they know that the
international reputation of our
country was restored during
the time of the FNM and that
there was a high standard of
conduct among ministers as
well as a prime minister who
was vigilant and accountable
about that standard.
Quite frankly, if the FNM
fouled up time after time like
, the PLP is now doing, I would
have resigned my post as a
government minister. As gov-
ernment ministers, my col-
leagues and I caught a lot of
hell from people about things
we were. doing, like the refer-
endum, Clifton Cay and
Atlantis. We did not catch hell
for not doing anything like the
PLP is.


As government ministers we
caught a lot of hell for false
claims spread by our oppo-
nents, including vindictive
columnists, regarding our poPli-
cies. We did not catch hell for
obvious failures in personal
conduct as is the case with so
may members of the current
blundering administration.
So let pretentious writers
keep writing; It is not that this
writer does not refiember
what happened during his
term in office. It's just that-
what he remembers is dis-
tinctly different from what
they, remember or rather,
what they wish could be true
about what they remember.

THIS COUNTRY IS
GOING IN CIRCLES

know why some .people
who supported the PLP,
or at least who do so by
stealth, are so unhappy even
though the party is now in
power. They are hnh:ipy
because the party has embar-
rassed them by the many
shenanigans it has been
involved in since becoming the
government.
When people k itc for a par-


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to
invite applications from suitably qualified individuals to fill the. -,' ".iontI1
of Information Systems Business Analyst in its Human Res c*':e
Division.

POSITION SUMMARY

The. Company is implerienting a new Financial/ Humai P. '' '
*Afiptolicaton' System. itpl W 'rieqn~re1the CTO
analystss Candidate: c 'Vai .;MifJrLW. .i _
l .4uman Kesources ro61'dM shouldd he able 1to demionstrati'.Yon an1'.
understanding of the proce ures, policici,. and internal control in a lT.I. nii
Resources Department. Additionally. these candidate, slIould b,' able
demonstrate an aptitude for software applications. This team wil! Ioe :r (th
centre of a dedicated cross funictional inIpi)ciin.tat ion effort and is( j"'li d
to form the core post implementation :application support. Applicants will
be expected.to demonstrate enthusiasm and motivation to see this poji-'a"
through the successful implementation by creating or assisting others.in,
developing processes, user acceptance testing i'UAT. r'Poorti-ng,
documentation, and training.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Become intimately familiar with all the modularhu features, fun, i,,litv,
workflows, related internal controls and interfaces for s Stemin modules
assigned..
Research and document usr requirements and specificatioi;t., condtuci
business and technical studies, design, develop and implement i formation
systems business solutions, and provide imput on service deli very.
Working with the vendor implementation teams. BTC Consultia:ts. and
super users to develop system test plans and associated test data and
execute User Acceptance Testing (UAT) for system modules assigned.
Ensure results of the conducted tests are well documented and failed
items are tracked for follow-up to completion.
Become familiar with all available standard reports for the system mo+dly-.
assigned.
Develop proficiencies with report writing tools to perform specified data
analysis aind studies as requested on system modules assigned; develop
and present as hoc reports in support of various initiatives.
Assist with the creation of training materials and the user training itself
for the system modules assigned. Training materials includes business
processes, system features, functionality, technology c.apab;.!ie.s n:1.
limitations, ect.
Develop post implementation documentation to assist with the support
of users and the daily maintenance and management of th system.
Documentation includes but is not limited to screen shots, process
diagrams, system enhancement requests, standard operating p'o'ce d-,S;.
etc.
Provide on-going post implementation systems support fore.nd .,S(rIs a
directed.
Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned by M", c-, n'mnii

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor's Degree or equivalent experience in a Huinan IR'souices
Department.
Demonstrate aptitude in the use of Microsoft office suite plus lt;_.tnse
driven application software.
Ability to create, compose and edit written materials; proven ',1al\ ic;!j
communication, research, and writing skills.

All applications should be received at BTC's Head Office, 2 1 John E
Kennedy Drive, no later than Wednesday, January 26th,':2005, and addressed
as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas

RE: Information Systems Business Analyst Human Rs. r, >'


ty, they do not just vmmrk a',
X; they put some of their own
credibility on the line by 'doin
so. They want and expect the
party to, make them prou(
after gaining their ." ,dp t,
This has not been the case fi
the PLP .administration
Rather than make people
proud, the PLP has caused
B.ih.imiJni) in great numi'bels
to be disappointed and even
disgusted by their perfor-
mance. There arm at least five
things that make this the case
First, Bahamians abhor PM
Christie administration's inde-
cisiveness. Bahamians believe.,
and rightly so, that the PM
and his team have a difficult!
time making decisions. That
is why it has taken some two
and a half years to "almost"
reach a decision on the LNG
proposals while a host of oth-
er projects still remain in lim-
bo. That is why the National
Ecdunioniic Council, the Invest-
ment Board, and the Immi-
gration Board meet less regu-
larly and make fewer decisions
than Was the case during hle
Ingraham administration
That is: why the cabinet agen-
da piles up so and why busT-
SEE page n eie


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Little accountability among




practitioners of medicine


THE current debate
over medical mal-
practice lawsuits in the United
States contrasts dramatically
with the situation in the
Bahamas.
American doctors face
soaring costs for malpractice
insurance coverage and want
to cap legal claims. The Bush
administration says lawyers
are filing frivolous suits that


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A F YS --


make treatment more costly
while forcing doctors to curtail
vital care.
This threat of potentially


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bankrupting litigation causes
American doctors to engage
in defensive medicine, analysts
say, which wastes billions of
dollars a year by directing
money to unnecessary drugs
and tests.
But in the Bahamas, the
position is almost exactly the
reverse. Patients have little
recourse in cases of medical
negligence, regulatory super-
vision is almost nonexistent,
and doctors are free to ignore
complaints about the care they
provide.
To make matters worse, we
have no publicly available sta-
tistics on issues of safety, time-
liness and competence in the
Bahamian healthcare indus-
try...data that is urgently need-
ed to drive quality and effi-
ciency among service
providers.

s crazy as it seems,
doctors are the third
leading cause of death in the
US (after heart disease and
cancer) killing nearly a quarter
million people a year. accord-
ing to the July 26, 2000 issue of
the Journal of the American
1Medical Association. This esti-
mate does not include nega-
tive effects associated with dis-
ability or discomfort. Evidence
from other studies indicates
that as many as 30 per cent of
patients receive inappropriate
care in the US.
If that is what happens in
the world's most advanced
and litigious healthcare indus-
try, what shortcomings must


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased
to invite applications from suitably qualified individuals to fill the
position of Associate in its Project Accounting Unit, a division of
its Cost & Investments Department.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

* Prepare a monthly Receivable and Contributions Analysis report.
* Prepare a monthly Deferred Income Amortization Report.
* Prepare monthly journal entries for completed projects.
* Monitor all development project expenditures and make necessary
adjustments.
* Updates and maintain individual "D" project expenditure files.
* Prepare monthly reconciliations showing all movements entered
into the general ledger and CIP modules for D100 accounts.
* Prepare a monthly Closure and Expense Reports for D100 accounts.
* Record and set up NEW and CLOSED Projects in the ROSS System,
and spreadsheet on request, in accordance with the policies and
procedures.
* Conduct site verification on all projects to assess the extent to which
project plan were achieved, and the impact of cost and overruns if
any.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. Bachelors Degree in Accounting or Finance with three (3) years
experience OR,
2. Associate Degree or Finance with five years experience in a related
field
3. Must be proficient in the use of Microsoft Excell and Word
4. Must possess strong Analytical skills
5. Excellent written and oral presentation skills required.

All applications should be recieved at BTC's Head Office, 21 John
F. Kennedy Drive, no later than Wednesday, January 26th, 2005, and
addressed as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.

Re: Associate Project Accounting Unit


we face in the Bahamas? The
short answer is no-one
knows.
Critics say that when it
comes to safety, the health-
care sector should borrow a
page from the airline indus-
try. When aviation accidents
occur, the industry can ana-
lyze important data to help
prevent future errors. In
healthcare, no such universal
information system exists.
According to Leandra
Esfakis, an attorney whose
late father was a well-known
Nassau GP: "We have the
benefit of some very good
medical practitioners here.
But many of us also have
grave reservations (no pun
intended) about local health-
care facilities, which may have
problems that are never
brought to light, and never
addressed."
Parliament set up the Hos-
pital, & Health Care Facilities
Board in 1998 to inspect and
license the private healthcare
sector in the Bahamas. One
of its chief responsibilities is
to investigate complaints from
the public.
However, it has no record
of doing so. Last June, for
instance, a complaint was
made to the board over the
death of a patient at a private
hospital and it has yet to
respond. Two more com-
plaints have since been sub-
mitted concerning inadequate
care at the same hospital. In
all three cases, the patients
died.
At first, the board said it
had no idea how to undertake
an investigation. So it asked
the Attorney General's office
for advice, but it still won't say
when or if an inquiry will be
launched. The board's chair-
Sman; D.Kitkldand'Cdulmpr, did
not respond to faied questions
on this subject.
One has to ask why, seven
years after it was set up and
six months after a complaint
was made, this statutory body
is either unable to hold an
inquiry, or refuses to do so.
Complicating matters is the
fact that some board members
are intimately connected to
the private facilities they are
supposed to be regulating.
Critics say they need to either
do the job the law requires or
resign.
From the public's point of,
view, the only leverage in
these, circumstances is the pos-
sibility that a complaint will
affect the bottom line of the
facilities involved. At the very
least this would mean sus-
pending licenses until
improvements are made.
There is no point in setting


up a statutory body to inspect
hospitals and clinics without
the capability to ensure that
proper standards are met and
legitimate complaints
addressed. After all, these are
matters of life and death. If
the health standards legisla-
tion is not implemented, it
leaves the survival of patients
at risk.
Why create meaningless
statutes in the first place? We
are currently being inundated
with so-called "consumer pro-
tection" legislation by the
Ministry of Trade & Industry.
Will, these regulations have
any more impact than the laws
currently in force to govern
the medical profession?
And why aren't death
records from private hospitals
collected and analysed...for
comparison %\ith similar rates
in similar-sized hospitals else-.
% here? If this were done, per-
haps it might move those
responsible to address the root
causes of deficiencies, instead
of running for 'cover.

n Britain a special com-
mission undertakes inde-
pendent-investigations into
complaints about both the
National Health Service and
the private healthcare sector.
These investigations are nor-
mally completed within six
months-information is pub-
lished on a Web site.
The UK commission says
it aims to be "an authoritative
and, trusted source of infor-
mation" and wants to ensure
that this information is used
to drive improvement in the
industry. Complainants, who
are unhappy with the outcome
of a review by the commission
can take the matter further,'
to an independent health
ombudsman.
In the Bahamas,- the Hos-
pital Board is supposed to pro-
tect the public from sub-stan-
dard healthcare. But the big
question is whether the law
works well enough in a small,
incestuous, accountability
free society like ours to allow
basic safeguards to be
enforced.
As part of the effort to
achieve an acceptable stan-
dard ofpatient safety, all
healthcare facilities should
establish comprehensive
patient safety programmes
operated by trained person-
nel, experts say.
They must establish a cul--
ture in which patient safety is
a top priority.
In the meantime, the auto-
matic licensing of private hos-
pitals, whether or not they
meet proper standards, can be


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MALL AT MARATHON (242) 393 6073
ABACO (242) 367 5792


construed as putting lives, at
risk,. And the position is very
similar for the elite medical
fraternity itself.
A medical council was
established by statute in 1975
to license physicians in the
country. There are currently
over 600 doctors licensed here,
about half working full-time
in government service. Under
the Act, doctors can theoreti-
cally be disciplined for negli-
gence or incompetence, for
disclosing confidential patient
information, or for serious
professional misconduct.

W written complaints
are supposed to be
evaluatedby the council,
which may then appoint a dis-
ciplinary committee that
includes a supreme court jus-
tice. Penalties can include a'
one-year suspension of
licence, a fine of $1000 and
payment towards the cost of,
the proceedings,
The council consists of sev-'
en members, including the
chief medical officer (current-
ly Dr Vernell Allen) who acts
as registrar. Members are
appointed by the minister of
health in conjunction with the
Bahamas lMedical Associa-
tion.
Their chief responsibility is
"to ensure that proper stan-
dards of professional conduct
in the practice of medicine and
proper standards of general
fitness to practice medicine
are maintained."
However, since the coun-
cil was created, it is believed
that only one Bahamian doc-
tor has ever been suspended
and that was for drug
abuse.
Although formal complaints
have been lodged over the
years (one as recently as last
December), Dr Baldwin
Carey, the council chairman,
would not respond to calls or
faxes on this matter.
This leads us once again to
the vexing issue of why there
is so. little accountability, or
rule of law, among practition-
ers of three of the nation's
most prestigious and reward-
ing professions. the law,
medicine and politics.
Of the three, it seems that
healthcare providers have the
highest degree of immunity
(or impunity)...perhaps
because of the greater respect
which their profession, for
obvious reasons, usually com-
, mands.
But as the late Indian sage
Krishnamurti once said: "It is
'no measure of health to be
well-adjusted to a profound-
ly sick society."


Share


your


news

The Tribune
wants to hear
from people who
are making news
in their
neighborhoods.
Perhaps you are
raising funds for
a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in
the area or have
won an award.
If so, call us on
322-1986 and
share your story.


For VOW SIVZIIOCs
oll pal lit,;. stain;, & 111c.)m


PAQE 8, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


i







TH TIUN HUSAY ANAR 0,205 AG


PLP is 'plagued by scan


FROM page seven
ness people find themselves
so disgusted with the polit-
ical process.
This indecisiveness is why
there remain no decisive
positions on the FTAA or
the CSME in spite of the
fact that both should come
into force this year.
Second, the economy of
The Bahamas is still floun-
dering despite all the talk
about approved billion-dol-
lar investments. Yes, the
economy is growing and


will continue to grow; but
it is doing so in the face of
the government's obvious
weaknesses. Additionally,
the economy's growth is not
doing much to reduce the
unemployment rate in the
country at this point.
Moreover, the state of the
government's finances
remains worrisome, no mat-
ter what officials say. The
government is running
deficits that are too high
and is not doing enough to
curb its spending or
enhance its revenue
prospects.


Third, Bahamians object
to this "talk much, do lit-
tle" approach that the pre-
sent government seems to
have. Government minis-
ters are fond of getting in
the media and announcing.
and pronouncing help and
hope. However, people are
saying that the PLP are not
doing anything and have
offered no more help and
no more hope since acquir-
ing the government. Of
course the apologists say,
give the government more
time, but people are saying
that almost 60 per cent of
the term of the government


is gone and less than 10 per
cent of its promises remain
unfulfilled.
Fourth, there is too much
controversy. Bahamians are
fed up with the rapid series
of controversial issues
involving the Christie
administration. They feel
that a number of govern-
ment ministers are simply
out of control. They also
feet that Mr Christie is
much too soft on these min-
isters and is incapable of
reining them in. They
believe that the actions of
these government ministers


are bringing the govern-
ment and the country into
disrepute and they do not
like it one bit.
Five, there is no sign of
better. With all the bad his-
tory the PLP has built up
so far in their new term and
in their previous term in
office, Bahamians see little
sign that much else will
change going forward and
that concerns them greatly.
In fact, many are convinced
that as the party becomes
desperate to win the next
general election, its spite-
fulness, undisciplined


spending, intimidation and
propagandising will inten-
sify. They believe that somdI
ministers will be prepared
to do anything and this
could mean even more con-
troversies going forward.
THOUGHT
FOR THE WEEK
"But 0 the truth, the
truth! the many eyes
That look on it! the
diverse things they see!"
George Meredith

zhivargolaing@coralwave.corn


FOR the sixth time, the Radisson Cable Beach and
Golf Resort has been recognized as a winner of Cor-
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Excellence.
The resort was cited "for excellence in accommo-
dations and meeting facilities, providing truly superi-
or staff service, trouble-free food-and-beverage func-
tions, exceptional ambience and convenient and acces-
sible location."
The publication's readers vote for the property they
want to win this award.
Warmth
"The warmth and professionalism of our staff as
well as the emphasis the resort has placed on meetings
and incentive programmes has proved to be of great
value," said Benjamin Davis, vice-president and gen-
eral manager of the 700-room beachfront resort.
"We are delighted to once again be distinguished as
a resort of choice for the group market."
The Radisson Cable Beach and Golf Resort
redefines the concept of a tropical vacation by giving
the option to customise and personalise one's experi-
ence through an all-inclusive plan or a room-only
stay.


A busy computer company is in search of a multi-task person
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Duties include
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follow-up on all service calls and related clientele issues.
Please send resume to:
Attention Technical Position
P.O.Box CB 13283
Nassau, Bahamas
Or fax to 328 0049/ e-mail: personnel@dctpc.com.
Before Friday, January 21, 2005
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE-9


1


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE10,THURSDYJANUARYA20,I 200TESIB BI


Flight makes return


FROM page one
proper processing and sub-
sequently took another
flight to Washington.
Senator Tommy Turn-
quest, leader of the FNM,
called the incident another
example of the arrogance
of members of the current


government.
"We are very concerned
about it and that is why
our Member of Parliament
Neko Grant brought it up
and it is clear and it is just
a further example of the
arrogance of the current
government for not fol-
lowing proper procedure,"
said Mr Turnquest.


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Teen is charged with




rape, armed robbery


FROM page one
all alleged to have occurred dur-
ing December 2004.
On December 12, Claudine
Beneby told police that a
gunman entered her conve-
nience store and robbed her


of 14 cellular phone cards,
valued at $20 each, 24 ciga-
rette lighters, and $100 cash,
which were altogether val-
ued at $404.
On December 15, Orel
Wilson told police that he
was robbed while working at


D&L Convenience store of
all the money in the cash
register, which totalled
$481.55.
Johnson is also accused of
robbing former Minister of
Health Dr Ronald Knowles
of his 2002 Ford Explorer,


Jeep, a leather wallet, a
Nokia cellular phone, Amer-
ican Express and Scotiabank ji
credit cards, and $200, alto- b
gether valued at $25,700. He n
is charged with receiving the
jeep on December 17. s
The youth was 'also a
accused of, stealing ;two.
Lexus cars. 4
Court dockets claim that I
on Monday, December 20, .
Johnson, concerned with ?
others, robbed Kelly Carroll ..
of a 2001 GS 300 Lexus, val-
ued at $35,000. He was also 1
charged with receiving the- 1
vehicle. a
The other Lexus was ,-d
stolen from Cedric Watson
on December 29. He told;.:i
Police that he was held at.
gunpoint and robbed of his -v
1999 GS 300 Lexus, which: ;I
belonged to Maurice Glin- ;p
ton. The vehicle is valued at ,
$28,000. ,
Johnson is also charged -
with 'receiving the vehicle as
well as Mr Watson's Carter ,
watch, Nike Air tennis shoes, e
a wedding band,, and a ;V6Qf; i
cellular phone. His posses- ' sions were valued at $4,250. .
Johnson appeared in court a
in a tan coloured Dickies
short set, which was stained. ti
with blood. There was a gash .1
over his left eyebrow. He (
shook his head and seemed v
perturbed as the multiple .,2
dockets against him were
read by Magistrate. Virgill;
The case is prosecuted bybag
Inspector Ercil Dorsette. ; <
He will be' remanded to.,.a ".
Her Majesty's Fox Hill
Prison until March 1, 2005, :7
when a Voluntary Bill of a .
Indictment will be handed to '.
him as the Preliminary j
Inquiry begins. Johnson
asked Magistrate Virgill for ;I
the dockets relating to his -,
case. He was told that he has &
the'right-to apply to ,tb ehe .i
Supreme Court for haili s s


FROM page one
loans were not being sent? Could you imagine
the anger and the hurt felt by the employees
when they learnt that their national insurance
contribution was not being paid and that their
pension fund contribution was in the same con-
dition?"
The, minister said that what this means'
"in a nut shell," is that both the employees'
credibility and their future have been dras-,
tically affected.
The prime minister has appointed a min-
isterial task force under the chairmanship
of Works Minister Bradley Roberts to
bring aid to those suffering from the hotel's
closure.
Last Thursday evening members of the
team met with a representative group of
the employees.
"Contrary to what those who wish to use
human suffering for political gain say, some
of the employees ha'e been recdiv'u is-g


tance from the Ministry of Social Services
but the demands and the needs are far
greater than the assistance they receive,"
said Mr Wilchcombe.
As a result of the meeting, an office was
established at the Bahamas Public Services
Union to deal specifically with the employ-
ees of Royal Oasis.
Mr Wilchcombe said that communica-
tions with David Buddemeyer,.president
of Driftwood, reveal that .the company's
response to the workers-are being delayed
by the ongoing negotiations with the
resort's insurance carriers.
"I know the process seems ludicrous but
we have been unable to move it along any
more expeditiously.
"The latest discussion with the carrier's
adjuster indicated that they would have a
more definite answer on the claim in two
weeks," said Mr Buddemeyer in a letter
'to M'Wilchcombe. '


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after closure


PAG E 10, TH URS DAY, JAN UARY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNEi


I


ip









THEAL TUU0


FROM page three
lane near the median on the
dual carriageway when he
noticed a car fast approaching.
"Did the driver attempt to
avoid the vehicle or
swerve?" Asked Ms Tynes.
"She came so fast, I don't
know if he saw her. I didn't
feel the breaks go on the
vehicle. The vehicle did not
swerve to avoid the car," Mr
Powell replied.
Under re-examination by
Prosecutor Thompson, Mr
Powell said the car never
slowed down before the
impact.
"The rate of speed of the
lady was very fast," he said.
Linda Garrett of Wester-
ville, Ohio, said she was sit-
ting next to Mr Powell in the
bus. Her sister Dottie, Vicky
and David Bennett were
seated behind them in the
back seat.
She said Russ Miller was
seated'in frC fi7-fr Powell
alone., while her husband
A DaveGarrett was sat in the
left-passenger seat in front
with the driver, who was
seated on the right.
Mrs Garrett said she saw
the car coming at a "very
high rate of speed" and
yelled out to the driver, who
was!'looking straight ahead.
She felt the hit and was then
knocked unconscious.
"I remember waking up
and my:brother-in-law telling
me that my sister was gone,"
she said.
Prior to the accident,
Vicky Bennett said she .was
seated next to Mrs Powell,
who .was holding her hands
because it was very cold.
She said that she too was
knocked unconscious and
only remembers coming out
of the taxi bus. She -said she i
was, hospitalized over 4night- ;i
at the Rand..- .- ...) 2'


"I didn't know Mrs Powell
had been killed until the next
morning," said Mr.Bennett.
Her husband, David Ben-
nett, a deputy sheriff, said
they were travelling at about
35 mph when he heard a
loud crash "before every-
thing went black".
Mr Bennett, who sustained
cuts to the arm, back and


legs, said everyone in the
taxi-bus had sustained vari-
ous injuries.
William (Russ) Miller, who
was severely injured and air-
lifted to a Florida hospital,
became choked up several
times while giving his
testimony on the witness
stand.
Mr Miller said he only


remember hearing Linda
Garrett yell and then a bang.
"I don't remember what
happened, he said. I remem-
ber waking up in Fort Laud-
erdale and didn't know
where I was."
The .trial was adjourned
until March 2, 2005 when the
prosecution is expected to
call further witnesses.


US policy on Cuba 'won't


1 1 p 1 *

change relationship




wit the Bahamas'
C t tl 'et all011s


FROM page three
tries are frank with each other and recognize
their respective opinions.
"We live with the practical realities of both
situations," he said.
Cuban charge d'affaires Felix Hernandez-
Wilson said yesterday he is not surprised by
the comment from the next Secretary of State,
as it goes hand-in-hand with the aggressive
Cuba policy that the Bush administration has
been pursuing.
"This only represents what have always been
their goals. I expected her to say something
like that," he said.
Mr Wilson-Hemandez said it is unfortunate in
his opinion that Dr Rice expressed a view which
is not shared "by million' of American people
and many members of the Senate and Parlia-
ment."
He said Dr Rice's statement indicates "that
tle US has no real interest in helping de% elop-


ing countries, in particular Cuba."
"They just want to make Cuba a part of the
US," he added.
He further said that despite the US embargo
and other anti-Cuba efforts, Cuba has cele-
brated success. in the fields of education and
healthcare.
Mr Wilson-Hernandez said Cuba has been
able to earn the respect of the Caribbean region,
including the Bahamas, as well as of countries
throughout the world.
"The fact is that Cuba is recognized by.
numerous international organizations such as
the UN and UNESCO," he added.
The charge d'affaires said that comments
such as those of Dr Rice do not influence Cuba.
"We will continue doing what we have been
doing."
Dr Rice's nomination for the office of Secre-
tary of State was overwhelmingly approved (16-
2) by the Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee Nesterday. Democrtic senators John Kerry
'and Barbara Boxer cast the two dissenting votes.


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SA NPINOR LT Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
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Manager of Customer
Service,
Prince Charles Branch
The.u ,c.sisil candidatLe should possess the
f,:.Lc-winf: qualifications.
P Bachelor s degree in Banking (or a related field)
A leas 110 or more years banking experience.
Demonstraled ability in the area of Customer
Service, Opefraions and Supervision would be
an assel..
Sioong communicabiiio and inmerpersonal skills
Strong leadership, problem solving, people
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Micro:sofl Office s.kills [ Word, Excel,. Power Poinr)
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P.O. Box N-7549
Nassau, N,P, Bahamas
Vid lax: 242 )3 28 7145
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TH URS DAY, JAN UARY 20, 2005, PAG E 1 1


THE TRIBUNE



















$1,300 for the tsunami relief d 1
Bridge players _n__as-
4 ao-0* aim 4m 10




$A0 for thsami relief d
sau have helped raised A
fund.
Bahamas Contract Bridge
Club manager Noreen Wur- i
demann and treasurer Bren-
da Rouse organised a special
tournament on Tuesday at n conten
It was part of a worldwide S N
effort by bridge enthusiasts
to help victims of the Decem-'o
ber 26 disaster in Asia.
Forty-four players tookhv n Al fo baes r o iders"
part in the Nassau event,
which was played simultane-
ously with other games
around the world.
Game results were: N/S 1
Brenda Rouse and Noreen
Wurdemann, 2 Audrey
Montgomery and Olive
Smith, 3 Connie Burnett and
Sonia Cartwright, 4 Jane
Evans and Angela Moree.
E/W 1 Gerhild Rees and Clif-
ford Rouse, 2 Elisa Lynch
and Grace Douglas, 3 Shirley
Bays and Dominique Kele-
com, 4 Gerry Hillir and
Sandy Walker.



Potcake book aims to

VACANCY NOTICE gie p
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to
invite applications from suitably qualified individuals for the position of
Information Systems Business Analyst in its Financial Division. A BOOK about dog own- Agriculture Minister Alfred Called Potcakes DogOwn-
ership in the Bahamas is to be Gray and Archbishop of Nas- ership in New Providence, The
POSITION SUMMARY published later this month., sati Patrick Pinder will attend Bahamas, the book covers
POSITION SUMMARY The book, co-written by W J the launch, which will be host- the "potcake problem" in
Fielding, Jane Mather and Dr ed by Advocates for Animal all its aspects and offers solu-
The Company is implementing a new Financial/ Human Resources Maurice Isaacs, will be Rights, the College of the tions.
Application System, which will require the creation of a team of Business launched at the British Colo- Bahamas, and Libraries and It is the result of meticulous
Analysts. Candidates for this team should currently be employed in a nial Hilton on January 27. Instructional Media Services. research over many years.


finance role and should be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of
the procedures, policies, and internal controls in a Financial Department.
Additionally, these candidates should be able to demonstrate an aptitude
for software applications. This team will be at the centre of a dedicated
cross functional implementation effort and is expected to form the core
post implementation application support. Applicants will be expected to
demonstrate enthusiasm and motivation to see this project through the
successful implementation by creating or assisting others in developing
processes, user acceptance testing (UAT), reporting, documentation, and
training.
DUITES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Become intimately familiar with all the modular features, functionality,
workflows, related internal controls and interfaces for system modules
assigned.
* Research and document user requirements and specifications, conduct
business and technical studies, design, develop and implement information
systems business solutions, and provide imput on service delivery.
* Working with the vendor implementation teams, BTC Consultants, and
super users to develop system test plans and associated test data and
execute User Acceptance Testing (UAT) for system modules assigned.
Ensure results of the conducted tests are well documented and failed
items are tracked for follow-up to completion.
* Become familiar with all available standard reports for the system modules
assigned.
* Develop proficiencies with report writing tools to perform specified data
analysis and studies as requested on system modules assigned; develop
and present as hoc reports in support of various initiatives.
* Assist with the creation of training materials and the user training itself
for the system modules assigned. Training materials includes business
processes, system features, functionality, technology capabilities and
limitations, ect.
* Develop post implementation documentation to assist with the support
of users and the daily maintenance and management of the system.
Documentation includes but is not limited to screen shots, process
diagrams, system enhancement requests, standard operating procedures,
etc.
* Provide on-going post implementation systems support for end users as
directed.
* Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned by Management.
MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:
* Bachelor's Degree or equivalent experience in a finance role specifically
relating to control of the general ledger, and financial reporting and
analysis.
* Demonstrate aptitude in the use of Microsoft office suite plus database
driven application software.
* Ability to create, compose and edit written materials; proven analytical
communication, research, and writing skills.
All applications should be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F.
Kennedy Drive, no later than Wednesday, January 26th, 2005, and addressed
as follows:
Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas
RE: Information Systems Business Analyst Human Resources


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005












Rosetta touched many



lives during her career


MRS Rosetta Rassin, SRN,
who died in Nassau on Thurs-
day, January 6, touched many
lives during her career. While
an Operating Theatre Nurse
during the war, she met .and
fell in love with Dr Meyer
Rassin. In 1947, the couple
moved their family from Lon-
don to Nassau and in 1955, she
and Dr Rassin opened their
new hospital, The Rassin Hos-
pital.
Retired
Mrs Rassin was the Head
Nurse from its opening until
she retired in 1983. She gave
her energy, patience, and wis-
dom to the community and was
loved by all of her patients. She
comforted those in need, gave
hope to those in their weakest
hour, and passed on a strength
that enabled them to recover.
After surgery a patient
described the sight of the
starched white uniform and the
compassionate blue eyes look-
ing down at her as seeing a
vision.
Mrs Rassin was truly a Flo-
rence Nightingale to her
patients. She was the healing
hands of the Rassin Hospital,
now known as Doctors Hospi-
tal.
Nurturing
Her love of people and nur-
turing spirit remain in the halls
of Doctors Hospital and her
superior nursing skills have set
the standard of care at the hos-
pital.
"As we approach the fiftieth
year mark of service to the
Bahamian community, we
remember a pioneer," said a
hospital spokesperson.
"We at Doctors Hospital
remember her with fondness
and admiration and mourn her
loss. May her soul rest in,
peace."


Doctors Hospital mourns the
death of beloved head nurse


N MRS Rosetta Rassin is pictured in uniform.


' CTbR Meyer and'Rosetta Rassin.


FULL TIME MOTHERS
ASSISTANT REQUIRED

I H W To help with all household care and associated
in arrangements for two small children. The
successful applicant will have a college degree,
childcare experience (with formal qualification
desirable but not essential), and will be able to
assist in motivational activities and learning
Iim skills. School runs and class attendance
necessitate that applicants are qualified drivers.
They must also be competent swimmers. Live
in facilities are available but it is not essential
that the successful applicant lives in provided
they are prepared to undertake evening baby
sitting duties are required.

The position may require foreign travel from
time to time and therefore a valid passport, US
Visa and police record are necessary.

.H Only non smoking Bahamian citizens or those
with the appropriate working papers need apply.

All applications with accompanying resume and
photograph should be submitted to P.O. Box
SS-19140, or email mfr@cit.co.uk.
-


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNIT


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


* Am


Report could recommend solutions



to fire 'problem' at the public dump


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Ministry of Health is
awaiting a report from Sable
Bahamas Ltd, which could
recommend a number of solu-
tions to the ongoing problem
of subterranean fires at the
Harrold Road dumpsite.
Minister of Health Dr Mar-
cus Bethel said yesterday that
his ministry on behalf of the
Cabinet had entered an agree-
ment with the Iowa-based engi-
neering and consulting firm to
do an assessment of the facility
and then prepare a report on
recommendations to address
the issue.
Dr Bethel explained that the
agreement was made on Octo-
ber 13, 2004 and gave Sable a


three month span to do its
assessment and make its rec-
ommendation.
Therefore, he said the report
should arrive any day.
He explained that once Cab-
inet has examined the recom-
mendations, it would plan its
course of action and determine
where the funding for the pro-
ject would come from.
Garbage
Dr Bethel stressed that the
fire was the result of garbage
burning underground at the
Construction and Demolition
dump site and not the landfill
as was reported in some media.
He explained that a dump-
site was simply as its name
implied an area where garbage


ar lxr~f,,xml &*)al of ol'o 8.k-.y
Th f IedpN1&eIef) h 1942


0 world school


St Andrew's School, the International School of
The Bahamas, needs, at the earliest possible
opportunity, a teacher of chemistry. We are
willing to offer a contract until either the summer
of 2005 or the summer of 2006 to the right
applicant. The person we hire must be able to
teach chemistry in years 10 13 (grades 9 12),
up to IB higher level standard. Details of
employment conditions may be found on the
school's website. at ww'w~.st-andre\\s.comI


is discarded as opposed to a
landfill which is a carefully
engineered impermeable area
where waste material is dis-
carded, in a sealed area, cov-
ered and filled to avoid any
interaction with the environ-
ment. He said the landfill at
the Harrold Road Facility
remains intact.
Dr Bethel said the fires at
the dump site have been a
source of contention for the
residents in the' area and the
government for many years.
Government
When asked why the gov-
ernment had not made
attempts to have the problem
corrected before now, Dr
Bethel said he has been in
office for two-and-a-half years
and can only speak for what he
has done while in office.
Dr Bethel had been in Mau-
ritius attending a conference
when the latest fire broke out
last week and yesterday, he
repeated the apology which
was extended to those affected
by the fire by Parliamentary
Secretary in the Ministry Ron
Pinder. Dr Bethel assured res-
idents that the government was
doing everything to ensure a
proper and sustained resolu-
tion to the issue. He reminded
them that to achieve this might
be a time consuming process.


* PICTURED left to right
are Paul O'Neil, Kerzner
International Bahamas
Ltd, President/Managing
Director, Dr Perry Gomez,
Director of the National
AIDS Programme and
Michael Jordan.


(Photo: Tim Aylen)


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Michael Jordan

golf tournament

sponsors donate

$25,000 to assist
Kerzner's HIV/

AIDS initiative
SPONSORS of the fourth
annual Michael Jordaj
Celebrity Invitational Gol
Tournament (MJCI) recent
held at the luxuribi
One&Only Ocean Club o
Paradise Island presented
$25,000 cheque; part proceed
from the tournament to Kerzr,
er International's HIV/AIDj
initiative. Basketball legend
Michael Jordan and Kerzn.
International Bahamas Limin
ed, President/Managingt5ired-
tor, Paul 0' Neil presented tih
cheque to Dr Perry Gome4
Director of the National Al
Programme.
Several worthy 0haritiq
including the American Re3
Cross benefited from the fo
day golf competition which fe.
tured sports stars Charl4
Barkley, Boris Becker, Barq
Bonds, Brandi Chastain, Rog
Clemens, Eric Dickerso
Wayne Gretzky, a Hamn
Brett Hull, DeI)rek Jer. Mar
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Morgan, Dennis Rodma.,
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ment personalities Cars
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G, Dennis Haysbert Jan
Jones, Judd Nelson, Maun
Povich, Aidan Quinn, Ala
Thicke and Damon Wayan
NBC-TV will broadcast tlI
tournament on January 2,
2005 from 3pm to 4:30pm. -


* THERE is an ongoing problem of subterranean fires at the Harrold Road dumpsite.
(The Tribune archive photo)


r


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I 1


SCHOOLt


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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2004, PAGE 15


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- .-
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"THE TRI I
THE TRIBUNj!


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff
Reporter
A GOVERNMENT
investigation has been
launched to determine
whether a landowner has
permanently damaged the
environment after clearing
down a tract of his proper-
ty on Eleuthera.
Ivan Ferguson, the
administrator of Gover-
nor's Harbour, told The
Tribune that he had asked
the Department of Physi-
cal Planning to investigate
if any lasting damage had
been done after American
resident Tom Hansford
cleared down tens of acres
of trees and bushes from
his 80 plus acre property.
There had been concern
that the clearance resulted
in the loss of endemic trees
some of which allegedly
were protected under the
Convention on Interna-
tional Trade in Endangered
Species of Wild Fauna and
Flora.
Mr Ferguson said that


while the act of clearing
may have been illegal, he
said in his defence, that Mr
Hansford who has lived in
the area for a number of
years, claimed that he was
ignorant of Bahamian law.
By the time Mr Ferguson's
office was made aware of
the situation, the trees had
already been cleared.
He said Mr Hansford met
with officials from the
department of local gov-
ernment, the Ministry of
Works and the Department
of Environmental Health
last month.
Works
He said Mr Hansford was
shown a copy of the Con-
servation of Physical Land
Act and informed that the
scope of the works he had
done may have been in vio-
lation of the law.
"Mr Hansford was quite
willing to work with the
government to correct the
situation," Mr Ferguson
told The Tribune.
Mr Ferguson said Mr


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Hansford was not some
"loose cannon" who went
around arbitrarily cutting
down trees.
He said that the matter
was under investigation and
said that to date there has
not been any concrete evi-
dence to suggest that it has
created excessive water
drainage or affected the
water table.
He said that until the
results of the investigation
were revealed, no conclu-


sion as to what damage was
caused should be made.

Satisfied
Michael Johnson, the
chairman of the Town Plan-
ning Committee in
Eleuthera, said the com-
mittee was satisfied that Mr
Hansford had worked along
with the committee to do
everything possible to
amend the matter. He said
Mr Hansford along with


The Ministry of Works
worked to rebuild the land
by filling in soil. In addi-
tion, Mr Johnson denied
that the trees which Were
cut down were endangered,
he maintained that they
were Cassuriana trees. Mr
Johnson added that Mr
Hansford's nearest neigh-
bour was 400 ft away and
said he had received no
complaints from people
that their property had
been affected.


ning committee has not had'
any complaints about water
run-off and said the only'
problem was during the
cutting of the trees ther-e
was sand in the road which
has been since been2
removed because hM.
brought in a tractor to leV'
el off the property. I M
The Tribune- w as,
unable to contact the
Director of Physical Plaift
ning or Mr Hansford fo*1
comment.


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Investigation is launched




into clearing in Eleuthera


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good cause, campaigning
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area or have won an
award.
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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. wishes to inform
its valued customers that technicians will conduct an equipment
up-grade in the Fire Trail Road area beginning Thursday, January
20 to Thursday, February 3, 2005 between the hours of 9:00am and
4:30pm daily.

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Fire Trail Road (East of Faith Avenue)
All Side Comers on Fire Trail Road as far as Hamster Street

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~ ___








PAGE 8, THRSDAY JANUARY 2,2005THE TIBUN


'Illegal gate installed'


to


stop rush hour traffic


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
RESIDENTS of Glenstiff
Close off Johnson Road have
reportedly constructed an illegal
gate at the entrance to their cor-
ner to stop traffic from flowing
through there during the morn-
ing rush hours.
" For weeks now, commuters
of the Eastern district of New
Providence attempting to get
into to%\%n through Johnson
Road have had to endure the
crawling line on the winding


and hilly road. The shortcut
through Glenstiff Close avail-
able to them for years was cut
short without warning recently
after residents got tired of the
practice.
The yellow and black iron,
gate is situated about ten feet
within the corner.
A reliable source at the Min-
istry of Works yesterday told
The Tribune: "They were ne% er
given permission, it was illegal-
ly erected, and they have been
asked to take it down."
-The source could not say.
exactly how the residents were


* HAVANA
DESPITE'its reputationI as a producer of fine cigars, Cuba
is preparing to ask smokers to step outside before lighting up.
according to Associated Press.
Beginning on Feb. "' smoking x\ ill be prohibited in the-
aters, stores, buses, taxis and other enclosed public areas
under a new resolution published in Cuba's National Gazette
by the Commerce Ministry.
Smoking will also be banned in indoor restaurants except in
designated smoking areas. Cigarette machines will be taken
down. There was no word if smoking would be allowed in
bars.
The resolution said the move was "taking into account the
damage to human health caused by the consumption of ciga-
rettes and cigars, with the objective of contributing to a change
in the attitudes of our population."
Tolerance for the habit has been slowly waning and even
President Fidel Castro gave up smoking cigars years ago. At
the same time, the cigar exports continue to play a key eco-
nomic role, generating $200 million annually.
Castro once joked about giving away boxes of cigars. "But
the best thing to do is give them to your enemy."
The resolution will also suspend sales of cigarettes to chil-
dren under age 16 and at stores less than 100 meters from
schools.
According to government statistics, four of every 10 Cubans
. smoke, and.3.0 percent.of the 15,000 deaths from preventable
cancers each year can be linked to smoking.
sft"' ~"w(


contacted and asked to remove
the gate, but to date, the
obstruction to traffic still existS,
Officers in the commercial)
designs unit at the ministry coln
firmed that the road is public,
and gave The Tribune the name
of the road, as there are no vis.L
' ible signs.
"It is public road and not a
gated community and therefore
the public-should b allo.,..
access.' said E. Fox. a
of Winton Meadows.
A father of eight \% hq 1. ini
the area tojd The Triba e:
lot of influtitial people e
through there. We live b e
black side of Johnson'', d
down at the bottom of, .- il
which leads into the Fox
Hill. They would nevd
us to bar off Johnson Te rir
like that, and traffic ,6 hes
through there every
too. "'"'



passing) es .or
mented:']f.,i
then other r e

corner as well.'' at woul '
be right and bet you th
wouldn't allowIif." .,Jj
Howe\ er. Briain Carey'"
lered with tho s.motorist
don't ha'e a problem with
because traffic flo'vs better aq
Bus drivers are too aggressi.
and up there at the end of th
corner. the\ let everyone out s
those on the straight-away had4a
longer wait." I
Since 9am Tuesday, The Tri
bune attempted to get an officiaI
response from the minister
about the recently-erected gatei
Permanent Secretary Anita
Bernard was not in office, and
her deputy Mr Poitier said qued-
tions should be directed to the
commercial designs unit. The
commercial designs. unit -was
unavailable fj.y comment.


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THE TRIBUNEi


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005





THE TRIBUNE


* Bid to bar


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 19


inau


lCopyright

-Syndicatei
le from Comme




1


Cuba accusesUS of

ying to theworld


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US attempts to drop climate




change from conference plan


* KOBE, Japan
CALLING it a "distraction,"
U.S. delegates worked to
expunge the issue of climate
change from the U.N. action plan
being readied for adoption at a
global conference to reduce nat-
ural disasters worldwide, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Scientists say global warming
is likely to stir up more disas-
trous weather events, such as
hurricanes and droughts, as the
century wears on. But the deputy
U.S. delegation head told
reporters the subject is too "con-
troversial" for the World Con-
ference on Disaster Reduction.
"It's our desire that this con-
troversy not distract this confer-
ence," said Mark Lagon, a
deputy assistant secretary of
state, whose delegation is seeking
to delete all six references to cli-
mate change in the draft "frame-
work for action," to be approved
Saturday by the international
gathering.
The chief U.N. official here
had a different view, saying the


world has seen "a dramatic
increase in hurricanes, storm
surges and climate-caused nat-
ural disasters."
"There is climate change. That
is not really controversial," Jan
Egeland, U.N. undersecretary-
general for humanitarian affairs,
told The Associated Press on
Wednesday. "What is contro-
versial is what causes climate
change."
Warming
The Intergovernmental Panel
on Climate Change, a U.N.-orga-
nized network of scientists, says
the planet is warming and most
of it is probably caused by the
accumulation of "greenhouse
gases" in the atmosphere, such as
carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-
burning. Other major scientific
bodies concur, but some dis-
senters contend the role of the
gases is overstated.
The Kyoto Protocol, which
takes effect Feb. 16, mandates
cutbacks in such emissions, but
the United States, the biggest


emitter, rejects that internation-
al pact. President George W.
Bush's administration opposes
treating global warming as a pri-
ority problem..
In its preamble, the action
plan draft says climate change is
one factor pointing toward "a
future where disasters could
increasingly threaten the world's
economy, and its population."
Other passages call for strength-
ening research into global warm-
ing and for clear identification
of "climate-related disaster
risks."
The U.S. move to delete the
passages, an effort backed by
Australia and Canada, is
opposed by the 25-nation Euro-
pean Union, a strong supporter
of the Kyoto agreement, and by
poorer nations potentially imper-
iled by the intensified storms, ris-
ing ocean waters and other
effects foreseen with climate
change.
"We feel there will be more
calamities unless there is some
action on climate change. The
number of natural hazards will


increase," said Siddiqur Choud-
hury, a delegate from
Bangladesh, where a half-million
or more people were killed by
cyclones in 1970 and 1991.
With global warming, millions
more Bangladeshis might be dis-
placed from low-lying coastal
regions by oceans expanding and
rising as they warm and receive
runoff from melting ice.

Disasters
"I hope there will be a global
recognition of climate change
causing more natural disasters,"
said Egeland, the U.N. emer-
gency coordinator overseeing the
relief effort for the Indian Ocean
earthquake-tsunami, which killed
more than 160,000 people last
month.
John Horekens, the U.N. con-
ference coordinator, said he saw
room for compromise on the lan-
guage: Inclusion of a brief ref-
erence to climate change in the
action plan, and additional ref-
erences in a less significant
annex.


* JAN EGELAND, U.N. undersecretary-general
for humanitarian affairs


STo The Shell Saxons Super Stars



for 40 Years of Celebrating



SJunkanoo in the Bahamas..._


*-I


AM'


4


te


,A 4


Seir Victt


"UnNew Years 2005 Parades
e


L^".


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


f


5;~


%


IiNJM







THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


SECTION


OJEW *--I


business@l00jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Driftwood





seeks buyer





for Hurricane





Hole Marina


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Driftwood Hospitality, the
hotel operator and owner that
runs the stricken Royal Oasis
Crowne Plaza and Golf Resort
in Grand Bahama, is in
advanced talks with potential
buyers for its Hurricane Hole
Marina on Paradise Island.
Although this newspaper has
been unable to discover the
identity of the purchasers,


sources last night said that nego-
tiations to see the marina, which
Driftwood owns, were pro-
gressing well and a deal could
be announced soon.
The Hurricane Hole Marina's
waterfront bar and grill is a pop-
ular venue with tourists, visit-
ing boaters, Bahamians and
expatriates.
The complex includes a 90-
slip full service marina that can
accommodate yachts more than
200 feet in length, plus fitness


and spa facilities, showers and
dressing rooms.
Driftwood's other Paradise
Island interest is the Holiday
Inn Sunspree, a 256-room prop-
erty that underwent a $10 mil-
lion renovation recently.
A further $3 million has been
pumped into the Holiday Inn
West Bay Street, also operated
by Driftwood, to create an 80-
room property adjacent to the
main site, which contains 185
rooms.


Royal Oasis in



$22m 'quagmire'


Hurricanes 'put us back a year':
Sales to be $15m less than 2004 and 2005 projections
But profits to come back 'quarter-by-quarter' in New Year
$3.5m ahead of debt reduction target, with debt halved to
under $13m in two years
Company to divest or discontinue Dunkin' Donuts
* Solomon's in Freeport to be rebuilt and re-open in June 2006


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Abaco Mai
yesterday
The Trib
that Sepi
ber's hi
canes were responsible
blowing it from a small
jected profit to a $2.2 mi
third quarter loss, with
retail conglomerate reveal
that the damage to its G.
Bahama operations
expected to cost it $15 mil
in sales during both this
the next fiscal year.
David Thurlow, At
Markets' president, said
despite reaching a resolu


* Turks & Caicos issues remain
with its 14 creditors over the arou
$7.9 million preference share milli
debt and being $3.5 million cal 2
rkets ahead of its debt reduction tar- HI
told get for the January 31 year- that
bune end (see story on Page 1B finau
tern- below), the hurricanes had, cane
urri- 'made the three months to ter, 1
for October 30 "frustrating" and dent
pro- "put us back a year". Aba
llion He added: "We were gene
i the expecting to produce a small quar
aling profit before all this hap- its ni
rand opened Tt
was Abaco Markets had been loss
llion running close to its projections tota
and for the previous two quarters mon
in 2004, generating small net to $:
>aco losses of $431,000 and $60,000 that
that respectively as it progressed
ition further in executing its turn- See


Lnd plan from the $25.8
on loss generated in fis-
003.
however, Mr Thurlow said
by taking most of the
ncial hit from the hurri-
damage in the third quar-
he was "much more confi-
A" that a "pared down"
co Markets would make
rate profits "quarter-by-
ter" when it moved into
ext fiscal year.
ie 2004 third quarter net
brought Abaco Markets'
l losses for the nine
ths to October 30, 2004,
2.7 million. Included in
total were $408,000 in net
RESULT, Page 4B


Minister

hits at

resort's

operators

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
'OBIE WILCHCOMBE
(RIGHT), minister of tourism,
yesterday described the more
than $22 million debt owed by
the Royal Oasis Crowne Plaza
& Golf Resort as a "quagmire",
and hit out at the resort's oper-
ator, Driftwood Hospitality, for
"unusual and unprofessional
practices".
Describing it as a "bad situa-
tion", Mr Wilchcombe said the
,Royal Oasis owed $13 million in
'unpaid casino taxes, $4.1 mil-
lion in contributions to the hotel
;.uiion pension fund, $2.7 mil-
lion to the Grand Bahama Port
Authority and its companies,
and $2.5 million to the National
Insurance Board (NIB). A fur-
ther $55,000 was owed to Grand
Bahama-based suppliers to the
:hotel.
^The minister had said previ-
oualy that the Royal Oasis was
$30 million in debt. However,
he added that a letter he
received last week from David
Buddemeyer, Driftwood's pres-
,ident, said the resort had paid
:ff $5 million in liabilities owed
-to various suppliers on Grand
.Bahama.
Mr Wilchcombe's address to
the House of Assembly is likely
to have brought little comfort
Jto the 1300 Royal Oasis workers
;who have been left without a
-regular salary and job since Sep-
tember 2004, when Hurricane
-.Frances struck.
Although Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie had established a
ministeriall committee, headed
by Bradley Roberts, minister of
works and public utilities, to
"bring relief" to the resort's
,.employees, Mr Wilchcombe
had been unable to obtain a
firm date for the property's re-
opening from Mr Buddemeyer.
':The Driftwood president's
letter, which Mr Wilchcombe
read out to the House of
Assembly, said a "final timeline
and determination" for the
Royal Oasis re-opening "con-
tinues to be delayed by ongoing
negotiations with the insurers".
Mr Buddemeyer added that
he knew "it seems ludicrous,
but I have been unable to move
[these negotiations] on expedi-


Abaco Markets reaches deal

on its $7.9m preference debt
By NEIL HARTNELL almost five years to December 31,2009.
Tribune Business Editor Abaco Markets had previously defaulted on
the dividend payments to preference share-
Abaco Markets yesterday told The Tribune it holders due to conditions set by its bankers
had completed the last stage of its "financial re- Royal Bank of Canada, as the price for the
engineering" by reaching an agreement with financial institution agreeing to renegotiate the
holders of its $7.9 million preference share debt, company's credit arrangements in 2003.
as it revealed that it had halved its total bank The settlement with the preference share
debt in two years to "just under" $13 million. holders, who include Colina Insurance Comn
The $7.9 million preference share debt was pany, British American Insurance Company
due to mature on February 8, but the agreement and the hotel union pension funds, saw Abaci
with the 14 preference shareholders has resched-
uled that by extending the redemption period by See DEAL, Page 4E


tiously".
He said the insurance carri-
er's loss adjusters had indicated
they would be able to give "a
more definitive answer" within
the next two weeks.
In the meantime, Mr Budde-
meyer had claimed all out-
standing union dues for Royal
Oasis workers had been
brought current, and monies
owed to the staff had been paid.
The Tribune understands that
the Government is so keen for
Driftwood and the resort's ulti-
mate owner, Lehman Brothers'
private equity arm, to sell the
Royal Oasis that a Ministry of
Tourism team offered to write-
off $11 million that the resort
owed to the Government when
it met with the Wall Street
investment bank in December.
Mr Wilchcombe said yester-
day that the Ministry of
Tourism was receiving interest
from potential., developers and
investors seeking to acquire the
Royal Oasis every week.
The absence of a set opening
date, though, is unlikely to reas-
sure the laid off Royal Oasis
workers about their futures no
matter what financial assistance
the Government may provide.
Mr Wilchcombe said that the
"credibility" and livelihoods of
Royal Oasis employees had
been "drastically affected" by
the resort's failure to send to
banks the money that was being
deducted from employee
salaries to service their loans.
NIB contributions and pen-
sion contributions had also not
been paid, causing Mr Wilch-
combe to attack Driftwood for
"unprofessional practices".
The minister said the Royal
Oasis staff were seeking finan-
cial assistance to help with their
mortgage payments, plus a
weekly stipend and early retire-
ment for senior members of
staff. Some 300 had already
been in contact with the
See RESORT, Page 5B


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Nine out of 10
Bahamian exec-
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Business Conti-
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have a sufficient solution in
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activities and services in the
event of a business interrup-
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tion and there must be a strong
focus on the recovery of IT sys-
tems in the event of a disaster.
Developing an IT Disaster
Recovery capability is at the
centre of your BC Plan.
It is Your Responsibility
As executives, we have a per-
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This is not an IT project it is
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enforcement of an executive's
liability requires ownership and
sponsorship of Business Conti-
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Recovery, by the executive
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The top three barriers to get-
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Return on Investment
It has been proven that a BC
Plan delivers significant bene-
fits even without a disaster.
In particular, a BC capability


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Teachers must also have at least a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
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BC is affordable


An BC Plan can be afford-
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Or choose a phased solution
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BC is simple
With the right help, BC is a
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To provide feedback on this
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About the Author:
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Mr Hassan has more than 20
years experience in IT strategy
and consulting in the Bahamas.
Providence Technology Group
is one of our leading IT firms,
specialising in Networking Solu-
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Services and Software Solu-
tions.


Ministry of Tourism


unveils campaign to


lure winter weary


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
The Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism has rolled out a major
winter blitz campaign to lure
cold and weary New Yorkers
to the warm shores of paradise,
just as freezing temperatures
have taken a strong hold on the
'Big Apple" and much of the
United States.
Basil Smith, director of com-
munications for the Ministry of
Tourism, explained that for Jan-
uary and February, the Ministry
had undertaken a major mar-
keting initiative targeting the
New York City area, which has
a tremendous amount of airlift
coming into the destination.
Initial reports are already indi-
cating the advertising campaign
is having a positive impact.
According to Mr Smith, part
of the campaign involves using
advertising spots on every' train
headed out of Grand Central
Station. Advertising space in
the station itself is expected to
be utilized during March and
April, also as part of the blanket
approach being taken to attract
visitors tired of the intense cold
during a winter season being
experienced all along the east-


ern seaboard of the United
States.
The advertising campaign, he
said, is building on the success
of the commercials from 'After
the Sunset'. In recent weeks,
the Bahamas has also found
itself in a number of other high
profile projects, including the
movie, 'Fat Albert', where a
song performed by Bahamian
singer Nehemiah Hield is heard,
a poster of the Bahamas is seen
hanging over one of the actor's
beds and the Bahamas, in the
context of a luxury destination
is referenced several times. Mr
Smith said the Ministry's public
relations firm, Weber Shand-
wick, has an affiliate in Califor-
nia whose job it is to place the
Bahamas in movies and televi-
sion venues.
The new advertising cam-
paign comes on the heels of a
consolidation of the Ministry of
Tourism's sales bureaus in
North America in 2004, in a
move to create a more focused
drive on public relations.
Offices in Toronto, Ontario,
Miami, Chicago, Houston and
New York were impacted.
Looking forward for 2005, Mr
Smith said an ongoing concern
for the Ministry is their ability
to continue to attract the high


caliber of clientele currently
seen in the destination. With
an explosion of new tourism
developments and new initia-
tives by the ministry geared
toward increasing visitor spend-
ing in the destination, every
effort is being made to mhin-
tain this market.
Another avenue that is being
heavily explored is the Inter-
net. James Turner, director of
e-commerce for the Ministry of
Tourism' Bahamas.com, said
some $3 million in bookings
have been made at the site to
date. He added however, that
'the figure does not take into
account the amount of traffic
driven to other sites where
bookings may have then taken
place.
The website, launched last
year, now has approximately
350,000 unique visitors per
month, with an average of
500,000 hits a month. Accord-
ing to Mr Turner, the tourism
industry's presence on the world
wide web is critical to the
growth of the industry, as
research continues to show that
more and more travelers 'are
turning to the web for travel
and vacation information.
See TOURISM, Page 5B


Colina
Pricing Information As Of: Financial Advisors Ltd.
19 January 2005
BISX USTED & TRADED SECE IIRrMS VSIT rWWWBXA~ ICOl DATA NFORil ATII '. .
BLSX ALL SHARE MDIMX CLOS )1,.*1JaCI3 14-uP.1i1 % 1Ca4 a0.94 Yt 173 3 vt 9L, -..' :':" .-
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS 5 DIv S PIE Yield
1 49 1 10 Abaco Markets 1 10 1 10 0.00 0.197 0000 N/M 0 000%
8.40 7.30 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 .0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.75 Bank of Bahamas 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.2 5.74%
0.85 0.75 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.97 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.000 17.8 0.00%
1.00 0.91 British American Bank 0.95 0.95 0.00 0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
7.25 6.25 Cable Bahamas 7.20 7.20 0.00 0.510 0.240 14.1 3.33%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.17 6.15 Commonwealth Bank 7.15 7.15 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.3 5.45%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 15,000 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.96 3.96 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.29%
9.75 p.02 FInco 9.73 9.73 0.00 0.649 0.480 15.0 4.93%
7.50 6.20 FirstCaribbean 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.40%
8.60 8.00 Focol 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.3 6.25%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99' 1.99 0.00 0.025 0.000 79.6 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J.S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.27 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.98 5.93 -0.05 1.000 0.245 0.000 24.4 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
Fidelity Over-The.-ournter SurI .. '
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid S Ask S Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S Div S PIE Yield
1300 13 00 Bahamas Superman.ets 1300 1400 1600 1 328 0 720 10.5 5 14%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
ColinaOvwrT cm : :.- ... '. e . .: ".
413 00 28 00 ABDAB 41 00 43.00 41 00 2220 0000 19 4 000%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months DIv S Yield %
1 .-(ji 1 1491 Collna Money Market Fund 1 201423"
2.0536 1.8154 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.1191"*
10.2148 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2648"****
2.1746 2.0012 Collna MSI Preferred Fund 2.174583**
1.0848 1.0823 Colina Bond Fund 1.084821****
'. ~J .',JeJWCx21 CL0dW 42-.4 4 1 YT .t I 2 .-4 : '. '. ." --...
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to da EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eaminge FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
- AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/** AS AT DEC. 31, 2004
* AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2004/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2004


TEMPLE CHRISTIAN
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


URGENTLY NEEDS

1 Spanish Teacher (Grades 1 6)

Applicant must:

A. Be a born-again practicing Christian who is;
willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian Schools.,

B. Have an Associates and or Bachelor's
Degree in Education from a recognized
College or University in the area of
specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or
Diploma.

D. Be willing to contribute to the school's extra;
curricular program.
t
Application must be made in writing with a full
Curriculum Vite, a recent coloured photograph andq
three references should be sent to:'

The Principal
Temple Christian Schools
Collins Avenue
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas


THE i TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005







THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 3B


Government urged




to approach foreign




land access carefully


-''By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
-Tribune Business Reporter

real estate
industry are
advising the
.. Bahamas
Government to approach with
:caution any possible changes to
.regulations impacting the sale
"'of land in the Bahamas to for-
I eigners, suggesting that a mis-
'step could lead to lower mar-
ket values and restricted devel-
o"ppment, which in the long-term
could potentially hurt Bahami-
'an land owners as well.
In an interview with The Tri-
'bune, Andrew O'Brien, a spe-
' $cialist in foreign real estate
- 'investment projects with
:"Lennox Paton, said concerns
'expressed by Central Bank gov-
'ernor Julian Francis in regard


A we
male
be al
pared


to limiting the access foreign
buyers have to segments of
Bahamian real estate, is an
important one as it underscores
the need to protect Bahamian
land interests for Bahamians.
He added, however, that it
would be essential for the Gov-
ernment to approach the intro-
duction of any new require-
ments cautiously because as
soon as the marketability of
property is limited, it lowers
market values and restricts
development.
Crediting the government
with already doing a good job of
monitoring the sale of land to
foreign buyers, Mr O'Brien sug-
gested that an important fea-
ture of regulating the sector is to
ensure that all potential buyers,
stakeholders and industry par-
ticipants are aware of what the
specific requirements are for
the purchase of land by a for-


eigner, as opposed to an unde-
fined policy:
"As much as possible people
need to know what will be
restricted. Right now we're
operating under the Interna-
tional Persons Land Holding
Act, which requires non-
Bahamians to submit for a per-
mit if they want to buy five or
more acres, or for commercial
purposes and that gives Gov-
ernment an opportunity to
review specific projects and the
people behind the projects,
which is a very important func-
tion.
"However, it can be frustrat-
ing for non-Bahamian pur-
chasers and both Bahamian and
non-Bahamian vendors because
greater regulation lengthens the
time it takes to purchase prop-
erty, increases the tasks needed
to be performed in order to get
approval for the property, rais-


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es the costs of a transaction and
increases the uncertainty of
completing a transaction," he
said.
During the 14th Annual
Bahamas Business Outlook
Central Bank Governor Julian
Francis said the Bahamas Gov-
ernment may have to revisit its
position on foreign access to
real property in certain popu-
lation centres, with a view to
protecting the position of
Bahamians.
"I'm not sure that given the
strong pace of development
which the country is likely to
experience over the next decade
and given the limited land
resources in New Providence in
particular, that it will be possi-
ble to escape such measures
without running the risk that
Bahamians will not be able to
own property in' the area of
their choice," he said.
Mr Francis also noted that
the existing mechanism for pro-
posals and decision on those
proposals are managed by Cab-
inet, and with hundreds of pro-
posals at various stages before
Cabinet, the speed at which
decisions can be made and the
range of expertise which often
needs to be brought to bear on
certain investment matters, has
'been systematically compro-
mised.
A real estate broker with a
leading Bahamian firm speaking
on condition of anonymity, said
a number of questions, includ-


See LAND, Page 5B
BTlB Bl AVIMl_ I


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VERLINE LOUIS, LIFEBOUY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the factswithin twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


THE DIOCESE OF THE BAHAMAS
AND TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS












ENTRANCE

EXAMINATIONS


The Entrance Examinations
for all Anglican Schools will
take place on
Saturday, February 5th, 2005
at 9:00 am.


The Examinations for the
Nassau Schools will take place at
St Anne's School, Fox Hill.
Applications can be collected at
the respective schools and
returned no later than
Wednesday, February 2, 2005.


M.ichael,


Tt-j^ 'Legendary Past ... Glorious Future!'

Now accepting applicants for teaching for September, 2005
for the following areas:
PRIMARY SCHOOL (Grades 1 6)
Classroom teachers, Information Technology and Physical Education


HIGH SCHOOL (Grades 7 12)
Mathematics, English Language, French, Spanish. Biology,
Information Technology, Home Economics, Art, Physi-
cal Education, Accounts and Economics.


CRITERIA FOR EMPLOYMtENT
* A minimum of a Bachelor'- Defee from a
recognized university confirmed by a certified copy
of certificate
* A post graduate cerlificole in education or a
teaching certificate confirmed by a certified copy of
certificate
* Names and contact information of at least two
professional references must be subirntled
* Willingness to support the school's Accelerated
Programme including teaching advanced courses
such as Advanced Placement and Advanced
Subsidiary. Experience in leadclng adv mced
courses is preferred


QC TEACHERS SPE-4K...
* "Canne colleague--"
* "A a lumier snjderit, i wmied to give
bacl: Io iy Alina Mater."
* '-SupporLhie Achmnin.h action Teamn
* "I c ani I The Baharia3 to work, lu learn.
to develop iny teaching sitle and min
paotion Ibi o my lisbjeci and I feel thai i've
h -._ f.ll_.1,.,. M Al, ll._ ,


* ;.' ,I ,FPt l:i rit. vl I. ..p t,:d i..chi d.ii. r'l iu U'J uilL
c'ommitrnent io work in h.-rrnr'r, '.*.'it Chn tt :ri
principle. and rtc uppF;-t th- -rnph,_. .::.-F th,: Application forms are available from the
E hmrr, Confr,-nc-. of Tie ; Ihod.t. Churn-h .l' Human Resources Office at the school or
.''hicb th. ;.:-l i: aI parpt by downloading from our website
S.. .. -h.-: .or. i ~'o L .
The completed application together with a
covering letter, a statement of educational
QUEEN'S COLLEGE ... philosophy and a recent photograph must
* 1i -theiF n- ire hc i Tn-ie [ i be sent to. The Principal
* I*the-I.ch 'r. pir 'r'e :hcol in TIle t ;dum n
Queen's College
* En:urt: 'ea' .::,::,n irn it ru r iL' u.:i: ..'r' .j.I .rrtran. P.O. Box N7127
:en:..:,-:cmmur ir.' Nassau, Bahamas
* 3f.'er: a rich cumiculum Or fax to: 242-393-3248, or email to
* 1 : -.'. I-L tL., t.e, anrd ,dJiicae 1 rcacher.. dlynch@qchenceforth.com and should
arrive no later than January
* l: Iplac wherj excellence is respected :nd puirJ-ud, wvhire I 28, 2005.
reaching in'J learning are innovauve ind ivhere:ainrt.y for Candidates
other Is .uinns..ic short listed
QUEEN'S COLLEGE contacted bey
P.O. Box N..7 7 we l lon ee be
Nassau, Bahamas telephone, fax
Tel: (242)393.1666039.215334S9-2646Fat(24)39M3248 '* or email for an
Websiit. 'vww.qhenm-erorthcoam 0 Emdal: queeu@qchluceforth.com interview

Quefn's CoAg wwas s ,da if in assu inw m 1890' 6y ,fiI,' "mosil Cfurfdi
and s a merier of .-t I1iliatUWafLssodation tffMirttdiut Sc3hoE. Co'ffijm dotI pm.,'rsitis (l7,ISCU'i
II


Need to save?


Cable Beach: 327-5170
Frederick Street: 325-8591
Mackey Street: 393-8270
Paradise Island: 363-4225
Wulff Road: 323-7459
Freeport: 352-6676


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I BUSINESS I


"--'THE TRIBUNE


I;


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~ ~s- C~b34~snce4~ ~i~ddbC $kb~


I







PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Result (From page 1B)


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANVEL MOMPREMIER,
WARWICK HOUSE, OFF SHIRLEY ST, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of JANUARY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






1. Experienced, courteous and versatile
receptionist/clerk
2. Data Processor
3. Accounts Clerk
Position also entails the handling of cash.
Please forward your resume with your
position of preference to:

P.O. Box EE-15484
Nassau, Bahamas




TRADEINVEST ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD.
A private Wealth Management CompAny and medium-sized
Family Office
Has an opening for an
ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT ADMINISTRATION

Applicants must:
Be a qualified attorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders
will also be considered.
Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in
any of the areas of trust, banking or investments.
Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal documents
relating to -special projects and to confidently communicate with
overseas legal and tix advisors on the same.
Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project,
coordinating its various parts and managing the team associated with
the same.
Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary
structures.
Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic
understanding of investment and financial transactions.
Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant
supervisor.
Have uncompromising personal and business ethics .
Successful candidate will work directly with the President of TTdelnvest
in the management of complex private fiduciary arrangements.
Responsibilities include regular contact with overseas affiliates, associated
trust, banking and investment professionals, as well as legal counsel and
advisors.
Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and
Confidential to:
The President,
TradeInvest Assest Management Ltd.,
West Building,
Lyford Manor, Lyford Cay,
P.O. Box N-7776 (Slot 193),.
New Providence, Bahamas:,
, Applications must be received by 28th January, 2005.


hurricane losses, mainly relat-
ed to insurance deductibles.
A further $669,000 in impair-
ment losses was taken from the
write-off of assets, mainly relat-
ed to its Dunkin' Donuts fran-
chise business. A $443,000
goodwill impairment was
incurred on both the Dunkin
Donuts' business and Cost Rite
store in Turks & Caicos. How-
ever, the adoption of new inter-
national accounting standards
ensured that some goodwill
amortisation of previous quar-
ters was reversed.
The Abaco Markets presi-
dent yesterday told The Tribune
that the company was expect-
ing an "improved" fourth quar-
ter for the year ending on Jan-
uary 31, 2005, compared to the
previous quarter.
However, he added that the
company "had to take some
extra redundancy and downsiz-
ing costs because our sales base
is reduced" due to the hurri-
canes.
Abaco Markets had enjoyed
an "OK" Christmas, but Mr
Thurlow said the holiday period
- which is when some retailers
generate up to 50 per cent of
annual sales was "not as good
as it could have been" due to
Christmas Day falling at the
weekend.
The company's retail formats
had enjoyed a good final week
prior to Christmas, helped by
government pay day falling on
the Tuesday and Wednesday of
that week, but early December
sales particularly the second
and third weeks of that month -
had "not lived up to expecta-
tions". This trend was experi-
enced by retailers the world
over.
Mr Thurlow told The Tribune
that the three store-strong
Dunkin Donuts franchise had
never made money since Abaco
Markets bought it for around
$300,000 in early 2002. As a
result, the company's Board had
taken a decision to sell or dis-
continue the business, which
employs 40-45 staff.
Abaco Markets' core food
distribution business account-
ed for just under 90 per cent of
the group's sales through its
Solomon's SuperCentre and
Cost Rite formats, with the
franchise division Domino's
Pizza, Dairy Queen and


Markets pay them $1.4 million
on December 31, 2004, to give
effect to the agreement and
wipe out the dividend arrears.
The payment also includes a 4
' per cent rollover fee.
The $7.9 million in principal
will be redeemed by annual $2
million payments on December
31, 2006, through to 2008, with
the remaining $1.9 million to be
paid on December 31,2009.
David Thurlow, Abaco Mar-
kets president, said the debt
restructuring removed "a major
uncertainty and distraction" and
would help the company to con-


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


TENDER FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A STORAGE
FACILITY AT THE SOUTH ANDROS POWER STATION,
ANDROS ISLAND, BAHAMAS

TENDER NO. 577/05


The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders
for the construction of 31' x 15' wooden structure with concrete floor and
shed roof storage facility at the South Andros Power Station compound on
the Corporation's premises on the island of Andros.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting: -

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 27 January, 2005 by 4:00 pm
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 577/05

"CONSTRUCTION OF SOUTH ANDROS STORAGE FACILITY"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject
any or all respondees.


Dunkin' Donuts generated the
remainder.
Domino's Pizza was the
major franchise, While Dairy
Queen was "self-supporting",
but consumer tastes in the
Bahamas meant that the US
Dunkin' Donuts model, which
generated 80 per cent of rev-
enues and most of the profits
from coffee-drinking customers,
did not work here.
Coffee was not that popular
with Bahamians, Mr Thurlow
said, and most Dunkin' Donuts
customers were more interested
in its donuts. This forced Abaco
Markets to manufacture donuts
in the Bahamas, giving the busi-
ness high overheads and fixed
costs, and the chain's limited
three-store size meant it was
unable to generate the sales vol-
ume to cover these costs.
Mr Thurlow explained that
the previous Abaco Markets
management team had planned
to expand Dunkin Donuts to
an eight-strong franchise, but
the business first required heavy
capital expenditure to upgrade
the stores and refurbish their
image.
However, the subsequent
decision to focus on Abaco
Markets' core food distribution
had meant that Dunkin' Donuts
never received the expenditure
on its Bay Street, Mackey Street
and East Street South sites that
was required.
Due to the high costs, non-


centrate on its core operations,
even though the settlement
increases dividend payments by
$170,000 in 2005 and again in
subsequent years. .
The Tribune also understands
that the interest rate attached
to the debt will increase every
year, rising to 9 per cent in'
20006 and hitting 10 per cent in
the final year.
Mr Thurlow told The Tribune
that it had been vital to secure
an agreement with preference
shareholders before the Febru-
ary 8 maturity date, as this
would have put the negotiation
on "a much different footing".
He added that Abaco Mar-
kets still had the ability to repay
the $7.9 million debt "with
three months notice", and said:
"We still have the ability to
repay it If we can refinance


profitability and high capital
expenditure required, Mr Thur-
low said Abaco Markets had
decided to divest and concen-
trate in investing instead in its
main formats.
He added: "It's only now
we're focusing on it. Whether
we find a buyer is conjecture at
the moment."
Mr Thurlow admitted that
Abaco Markets had failed to
revitalise its Turks & Caicos
operations, which continued to
post operating losses and were
temporarily closed in fiscal 2003
to convert them from a whole-
sale grocer to the Cost Rite for-
mat.
He added: "We haven't by
any means turned it around. It's
probably our last remaining
business issue. We have contin-
ued to invest in it over the last
six months. We're still working
on that one."
Hurricane Frances' destruc-
tion of the roof at Solomon's
SuperCentre's Cedar Street
store in Freeport meant that
Abaco Markets had lost some
50 per cent of the selling space it
enjoyed in Grand Bahama. This
was chiefly responsible for the
$15 million projected sales
shortfall for this fiscal year and
next.
Mr Thurlow said that apart
from the loss of selling space,
the hurricanes had also disrupt-
ed sales at Abaco Markets'
Domino's Pizza and Thompson,
-1 1. .'' ..l~ ; :1 ,, -- .1 9pips- .e.A < -.,


with the Royal Bank or another
bank, we may be able to pre-
pay it and reduce our,debt
costs."
The preference share settle-
ment, Mr Thurlow said, would
have no impact on the compa-
ny's overall debt or position
with the Royal Bank.
He added that Abaco Mar-
kets was "substantially ahead"
of its debt reduction targets
agreed with the Royal Bank,
and was set to be $3.5 million
ahead by the time the year-end
closed this January.'
"We're in a lot better shape
than we were two years ago,"
Mr Thurlow said.
Gavin Watchorn, Abaco
Markets' chief financial officer,
said that since 2003 the compa-
ny had halved. its total debt
from just under $27 million to


Wholesale outlets in Freeport
both during and in the storm
aftermath. With many hotels
and restaurants still closed or
just partially open, Thompson
Wholesale's business is still
affected, although both it and
Domino's are now open.
Gavin Watchorn, Abaco
Markets' chief financial officer,
said the food distribution divi-
sion's sales for the current fiscal
year would be reduced from a
projected $105 million to $90
million. The company's total
sales, which include the fran-
chise division, would be reduced
from $112 million to about $97
million.
Solomon's SuperCentre was
operating from the former
Grand Bahama Windows
Building until its Cedar Street
location was rebuilt, Mr Thur-
low said, although he was
"pleased with the results". That
location had been earmarked
for Thompson Wholesale, but
that format was continuing to
* operate from its existing base..
The Grand Bahama Win-
dows Building was less than half
the size of Solomon's 50,000 sq
ft Cedar Street location, stand-
ing at "a little less than 20,000 sq
feet". Although food sales were
unaffected, Abaco Markets had
lost selling space for its general
merchandise products, which
were higher margin.
Mr Thurlow said the Cedar
Street location would be rebuilt
in way thai would make it supe-
rior to the original store, but it
was unlikely, to re-open until
June 2006. Construction work
was set to start on the roof
replacement within 60 days.
The company had also re-
hired some of the 100 I"orkers it
made redundant in the hurri-
cane's wake, bringing the staff
complement back up to about
90-100 of the original 150.
Abaco Markets has ,already
received $2.75 million on insur-
ance claims it had submitted to
date in relation to hurricane
damage, and estimated that
total claims, including business
interruption coverage, will be
around $5 million.
The business interruption
coverage has an indemnity peri-
od of 18 months and insurance
recoveries will support its
Freeport operations until Feb-
ruary 2006.


less than $13 million.
Mr Thurlow said: "The strat-
egy now is to generate
improved operating cash flow
and at the same time reduce the
capital expenditure to under $2
million in 2005."
Some $4 million had been
spent on investments in the
company's stores during the
past fiscal year, with upgrades
improving productivity and
expense controls.
Mr Thurlow said the compa-
ny's focus in 2005 and 2006
would be on managing Abaco
Markets' business and growing
it, with 2004 having been a year
when technology and people
were put in place to create an
infrastructure. Cost controls and
inventory shrinkage were two
other issues Abaco Markets was
still grappling with.


THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES
School of Continuing Studies
NASSAU, BAHAMAS



For the academic year 2005-2006, The School of Continuing Studies in Nassau, Bahamas will
be offering the following face-to-face courses at The Bahamas Tourism Training Centre on
Thompson Boulevard.

AVAILABLE PROGRAMMES

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN ADMINISTRATIVE
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT

CERTIFICATE IN LABOUR STUDIES

1. Applications are invited from persons who wish to pursue the above Programmes.

2. Application forms and information on matters related to courses, fees,
matriculation requirements, etc; may be obtained from:

University of The West Indies, School of Continuing Studies, Bahamas
Tourism Training Centre, Thompson Blvd., Nassau.
Tel: (242) 323-6593, Fax: (242) 328-0622

3. Completed application forms should be returned to the Resident Tutor at the
School of Continuing Studies by February 7th, 2005.

4. Applicants are required to pay a non-refundable application fee of $10.00.

5. Classes will begin in September 2005.


Please note that the offering of any of the above programmes/courses is
subject to the availability of adequate numbers of qualified applicants.


:Dea[, ("From, p~ :1~agq- 1


I BUSINESS I






THURSDAY, JANUARY20, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


Land (From page 1B)


ing the negative impact on gov-
ernment revenue, need to be
considered before restrictions
could be placed on the ability of
foreigners to purchase land in
the Bahamas.
Implementing a strategy to
support Bahamian land owner-
ship, as suggested by the Cen-
tral Bank governor, could also
have a devastating impact on
Bahamians who are hopeful of
making a profit from the sale
of land: "If you are restricting
the amount of buyers on a prop-
erty then its hard for the price
to increase. When you restrict
buyers you restrict the market, -
so you need a free flowing mar- a
ket of buyers and sellers. I I i
understand that you have to do e ] j
your best to protect Bahami- M
ans, but at what cost?" Mapi
While the need to safeguard
Bahamians is understandable
and admittedly many Bahami-
ans have been out priced in cer-
tain areas, he said the situation -
created by a strong foreign mar-
ket that drives the price of real
estate up, is not unique to the -S
Bahamas and comes down to a Ha ;
question of supply and demand.
Barbados also has similar issues
with its real estate, but with rel-
atively low crime levels locals 1
are moving outside the city lim- 10 L -W
its where cheaper land is avail-. a a ..I
able.
Restricting the sale of land to
the local economy, will mean
that Bahamian sellers can only
access what the local popula- Julian Francis, governor of the
tion is willing to pay, which Central Bank of the Bahamas
could drastically drive down the
price of real estate.
One solution to the problem
of escalating real estate prices, it
was suggested, is to encourage
relocation to the Family Islands TO advertise in
where land is still available at an
inexpensive rate. To get The Tri une
Bahamians to move to the Fam-
ily Islands in large numbers call 322-1986
however, will require strong
development and the placement
of infrastructure in the islands.

Tourism (From page 2B)
He noted also that while a number of private sites, such as Expe-
dia, Orbitz and Travelocity, focus only on selling a vacation to
the Bahamas, Bahamas.com puts forward an intimate picture of the
Bahamas. Entrepreneurial ventures, such as straw vendors are
showcased, as well as smaller hotels and unique tours and other
aspects of the Bahamas unlikely to be found on any other travel site.
The Internet connection, one of the cheapest ways to communicate
globally, creates a level playing field for smaller Bahamian com-,
panies and hoteliers that either have a limited budget or none at all.
Looking forward, it is expected that shortly, a wide variety of
items will be available for purchase by visitors to the Bahamas.com
website.

Resort (From page 1B)


Department of Social Services,
and Mr Wilchcombe urged the
remainder to do so also.
He added that a weekend
meeting with Sir Albert Miller,
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority's co-chairman, had
produced a commitment to re-
located the straw vendors cur-
rently based behind the Royal
Oasis in Goombay Park.
Driftwood acquired the Roy-
al Oasis for $25 million in May
2000, but the resort has contin-
ued to prove a troubled prop-
erty. Its ultimate financial
backer and owner is Lehman
Brothers' private equity arm,
which is understood to own a
substantial stake in Driftwood.
Donald Glass, the Royal
Oasis' head of public relations,
admitted it was a "possibility"
that the hotel's re-opening
would be pushed back beyond
the previous April 1,2005, date.
This was due to a dispute
between the hotel and Balfour
Beatty, the construction com-
pany hired by its insurance com-
pany.
Several tourism industry
sources have suggested that'
Lehman Brothers and Drift-
wood could use the damage
inflicted by Hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne as an excuse to exit
their failing investment, leaving
the Royal Oasis employees fac-
ing an uncertain future.
Pat Bain, the hotel union's
president, has been among
those urging Lehman Brothers
to sell, claiming that just "slight
movement" was being made in

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paying back the monies owed
to employees.
He added that "the next
viable option" for the workers
may soon have to be assessed,
as they had not been made
redundant and were waiting for
the Royal Oasis to re-open. As
a result, they had received no
severance pay.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROBEN ETIENNE, NORTH
PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CAMERAGE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th day of December,
2004. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)


Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.

HIGGS & JOHNSON
P.O. Box N-3247
Sandringham House,
No. 83 Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Executor


GN-151

Ministry of

STransport & Aviation


Post Office Department

Request for Proposal

BAHAMAS POST OFFICE COUNTER SERVICES
AUTOMATION INITIATIVE
OBJECTIVE:
The Ministry of Transport and Aviation and the General Post Office is inviting proposals
from interested and suitably qualified vendors for the development and procurement
of a solution to fully automate the counter services at the General Post Office and
Sub-Post Offices in New Providence and Grand Bahama.
Interested vendors are to collect a copy of the official Request For Proposal from
the Ministry of Finance, 2nd Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach,
Nassau, Bahamas.
SUBMISSION DETAILS:
Proposals should be delivered to the reception desk, 3rd Floor Cecil Wallace-Whitfield
Centre, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas on or before Friday 4th February 2005
before 4:30 pm.
Submissions should be delivered in a sealed envelope addressed to:
Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Labeled: RFP BAHAMAS POST OFFICES COUNTER
SERVICES AUTOMATION INITIATIVE
Only those submissions that are labeled properly and delivered on time would be
accepted and opened at the Tender Board.
Submissions would be opened at 10:00 am on Tuesday 8th February 2005 at the
Tenders Board meeting, 3rd Floor Ministry of Finance, Cable Beach, Nassau,
Bahamas.
The Government reserves the right to reject any or all tenders/proposals.


BUSINESS


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLY JOSEPH OF #150,
FAWCETT LANE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why.
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20TH day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister,
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box F-41085,'
Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MR ROSLYA FRANCOIS, HEPBURN
TOWN, P.O. BOX F-43241, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of JANUARY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ISMANIE FRANCOIS OF HEPBURN
TOWN, P.O. BOX FOX F-43241, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of JANUARY,
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



LEGAL SECRETARY

A commercial law chambers invites applications for the
position of Legal Secretary for a corporate and commercial
attorney.

Qualifications:
Bachelors or Associate of Arts Degree in
Secretarial/Administrative Studies, or equivalent
professional qualificationss.
Five (5) years secretarial/administrative experience in
a law firm or financial institution.

Skills and Personal Qualities:

Superior knowledge and experience of MS Word, MS
Outlook, MS Excel and MS PowerPoint.
Knowledge of conveyancing, mortgages, company
formation and administration, commercial transactions
and anti-money laundering and coihpliatce legislation
and regulations.
Effective leadership, interpersonal, and communication
skills.
Strong time-management and organizational skills.
High initiative and motivation.
Team player.

Benefits:

Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications, group medical and life insurance, and
excellent vacation package.
Interested persons should apply no later than Friday, 28th
January, 2005 to:
Law Chambers
P.O. Box CB-11173
Nassau, The Bahamas
email: LegalSecretary_@msn.com




NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE
KATE CLAUDE late of the Settlement
of Pinder' s Point on the Island of Grand
Bahama one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas

deceased.


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the above
Estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the Undersigned on or
before the 21st day of February, 2005, after
which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the
claims of which she shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


Corporate donations to relief

p to lie


effort generates owi
By KIMBERLY BLANTON assist tsunami victims: Players it much more a human appeal," cy's plans for assistance in
.2MS The Boston Globe on its website could volunteer to said Kevin Aronin,. PlasmaN- Southeast Asia, said Janet Van
Turn over their winnings to help et's founder, who was moved Zandt, Oxfam's director of insti-
PlasmaNet Inc., which oper- Oxfam rebuild a village in Sri by the devastation in Sri Lanka, tutional fund-raising.
rates an online lotto game played Lanka, where a plaque would where his secretary is from. The worst natural disaster in
by millions worldwide, honor them. Oxfam politely declined the decades created a tsunami of its
approached Oxfam America in "If you personalize it and say, proposal, which didn't mesh own in the relief world, over-
Boston with a unique concept to 'Let's save one village,' it makes with the international aid agen- whelming agencies with dona-


GN-154


MINISTRY OF
TRANSPORTATION

NOTICE

PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A
SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application
has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in
respect of the ship "GAIDA" Official
Number 8000902 Gross Tonnage 25803
Register Tonnage 11222 owned by Akrotiri
Shipping Co. Ltd. with its principal place
of business at 80 Broad Street, Monrovia,
Liberia for permission to change her name
to "KAMPOS" registered at the port of
Nassau in the said new name as owned
by AkrotiriShippn God. L

Any objection to the proposed
change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O.Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within
seven days from the appearance of this
notice.

Dated at Nassau this 11th Day of
January, 2005.

J. Mervyn Jones
Director of Maritime Affairs

The Director of Maritime Affairs for
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application
has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in
respect of the ship "AKROTIRI" Official
Number 8000902 Gross Tonnage 25803
Register Tonnage 11222 owned by Akrotiri
Shipping Co. Ltd. with its principal place
of business at 80 Broad Street, Monrovia,
Liberia for permission to change her name
to "GAIDA" registered at the port of Nassau
in the said new name as owned by Akrotiri
Shippng Co. Ltd.

Any objection to the proposed
change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O.Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.R The Bahamas within
seven days from the appearance of this
notice.

Dated at Nassau this 11th Day of
January, 2005.

J. Mervyn Jones
Director of Maritime Affairs

The Director of Maritime Affairs for
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application
has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in
respect of the ship "LINNET ARROW"


Official Number 8000761 Gross Tonnage
19653 Register Tonnage 9356 owned by
Gearbulk Shipowning Limited with its
principal place of business at Par La Ville
Place, 14 Par La Ville Road, Hamilton
HMJX, Bermuda for permission to change
her name to "PALUA PEARL" registered
at the port of Nassau in the said new name
as owned by Gearbulk Shipowning Limited.

Any objection to the proposed
change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O.Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within
seven days from the appearance of this
notice.

Dated at Nassau this 11th Day of
January, 2005.

J. Mervyn Jones
Director of Maritime Affairs

The Director of Maritime Affairs for
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application
has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in
respect of the ship "THE LYNX" Official
Number 8000675 Gross Tonnage 6581
Register Tonnage 2514 owned by High
Speed Catamarans B.V. with ,it principal
place of business at Sch.bij Nacht_
Doormanweg 43, P.RO.Box 806, Curacao,
Netherlands Antilles for permission to
change her name to "NORMANDIE
EXPRESS" registered at the port of Nassau
in the said new name as owned by High
Speed Catamarans B.V.

Any objection to the proposed
change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O.Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within
seven days from the appearance of this
notice.

Dated at Nassau this 11th Day of
January, 2005.

J. Mervyn Jones
Director of Maritime Affairs

The Director of Maritime Affairs for
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application
has been received under Section 42 of the
Merchant Shipping Act, Chapter 268 in
respect of the ship "HOEGH MERIT"
Official Number 716006 Gross Tonnage
30987 Register Tonnage 14142 owned by
Merit Shipping Ltd. with its principal place
of business at R.R.E. Commercial Center,
Delap Wing, Suite 200, Mujuro, Marshall
Islands MH 96960 for permission to change
her name to "SAGA MERIT" registered at
the port of Nassau in the said new name
as owned by Merit Shipping Ltd.

Any objection to the proposed
change of name must be sent to the
Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O.Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within
seven days from the appearance of this
notice.

Dated at Nassau this 11th Day of
January, 2005.

J. Mervyn Jones
Director of Maritime Affairs


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Temple Christian High School
Where Excellent Learning Takes Place


ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Grades 7-10


Entrance Exam for students wishing
to enter Grades 7 10 for
September, 2005 is
scheduled for
Saturday, February 12th, 2005
9:00 am to 12:00 noon.

Registration deadline is
Friday 28th, January.
Students may register at
Temple Christian High School
9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

Students must bring with them the
following:
Pen Pencil Geometry set
First two pages of their Passport.

"Teach Me, 0 Lord, Thy Way"
Psalm 119:33


1!
i


tions and requests for corporate
tie-ins. "We were beginning to
think through" a strategy for
corporate giving "when it actu-
ally descended upon us," Van
Zandt said, looking over a list of
companies, including Daimler-
Chrysler and Levi Strauss, that
gave a total of $2.5 million to
Oxfam earmarked for tsunami
relief. Oxfam and PlasmaNet
are discussing ways the firm
might also give.
Tsunami relief efforts are
expected to generate-$750 mil-
lion in cash and gifts such as
medieines-from-US corpora-
tions, topping their donations
in the wake of the Sept. 11,2001
terrorist attacks, according to
the Contributions Academy,
which tracks corporate philan-
thropy. The total doesn't
include millions raised in a star-
studded concert Saturday on
NBC, featuring Madonna, John
Mayer, and others.
Apple Computer Inc., Gap
Inc., Starbucks Corp., The Mon-
santo Corp., Target Corp., Wal-
Mart Stores Inc., Whole Foods
Market, and 7-Eleven Inc. are
among dozens of corporations
advertising donations on their
websites or in press releases,
asking customers to give, or
dedicating a portion of sales to
the victims. This so-called
"cause branding" is an attempt
to associate the company's
brand, and its image, with a
worthy cause.
Giving to a disaster that
claimed at least 162,000 lives,
many of them children, is a
compelling cause, regardless of
one's religion or political beliefs,
said Dwight Burlingame, asso-
ciate executive director of The
Center on Philanthropy at Indi-
ana University. The tsunami "is
a great opportunity" for com-
panies "to be seen as a positive
contributor to something that
isn't going to alienate any of
their potential customers," he
said.
Some agencies are. over-
whelmed by the outpouring of
corporate, support. Doctors
Without Borders, which pro-
yides emergency medical care,.
shut its door on tsunami-target-!
ed giving because aid workers in
the field felt they had raised all
they could use. The agency
adopted a strict policy to guide
corporate gifts, and it recently
cut ties with an airline donor
that wanted it to do more mar-
keting on the airline's behalf,
said Patricia Surak, director of
foundation and corporate rela-
tions. "Our name should rep-
resent the reputable work we
do on the ground and not the
corporate sponsors that we
have," she said.
Companies know cause mar-
keting works: Ninety-one per-
cent of respondents said they
have a more positive image of
companies that support a cause,
according to a 2004 survey by
Boston consultant Cone Inc.
On its website, Starbucks
Corp. offers to donate $2 for


ami
each pound of Sumatran coffee
bought by customers. Sumatra,
in Indonesia, was directly hit by
the earthquake and tsunami.
"I'm a cynic when it comes to
corporate America," said Katie
Block, as she bought two cups
of Starbucks coffee downtown,
for herself and a worker at
Miller-Block Gallery. Howev-
er, she was willing to make an
extra effort to go to Starbucks
for Sumatran coffee, rather than
Star Market. The promotion
"does give me a warm feeling."
Debate over whether Star-
biicks is doing enough rages on
one website, "Starbucks Gos-
sip." "Wow! $2 from their $10
retail," one anonymous com-
menter remarked. Another one,
defending Starbucks, said, "It
will bring incremental business
to Sumatran farmers, which will
drive up the price for Sumatran
coffee. That will help the
locals." The company's similar
position is greater awareness
will, over time, help coffee
farmers.
Most multinational US cor-
porations have annual budgets
devoted to aid and are increas-
ingly sophisticated about giv-
ing, spreading money in coun-
tries where they sell products,
employ people or own manu-
facturing facilities. New York
philanthropy consultant Chang-
ing Our World prepared a 37-
page list of company donations
to tsunami relief, from Abbott
Laboratories to Xerox Corp.
Pfizer Inc. and Merck & Co.
Inc. rank among the largest
tsunami donors, at a time the
pharmaceutical industry has
been barraged by negative pub-
licity over drug safety. Merck,
which recalled its arthritis drug
Vioxx last fall over concerns it
may lead to heart attacks, is giv-
ing $10 million in cash and in-
kind donations, such as medi-
cines. Pfizer employees in Thai-
land mobilized hours after the
tsunami, contacting medical
agencies and hospitals to deter-
mine what drugs were needed
and where. Pfizer's $35 million
contribution of cash and medi-.
cines far exceeds donations. -
"Do companies maybe getwla
halo effect because they've been
a good corporate citizen? Prob-
ably," said Paula Luff, senior
director of international phil-
anthropy. The primary reason
for donating, she said, is "the
world has changed. Employees,
investors and their management
have an expectation that com-
panies will play an economic
and social role in society and
supporting efforts such as tsuna-
mi relief or ongoing relief."
Some aid agencies raised as
much, within days after the
tsunami, as they typically col-
lect in a full year. They are con-
cerned this surge in giving will
drain funds for long-term relief
in Southeast Asia or for less
popular disasters, such as the
millions displaced by armed
conflict in Northern Uganda or
the Sudan in Africa.






THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 20, 2005

1 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

$ WPBT cobb sal- Minn.; Babe Ruth watch; auto- can Frontiers the Concorde for supersonic pas-
ad. (CC) graphed Marilyn Monroe photos. Surgery. singer flight. ) (CC) (DVS)
The Insider (N) Wickedly Perfect Perfection in the CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace The team search-
t WFOR A (CC) Woods... A High-End Camping Ex- 'Swap Meet" r (PA) (CC) (DVS) es for a missing man who believes
perience" (N) (A(CC) aliens abducted him. t)
Access Holly- Joey Joey inter- The Apprentice Whopper 101' (Season Premiere) (9:59) ER 'Only Connect" Two
* WTVJ wood (N) (CC) views personal The new candidates amve; the contestants battle it out teenagers are brought into the ER
assistants. (N) in the fast-food business. (N) n (CC) with gunshot wounds. (N) 9
Deco Drive The O.C. Marissa, Summer and Point Pleasant "Human Nature" News (CC)
WSVN Undsay have a girs night out, while The town prepares for its annual
Ryan, Seth and Zach bond. boat parade. (N) (CC)
Jeopardyl (N) life as we know it Sue and Ben Saving Kids Like Me St. Jude's PrimeTime Live Efforts to utilize
* WPLG (CC) come up with a scheme to be to- Children's Research Hospital's life- technology for security purposes.
gether on the class ski trip. (N) saving mission. (N) (CC)

(:00) American Cold Case Files "Friend of the Famr y; Remains of Murder & Under a The First 48 Police rhut for a van
A&E Justice 'Mar- Spell; Justice" An 11-year-old girl's killer is brought to justice thanks to his seen leaving the scenee of a brutal
nage & Murder' ex-girifriend. (CC) murder in Miarr,. (1i)(CC)
Hardtalk BBC World Talking Movies BBC World Kill or Cure? BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News News News
BET BET Style The Parkers n Girlfriends l Soul Food 11 (CC) Club Comic View
B Ti (CC). (CC)
CBC :00) Life & Opening Night Montreal International Jazz Festival; Sarah Clark, the first The National (CC)
mes (N) (CC) Canadian to study at the Bolshoi Ballet School. (N) (CC)
Late Night With Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. Dennis Miller Lawrence O'Donnell, Dennis Miller John Rhys-Davies.
CNBC Conan O'Brien (N) (N)
S (00) George W. Bush: The Road Ahead Paula Zahn Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN and Anderson Cooper. (Live) (CC)
Mad TV Louis Farrakhan and Reno 911! Profil- Crank Yankers South Park Drawn Together Shortles
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'Mad About Jew. '/ (CC) tion. (CC) hunt Bigfoot. dance drops off. ies (CC)
COURT Cops l (CC) The Investigators Defense attorney Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators Scout leader
COURT on trial for his wife's death. (N) dence linked to triple murder.
That's So Raven **s MY DATE WITH THE PRESIDENT'S DAUGHTER (1998, Come- Lizzie McGuire Sister, Sister
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El Scenes (N) n(CC)
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ESPNI (:00) Tennis Australian Open -- Early Round -- Day 5. From Melbourne, Australia. (Live)
Dally Mass: Our Life on the Rock (Live) Back Stage. The Holy Rosary Does Church St. Catherine of
EWTN Lady Still Teach Sienna
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FIT TV (CC) Dad; Secret Service" '3 n n mance Lab" Muscle research.
FOX-NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL Totally Football Championship Poker at the Plaza Best Damn Sports Show Period I, Max College Basket-
FSNFLFrom Las Vegas. (N) (Live) (CC) ball
Champions Tour Preview: 2005 Atlantic City Commemorative Highlights 1th Anniver- PGA Seniors
L (N) sar Special Championship
GSN (o00) Weakest Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ( American Dream Derby Vocalist Dog Eat Dog t (CC)
GSN Ink 1(CC) (CC) LeAnn Rimes helps the players.
G4Tech 00) The Screen X Play Cheat Filter Judgment Day Icons Cinematech
W~iech savers
(:00) Walker, Touched by an Angel Monica fights **s PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE DEFIANT DAUGHTER
HALL Texas Ranger to save a runaway being corrupted (1990, Mystery) Raymond Burr, Robert Vaughn, Robert Culp. Mason
"Payback" (CC) by life on the street. n helps a girl's father fight a false murder charge.
Dream House Holmes on Homes 'Two Steps Real Renos Weekend War- Mission: Organi- Hot Property
HGTV Foundation poses Back" A (CC) "Holding Up the riors zation Cluttered "Nottingham" ,
challenges. House" A (CC) apartment. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerlllo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Inspirational :
INS (CC) ...- 1... (CC) day .. Programinllgt
Yu-GI-Ohl "Mime Sabrina, the NBA Basketball Los Angeles Clippers a Dallas Mavericks. From American Airlines Center
KTLA. Control" (CC) Teenage Witch in Dallas (Live) A '
Sabrina tells all.
*x DIRTY LITTLE SECRET (1998, Drama) Tracey WALL OF SECRETS (2003, Suspense) Nicole Eggert, Dean McDermott.
LIFE Gold, Jack Wagner/A kidnapping leads to the revela- A woman's neighbor dies under mystenous circumstances. (CC)
tion of a disturbing truth. (CC)(DVS)
MSNBC :00) Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Hardball (CC) Scarborough Country
MS C Vcc mann
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NICK Parents h (CC) SquarePants t) head" ,l (CC) skips school. (CC) Bel-Air Show (CC)
NIV (:'00) Will & Complete Sav- The Apprentice The new candidates arrive; the con- News 1 (CC) News
I Grace 1) (CC) ages ,) (CC) testants battle it out in the fast-food business.
Dakar Rally: Hunting 201 Buckmasters The World of Guide To The Snowboarding USSA Grand Prix
OLN Team USA Beretta Outdoors Half-Pipe. From Bachelor, Ore.
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Everybody Friends Imagin- Friends Imagin- **s YOU'VE GOT MAIL (1998, Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Park-
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TLC Teenager's Bed- hard's championship racer is re- Nova with after-market parts.
room" (CC) built.
(:00) Law & Or- NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Orlando Magic. From the TD Waterhouse Centre in NBA Bakelball:
TNT der Mad Dog" Orlando, Fla. (Live) (CC) Cavalers at
An(CC) Kings
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(:00) La Mujer Rubi Amor Real Aquly Ahora
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(:00) Medical In- Law & Order: Special victims Unit **u MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE (1996, Adventure) Tom CnrUise, Jon
USA vestlgation "Baby Killer' A 7-year-old boy fatally Voight, Emmanuelle Beart. A botched mission puts a spy on the run from
'Tribe n (CC) shoots a schoolmate, his employers. (CC)
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S '90s:PartDeux n (N):C (N) C
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WGN ment 'Birth of a Schwarzenegger, Sandahl Bergman. A sword-swinging heroine sets out
Hot Rod" (CC) to depose an evil queen. (CC)
Everybody **'s BRING IT ON (2000, Comedy) Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku, Jesse WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond Bradford. High-school cheerleaders vie for a coveted national title. Tong, Jim Watldns, Sal Marchlano
Debra's sister. (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
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HBO-E SEABISCUIT dy) Ben Stiller. A jilted newlywed finds solace with an- nifer ponders
(2003) 'PG-13' other woman, 'PG-13'(CC) selling her eggs.
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HBO-W lead a racehorse to glory in the 1930s. nl 'PG-13' (CC)
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T C (1978, Tla rebe aithe'R 2002, Comedy) Johnny Knoxville,


CeLRNIILIR er

Certified Member


Tel: 9 6 63


Stre25. WOOD

46 Madeira Street





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


AP GE 10B THURSDAYJANUARY 20, 2005


I


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

JUNIOR sprinting sensation T'Shon-
da Webb has her eye set on two col-
leges so far, and she is hoping to add
more to the list throughout the track
and field season.
The current season saw Webb com-
pete for the first time in the under 20
women's division at the Odd Distance
meet.
She competed in the 60m, 150m and
the 300m, which she won in times of
7.62 seconds, 18.22 seconds and 40.39
seconds respectively.
Webb, an eleventh grader at the RM
Bailey high school, was expected to
graduate this 2005 year, but opted to
stay behind a year to increase her
scholarship chances.
So far Webb has been offered full
scholarship to the University of
Nebraska and Pennsylvania State.
However, Webb is "gunning"
towards Louisiana State University
(LSU), stating that she was impressed
with their sprinting coaches, athletes
and times.
She said: "I have a least two schol-
arship offers so far, but I am more
interested in attending LSU.

Applied
"I am not going to put everything in
LSU because I haven't applied to go
there as yet and the other two schools
are up in the ranks as well.
"In order for me to go to a school
like LSU I will have to produce faster
times, times I am capable of running. I
am not forgetting the academic part, I
will have to get a high score ,on my
SAT's." '
Webb was the only double medallist
at last year's Carifta games, taking
bronze in the 100m and 200m in times
of 12.17 and 24.64 seconds, respec-
tively.
This will be Webb's first year com-
peting in the under 20 division at the
games, but she is not worried.
"I am training hard so I am, looking
forward to some fast times this year,"
said Webb, who has set several goals
for herself.
"Training has been coming along
great and I'm more focused than I
was last year. I am on this meal plan
and so far eating the correct meals and
types of food has paid off tremen-
dously.
"I am hoping to run around 11.60 in
the 100m and low 23's in the 200m. I
know a lot of people say that you're


not suppose to set time goals, but I
usually set them as a target."
Webb claim that she wasn't in the
best shape of her life last year and
the goal of winning two gold medals at
the games was destroyed because of
it.
But, with her determination and
hard work, Webb is expecting to peak

"I am training hard
so I am looking
forward to some fast
times this year.
Training has been
coming along great
and I'm more
focused than I was
last year. I am on this
meal plan and so far
eating the correct
meals and types of
food has paid off
tremendously."

at the games and again at the Pan
American junior championships.'
She is hoping to be one of the junior
athletes that will be considered to rep-
resent the Bahamas at this year's Cen-
tral American and Caribbean (CAC)
games.
Webb added: "Last year I wasn't in
the best shape of my life, but I was
able to win two medals at the Carifta
games.
"No one recognized what I did
because they placed all of their atten-
tion on other athletes who weren't as
successful.
"I didn't let that bother me though,
I am not running for the public's
recognition, I enjoy track and field and
it only inspired me to push harder.
"I am under the impression that if
you allow the little things such as this
to bother you then your performance
level will drop, you should let these
things motivate you.
"When they see me again I am sure I
will be closer to my times set. I am
looking forward to bringing back golds
for the Bahamas in the Carifta games,
nothing less and to have a shot at the
CAC team."


Bahamas Rugby
Football Union,
15-a-Side Week 8
Schedule & Tables


Baillou Finally Break Cuckoos
Unbeaten Run

A large crowd last Saturday witnessed some
of the most exciting rugby seen at Winton
in quite a while. In the men's game,
Cuckoos lost their unbeaten record to a
strong Baillou side which is looking to
dominate the play-offs after the worst start
to the season that most of their players can
remember. For Cuckoos it was a harsh
knock to lose out in their final game of the
regular season and the result has fortified
their resolve going into the play-offs on
February 12th. The other three places, are
still, mathematically at least, undecided
with each team capable of finishing second
so Saturday's match between Baillou and
Freeport will be-of great interest to everyone
in Bahamas Rugby.


Nassau Youth Overcome
Technically Strong Florida Side

The 18 & under boys game was the
undoubted highlight of the day with a
Nassau Select XV playing its first ever
game against a well coached and more
experienced Florida side. Despite end
to end rugby, there was no score after'
30 minutes with both teams
demonstrating their defensive abilities.
However' the superior pace and
breathtaking tackling of the Nassau Boys
xwon out in the end, though both teams
share the honours for an inspirational
match after which they left the field
bloodied and exhausted. All who saw
the game agreed that it was one of the
greats and it bodes well for the sport.


Floridians Triumph over Cuckoos in First ever Ladies Game
Not to be outdone, the ladies played their part in this historical day and put the sport
of women's rugby on the map. The tackling and pace was every bit as dedicated as
in the boys' game, though this time the Port St. Lucie girls took the honours with
two good second half tries. Every player on the field won the respect and admiration
of the crowd who gave them a standing ovation at the end of the hard fought 7s
match.


Stella Artois League
Youth International
Youth Ladies 7s


Jan. 15th Results
Baillou 15 10 Cuckoos
Nassau Select XV 10 5 Port St. Lucie (Florida)
Cuckoos Ladies 5 15 Port St. Lucie Ladies
Tables


Stella Artois League SCORE
Pid W D L F A Pts
1 Cuckoos 6 5 0 1 110 46 15
2 Baillou 5 2 0 3 91 81 6
3 Buccaneers 5 2 0 3 72 105 6
4 Freeport 4 1 0 3 41 82 3
Stella Artois League
Baillou Buccaneers Cuckoos Freeport
Baillou X 20-21 10-20
Buccaneers 13-41 X- 11-13
Cuckoos 10-15 14-3 X 26-0
Freeport 17-5 17-24 7-27 X


New Providence Youth SCORE
League Pld W D L F A Pts
1 Buccaneers 5 2 1 2 95 105 7
2 Cuckoos 4 2 1 1 70 607
3 Baillou 5 2 0 3 95 95 6
New Providence Youth League
Cuckoos Baillou Buccaneers
Baillou 0 30 X
Buccaneers 20 20 30 25
Cuckoos X 25-5 20-10
Baillou 25 25 35 10
Buccaneers


Schedule for January 22nd Both Games at Winton Rugby Centre
3pm Baillou vs Freeport
4.45pm Baillou Youth vs Cuckoos Youth


Let's make it



a team effort


T HE Bahamas Softball
Federation is going
through a reconstruction of their
men and women's national teams.
Last year, the association
announced plans for a three-year
development to get its national pro-
gramme back to the level that it
once enjoyed in the 1970s and '80s.
It's a long shot, but unless the
federation can get the cooperation
of the players, it may take longer
than anticipated.
The federation has at least three
major tournaments to participate in
over the summer, two of the
women and one for the men.
The women will kick things off
when they travel to Cartagena,
Colombia from June 24 to July 2 to
participate in the XIII Central
American and Caribbean Softball
Championships.
This will serve as a qualifier for
the XX CAC Sports Games that
will also be held in Cartagena from
July 15-30, 2006.
A month later, the men will
travel to Cartagena for the XVII
CAC Championships for men from
August 18-29.
This will serve as a qualifier for
the XX CAC Sports Games in
Cartagena from July 15-30,2006.
And from November 13-23,
the women will travel to the VI
Pan American Softball Champi-
onships in the City of Guatemala,
Guatemala.
This serves as a qualifier for the
XV Pan American Sports Games
in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from July
14-29, 2007 as well as the XI ISF
World Championships for women
in Beijing, China from August 20-
29.
If the BSF's plans come through
in three years, it will move the
Bahamas that much closer to going
to Beijing, China for the Olympic


STUB


Games in 2008.
It's a long shot, bu
can get the right play
they can put together
in each tournament,'
competition in our fir
petition on the wor
stage.
Over the years as t
continued to make i
athletics, winning n
medal since Frank
made the breakthr
men's triple jump wit
1992, there's been a
participation of the
team sports.
Even after he tray


2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece,
where Tonique Williams-Darling
emerged as the star with her gold
medal performance in the wom-
en's 400 metres, Minister of Sports
.Neville Wisdom has echoed
the sentiments of many: it's time
;YR for our team sports to emerge at
the biggest world sports spectacu-
lar.
in their regional meets, including
the CAC Championships (which
are being staged at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Stadi-
tum in June), the teams have to start
by going through the CAC and
then the Pan Am competitors.
If, within these next three years,
the BSF can survive the fierce com-
petition from our neighbours,
-- maybe we can look ahead to the
Olympics.
It might be a long shot, but when
Tommy Robinson and others set
the pace back in the 1970s, those
were the same sentiments too.
N. But look at us now.
O iI We can't go to an Olympic
Games and not expect to come out
,MMW M with a medal.
Why can't the same be said
about our teams competing for a
shot at the Olympics?
at if the BSF Softball has been on this road
yers out and before. There was a time when
a solid team both our men and women's teams
we could see were ranked in the top three in the
st team com- world.
rld's biggest If we could have done it before,
we can do it again.
:he Bahamas It might be a long shot over the
its strides in next four years. But, again, if the
medal after right athletes come out and try out
Rutherford for the team, we can give it a good
ough in the shot.
h a bronze in We have four years to go, but
call for the at least the athletes know what
Bahamas in path they have to take and how
they will get there. Now they just
yelled to the have to go out and do it.


Buaat


Sprinter T'Shonda sets her





targets for the year ahead




THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 11 B


4 -- _M_ IM __ WWANN MO 040i bno 4- 0 -0 ftsw -
4ro 0 ob40= -m aommm


Pakistan ease past
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West


"Copyrighted Material
""Syndicated Content


---


Available from Commercial News Providers"


by six wickets


TRIPCUNE SPORTS


4lb








THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005

SECTION



Fax (242) 328-2398
E-Mai: sports@100jamz.com


.' ~


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


'n-' = -..ti


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.-
'- .
~e.4

I1


DW Davis

edge nail-biter

E By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
DW Davis Pittbulls saw off the SC McPherson
Sharks in a nail biting game yesterday.
The match. which %went do"n to the wire. saw the
Pittbulls put the bile on the Sharks 29-27.
Sharks, who were the favourable team heading into
the second half held the Pittbulls to 15 points as they
went on an 8-0 run.
The run was stopped by game's top scorer Philipa
Wallace, after five minutes into the second half.
Wallace was fouled by Sharks' point guard Tanaz
Higgs and "as successful on both free throws finishing
the game with 17 points nine rebounds, three steals and
two assists.
With a last chance to tie the game and the clock
reading 7.4 seconds Sharks' inbound pass by Tenaj
Cooper was intercepted by Wallace, who tried to hold
onto the ball to burn time.
However., Sharks' NMatesha Nottage tied up the ball
forcing the referee to call a jump ball.
Pass
With the Sharks having possession and the clock
now reading 5.2 seconds, the ball was inbounded under
the basket but the pass was to tar underneath the bas-
ket for Nottage to fire off a shot.
For the Sharks. Nottage and Coopei were the lead-
ing scorers with It. points, 11 rebounds and one steal
and seven points, nine rebounds, five steals and one
block. respectively.
It was ALSO feeding time for the HO Nash Lions
junior gtrls yesterday, as they roasted the CH Reeves
Raptors.
Lions chowed down on the Raptors early in the
first half ending the periods with a 22-5 score, with the
final result 40-1S.
Top scorer in the game was Lions' Kenya Johnson,
having scored 19 points, five rebounds. three steals and
one assi-t.
Chipping in for the Lions was Deandre Cunning-
ham, who was outstanding on the board.
Cunningham brought down 14 rebounds for the
Lions, four steals.. two blocks and one assist.
For the Raptors Jakia Brown was the big scorer.
putting in nine points, eight rebounds, two steals and
two blocks, while teammate Kishnique Hamilton
chipped in with seven points, four rebounds and three
blocks.
* TOP scorer Phillipa Wallace in action yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


The Tribune


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Sharing Christ's message


By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
he message of Christ is
being shared with chil-
dren in the Woods Alley
community and sur-
rounding areas by a
team of Christians who grew up in the
area, and say that they want to see it
return to "the glory days".
'While there are many community-
rminded organizations that seek to
erase crime and vices, Police Superin-
tendent John Ferguson, believes that
sharing the name and life of Christ is
still most effective.
"That name is above all names, and
it is only by that name that one can be
saved. There is only one name given
under heaven that would make the
difference with the transformation,
and all of the other activities that are
on stream in that area are very good
and excellent and will further enhance
life in Woods Alley," he told Tribune
Religion.
Mr Ferguson, who describes him-
self as a devoted Christian, began this
effort in September 1995, and today it
is still going strong.
The Big Harvest Community Sun-
day School now has an enrollment of
more than 700 children from Woods
Alley and the surrounding areas.
;, On any given Sunday an average of
3;5 children attend the special session
to learn about Christian values.
What makes this Sunday school so
unique is that it not only brings the
community together, but it is held on
a; Sunday afternoon, a practice which
was common up until the late 1980s
but has since lost its popularity
"I may be wrong.but I am of the"
opinion that this is the only Sunday
school that still meets on a Sunday
afternoon, at 4 o'clock every Sunday,"
Mr Ferguson says.
Mr Ferguson grew up in Woods
Alley and affectionately refers to the
area as the "old homestead". The idea
to host a community Sunday school
.-came out of a need to engage the
young people of that area in positive
activities.
After moving out of Woods Alley
he still maintained relationships with
some residents in the area and
returned to the neighbourhood on a


Team of Christians spreading the word to

children in Woods Alley, surrounding areas,


* CHILDREN from the Woods Alley community are excited about receiving the message of Jesus Christ.


!regular basis to see what had devel-
oped since his last visit.
"I'll never forget, one Sunday after-
noon when I went back into the
Woods Alley community, just driving
through, I saw all of these youngsters
just (hanging) around, wasting time.
And it was like a voice spoke to my
heart and said, 'this is your harvest.
You have to do something about
this'."
After several nights "wrestling with
the voice in his heart", the Big Harvest
Community Sunday School was born.
It is geared towards young persons,
particularly underprivileged children
who are not attached to any particular


denomination, says Mr Ferguson. Chil-
dren are instructed in basic biblical
teachings, like the Ten Command-
ments and the Fruit of the Spirit.
"We want them to develop a posi-
tive and a spiritual attitude in their
everyday living, and so we train them.
Those who cannot read, we help them
to read. Those who cannot write, we
help them to write. And those who
have what you call the negative atti-
tudes, we try and correct that and
point them in the right direction," Mr
Ferguson adds.
Since the first Sunday school was
held in 1995, it has attracted many
children, who Mr Ferguson claims are


excited to attend.
This past Sunday, the teachers-had
to literally turn away the children who
braved rainy weather to attend Sunday
school in the open park.
"In all that bad weather, they were
just coming. We realized that the
weather was not in the best interest of
the children because it was raining,
but that's just how enthusiastic they
were to be there," says Mr Ferguson.
"We have youngsters who were
there from birth. Some of them are
now young teenagers. They come
from as far as Millennium Gardens,
and some of those who moved out of
the area still come back to Sunday


school, which means that we planted a
seed in them and wherever the seed
goes it's gonna grow."
Mr Ferguson feels as if the Woods
Alley Sunday School has affected the
community.
It is a "pillar" in the neighbourhood,
he adds, and a "force" in helping to rid
Woods Alley of many societal vices
that have managed to enter the com-
munity over the years.
Recalling his earlier years in that
area, Mr Ferguson says that things
were more peaceful and the commu-
nity was more close knit. It has taken
a turn since then, and anti-social
behaviour has "crept in".
However, this Sunday school is
helping to return the community to
its "glory days," when Sunday after-
noon was a time for the family and
the community to come together.
"If you knew that area, a lot of anti-
social activities used to happen, and
perhaps it's still happening, but
because of that Sunday school, so
many negative attitudes have been
curtailed and the parents are particu-
larly happy that someone, or at least
there is something that is again going
on Sunday afternoon to keep those
youngsters occupied, and not only.
occupiedLbut something where there is
spiritual guidance and sound advice
to prepare them for life," said Mr Fer-
guson.
This Sunday, beginning at 3pm, the
Big Harvest Community Sunday
School will host its 4th Annual Rally in
the Alley, when the community and
the wider public will meet at Woods
Alley for a time of praise and enter-
tainment.
The highlight this year will be the
students of the Woods Alley Com-
munity Sunday School. who will put
on a talent display, showcasing what
they have learned throughout the year.
The Bahamas Brass Band and the
Farm Road Community Band will be
marching. And other groups from the
surrounding communities have been
invited to display their talents.
For the past three years, the Big
Harvest Community Sunday School
has been giving the Conquering Lion
Award to persons who have grown up

See CHRISTIAN, 2C


Marking the first Ladies



Day of the New Year


- .4'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
THE Church of God Cathedral was
'packed on Sunday for the celebration of
the first Ladies Day of the New Year.
The women, all dressed in white and
pink, filled the Sanctuary for the special
service. On the third Sunday of each
month women members of the Cathedral
take responsibility for the service.
- The atmosphere was charged with a
-holy presence during the service conduct-
ed by Deaconess Berthame Ferguson.
Songs of praise and worship filled the air,
and there was truly a sense of the power of
God in that place.
First Lady Cynthia Johnson is the chair-
person of the Ladies Events.
The sermon "The Sermon from St
Peter's Boat" taken from Luke, Chapter 5
- was delivered by Bishop Mosses A John-
son, who continued his theme from the
previous week.
His message was very encouraging. The


bishop explained the importance of con-
.secrating oneself in order to be used by
God.
"As insignificant as one may feel or as
insignificant as one may feel about his or
her gifts, God is able to use an individual
in: a mighty way," he said.
"One must first be dedicated. The con-
secration of a boat allowed Jesus to use
that. The degree of which we reap is a
result of the degree of which we conse-
crate ourselves to God."
According to Bishop Johnson, the act of
consecration causes a child of God to be
willing to decrease "Self" and increase
"Himself".
"Consecration compels God to use us
mightily. Consecration will make us per-
mit God to plan our lives and not our-
selves.
"It will make us tell God to have His
divine way in our lives; therefore ensuring
success to the glory and honour of God."
Sanctification, he says, is what makes


the word come alive in all of his followers.
"We are mandated by God to go into
the highways and byways and seek out
lost souls.
"Consecration will help us work with
the broken souls and not throw them
aside. It forces us to labour with those
people who are torn and tattered and
worn to shreds."
He added: "We are commended by
God to pull in the whole net and not sift
through it, but welcome even the unde-
sirables. Show them the Word in our daily
lives."
The congregation was encouraged to
be "the light" in every dark situation.
"Our goal this year should be to conse-
crate our lives; our prayer this year should
be that God covers us with the Blood of
Jesus Christ so as to shield us from the
enemy," said the bishop.
A collection was taken during the ser-
vice to assist a member of the Cathedral
who had been recently robbed.


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PARE G a D J A 2 0T


Christian (From page 2C)


in Woods Alley and went on to make
a significant impact in their careers.
These are persons like Rev Leonard
Johnson, president of the Bahamas
Conference of Seventh Day Adventist,
and Bishop Simeon Hall, past presi-
dent of The Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil and pastor of New Covenant Bap-
tist Church all past honourees.
"These persons have succeeded
against all odds and have the bold-
ness of a conquering lion. When you
grow up in a place like Woods Alley,
that was once known as 'Chokeneck


Alley', the odds start off against you
because you were born in the wrong
place in the alley. And anyone who
knows what an alley is about, it's like
a dead end, nothing is supposed to
happen for you. But if you notice the
kinds of people who came out of
there, that's different," Mr Ferguson
says.
At the Rally in the Alley this year,
Mr Ferguson and his team have decid-
ed to posthumously award couples
from the Woods Alley community
who have made contributions to fam-


ily life in that area. One of the women
is still alive.
"We tend to forget those persons
who made contributions to family life,
and so many of the young people
through there, they don't have a clue
as to what use to happen through
there and they will only know that
unless we tell them. And not only tell
them, but we have to do some things
to make them remember, and that's
why we want to highlight the contri-
bution to family life," he explains.
Because the children of Woods


Alley are the ones who will build that
community in the future, Mr Ferguson
says that they must be directed in the'
correct way. They must also know
about where they have come from,
and have an understanding of God.
and a sense of pride in their area.
There are also plans to construct
the Woods Alley Youth Training Cen-
tre, which, once completed, will be a
"permanent fixture" for young peo-
ple in the area. It will consist of a
library, a mini- computer room, a mul-
ti-purpose auditorium, and will also


have the capacity to be a hurricane
shelter.
Says Mr Ferguson: "We (adults) are
only the ones to teach them as they
grow older. We are responsible to
train them to run that work (training
centre).
"What we are doing as a people -
with the Sunday school, with the rally,
with the training centre is making
sure that Woods Alley will always be
a memorial for generations yet
unborn, that good things come from
Woods Alley."


Church Notes


THE REMNANT
TABERNACLE
OF PRAISE
IN the spirit of unity, Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort associates
are invited to worship with
Pastor Kendal Stubbs, officers
and members of the church
during its 3rd Annual Service
of Thanksgiving.
The event is scheduled for
10:30 am January 30 on church
grounds at Carmichael and
Golden Isles Roads.

CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, January 23.
(Speakers: BishoV G Clarke
and Pastor James Newry)
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Ser-
vice, 7:45 pm Men's Fellow-
ship Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm WOI
Meeting
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Upcoming events
January 22, 6:30 pm Evan-
gelism Park Service, Nassau
Village Park
February 28-March 3 Men
With A Purpose Conference
March 28-April 3 WOI
Conference
March 27 Easter Sunday


CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
January 23, 9:15 am Church
School, 10 am Divine Wor-
ship Service with Pastor
Charles Lewis, 7 pm Worship
Service (Holy Eucharist) with
Pastor Lewis
First Monday of each month,
7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-
ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30
pm Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
January 23, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-


tice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
SIgas,4pym--Prayxr Chapel,j.
. pm- Bible .Glass, ,, .
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,'
6:3,0: prmn .Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
4 Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

EAST ST GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells


Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th-,
Thursday) ..
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors foi Christ Club (Boys"
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting

BISHOP
STEPHEN
STUBBS'
MINISTRIES
THE organisation is sched-
uled to hold the following
events:
January 23 Dr Kevin
King to speak during 10 am
and 6 pm services.
For further information, vis-
it:
www.restorationoflife.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK

YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com


BENEFIT
CONCERT
YOU are cordially invited
to.a benefit concert given by
Maude Lockhart & Friends at
St Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk,
located at the corner of Peck's
Slope and Princes' Street,
across from the Central Bank.
The event is set for 7:30 pm
January 22. Proceeds will go
to Teen Challenge.

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible
Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer.
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our
website:
www.holytrinitybahamas.org

CANAAN
BAPTIST
CHURCH
YOU are invited to the fol-
lowing services at the church in


Nassau Village:
Sunday, 11 am and 7:30 pm -
Divine Worship Service
Rev Eugene Bastia ,
senior pastor.

ST MARGARET'S
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Kemp Road
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing worship services:
Sunday, 7 am Low Mass
and Sermon, 9:30 am Sung
Mass and Sermon, 6:30 pm -
Evensong, Sermon and Bene-
diction

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30.
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)

See BULLETIN, 3C


HEESE PIZZAS



& CHEESY BREAD


Iq' mtI JHF


r


THE TP.!SIJNE


PAUEtL~ i viuviciDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 3C
I


RELGIO


One does not live by bread alone,
but by every word that comes from
the mouth of God. (Matt. 4:4)
N By REV JAMES MOULTRIE
We have just begun
a New Year and
each year we
make resolutions,
among them that
we will lose so much weight this year.
Many of us have resolved to get that
slim and trim figure that we used to
have.
Some of us will make that a reality,
but sadly most of us will not achieve
that goal again this year. Either our
goals are too ambitious or we lose
courage as the year progresses and
we fall back into business as usual.
So let us see if we can learn some-
thing from Jesus in the above text.
Before Jesus uttered those words
He had been standing on the banks of
the River Jordan, having just been
baptized by John the Baptist in its
cool waters. The Bible describes the
Holy Spirit descending upon Jesus
and the voice of God booming from
Heaven, "This is my Beloved Son, in


whom I am well pleased".
From the high point of that experi-
ence, which was an epiphany moment
for John the Baptist and those who
witnessed the baptism, Jesus entered
the wilderness where He endured
severe hunger. No admiring crowd,
no voices from Heaven, just tempta-
tions in the wilderness. Forty days of
fasting had taken its toll. He felt the
hunger pangs. Knowing that, the dev-
il suggested that Jesus turn stones into
bread. But there was much more at
stake than easing hunger pains there
was the matter of obedience to God.
And that is the heart of the matter.
The word diet is heard more today
than at any other time in earth's his-
tory. Everyone seems to be on a diet
or going on one. Bookstores are filled
with every imaginable type of diet
books, ranging from the Atkins Diet
to the new fad with carbs. Many of
them do not yield the results they
promise, yet billions of dollars are
spent on them every year, worldwide.
And many of us buy into the adver-
tisements and we become frustrated
when we do not achieve the desired
result.
But there is a part of us that food


* REV JAMES MOULTRIE


can't feed; it is that immaterial part of
us called the soul. Like the body, it
grows hungry. It must be fed or it
grows weak and feeble. The soul
requires a special diet.
We spend a great deal on the latest
fads in dieting, but how much atten-


tion do we spend feeding our souls?
How much attention do we pay to
feeding our spiritual hunger? Is that
not, in the last analysis, more impor-
tant than losing weight?
In the above text Jesus gives us the
answer.
The soul is meant to feast on the
Word of God. When we listen to
Him, when we read and study His
Word as found in the Bible, we start a
healthy diet for the spirit, a diet that
has eternal ramifications. God has
spoken with words meant for our
ears. Those words have been record-
ed for our benefit in the Bible. They
are words we can and should con-
sume every day. It is the diet which
makes a difference; yet we do not
take care of it. Remember the words
of Jesus in Luke 11;28, "But even
more blessed are all who hear the
word of God and put it into practice".
President Dwight Eisenhower said,
"To read the Bible is to take a trip to
a fair land where the spirit is strength-
ened and faith renewed"; President
Abraham Lincoln said, "I believe the
Bible is the best gift God has ever
given to man. All the good from the
Saviour of the World is communicat-


ed to us through this book"; Presi-
dent John Quincy Adams said, "I
have for many years made it a prac-
tice to read through the Bible once a
year. My custom is to read four or
five chapters every morning immedi-
ately after rising from my bed. It
employs about (30 minutes) of my
time, and seems to me the most suit-
able manner of beginning the day";
And Charles Dickens said, "The New
Testament is the very-best book that
ever was or ever will be know in the
world".
Three United States Presidents
(and there are others like Jimmy
Carter), the most powerful men on
earth, and noted author Charles Dick-
ens found a new diet in the study of
the Word of God.
How much time will you devote
this year to the reading of the Bible?
That is one resolution you can and
should keep; and it will satisfy the
hunger in your soul! Get started on
your new diet today and get in shape
for the Kingdom of Heaven.
Rev Moultrie is the Rector of St
Matthew's Anglican Parish, Shirley
St.


Bulletin (From page 2C)


Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT.
THE church in the Summer
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road,
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 8 am Morning
Glory Breakthrough Service,
10:30 am Divine Worship
Service .(Live broadcast at 11
am on More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer
meeting every Wednesday and
Saturday at 5 am 1..
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm -
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
For further information, e-
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs
or call 328-3737/328-6949

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings
to be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of January 23-29:
Sunday, 7 am Sung Mass
and Sermon, 10 am Family
Eucharist & Holy Baptism,
6:30 pm Evensong and
Teaching
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM)
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 6:30 pm -
Marching and Concert Band
Wednesday, 6 am Mass
and Breakfast, 7 pm Vestry
Meeting, 7:30 pm Chorale
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm March-
ing and Concert Band, 7:30 pm



E-mail

your

articles

to The

Tribune's

Religion

section:
srose@tribunernedia.net


- Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 7:30 pm -
Youth Choir Practice


Saturday, 2 pm Acolytes
Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian
Campbell)


SIGN U TODA


.- .


Competition open to both Girls & Boys Ages 7 12 years old
Bahamian Citizens and those residing in the Bahamas for at least 6 months


f)Grand Prize of


"1 00.0,:^ 1
l atrday. 15h Ja -uarv 5pm Sunday.. 6to Ja uary 4apm to,,
SSaLurday. 22nd January, lOam
a Resort, able Beach Upper Lobby Entrance




















CUSES BEING6OFFERE


Founatios I OldTestmen
Fudtos InNe Tstmn


Sister on


missionary


journey to


Thailand
SISTER Lisa Gardiner of Blue
Hill Gospel Chapel left for a mis-
sionary trip to Thailand. East
Asia on Monday. She was com-
mended to the Missions field as a
Missionary, to Thailand on Fri-
day, Januar, 14. Missionary Ray-
mond J Jones, chairman of New
Tribes Missions in Canada deliv-
ered the sermon. Associate Pas-
tor Perrh R Wallace. chairman of
the United Missions Department
of the Assemblies of Brethren.
conducted the Commendation
Ser ice. assisted by Blue Hill's
Elders and other leaders of the
Assemblies of Brethren in the
Bahamas. Sister Lisa is the daugh-
ter of Elder Harry and Sister
Carmine Gardiner.


N SISTER LISA GARDINER


TSUNAMI REI


FOR SRI LANKA
Natural disasters can't be prevented, but the effects can be more
manageable with YOUR HELP.
Friends of Sri Lanka invite individuals and institutions wishing to
contribute towards the tsunami relief efforts in Sri Lanka to help in
one of the following ways:
1. Deposit your contribution Into the special account opened at
Bank of The Bahamas -
Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka
Account Number: 5265970
Bank of The Bahamas
Main Branch
The deposit can be made at any branch of the bank.


2. If you are paying by cheque, you can take your contribution
to A. I. D. at any of their locations in New Providence, Grand
Bahamas, Abaco, Eleuthera, Andros and Exuma.

3. Simply call us at 502-7094 and we will arrange to
collect it from you.
Contributions will be forwarded to the Sri Lanka Red Cross
Society for effective deployment.

"T I I I O0 A


070 ",U


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Medicine is All Strepsils with two antiseptic

Choked Up Throat Lozenges ingredients for quick relief
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PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20. 2005


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UNE


if'















'Continue to pray for seminarians'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

Newly ordained Dea-
con, Rev Elvado
Turnquest, asked the
congregation at his
recent ordination to
continue to pray for seminarians.
He said it was not easy and they
needed all the encouragement they
could get.
In an article that appeared in the
September issue of Bahama Catholic,
Rev Turnquest shared his personal
journey towards the priesthood. At
times, he said, it could be likened to a
"desert experience".
"Throughout seminary I have had
to painfully strip away things I
thought were absolutely necessary for


Newy odai ed deacnpre ches a rinto0


my journey through life. It was then
that I was able to see the real me. It
was then that I came face to face with
'plain ole' me'. It was then that I was
able to present myself to God saying,
'Wow God, you already knew me
who I am! These are my strengths
and these ate my weaknesses. What
do you want me do?"
Rev Turnquest wrote that one of
the most popular questions he is
asked is, "Why priest? Do you know
you can't get married?"
He said his answer would always
be the same: "Of course I know this.
A life of celibacy indeed has its share
of challenges. So does marriage. They


* REV ELVADO TURNQUEST


both require one thing of us faith-
fulness."
He believes that faithfulness in the
Bahamas is fast becoming a concept
that is more and more foreign, and
sound values are being compromised,
or in some cases, totally abandoned.
"A life of sexual promiscuity and
selfish gain seem to be more tolerated
than. a life of commitment and fideli-
ty. Far too often I find myself defend-
ing my decision to enter the order of
priesthood and a life committed to
celibacy. This should not be so! I
should not have to say this, but the
priesthood is a GOOD thing and we
all, Catholics and non-Catholics alike,


should be encouraging not discour-
aging 'good' living."
Within the archdiocese of Nassau,
he said, there are about 47,688
Catholics with only seven official sem-
inarians. Rev Turnquest said that
these young men should be encour-
aged, and the whole community
should be encouraging vocations
because there is need for serious,
quality men to pass on "this great
faith of ours".
He ended the article with the fol-
lowing prayer:
"Lord, let me know clearly the
work which you are calling me to do
in my. life. And grant me the evdry
grace I need to answer your call with
courage and love and lasting dedica-
tion, to your will, Amen."


Managing


'dollars and sense'


The congregation at St money.
Michael's Methodist Church Scripture has much to say
received some sound advice on about money, tinances, stew-
Sunday, January 16 from their hardship, wealth and poverty.
pastor, Rev Philip Stubbs. Each As a matter of fact, apart from
week Rev Stubbs highlights his salvation money is the most
sermon in the parish bulletin as prominent subject that Jesus
part of a teaching exercise. On Christ focused on as he moved
Sunday, the members received to meet felt-needs of persons
more than just help for their reli- during his ministry.
gious journey, but a lesson in Today we focus on three
managing "dollars and sense". principles.
Following is part one of Rev First, scripture teaches us
Stubbs' sermon entitled "Dol- that persons are to produce
lars and Sense", from Matthew wealth through consistent
6:19-24. work, and that laziness pro-
duces poverty. All too often,
TODAY, at the beginning of religious persons have an
a New Year, we turn to apply unhealthy approach to grace,
our faith to our finances. There seen in the notion that prayers
are those persons who believe or faith alone ought to produce
that it is inappropriate to material wealth..
preach or teach publicly about Not so at all! Christians need
money, because money is not a to be the most industrious per-
spiritual matter. The truth of sons in any circumstance, as
the matter is God's word, the scripture teaches that not only
whole counsel of God, needs are we (Christians) to pull our
to be applied to all of life. own weight but we are to pro-
Often the spiritual dimension duce material assets so that oth-
of money becomes obvious ers might benefit.
when persons come to a Proverbs chapter 6 verses 6-
Church service to pray because 8 points to the ant as an exam-
of the absence- of money. or ple for the. person whoQwould
poor decisions made, b,qt ,,,be, ,industrious: "Go,the ant,.


you sluggard; consider its ways
and be wise! It has no com-
mander, no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in
summer and gathers its food at
harvest." The ant is diligent and
focused, moving to store up
material provisions for each
season. The ant understands
that while one experiences
spring, winter is
coming and wis- m ts,
dom calls for [b
the creation of
material provi- p ero
sions in spring r di
for the winter
season. thro M
Every season wr, i
needs its provi-
sions. Laziness IlaIn sI
is ultimately
condemned in
scripture. Take
note of 2 Thessalonians 3:6-7
from the Message translation:
"Our orders backed up by
the Master, Jesus -,are to
refuse to have anything to do
with those among you who are
lazy and refuse to work the way
we taught you. Don't permit
them to freeload on the rest.
, We showed you how to pull


your weight when we were with
you, so get on with it." (Thes-
salonians 3:6-7)
Secondly, we need to under-
stand at the beginning of this
New Year that debt produces
financial DEATH. Many of us
don't want to hear this, but it is
true. It is better friends to car-
ry the burden of hard truth
than to be com-
Ai s hias wforted by a soft
usfta s lie. The hard
truth is that reg-
arewitho ular usage of
wealeth credit cards to
purchase items
will result in too
much debt and
this debt will
produce finan-
cial DEATH
for so many of
us.
As Bahamians, we need to
face some harsh but life-giving
truths that will free us to live
without wholeness. Parents of
dependent children who con-
tinually purchase items of con-
venience for their children with
or without credit will produce
children who as adults will not
be concerned with investing so


that their futures might be
secure. Instead, they will be
absorbed with getting more and
more no matter %\hat the
cost...the truth is it will cost
them their financial futures.,
Hear God's word: "The rich
rule over the poor and the bor-
rower is servant to the lender."
(Romans 22:7)
Our friend Father James
Palacious is correct, when he
says: "All too often Bahami-
ans buy things they don't need
and cannot afford to impress
people who don't like them."
How absurd! Wholeness in the
area of finances is seen in keep-
ing a responsible hold on debt.
Debt is expensive and this is
why: "The rich rule over the
poor and the borrower is ser-
vant to the lender." (Romans
22:7)
Finally, giving priority to
tithes and offering is a primary
part of our faith. All of creation.
is God's, "The earth is the
Lord's, and everything in it, the
world, and all who live in it."
(Psalm 24:1)
All of creation belongs to
God, the human family is called
to steward, manage God's cre-


ation. We are not owners but
managers. We will have to give
an account of our management
of God's resources. We need
to live with this mindset, the
mindset of managers not own-
ers.
To act as an owner of God's
creation is to "rob God". This
is clear in Malachi chapter
three, where movement away
from God is identified as rob-
bery. How does one move with
consistent obedience in his or
her walk with God? "Bring the
whole tithe into the storehouse,
that there may be food in my
house. Test me in this, says the
LORD Almighty, and see if I
will not throw open the flood-
gates of heaven and pour out so
much blessing that you will not
have room enough for it. I will
prevent pests from devouring
your crops, and the vines in
your fields will not cast their
fruit, says the LORD
Almighty."(Malachi 3:7-11)
The way of wholeness is
clearly laid out for each of us.
May we respond with loving
obedience to God so that we
might live with wholeness
financially in 2005.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005, PAGE 7X
RELGIO


The Adventists
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists


www. bahamasconference.org


TEAM


Prayer Conference


2005

January 28-30, 2005


with Pastor Samuel Telemaque of the Caribbean Union Conference of
Seventh-day Adventists Trinidad
Call to find out how to can be a delegate
Pre-Registration Required at Adventist Headquarters
Call: 341-4021



AFrent st T2rade h.A.
February 27 &' 28 Bghernrap,, Aca~ce,,ny G.,rn ,,.


Register For








BIBLE



Software


Training


February 7 & 8, 2005
For pastors, church
leaders, and Bible
Libronix students of all faiths
"Sysom CALL 341 4021






JOIN US AT THE MARRIAGE SEMINAR
Only a short time register for the greatest Marriage seminar
of the year. Visit the Adventist Headquarters on Harrold
Road today: Cost: $90 per coupld with scientific inventory
(Enrich). $50 without inventory. Enrich is a scientific inven-
tory designed to help couples to: 1) Explore Relationship
Strengths and Growth Areas. 2) To learn Assertiveness and
Active Listening ,Skills. 3) To learn how to resolve conflict
using the Ten Step Model. 4) To help the couple discuss'their
Family-of-Origin. 5) To help the couple with financial plan-
ning and budget. 6) To focus on personal, couple and fami-
ly goals. The seminar is for all married
couples: healthy, happy, sad, confused,
troubled, separated, or engaged. Come
and be blessed. Call 341 4021 for more
information or visit the web site
3. ... www.bahamascon ference.org/marriage.

ADRA President Visits Sri Lanka
Disaster Sites
. Charles Sandefur, president of the
Vt. Adventist Development and Relief
Agency (ADRA) International, is in Sri
Lanka visiting sites affected by the dev-
hastating tsunami. Sandefur arrived with
an airlift, provided by the humanitarian
i lin- i organization Heart to Heart
International, that included 40 tons of
i medical supplies, water filtration sys-
terns, and drinking water to be distrib-
uted by ADRA.
"The magnitude of the disaster is
like nothing I've seen," said Sandefur,
who got an aerial view of the destruction
mH earlier thi-s week during 'a helicopter
flight over the affected areas. "The coun-
try is lush and beautiful, but there is a
point where that beauty stops and devas-
tation begins."
Traveling with Senator Sam
Brownback of Kansas, Sandefur visited
an ADRA-supported camp for internally
displaced persons ([DPs) near Ham Ban
Tota, During the visit ADRA provided
5 approximately 2,000 people with 20
pounds of rice, powdered milk, oil and
fresh produce. Sandefur also visited a
water treatment unit run by ADRA that
daily provides 50,000 liters.
"I am incredibly pleased and
proud of what our staff [is] doing here in
Sri Lanka," said Sandefur. "They are
working with their hearts and souls to
make a positive impact on those affected
5 i by this tragedy."
Sandefur is scheduled to visit
Affected areas in Phuket, Thailand later
this week. Adventist World News
Network


CHURCHES
Berea
Blue HLl Roq RoASh ,
341 1607 .
Centrevilie
5th TeWnce & 3 i04a7:'
GrantsTet-'.
3236326- :;,: : ,
JohnsonrI,,k', .,
Famington RoWd 32690k,
New Eng -on..
East Streetl: o -
322 -1926 ..
Good News
Flamingo Gardens
341 4162
Maranatha
Prince Charles Drive
324 5454
Message of Hope
Wuff Road
Philadelphia
Ehzabetf Estates .
3246939 ..
New Prvt.mnr ..-, q,
Solditer Road.;

Aan
Bahamas Ace a
Road 3 1 3
Breath of Life
Marshall Road, Bluti H-ift
Living Faith
Old Trail Road 394 40/'7
Parkgat, .
Adethe.; : .-,


Fox FW .. '"
Eberaneza.
Carm*hoaei Road
HiBview
Harrold Road 361 86W?
Lowe Sound Church
North 4r'droz
New MacedQnia
South Andray. .
Kemp's Bay Ch:a ,;'
Kemps BaWA" ?'
Seaew ,..,4
Benneffs Ha H
OevEf's Poinitr
Devil's Poriwni
Landrall Ponin
Bluff.ChgrI.t.':-
Gregory 1Tawn
Eeuaiser :.
Rock Sound Church
Eleuthemr
Tarpum Bay Church
Eleutfiera
Mount Thompson Chi-ch
Exuma
Moss Town Chirch
Exuma
Steven's Church-
Staraen Long, Islend
Cockburn Town
Ean SaAgador
Matthew Town Church
inagua


Pastor Poault Save
Hea)trDkectr
Pastor Basi Sturmn '
Personal Ministries.&
Sabbarth Scho Director
Mrs. MiMahf Knowie.
Women's M fnlstblea Dh
Pastor Andrew BurroWs
Youtrh & Pathfinder Dim,:lr
Mrs. Cheryl Rolle
Elucaionr & C;,-.Jf'.
Min rie Difract :*.
Pastor Barrington
Brennen
Family, itternel &
Counseling 1"istri .
3414021


M.- Diff
Adven i's king,:,,A,,,.. erence









PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


RELIGION


:r < NATIONAL
RELATIO

,COME UNDER -- ..



e' bsilr: "'.cogopb'hamais.org



"s Wo '- J.it ... ;Jj .. ... .. ', .S... . -
L OUER NIATIONIIAL VISION/OUR OBJECTIVES
To bear witness for Christ and His truth b) through Bible Teachings. Seminars, maturation of our children south.
spreading the gospel throughout all of our Specialized Courses and Conferences. To accelerate our holistic outreach e% ai
islands in all its fullness and pow-er, to bring To full) embrace plurality of leadership in istic efforts with a %iew to reach and It
about the rule of God in the hearts of men. all of its posidi e goodness, people everywhere in our Bahamas to
To worship God in spirit, in truth and in To loie God totally. and our fellowmen as up building of the kingdom and to
I holiness. ourselves, growth of the Church of God.
To train, develop and equip our people for To pa. focused and specialized ministry To prepare our people for the return ol
Godly Living and Christian Service attention to the growth, development and Lord.











CRUSADE UPDATE BY DEBORAH JOHNSON
Co-Chairperson -Public Relations (Church of God) -.
A after weeks of prayer, to come.
planning and prepara- On Monday evening, the
tioh, the first ever joint second night of the crusade.
island wide evangelistic cru- the presence of the Lord % as '
sade of the Church of God and also clearly evident. The
the Church of God of ..-.. Church of God of:" Prophecy's
Prophecy got off to a fantastic National Praise Team. The .
start. Joint National Crusade Choir
The inaugural session, as & Graham McKinney blessed
will be the case each night, us mightily in song.
began with a period of prayer Greetings came from
and consecration which set the Bishops Rudolph \ Bowe &
tone for worship and opened Cleophas L. Capron Jr.
the way for the presence of the (COGOPi and Bishop Dr.
Lord to permeate the atmos- Drawing from several pas- Teuton Stiubbs kCOG i .
phere and to reach deep into sages of scripture from both Bishop Wilhiam \V ilson -
the spirits of those in atten- the Old and New Testaments, took his text from Genesis i
dance. Bishop Wilson centered his 19:17-26 and spoke on the
Bishop Dr. Franklin message on four points: topic, "Today is the da\ for B
Ferguson, pastor of the Church i. It is God who opens the Higher Ground". Comparing
of God of Prophecy East Street door.' He gives us opportuni- sin to a Tsunami, he admon- 'j% t I
Tabernacle; echoed the senti- ties to receive salvation, ished the congregation to s1.a5 :N
ments of those present when 2. The devil guards the door. away from the flood of filth
he stated in his' welcome Every door of opportunity such as alcohol, Jruys,. illicit
address that the setting was brings opposition: "new door, sex, pornography and homo- '
indeed a good one in which to new devil". However, God's sexuality and run for dear Iife t :
meet the Lord. grace is greater than any devil, to higher grounds. God does-
And indeed it was. The Bishop Wilson stated, "There n't want us to compromise but
cathedral was filled to capacity is a hurting,' broken world to be mountain climbers d id
with bishops, ministers, lay which demands that we join rise to the top. There are spir-
leaders, members and follow- forces. The devils of opposi- itual heights and spiritual
ers alike from both churches tion will arise as we come places of victory that \%e can
who came with a mind to wor- together, but God. will get us attain and in this time % hen the ,
ship and a definite spirit of through it." land is being flooded \ .ith
expectation and fellowship. i3. Faith goes through the door. unrighteousness, God's people
There was electricity in the When God opens the door, it will have to unite to climb to
place which was heightened takes faith to go through it. It higher grounds; xe ha e to
even further as the joint praise takes faith to inherit the prom- help each other make it.
and worship team led the con- ises of God. Jesus is the door Once again, after such a
gregation in spirit-filled wor- and through this door we will deep reaching sermon, man "
ship and as the COGOP's find everything we're looking responded to the call for sal a- I ' a ,"
Tabernacle Concert Choir and for. tion, rededication and deliher- A
the joint crusade choir ren- 4. God closes the door. We ance. Others responded to the
dered soul stirring selections, must not let God shut the door invitation to receii e the bap-
Spirited greetings were in our lives. Bishop Wilson tism of the Holy Ghost A 'ast
brought by Bishop Dr. urged persons to go through amount joined hands in pra\.er .
Elgarnet Rahming, National the door and emphasized the for God to take them to higher : ,
Overseer of the Church of God need for them to do it right heights in Him. The session --" 'I '-':i
of Prophecy; Bishop Dr. John then now is the day of salva- ended on a high note of praise. ;
Humes, National Overseer of tion for the next day the 'i-.. '.
the Church of God, the opportunity might not be there. Stay tuned for more crusade ,- .-
Bahamas and the Turks & Persons all across the sane- news.- '- .
Caicos Islands and Bishop Dr. tuary stood in response to the
Brice H. Thompson, General urgent call and made their way I
Presbyter of the Church of to the altar to go in faith
God of Prophecy. through the door which is .
Bishop William M. Wilson, for the kingdom of heaven. To
International Minister of God be the glory!
Outreach, stood up to preach, This first session has been a
it was evident that he was tremendous blessing and has F
flowing in the anointing, given us a taste of what is yet

MINISTRY To A WORLD IN CRISIS...

BAHAMAS COOPERATIVE CRUSADE 2005

LEADERSHIP SEMINAR i,.
mI.s his':'-;


EAST STREET TABERNACLE
SATURDAY, JANUARY 22
2:00 P.M. TO 6:00 P.M.



S: CONNELING



B13h-3PWilllI3-nM WiSon Dr Bill Leonard BiPASOrr.T hrm r P.STLT.RALC(AiRr
Iniremaonal Clhurch ~1 GOd Ch, ch r ch P,,
M.r.it 01 OlO ulreacn Dt ior o l str~al Cal. .1cr,,3r P ,llon,. :w ,r C i RL.,1C II


.'UP lsT Vl


ob of

PL PUBLIC
NS MINISTRY


M 'ATTHEW '/5:16
MATTHEW 5:16


BISHOP DR. ELGARNET B.
RAHMIING.D.D.. J.P.
Natioi'l t-)\ %l_.ec r


Einail: t:eI!arriua baitdnm.b%


'os'sa S Bah 0 6


ingel-
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NAINLMNSRE


~l~i~dP~s~ _~l~ms~p--- II


~i~pi9r~6e~s~*~-~






THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 20U5, HAULt- SU


RELGIO


MOUNT TABOR

S7 FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Willow Tree Ave. Pinewood Gardens PO Box N-9705 Tel: (242) 392-2322 Fax. (242) 392-4343
Websile- www.mounttabor.org www.neilellisministries.com Email: mttabor@batelnet bs



NEWS


2005 JUMP STARTS WITH INTENSIFIED PRAYER!


BisHOP ELLIS STARTS HISTORIC R\i[)[ PROPER
PROGRAM WITH A SHORT WORD.
With prayer as a major building block of the Ministry
and Prayer Meeting being the largest weeknight gather-
ing of the church, one would think that the Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Baptist Church family would be content
with the place that prayer now has in the Ministry and in
the lives of its members. Additionally, after the Church
dubbed 2004; "The Year We Pray It Through"; and even
greater emphasis was placed on prayer, which subse-
quently resulted in Mt. Taborites being so inspired to
strengthen and enhance their prayer lives; that a spirit of
prayer and intercession and another level of excitement
about the practical,
life changing power
of prayer became
even more predomi-
nan-t within the
Church than ever
-A before; one would
.t.,ume that surely
Shey would settle
\\I ih .that. But under
the anointed leader-
ship of Bishop Neil
C Ellis, Senior
Pastor, Mount Tabor
H is once again
focused on intensi-
gf ing their prayer
C1 LLLNG ON THE LORA! IN es. Mindful of the
fact that, "Little
--- Prayer" pro-
duces "Little
P o wer",
SM o r e
Prayer" pro-
duces "More
Power", and
M 1" uch
Prayer" pro-
duces "Much
Power"; Mt.
Tabor's theme
this year is;
"Intensifying
Our .Prayer
6 Lives &
Pursuing Our
Dreams". So
in 2005,
WVILLIAM IVIURPHIY JR. prayer once
SMHARES ON again found its
INTERCESSORY PRAYER. way into the
central focus
of the Ministry for the year and this dynamic body of
believers is already diligently in pursuit of this incredi-
bly powerful and timely objective!

It all got off to an official and national start on Monday
January 10th at 10:30am with the hosting of an historic
LIVE Prayer Call-In Radio Program "Prayer Power
Hotline" hosted by Bishop Ellis on 1540AM. The radio
program, the first of it's kind in the Bahamas committed
solely to allowing Bahamians throughout the length and
breadth of the country to call in live with their personal
prayer
requests,
got off to
a tremen-
dous start
a n d
already
appears to
Sbe shap-
ing up to
becoming
120 INERCESSOIIs AND LEADERS ASSEMBLEDIN MT. very pop-
TABOR'S UPPER ROOM FOR PRAYER WoRKsHOP. u 1 ar .


Certainly, popularity is not the objective of the show,
but Bishop Ellis is convinced of the fact that Bahamians
need to be reminded of the awesome power of prayer
and that a program of this nature will not only reintro-.
duce and reinforce the need to "Pray It Through" with- I
in the hearts and minds of many in our country that may
have turned to other means of finding help and relief for
the challenges of life, but it will also be a powerful
means of getting Prayer into the atmosphere of our
nation. Thus, the programs placement on the only radio
station that covers the entire country was deliberate and
strategic! The response to the program was immediate
and tremendous, as phone lines lit up within a few min-
utes after the half hour program got started and
remained clogged with callers for the entire show.
Additionally, many persons that could not get their
prayer requests in to Bishop Ellis on air during the pro-
gram, called in to the Mt. Tabor with their requests
throughout the day.

But before Bishop Ellis turned his prayer focus to the
nation, new in-house initiatives were undertaken to
ensure that the prayer goals of the Ministry are accom-
plished this year. To this end, a Pastor of Intercessory
Prayer (Pastor-Elect Rochelle Moss) was appointed and
a group of 120 intercessors was formed. And because
Bishop Ellis firmly believes that a call to ministry is first


SAINTS IN PRAYER.


of all call to preparation, from Monday January 10th -
Wednesday 12th the intercessors and top leadership of
Mount Tabor went through and intensive Intercessory
Prayer Workshop with Bishop William Murphy Jr.,
Senior Pastor of New Mount Moriah Baptist Church in
Pontiac Michigan and Bishop of Intercessory Prayer of
the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship
International. In these intense and powerful sessions,
Bishop Murphy dealt with both the practical and spiritu-
al aspects of Intercessory Prayer and also gave the par-
ticipants insight into both the blessings and challenges
of being on the "front line" of ministry as an intercessor.
In every session the Lord moved so powerfully both
during the teaching times and in the practical demon-


INTERCESSORS ENJOY INTENSIVE PRAYER TRAINING
WORKSHOP.

stations, that it was at times .challenging to conclude the
90 minute sessions, which were held 6:00 7:30pm
nightly.

But Praise God there was more praying to be done, as
at 7:30pm each night the entire congregation also came
together for the Annual Jump Start Services. And
because this focus on prayer is both corporate and per-
sonal, this year Jump Start (which is the church's first
weeknight gathering for the year), was also committed
to prayer. On Monday January 10th, after leading the
way in the first Communion Service of the year, Bishop
Ellis delivered a very powerful and insightful message
outlining why Prayer is so important in this season of
the Ministry and indeed-the individual lives of the entire


membership of the i
Church. Those \ ho
may have taken a
casual approach to
the need to prai cer-
tainly developed a i
greater understand-
ing of the spiritual
implications of ithk
prayer focus and .
many went a" a\
with a greater appie-
ciation for the
absolute need to
"Intensify" petheir
prayer lives regard-
less of the level IhaI
it was previoui,1 ,at.
Then on the follow -o
ing two nights, GETTING A PRAYER THROUGH!
Bishop Murphy and his team of intercessors led the
church into some awe inspiring sessions of prayer and
communion with God that was nothing short of
"Heaenl cI) There ~ w \s little preaching, just praise,
worship, prayer and intercession. What a glorious, rich
experience it was to see everyone from the pulpit to thb
pew either on their faces or on their knees before the
Lord. The atmosphere each night was so saturated with
the manifested presence of God, that bodies were


BISHOP MURPHY IN DEEP INTERCESSION.
healed, generational curses were broken 'and nightly
persons were eternally delivered and set free from
almost every type of bondages imaginable. The sessions
concluded on Wednesday evening with a special
"Laying on of hands" session for the newly appointed
intercessors, who were then officially released to Pray
until they touch the Heart of God, release the Power of
God and cause the Hand of God tc move!

It's becoming more evident now why Mt. Tabor's slo-
gan for the year 2005 is; "Our Year of High,
Expectations", because with this kind of commitment to
Prayer, this year the sky is not the limit, it's merely a tar-
get; as God is able to do exceedingly and abundantly
above all that we are able to ask (pray for) or think!


TO GOD BE THE GLORY!
im mu


BISHOP ELLIS HANDLES PHONE LINES DURING NEW
PRAYER POWER HOTLINE RADIO PROGRAM


THE TRIBUNE


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