• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Business
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Insight














Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00006
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 10, 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
        page A 15
        page A 16
    Section B: Business
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B: Sports
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C: Insight
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
Full Text







"DELUXE fy

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HIGH 77F
LOW 66F

PARTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.38


MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


PRICE 500


I : I I~- z


Christie: allegations do not


breach 'code of ethics'


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has declined to com-
ment on the rape allegation
made against Works and Utili-
ties Minister Bradley Roberts,
other than to say that allega-
tions do-not breach the code
of ethics he has announced for
his over ".eimt.
While Mr Christi'e admitted
that the personal code of ethics
he outlined shortly after tak-
ing office could be "tightened
and broadened", he did not
suggest it should be changed
to include the regulation of
"moral" behaviour.
Mr Christie said of the alle-
gation against Mr Roberts:
"From my point of view, I have
nothing to say with respect to.
that, because of the position I
hold and the implications it
may have."
Mr Christie was speaking on
a special edition of Island FM's
"Parliament Street" yesterday.
The talk show was hosted by
Island FM CEO and Nassau
Guardian publisher Charles
Carter, and Jerome Sawyer,
Island FM news director.
Mr Carter said that Mr
Christie's personal code of
ethics "has been brought into
question due to what critics say
are serious lapses of your par-
liamentary group; allegations
of personal moral misconduct".
Mr Christie, acknowledging
that the criticisms were in con-
nection with a claim against Mr
Roberts, said that allegations
"do not breach the code of
ethics".


-liP


"There has to be a finding, a
pLecific finding of fact," he
S.Iid.
He said that Attorney Gen-
eral Alfred Sears has stated
that the allegation is "receiv-
ing the most exact examina-
tion".
"The prime minister must
therefore exercise the greatest
care, because anything he says
may have some negative .v.;;
cation either to the accused or
to the accuser," said Mr
Christie.
He noted that despite being
part of Cabinet, under the
Bahamas Constitution, the
Attorney General reviews mat-
ters such as the allegation
against Mr Roberts, under his
"independent prosecutorial
function".
Mr Christie said that critics
who allege that his code of
ethics has been breached by
the allegations against Mr
Roberts point to a moral ques-
tion not covered by the code.
"The morality issue has not
been respected in the code of
ethics, other than, I have
admonished myself and col-
leagues that if we are to main-
tain public confidence in the
integrity of the political direc-
torate, then we must be seen
to see, as the matter of first
importance, maintaining the
highest standards of probity in
public life," said the prime min-
ister.
"It's a question of whether
or not we are in a position to
judge anyone at a given stage
of having in breach of this gen-
SEE page three


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Shell Saxons Superstars cut through
the competition to win Friday's Maureen
Duvalier New Year's Junkanoo Parade,
swinging their mock weapons in time with
the drumline rhythm and invading Bay
Street with a warrior-like fierceness in imi-
tation of the Anglo-Saxons who invaded
England in the 5th and 6th centuries.
The win for the 3,800-member group, out
of Mason's Addition, marked a "two-
straight" victory for the Saxons, who also


won the Boxing Day parade.
Saxons leader Percy "Vola" Francis said
the victories were for all those fans who
have been loyal to the group since it was
formed in 1965.
He said the group's second lap on Shirley
Street, where hundreds of Mason's Addition
residents gathered to watch the parade, was
"for our people".
Their two-part theme: "Invasion of the
Saxons Dey Comin' Thank God for Forty
Years of Excellence Celebrating 40 years",
SEE page 12


Man shot in

face is second

murder victim

of the year

N ByPACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
A 20-YEARrOLD man
became the second murder vic-
tim of 2005 at the weekend
when h-,was shot in the face
following an argument.
Tevarus NMerlin Johnson was
found by police shortly after
10pm on Saturday in the dri-
ver's seat of a green Ford Escort
with severe gunshot wounds to
the face, Chief Supt Hulan Han-
na reported last night.
A 30-year-old Blue Hill Road.
man is in police custody in con-
nection with the incident.
The shooting occurred in the
Jehovah Court area of Blue Hill
Road South.
"The information would sug-
gest that there was apparently
an altercation between himself
and (another man)'in the area,
which resulted in Mr Tevarus
ivierlin Johnson being shot in
the face," Supt Hanna said.
Police have confiscated .a
shotgun, he added.
Investigations continue.
In other crime news:
A woman received minor.
injuries when she was grazed
by a bullet during an armed
robbery of a Boyd Road liquor
store Friday night.
At 9.52pm a gunman entered
and attempted to rob the
Shanandor Liquor store, police
reported.
Supt Hanna said he could not
confirm the exact 'details, but
apparently the man was in some
way hindered in his intentions.
"He was somehow frustrated. I
don't know if he was physically
frustrated."
As a result, the gunman dis-
charged the weapon, grazing
Mildred Russell, 45, in her mid-
section.
He robbed a 30-year-old male
customer of his wallet, which
contained cash and some per-
sonal effects.
The suspect is reported to
have fled the scene on foot in
the direction of Pilgrim Street.
The East Bay Street branch
of Dominoes Pizza was robbed
Saturday night by two gunmen
who entered the establishment
and demanded cash.
SEE page 12


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


LOC


First woman to participate in Junkanoo




is honoured in New Year's Day parade


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
MAUREEN Duvalier, the
first woman to participate in
Junkanoo, officially opened
the New Year's Day 2005
parade named in her honour
on Friday night with the hope
that the festival would remain
a cultural event and not turn
into a commercial enterprise.


Colours Junkanoo group,
dressed in costumes of gold,
aqua and black, paid tribute
to both the Bahamian flag
and 78-year-old Ms Duvalier
during a special Junkanoo per-
formance. that-encircled the
"Original Bahama Mama".
Although retired, Ms Duva-
lier still performed for the
crowd with.her unique danc-
ing style, reminiscent of 1958,


when she led, for the first
time, a group of 25 female
-dancers to Bay Street for
Junkanoo.
Her work in the entertain-
ment industry as a calypso sto-
ry-teller/singer and performer
allowed her to travel the
world. She was also the first
female member of the
Bahamas Musicians and
Entertainers Union.
During her career she
released one album with the
songs Yes Yes Yes, Ask Me
Why I Run and Court House
Scandal, earning her another
nickname, "Calypso Mama".
In' May 2004, she was
awarded the Most Excellent
Order of the British Empire
by Queen Elizabeth II for her
endeavours as both an enter-
tainer and an ambassador.

Moment
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, who was a young boy
when the female dancers came
onto Bay Street. said he
remembered the moment
well.
At the time Ms Duvalier
won the Queen's award, he
said: "It was so incredible to
see the cultural development
'that she has impacted. She is
aptly described as a cultural
icon."
Ms Duvalier said that she
was proud to officially open
the parade on Friday night.
She attends Junkanoo each
year and says the location of
Bay Street is an important
'aspect of the event.
She believes the parade
would be' improved if it was
extended on Bay Street alone,
instead of turning onto Shirley
Street. "Bay Street doesn't


end on Elizabeth Avenue. We
have to fix this Bay Street up
and parade straight down to
Arawak Cay."
She also insisted that
Bahamians do not treasure
Junkanoo enough.
"This is what our country is


all about," she said. "This Ms Duvalier said she is
parade is part of our history. especially worried about the
You cannot have the Bahamas cultural festival becoming too
without Junkanoo or vice ver- commercial. Boxing day .and
sa. We didn't steal Junkanoo New Year's day should always
from anyone like we do every- remain special for Bahamians,
thing else. No one else can because of Junkanoo.
claim it. It's ours." Seepage one


Attendance 'comparable




to that of previous years'


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* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
JUNKANOO seating administrators said that
despite public concern about the number of
empty seats at the New Year's Day parade,
attendance at the event was comparable to that
of past years.
There were large stretches of vacant bleach-
ers on Bay Street during Friday's parade. For
the most part, these seats remained empty
throughout the event.
Some speculated that the seemingly poor lev-
el of attendance might have been the result of
the parade's postponement. The date of the
parade was moved to January 7 after the Box-
ing Day parade was rescheduled to New Year's
Day because of high winds.

Tourists
Many of the spectators who spoke to The
Tribune noted that in particular very few tourists
seemed to be in attendance on Friday.
However, according to C-CUBE, the com-
pany managing ticket sales, traditionally, less
seats are sold for the New Year's Day parade
compared to Boxing Day.
C-CUBE spokesman Peter Adderley said
that official seating sales figures would not be
available until Tuesday, but initial information
indicated that figures for the New Year's parade


did not differ greatly from last year's.
C-CUBE also oversees the installment and
removal of the bleachers.
Mr Adderley said he was pleased with the
'success of the plan for the removal of bleachers
and barriers in time for the opening of busi-
ness on Saturday morning.
This, he said, was in accordance with an
agreement between C-CUBE and Bay Street
merchants.

Speed
One merchant who asked not to be named,
said he was pleased with the speed that the
bleachers came down after the parade, but
pointed out that any benefit this had to business
was cancelled out by the disruption caused by
the parade being delayed by one week.
The merchant added that C-CUBE should
re-examine the manner in which it carries out
both its preparation for the parades and its
clean up efforts.
The intricate brickwork featured on the Bay
Street sidewalks is often severely damaged by
the erection of the fence system separating each
seating section, said the merchant. "The way
they destroy the sidewalks is disgusting. They
dig holes and remove the bricks and then after-
wards just fill them up with concrete."
Seepage one


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I'm lovin' it


DELUXE SALADS


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.PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 10', 2005


RK'i-W,
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THiE TRIBUNE





MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 3


TI-F TRIRIINF


Government to green




1ijht cN( nronosak


PRIME Minister Perry
Christie spoke very briefly
yesterday about a number of
projects that are set to take
off in New Providence in
2005.
Appearing on the Island
FM radio programme "Par-
liament Street" on Sunday,
Mr Christie said that his gov-
ernment is "very excited"
about initiatives in both New
Providence and the Family
Islands
He gave a very brief out-
line of the projects, which
include:
* BAY STREET
Government will immedi-
ately begin considering pro-
posals for the relocation of
the freight shipping houses
to the southwestern coast of
New Providence, as a key to
the formation of an "inte-
grated new Bay Street, where
you are able to walk along a
board walk or walk to the
Hilton Hotel, and have all
sorts of experiences on the
way".
As part of this project,
government is looking at cre-
ating two straw markets, at
both the eastern and western
ends of town, and at expand-
ing the facilities offered by
the British Colonial Hilton.
* CABLE BEACH
A decision may be made
this week on the proposals to
develop the entire Cable
Beach area, said Mr Christie.
(See story in Tribune Busi-
ness)
* ARAWAK CAY
Government is negotiating
the creation of "a new
approach to Arawak Cay"
from the downtown area.
OLD FORT
Ground will be broken
today for a new up-scale sub-
division opposite Old Fort
Bay.
CLIFTON
Mr Christie said that 2005
would see the beginning of
the construction of the Her-
itage Park at Clifton Cay','
"with regular use of beach-'
es, and a commitment to
make even more beaches at
Clifton, and to rebuild the
historic plantation, complete
with experiences of the three
civilizations that impacted it -
the Lucayans, the slaves and
the Loyalists.
SOUTH OCEAN
Government is set to nego-
tiate a Heads of Agreement
to expand South Ocean
Resort, "with an expanded
marina presence, on the basis
that the dive operation there
brings in 50,000 visitors right
now, as is, and we'll be able to
quadruple that with better
facilities, which are in plans,
possible with a Greg Norman
golf course at South Ocean".
He said that negotiations
for a major development
adjacent to South Ocean
were also under way.
Mr Christie said the devel-
opments he mentioned in
New Providence "will be seen
in 2005 and 2006".
GRAND BAHAMA
Two new resorts in Grand
Bahama, one in Freeport and
one in West End, are under
negotiation.
The decisions on the two
proposals for Liquefied Nat-
ural Gas storage facilities
would be made nmminentl\.
(See slor) this page) OC)ne
located in Freeport. the other
in Ocean Cay, near Bimini
ELEUTHERA
Mr Christie said that he
expects in the coming weeks
to develop a "master plan"
for the development of the
entire island of Eleuthera.
both in terms of public infra-
structure, and the identifica-
tion of a site for a major
resort.
NLAYAGLIANA
The development of a
large scale resort facility min
Mayaguana is under consid-
eration b. the government.
Compded by Paco
NViite:. Tribune Staff
Reporter


"Everything is in place, except
I have to look a little closer at a
couple of figures to see if the
Bahamas is going to benefit
significantly from it."


Prime Minister Perry Christie


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE two proposals for Liq-
uefied Natural Gas (LNG)
facilities will be approved in
"short order", Prime Minister
Perry Christie reiterated yes-
terday.
Speaking as a guest on the
Island FM talk show "Parlia-
ment Street", Mr Christie said
that one of the LNG proposals
should be approved by the
end of the month, and that the
other would be given the
green light "imminently".
The two proposals for stor-
age terminals for LNG en
route to Florida from harvest-
ing countries on the other side
of the Atlantic have been
under consideration by the
government for some time.
Originally, there were three
proposals under consideration.
One was by international
energy giant AES, another by
European entity Tractabel,
and a third from the Texas-
based El Paso.
The bids were reduced to


two after the merger of
Tractabel and El Paso last
year.
The AES proposal is for the
construction of a facility at
Ocean Cay, a man-made
island near Bimini originally
constructed for the mining of
aragonite.
The proposal by the recent-
ly merged Tractabel, El Paso
and Florida Light and Power
was originally envisioned to
be located in Freeport Har-
bour.

Safety
Mr Christie said however,
that for safety reasons anoth-
er location in Grand Bahama
would have to be identified
for this project.
When the proposals were
first announced, members of
the public raised a number of
safety concerns.
And environmentalists are
concerned about how the
underwater pipelines needed
to transport the LNG will
impact marine life, among


other factors.
"I'm excited about the AES
proposal for Bimini. I'm excit-
ed about this other proposal,
as to where it will be located.
"If in fact there is an agree-
ment for a location in Grand
Bahama outside the port, they
are likely to be approved
imminently," said the prime
minister.
Mr Christie said he had indi-
cated to AES that aside from
a final financial evaluation, he
would have given them an
approval by the end of 2004.
"Everything is in place,
except I have to look a little
closer at a couple of figures
to see if the Bahamas is going
to benefit significantly from
it," he said.
Mr Christie said that
approval of the AES project
should be given by the end of
January.


f A/WCHRISTMAS SALE


0 ades0 rets0''uh oe


FROM page one

eral characterisation of maintaining high
standards."
Mr Carter pointed out that religious lead-
ers have suggested that the code of ethics
be extended to include moral misconduct.
In a press statement released on Saturday,
the Save the Bahamas Campaign, an organ-
isation of several religious leaders, echoed
the call for matters of morality, in particular
adultery, to be included in any code of ethics.
Mr Carter on Sunday proposed a scenario
to Mr Christie in which a Cabinet minister is
found to be engaged in "illicit sexual activi-
ty, like adultery".
He asked whether such activity might open
that minister to "potential bribery, black-
mail and other forms of ethical compromise".
Mr Christie said he has no doubt that the
suggestion to include matters of personal
1,


morality will be a matter of public discus-
sion, "as it has been doubtless through the
ages and over the years; The extent to which
one can in fact legislate, regulate personal
morality".
"It would be very difficult for a prime min-
ister to be empowered to investigate the pri-
vate affairs of his colleagues or members," he
pointed out.
Mr Christie did say however, that it "may
well be that a form of adultery, manifested in
a flagrant and public way, causing people to
see a minister in a disreputable position, may
cause a prime minister to check him, to cau-
tion him".
Yesterday's programme took questions
from listeners submitted by e-mail and fax,
and entertained questions from media hous-
es and special interest groups.
Questions from live callers were not enter-
tained.


0
TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157


Allegations
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cdo not reach





code of ethics'


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;7hen'l '7 rlCS Crafts & Inspiration Meet.





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. MONDAY. JANUARY 10, 2005


EDITORIAULETTER- STOHEEITOR


WHY MUST crime make headlines? Why
must crime be printed on the front page?
Why can't crime be buried on an inside page
or better still, not published at all?
These are some of the questions asked by
persons who believe that the community
would be better off if newspapers would ban-
ish crime from its front pages, or print it in
type so small that it could only be read with
the aid of a magnifying glass.
We agree that it would be wrong for a
newspaper to seek out petty crime and sen-
sationalise it out of all proportion to its true
worth. However, here in the Bahamas crime
is news; it's big news, and it's big news
because it is society's major problem. Only a
dishonest editor would either ignore it, or
minimize its newsworthiness.
On Friday, December 31, 2004 the last
day of the old year The Tribune's front
page headline read: "Man dead after shooting
43rd murder of the year".
The New Year opened with the heading:
"First murder of 2005 29-year-old man
shot in Nassau."
Those two headlines tell the whole story -
the Bahamas has a major problem in crimes
against the person. A problem that can only
be tackled face on, not buried under the car-
pet in the hope that it will eventually go away.
Unfortunately, it will not go away unless,
and until the citizens of this country are
shocked into action.
The Tribune did not commit the crimes.
However, The Tribune. in fulfilling its duty to
its readers, will continue to record the facts of
those crimes. And major crime will continue,
to be printed on the front page until the day
that a banner headline can report that guns
are off the streets and major crime is under
control.
It is true that there was a three per cent
drop in crimes against the person in 2003. It
is also true that if it had not been for one
person who was accused of committing 10
per cent of the 50 murders in 2003 and 33
per cent of the murders on Grand Bahama,
"the Bahamas could have recorded its best
murder rate in years." However, newspapers
don't deal in could-have-beens, they deal in
facts, and the facts are that there were 50
murders in 2003, and 43 in 2004.
There was a time '- not too long ago-
when most of the police force believed that
crime other than the "petty stuff" -
should be withheld from the press. And they
suppressed it to the point of angering the


public. It got so bad that the public started to
accuse The Tribune of aiding and abetting the
police in the suppression of the news. It was
at that point that The Tribune hit back,
exposing the fact that the reason certain crime
was not being reported was that the police
refused to give out the information. Members,
of the public soon took care of that. Many
made it their business to phone crime into our
news desk. and, instead of relying on police
reports, our reporters were sent directly to the
crime scene, sometimes arriving before the
police.
Members of the public made it clear that
the police were doing a disservice by not
keeping them informed of the evil lurking in
their communities and threatening their safe-
ty. They wanted to be forewarned so that
they could protect themselves. And they
expected their newspapers especially The
Tribune to keep them informed.
The argument has been put to us that so
much crime on the front page of a local news-,
paper could frighten tourists. The reality of
life is that tourists come here.from cities with
far greater crime statistics than the Bahamas,
and since 9/11 they are wise enough to know
that although there is a Paradise Island in
the Bahamas, there is no longer a true par-
adise anywhere on.this planet.
Over the years many tourists have com-
plained that they could have protected them-
selves against violent crime if only someone
had informed them that certain areas of the
island were unsafe.
One visitor, in fact was so angered, by what
he considered false advertising about the
idyllic nature of these islands, that after he
was mugged walking one evening from the
Sonesta Beach Hotel (now Breezes) to the
Nassau Beach, he took out a full page adver-
tisement in a national US newspaper (we
believe it was The New York Times) to warn
Americans of a crime-ridden Bahamas. It
was after that incident that street lights were
erected in the Cable Beach area.
People in general both locals and visi-
tors feel far more secure armed with
knowledge. It is only by being fully informed
that they can take precautions and avoid
potentially unsafe situations.
We feel that it is the duty of a newspaper
to keep its public informed. Serving up sac-
charin-coated news, tucked away on inside
pages of a newspaper helps no one, not even
the Pollyannas of this world.
To be continued tomorrow.


'Oppos


to


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
.Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


What makes up the news


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THIS letter is in direct
response to the letter submit-
ted by Neil Sealey, published.
December 26,2004, concerning
the Passerine development pro-
ject on the north end of Guana
Cay. I would like to point out
some information that your
readers may find very interest-
ing.
First, Mr Sealey claims to
have no direct connection to the
development. Mr Sealey, are
you the husband of Kathleen
Sealey? Kathleen is the biolo-_
gist hired by the development
company. If you are the hus-
band, brother, or father of Mrs
Sealey, then I would say that
that is a very direct connection.
If so, then I would think that
you have a vested interest in
this project's passage and com-
pletion.
Secondly, you mention public
meetings that were held previ-
ously concerning the project.
Many, if not all, locals agree
that the meetings were not ade-
quately advertised and senti-
ments expressed by the locals
about this project were nega-
tive, and not in support of, as
you claim. A follow-up meet-
ing was promised but mysteri-
ously never happened. We chal-
lenge you to come to Guana
Cay and find anyone in favour
of this project. As to your men-
tion of the "Disney" effect on
the island, do you realise that
the locals also opposed that pro-
ject?
You mention the sediment
runoff from Shell Island. Are
you implying that this environ-
mental impact-was.the fault of
the locals? Trust in the fact that
the locals have learned a hard
lesson from their experience
with Dishey. Now armed with
this knowledge the locals see
the potential for a much larger
environmental disaster. Disney
was only a preview to the fea-
, ture presentation produced by
the Passerine project. The locals
refuse to close their eyes to
what they now know is a proven
fact. Sediment runoff is a death
sentence for marine life. The
runoff from Shell island dredge
spoils contains what used to be
under the water. The project
you are advocating will contain
massive sediment runoff from
the construction of the golf
course. After the course is com-
plete, the runoff will include all
of the chemicals used to main-
tain the course. You say that
runoff is not good, yet you
refuse to address the sediment
produced by construction, and


the chemical goodies that will
go along with it. Is it your argu-
ment that the residents should
close their eyes to further
destruction? This new project
is a land-based project with a
much larger impact than Dis-
ney. If you can plainly see the
results of Disney's project, then
why can you not see that the.
results-will be.even worse with a
project of this size? Do these
developers have special powers
that allow them to carve the
land with no runoff and apply
liberal amounts of chemicals
with no environmental effect,
or are the homeowners there
signing an agreement that they
will never use their bathrooms?
Maybe you even believe that
creating a 240-slip marina, that
will sink approximately 1,440
creosote soaked or arsenic filled
pilings, will have no effect on a
beautiful and pristine fish nurs-
ery known as Joe's Creek. Your
apparent ignorance is stagger-
ing. Y6c laim outright that this
project will have absolutely no
effect on the reef. This is per-
haps your most preposterous
statement. You mention the
Florida Keys as an example in
your article. For your informa-
tion, there is NO central waste
treatment system in existence
in the Keys. There are a few
small areas that have systems,
(one encompassing 15 streets
and another serving Key West)
but no central system. As of
- right now, the Florida Keys-
have a very sick reef in critical
condition according to all major
environmental groups and gov-
ernment agencies alike. The
estimated cost of installing a
central waste system in the Keys
is $500 million; a price the resi-
dents and taxpayers there must.
pay to even begin to salvage
what little is left of that reef.:
This cost is in addition to the
millions it will take to clean up
the waters as they are now.
These are hard facts and proven
figures. Should you dispute
these facts and figures then you
are welcome to read the Nation-
al Oceanic and Atmospheric
Agency's report on the Marine
Sanctuary in the Florida Keys.
A copy of this report is on Gua-
na and you are welcome to read
it. By the way, the sanctuary
was created in the Keys by the
United States government as a
direct response to the critical
condition of the water and reef


there. Why is the water and reef
in such a critical state? The
answer is unchecked develop-
ment, a lack of a central waste
treatment system, and pollution
from golf course runoff and
holding tanks being dumped
with little or no compliance or
enforcement of pump-out laws.
This is a proven fact. Have you
ever been to the Florida Keys?
Have you done any research?
Perhaps you should check your
facts before you present them.
Check your facts, or at least vis-
it an area, before you claim
knowledge of such. To use your
words Mr Sealey, "your igno-
rance is particularly apparent.",
Let us be very clear now. We
are not against development of
this area.. .we are only opposed
to irresponsible development.
Everyone is aware that the
majority of this land is private-
ly owned and could be sold to
someone else to develop.
Maybe that is a good thing since
the new owners would come in
with the knowledge that Guana
has a concerned, aware, popu-
lation that cares about the
future of their home. If the new
developers started with this in
mind, perhaps their develop--
ment would BEGIN with the
goal of sustainable tourism and
not end with quick bucks for
the developer and lip service
for the residents. Is the govern-
ment of the Bahamas prepared
to pay the enormous price that
the Florida Keys are now forced
to pay?
Right now, Guana Cay is
experiencing a period of growth
like never before. Fortunately,
this growth is steady and-
digestible. A project of Passer-
ine's size is enough to choke a
herd of elephants and in no way
compares to the pace now. To
dateCno one has constructed
450 homes, a resort golf course,
and 240-slip marina in one fell
swoop. Perhaps the developers
think that no one will notice?
Let us also point out that this
development company has
absolutely no experience build-
ing on a small barrier island in
close proximity to a reef. We
do not want to be the test case.
Finally, we invite you to ask
anyone whether they would
prefer a Tom Fazio designed
golf course, or a reef designed
by the most experienced cre-
ators ever, Mother Nature and -
God.
AUBREY ST JOHN
CLARKE
Guana Cay,
Abaco,
January 7, 2005.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 5


Taxicab union trustee hits




out at election statements


* By KILAH ROLLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMAS Taxicab
union trustee Daniel Cleare,
one of six members facing
remove1 from the union, hit


Daniel Cleare claims voting process never bgan


out last night at statements
made by the union's presi-


dent on last week's emer-
gency election to determine


the group's future in the
organisation.
Mr Cleare, responding to
a statement made by Leon
Griffin last week, said he
was disappointed by the
president's version of
Thursday's election, which
was stopped by the Ministry
of Labour.
Mr Cleare said that con-
trary to what Mr Griffin
said on Friday, the election
process was not stopped 30
minutes into voting. He said
the voting process never
begarrn.

Members
Sixty union members met
on Thursday for an emer-
gency meeting to vote on if
vice-president Cheryl Fer-
guson; Mr Cleare; first vice-
president Sigmund Bethel;
and executive officer Mark
Sawyer should remain in
office.
There are about 156
financial union members
who have paid their dues
and are eligible to vote.
Labour Minister Vincent
Peet was not available for
comment yesterday, but had
said previously that the
election was suspended
because four officers had
not received a list of the
financial members.
In response; Mr Griffin
said that his office is always
open throughout the work
week and that his secretary


had presented a copy of the
list to Mr Cleare. He
claimed Mr Cleare had
refused to accept the list.
However, Mr Cleare has
denied that he refused to
accept a copy of the list of
financial members in the
union.

List
He said that Roscoe
Weech, the union's secre-
tary general, received two
of his letters dated
December 13 and Decem-
ber 20. Each requested a
copy of the list prior to the
election, Mr Cleare added.
He said that on the day
before the elections he
received a message that an
envelope was waiting for
him, but when he received
the message he was on his
way to the Labour Board to
present copies of his unan-


swered letters.
"I have never been dis-
honest in my life because
dishonesty breeds con-
tempt," said Mr Cleare.
"The first time I received a
list it was Jaduary 5 and the
list was unsigned, undated
and is still in question. This
is not about mudslinging,
it's about telling the truth."
He said it was unfair of
Mr Griffin to report that
officers from the Depart-
ment of Labour stopped the
voting process.
Mr Cleare said that he
was the first person in line
to receive a ballot paper on
Thursday but before he
could vote a call came down
from the Ministry of Labour
to stop the process.
Said Mr Cleare: "I doa't,
see where the intent to
challenge the Labour
Department comes into
play."


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


F OR all of their rhetoric, successive
Bahamian governments have treated
agriculture as a subsistence activity. In doing
so, they have missed an opportunity to
encourage the creation of an agricultural
industry that is sufficiently competitive and
advanced to take meaningful advantage of
the potential linkages offered by the tourism
industry.
The packinghouses, which are the single
most prominent brick-and-mortar-feature of
Bahamian agricultural policy, are sadly rep-
resentative of this limited vision.
Essentially, the idea behind the packing-
house is to sustain traditional Bahamian-style
farming by offering those who continue tra-
ditional, non-competitive methods a cen-
tralised point of sale. The implementers of
the policy saw no need to encourage farmers
to handle and advance their own marketing,
or to invest in higher-tech growing methods.
They simply gave them a place to sell their
traditionally limited range produce.
As a result, the perception among young
Bahamians is that, when ministers and MPs
urge them to stay on the island and farm,
they are being invited to return to the back-
breaking, tedious and unstimulating careers
of their forebears.
To most of the young people on the Fami-
ly Islands, (who, incidentally, are clearly not
looking for the quiet life, judging by their
near-universal tendency to migrate to Nas-
sau) it lacks not only glamour, but also the
promise of attaining and sustaining a mid-
dle class life-style.
L;-This perception has tq' be countered,not '
just with words, but with actions and with
hard policy.
Technology, organisation
and a wider outlook are needed
Judging from their actions to date, agri-
culture is still seen by too many
Bahamian politicians as an intrinsically low-
tech profession, suited for people looking
for the quiet life.
While there is endless talk in government
circles about forging linkages between
tourism :- and agriculture, the realities and lim-
itatio,.s of the ministry's programmes actually
militate against any real linkages develop-
ing.
To begin with, the Ministry of Agriculture
is simply under-funded. The kind of trans-
formation that is needed if substantial link-
ages are going to be forged with tourism was
recently demonstrated with the unveiling of
the Lucayan Tropic hydroponic facility.


PERSPECTIVES

A.N D R E W A L L E N

On a national scale, it will take hundreds of
millions of dollars to initiate farming pro-
jects on all of the agricultural islands that
will be' in a position to take advantage of the
government's much touted "anchor" resorts,
as Lucayan clearly intends to take advantage
of the presence of Atlantis in its backyard.
The derisory sums that agriculture has
attracted to date tell us a lot about what actu-
al priority government gives the transforma-
tion of the industry. It certainly tells us a lot
more than all their words and promises.
Government needs to realise that the
Atlantises of this world are not going to slow
down and wait for traditional farming meth-
ods to catch up to their needs. As sophisti-
cated businesses, they require the same level
of sophistication among their suppliers. To
supply such an industry satisfactorily, farmers
have to possess access to modern technolo-
gies that Bahamian agriculture has never
before had.
Facilities that provide protection from the
vagaries of weather and skilled workers with
an understanding of crop cycles, disease treat-
ment and improving breeds are all necessities
in modern farming, and they all cost money.

If The Goodfellows.can do it?
a, iiiaiianns \wlho ate familiar wittbe'lie
Go.dfellp,w. fa.m located near
Mount Pleasant in western New Providence,
will know first hand that it does not take the
kind of investment that went into Lucayan
Tropic to produce a first-rate, modern facil-
ity answering today's need for freshness, vari-
ety and responsive organisation.
In the few years they have been operat-
ing, the Goodfellows, non-Bahamians, have
managed to significantly improve the quality
of produce available to Bahamian shoppers in
western New Providence, where they supply
several foodstores.
They also supply clientele on other islands,
shipping on the fast ferries that are now avail-
able to Harbour Island, for instance.
It is this kind of fresh approach to agricul-
ture (as a science and as a potentially lucra-
tive profession) that the ministry needs to
adopt and to encourage among Bahamian
farmers, rather than just more of the old
packinghouse-to-produce exchange subsis-
tence.


MONDAY
JANUARY 10
2:00 Community Page 1540AM
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
7:30 Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:30 Immediate Response
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 Cybernet
2:00 Animated Classics
3:00 Treasure Attic
3:30 CMJ Club Zone
4:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
4:30 Kids On The Move
4:58 & 30 ZNS News Update LIVE
5:00 After School Special
6:00 Holy Hip Hop
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Teacher's & Salaried Co-op
Credit Union
9:00 Black College Talent Hour
10:00 Sports Lifestyles
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540AM


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Ministry must adopt fresh



approach to farming





PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


* THE 6th Annual Judicature Gala Ball, hosted by the president and justices of the Court of
Appeal, and the justices of the Supreme Court, was held at Sandals Royal Bahamian over the
weekend. Pictured, from left: Paul Farquharson, Commissioner of Police; Sharon Farquhar-
son; Lady Hope of Craighead Katherine Mary; and Lord Hope of Craighead Arthur David.
(Photo: Franklyn Ferguson)


RIDLEY OFFERS:
* 600 students (ages 10-19) enrolled
from across Canada and 36 countries
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* outstanding facilities for academics, arts,
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* Macintosh laptop computer integration
* internet access campus-wide
* over 50 sports and extra-curriculars
* distinguished university placement rate
* $1,4 million bursary/scholarship
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* global network of loyal alumni


Upcoming
Ridley Event in Nassau

Ridley Admission Reception
Friday, January 14th, 2005 6:30 pm
British Colonial Hilton Hotel
One Bay Street, 242-322-3301
Don Rickers, Ridley's Director
of Admission, in attendance.


Fason iHall

Top of The Hill Mackey Street,
Mall at Marathon & Town Centre Mall

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A SPECTACULAR costume from the Valley Boys
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


ICI~I111 I I


-- i


I rmLOCAL NEWS


THE TRIBUNE


,.;
., .- q ,




MUNUAY, JANUARY IU, eUUO, -NAU- /


THE TRIBUNE


Red Mass ".
service
PICTURED at the Red
Mass on Sunday. from left.
front row: Appeal Justices
Emmanuel Osadebay. Mlau- A
rice Churman, and Chief
Justice Sir Burton Hall.
Catholic Archbishop Patrick
Pinder, Lord Hope of Craig-
head Arthur David. Court [-
Appeal President Dame
Joan Sawyer and Justice
Hilton Ganpatsingh. Also
pictured (behind, right of
Bishop Pinder. Justice Jon
Isaacs). Fr-o
(Photo: Franklvn i


-i --
1~~V -,~ mU
w,"w~ ~WF1~
I t
I
*
-


z .


--2





SCHIEF Justice Sir Burton Hall (far left) is pictured at the Red Mass with Catholic Archbishop Patrick Pinder; Lord Hope of
Craighead Arthur David; and President of the Court of Appeal and fifth member of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Coun-
cil, Dame Joan Sawyer.
(Photo: Franklyn Ferguson)


Patio Grille
Dine outdoors and enjoy a casual lunch at the most
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For more information or reservation please call 322-3301 ect. 4045
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at 7:30 p.m. nightly at the Church of God Convention Centre
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004


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THE TRIUN MOY J


TUC president




predicts 'very




active 2005'


HAVE you noticed how US
political campaigns target spe-
cific groups of voters? The
needs of each group are identi-
fied and addressed separately,
because politicians recognize
that the voting public is not a
single, generic person, but a
collection of millions of per-
sonalities. Positions on US
Social Security are addressed
to older generations, while tax
incentives for business are
aimed at corporate types, and
so on.
That strategy is known as
"target marketing." When sell-
ing your home, it could be the
single most important strategy
implemented by your BREA
agent. Purchasers have differ-
ent needs, just like voters.
If your home has three bed-
rooms, two baths, a fenced
yard, and is near a good school,
a family with young children
might find it attractive. On the
other hand, if you own an exec-
utive home, for example, on
the fairway of a golf resort, it is
not likely to appeal to college
students.
When listing your home, ask
your BREA agent for details
about the marketing plan used
to attract purchasers. Look for
an innovative, imaginative
approach to locating and
attracting specific buyer groups.
Ask what advertising or pro-
motional vehicle will be used -
newspaper ads, direct mail fly-
ers, brochures, internet? What
is the plan if the first approach
doesn't yield results? Target
marketing is an extremely
effective method of attracting
homebuyers, and no one
understands the process more
than a BREA professional.
Ms Massoni is a sales
.associate at Coldwell
Banker/Lightbourn Realty in
.- Nassau.


"There are a lot of things we
need to get done, and we're
gonna do them fearlessly."

Trade Union Congress president Obie Ferguson


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
TRADE Unions will be
"very, very active" in 2005,
Trade Union Congress (TUC)
president Obie Ferguson has
predicted.
He said large scale industrial
action could not be ruled out
this year if labour concerns are
not addressed.
Mr Ferguson told The Tri-
bune that the TUC plans to
hold a conclave some time this
month to discuss its approach
to the many labour issues that
need attention.
"There are a lot of things we
need to get done, and we're
gonna do them fearlessly," he
said.
The focus of the TUC's
efforts in 2005 will include the
conclusion of industrial agree-
ments for Radisson Cable
Beach hotel employees, air traf-
fic controllers, construction
workers and members of the
recently formed Nurses Union.
The TUC, which represents
approximately 30,000 workers,
will also work for the imple-
mentation of International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
Convention 87, which stresses
the principle of freedom of asso-
ciation.
' "Every worker should have


a right to join a trade union,"
Mr Ferguson said, adding that
although this right is consistent
with the constitution, it is
presently not respected in every
industry in the Bahamas.
A number of issues sur-
rounding the Employment Act,
2001, including the functions of
Bahamas Industrial Tribunal,
will also receive attention, Mr
Ferguson said.
Disputes
He believes that the tribunal
is "not functioning in the man-
ner it ought to be", as it attends
only to disputes concerning
individual workers and not dis-
putes between unions and
employers.
This, he said, is contrary to
the provisions of the Act.
In addition, the TUC will
contest an amendment to the
Act revoking a cap on t*e daily
hours of managerial staff.
Since 2001, managers an be
made to work as many h urs as
employers see fit, comp red to
other workers who are r quired
to put in an eight-hour c ay.
The TUC will also ptsh for
the reversal of the "discri ina-
tory provision" which denies
overtime pay for a sixth work
day to employees in the hospi-
talit) industry.


Mr Ferguson explained that
unlike other workers, hotel staff
presently receive overtime
pay-only for-a seventh day of
work.
Over the past year, the TUC
found reason to attack the
Department of Labour on a
number of occasions for what
it called the slow and "indeci-
sive" manner in which labour
disputes have been dealt
with.
Acknowledging some recent
responsiveness from govern-
ment on this matter, Mr Fergu-
son said he would continue to
press the issue. Disputes, that
by law should be dealt with in
days, continue to take months
or years to be resolved, he
added.
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stressed that while the TUC
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tinue to do so with the appro-
priate regard for the welfare of
the country as a whole.


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MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


LOCL


Pilot project for National Youth Service launched


* By GLADSTONE
THURSTON
Bahamas Information
Services
FIFTY-EIGHT youngsters,
representing the government's
nascent National Youth Service,
left for a pilot stint at the
Bahamas Agriculture Research
Centre (BARC), North Andros,
on Saturday.
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Neville Wisdom; Agri-
culture Minister V Alfred Grey;
Senator Trevor Whylly; acting


director of Youth Autherine
Turnquest; executive director of
the National Youth Service
G iella Fraser; and parents and
"wishers were on hand to
e urage the all-male group and
their 11 instructors as they left on
the Sea Wind.
The juniors (12 to 15 year olds)
will spend three months partici-
pating in character and leader-
ship development programmes.
They will return to their regular
schools.
The seniors (16 to 19 year olds)
will spend six months taking the


entire programme that include
skills training.
When they are completed, they
will enter the Ministry of Youth's
Fresh Start programme which will
prepare them further for jobs
and micro entrepreneurial activi-
ties.
Their instructors include spe-
cialists secured by the Inter
American Development Bank
and officers of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.
"We are very, very happy,"
said Deacon Jeff Lloyd, execu-
tive director of YEAST (Youth
Empowerment and Skills Train-
ing Institute), the executing
agency of this pilot programme.
YEAST is the outreach arm of
the Catholic Archdiocese of Nas-
sau.
"Finally the country is witness-
ing the start of a long held dream
by the leaders of this country, par-
ticularly the Progressive Liberal
Party government and the late
Prime Minister Sir Lynden Pin-
dling," said Mr Lloyd.
When this pilot is completed,
the Ministry of Youth and Cul-
ture, YEAST, and the Inter
American Development Bank
will evaluate it and determine the
next step.

Implemented
"It is the intention of the gov-
ernment to implement a national
youth programme comprising of
three components," said Mr
Lloyd. "How that will be imple-
mented and executed after this
will be largely determined by
what we learn through this pilot
effort."
Mr Wisdom, described Satur-
day as "a very special day in the
history of the Bahamas because a
dream is being realized".
"It is a dream towards organis-
ing the youth of our country in a
more structured way through the
implementation of a pilot project
for the National Youth Service.
"Today signals the beginning
of the overall programme and I
feel very proud and privileged
that it was able to happen so
quickly after we assumed the gov-
ernment.
"As Deacon Lloyd and his
team prepares young men in dis-
cipline and skills training, at this
end we will be making assess-
ments of where they are and pro-
viding them opportunities for
when they exit this programme.
We want to do the best we can to


MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture, Neville Wisdom, encouraged youngsters on their way
to Andros in a pilot project of the proposed national youth programme to do their best.
(BIS photo by Gladstone Thurston)


ensure their success."
In its election platform 'Our
Plan', the PLP told of its intention
to introduce a Bahamas Youth
Achievement Programme.
"It is essentially another name
for the National Youth Service, a
dream of former prime minister,
the late Sir Lynden," said Mr
Lloyd.
When the PLP won the last
general election and became the
government, Prime Minister Per-
ry G Christie appointed a consul-
tative committee to see how best
such a scheme could be imple-
mented.
"Eventually we were able to
present to and have approved by
the Ministry of Youth, the Cabi-
net of the Bahamas, and the
Inter-American Development
Bank a three-part scheme which
would be a part of an overall,
overarching national youth devel-
opment programme," said Mr
Lloyd.
Three areas were proposed.
The first, aimed at students in
grades seven through twelve,
would underscore national pride,
and incorporate, among other
things, the Governor General's
Youth Award programme.
The second would emphasise
a "restorative element," said Mr
Lloyd, and target "at-risk" young-
sters.


The third area would under-
score transferable skills. "These
would be young people who are
no longer in school, who are not a
problem to society as such, but
who are, however, in need of
training so they could be ready
for jobs," said Mr Lloyd.
The consultative committee
decided that a pilot project should
be executed "to see how it goes,
to be evaluated, so that that infor-
mation can be used to develop a
larger national programme.

Restorative
"It was further decided," Mr
Lloyd explained, "that the
restorative element, dealing with
at-risk youngsters, would be the
one area that would be this pilot
programme."
The committee also recom-
mended that instead of the gov-
ernment creating a new pro-
gramme, it should find in the
community non-governmental
organizations which have records
in delivering quality programmes,
which could benefit from some
institutional strengthening and
programme delivery enhance-
ment, and appoint them to deliv-
er these various components, Mr
Lloyd explained.
YEAST ",as ,pproached and
appointed to deliver this pilot


programme of the restorative
element.
"It was decided, after consul-
tation, that we should use the
facilities in Andros; have the pro-
gramme for six months; and that
the young men should be away
from home for the duration of
the project.
"They would be taught disci-
pline, national pride, loyalty, team
work, improve their academics,
upgrade their mental health, and
learn four construction trades -
carpentry, electrical installation,
plumbing and masonry," said Mr
Lloyd.
Acting director of Youth
Ms Tumquest described the start
of the project as "wonderful
news".
"There are other areas that we
are going to be looking into with
the assistance of the Inter-Amer-
ican Development Bank which
has brought over a number of
team members and specialists
who have training and exposure
in other countries.
"They are bringing along all of
their various methods...and
hopefully with their assistance we
can create innovative pro-
grammes for this country," said
Ms Turnquest. "It is going to be a
major task but I am sure we are
up to thd mark to make sure it
happens."


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MONDAY, JANUARY 10,~ 2004, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


S4~






THE TRIBUNE


DArF 19 2UnNnAY .IANUARY 10. 2005


Man shot in face ASAONSSuper
Msiar dancer has all the ..


FROM page one
The men robbed a female
employee of a handbag
containing cash and per-
sonal items.
The men escaped on foot.
Investigations continue.
During the New Year's
Junkanoo parade a number
of persons were arrested
for disorderly behaviour
and one man was taken into


custody in connection with
possession of a small
amount of marijuana, Supt
Hanna said.
Police also detained two
juveniles in connection with
separate stabbing incidents
in the Bank Lane area.
The victims in both cases
received only minor
injuries.
They were treated and
released from hospital.


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SRetired Chief
Superintendent Of
Police
DWIGHT
ALEXANDER
MONCUR, 70

of Carmichael Road,
will be held on
SWednesday, 11:00 am
at St Gregory's
Anglican Church, Carmichael Road. Fr
Addison Turnquest assisted by Fr Anthony
Roberts and Fr Peter Grist will officiate.
Interment will be in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, JFK Drive.

Memories of his life will forever be cherished
by his wife, Dorothy and their four children,
Alexandra, Amanda, Anita and Augustus
Moncur; a daughter, Michelle Moncur and
her children, Shaniqua Mackey and Jerome
Smith; one sister, Joyce Moncur and her
children, Brenda Ferguson, Lawrence and
Anton Moncur and Monneith Thompson; one
brother David Moncur and his wife, Florazel
and their children, David and Darice Moncur;
brothers and sisters-in-law, Marguerite
Moncur, Al and Eileen McCartney, Ruth and
Lloyd Delancy, Ivis and Archie Carey, Charles
and Angela Wallace, Arnold and Mary
McCartney; other nephews and nieces, Philip,
Cecil, Gilbert, Samuel (Mighty) and Rodney
Moncur, Derek and Ryan Davis, Terrance
Ferguson, Sheenie Pratt, Shariah Saunders,
Tamina Anderson, Carla Bastian, Tonneitte
Munnings and numerous other relatives and
friends including the families of the late William
and Ancel Moncur, Ulrica Holmes, Roosevelt
Carey, Bessie Allen, Ella Evans, the family
of Bernard Lafayette Sr of Tampa, Florida,
his caregiver Annie Greene and the entire St
James' Parish Church family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, Nassau Street on
Tuesday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and on
Wednesday at the Church from 10:00 am to
service time.


Saxons' double delight


FROM page one

was portrayed with Viking-
inspired costumes and fight-
style choreography, securing a
winning total score of 3,052
points, according to the unoffi-


cial results.
Saxons fan and former NBA
star Rick Fox said he was
impressed with the performance
of the Saxons on Friday, and he
was happy to be able to attend
the event for the first time in
many years, now that he is


retired.
"It's amazing to have the
chance to come back after all
this time," Mr Fox told The Tri-
bune. "And it's nice to be home
with my family."
Roots were not far behind the
Saxons with an overall score of
3,024 points. The group
impressed the crowd with its
depiction of "Egypt the Glo-
ry's Journey to the Afterlife".
Their lead piece "Pharaoh's
Hunt" won major points, along
with the group's free dancers
led by Monique Elliott and
Mettellus Chipman, who direct-
ed the dancers in the exagger-
ated movements of Egyptian-
style moves.
The Valley Boys, who missed
out on third place by a mere 11
points, was the first group to
rush. Just after 9pm on Friday,
Bay Street was transformed into
"Ancient Mexico".
The group's lead piece,
"Faces of the Divine", won the
best lead, costume title, and, its
"Aztec Sacrifice" piece was


DISTRIBUTION OF 2005

TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES


Batelco wishes to advise the public that the 2005
Bahamas Telephone Directory will be available for
distribution in New Providence as of Tuesday, January
4, 2005 to Friday, January 14th 2005.


For the convenience of subscribers, sub-depots will be
opened daily (with the exception of Saturdays and
Sunday) as follows:-:


John F. Kennedy Drive

Shirley Street Plaza

Mall at Marathon


9:00a.m. 5:00p.m.

9:00a.m. 5:00p.m.

9:00a.m. 8:00p.m.


Business customers requiring more than 50 directories
may collect them directly from our Stores Department
at Perpall's Tract from Tuesday, January 4th, 2005


between the hours of 9:00a.m.


and 4:30p.m.


Family Island customers may collect directories from
the local BTC offices.


However, after January 14, 2005, directories may only
be collected for a limited time from the Administrative
Building, John F. Kennedy Drive or the Mall at
Marathon.


judged the third best costume.
One Family celebrated a
"New Year's Fiesta". The
group's execution of its theme,
"Should All Acquaintances Be
Forgotten and Never Brought
to Mind", scored a total of 2,782
points overall for fourth place.
The choreography of the
front-line female dancers was
similar to a Las Vegas show.
Dancers dressed in purple pin
striped jackets, silver shoes and
feathered top hats. The women
also incorporated umbrellas into
their routine, much like Vegas
showgirls. Most of the men
wore crepe black tuxedos with
oversized bows, and the brass
section resembled the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.
A dancer who sported a cos-
tume entitled "A Time For
Wine" placed first in the Off
the Shoulder costume catego-
ry, winning the judges over with
his design and enthusiasm for
the wine .he pretended to drink
throughout the parade.
The P|odiLIa| Sons, a 1,500-
me niber gioup based in Yellow
Elder Gardens that broke away
from the Valley Boys last year,
earned 2,672 points and placed
fifth with the theme "Welcome
to the Bahamas The World's
Greatest Destination".
The 28-year-old Music Mak-
ers group rounded off Category
A with 1,440 points and a sixth
place finish.
Many scrap groups per-
formed in the New Year's
parade and the Z-Bandits, a
group which has resi -faced
after several years, paid tribute
to Olympic gold medallist Sir
Durward Knowles as a Bahami-
an National Hero.
Sir Durward, who attended
Junkanoo on Friday for the first
time in 50 years, said the parade
"is such a change from the old
days".
In the 1950s, scrap groups
were more common and the
parade highlighted individual
characters instead of the highly
organised large groups that now
frequent downtown once a year.
Twenty-six groups participat-
ed in the parade, including 11 in
the B Category, three in the C
Category and six scrap groups.
Track Road Theatre joined
the lineup on Friday and per-
formed a Junkanoo-style play
in Rawson Square.
Playwright, poet and author
Dr Ian Strachan founded the
group more than 10 years ago
and said the theme, "Pleez Jesus
Gimmie a Escalade", aimed at
addressing "disturbing trends
in the Christian community".
The New Year's parade,
which began at 9pm instead of
the usual post-midnight time,
continued into early Saturday
morning. The results were
announced Saturday afternoon
at Arawak Cay.
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Neville Wisdom said
the earlier time would not be
regular feature of the parade.
Weather permitting, next year's
New Year's parade will return
to its regular time.
Mr Wisdom commended
parade organizers for a "job
well done", and added that the
competition was very keen.
The wrap up of the two main
Junkanoo events does not signal
the end of the season. Eleuthera
held its parade on Saturday and
Grand Bahama's Junior
Junkanoo parade, postponed
because of the hurricanes, has
been rescheduled for February.
Results from the Boxing Day
Parade in New Providence are
still unofficial.
See page 2


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MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


4


2ND ANNUAL NATIONAL TOURISM CONFERENCE
GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
JANUARY 26 28 2005
MAKING IT BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS AGAIN!


DAY I WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26,2005 (GROWTH)


SESSION 1
Opening ceremony includes remarks by the Minister of Tourism, Keynote Address by
Jeffrey F Rayport, Chairman and CEO, Marketspace LLC. Musical entertainment by
the Grand Bahama Chorale and Freeport Anglican High School Band

SESSION 2
Workshop conducted by Rayport and Director General of Tourism, Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace.

SESSION 3
MEETING THE GROWING DEMAND FOR LABOUR
Focus on manpower needs and education and training for tourism-based economy

SESSION 4
ENHANCING ACCESSIBILITY
Focus on major ports of entry, sea transportation, air travel linkages; security

SESSION 5
INCREASING VISITOR EXPENDITURE
Focus on creating opportunities, attractions/events, merchandizing, film industry

DAY 2 THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 (IMPROVEMENT)

SESSION 6
NEW PERSPECTIVES
Presentation of the best conceptually based paper submitted in response to
general invitation

SESSION 7
LEARNING FROM DISASTER: MINIMIZING THE EFFECTS OF A MAXIMUM STRENGTH
HURRICANE
Focus on building code, communications, tropical redevelopment, emergency
response/relief, national plan, new legislation

SESSION 8
DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
Focus on land use, managing operating costs, urban and Family Island
redevelopment


SESSION 9
SERVICE IMPROVEMENT
Focus on productivity and quality service
DAY 3 FRIDAY, JANUARY 28,2005 (SUSTAINABILITY)


SESSION 10
NEW PERSPECTIVES
Presentation of the best empirically based paper submitted in response to
general invitation

SESSION 11
BAHAMIANISATION OF THE PRODUCT
Focus on Bahamianising investment, concept/theme, innovation, quality
products, entertainment


SESSION 12
PLANNED DEVELOPMENTS
Updates on major tourism projects in New Providence and the Family Islands

SESSION 13
THE VALUE OF PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS
CLOSING CHARGE BY PRIME MINISTER, RT HON PERRY G CHRISTIE


# The 9th Annual Cacique Awards, Friday January 28,2005
at the Regency Theatre, 8pm.


9thanmnual
CACIQUEg
awardB
THE NINTH ANNUAL CACIQUE AWARDS
honouring tours' finest
An evening of elegance and entertainment.
Awards ceremony will be held on
January286 2005 at the Regency Theatre.
TICKETS $25
DRESS: Semi formal
Live music by finalists of the People's Choice
Bahamian Song Competition. Winners chosen
through public voting

THE BEST AND BRIGHTEST
TOURISM CAREERS FAIR
The Best and the Brightest Tourism
Careers Fair is designed to allow
students, educators, counsellors and
parents to gain awareness of lucra-
tive and rewarding careers in tourism,
and to inspire a desire to work in the
industry. (Daily at conference site
12:00-2:00pm January 26-28).


4 4


THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE
BAHAMIAN SONG COMPETITION
Voting deadline is January 12th, 2005
Vote for your.favourite gospel and secular
songs at www.cociqueowards.com
or call us at 326 3677 in Nassau or
1 (242) 300-7664 in the Family Islands.

A thentically
Bahamian
Craft Show


THE AUTHENTICALLY BAHAMIAN CRAFT &
SOUVENIR SHOW
Featured items at the Authentically Bahamian
Craft & Souvenir Show will include exquisite
handcrafted jewellery, ornamental scented
candles, homemade treats, high fashion straw
bags, charming straw dolls, and souvnfr items..
(Daily at conference site).


FEATURED SPEAKER
Jefrey loypo





Jeffrey Rayport is widely considered in
business and academic circles as-one of the
world's most Influential experts on the impact
of new information technologies on compa-
nies' service and marketing strategies.
Managing in a Service-Dominated Economy
The numbers are in: customer service and
customer loyalty have hit an all-time low, despite
an economy in which organizations succeed or
fail based on customer loyalty. Organizations
ignore these implications attheir own peril.in this
presentation filled with his passion for marketing
and branding, Rayport describes what's
necessary: a customer service "leap of faith" that
involves putting long-term relationships ahead
of short-term profits something most firms are
unwilling to do, but one that's necessary in
today's market. source:Was-lngtonSpeakeBuruea


SPEAKERS

Prime Minister, Hon Perry G Christie
Hlon Obie Wilchcombe, MP
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
Vernice Walkine
Willie Moss
Dr Doswell Coakley
Iris Pinder
Beverley Saunders
Renee McKinney
Dr Joan Vanderpool
Dr Kwame Charles
Raymond Jones
Anthony Kikivarakis
Kevin Healy
Ellison Greenslade
Greg Douglas
Daniel Melville
Paul Quigly
Dr Pandora Johnson
David Johnson
Frank Comito
Arthur Rolle
Rick Murrell
Carl Smith
Barry Benjamin
Cedric Saunders
Basil Smith
Todd Hill
Angela Cleare
Dr Sophia Rolle
Agatha Marcelle, MP
Robert Kramm
Archie Nairn
Dr Joseph Koppel
Arlene Nash Ferguson
Jason Prfid
Kenneth Bowe
Chris Justillien
Amy P Wilkins
Samuel Gardiner
Pat Bain


Earle Bethel
MAJOR TOURISM PROJECT UPDA1


DISCOUNTED ACCOMMODATIONS AT



Sheratorr

$133 (save 53%) $103 (save 52%) $79 (save 40%) Starting at $110

DISCOUNTED ROUNDTRIP AIRFARE ON bahamosalr
from Abaco, Cat Island, Eleuthera, Exuma, Long Island,
San Salvador & New Providence


FOR MORE INFORMATION
NP: Ruthann Rolle
TEL: 326-5179:
E-MAIL: rrolle@bchamas.com

GBI: Samuel Gardiner
TEL: 352-8044/5
E-MAIL: sgardiner@bahamas.com


OR REGISTER ONLINE: www.tourismbahar


.4
'4
.4




.4
.4
.4
'.4
.4
45


TES


Objective: To identify a series of steps that will lead to the significant growth,

improvement, and sustainability of the tourism product.


EbanWT;WSS


mas.,


;.Org






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14. MONDAY. JANUARY 10. 2005


After-school programme





aims for child development


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
CHILDREN attending the
after-school programme at the
St Andrew's Presbyterian Kirk
will be developed socially,
emotionally and spiritually,
says Tamyka Davis, the Kirk's
youth director.
The after-school programme
scheduled to begin Monday,
January 10, at the Kirk on
Princess Street and Peck Slope,
is sanctioned by the Ministry of
Social Services and Communi-
ty Development.
Each child will be provided
with tutoring, counselling,
recreational activities and spir-
itual instruction for each child,
says Ms Davis.
"We are distinct and differ-
ent because we are a pro-
gramme with a mission," she
says. "We have a clear pur-
pose. Our purpose primarily is
to see young children be cre-
ated, nurtured, developed in
every aspect of their person-
hood meaning their spiritu-
ality; socially in relation to one
another and emotional in
terms of their inward healing


Ask How.


Tutoring, counselling and


recreational activities


and health and wholeness;
communally in terms of how
they relate to other people.
We want to develop the child
in a holistic fashion."
The programme is a follow-
up to last year's six-week sum-
mer programme for at-risk
children jointly sponsored by
the Ministry and the Kirk.

Success
The success of the pro-
gramme led to its extension
into an after-school pro-
gramme for children between
the ages of five and 12 years. It
will be held Mondays through
Thursday from 3.15pm to
6pm.
Ms Davis says she is con-
vinced the programme is dif-
ferent from any programme to
be found elsewhere.
"We have the perfect blend,


where we include spiritual dis-
cipleship and nurturing. That's
foundational, so any time you
hear about a programme at St
Andrews Kirk, parents don't
need to worry because every-
thing that we do is Christ cen-
tred. There is always some
form of devotional. If it is a
puppet skit or a drama pre-
sentation or singing or an
object lesson, we believe that
everything that we are trying
to do is only going to be as suc-
cessful as we are able to instill
Godly values and principles
into our children," she says.
As with the summer pro-
grammes at the Kirk, the after-
school programme will be
based on five key components
- spiritual development, tutor-
ing, recreation, anger manage-
ment and community service.
Each day the programme
will begin with a devotional.
, "We are a church-based


organisation so that everything
that we do, everything that
happens really stems from a
spiritual transformation that
occurs inside the hearts of the
children that we reach," says
Ms Davis.
Tutoring is another essential
component to the programme.
It was discovered that a num-
ber of the children are not
achieving or maintaining the
grade point standard compe-
tencies that have been set
either by the Ministry of Edu-
cation or by classroom teach-
ers.
Ms Davis says the after-
school programme will seek to
reinforce what teachers are try-
ing to instill during the regular
9am to 3pm school hours.

Perfect
"It is a perfect opportunity
for students who need the
extra reinforcement, who may
be lagging behind or even
those who excel, who need to
be pushed further and encour-
aged to achieve more," says
Ms Davis.
Tutoring in language arts,
mathematics, science and
social studies, she adds, will be


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'j Although its sturdy frame and
box-body structure alone puts
the Sorento ahead of its
competition, Kia's pursuit of
safety does not stop there.
Intelligent safety systems used
in other premium-end vehicles,
like front impact sensors (FIS).
de-powered dual airbags and
y bell buckle sensors hare been
built into the Sorento.


done by trained professional
teachers or students currently
at COB in the teacher educa-
tion programme.
Computer classes will also
be offered, she says, courtesy
of the Lyford Cay Foundation
that helped to furnish their
computer lab.
Following devotions and
tutoring, there are a number
of recreational activities the
children, along with their par-
ents, can choose to do. They
include karate, art, choir, cre-
ative discoveries, sports, ani-
mal discoveries, computer, dra-
ma, bells, baking, step and
Junkanoo craft.

Skill
Ms Davis hopes that through
these activities, the child will
see a gift or a skill they can
"develop, hone, harness and
use as an alternative to being
involved in non-productive
activities".
The fourth key component
is anger management therapy.
Ms Davis says from coun-
selling with schools, group ses-
sions and the assessment of
students, it became, evident
that a lot of the nation's chil-
dren are dealing with anger
and aggression, mostly because
of the situation and the social
context within which they find
themselves.
"This anger is stemming a
lot from the problems that
exist within our families," she
says.
"Everything, from poverty,
low income families, single-
parent families, the lack of
positive role models in the
lives of our children, them hav-
ing witnessed and having been
victims of violent crimes.
"And so as early as five, six,
seven, eight our children have
been exposed to very traumat-
ic events in their lives, and, not
yet being equipped with the
proper skills and abilities to
handle and, assess what has
happened to them, they often
exhibit symptoms of violence,
aggression and anger..

Strategies
Anger management therapy
will provide the children an
opportunity to sit with trained
professional counsellors in a
group setting. There they will
learn how to express their
anger in non-violent ways and
they will be given the tools and
techniques to use when faced
with situations. They will also
be given life strategies to deal
with anger and aggression for
the rest of their lives."
The programme will also
seek to instill in each child the
importance of being a part of a
larger unit through community
service.


Children, says Ms Davis,
need to learn they are part of a
nation and have a social and
communal responsibility to
uplift, care and nurture each
other.
The success of the pro-
gramme, says Ms Davis, will
be measured in terms of
improved test scores, decreas-
es in violent activities and
more increases in their ability
to use the strategies they are
being taught in any attempts
to handle and process trau-
matic events that happen in
their lives.
Success will also be seen, she
adds, when children form rela-
tionships and are able to talk,
express and articulate things
that are happening inside of
them, and when they are able
to trust their mentors or adult
role models.
Ms Davis says that success
will also be evident when the
children understand they can
find peace and establish a rela-
tionship with God a rela-
tionship that gives them the
inner strength to withstand
whatever happens in their
lives.











THE Rotary Club East
Nassau and The Wheel-
chair Foundation will
present 50 brand-new
wheelchairs to the
Eleuthera community on
Tuesday, January 11 in
events being held at the
Rock Sound, Governor's
Harbour, Hatchet Bay
and Harbour Island clin-
ics. Senior Supervising
Nurse Sharon Cooper;
Herve Kelecom of
Rotary Club East Nassau;
Michele Rassin of Doc-
tors Hospital Group;
Khaalis Rolle of
Bahamas Ferries; and
Angie Pattusch of Ardas-
tra Gardens will join local
and central government
officials in congratulating
the recipients of the new
chairs.
Events will be held at:
Rock Sound Clinic, 10am;
Governor's Harbour
Clinic, noon; Glass Win-
dow Bridge, 2pm; Hatch-
et Bay Clinic, 3pm; Har-
bour Island Clinic, 5pm.


Calvary Delerance Church
East Street South
Tel: 325-1802


Come and Worship


with us each Monday at


12:30p.m. during our














"Mid-day Praise






Deliverance erice"
~~~~. : :. '. :-(, .. ,'!'* *.,.- J'*ii' i., ,-


-- ~ -----~-~~~I --


- LOCAL NEWS


m


2005 KIA- SORENT(


1~



-. -;-
,
iii rig







MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 15


THF TRIRI NF


M A 'WARRIOR QUEEN' from the Saxons Superstars
gets into the spirit of Friday evening's parade
(Photo: Joann McPike)


WINGS






IS BACK!

Buy a Large
3-topping pizza,

get an order
of 10 Wings

p for














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393-50 0 361.300-
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393-8080 393-83
Poet Lucaya 373-8000
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Elizabeth Higgs was the grand prize winner of the (--
free-for-all at Nassau Motor Company. She received a full
refund of the amount of her purc.tA aSO. Cherowlet Aveo.
The contest ran 'from August to Octber. There were many
other prize winners during the promotion, which was
designed to showcase the new Chevrolet models at NMC
Pictured with Ms. Higgs are Sean Moore, marketing executive
for the campaign, and Forestall Dorsett, NMC salesman.


SI |I- I I-JIM


~h~g~a~a!~ t-









PAGEOCALM,-,AY,-JANUARYN10,E2005WTHE TRIBUNE
"g A, .- C -: .,.. . -. .. . . .


N A ROOTS drummer helps create a powerful beat at Friday's Junkanoo parade.


(Photo: Franklyn Ferguson)


PAGE 1 6,'MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


MAU".








MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


SECTION


business@100jamz.com


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahamas tops Caribbean





over economic freedom


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

been ranked as
the most econom-
ically free nation
in the Caribbean
for 2005 by a Wall Street Journal
survey, although this nation's
rating and country ranking has
changed little over the past
decade.
The Wall Street Journal's
Index of Economic Freedom,
carried out in conjunction with


the right-wing think-tank, the
Heritage Foundation, ranked
the Bahamas 25th out of 149
nations, placing it seven spots
ahe",d of the next highest
Cafibbean nation, Barbados.
The survey ranks nations on a
sliding scale of one to five, with
one being the highest level,
based generally on what is per-
ceived as the level of "govern-
ment interference" and involve-
ment in an economy, assessing
categories such as trade policy,
government fiscal burden,
wages and prices, property


Wall Street Journal index ranks nation 25th out
of 149, despite lack of transparency on business
licence issuances, lengthy court and permit
processes and intellectual property violations


rights, regulation and govern-
ment intervention in the econ-
omy.
The Bahamas, in gaining 25th
spot, achieved an overall score
of 2.5 the same it gained in


2004. This was despite criticism
in the Index of Economic Free-
dom's country report on the
Bahamas of the "lack of trans-
parency" in the issuing of busi-
ness licences, and the lengthy


time to obtain the relevant per-
mits.
In giving the Bahamas top
marks on property rights, the
Wall Street Journal's Index of
Economic Freedom said the<


Bahamas had "an efficient legal
system", something that is like-
ly to raise eyebrows among
most who come into contacts
with the report.
The survey drew heavily on
the US Department of Com-
merce's current country report
for the Bahamas, which said:
"While generally fair, the
Bahamian judicial process tends
to be much slower than the
norm in the United States."
* And while the Bahamas did
-,See RATING, Page 4B


US businessmen told:


expect late payments


and hidden differences


in Bahamas dealings


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN businessmen
and women may still have
"real differences" with your


position despite ending a meet-
ing with "handshakes and
pleasantries", a US Commerce
Department guide warns its
unwary private sector clients,
while drug trafficking is a sub-


ject that should "be avoided"
as a discussion topic.
The US government's guide
on business customs in the
Bahamas, part of a 27-page
package designed to help the


unwary American in develop-
ing business relationships with
this nation, describes Bahami-
ans as "not punctual for meet-
See GUIDE, Page 2B


PM: S1.2bn Cable ,

Beach decision to

arrive this week


ic


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Baha Mar consortium
will this week learn whether its
planned $1.2 billion Cable
Beach rc development will get
the go-ahead from the Govern-
ment, as Prime Minister Perry
Christie said talks would be con-
cluded one way or another this
week.
Speaking on Island FM yes-
terday afternoon, Mr Christie
said the talks between the Gov-
ernment and Baha Mar would
"have to be" concluded "very,
very shortly". He added: "I
can't imagine they will go on
beyond next week."


The Prime Minister's com-
ments that the investor consor-
tium, headed by Lyford Cay bil-
lionaire Dikran Izmirlian and
his investment banker son,
Sarkis, needed to be given time
to get their financing in place
indicated that the Government
has finally realized the urgency
of the situation that was
revealed by The Tribune last
Friday.
This newspaper reported that
the Baha Mar project could be
"blown up" if it failed to rapid-
ly conclude a Heads of Agree-
ment and deal with the Gov-
ernment to acquire the Radis-
See DEAL, Page 4B


Retail formats

drive Freeport

Concrete's first

post-IPO profit


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The $279,000 net income gen-
erated by Freeport Concrete's
Home Centre and Robin Hood
Enterprises retail operations
drove the company to its first
annual net profit since becom-
ing a public company in 2001,
more than offsetting the loss
from its aggregate and ready-


mixed concrete business.
The modest $117,345 in net
income generated for the year
to August 31, 2004, was never-
theless a big improvement over
the previous fiscal year's $1.168
million net loss although much
work remains to be done at
Freeport Concrete, particularly
following Hurricanes Frances
See REPORT, Page 6B


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PAGE BAWRYT


By Fidelity


Capital Markets


We^tl NOTICE %


Assistant Manager

Mr. Pretzels Family Entertainment Centre seeks
Assistant Manager with responsibility for Food &
Beverage. Supervisory experience with food franchise
required. Fax resume & application to 364-2470 or
leave at Mr. Pretzels at The Mall At Marathon.






Admi tr bAs ury





1a14.u3 asma u .sp11 A in

















frii j s sNA
1uEC~S &^hfji


Bahamas stock market
Findex: 420.14
Unchanged: 0.00 points
Percentage Change: 0.00%

Market Capitalisation: $2.1 billion
Change: $4.2 million
Volume Traded: 17,500

Volume Leaders:
Volume % of Volume
CBL 10,000 57.14%
DHS 3,000 17.14%
CHL 2,000 11.43%
Major Market Movers:
Closing Price Price Change
BAB $0.95 -$0.01
CBL $7.15 $0.05
KZLB $5.87 -$0.13


The first trading
week of 2005 got
off to a good start,
with just over
17,000 shares
changing hands. The market
saw six out of the 19 listed
stocks trade, of which one
advanced, one declined and
four remained unchanged.
The volume leader for a sec-
ond consecutive week was
Commonwealth Bank (CBL),
with 10,000 shares changing
hands and accounting for 57 per
cent of the total shares traded.
CBL was also the big mover in
the market this past week as its
share price rose by $0.05 to
close at $7.15. On the down
side, British American Bank's
(BAB) share price lost $0.01 to
close at $0.95.

COMPANY NEWS
Colina Holdings Bahamas
(CHL) -


CHL recently issued its finan-
cial results for its third quar-
ter. However, the 2004 results
includes the Canada Life busi-
ness, .whereas this was not the
case for the same period in
2003. Thus an accurate com-
parison of the two periods can-
not be made.
For the quarter ended Sep-
tember 30, 2004, CHL posted
net income of $926,000. Net
premiums stood at $16.2 mil-
lion, while total benefits and
expenses were $20 million.
Earnings per share (EPS) stood
at $0.04.
While the increase in CHL's
bottom line looks impressive,
not enough time has elapsed to
ascertain how much of this
growth is sustainable whether
it is real growth or the result of
numerous acquisitions.

Investors Tip of the Week
Happy New Year to all read-


International markets
FX Rates
Wkly % Change
CAD $ 1.2316 2.46
GBP 1.8694 -2.40
EUR 1.3051 -3.61

Commodities:
Wkly % Change
Crude Oil $45.43 4.56
Gold $419.50 -4.31

International Stock Market Indexes:
Wkly % Change
DJIA 10,603.96 -1.85
S & P 500 1,186.19 -2.28
NASDAQ 2,088.61 -4.20
Nikkei 11,433.24 -0.48


ers and we certainly wish you
the best in your investing
endeavours in 2005.
Chances are you might be
one of many persons who have
made a resolution or two per-
taining to your financial health
in 2005.
Therefore, we will start the
year off with some basic tips
that are designed to assist you
on your journey to financial
well-being.
Over the next several weeks,
we will explore the ways that
living on a budget can improve
your life.
A budget is a guide that tells
you whether you are going in
the direction you want to be
headed in financially.
You may have goals and
dreams, but if you do not set
up guidelines for reaching them
and you do not measure your
progress, you may end up going
so far in the wrong direction


that you can never make it
back.
Simply put, a budget lets you
control your money instead of
your money controlling you.
A budget will let know. you
if you are living within your
means.
Before the widespread use of
credit cards, you could tell if
you were living within your
means because you had money
left over after paying all your
bills.
The use of credit cards has
made this much less obvious.
Many people do not realise they
are living far beyond their
means until they are knee deep
in debt.

Dividend/AGM Notes:
CIB to pay dividends of $0.18
on January 7, 2005, to First-
Caribbean Bank shareholders
of record as at December 29,
2004.


Guide (From page 1B)


ings", and advises that a deposit
against future payment for
goods and services be obtained
because companies in this
nation "often juggle financing
from one commitment to anoth-
er". Payments from Bahamian
companies can be tardy, it
warns.


Qualified Registered Pharmacist


Required for Medical Facility
In Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested Applicant must have at least five (5) years or more
experience as a qualified registered pharmacist.
Salary Negotiable


Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box F-40827
Freeport, Grand Bahama


Phone: (242) 352-7288


For the initial contact, the US
Commerce Department advises:
"Bahamians shake hands upon
meeting, sometimes exchange
business cards and address first-
time business acquaintances by
their last names.
"Conversations generally
move to a first name basis a bit
more slowly than in the United
States. Firm appointments for
business meetings are advisable.
Although Bahamians are not
punctual for meetings, foreign
visitors should be timely."
Having got past the initial
contact, the US businessperson
is then warned that not every-
thing may be as it seems in deal-
ing with Bahamians. The US
Commerce Department guide
says: "In addition, the Bahamas
is very much a consensus-dri-
ven society, in which people
often disguise personal feelings
beneath a surface cordiality.
"Business meetings in the
Bahamas tend to be very pleas-
ant and Bahamians often end a
meeting with an air of agree-
ment even if real differences
remain. Thus, Bahamian part-
ners may still retain some reser-
vations even after meetings that
ended with firm handshakes
and pleasantries. Of further
note, Bahamians at the middle
levels of business or Govern-
ment almost always need to
gain final approval from more
senior officials."
Not forgetting the financial
constraints that the US Com-
merce Department believes
some Bahamian businesses
operate under. It said:


"Bahamian businesses tend to
operate on a tighter financial
margin than their American
counterparts, often juggling
financing from one commitment
to another.
'Therefore, for initial or large
sales, a businessman should
require a deposit against future
payment for goods or services
delivered, and expect that some
delays may occur with subse-
quent payments."
Now for the course in busi-
ness and social etiquette.
According to the US Com-
merce Department: "Business
lunches are common in the
Bahamas, and invitations to dis-
cuss matters over hmch in a qui-
et restaurant are common prac-
tice. Bahamians tend not to
drink very much at business
lunches and usually expect the
lunch to last between an hour
and an hour-and-a-half.
"Business dinners are rela-
tively rare, and Bahamians do
not often invite new acquain-
tances to their homes. When
they do so, dinners at the homes
of well-to-do Bahamians tend
to be elaborate and formal
affairs, at which business attire
for men and conservative
evening wear for women is
appropriate. A small gift for the
hostess, such as flowers, and a
follow-up 'thank you' note, are


appropriate acknowledgements.
"Acceptable topics of con-
versation include: sports; the
tourist business; the beauty of
the islands; the weather; and
unique or distinctive aspects of
Bahamian culture such as the
local cuisine, Junkanoo, local
music, art, architecture, and his-
tory. While Bahamians are
comfortable with discussing
most topics, drug trafficking and
race relations are sensitive top-
ics and should be avoided dur-
ing initial contacts."
And not forgetting the cen-
tral role that the church plays in
Bahamian life-.... "Since much
of Bahamian social life revolves
around church, an invitation to
a church service is a sign of per-
sonal respect and affection.
Many churches in the Bahamas
have proud traditions of gospel
choir singing, and church ser-
vices can be quite lively. Dress
at church services is usually for-
mal with conservative business
suits for men and colourful,
sometimes elaborate dresses for
women."

To advertise in

The Tribune

call 322-1986


- Colina
SFinancial Advisors Ltd.


BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM POR MORE DATA & WINFOR-AT ; .-v
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,039.75 1CHG -00.431 %CHG -00.04 1 YTD 171.4S YT% (.T '. ,.
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ DIv S PIE Yield
1 4c 10 rDa,:.:. r.1rK..-I 1 10i 1 10 000 0 197 0000 N/M 000%
8.40 7.25 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
6.25 5.75 Bank of Bahamas 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.2 5.74%
0.85 0.63 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 NIM 0.00%
1.97 1.80 Bahamas Waste 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.101 0.080 17.8 4.44%
1.00 0.91 British American Bank 1.00 0.95 -0.05 1,000 0.007 0.040 12.8 4.21%
7.25 6.21 Cable Bahamas 7.10 7.10 0.00 0.510 0.240 13.9 3.38%
2.20 1.35 Colina Holdings 2.20 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8.5 2.73%
7.17 6.15 Commonwealth Bank 7.15 7.15 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.3 5.45%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hospital 1.50 1.50 0.00 3,000 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Famguard 3.96 3.96 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.29%
9.70 8.00 Finco 9.70 9.70 0.00 1,000 0.649 0.480 14.9 4.95%
7.49 6.20 FirstCaribbean 7.49 7.49 0.00 0.513 0.330 14.6 4.41%
8.60 8.00 Focol 8.00 8.00 0.00 0.710 0.500 11.3 6.25%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1.99 1.99 0.00 -0.089 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.38 9.90 ICD Utilities 9.89 9.89 0.00 0.818 0.405 12.1 4.10%
8.25 8.10 J. S. Johnson 8.22 8.22 0.00 0.785 0.550 10.5 6.81%
6.27 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.87 5.83 -0.04 0.245 0.000 24.0 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.694 0.350 14.4 3.50%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities .; :'.e
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ DIv $ PIE Yield
13.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 16.00 1.328 0.720 10.5 5.14%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
CoHlna Over-The-Counter Securities - .
4300 28 00 ABDAB 1 ':.0 4,3 0:) 4100 2220 0000 194 000%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.00 14.00 13.00 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds : .
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD'D% Last 12 Months Div S Yield %
I~ I A 1. 1---II r oe .a.-. - F 1. -1 1-39


1 180-
2.0536
10.2148
2.1564
1.0631


1.8154
10.0000
2.0012
1.0000


Coi-na Money r.larh.- Fu,-.,a
Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund


1 166395'
2.1191"*
10.2648"***
2.156379**
1.063110"**


FINDEX: CLOSE 420.140 I YTD 12.259% 12003 -0-.649% -. .
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidellt)
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to da) EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamingE FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100
- AS AT SEP. 30, 2004/ "" AS AT OCT. 31, 2004
* AS AT SEP 24. 2004, -'" AS AT DEC 31. 20041 ". AS AT DEC. 31. 2004
TO TRAD CALL; GOQINA 240-p0-7010D I FIP KJTY 44a4 ,74 ":-. ':' ... '


Kingsway Academy

High School


will hold its Entrance
Examination on Saturday,
January 15, 2005 at the
School on Bernard Road from
8:00 am 1:30 pm for students
wishing to enter grades 7,8,
9 and 10.


Applications are available at
the High School Office and
should be completed and
returned to the school by
Friday, January 14, 2005.


For furtheinformatiopl
te0 le h n -:
324-811 324340 or 24-269


BIS
Pricing Information As Of:
07 January 2005


,I~rnplrr~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005








T ea T EJ R 2P


iReal estate


set for strong




2005 growth


But lending and

approval processes

must match rivals


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
Despite two dev-
astating hurri-
canes, the
Bahamian real
estate market
has remained largely unaffected
with initial projections for 2005
suggesting a strong growth year
through increased sales in
prime Family Island destina-
tions, analysts told The Tribune.
A principal with Damianos
Realty, George Damianos, had
only positive predictions for
2005. He said New Providence's
domestic market buyers con-
tinued to look to the West for
prime residential property.
Gated communities remained
heavily sought after, as buyers
looked for security and a strong
maintenance programme and
location. Lyford Cay had
remained a very active market,
particularly over the Christmas
period, with expectations that
the area will continue to attract
much attention in the coming
months.
For the foreign market, buy-
ers continue to look strongly at
the Family Islands. As one of
the most sought after destina-
tions within the Bahamas, Aba-
co, despite suffering substantial
devastation in some parts from
the hurricanes, had rebounded
strongly, particular I y a t Oe
tourism sector returned to n(-1


mal.
With three offices in Abaco
at Marsh Harbour, Hope Town
and Lubbers Quarters in Elbow
Cay, Mr Damianos said Abaco
was busy with tourists, although
there were still signs of recovery
efforts in some areas. While
sales there had not quite
returned to their pre-hurricane
pace, there was still significant
interest in the island's real
estate, with expectations that


2005 will see a steady climb in
numbers.
Another Family Island doing
well for Damianos Realty is
Eleuthera. With minimal dam-
age suffered during the hurri-
cane, foreign buyers are ready
to snap up beach front property,
Mr Damianos said.
Mr Damianos said the New
Year is expected to provide a
real estate bonanza, with sales
expected to top levels seen in
2004 as both the local and for-
eign market look to secure
strong investment.
Looking for increased activi-
ty in the Family Islands,
Andrew O'Brien, an attorney
with Lennox Patton, predicted
2005 will be a good year for the
real estate market, with negli-
See REALTY, Page 9B


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MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B. MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


Legal Notice




NOTICE


SERENA UNITED S.A.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
SERENA UNITED S.A., is in dissolution, as of January 6th,
2005.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.





VACANCY FOR A SENIOR ECONOMIST

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Senior Economist will be expected to lead a team of
experienced research officers, economists and statisticians,
providing technical oversight in the following key areas:

* Preparation of economic reports and analysis for publication
* Formulation of monetary and fiscal policy recommendations
* Implementation of research projects and economic surveys
* Development and review of statistical systems and
methodologies
* The position also has important administrative responsibilities.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE

* A Master's Degree in Economics or related discipline with
a proven track record in economic research
* Expert Knowledge of the structure and policy issues for
Caribbean economies
* At least 5 years experience, including three at the supervisory
level, in an economic policy environment, including central
banks, finance ministries, or multilateral agencies
* Methodological experience with the complication of economic
and financial statistics

HOW TO APPLY
Qualified Applicants should submit their curriculum vitae and
references to:

The Manager, Human Resources Department
P.O.Box N 3207, DA#- 13424
The Tribune
The deadline for applications is January 14, 2t5 Y",'


Taxation to take





centre stage at





Business Outlook


Ernst & Young's country
managing partner for the
Caribbean, Ben Arrindell, is set
to address the upcoming
Bahamas Business Outlook
Conference on all the options
this nations could consider in
revamping its taxation system.
With James Smith, minister
of state of finance, having pre-
viously pressed the case for a
Value Added Tax (VAT) and
expected to touch on the topic
again in his own address at the
January 17 Business Outlook
conference, the stage is set for a
good comparative analysis of
the issue.
, In his address, Mr Arrindell
will briefly examine the
Bahamas' tax system and the
issue of tariff reductions. He
will look at tax reforms that


DEBATING TAX -
James Smith


have taken place in other coun-
tries with similar economies to
the Bahamas, such as the British
Virgin Islands, Barbados and
Cyprus, assessing the mix of
direct and indirect taxation.
Mr Arrindell said the
Bahamas' various tax options
included income, corporation,
VAT and payroll taxes. Income
tax, he added, was a highly
emotional issue that needed
careful management and also
had implications for the
Bahamas' labour costs.
Hoping to identify the real
advantages and disadvantages
of different tax regimes, Mr
Arrindell said the British Virgin
Islands had got rid of its income
tax regime and replaced it with
a payroll tax where employer
and employee both paid.


Mr Arrindell is the leader of
Ernst & Young's international
business industry group and an
international tax partner with
over 20 years' experience in the
tax advisory field.
He specialises in advising
clients on Barbados tax issues as
well as international tax mat-
ters.
Mr Arrindell joined the firm
in October 1992 from the inter-
national tax group of Ernst
&Young, London (UK).
Prior to joining Ernst &
Young, he worked with the
international tax division of the
UK Inland Revenue, where his
duties included negotiation of
double taxation treaties and
dealing with issues relating to
tax harmonisation in the Euro-
pean Union (EU).


Rating (From page 1B)


reasonably well on government
regulation, the Index of Eco-
nomic Freedom's assertion that
the Government "generally fol-
lows a hands-off approach to
business" is again likely to cause
some smiles in the business
community, especially given its
level of involvement in the
economy through publicly-
owned corporations and its four
consumer protection Bills seen
by many as an attempt to
engage in micro-managing.
Again drawing on the US
Commerce Department's
assessment, the Index of Eco-
nomic Freedom said: "The dis-
cretionary issuance of business
licences can result in a lack of
transparency in decisions to
authorise or to renew the
authority of a business. Obtain-
ing required permits, especially


VACANCY NOTICE

Project Manager

National Health Insurance (NHI) Implementation Project
Applications are invited for the position of Project Manager, National Health Insurance
Implementation Project, responsible for the detailed planning and preparation for implementation
of the National Health Insurance System.
Reporting to the Chairman of the National Health Insurance Steering Committee, the Project
Manager will be responsible for managing the Project Implementation Team and the overall
project activities related to planning and preparation for implementation of the National Health
Insurance System, consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission Report.
Specific responsibilities will include the following, as guided by the NHI Steering Committee:
Prepare scope of work for Project Implementation Team members, and coordinate
the process of assignment of staff to the team.
Organize the project implementation team members and other technical inputs into
appropriate working groups, and work closely with group leaders to support and guide
the entire project team in the planning and preparation for the National Health Insurance
System.
Coordinate and support working groups in preparation of project reports/documents as
required.
Coordinate the preparation of terms of reference for external consultants and coordinate
their recruitment, Ensuring the Integration of the work of technical consultants with that
of the project implementation team.
Liaise between team members and external consultants where necessary.
Oversee the day-to-day operations of the Project Implementation Team to ensure completion
of preparations and plans for a National Health Insurance System within the budget
allocated.
Knowledge/skills required:
In-depth knowledge of social health insurance.
A general understanding of the health sector in The Bahamas, and familiarity with the
findings and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon commission.
Knowledge and ability to work with a variety of persons and organizations with competing
issues, concerns and agendas.
Ability to assess social, economic and political climate; skills in negotiation and coalition
building to achieve objectives and resolve conflict.
Knowledge and ability to facilitate meetings, conduct effective briefings and presentations
and develop consensus.
Ability to develop and maintain systems for administrative feedback, monitor and evaluate
information and make necessary adjustments to procedures and program implementation.
Sensitivity to the larger political, economic and social environments within which the
project is situated.
Strong written and oral communications skills; computer skills, knowledge of project
management software will be an asset.
Qualifications:
Experience and training in project management; at least ten (10) years relevant experience
involving management of health related projects with interdisciplinary staffing.
Education; Academic qualifications at least at bachelors degree level.
Duration of assignment: one (1) year, option for renewal.
Salary to be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Letters of application and curriculum vitae should be submitted to the Chairman, National
Health Insurance steering Committee, P.O. Box N-3730, or delivered by hand c/o The Director's
Office, The National Insurance Board, Baillou Hill Road, Nassau, N.R, Bahamas, no later than
Monday, January 17, 2005.


immigration permits, can take
an inordinate length of time.
Large foreign investors may be
held to higher labour, health
and safety standards than out
local entrepreneurs."
The survey also noted that
the Bahamas' labour laws "can
be burdensome, especially for
domestic businesses", and the
private sector had complained
that some legislation was too
restrictive. And the Index of
Economic Freedom added: "In
addition, allegations of improp-
er conduct on the part of some
government officials surface
regularly."
The Bahamas' ranked lowest
in the trade policy category,
where it achieved a rock-bot-
tom score of five due to its a\ er-
age laiftt rate of .4 pr cent.

Deal (From page 1
son Cable Beach Resort.
Sources said Baha Mar was
becoming increasingly con-
cerned about the looming Feb-
ruary 19 deadline to complete
the deal with Phillip Ruffin for
his Wyndham Nassau and Crys-
tal Palace Casino and Nassau
Beach Hotel properties.
Baha Mar has to complete
several steps before that date,
including getting bank financ-


with 7 per cent in stamp duties
added to most imports.
The Index of Economic Free-
dom noted: "Higher stamp tax-
es are charged on some duty
free goods, including tourist
items such as china, crystal,
wristwatches, clocks, jewellery,
table linens, leather goods, per-
fume, wine and liquor."
Price controls on 25 food
items, 11 drug products, gaso-
line, automobiles and public
transport, plus the minimum
wage laws, ensured the
Bahamas rated an average
'three' on wages and prices.
Meanwhile, "software, music
and video piracy is a problem.
According to the International
Intellectual Property Alliance,
the Bahamas repeatedly vio-
lates its-agreements regarding

B)
ing in place to reduce its
investors' multi-million dollar
equity exposure, but cannot do
that without securing a purchase
agreement for the Radisson and
Heads of Agreement.
The sources said the consor-
tium fears that, absent a deal
with the Government, if it can-
not complete the process and
the February 19 deadline
expires, Mr Ruffin a notori-


Professional assistance is foremost in having your special projects and
reports completed.... typeset, edited, professionally presented/bound in a
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Contact Copy & Design 242-427-9100


PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, THERESEO MARTIN of Fresh
Creek, Andros, Bahamas, intend to change my sons name from
LORENZO RACHAD MARTIN to LORENZO RACHAD RIZZO. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.



MANAGEMENT TRAINEE

POSITIONS

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited, operators of City
Markets, Nassau has openings for the position of
Management Trainee.

The successful applicant will have at least 2 years experience
in retail management and 2 years experience in
merchandising, buying or marketing. The applicant will
have strong inter-personal skills, is a self-motivator and has
effective supervisory skills. The completion of secondary
school with a minimum of 3 BGCSE and some computer
literacy is required. The position requires the ability to work
a flexible schedule including weekends and holidays.

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience
and qualifications.

Please send a covering letter and resume together with
references from past employers, a picture and police
background check to the Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N-3738, Nassau, Bahamas.

No Phone Calls Please

Only qualified applicants will be contacted.


intellectual property rights". As
a result, the Bahamas scored a
'two' on the informal market.
And the Bahamas gained
only a mediocre 'three' for its
economic lifeblood, foreign
investment,, largely due to the
maintenance of exchange con-
trols and the fact that parts of
the economy are.reserved for
only Bahamians.
Since 1995, the Bahamas'
score has on the Index of Eco-
nomic Freedom has changed lit-
tlie, having fluctuated between a
low point of 2.36 that year to
its highest ever reading of 2.05
in 1997.
This nation came close to
matching that reading again
with 2.06 in 2002, but has since
gone backwards slightly to the
current 2.25.



ously cagey and difficult man
to negotiate with will walk
away from the purchase and fail
to be enticed back, ending for-
ever hopes of a much-needed
Cable Beach upgrade.
"They don't understand why
they can't close the deal with
the Government and get things
moving forward," one source
said., "If they can't do a deal
with the Government, they
can't do all the next steps to tee
up the closing, and if they can't
tee up the closing it will blow
their deadline with Ruffin."
Baha Mar secured a 120-day
option in the purchase agree-
ment they signed with Mr Ruf-
fin in October, a four-month
time period that was designed
to give the consortium enough
time to close a deal with the
Government.
However, the sources said the
Izmirlian-led group has again
become frustrated with what it
sees as the Government 'drag-
ging its feet' and a seeming
inability to make a final deci-
sion on approving its investment
project.
The sources close to the
negotiations said Baha Mar felt
there was no appreciation on
the Government side that "the
clock is ticking", adding that the
whole $1.2 billion project could
be "blown up" through lack of
movement in the negotiations.
It is also understood that
Baha Mar has only been able
to conduct limited due diligence
on the Radisson, and the
absence of an agreement is also
delaying the consortium's abili-
ty to ready insurance coverage
for the properties and invest
millions in maintaining the
hotels' operational capabilities
before they are redeveloped.
Meanwhile, Prime Minister
Perry Christie said a Heads of
Agreement could be conclud-
ed with the AES Corporation
for its $650 million liquefied nat-
ural gas (LNG) terminal and
pipeline, set to be situated on
the man-made island of Ocean
Cay near Bimini, by the end of
this month.
He said the Government and
its advisers were still assessing
"one or two figures" in relation
to the AES project to ensure
the Bahamas derived the rev-
enue benefits it was seeking. A
similar agreement with El Paso,
Tractebel and a Florida Power
& light (FPL) subsidiary for
their Seafarer project at South
Riding Point in Grand Bahama
could also be concluded shortly.


I


BUSINESS




MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004, PAGE 5B
:: ;:','': ... .... Ii


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




Thel


of the Bah


amas
-. -.- ....... .

./.. ..
-" ... .. -.'./
; ." ". -" " : ..., :. .-.. ,- .., , /-.


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each way based on round-trip purchase. Fares do not include (a) a segment tax of $3.10 per U.S. domestic flight segment of a passenger's itinerary: a flight
segment is defined as one takeoff and landing; (b) up to $18 per round trip in local airport charges; and (c) September 11 th Security Fee of $2.50 per enplane-
ment originating at a U.S. airport, up to $5 per one way or $10 per round trip. Puerto Rico fares do not include government taxes and fees of $13.70 each way.
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on all days. Certain restrictions apply. 2004 Spirit Airlines, Inc. Miramar, FL 33025. All rights reserved. Spirit Airlines (logo) is a trademark of Spirit Airlines, Inc.
Blackout dates: 1/17/05, 2/18/05, 2/21/05. *


1-800-772-7117
or call your local travel agent
spiritair.com


P PIR ITM


A I R L I N E S


L V k L IL


Lolppp,









PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10,2005 THE TRIBUNE


Report (From page 1B)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

EVERBEST ENTERPRISES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

RAEBER HILLS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


GN 147






MINISTRY OF HEALTH
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES
BAHAMAS GOVERNMENT/INTER-AMERICAN
DEVELOPMENT BANK
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT
PROGRAMME

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders
for the contracting of labour, material/equipment and
services for the construction of a Transfer Station
Facility at East Grand Bahama.

These projects are a part of The Bahamas
Government/Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
Bahamas Solid Waste Management Programme.

Interested parties may obtain further information
including eligibility to participate and may collect
the bidding documents upon payment of a non-
refundable fee of fifty ($50.00) dollars per document
from:

The Department of Environmental
Health Services
Farrington Road
P.O. Box SS-19048
Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas

Telephone: 322-8037
Telefax: 322-8120

The method of payment will be certified cheques or
cash, and the documents would be ready for review
as of Wednesday, January 5th, 2005.

Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope (s)
marked, "Tenders for the construction and completion
of the Transfer Station Facility at East Grand Bahama"
and sent to:

The Tenders Board
c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance & Planning
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Bldg.'
Cable Beach
Nassau, The Bahamas

All tenders must reach the Tenders Board no later
than 4:30 p.m. on Monday 7th February, 2005. All
tenders must be submitted in triplicate. Tenders will
be opened at 10:00 a.m. Tuesday 8th February 2005,
at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.
The Government reserves the right to reject any or
all tenders.


and Jeanne.
Freeport Concrete said it had
"settled" with its insurance
company over claims resulting
from the hurricanes, during
which its Home Centre retail
operation in Grand Bahama
suffered "significant damage".
The hurricanes struck after fis-
cal 2004 ended, so the financial
impact was not recorded in the
company's results, and the
prices placed on the insurance
settlement, hurricane-related
losses and deductible were not
divulged.
Freeport Concrete said it
"anticipated resuming full oper-
ations [for the Home Centre]
at our current or a new location
within the next six months".
It added that the Home Cen-
tre continued to operate "out
of a portion" of its heavily dam-
aged premises, which the com-
pany operated from under a
lease agreement, and was "also
in the process of opening a
satellite facility" to boost its
Robin Hood sales. Following
the insurance settlement, Robin
Hood was replacing lost inven-
tory, office equipment, furni-
ture and fixtures.
Meanwhile, Freeport Con-
crete confirmed that its concrete


operations in Grand Bahama
and Robin Hood division in
Nassau sustained "minimal
damage" from the hurricanes,
and were fully operational.
For fiscal 2004, Freeport
Concrete's gross sales inclusive
of net discounts increased by
32.3 per cent to $22.083 million
compared to $16.687 million the
previous year. Most of this
increase came from the Home
Centre and Robin Hood opera-
tions, classified by the company
as its hardware and consumer
products division, where rev-
enues increased by 37.4 per cent
to $19.070 million from $13.884
million.
The cost of sales, though,
increased by almost as much as
Freeport Concrete's sales them-
selves, growing by 31.6 per cent
to $16.33 million from $12.405
million in fiscal 2003.
As a result, gross profit rose
year-on-year by 34.4 per cent
to $5.753 million from $4.282
million. Gross profit margins
rose slightly to 26.1 per cent in
2004, from 25.7 per cent in 2003.
However, Freeport Concrete
continues to have an issue with
increasing operating costs. Total
operating expenses in fiscal
2004 increased by 3.9 per cent


LEGALNOTICE

NOTICE

RAEBER HILLS INC..
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE '

NOTICE

BLUE SHOWERED CO. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)







ANSBACHER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Ansbacher in the Bahamas invites applications from
qualified individuals for:

INVESTMENT SERVICES MANAGER

Salary + Banking benefits + Performance Based
Incentive Scheme

Suitable candidates will have managed, acquired
and advised investment portfolios for at least 5
years. Core competencies will be the management
of a diverse range of investment portfolios, a strong
knowledge of diverse investment products and the
ability to generate new investment/ banking accounts
utilizing Ansbacher's established global distribution
network.

The degree individual will benefit from a
background in economics or finance and a CFA/
MBA will be advantageous. Excellent
communication skills, analytical skills and team
commitment are required.

Contact:

Human Resource Manager,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O.Box N-7768,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Fax: 325-0524


to $5.534 million from $5.327
million, the bulk of this rise
coming from growth in payroll-
related costs, which expanded
by 11.4 per cent to just under $3
million.
According to Freeport Con-
crete's accounts, total executive
remuneration increased only
slightly in 2004, growing from
$538,794 to $565,369. They also
revealed that an executive offi-
cer, believed by The Tribune to
be Sandy Schaefer, who runs
Robin Hood, receives a com-
mission of between 1.5-3 per
cent of gross sales made by the
retail chain. In 2004, this com-
mission increased from $199,650
to $231,489.
On the balance sheet front,
Freeport Concrete's total assets


increased by 10.1 per cent to
$8.674 million from $7.875 mil-
lion by year-end, largely due to
a more than doubling in
accounts receivables to $1.718
million from $668,853.
During fiscal 2004, Freeport
Concrete wrote off $306,758 in
doubtful accounts receivables,
leaving the company with a
$187,711 allowance for doubtful
accounts at year-end August 31.
The company almost doubled
the amount of inventory writ-
ten-off in 2004, increasing this
from $87,008 in 2003 to
$151,058. As a result, the provi-
sion for obsolete and slow-mov-
ing inventory remained almost
unchanged at year-end, standing
at $559,428 compared to
$531,653 for the previous year.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SALAMIS INV. LTD
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 6th
day of January, 2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander
and Ingrid Davis of P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.


Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ZAGROS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of January,
2005. The Liquidators are Cordelia Fernander and Ingrid
Davis of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



Cordelia Fernander
(Liquidator)



Ingrid Davis
(Liquidator)




Network Administrator




S a t




wishes to employ a network administrator
with two or more years experience in
Windows Server 2000/2003 and
Windows XP Pro preferred


Other Requirements/Responsibilities:

Ability to learn and support all
in-house database
software applications
Manage PBX
Self-motivated
Excellent interpersonal skills
Flexibility
Versatility

Please send applications with resume to:

Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-3714
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Fax: 394-2413


o


I BUSINESS I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004, PAGE 7B


force threatens the students at Hogwarts. Swearengen. (CC) the Garret claim. (CC) ...
(6:30) ** THE Carnivale "Los Moscos" Brother Unscripted Three actors participate *x THE HAMBURG CELL
HBO-P SUBSTITUTE Justin spreads his radio message. in a workshop. ,( (CC) (2004, Docudrama) Karim Saleh,
(1993) 'R' (CC) (CC) Kamel, Premiere. h 'NR' (CC)
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H BO-W Haas, SkeetUlIrich. A prep-school student falls for a (2002, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. A malevo-
mysterious woman. C 'PG-13' (CC) ent force threatens the students at Hogwarts. l 'PG' (CC)
(:15) ** SILENT FALL (1994, Suspense) Richard ** *s AMERICAN SPLENDOR (2003, Biography) (:45) The Making
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plots revenge on his former pupil. A 'R' booked on an all-gay cruise. C 'R' (CC) NORTH (2003)
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MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 10, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 | 9:30 10:00 10:30

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* WSVN hostage situation to monitor the trained operative he's been tracking. (N)
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* WPLG (CC) How'd They Do That? "Dore Fami- chance at love. (N) A (CC)
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BBCW News News News
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B ET Leon. An homage to the black singing groups of the 1960s.
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CBC Street (CC) Monday Report (N) (CC) Premiere) (N) (CC)
Late Night With The Apprentice / (CC) Dennis Miller Cover to Cover H)sI Liz Claman.
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DISN "Run Raven Run" Storms, Raven-Symone, Gregory Smith. A gid raised on a space station Frankie Muniz and Tamera get
gets down to Earth. (CC) visits. (CC) 'ake iDs. il
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HALL Texas Ranger juvenile offender helps himself and Sams. Four teens and an abandoned child form an unlikely family (CC)
n (CC) a severely handicapped child.
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LIFE Annabeth Gish, Tom Irwin. A dying woman chooses a Premiere. A woman must contend with her child's death at Columbine.
replacement to care for her family. (CC) (CC)
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PAGE8BMONDY, ANUAY 1, 204 TE TRBUN BUSNES


GN-149



b MINISTRY OF


FINANCE


PRESS RELEASE

HURRICANES FRANCES AND JEANNE ASSISTANCE


The Public is hereby notified that the Declarations of Exigency
Numbers 2, 4, 5, and 6 of 2004 expired on 31st December, 2004.

As some residents from throughout The Bahamas who were affected
by Hurricane Frances or Hurricane Jeanne were unable to. import the
-necessary goods within the specified period of Declarations of Exigency
Numbers 2, 4 and 6 to undertake reconstruction or repair to their properties,
the Government has decided to extend the period for the importation of
certain goods free of duty under the Tariff Act, 2003 by issuing Declaration
of Exigency Order No.7. The only goods that are exempted under
Declaration of Exigency Order No. 7 are:


Building materials
Electrical fixtures and materials
Plumbing fixtures and materials; and
Household furniture and appliances


Application forms may be obtained from the office of the Family Island
Administrator or from the National Emergency Management Agency
JNEMA] at the Cabinet Office in New Providence.

As so4ie licensed hotel and touristic attraction operators who were
affected by Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne were also unable to import
required goods within the specified period of Declaration of Exigency Order
No. 5, the Government has decided to issue Declaration of Exigency Order.
No. 8 to facilitate importation of goods needed for reconstruction and repair
to their affected facilities. Affected hotel and touristic attraction operators
who wish to access assistance under Exigency Order No. 8 are required to
make application to the Ministry of Financial Services and Investments.

The Government has further decided to assist registered farmers and
fishermen with reconstruction and repair necessitated by damages and/ or
losses caused by Hurricanes Frances or Jeanne by issuing Declaration of
Exigency Ordr No. 9. Registered farmers and fishermen [including licensed
fish processing plants] who wish to access assistance are required to make
application t9 the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Local Government
through their, local agricultural or fisheries representative.


The Public is advised that exemptions under Declarations of Exigency.
Numbers 7, 8 and 9 are available for a period of three months commencing
on 1" January, 2005 and ending on 31st March, 2005. All persons wishing to
access benefits are advised that approvals for the importation of goods must
be sought as indicated above prior to the arrival of the -goods in The
Bahamas. Once an application has been approved, the Comptroller of
Customs will be advised accordingly.



NOTICE

THE TARIFF ACT
(No. 5 of 2003)

DECLARATION OF EXIGENCY (No. 7)



The Minister of Finance, pursuant to the provisions of item 11 of Part
B of the Fourth Schedule to the Tariff Act, hereby declares the following
exigency to be an exigency which qualifies for the purposes of the
exemption permitted under the said item 11, namely -



the urgent need for goods specified in the Schedule which the
Minister is satisfied are intended for the relief of persons who
have suffered hardship or loss as a result of the hurricanes
known as "Hurricane Frances" and "Hurricane Jeanne".


The Minister of Finance further declares that the importation of goods
under the provisions of the said item 11 are only permitted during the period
commencing on 1st January, 2005 and ending on the 31st March, 2005.




SCHEDULE

DUTY FREE GOODS

Buildings materials
Electrical fixtures and materials
Plumbing fixtures and materials
Household furniture and appliances


Where any abuse or misuse of goods imported under this Declaration
is observed, the goods may be seized and disposed of in accordance with
Section 83 of the Customs Management Act.


Date this 30th day of December, 2004

Signed: Perry G. Christie


NOTICE

THE TARIFF ACT
(No. 5 of 2003)

DECLARATION OF EXIGENCY (No. 8)

The Minister of Finance, pursuant to the provisions of item 11 of'Part
B of the Fourth Schedule of the Tariff Act, hereby declares the following
exigency to be an exigency which qualifies for the purposes of the'
exemption permitted under the said item 11, namely -

goods for any hotel licensed under the Hotels Act or goods for
any touristic attraction which the Minister is satisfied are
intended for the relief of such hotels or touristic attractions that
have experienced loss and damage as a result of the hurricanes
known as "Hurricane Frances" and "Hurricane Jeanne".

Provided that the importation of goods under the provision of the said
item 11 is permitted only during the period commencing on 1st January 2005
and ending on the 31st March 2005.


Where any abuse or misuse of goods imported under this Declaration
is observed, the goods may be seized and disposed of in accordance with
Section 83 of the Customs Management Act.

Date this 30th day of December, 2004

Signed: Perry G. Christie

Minister of Finance

NOTICE

THE TARIFF ACT
(No. 5 of 2003)

DECLARATION OF EXIGENCY (No. 9)


The Minister of Finance, pursuant to item 11 of Part B of the Fourth
Schedule to the Tariff Act, declares the following exigency to be an
exigency which qualifies for exemption permitted under the Tariff Act,
namely -
the urgent need of farmers and fishermen for the goods
specified in the Schedule which the Minister is satisfied
are goods to alleviate hardship and loss suffered as a
result of the damage caused by hurricanes known as
"Hurricane Frances" and Hurricane Jeanne".


The Minister of Finance further declares that the importation of goods
for the above exigency under item 11 is only permitted for the period
commencing 1st Janiuary, 20i5 and ending off'31 t March, 2005'

SCHEDULE
DUTY FREE GOODS
PART A [Farmersi


Supplies for the reconstruction and repair to
greenhouses and shade houses: polyethylene
sheeting, insect proof mesh, filters, polyethylene
tubing, PVC pipes, PVC connectors, PVC cement,
cables, ties, poly paneling, plant sleeves, timers,
plant pots, and soil-less growing media for plant
growth.

2. Supplies for the reconstruction and repair to
poultry houses and processing plants: layer cages,
feed silos, feeders, water dispensers, poultry
processing equipment, egg processing equipment.


3. Refrigeration systems for chilling and freezing of
poultry products: compressors, evaporators,
condensers and thermostats.


4. Supplies for the,, reconstruction and repair of
irrigation systems: filters, PVC pipes, PVC
fittings, sprinkles, emitters, timers and valves.


5. Nursery stock for the re-establishment of fruit .
orchards: grafted plants, liners, cuttings and tissue
cultured plantlets.


6. Items required for fencing: fence posts, cattle wire,
fencing pliers, fencing staples and cattle gates.

Part B [Fishermenl


1. Galvanized sheeting (galvalume) for the
construction of crawfish habitats


2. Refrigeration gear and parts for the chilling and
freezing of fisheries products: evaporators,
compressors and condensers


Where any abuse or misuse of goods imported under this Declaration
is observed, the goods may be seized and disposed of in accordance with
section 83 of the Customs Management Act.


Date this 30th day of December, 2004

Signed: Perry G. Christie


Minister of Finance


I ~ 3 --. .' . ... I : . '. ... I I `


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004


Minister of Finance







THE TRIBUNE


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Realty (From page 1B)
gible impact seen as a result of the hurricanes.
He said: "I don't think the hurricanes have negatively impacted
sales. I don't see any impact. People are interested in the Bahamas
and they see an opportunity to get value for their money, so they
are taking advantage of that."
Although interest in the Bahamian real estate sector remains
high, Mr O'Brien said concern remained over the Bahamas' abil-
ity to regularise its lending and approval systems, bringing those in
line with other jurisdictions.
Mr O'Brien said: "We have to come up to speed with our bank-
ing to accommodate foreign buyers who are interested in a more
efficient manner. We have to bridge the gap between how the
Bahamas does things and how the US does things. I'm having
more of these experiences recently, and so am more aware of it. I
see where if we can accommodate foreigner borrowers, the business
will be there."
While the Central's Bank's decision to lift the lending cap was
applauded, the recently imposed lending guidelines that limits
total debt service ratios to 40 45 per cent of a borrowers' income
have acted as a burden, in some cases, for those seeking a mortgage
loan.
Mr O'brien said foreign borrowers are usually surprised to hear
they have to make an equity payment of up to 40 to 60 per cent, a
rate that is very unusual outside the Bahamas.
In terms of Bahamian buyers, banks have proven more liberal.
He added: "I think they're a lot more liberal for persons borrow-
ing locally, offering up to 95 per cent financing in some instances.
Generally, when you make money available people will use it."
Meanwhile, after many months of waiting, the Attorney Gener-
al's Office has responded to submissions from the Bahamas Real
Estate Association (BREA) in regard to the names submitted for
its investigations and disciplinary committee. The Association is said
to be working on a response to the AG's office.
Also, concerns remain over sales involving non-licensed, for-
eign real estate agents in the Bahamas, with BREA continuing to
look to the Government for assistance in preventing the illegal activ-
ity.


MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 9B



GN-150 deceased.


SUPREME

COURT





THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 13, 2005

No. 6692004

Whereas ANITA PRATT SMITH, of
Sunset Park, Southern District, on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of IRVIN STEPHEN
SMITH late of Sunset Park, Southern District,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date thereof.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
322-4348
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
JAN.13, 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 671/2004

In the Estate of MARJORIE GLADYS
BOUNDS late of 550 of Wellingborough,
Northampton in England and Wales, United
Kingdom,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, on its Probate Side by
WILLIAM FREDRICK POMEROY
FOUNTAIN of 25 Retirement Road, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas, for the Resealed Grant of
Probate of Will and Testament with a Codicil
in the above estate granted to TREVOR
GEORGE and MARGARET CATHERINE
RILEY, the Personal Representatives by the
Hight Court of Justice, the District Probate
Registry at Newcastle Upon Tyne, on the 4th
day of September, 2003.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE

No. 672/2004

Whereas MONIQUE V. A. GOMEZ of
Sea View Drive, Western District, on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by
Deed of Power of Attorney for CARLTON
B. CAMPBELL, the Executor has made
application to the Supreme Court of The


Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
the Will Annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of MARGARET CAMPBELL
THOMAS late of Musgrove Street,
Chippingham, Western District, on the Islands
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas,


Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 12, 2005

No. 674/2004

Whereas ROLAND LAMBERT
ALBURY of Hurricane House Road, Black
Sound, Green Turtle Cay, on the Island of
Abaco, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of RICHARDSON
ALBURY late of Carmichael Road, Western
District, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
JAN. 13, 2005


No. 675/2004

Whereas MARIE BETHEL of Hawksbill
in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of LLOYD BETHEL late of Hawksbill in the
City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 21 days from the date thereof.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
JAN. 13 2005

PROBATE SIDE
No. 676/2004

In the Estate of ETHEL WINIFRED
MEERLOO, late of 46 Highway, Mount
Waverley, Victoria, Australia,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY, of the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in the Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration with the
Will Annexed in the above estate granted to
JEFFREY EDWARD FAURE, the legal
personal representative, by the Supreme Court


of Victoria, Probate Jurisdiction, on the 4th
day of June, 2004.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
JAN. 10, 11, 12.


i, i


(n


O







TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004


SPOR-S


Jets on full


11


run


power





victory


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Williams Construction
- b at h d Jets stayed on track for another
- trip to the Masters Softball
League's postseason with an 11-
run victory over the hapless
S- Accent Limo Cruisers.
S The Jets stopped the Cruis-
-ers 17-6 in the feature game on
w Sunday at the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Sta-
dium as the league resumed
.- after the Christmas break.
"We played fairly well. We
-- made a couple of errors on the
S- -infield, but it didn't hurt us
much," said Jets' manager Akle
*Clarke. "We should have
stopped the team earlier."
The game was stopped in the
-- fifth inning via the ten-run rule.


- - -






0
-


- -~ .~ -


~
- .-~
- _
_____ ~. -

-- -~ -



~- ~- -


Victory
The game came right after
the Tyreflex Stars held off the
Dog House Rangers 13-12 for
their second straight victory
over the weekend.
On Saturday, the Stars pol-
ished off the Miller Lite Knights
16-13 in the lone game played.
Tyreflex improved to 5-2 to
take sole possession of third
place. Their manager George
Adderley said they are just
starting to turn things around.
"We played good yesterday,


HERE'S a look at the Masters League's standings after
play resumed over the weekend.
Teams W L Pct. GB

Joshua Knights 6 1 .857 -
Williams Construction Jets ..............5 1 .833 1/2
Tyreflex Stars 5 2 .714 1
Doghouse Rangers 3 4 .428 3
Miller Lite Knights 2 5 .285 4
The Dough Boys 1 3 .250 4
Accent Limo Cruisers 0 6 .000 51/2


but today, it shouldn't have
been the way it wag, but we still
came out as the winner,"
Adderley stressed.
"If we can get past Williams
Construction, I think we can
win the championship. They are
a good team and Joshua
Knights is an excellent team.
But we feel we can beat the two
of them."
All of the teams will be jock-
eying for the four playoff spots
until February 12 when the reg-
ular season comes to a close.
After that, it's the best-of-
three first round playoffs.
Manager Clarke feels that if
his Williams Construction can
play like they are capable of
playing, they should be a force
to reckon with.
"The first part of the season,


we haven't been hitting the
ball," he stressed. "But as the
second half of 'the season gets
underway, we are hitting the
ball."

Triples,
On Sunday, they really hit the
ball, including banging out a
team high seven triples. If that
wasn't enough, the Jets got at
least one hit or more from all
nine batters in their line-up.
Third baseman Sonny 'Jiggy'
Haven led the way with a 2-for-
5 production, driving in two
mates and scoring as many runs.
Designated player Anthony
'Boots' Weech was 3-for-4 with
three runs scored.
Anthony 'Hotdog' Pearce
was 2-for-3 with three RBIs and


two runs scored; Mike 'Reds'
Major was 2-for-2 with two
RBIs; Lee Rahming 2-for-3
with two RBIs and a run scored;
Clifford Jones 2-for-4 with two
RBIs and three runs scored;
Leslie 'Truck' Johnson 2-for-4
with two RBIs; Gary 'Super'
Johnson 1-for-4 with three runs
and Jeff Cooper 1-for-5 with
two runs.
For the Cruisers, Will Bas-
den was 2-for-3 with a run
scored; Foster Dorsette was 1-
for-3 with a RBI and a run
scored; Max Culmer 2-for-2
with a run scored and Greg
Rahming was 1-for-3 with two
RBIs.
Dorsette was also tagged with
the loss.
STARS 13, RANGERS
12: Larry Forbes came in for
the save in the bottom of the
seventh inning as Tyreflex held
off the Doghouse.
Fyreflex was leading 13-9
going into the inning, but John
Woodside ripped a three-run
double to chip the deficit to 13-
12.
Forbes then got Eddie Fer-
guson and Joey Demeritte to
ground out to end the game.
Ken O'Brien started the
game and was relieved by Mike
Isaacs before Forbes came in to
close the door.
O'Brien helped his own cause


for the win with a 2-for-3 day,
driving in a run. Anthony 'Skee-
bo' Roberts was 3-for-4 with
two runs scored and Dick
Brown was 3-for-5 with a run
scored.
Woodside was tagged with
the loss. He also led the '
Rangers' attack with a 3-for-4
day, driving in five runs. John "'
'Kong' Wallace was 2-for-3
with two RBIs and two runs
scored.
Stars 16, Knights 13: Seven
of Tyreflex batters had two or
more hits as they out-slugged 2
Miller Lite on Saturday.
Anthony Roberts was 2-for-3
with a RBI and four runs
scored; Dick Brown was 3-for-5
with three RBIs and two runs;
Ken O'Brien was 3-for-5 with
three RBIs and two runs; Den-
nis Smith was 1-for-5 with two
RBIs and a run; Barry Carroll'"
was 2-for-6 with two RBIs and
two runs; Mike Isaacs 2-for-3
with a run and Larry Forbes
was 3-for-3 with two RBIs and
two runs scored.
Mike Isaacs got the win'-
over Harold 'Banker' Fritzger-
ald. .
Randy Flowers paced the
losers with a 2-for-4 day, dri- '
ving in a run and scoring
twice. Hillary Deveaux was 2- ;
for-4 with two runs and Joe
McPhee was 4-for-5 with six
RBIs.


FROM page one

is expected to be a very
competitive season, Grant
said he's confident that his
Knights will polish off their
challengers and retain their
title.
"The kids have big shoes
to fill. They have to say
whether or not they feel
they can go out there and
repeat," he stated. "I'm not
putting pressure on myself
or my team. "We're taking it
one game at a time."
For the past two years in
winning the title, Grant has
only lost two games in each
season. This year, he's hop-
ing that they can at least
duplicate or surpass that feat
and not lose any games.
Over the Christmas holi-
day, CI Gibson went head-
to-head with CV Bethel for
the CI Gibson Yuletide Invi-
tational Tournament with
the Rattlers repeating as
champions in overtime.
At the same time, Grant
carried some of his CR
Walker players to Alabama
to play in a tournament.
They ended up third.

Access
"I feel like Nassau needs
to do better with tourna-
ments. They should start
from October," said Grant,
who noted that he simply
doesn't try to put on one
because his school doesn't
have access to a gym.
"Most people travel in
December to see if anything
can break for their players.
But if they had two to three
teams before Christmas,
then the teams will be
ready."
Grant said that is why the
schools in New Providence
are at a disadvantage to the
teams from Grand Bahama,
who come down to the pres-
tigious Hugh Campbell Bas-
ketball Classic.
"Grand Bahama already
had four and we only had
one and we are supposed to
be the leading city," Grant
noted. "I would like for a
lot of private entities to try
and put on a tournament
because it's a lot of work."
The Hugh Campbell
Tournament, organised by
AF Adderley, is a fantastic
tournament to participate in
and Grant said his Knights
will be there.


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MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 11 B


TRIBUNEj SFC;r2'-r,


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MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mal: sports@100jamz.com


~JE I all[


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Senior Sports
Reporter
THE CI Gibson Rattlers
and the CV Bethel Stingrays
have emerged as two pre-
season favourites for the
Government Secondary
Schools Sports' senior boys
basketball title.
But when the league
opens next week, two-time
defending champions CR
Walker Knights may feel
they will have a say about
who will be the last team
standing.
"My team is a fairly old-
new team because the play-
ers I have are guys who
were backup for the guys I
had last year," he said.
"I'm looking forward to a
lot out of Carey Knowles
and Orlando Pritchard,"
said Grant of his starting
swing guard and power for-
ward respectively. "I'm
looking for them to come
through.
"But we have other role
players we picked up like
Danni McKenzie, the point
guard, who is in the 10th
grade. We also have another
guard who came off the
bench and performed well
down the stretch,
Batchelette LaFleur.

Experience
"These are the guys who
will come in and fill in the
blanks. But as far as height,
size and experience, we have
it. The guys who I expect to
carry the team are all ready
to go. That's the good team
about this team this year."
On a visit to the team's
practice on Friday, Grant,
who is assisted by Andrew
Rolle, said he's comfortable
with the team he has this
year.
"You supposed to know
how to react and think and I
think these players can do
that," Grant insisted. "If you
go on the court, you should-
n't have to be worrying
about how I should react.
"You should know what
to do when a guy jumps out
in front of you. That's what
I'm trying to work on with
these guys. But they are tal-
ented and very athletic. So
we shouldn't have any prob-
lems."

Force
While the Rattlers and the
Stingrays showed that they
can be a force to reckoned
with this year, Grant .said
he's not concerned about all
the noise in the market.
"One thing I don't do is
watch teams. Teams have to
watch me," he stated. "I
don't watch teams. I'm a
coach. So whatever you
throw at me, I should be
ready for it.
"This is not like a boxing,
match where you are throw-
ing blows and you have to
watch out for what jab he's
throwing. I just need five
minutes to adjust to what
they're doing and who's
scoring and rebounding."
Despite the fact that this
SEE page 10B


Pauline







yeaPr to



* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
RECENTLY named coach
of the year by the Bahamas
Associations of Athletic Asso-
ciation, Pauline Davis-Thomp-
son has planned an explosive
2005 for herself and her ath-
letes.
Davis-Thompson coaches ., &-':"
athletes from seven different .:2
countries from her home base ','.
in Atlanta, Georgia,.
Bahamians Avard Moncur -' '
and Christine Amertil,
Monique Hennagan are ...
among the athletes Davis-
Thompson coaches.

Health -4
For Davis-Thompson, the
health of her athletes is more
important than competing or .
winning a medal of any sort.
Moncur who had to sit out
the remaining of the 2004
track and field season will
return this year healthy and"'
Davis-Thompson hopes his
return will help improve the M PAULINE DAVIS-THO
Bahamas' status. left: Sevatheda Fynes, Chandra
She said: "To me the ath- by Pauline.
letes' health comes first,
Avard was very sick and I too more than to see him compete
was among the persons who in this year's Olympic games,
would have but his health is what matters.
love d "Last
nothing year


aims for


rememb er


MPSON (third from left) was part ofthe Bahamas 4x100 meter relay team that also included, from
Sturrup and Debbie Ferguson. Bahamians Avard Moncur and Christine Amertil (below) are coached


was an impressive year for the
athletes, despite it all. As a
coach I always aim for perfec-
tion, I know some think there
is no such thing as perfection,
but for me I am constantly try-
ing to evolve and make my
athletes better.
"We just missed the podi-
um last year, but I am still
keeping my eyes on the prize
and I am certain that we will
get there. We're working
extremely hard, just making
sure that everything is going
the way we have planned.
"At the end of the year I
went over everything in my
head, checking everything to
see if there was something I
could have done differently to
change in my athletes' perfor-
mances. I discovered that
there were some things I could
have done differently."

Elite
This was a phenomenal sea-
son for Davis-Thompson, who
was among the elite coaches
that was selected to attend a
coaching conference in Las
Vegas earlier in 2004 and with
two of her athletes ranked in
the world's listings.
She has an impressive sport-
ing pedigree having been
awarded the Order of the
British Empire (OBE) in
Queen Elizabeth II's New
Year's honours list and hav-
ing competed in five Olympic
games, with the 2000 Olympic
games being her final interna-
tional appearance.
The former national record
holder in the 400m was a silver
medallist at the 2000 Olympic


games in the 200m and a
member of the 4xl00m Gold-
en Girls squad.
Before the feat in Sydney,
Australia the Golden Girls
took the silver at the 1996
Olympics in Atlanta behind
the Americans, but they came
to prominence two years later
when they took gold at the
track and field World Cham-


(AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau)
team, we have the world
leader, Tonique Williams-
Darling and Christine Amer-
til, who is ranked number
five.
"Not being able to produce
a 4x400m team showed that
we still have a lot of weakness
in our programme even
though we have had a lot of
success in the past few years-


pionships in Seville, Spain.
Davis-Thompson graduat-
ed from the University of
Alabama in 1989, she spent
20 years on the international
track and field circuit includ-
ing a record seven appear-
ances at the World Champi-
onships and five at the
Olympic Games.
Individually, her most mem-
orable performance was that
silver medal winning one, but
she also won a bronze medal
in the 200m at the indoor
World Championships in
Maebashi, Japan.
She added: "I was disap-
pointed when the Bahamas
didn't field a 4x400m women's


- it shows that the founda-
tion has a lot of cracks in it
and that we need to build a
stronger foundation to bring
up the athletes.
"I do believe that we have a
lot of talented athletes in this
country and some excellent
quarter-milers and, even
though a lot has been done, I
feel as though there is room
for improvement.
"Even though I won this
award, I feel as though more
should be done, even on my
part.
"We need to turn over
every rock in this country and
find these athletes, showing
them the support they need."


"I do believe that we have a
lot of talented athletes in this
country and some excellent
quarter-milers and, even
though a lot has been done,
I feel as though there is room
for improvement."

Pauline Davis-Thompson


I~LI~









MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


The stories behind the news


I LAC SI


Police Commissioner Paul Far-
quharson last week recommended
to Attorney General Alfred Sears
that Works and Utilities Minister
Bradley Roberts (left) not be
charged with rape.
Mr Sears told The Tribune
Thursday that the commissioner,
who submitted his recommenda-
tions to the Attorney General last
Tuesday, said that based on their
findings Mr Roberts should not be
prosecuted...


UST


Volunteers place dry ice on
corpses in a mass grave at Wat
Bang Muang, near Takuapa, Thai-
land, on Friday. More than 5,000
people are listed dead in Thailand
following a massive tsunami that
struck the popular tourist area in
southern Thailand on December.
26. More than 4,000 people are
still listed missing in Thailand in
the disaster. (AP Photo: David
Longstreath)


DO


The Roots Junkanoo Group last week launched an
official protest of the results of the Sammy Thompson
Boxing Day Junkanoo Parade, claiming that judges gave
the Shell Saxons Superstars the victory after scoring
only 45 per cent of the parade. According to group
members, despite not having scores for several key cat-
egories, the Parade Management Team went ahead and
announced unofficial results declaring the Saxons as the
winners. Absent from the results announced at Arawak
on Sunday afternoon were the highly contested best
music and banner categories. Group members said the
decision to announce the scores has left them saddened
and disappointed ...


SETTER


Government's half-term report 'far from sasfactory',


IBy JOHN MARQlUIS
Inertia, lack of accountability,
and a disturbing tendency to
gloss over problems rather than
confront them head-on have
become the predominant fea-.
tures of the PLP government, accord-
ing to its critics.
There is too much talk, too little action
and a worrying impression that certain
gao ernmrent figures have virtually a free
rein, causing embarrassment and dismay
all round, they say.
Business, professional and political
sources are now convinced that a Cabi-
net reshuffle will take place soon, right-
ing some of the wrongs which, they say,
_ ought to have been tackled a long time
ago.
Speculation is rife about who will
"come anfd who will go, centred mainly on
those ministers who, many believe, have
been most culpable in the PLP's lack-
lustre first two-and-a-half years in pow-
er.
Firstly, there is Trade and Industry
Minister Leslie Miller, whose maverick
style, blustering manner and lack of
finesse have all led to growing dis-
gruntlement among some party col-
leagues.
His term of office has been marked
almost from day one by controversy and
consternation. His unseemly verbal
brawl with ill-starred BAIC executive
chairman Sidney Stubbs was seen as a
lamentable lapse in standards by those
who believe that public office demands a
certain decorum. He has never been able
to recover fully from the fall-out this
encounter brought down upon his head.
Mr Miller is, in political terms, known
as a street-fighter with a bruising
approach to problem-solving. But there
was something particularly unedifying
about this bust-up, which left both the
minister and his bungling adversary look-
ing distinctly unfit to handle the respon-
sibilities thrust upon them.
Surprisingly, though, inside sources
believe Mr Miller is less likely to fall in
any Cabinet revamp than his equally
controversial colleague Bradley Roberts,
a man whose waspish wit and poisonous
tongue were once the bane of the FNM
government.
Mr Roberts, the Works and Utilities
Minister, was a formidable force in oppo-
sition and the man most readily credited
by party colleagues with bringing down
the FNM in 2002. His outbursts in the
House peppered with eye-popping.rev-
elations made the FNM squirm, espe-
cially during the last three years of its
reign.
His torment of the former deputy
prime minister, Frank Watson, was not a
spectacle for the faint-hearted. Only
sadists would have found pleasure in the
way he systematically dismantled Mr
Watson under the protection of parlia-
mentary privilege. There was something
of the Colisseum about the House in
those days, and we all know who played


.... . . . . .

...........
.- .~ ,-I.. ,- ... .... ...


N SUBJECTS OF SPECULATION What does the future hold for this PLP quartet? Pictured (1-r): Trade and Industry Minister Leslie Miller, Works
and Utilities Minister Bradley Roberts, Education Minister Alfred Sears and Sidney Stubbs.
(Photos: The Tribune archive)


the lion and who played the bait.
In government, though, Mr Roberts
has been much less of a force, achieving
relatively little to right the wrongs which
he was quick to highlight from the oppo-
sition benches. Notable among these is
Bahamasair, which continues to be a
major drain on public resources and an
ongoing irritation for all those who use
its services.
Though the minister has made some
inroads into the Bahamasair problem,
there is still a very long way to go. No-
one with an important appointment, or
another flight to catch, opts to fly the
national flag-carrier, whose time-keeping
is notoriously unreliable. In many
respects, it still operates like an airborne
mailboat service, and some passengers
treat it as such. On one recent Miami
flight, a passenger checked in no fewer
than 11 huge bags and containers while
the long queue at the ticket counter grew
more and more restive. Inevitably, the
flight was over an hour late when it head-
ed back to Nassau.
In addition to Bahamasair and its
many failings, Mr Roberts has presided
over a truly woeful situation on the util-
ities front. Having belittled the FNM
repeatedly in his role as the opposition's
hatchet man, Mr Roberts now finds him-
self in charge of a water corporation with
no water, an airline with no meaningful
timetable and an electricity enterprise
which has, over the years, proved a very
good friend of candlemakers every-
where.
The once highly vocal Mr Roberts is
now strangely muted, and political ana-
lysts have been prompted to wonder
whether he actually carries sufficient
intellectual firepower to handle Cabinet
office. His reference to Tribune pub-
lisher Eileen Carron as a "terrorist",


showing an apparent inability to grasp
the seriousness of the international secu-
rity situation, was one of several low
points in a ministerial career which has
yet to register any notable peaks.
The recent controversy surrounding
him is unlikely to endear him to those in
the party who bridle at his ministerial
shortcomings. Any sniff of scandal, jus-
tified or not, is the last thing any gov-
ernment needs, especially when it has
sought to raise behavioral standards in
high office. Is it time for Big Bad Brad to
take his leave?
Alfred Sears, the Boys' Industrial
School alumnus made good, is another
whose ministerial expertise has been
under the spotlight. His twin portfolios as
Attorney General and Minister of Edu-
cation have been viewed with suspicion
and doubt from the start. Was it possible
for one man to run two such important
jobs effectively? 'No' is now the
informed consensus.
His Minister's Book Club initiative is
laudable, and necessary, but hardly a
priority when the court system is seen
increasingly as a shambles of alarming
proportions. Who is going to bring order
to the judicial process and continue to
assert the rule of law?
If this hapless triumvirate look most
vulnerable in any ministerial shake-up,
they are far from being the entire story
when it comes to disillusionment with
the present government.
Prime Minister Perry Christie, proba-
bly the "nicest" government leader the
Bahamas has had, certainly since inde-
pendence 31 years ago, has been the sqb-
ject of concerned discussion ever since he
took office 30 months ago.
Unlike his two immediate predeces-
sors, who were seen as "strong" which
often translates as intransigent, mulish


and unreasonable Mr Christie is viewed
as an affable conciliator who believes in
sharing power with the public.
His appointment of several commis-
sions in the early months of his reign
was seen as praiseworthy by some and
futile by others. Most voters like to see
power wielded by the elected leader, not
small caucuses of alleged experts with
no public mandate. The commissions,
they feel, have blurred the government's
vision and stunted its progress. But no-
one doubts his intentions were hon-
ourable.
At one point, Mr Christie was consid-
ered an easy target for ambitious minis-
ters with leadership ideas. Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell and
Financial Services Minister Allyson May-
nard-Gibson were constantly being cited
as prime contenders for his job.
Since then, talk of leadership chal-
lenges have waned, but. there is still dis-
satisfaction with Mr Christie among
many old-style PLP supporters. They
see him as an arch-prevaricator who tries
his best to ignore problems until they
go away. His laissez-faire approach to
leadership does not sit well with those
who prefer brass-necked bravura to a
seemingly timorous policy of non-inter-
ference.
After 25 years subject to the say-so
of a maximum leader like Sir Lynden
Pindling, these die-hards find it hard to
adjust to the cosier style of his power-
sharing protege. Discontent might be
less pronounced if the government had
established a reputation for action over
the last, two years. However, inaction
has been its dominant characteristic -
and many people are tired of it.
Mr Christie has been blamed, in par-
ticular, for his handling of three promi-
nent PLP figures the aforementioned


Mr Miller, Youth and Sports Minister.
Neville Wisdom, and the now bankrupt:
backbencher Sidney Stubbs, a mani
whose short political career has been a
signature study in abject ineptitude.
Only a few months after the 2002 elec-,
tion, INSIGHT warned that Mr Stubbs'
appointment would probably prove to.-
be the beginning of the end for Mr
Christie. His mass firing of known FNMs
from BAIC, and his ridiculously vindic-
tive letter to a leading corporation offi-
cial, were the first signs that Mr Stubbs
was unsuited to this kind of office. It
was a calamitous start to a reign as chair-
man which, improbable as it sounds,
actually went from bad to worse to utter-
ly dire as the months rolled by. His sub-
sequent controversial junket to China,'
the Korean boats scandal and then his
bankruptcy all added fuel to critics"
claims that Mr Stubbs' removal was long
overdue.
It was Mr Christie's uncertain han-
dling of the Stubbs affair, and his failure
to clamp down on Mr Wisdom in the
Junkanoo bleachers scandal in 2002 that
led to allegations of unaccountabilityy",
a seeming reluctance to penalise any-
body for anything.
Alongside specific inadequacies lies a
general feeling that the government takes
too long to make up its mind. Many
potential investors have, over the last
30 months, complained bitterly about:
ministerial slackness in bringing projects
to fruition.
The protracted process of granting:
work permits is another annoyance,
especially as certain elements in the
administration persist in adopting an
anti-foreign mindset passed down by the

See GOVERNMENT, 5C


$fff


. 'ne, -m y


:


The TribuneD


I


_~p~'~7"Rs






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005


'We should not ignore Atlantic





volcano's destructive potential'


By JOHN MARQUIS
assau architei
cum-noveli
James Frew'
Latest boo
..L which tells
the destruction of an enti
civilisation by a single volcar
eruption of world-shatterin
force, has taken on new sign
ikance with last month's tsun
i"u disaster in the Far East.
; For the eruption of .Volcai
Santorini, which wiped out t
gentle and cultured Minoa
at a time when the Gree
were still virtually barbarian
offers disturbing parallels wi
ihe scenario mapped out b
scientists if a peak in tl
Canary Islands ever blows
top.
The Santorini explosion
four times more powerful th
'the 19th century erupti<
which destroyed the island
Krakatoa off the coast of Jav
Aifted a chunk of real estate t
sze of Manhattan 25 miles in
the sky.
It set off tsunamis which
bttled up by the Medite
fanean basin, caused massi
*struction over a very wi,








, FEEDBACK

S THE Bradley Rober
uproar has focused attentic
.on a recent INSIGHT arl
?Scle which highlighted short
Comings in the system of ju
,tice in the Bahamas, claimiq
"the rule of law was beir
.undermined.
The long delay in que
-tioning Mr Roberts, tt
,Works and Utilities Mini
:'ter, over a woman's rap
;,allegation certainly rang
Sell with one reader, \% %h
|contrasted this with his ov
experience when he wa
;accused of a petty act of van
dalism.
"Clearly in this society v
do have influential classic
cations of persons," said tl
reader. "I myself was accuse
of a much lesser 'crime' I
a vicious neighbour, but w:
arrested and detained wit]
out question the instant tl
SCID officers came on ti
Si scene to 'investigate'. I w:
put into a stenchy police ce
with segments of human
waste on the floor and ha
Nowhere clean to sit.
"I was finally release
from that horrible inhuman
place after some four hou
without a charge, probab
because my attorney turned
up after 15 minutes, othe
wise it could have been a dw
or longer.,
"If I were of the influenti
class I would not have bee
locked up for vandalisingg
By contrast, the minister w
not incarcerated at all, ye
he faced the much more sed
ous accusation of rape."
The reader said he com
plained about his treatment
;:to the police, but got r
reply.
"I was informed to con
to the police to make a stat
ment, but once there I w:
thrown into a cell withoi
leniency."
The reader said th:
Human rights were no
respected in the Bahamas fi
. "non-influential" people
S"But the matter will not va
. ish, I will see to that, becau
; it is a matter of honour atr


area, and laid waste the entire
Minoan culture, which had
provided the foundation for
ancient Greece and modern
Europe as civilising powers.
Mr Frew, a former wartime
pilot who conducted intense
research into the Santorini dis-
aster before writing his book,
believes the Canary Islands
volcano relatively benign at
present offers a long-term
threat which can never be tak-
en lightly.
And he believes the
Bahamas, together with the
entire Caribbean and the east-
ern seaboard of the United
States, might one day have to
face tsunamis at least as big,
and probably much bigger,
than the sea swells that created
such havoc in Thailand, Sri
Lanka and Indonesia.
Of course, timescales are
impossible to assess when it
comes to natural tragedies of
this kind. No-one suggests that
Cumbre Vieja on La Palma is
going to explode tomorrow, or
even in the next 10 or 50 years,
but it would be foolish to sup-
pose that it never will.
Whether it's next week, next
year or a century down the


principle."


EVEN though three
months have passed, readers
are still responding to
INSIGHT'S controversial
9/11 article, which touched
on New York's financial sup-
port for the IRA terrorists
during the 1970s. 1980s and.-
1990s.
Last week's disclosure by
Northern Ireland's police
chief that the IRA was
behind the $50 million bank
raid in Belfast a few weeks
ago brought this comment
from Tribune reader D M
Humes:
"At the time, INSIGHT
made the point that New
York and Boston, which are
now so virulently anti-ter-
rorist, had for 30 years been
enthusiastic supporters of the
IRA bandits, who specialised
in blowing up innocent civil-
ians.
"INSIGHT also pointed
out that soon after 9/11 the
IRA leader was keen to
assure his American sup-
porters that his organisation
was 'different' from al-Quae-
da, an obvious attempt to
keep the money supply flow-
ing from the IRA's gullible
American supporters.
"However, the bank raid
suggests he failed to convince
them. The IRA's American
money supply is now appar-
ently cut off, so the criminals
in the organisation are now
resorting to robbing banks,
which is very much in keep-
ing with their total lack of
morality.
"As the police chief point-
ed out, 'the bank raid was not
'Robin Hood effort' but a
violent and brutal crime in
which two families were tak-
en hostage.
"If there are any Ameri-
can pro-IRA lunatics out
there, please take note. If
you send money to the Irish
criminals, you are support-
ing people who are just as
bad, and probably worse,
than al-Quaeda."


The problem with tsunamis like those which caused such
widespread devastation in Asia last month is that they are
always "extremely remote" possibilities until they happen. The
Atlantic volcano which threatens the Caribbean, including the
Bahamas, is also a long-shot threat...but we would be foolish to
ignore its awesome destructive potential. INSIGHT reports...


* JAMES FREW, the Nas-
sau-based novelist whose
latest book focuses on
another famous volcano,
Santorini, which destroyed
the Minoan civilisation.


line, it's as well for the
Bahamas to be prepared and
to accept the full implications
of such a calamity.
Mr Frew's book, which came
out in hardback and trade
paperback last year, provides
well-researched detail about
Santorini, the Greek island vol-
cano which sucked a large por-
tion of the Aegean Sea into its
huge mouth after an explosion
of shattering power.
"Even today the area is still
bubbling away," said the
author, "it was an event the
likes of which the world had
rarely seen."
' The Santorini incident took
place some 1,600 years before
Christ, but it remains a bench-
mark among those who study
the behaviour of volcanoes.
The convulsions wrought by
events of such magnitude have
terrifying implications over
vast areas, as the Sumatra
earthquake proved. And San-

"Even today
the area is still
bubbling away...
it was an event
the likes of which
the world had
rarely seen."
James Frew

torini was right up there
among the mega-blasts, a sub-
terranean spasm almost with-
out parallel.
When a Tribune article
appeared last week about the
.Canary Islands volcano, and
the threat is poses to this area,
quite a few readers scoffed,
complacent in the belief that
such an event will never hap-
pen here.
It is possible that it never
will, certainly not in the life-
times of anyone around today.
But Sri Lankans, Indonesians
and Thais were probably
thinking exactly the same thing
just three weeks ago because
earthquakes and tsunamis like
the Sumatra tragedy were alien
to their region, too. That's why
there was no early warning sys-
tem in place.
However, a BBC television
documentary screened four
years ago focused on the
Canary Islands volcano in a


U CUMBRE VIEJA, the menacing volcano in the Canary Islands which could unleash
untold destructive power.


way which must have left all
thinking people on this side of
the Atlantic feeling distinctly
uneasy. The statistics offered
by researchers did not'make
for comfortable viewing. ,
What they. discovered, in
essence, is that Cumbre Vieja,
a smouldering peak with cin-
dered flanks, is one of a hand-
ful of rare geological "time-
bombs" around the world.
And it has the potential to hit
New York with a wall of water
the like of which has never
been seen before.
Scientists say if Cumbre Vie-
ja ever goes into full eruption
mode, and the mountain splits,
the subsequent mega-tsunamis
would make the Sumatra
waves look like playtime in a
paddling pool.
Travelling at the speed of a
jet airliner, the waves would
crush the eastern United
States, washing everything
away in their path for several
miles inland. The eastern
Bahamas would, it appears, be
totalled and the rest of the
country would not be looking
too good, either.
Although last month's
quake-induced tsunamis
seemed to contradict scientific
thinking, which was that vol-
canoes posed the greatest
threat of such disasters, they
did nothing to undermine the
original thesis, which is that
the odds still lie in favour of
volcanoes as the most prolific
creators of killer waves.
The BBC said huge volcanic
landslides, and resulting mega-
tsunamis, are extremely rare -
so rare, in fact, that the last
really big ones all occurred
before the Christian era began.
The Sumatra cataclysm, tak-
ing more than 150,000 lives in
11 countries, echoed the hor-
rors of those former eruptions,
but its waves were not as great.
Researchers, however, are
concerned because Cumbre
Vieja is unlike other potential


* A MAP showing the extent of the mega-tsunamis that a
volcanic explosion would produce.


volcanic "time-bombs" around
the world in that conditions
there appear ideal for such a
catastrophe to occur.
In 1949, when the southern
peak on La Palma erupted, an
enormous crack appeared as
the western half of the moun-
tain slipped a few metres
towards the Atlantic Ocean.
While the volcano offers no
threat while in repose, ,scien-
tists fear any future eruption
on its summit could shake the
entire western flank of the
mountain into the sea.
Like a gigantic dump-truck,
the volcano would spill 500,000
million tonnes of rock and
earth into the Atlantic, creat-
ing an inconceivably destruc-
tive wave system far bigger
than anything witnessed in
modern times.
Boston would be hit first,
followed by New York. Then
the mega-waves would come


ashore all the way down the
coast to Miami, the Bahamas
and into the Caribbean basin.
The swirling water would pen-
etrate up to 20 kilometres
inland, smashing everything in
its path.
For the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, 50-metre waves
would be likely. That's higher
than Nelson's Column in Lon-
don. It would take roughly
eight or nine hours for the
tsunamis to make landfall.
As Mr Frew's book relates,
volcanoes have almost unimag-
inable killing power, not only
with the initial blast, but in all
that follows. The dark silhou-
ette of Cumbre Vieja casts an
enormous westward shadow
we can't afford to ignore.

Volcano Santorini by
James Frew is published by
LMH Publishing and is on sale
at Nassau bookshops.


'B&IBI







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 10. 2005, PAGE 3Q.


Im


Police Commis-
sioner Paul Far-
quharson last
week recom-
mended to
Attorney General Alfred
Sears that Works and Utili-
ties Minister ,Bradley
Roberts not be charged with
rape.
Mr Sears told The Tribune
Thursday that the commis-
sioner, who submitted his
recommendations to the
Attorney General last Tues-
day, said that based on their
findings Mr Roberts should
not be prosecuted.
Mr Sears said that his
office has the final say in the
matter, but if evidence does
not support a prosecution
one is not advanced.
Mr Sears, however, would
not comment on the circum-


stances under which the
commissioner recommend-
ed that no charges be made
against the minister.
The force last week defend-
ed its actions in the investiga-
tion of the highly-publicised
rape allegation against Mr
Roberts.
It was reported that police
mediated a confrontation
between Mr Roberts and his
accuser during their investiga-
tion of the case.
In a press conference last
Wednesday, Commissioner
Farquharson confirmed that
there was a meeting between
the two parties and said it was
not unusual for pplice- to use
a confrontation between a
complainant and the accused
to determine the validity of a
case.
Retired police officers told


Climate Change: Should


the Caribbean care now?


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a former
Caribbean diplomat, now corpo-
rate executive, who publishes
widely on the Caribbean in the
international comn umi.'y)

AVAILABLE evidence
shows that both the islands of
the Caribbean and Caribbean
countries with coast lines are
very vulnerable to global warm-
ing.
Although the scientific com-
munity appears to be divided on
the extent of the damage to the
world's environment and the
length of time that it will take
for such damage to be irrepara-
ble, the fact is that damage is
being done now. A further fact is
that small islands such as those in
the Caribbean and coastal
regions are already being affect-
ed.
The one country that has tak-
en a strong position against the
Kyoto Protocol of the UN Cli-
mate Change Convention is the
United States of America even
though with only a small per-
centage of the world's pptpula-
tion, it emits 25 per-cent of the
world's greenhouse gases. I will
return to this later.
It now seems unquestionable
that the increased intensity and
frequency' of hurricanes in the
Caribbean can, in part, be attrib-
uted to global warming. Witness
the disastrous effects of hurri-
canes Charlie, Ivan, Jeanne and
Frances on The Bahamas, Cuba
and Haiti, and principally on the
Cayman Islands and Grenada in
2004.
Two recent events, apart from
the debate that took place at a
Global Conference in Argenti-
na in early December 2004,
cause me to focus on this issue.
The first is that a life-long
Guyanese friend, Hutton
Archer, a man who worked tire-
lessly in the cause of protecting
the environment, dropped dead
a few weeks ago immediately as
he finished delivering the eulogy
at another person's funeral. The
second is a discussion I had with
Joy-Dee Davis a bright, intelli-
gent, young Antiguan woman
student at one of the world's
most prestigious universities.
She was writing a paper that
originally took the position
against the Kyoto protocol. She
argued that the economic back-
lash for several important
economies of the world that
would be caused by actions to
reduce greenhouse gas emissions
would not be advisable especial-
ly in the face of the scientific
uncertainty over the effects of
climate change.
She said to me in a personal
note: "Let's face it; we'll be dead
by the time that 'greenhouse gas-
es' damage the global environ-
ment irreparably".
Joy-Dee might be right about
the length of time that 'green-
house gases' will take to dam-
age the global environment
irreparably. However, is that a
reason to defer action to stop
global warming? I argued with
her that it was not, particularly as
the islands of the Caribbean and
elsewhere are already suffering,
as are the coastlines of many
countries that can ill afford the
high cost of continuous sea
defences; among these countries
are Belize and Guyana both of
whose coastlines are not only the
habitat of most of their popula-
tions, but are also the centres for
their main economic activity.
Beyond the argument of the
present effect of global warming
on islands and coast lines in the
Caribbean area, should our pre-
sent generation really be content
to leave a legacy of "irreparable
damage" to future generations? I
think not.


SIR RONALD SANDERS

Each generation rents space
on the earth for the duration of
our lives. That space was occu-
pied before this generation and it
will be occupied by others to
come. We found the Earth our
single habitat in reasonably
good shape environmental-
ly. Over time, we have polluted
it, killed parts of it and rendered
others unfit for anything to
thrive. If matters continue as
they now are, there will be irre-.
versible ecological damage with
dire consequences for'the sur-
vival of all forms of life..
I am pleased to say that Joy
Dee Davis amended heri paper to
argue impressively in support of
the UN Convention on Climate
Change and the Kyoto Proto-
col. In a sense, I felt that her
paper gave reason to the work of
people like my friend, Hutton
Archer, who had turned sixty
just two days before his sudden
death. He, and many others like
him, have devoted their lives to
protecting and preserving the
environment not for themselves
but for the benefit of future
inhabitants of our common plan-
et.
The point is: if we know that in
the future greenhouse gas emis-
sions are causing problems for
some countries now and will
damage the world's environment
significantly in the future, why
is there disagreement on doing
something about it now.
The answer boils down to
issues of world governance ver-
sus national interests or, at least,
national interest as perceived
governments.
To understand this contention,
we must first appreciate that The
Kyoto Protocol is an interna-
tional agreement setting targets
for industrialized countries to cut
their greenhouse gas emissions
which, are considered at least
partly responsible for global
warming.
The protocol was established
in 1997, based on principles set
out in a framework agreement
signed in 1992. Each country that
signed the protocol agreed to its
own specific target. EU coun-
tries are expected to cut their
present emissions by 8 per cent
and Japan by 5 per cent. Some
countries with low emissions
were permitted to increase them.
Russia initially wavered over
signing the protocol, amid spec-
ulation that it was jockeying for
more favourable terms. But the
country's cabinet agreed to' back
Kyoto in September
2004. Allegedly Russia's motives
for signing were not all altruis-
tic. It is claimed that it agreed to
join the Protocol in exchange for
the European Union countries
allowing it to enter the World
trade Organisation.
The US had originally signed
the Kyoto Protocol in the dying
days of the Democratic Party
administration of President Bill
Clinton. When President George
W Bush came to office, he quick-
ly reversed the US position with
considerable support from the
US Congress. He said imple-

See CLIMATE, 5C


The Tribune last week that the
procedures adopted by inves-
tigators were "unprecedented"
and a cause for major concern.


THE Bahamas recorded its
first murder three days into the
New Year with the death of
29-year-old Brian Cephus
Sands who was shot in Nassau.
Mr Sands, of Kemp's Bay.
Andros, was shot last Monday
night on Sunshine Park off
Baillou Hill Road shortly
before 9pm.
Mr Sands was reportedly
standing around with other
men on Sunshine Park when
they were approached and
attacked by two men, one of
whom had a handgun.



THE Roots Junkanoo
Group last week launched an
official protest of the results
of the Sammy Thompson
Boxing Day Junkanoo Parade,
claiming that judges gave the
Shell Saxons Superstars the
victory after scoring only 45
per cent of the parade.
According to group mem-
bers, despite not hav ing scores
for several key categories, the
Parade Management Team
went ahead and announced
unofficial results declaring the
Saxons as the winners.
Absent from the results
announced at Arawak on Sun-
day afternoon were the highly
contested best music and ban-
ner categories.
Group members said the
decision to announce the
scores has left them saddened
and disappointed.
They have filed an official
protest pursuant to the official
rules that governed the parade,
to the Junkanoo Corporation
of the Bahamas, the Parade
Management Team and the
Junkanoo Community.
According to the Official
Rules that governed the
parade, the Category Weight-
ing Percentages are as follows:
overall group costume 50
per cent;
music 25 per cent;
. performancee 20 per cent
and; ,
execution of theme five per
cent; -


* A MEMBER of the Shell Saxons Superstars shows off her costume during the 2004 Sammy Thompson Boxing Day
Parade. Last week, the Roots Junkanoo Group launched an official protest of the results, claiming judges gave Saxons
the victory after scoring only 45 per cent of the parade.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


Quotes of the Week


"I have asked the Director for Pub-
lic Prosecutions to review the recom-
mendations and he will advise me if
the recommendations ot the cominis -
sioner should be followed. "
Attorney General Alfred Sears
on the police commissioner's recom-
mendations not to charge Cabinet
Minister Bradley Roberts with rape.

"I wish to assure members of the pub-
lic that there was no delay. We had to
ensure that the investigation was done
thoroughly and professionally.
"There is no one above the law in this
country and once complaints are laid to
the police, the police has an obligation to
investigate transparently and profession-
ally, no matter how long it takes, in the
public's interest."
: Commissioner of Police Paul Far-
quharson responds to claims that there


was a delay in the investigations into
the highly -publicised rape allegation
against Cabinet Minister Bradley
Roberts.

''We do not want to be tied to a
deadline. We certainly will review the
police's findings and give it the atten-
tion that it deserves.
"There are other matters that this
office is dealing with and we will treat
this matter like any other matter."
Bernard Turner, Director of
Public Prosecutions on the status of a
rape allegation case involving Cabi-
net Minister Bradley Roberts.

"'It bothers me because i\e have a
good police force. But they have gone
about things the wrong way and it is
causing serious concern among many
retired officers.


"They took too long to question this
man. If this had been an 'ordinary'
person, they would have questioned
him that day and taken appropriate
action.
"As for the meeting at the CID
office, no police force does that. Now
we have a press conference. What's
going on?"
A retired officer expresses con-
cern over the police's handling of the
rape allegation investigations involv-
ing Cabinet Minister Bradley Roberts.

"There is no way that the unofficial
scores should have been announced.
because the validity of the results could
not be confirmed."
A Roots Junkanoo member. The
group is protesting the outcome of
the 'Boxing Day' parade that put the
Saxons in first place.


Flying or

crawling...

nothing

escapes us!


1 Now distributed in the Bahamas by: .
The d'Albenas Agency Ltd.
Madeira Street, Palmdale, Nassau 2
TEL: (242) 322-1441

30ml and 250ml.






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C. MONDAyV JANUARY 10, 2004


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2005, PAGE 5C


Despite success of the Urban Renewal


Initiative,


'many unsure about meaning'


This is the first column in a
series by Dr Desiree Cox, who
was the first Bahamian and
British Caribbean Rhodes Schol-
ar. Described as a "Renaissance
woman" by the British Medical
Journal, Dr Cox is a medical
doctor whose expertise lies in
medicine and humanities.

N By Dr Desiree C. T. Cox
Consultant to the Urban
Renewal Commission

'And do not be conformed to
this world, but be transformed
by the renewing of your mind,
that you may prove what is that
good and acceptable and perfect
will of God'.
Romans 12:2

What sustains
the individ-
ual, also sus-
tains the
community
and the planet. The reverse is as
also true. What sustains the plan-
et, sustains mankind.
We, as individuals, acting on
our own cannot sustain ourselves
over time. It might at times
appear as if we can. Indeed, it
might even seem as if we are
doing just fine on our own. But
this is an illusion.
It was with this recognition -
that we as a nation are not truly
self-sustaining if we neglect each
other, and, in particular if we
neglect people in lower-income
areas, 'urban' areas of our coun-
try that the Urban Renewal
Initiative was started in June,
2002.
Despite its success, many are
unsure about the meaning of
urban renewal. Fewer still have a
clear sense of the importance of
this initiative for the country as a
whole.
'The renewing of the minds',
bodies and spirits of people 'on


the bottom', is inextricably
linked to the futures of every-
one in the Bahamas. And
attending to urban renewal is
crucial to the sustainability of all
communities in this country.
There is a South African word
which captures this essence. The
word is 'Ubuntu'. Literally trans-
lated, Ubuntu means 'I am
because we are-I can only be a
person through others'., Arch-
bishop Desmond Tutu put it
beautifully (1994):
'Africans have a thing called
Ubuntu; it is about essences of
being huma...It embraces hos-
pitality, caring for others, being
willing to go that extra mile one
for another. We believe that a
person is a person through other
persons; that my humanity is
caught up, bound up inextricably
in yours. When I dehumanise
you, I inexorably dehumanise
myself. The solitary human
being is a contradiction in terms,
and therefore you seek work for
the common good because your
humanity comes into its own in
community, in belonging.'

Tutu, D. 1994. The Rainbow
People of God: South Africa's
Victory over Apartheid. London:
Transworld Publishers Ltd.

The Bahamian approach to
'Urban renewal' is very much
aligned with the South African
spirit of 'Ubuntu'. Urban
Renewal, as articulated by the
actions of the Urban Renewal
Task Forces of the urban renew-
al commission of the Bahamas, is
a collective term used to describe
a holistic approach to dealing
with the problems of poverty
and deprivation in lower income
'urban' areas of the country.
'Self-knowledge' and 'broth-
erly love' are at the heart of the
initiative. At the most basic lev-
el, 'self-knowledge' has meant


house-to-house surveys, research
into the history of the urban
areas where Task Forces have
been stationed, and information
gathering. I
Self-empowerment pro-
grammes, marching bands, and
after-school programmes created
and run by the urban renewal
task forces also promote self-
knowledge and self-respect at an
individual and personal level.
The philosophy behind this
approach to urban renewal is
simple: when people transform
their mind-set they begin to
direct their energies in accor-
dance with their new viewof life.
Fixing buildings, building new
houses, parks, hotels and shop-
ping malls are important, but
this, in and of itself will not trans-


form the urban, low-income, or
any other area of the Bahamas
for that matter.
New buildings used by people
with the same old 'mind-set' will
soon be devastated and demol-
ished. Therefore, in situations
where resources are scare, it is
best to invest in self-empower-
ment programmes which are, or
can become self-sustaining.
This kind of investment has
an immediate pay-off. Transfor-
mation happens in a moment.
The stories of children and
young people participating in the
Bain Town and Farm Road
marching bands show this clear-
ly.
And, in the weeks that follow,
I shall be presenting more of the
local and international evidence


. .s fiL :.;


for the transformational effect
of music on an individual, com-
munity and national level. I'll
also be-showing how you can
participate in the transformation
of a child's life through this, and
other programmes such as the
'Make it Happen' game which
was designed and piloted at the
E P Roberts School during the
September, 2004, term. Primary
school children and teachers are
more inspired to do their school
work, and participate in school
life when they take ownership
of their environment.
Now that the urban renewal
after-school programmes,
marching bands, senior citizen
programmes and other individ-
ual and community empower-
ment programmes are up and
running in the urban renewal
task force areas of Farm Road,
Bain and Grants Town, Engler-
ston, Fort Charlotte and St
Cecelia what will it take for the
renewal to be sustained over
time? This brings me back to my
initial statement, and the focus of
this series, 'sustainable living'.
What sustains individuals?
Living in healthy communities,
creating sacred spaces in those
communities, and creating those
communities as sacred spaces
sustains individuals and com-
munities.
People living in healthy com-
munities are safe and feel safe,
and are well-informed, feel that
they have the power to make
choices, have lasting bonds with
one another, have strong family
and community support, and
have a sense of meaning and
purpose in their lives.
People gravitate towards cities
and towns which either are
- sacred spaces, because these are
exciting place, places of possi-
bilities and ideas, places where
there is freedom of expression.
Partnering with people who


Government (From page 1C)


corrupt and incompetent Pin-
dling government of the 1970s
and 1980s.
Flying in the face of globali-
sation, and the need for the
Bahamas to compete increas-
ingly on the world stage., certain
PLP "dinosaurs" continue to
spout outmoded ideas that were
preposterous even when first
mooted 35 years ago.
Many observers today believe
that Mr Christie, having been
given the chance to readjust the
party's mindset after his 2002
victory, blew it by retaining too
many discredited reprobates of
the old regime. There is also a
strong feeling that be has failed
to capitalise on rising talent in
his party in favour of people who
did not deserve a second chance.
"Overall," one business source
told INSIGHT. "the perfor-
mance of this government has
been far from satisfactory. There
is a certain slackness about the
way they do business. I have
heard so many times from busi-
ness colleagues about straight-
forward lack of courtesy, minis-
ters being late for appointments
and so forth.
"There is a lack of profes-
sionalism that harkens back to
bad old times when the Pindling
government was driving the
Bahamas into the ground."
It's no secret that the PLP was
surprised to gain power in 2002
and therefore, according to its
critics, ill-equipped to take on
the challenge. Many of its can-
didates were seen as
makeweightss' who. against all
odds, found themselves pro-
pelled into parliamentary seats
they never really expected to
occupy.
"As a result we have a House
of Assembly full of -nodding
dogs' and 'me too' men." said a
former politician who despairs
at the lack of intellectual sub-


-stance in parliament. "There is
little or no statesmanship in
sight, no-one of real calibre to
take the country forward."
If all this amounts to a
depressing scenario, it is made
worse when the alternatives are
considered.
With a little over two years
left before the country goes to
the polls again, and with many
PLP supporters now thoroughly
sick of their party's performance.
there is seemingly nowhere for
the disaffected to turn.
In fact, observers feel the
opposition's plight is even
greater than the government's,
for its leadership remains the
subject of endless speculation
and disenchantment.
However well-meaning Tom-
my Turnquest is. it is hard to
find anyone out there who views
him seriously as a national leader
in the making.
The implausibility of his posi-
tion and especially his odd sta-
tus as a Senator-in-charge
instead of a properly elected MP
is a serious burden for the
FNNI to carry.
There are powerful forces
within the FNM itself who
acknowledge that the Turnquest
leadership is farcical, .et they
are confused about how to over-
come the problem.
"If Tommy goes. who takes
over?" asked one despairing
FNM member.
The answer, for some. is
Hubert Ingraham, whose ten-
year tenure as prime minister
resurrected the Bahamas from
near ruin. There has been talk
for some time of the former
leader making a comeback.
Unfortunately for the Ingra-
hamites, memories have not yet
dimmed on why their man's gov-
ernment was overturned in the
first place.
Mr Ingraham, for all his


unquestionable strengths., waPs .tint of the Bay Street Boys puts
seen at the end as an arrogant him well out of bounds as a
tyrant who treated all around potential prime minister, accord-
him as half-wits. The way the ing to most insiders. And Mr
Turnquest-Foulkes 'dream team' Bethel, articulate as he is, bears
and an eleventh-hour referen- the burden of youth. He is too
dum were foisted on the public lightweight for most observers.
was enough to tip the electoral On the sidelines sits Dr
scales emphatically in the PLP's Bernard Nottage. leader of a
favour. The FNM has been meaningless fringe group called
floundering like a beached dog- the Coalition for Democratic
fish ever since. Reform Some see him as a
If the ex-PM were to reappear potential national leader but, if
as a leadership candidate, there that is so. why is be not in the
is a chance that a sizeable slab of thick of battle? At the moment
the party would not fall in his contribution to the national
behind him, INSIGHT was told. debate is zero not the posture
However, there are many who of someone busting a gut to pull
see him as the party's only hope the' country out of a rut, say his


"As a result we have a House
of Assembly full of 'nodding dogs'
and 'me too' men ... There is little
or no statesmanship in sight, no-
one of real calibre to take the


country


and therefore, in spite of his
recent heart scare, not a prospect
to be written off. Whatever his
faults, he is a consummate par-
liamentary performer with a
sound grasp of his brief and an
intimidating presence. Who else
can make such a claim?
The only other credible poten-
tial leaders, it seems, are the for-
mer Attorney Generals Brent
Symonette and Carl Bethel. Mr
Symonette, though apparently
savvy and smart, is far too white
for most tastes. Whatever illu-
sions exist about, a mixed
Bafamian society, there is no
room at the top for someone
with his racial and political pedi-
gree. Unfair perhaps, but the


forward."
Former politician


critics.
Aside from all such consider-
ations, what really rankles with
most serious analysts is an aura
of lassitude on both major poht-
ical flanks.
"What we have now," said the
ex-politician, "is a government
that does little and an opposi-
tion that does even less. There
have been several occasions
when the opposition should have
been jumping all over the gov-
ernment, but they haven't. It's
a shambles and I'm not sure how
were going toemerge_from what
is probably the least inspiring
era in Bahamian politics."
When politicians grow com-
placent, it's the nation's youth


that generally injects vigour into
the national debate. But there
appears to be an absence of
political will among the young,
the product of a surprisingly
thick layer of apparent apathy
and conservatism.
"There seems to be a lack of
national direction." said one
observer. "There is even a loss of
focus, as though we don't know
what we're all about anymore.
"Pindling. for all his faults,
brought a level of class and
showmanship to the political
scene. It may have been all myth,
but he made us believe that the
Bahamas was a great little nation
in the making.
"Ingraham, on the other hand,
always seemed to make us sound
like a fishing village. He liked to
project himself as the little guy
who came from nowhere with
no special desire to go anywhere
else.
"While there's no doubt
Ingraham cleared up-a big mess
left by the Pindling government,
it is also true that in some
respects we ended up somehow
smaller and less important in our
own eyes, if no-one else's."
If Mr Christie vere to point
to his government's success sto-
ries, Kerzner International's
Phase Three commitment would
have to be right up there near
the top. The proposed Las
Vegas-style development on
Cable Beach would be another,
assuming it reaches fruition. And
Peter de Savary's Winding Bay
resort in Abaco is a third.
But its greatest achievement
is probably one most people
would view as fairly negative.
Mr Christie has succeeded in
modifying. to some extent, the
PLP's image, thus encouraging
existing investors to stay, and
even persuading one or two new
ones to join them, in spite of the
red tape and endless delays


involved in getting projects off
the ground.
Under Sir Lynden, there was a
growing impression that the
Bahamas was off-limits for seri-
ous foreign interests. It had
become an increasingly derelict
haven for drug-dealers where
law-abiding citizens felt down-
cast and demoralised. Its credi-
bility was in shreds, with the
international press romping glee-
fully all over it, plastering it with
slogans like Paradise Lost and
Nation for Sale.
Mr Christie has, at the very
least, shown that the PLP has
learnt something from its past,
when it was seen with one or
two exceptions as a thoroughly
disreputable collection of wide-
boys, cancers and miscreants.
No-one suggests it is entirely
clear of its old image, but there
has been an apparent move for-
ward, and it is Mr Christie who
deserves credit for that.
According to those who take
the nation's pulse on the streets
and down the byways, what the
Bahamas needs now is in invig-
orating injection of new politi-
cal blood.
"In the past, too many
Bahamian parliamentarians have
taken office with the sole aim of
stealing as much as they could
in five years in power," said the
ex-politician.
"What we need are really
smart people with the national
interest at heart. We need peo-
ple who have succeeded in open
society and can bring their skills
into the political arena.
"We need vision, high princi-
ple and a sense of direction. At
the moment the Bahamas is
becalmed. It needs a strong puff
of wind and someone of stature
at the helm."
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmarquis@tri-
bunemedia.net


Climate (From page 3C)


meeting the Kyoto Protocol
would gravely damage the US
economy. In domestic political
terms, neither President Bush nor
the US Congressmen were pre-
pared to tell US industry to cut
back on their dependence on fos-
sil fuels and to develop alterna-
tive technologies.
President Bush also dubbed
the treaty "fatally flawed", part-
ly because it does not require
developing countries such as Chi-
na and India to commit to emis-
sions reductions. In other words,
he believes that adherence to the
Kyoto Protocol would put the


economy of the United States at
a disadvantage to economies such
as China's from which the US is
already facing stiff competition.
Of course, the argument of the
large developing countries is that
global warming and other global
environmental damage has been
caused by the industrialized
nations, and they should now pay
the price of their excesses while
developing countries get the
opportunity to grow.
In Argentina in early Decem-
ber 2004 at the Global Confer-
ence on Climate change and the
Kyoto protocol, the US refused


to change its position. So too did
the European Union nations and
the large developing coun-
tries. Powerless in ,all this were
the small countries suchas those
in the Caribbean who are suffer-
ing from the effects of global
warming without contributing to
it in .any significant-way- --.
Where does this all leave
Caribbean countries? The truth is
it leaves us victims of the refusal
of both the United States and
large developing countries, such
as China and India, to curb harm-
ful greenhouse gas emissions.
The future of the world and


the immediate problems of small
islands and countries with low
lying coastlands should not be
matter for barter. In the 21st
Century, there should be a more
enlightened approach to gover-
nance of the common areas of
mankind's survival. And that
enlightenment-should-be encour-
aged amongst all the world's
nations industrialized and
developing.
The Caribbean was not very
active in Argentina in December
at the political level. We should
have been. Our region has the
intellectual and creative capacity


to propose solutions that could
command the regard of the US as
much as China's.
Joy-Dee Davis, one of our
bright Caribbean students, is
thinking deeply about this prob-
lem at a great American univer-
sity. Hutton Archer, one of our
devoted and caring Caribbean
citizens lived his life fighting the
cause in the UN Environmental
Programme and the Global Envi-
ronmental Facility. They repre-
sent tens of thousands in our
region. The problem of climate
change and global warming are
real for us. Our voices should be


heard throughout the interna-
tional community.
For various reasons, the coun-
tries of the European Union are
playing a leadership role in cli-
mate change. Britain's Prime
Minister Tony Blair had pledged::
to make this one of two priorities
of Britain's presidency of the
Group of Eight body of industri- ,
alised nations in 2005; this:,
includes the United States. The
Caribbean should give the EU ,
active support not only in our '
own interest, but in the cause of
preserving and sustaining life
worldwide.


live in urban areas to create sus-
tainable communities in these
lower-income areas will have
positive benefits for people all
over the Bahamas, but only if
all of us take the issue of sus-
tainability seriously in our own
communities.
This column will be a sacred
space for exploring all aspects
of sustainability, and sustainable
living in the Bahamas as it
relates to urban renewal. I'll be
examining the issues relating to
urban renewal in the Bahamas,
and presenting the facts about
the Urban Renewal initiative,
along with evidence from inter-
national sources about what
works in urban renewal.
How do we create sustainable
communities in urban renewal
areas, and elsewhere in the
Bahamas? How can we be better
stewards of our environment?
How can we create sacred spaces
in our urban areas? What makes
a sacred space? What would be
the benefit of green spaces, fruit
trees, and vegetable plotsin our
urban areas?
These are some of the issues
I'll be addressing as we expand
the conversation about 'urban
renewal' and move towards sus-
tainable communities through-
out the Bahamas. So join me
next week for more on Sustain-
able Living. God bless

If you would like the oppor-
tunity to participate in the urban
renewal initiative, or creating sus-
tainable communities please con-
tact (Dr Desiree Cox) at the
Transformation and Research
Unit (Urban Renewal Commis-
sion), 14 Collins Avenue
(Bahamas Law Enforcement and
Credit Union Building), Nassau,
Bahamas, Telephone: 242-328-
1728/9 or email HYPERLINK
"mailto:dctcox@hbtmail.com"
dctcox@hotmail.com


..DR DESIREE COX .









ISSUES&IDEAS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 9,2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


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7C SUNDAY,JANUARY 9,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION ISSUES & IDEAS


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OPINION
ALBERTO IBARGOEN, PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


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PAGE 10C, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2004
/-











TEXT



MESSAGING


is now available
as a paid service.
As of December 15th, 2004
QuikCell and Post Paid TDMA customers who
are currently testing SMS Text Messaging
Service need to apply between December 15th
and January 11th 2005 in order to keep the
service.

PLEASE NOTE: Customers who do not apply
for this service will not be able to utilize
the Text Messaging feature as of
January 15th, 2005. A $10 activation fe
will be charged if service is deactiva
-,a..l.


TEXT MESSAGING

Application Form
You may hand deliver to Drop Boxes in New Providence and Grand Bahama CTOs or fax registration
form to 393-9008/9 in New Providence. In Grand Bahama (242) 351-7682.
Last I lam e:... .......................First Nam e:....................... .............
Telephone:(H) ...........................(W )................................ ........... .. .
Cellular Number: ................Email:..................................................
SMS Text Messaging Packages
Packages Monthly Includes Additional
Light $5.00 100 text messages $.05 permessage
Basic $14.99 500 text messages $.03 per message
Premium $19.99 1000 text message $.02 per message
For more information call: (242) 302-7550 (New Providence) -(242)352-5555 (Grand Bahama)
Famr Island customers please contact your local BTC Wireless office.

Customer Signature Date
Billing will commence on January 15th 2005. However, subscribers who exceed the Text Messages beyond their selected packages
may be charged an overage fee during the sign up period. : I
Note: All phones may not be able to send text messages. To determine if if your phone is able to send a text message please follow these steps. 1. From handset
menu select messages 2. Scroll to write or create messages (if this option appears the handset is capable of sending a text message.)


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