• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section B: Business
 Section B: Sports
 Section C: Religion
 Section C continued














Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00003
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: January 6, 2005
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
        page A 15
        page A 16
    Section B: Business
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section B: Sports
        page B 9
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C: Religion
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section C continued
        page C 9
        page C 10
Full Text







"DELUXE

SALADS" a

HIGH 82F
LOW 70F

r, SUNNY
MAND NICE


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.35 THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005 PRICE 500


nr ICw


sections inside


ur In


Men are

remanded to

her Majesty's

Prison

* By TIFFANY GRANT
.*; OUR men appeared in
court yesterday in connection
with the murders of two peo-
ple in Nassau.
The four, who were brought
to court under heavy police
guard, claimed in Magistrate's
Court during their arraignment
that they had been severely,
beaten by police following their
arrests.
Police allege that Benjamin
Gray, 28, of Strachans Corner,
Trpy Symonette, 30, of Sunlight
Village, Jamalio Laing, 23, of
Gibbs Corner and Dwayne
Evans, 42, concerned together,
are responsible for the murder
of Oszell Moncur, which
occurred sometime between
December 22 and 24 last year.
Mr Moncur was found in the
trtink of a vehicle in Bain Town
wifh his hands bound and his
mouth gagged on Christmas
Eve.
They also appeared in court
in connection with the murder
of Pedro Demeritte, which
occurred between December
20, 2004 and January 2, 2005.
Mr Demeritte was found
dead in bushes off Hanna Road
on;New Year's Day.
-The accused men were
escorted to Court Number One,
Bank Lane by armed police
shortly after 2pm yesterday.


~mm~


BENJAMIN GRAY TROY SYMONETTE


A small group of people,
including family members, were
present to watch the men
escorted to the court.
One of the accused told his
mother: "Don't cry, be strong."
Laing was represented by
lawyer Gregory Hilton, Symon-
ette by Murrio Ducille, and
Gray by Ian Cargill. All three
SEE page 10


e t y o u r

'"'Isco
Certification
today!
Take the CISCO CCNA
Certification Course for only 9 9 5 ,
-1-CNA certified professionals can install, configure,
and operate Local Area Networks and Wide Area
Networks using wor-In lenowne CISCO routers and
cwi tc.hes. This certification is one of the most
Prestigious and necessary certifications that IT
professionalls require today. Upon completion.of this
r-ourso, per-sons can sit the CCNA exam 640-801.
Register by January 30th, 2005,

S r) o' I," Uia)itle."d Poyn)('nf P 1 (j n A va I'lo h I e
oil -


JAMALIO LAING


DWAYNE EVANS


Police defend investigation


* By DANIELLE STUBBS
Tribune Staff Reporter
A SPECIAL Education
teacher at the Stapeldon
School for the Mentally
Retarded admitted that the
facility has knowledge of sev-
eral incidents of incest and sex
solicitation involving mental-
ly disabled students.
The teacher, who spoke on
condition of anonymity,
said: "Persons who have spe-
cial needs are often
taken advantage of because
they are obviously very vul-
nerable.
"Most of these mentally
disabled' children come from
poor socio-economic back-
grounds and are easily bribed
or persuaded to engage in
promiscuous activities that


they are obviously not ready
for at this stage in their young
lives."
The teacher claimed that in
many cases, these mentally
challenged youngsters are
coaxed to perform sexual
favours for adult males and
females "in order to receive
a measly dollar to purchase a
bag of chips or a can of soda
when their parents or
guardians are away or at
work."
Although these incidents
occur off the school's campus,
usually at the residence or in
the communities of the spe-
cial needs students, the
teacher claimed that details
of many of the cases are heard
by school administrators and
SEE page 10


into rape
* By DANNEL ROLLE
THE Royal Bahamas Police
Force defended its actions yes-
terday in the investigation of
the highly publicised rape alle-
gation against Works and Util-
ities Minister Bradley Roberts.
It was reported that police
mediated a confrontation
between Mr Roberts and his
accuser during their investiga-
tion of the case.
'In a press conference yester-
day, Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson confirmed
that there was a meeting
between the two parties.
He said that it was not unusu-
al for police to use a confronta-
tion between a complainant and
the accused to determine the
validity of a case.
"A confrontation is a certain
aspect of police work and is
used as a police tool to gather


allegation
further information or clear up
any ambiguity," he said.
Mr Farquharson also said
that the police have completed
their month-long investigation.
The matter has now been
turned over to the Attorney
General's office.
Director of Prosecutions for
the AG's office, Bernard Turn-
er, told The Tribune that he is
not sure when or if charges will
be filed against Mr Roberts.
"We do not want to be tied to
a deadline. We certainly will
review the police's findings and
give it the attention that it
deserves.
"There are other matters that
this office is dealing with and
we will treat this matter like any
other matter," he said.
Mr Farquharson did not want
to comment'on the recommen-
SEE page 10


Course commences February 19TH, 2005 and runs
, each Saturday from 9:00AM to 5:00PM for 5 weeks.
To register, call (242) 325-2638.
- ANDERSONPRCIC


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


Ehe iHami Eitratb
BAHAMAS EDITION


Claims of 'sex solicitation' involving

witally- disabled students
I


1


r mupders


E








THE TRIBUNE


Search for suspect in connection with shooting death
utdl~~~l 1U ljtl11llltl~lWllal~l' Uwl


Dencil Deal, alias "Fathead",
was involved in the shooting of
20-year-old Anthony Roach of
Pinewood Gardens on Decem-
ber 30, sometime before lam.
Police describe Deal as a
brown skinned Bahamian of
medium build, 5ft 5in tall and
weighing approximately 140
pounds. His last known address
was Fox Dale Subdivision.
Assistant Superintendent Fer-
guson in charge of homicide said
Deal is considered armed and'
"extremely dangerous."
He added that the evidence


collected from the scene sug-
gests he is armed with a shotgun.
Police received a call shortly
after lam concerning gunshots
in the area. When they arrived
they found Anthony Roach dead
with several gunshots wounds to
the head and upper body.
A nearby resident saw a green
Chevrolet truck with a group of
men drive into an open lot about
15 feet from his home where
another group of men, including
the victim, were standing.
According to information giv-
en to police, there was a heated


verbal exchange between the two
groups of men which eventually
led to several gunshots being
fired from one of the men on the
back of the truck.
By the time the police were
notified, the vacant lot had been
deserted, except for the lifeless
body of Anthony Roach.
Police are appealing to the
public for any information con-
cerning Duran "Fathead" Deal,
and want anyone with informa-
tion to contact them at the fol-
lowing numbers: 394-4541, 919,
322-3333, 502-9911 or 328-8477.


Aquapure unrest




continues after




press conference


* By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
UNREST continued at
Aquapure yesterday when
workers who participated in
a press conference held out-
side the company by the
Bahamas Beverage Water
Distributors Union, were
told by Aquapure officials
not to return to work.
Speaking with The Tri-
bune, Huedley Moss the
chief negotiator for BBW-
DU, highlighted the
patience he had displayed
in'working with the water
company, and said that the
press conference was mere-
ly used as a instrument to
inform the media and gen-
eral public of the workers'
plight.
"We have to highlight the
plight of those workers who
were denied their Christmas
bonuses. It's difficult for
someone to slap you or
knock your teeth out your
mouth and then try to talk
to you.
"If we don't get the mat-

TOICALI


ter settled very, very soon,
the full membership of this
union will have no excuse
but to involve themselves in
this exercise," he said.
Mr Moss stressed that his
members' involvement in
the press conference was
"not a strike" and stated
that he is at a loss to under-
stand why they were locked
off the premises by Aqua-
pure officials.

Premises
"About sixteen workers
that were involved were
locked off the premises. The
drivers did not have access
to the trucks to carry out
their normal duties.
"We were approached by
one of the directors, John
McSweeney, who ques-
tioned the members why
they were at the press con-
ference. I told him that I
was the spokesperson for
the union and to address his
questions to me," said Mr
Moss.
At this point, Mr Moss
said that the workers were
requested to leave the
premises. It was at this time
that the union's lawyer was
sought, who in turn advised
the workers to go about
their duties in the normal
manner in spite of the
instructions given to them


by Mr McSweeney.
"I mean how low can you
go? I believe an ounce of
prevention is better than a
ton of cure. It is getting
worse.
"No worker can lose their
job for highlighting their
plight, particularly when
those workers' complaints
a're legitimate and can be
supported by easily verifi-
able information," yelled
Mr Moss.
The Tribune phoned the
law chambers representing
Aquapure (Lobosky and
Lobosky) and the water
company for comment, but
calls were not returned.
"This is bad and I don't
know if they understand
what they are dealing with,"
said Mr Moss.

Battle
He said that in his opinion
"they are a disgrace to the
founders of that organisa-
tion. As you can see we are
fighting the battle intelli-
gently and trying not to do
anything that will affect the
bottom line of that organi-
sation," said Mr Moss.
Today contractual nego-
tiations between the union
and Aquapure will begin as
both sides try to resolve the
situation that erupted last
week.


rmi -E'r SAL, -AD..
DE.LUXE SALA


I LOCAL NEWS I


PAGE 2, 1 tluhODAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


'*<*







THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


Concerns
One officer said: "It
bothers me because we
have a good police force.
But they have gone about
things the wrong way and
it is causing serious con-
cern among many retired
officers.
"They took too long to
question this man. If this
had been an 'ordinary'
person, they would have
questioned him that day
and taken appropriate
action.
"As for the meeting at
the CID office, no police
force does that. Now we
have a press conference.
What's going on?"
The officer added: "It is
unprecedented having a
meeting between the
accuser and the accused
in a police office. Other
officers are expressing
disquiet because this
complaint, it seemed, was
not investigated properly
in the early stages.

Action
"If it had been anyone
else, the person would
have been picked up the
same day. Once you have
completed the investiga-
tion, you send the file to
the Attorney General's
Office, which then
makes a determination
on what action, if any, to
take."
There was also concern
among Tribune readers,
who urged police action
against a Baptist preacher
who allegedly tried to
"pressure" the accuser
into withdrawing her
claims.
One, a civil servant
who wanted to remain
anonymous, said political
interference with the
judicial process was
becoming a major issue in
the Bahamas.
"The police force and
judiciary are supposed to
be independent of politi-
cal influence in any
civilised society."
The reader felt the
preacher could have been
influenced by political
connections and tried to
interfere with the
processes of law.

Scared
"As for the police, the
impression one gets is
that they are like scared
rabbits whenever anyone
with high-level political
connections is under
investigation.
"Now is the time for us
to decide whether we are
a free society, or whether
our laws apply only to
those who are not in
a position to evade
them."
Mr Roberts has
strongly denied his
accuser's claims and has
threatened newspapers
and radio stations with
legal action if they contin-
ue to publicise her accu-
sations.


0 THE FNM Action Group held a small protest calling for Minister of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts to step aside yesterday.
(Photo: Felipi Major)




FNM Action Group





holds Roberts protest


* By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune Staff Reporter
and NATARIO McKENZIE

THE FNM Action Group
held a small but animated
protest outside Cabinet yester-
day, renewing its call for Works
Minister Bradley Roberts to.,
step aside whilee the rape alle-,
gation against him is investigat- :'
ed.
About 15 members of the
Action Group mounted the
demonstration at the steps of
the Churchill Building, where
a Cabinet meeting, attended by
Mr Roberts, was taking place
yesterday morning.
The demonstrators were
wearing placards calling
loudly for Mr Roberts to step
aside.
The group was confronted by
police when they attempted to








By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

TRAFFIC police are still
trying to identify the man
who became the second traf-
fic fatality of the year after a
male cyclist was struck by a
car on Carmichael Road
west of Bacardi around 2pm
on Tuesday.
According to police, the
unidentified male was trav-
elling east on Carmichael
Road when he made a right
turn into the path of a 1996
white Avalon registered to
Keith McSweeny. He was
pronounced dead at the
scene.
Patrick Henry Lewis, 47,
became the first traffic fatal-
ity for the year after losing
control of his motorcycle at
the Coral Harbour round-
about on Sunday, January
2.
Following the second inci-
dent involving a cyclist,
Assistant Superintendent
Charles Walkine of the Traf-
fic Division urged cyclists to
wear protective helmets
which are required by law.
He said helmets seriously
reduce the risk of head
injuries and in many cases
can save lives.
In addition, he said both
bicyclists and motor cyclists
should ensure that they wear
reflective clothing at night,
drive on the side of the road
and should have mirrors on
their bikes so that they can
see vehicles coming behind
them.
He added that the traffic
police will launch a number
of initiatives this year to
improve conditions on the
road.


mount the steps of the build-
ing.
They responded to attempts
by officers to force them away
from the entrance by linking
arms and protesting that they
would not be moved.
Police ordered the demon-
strators to disburse, confiscat-,
ing several placards.
, Officers did however allow
Action Group Chairman,
Oswald Marshall to make a
statement to the press.

Process
Mr Marshall said that the
demonstration was being held
because their recent call for Mr
Roberts to step aside "and give
the process an opportunity to
"work" had not been heeded.
He said that the Action
Group would be "satisfied" if
Mr Roberts voluntarily stepped
aside, and they would then
cease their demonstrations.
He warned however that if
this was not the case, the Action
Group would demonstrate out-
side the House of Assembly
when it opens for its first session
on January 12.
A press release issued by the
Action Group said that inter-


national conventions "dictate
that Mr Roberts take this
course of action."
It said the Action Group
hopes other members of Cabi-
net would insist that Mr
Roberts "do the decent and
honourable thing and remove
himself from the government
of the Bahamas; and should he
fail to do what is right, we again
call on Prime Minister Perry
Christie to have Mr Roberts do
so."
Mr Marshall pointed out that
Mr Christie had announced the
enforcement of a code of ethics
in government when he took
office. He called on Mr Christie
to put this code into practice.
"At the end of the day, if
Bradley Roberts is still allowed
to sit as a cabinet minister, then
we know that Mr Christie is
unable to activate his own code
of ethics," he said.
*Mr Marshall stressed that the
Action Group- is not alleging
guilt on the part of Mr Roberts,
only asking that the appropriate
process be followed in investi-
gating the matter.
Some members of the group
also added that if Prime Minis-
ter Christie could not control
his Cabinet, then he should step


[A "'CHRISTMAS SALE


S-U


down also.
Before being escorted from
the premises, the demonstra-
tors delivered a copy of the
release to the Cabinet office for
the attention of Mr Roberts.
They then made their way
to police headquarters on East
Street, where Commissioner
Paul Farquharson was holding a
press conference.
They attempted to speak
with the commissioner, but
were informed that the confer-
ence had already started.
Members of the group said
that they would remain in the
area in the hope of being able to
speak with Mr Farquharson
when the press conference was
over.


%?iLADIES....S
W Are you feeling tired C
and overwhelmed with stress?
Do you desire to experience
stress relief and rejuvenation?
Ca a9

and book an
appointment today;
328-1250 or 328-1253.

r2arm'6t a place
where women experience
rejuvenation, restoration and
h transformation!
)PS.^^


I he nll -at-M ra mtIh o f
BOX OPP IC E

WHITE NOISE NEW 1:10 3:40 N/A 6:20 8:25 10:50
FATALBERT B 1:15 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:25 10:35
THE AVIATOR T 1:20 N/A N/A 5:45 N/A 9:45
DARKNESS T 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:05 8:15 10:50
MEET THE FOCKERS T 1:00 3:20 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:40
FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX T 1:05 3:35 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:45
SPANGLISH T 1:30 N/A 4:15 7:10 N/A 9:45
LEMONY SNICKETS B 1:10 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:40
OCEAN 12 T 1:00 3:25 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:40
BLADE: TRINITY C 1:00 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:50
NATIONAL TREASURE T N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:15 10:45
SPONGEBOB MOVIE B 1:20 3:45 N/A 6:20 N/A N/A
L ::1Yq ol ,,:1 wIV
FATALBERT NEW 1:20 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:15 10:25
DARKNESS NEW 1:30 3:45 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:20
THE AVIATER NEW 2:00 N/A N/A 6:00 N/A 9:30
MEET THE FOCKERS T 1:20 3:35 N/A 6:20 8:35 10:45
LEMONY SNICKETS B 1:00 3:40 N/A 6:10 N/A N/A
BLADE TRINITY C 1:10 3:30 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:35
OCEAN'S 12 C N/A N/A N/A N/A 8:30 10:45
USE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE TICKETS AT 380-3549 OR WWW.OALLERIACINEMAS.COM
~'~flI1N1iflIf1 1I~II I I *I1 ~ ii iUIEV


rhll'l 'FIbIllsi Claft5 & Inspiration Meet.









PAG 4, THRDY JNAY620


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., KC.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


Faith meets Science and survives


THE tsunami that has devastated Asia,
causing an estimated 155,000 deaths, calls to
mind another tragedy: the earthquake that
flattened much of Lisbon on All Saints' Day,
1755.
When the quake struck at 9.30 that morn-
ing, it caught much of the Catholic city at
Mass. In a mere six minutes, 30 churches and
as many as 12,000 homes were destroyed. As
Lisbon rocked from successive tremors, thou-
sands raced from the rubble to the open area
r along the Tagus River. Then came a series of
tsunamis, the highest estimated at about 20
feet, carrying many more to their deaths. Still
more perished in the fires that raged through
the city.
Fifteen thousand died instantly in the earth-
quake, with a final death toll as high as 60,000.
It was a disaster unlike any the modem world
, could remember, and if the immediate dev-
astation was physical, the aftershocks were
distinctly theological.
In an age where, despite Enlightenment
, values, many still looked for God's hand in
' natural phenomenon, one widely held view
' was that the catastrophe was the Lord's pun-
ishment for the city's sins. That theory, his-
' torian Will Durant has noted, had to manoeu-
vre around some troubling questions.
If so, why had the Lord destroyed Lisbon's
churches rather than save the faithful at wor-
ship? And why pious Lisbon rather than
A licentious Paris?,
Protestants were inclined to see the Lord
j taking their side against Catholics. Then, a
' mere 18 days later, there came an earthquake
that inflicted considerable damage on Protes-
tant Boston.
Still, prominent theologians saw the dev-
astation as God's will. In a sermon entitled
"The cause and cure of earthquakes," John
Wesley, founder of the Methodist Church,
averred that sin was the moral cause of earth-
quakes. William Warburton, chaplain to
* George II and a man who felt that his
own arguments about the existence of God
had stopped "very little short .of mathemati-
cal certainty" thought the devastation "dis-
pl iyed God's glory in its fairest colours." Lis-
bon Jesuits. saw the catastrophe prefiguring
the Final Judgment.
Certainly a wave of apprehension passed
through Europe. Sinful Paris flocked to
church. At Versailles writes another histori-
an. Madame de Pompadour. nustress to Louis
X\ "renounced her connection with the
he indignkin."
The indignant toice of reason


came from Voltaire.
Rejecting the philosophical Optimism of
Alexander Pope and Gottfried Leibniz -
the belief that whatever happens is for the
best, a creed that Pope, in his "Essay on
Man," pithily put as, "whatever is, is right" -
Voltaire wrote an anguished poem that ques-
tioned the notion of an omniscient deity
determining events in the world.
Recounting the horrid suffering of the
quake's thousands of victims, Voltaire asked:
"Will you, before this mass of victims, say,
'God is revenged, their death repays their
crime?' "
Two and a half centuries later, Voltaire's
view has prevailed. While we see a horrible
tragedy in the Christmas weekend tsunami,
the vast majority sees the cataclysm as dis-
tinctly of this world. We now know that the
shifting of tectonic plates causes earthquakes
- and the notion that God uses natural dis-
asters to punish sinners seems hopelessly
antique to most of us.
To profess that sort of belief is to betray
oneself as a captive to a fundamentalist mind-
set that has elevated faith above reason in
apprehending natural phenomena.
Yet just because we don't see God's hand
at work in natural disasters, neither do
tragedies of a magnitude that shocks the mind
strike us as a compelling argument against
God's existence.
Now, one can argue that that's because
the faith-eroding questions that would be
raised are simply too disquieting to confront.
Or that we don't have our own Voltaire to
frame them for us.
Yet the larger reason is surely this: Sci-
ence has so succeeded in separating the phys-
ical from the spiritual world that if we don't
see the tsunami as God's wrath, neither do we
realistically consider that divine intervention
might have stayed the massive wave, that
claimed so many lives. Indeed, even as we
pray for the afflicted, we neither fault God for
the tragedy nor expect that he might have
forestalled it.
Thus have faith and science come to exist in
their own realms, a construct that largely
sidesteps the great debate that followed the
earthquake of Lisbon. By separating faith
from the natural processes of the world, we
have also removed it from the path of calami-
ty. And made it possible to maintain our
belief in the face of such a mystifying tragedy.
(This article iwas written by Scot Lehigh of
The Boston Globe c.2005).


PM must




'cleanse




the stables'


EDITOR, The Tribune.
PASSION and judgment
are two important qualities
that decide a person's
entire personality. Passion
and judgment must not be
abused. It is very easy to
have one and very little of
the other. The correct bal-
ance of passion and judg-
ment must be evident in all
leaders. It is all well to be
passionate in everything a
leader does, but he or she
must be able to make and
execute hard judgment.
This brings me to the
leadership ability of the Rt
Honourable Perry Glad-
stone Christie, prime min-
ister of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas. No one
would disagree that Mr
Christie is a very passion-
ate leader. He has the dis-
position of a fiery preach-
er; he is an excellent orator
and debater; he is also very
affable indeed. The area in
which the prime minister
has failed is his seeming
inability to make timely
and decisive judgments.
Another area in which he
has failed miserably is the
removal of some of his
ineffective cabinet minis-
ters. For almost three years
the Bahamian people have
put up with his embarrass-
ing cabinet. A prime min-
ister must at all time act in
the interest of the people.
There will come a time
when a leader must make
some difficult decisions.
Whenever the decision
must be between party and
people, the people must be
given the benefit of the
doubt. The prime minister
must never forget that it is
the people who elected his
party and the people who
can remove them. A leader
must not get too attached
to those he appoints, so
that he cannot remove
them when they abuse their
sacred duties and thus lose
the people's trust. The
buck stops with the prime
.minister.
In many respects a cabi-
net is a reflection of its
leader. If that premise is
true, it doesn't look too
well for Mr Christie. It's
my opinion fhat the pre-
sent cabinet has lost the
moral will to govern the


O1.. ORALII FASHIONS


Inside the Town Centre Mall
(Next to Furniture Plus)
Tel: 242) 394-2607 T.
Fax: 242) 394-2612
eMai : info@autoplusltd.com
'4."


Extends a Happy & Prosperous New
Year to all its Valued Clientele. May
we continue to serve you in 2005






VERSACE / CHOPARD
UNLEASH YOUR POTENTIAL

Sales Manager Ladies fashion

SALES ASSOCIATES
Competitive salary plus excellent benefits.
You live for fashion. What you don't know about leading
fashion brands isn't worth knowing. And crucially, you
have proven your sales and management ability at the
highest level. All of which means that this is the perfect
opportunity to make you mark at the cutting-edge of
fashion, working with the most prestigious brands and
designer names in one of the most renowned retail
environments in the world.
It goes without saying that you must be as passionate
about sales and service as we are. And rest assured, if
you share our high standards, we'll reward your insights
and initiative with a first-class remuneration package that
includes 50% discount off clothes and jewelry worn for
work. So if you can deliver the high quality service we've
built our reputation on, please bring your, Resume, Photo
ID, Police Record, Reference letter.
To: Versace Boutique
Crystal Courts
Atlantis
Anytime After 4:30pm


affairs of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.
Some of them continue to
be a terrible role model for
the youth of this nation.
I must seriously implore
the Rt Honourable Perry
Gladstone Christie to
"cleanse the stables" like
the ancient Hercules.
Please remove the stench


from the noses of the
Bahamian people. Passion
is nice, but it is now judg-
ment day.
It is hurtfully obvious
that morally and ethically
the PLP Cabinet and the
Prime Minister have been
weighed in the balance and
have come up scandalously
short.

STEPHEN ROLLE
Nassau,
January 4, 2005.


Lack of water



is driving



me to drink!

EDITOR, The Tribune.
CAN someone please help me get a shower!
Many years ago there was a study done for the proposal of
building a pipeline for water, from Andros to Clifton Pier.
Apparently the loss of Bahamian jobs was cited as a reason
for not going ahead with the plan.
Apparently the water barge crew are almost all foreign. If
the pipe leaks water into the sea, big deal!
The increasing cost of petrol alone should make this pro-
ject cost effective.
h This plan would also be more environmentally friendly,
important for all of us living so close ib sea level (which,
remember, is not a constant!).
If the Government had any nous it would offer home/busi-
ness owners incentives such as a discount on land tax, for
putting gutters and spouts on buildings to catch the rain.
Rain water in tanks is not just for the garden and flushing
the toilet, in most rural areas this is the only water source,
and a better tasting source it is too!
Education about water usage should be improved. I had
not had a shower in three days and so I went to Winton to
my friend's house to shower.
On the way there, I saw people washing their windows and
their cars, and yet water in my area (Montagu) is turned off
for hours daily.
We need to improve this situation, as we can only help our-
selves!
.The lack of water is driving me to drink!


SARA APPLETON
Nassau,
January 4,2004.



Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning ,
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Invites applicants for the position of

DIRECTOR OF VALET SERVICES

Applicants must:

Speak a minimum of three languages
Have an Associate Degree in Hospitality or higher
Have worked a minimum of 5 years in the hotel business
Have a diploma from the Guild of Professional English
Butlers or similar institution
Be able to work long & flexible hours

Email Resume to:
cmajor@srb.sandals.com

Hand deliver or fax to:
327-6961
Human Resource Manager
Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa
P.O. Box CB-13005


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










THE TIBUNETHURDAYLANUARE6,205,SPGEI5


Privy Councillor explains UK judiciary changes


By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIVY Councillor Lord
Hope of Craighead announced
yesterday that the new Supreme
Court for the United Kingdom
will absorb the jurisdiction of
the Privy Council.
At yesterday's special sitting
of the Court of Appeal, which
officially opened the new legal
year, the Law Lord explained
the changes to the UK's judi-
ciary, and the President of the
Bar Association Wayne
Munroe called for a review of
the budget for the judicial sys-
tem in the Bahamas.
Lord Hope of Craighead,
who is visiting the Bahamas
with his wife Lady Hope,
advised the court that the Con-
stitutional Reform Bill, which
will abolish the office of the
Lord Chancellor and create a
new Supreme Court for the
UK, is in its final reading before
the House of Lords.

Bill
He explained that the bill
contains submissions for a
Supreme Court that will be an
amalgamation of the jurisdic-
tions of the House of Lords and
.the Privy. Council and that
future matters from the
Bahamas will be addressed by
this new institution.
"We are starting from
scratch," he noted.
Lord Hope pointed out, how-
ever, that Privy Council mat-
ters will continue to be dealt
with independently.
"We will have a separate
court room and registrar. We
are very conscious that this
independence be maintained,"
he said.
The Privy Councillor said that
his visit to the Bahamas can
serve the purpose of observing
first-hand how judicial matters
are handled in other countries
and can lead to recommenda-
tions for the UK's future legal
system.
Also speaking at the Appeals
Court sitting, Mr Munroe reit-
erated that "the powers that,be"'...
should take notice it ''ot m
_ peting countries in the regio n"
are spending considerably more
money on their respective judi-
cial branches.
He said that although the




THURSDAY
JANUARY 6
2:00am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:30 Immediate Reponse
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 Cybernet
2:00 Animated Classics
3:00 Treasure Attic
3:30 This Generation
4:00 Usa Knight & The Round
Table
4:30 Kids On The Move
4:58 ZNS News (Update Live)
5:00 After School Special
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Native Stew
8:30 Da' Down Home Show
9:30 The Darold Miller Show
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Pg./1540


(Photo: Felipe Major)


said Mr Munroe. without further delay," he
Addressing the work of the added.
Court of Appeal in the past Both the Attorney General
year, Attorney General Alfred and the President of the Bar
Sears congratulated the court Association pledged their
"for its stellar work in clearing services and continued com-
away its inventory of pending mitment to the Court of
appeal papers," which in many Appeal.
cases were either "completed
appeals, withdrawn appeals or Presided
matters in which the appellant
simply no longer wanted to pro- At the sitting, which was
ceed." presided over by Dame Joan
He commended the President and the Justices of Appeal and
of the Court of Appeal Dame attended by the Lord and Lady
Joan Sawyer and her fellow Jus- Hope, the Attorney General,
tices of Appeal as well as the the Bar Association President,
Registrar for their hard work the Director of Prosecutions as
which made it possible that mat- well as the Director of Legal
ters on appeal can now be heard Affairs and other representa-
within six months. tives of the judiciary, it was also
The Court of Appeal Presi: _,..nnounced that Justices of
densd that currently there" '"A"ppeal'Maurice Churaman and
are : o longer an\ "'\ ry old Mstapha Ibrahim will be
matters.awaiting to be heard 'reaching retirement age and
stepping down from office this
Praised year.


Mr Sears also praised the
publication of the annual report,
which was presented to the pub-
lic yesterday, and "functions not
only as a review of the Court
of Appeal for the past year but
is also as a handbook for attor-
neys and litigants with matters
before the Court of Appeal."
The annual report showed
that from November 1, 2003 to
October 31, 2004 the court
heard 80 criminal appeals, of
which 17 were allowed.
The court further disposed of
84 magisterial appeals and 81
civil appeals.
The Attorney General also
announced that a report making
recommendations for improve-
ments of the court records sys-
tem "with a view to alleviating
the backlog of the transcripts
of proceedings" will soon be
submitted to Cabinet for con-
sideration.
"It is anticipated however
that the recommendations will
be accepted and implemented



S Fertilzer, Funicie
Pes Cotro


Court of Appeal has performed
admirably with the financial
resources that were allocated


to it, a review of the national
budget in regards to the judi-
cial system, "is long overdue,"


E By IANTHIA SMITH

THE effects of the tsunami that hit South Asia killing more than
150,000 people has been brought closer to home as native Sri
Lankans living in the Bahamas have called on the public to assist with
their appeal for aid for survivors.
The 15 to 20 Sri Lankans living in the Bahamas are making
efforts to raise funds in the Bahamas to donate to the survivors of the
disaster, according to J Ravi Jesubatham, a local Sri Lankan living
.in N assau . .. > ,;i. 'F ,;.'., .,..',.: i; a (,' /" /
e felt ttronlvY that \ hile we are.fafrpp home,ywp:want.t,0,ty
td do the besr%.e can to help,"lhe spid,.., .I ,:. .- ,1'v
According toMrJesttbathari, the small group of Sri Lankans have.
formed an "informal" body that meets regularly. Mr Jesubatham said
that when they learned of the tsunami that hit Sri Lanka, they
immediately began working on plans to assist the people left dev-
astated by the disaster.
"We immediately got in contact with Sri Lankans living in other
countries to share with us ideas as to how they are initiating their
efforts and we basically tried to copy their model," he said.
Mr Jesubatham added that although his immediate family living
in the mountains of Sri Lanka have not been hurt by the tsunami, he
is calling on the public's help for the relief of distant family members
and friends who have been left homeless.

Churches
Mr Jesubatham is also appealing to various churches and organ-
isations to assist with the effort, hoping to gain a "better level of
involvement from the Bahamian people".
Mr Jesubatham said that it is most important for Bahamians to
have sympathy for the people of Sri Lanka, recognizing that such a
disaster can hit anywhere in an unexpected manner.
He emphasised that it is also important to remember that although
the currency is different in Sri Lanka, no contribution is too small.
"What we consider to be a small amount of money can go a long
way in the relief efforts over there," he said. "However small, we will
take it."
The earthquake off the coast of Indonesia rattled the ocean floor
at 7am, creating the tsunami, and sending massive waves crashing
across beachfront communities from South Asia to Africa. The
tsunami caused severe damage in Sri Lanka, leaving approximate-
ly one million people homeless and killing more than 150,000 peo-
ple in several countries.
According to reports, the death toll is expected to rise as a result
of infection, pestilence and starvation.
Mr Jesubatham said that he wants the Bahamian people to relate
the emotions of Sri Lankans to how it would be if thousands of
Bahamian were to die at one time.
Donations can be made to The Tsunami Relief for Sri Lanka at
any branch of the Bank of the Bahamas. Persons wishing to gather
more information about the fund can contact Mr Jesubatham at 502-
7094


Military device

found at beach
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
A POTENTIALLY explo-
sive US military device was dis-
covered at the beach at Gold
Rock Creek by a park ranger
at the Lucayan National Park
during a routine patrol of the
area on Tuesday.
Supt Basil Rahming said
police have-cordoned off the
area near the shoreline where
the device is partially embed-
ded in the sand until the arrival
of US Coast Guard and mili-
tary officials.
"We are awaiting their
arrival so they can retrieve the
device before it explodes and
hurts anyone in the area," he
said.
While on routine patrol of
the area around 10am, Ranger
Ivan Laing spotted a gray met-
al canister in the sand with mil-
itary markings. He immedi-
ately alerted the police.
Supt Rahming said the
device is about six inches in
diameter and 24 to 30 inches
long with military markings on
the exterior.
Public Analyst Mike Wal-
lace, who accompanied police
to the scene, inspected the
device and confirmed that
it was a US military ordin-
ance that could possibly still;
be live.
The US Embassy was con-;
tacted and informed the Coast'
Guard. A team has been sent
to retrieve the device.
When asked how such a
device could make its way to.
the shores of Grand Bahama,,
one theory was'that maybe it
had drifted from the AUTEC
base at Andros.
In other news, a number of,
suspects have been detained
and questioned in connection,
with two murders last year, but
so far no charges have been
filed in those cases.
Mr Rahming said investiga-
tions are continuing into the
murder of 35-year-old Sean
Seymour, alias "KV", of 57
Bayberry Lane. Seymour was
shot to death on December 27
at a cul-de-sac off Spinney.
Road.
Police are also continuing:
their investigations, he said,'
into the murder of Michael,
Brown, alias, "Miguel Murphy"
and Ninta" of Red Hill Road.I
Brown was shot and killed-
on December 15 while at;
House 102 on Adventurer's,
Way.


BED BATH & HOME


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTER'


I


nE LViEEW


WOOD STAINS

CLOSET ORGANIZERS .,

& SPRAY PANT TOO!


* ATTORNEY General Alfred Sears speaks with Privy Councillor Lord Hope
and Lady Hope of Craighead after the special sitting of the Court of Appeal.


I

.. .$.. .


8-;-.- .


THURSD,,Y JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 5


.15


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6. THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


11, -


Bahamas to work with US on




detecting nuclear shipments


THE United States and
the Bahamas have signed
an agreement to work
together in the war on ter-
rorism by installing special
equipment in Freeport to
detect hidden shipments of
nuclear and other radioac-
tive material.
The effort is part of the
Megaports Initiative, a
nonproliferation pro-
gramme of the US Depart-
ment of Energy's (DOE)
National Nuclear Security
Administration (NNSA)
that works with foreign
partners to detect, deter,
and interdict illicit ship-
ments of nuclear and other


radioactive materials
through the international
maritime shipping network.
This is the sixth co-oper-
ative agreement and joins
efforts currently underway
in the Netherlands, Greece,
Sri Lanka, Belgium, and
Spain.
The agreement was
signed on December 30.
Smuggling
"Helping better protect
the world's maritime ship-
ping network from nuclear
smuggling is a important
objective we are working
hard to achieve," Secretary


British Colonial Hilton
Your best option for lunch
Portofino Restaurant
Buffet Lunch 12:00 noon 3:00 pm
Monday thru Friday
Only $18.95 including one soft drink
+15% service charge
Business a la carte menu available

Patio Grille
Dine outdoors and enjoy a casual lunch at the most
exclusive downtown location, with beautiful harbor views.
For more infonaition or reservation please call 322-3301 ext. 4045
British Colonial Bilton
i-ww.hilioncaribbean.cominassau t 4t2 .22-3301
t. M I _.-. r- .., ,1 1.0 -, s.J---. I d b ., -.1> .'',H Hll.lH .i-"ll 1 .


of Energy Spencer Abra-
ham stated. "Co-operating
with the Bahamas will
enable our countries to fur-
ther international nonpro-
liferation efforts and bet-
ter protect the citizens
of the Bahamas, the
United States and other
countries against nuclear
terrorism."
Ms Ruth Millar, Finan-
cial Secretary at the Min-
istry of Finance and Mr
Robert Witajewski, Charge
d'Affaires at the US
Embassy, signed the co-
operative agreement on
behalf of their respective
governments.


The Bahamas will be the
first country in the
Caribbean to utilise
this type of detection sys-
tem.
Radiation
Under the Megaports
Initiative, DOE/NNSA
works with foreign partners
to equip major seaports
with radiation detection
equipment and.to provide
training to appropriate law
enforcement officials.
The specialised radiation
detection technology
deployed under this pro-
gramme is based on tech-


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREE PORT Grand Bahama Police have
released the autopsy results of an American
woman who was found dead in a hotel room
recently at Our Lucaya Resort.
Supt Basil Rahming reported that Kristine
Lynn Hart, 37, of Los Angeles, California, a
guest at Our Lucaya Resort, died of
esophageal erosions or bleeding ulcers lead-
ing to internal haemorrhage on December
23.
"'According to reports. Ms Hart travelled to
"Treeport with her boyfriend Daniel O'Ha-,


nologies originally devel-
oped by NNSA laborato-
ries as part of overall US
Government efforts to
guard against proliferation
of weapons materials.
Established by Congress
in 2000, NNSA is a semi-
autonomous agency within
the U.S. Department of
Energy responsible for
enhancing national security
through the military
application of nuclear
energy.
NNSA maintains and
enhances the safety, secu-
rity, reliability and perfor-
mance of the US nuclear
weapons stockpile without


gen, 39, of Los Angeles, California.
He told police that he and Ms Hart went to
bed around 9pm on December 22.
He awoke around midnight and attempted
to wake her but she did not respond.
Police received a report around
12.15am from the hotel's security depart-
ment.
When police arrived at the room they
observed no visible bodily injuries.
Mr Rahming said police have classified Ms
Hart's death as due to natural causes.
Ms Hart's family has arranged for her
remains to be cremated and ashes flown to
the United States.


nuclear testing; works to
reduce global danger from
weapons of mass destruc-
tion; provides the US Navy
with safe and effective
nuclear propulsion; and
responds to nuclear and
radiological emergencies in
the US and abroad.



Man pleads

guilty to

breach of

gaming act

* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A 51-year-
old Abaco man was fined $200
or one-month in prison after
pleading guilty in Freeport
Magistrate's Court to breach
of the Lotteries and Gaming
Act at Isle of Capri Casino in
Lucaya on New Year's day.
Fred Rolle, a resident of
Crown Haven, Abaco,
appeared on Tuesday in Court
Two before Magistrate Subu
Swain.
A security officer at the
casino spotted Rolle around
9.15pm on January 1 at the
Isle Capri Casino gaming at a
slot machine. When confront-
ed by the security, he admitted
that he was a Bahamian.
Police were summoned to
the casino and subsequently
arrested Mr Rolle, who was
taken into custody at the Port
Lucaya Police Station.
., = ,+,


DISTRIBUTION OF 2005

TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES


Batelco wishes to advise the public that the 2005
Bahamas Telephone Directory will be available for
distribution in New Providence as of Tuesday, January
4, 2005 to Friday, January 14th 2005.


For the convenience of subscribers, sub-depots will be
opened daily (with the exception of Saturdays and
Sunday) as follows:-:


John F. Kennedy Drive
Shirley Street Plaza
Mall at Marathon


9:00a.m. 5:00p.m.
9:00a.m. 5:00p.m.
9:00a.m. 8:00p.m.


The daily commute is now more an adventure in comfort.
The Suzuki Grand Vitaras come packed with these features:
* Sturdy full-ladder-type frame
* High tensile steel body
* Power steering, windows, locks


Business customers requiring more than 50 directories
may collect them directly from our Stores Department
at Perpall's Tract from Tuesday, January 4th, 2005


and 4:30p.m.


Family Island customers may collect directories from
the local BTC offices.


However, after January 14, 2005, directories may only
be collected for a limited time from the Administrative
Building, John F. Kennedy Drive or the Mall at
Marathon.


SPECIAL CASH PRICE
SUZUKI Starting at SPECIAL
-23 995 EDITION
Dependable, Reliable Quality AVAILNOW
AVAILABLE


Price includes licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel
and 12,000 mile/12-month warranty.


QUALITY ''
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 OR 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Highway, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916


Autop sy results



of American



woman released


between the hours of 9:00a.m.


I _







THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


*i E


Bahamas Red Cross announces closure




of Family Island hurricane relief efforts

0 By PAUL G.
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE BAHAMAS Red
Cross announced yesterday
the closure of relief efforts to
the Family Islands that were
affected by hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne. k a "
The organisation said that
yesterday marked the final
shipment of supplies to the
two most devastated islands. .
Abaco received two 20ft
containers, containing 1,000
pre-packaged food parcels and "
one 40ft container with 1,000
hygiene kits, and 1,000 water
buckets, tarpaulins and blan-
kets.
Supplies
Grand Bahama will receive
two 4Oft containers stocked
with 1,000 hygiene kits, 1,000
food parcels, 1,000 water buck-
ets, and 1,000 sheets of tar-
paulin which will be shipped
today.
These final supplies were ,
provided by the European
Commission for Humanitari-
an Aid Office.
Red Cross members were
assisted by volunteers from the
International Fe'deration,
Suzanne Klitgaard a Logistic_. -
Officer, Sheila Thornton and :
Marie Claire Brien. A
The Red Cross says this will ,
be the final shipment to Aba-
co and Grand Bahama, but
1,000 boxes of relief items, .i.....
including food will be sent to
the remaining islands which
were affected before the end 0 SUSANNE Klitgaard from the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Society is pictured here with volunteer Elizabeth O'Asare, Sheila
of January. Thornton, also of the International Red Cross, and Marina Glinton, the Bahamas director general of the society.


Summons filed on behalf of eight Sea


Sun Manor North owners is dismissed


To avertse i


(Photo: o -ranKlyn u rerguson)

PORCB T IE FORM SE
12x12 Porcelain Tile
Look like marble at very good price.
$5.00 per tile, retailing at $8.50.
For further information call
427-9713 or 364-5961 Philip Gray.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Owners at
Sea Sun Manor North appeared
in Freeport Magistrate's Court
on Wednesday to seek some res-
olution to the ongoing dispute
with the condominium associa-
tion.
A summons filed by lawyer
Carlson Shurland on behalf of
eight owners, who claims that
the condo management/associa-
tion are treating them unfairly,
was dismissed by Magistrate
Helen Jones in Court Three.
Constance McDonald repre-
sented the condominium associ-
ation.

Dispute
There has been a dispute
between condo owners and man-
agement for several weeks over
the disconnection of water at the
condominium complex on the
Mall. It is alleged that manage-
ment had the water shut off in an
effort to collect outstanding
maintenance fees owed to the
association.
Ron Pinder, parliamentary
secretary with the Ministry of
Health and Environment, last
week met with management to
ensure that it was in compliance
with a public health order to
restore water to all units.
Mr Pinder, who was concerned
about the general sanitation of
residents, stressed that tampering
with water or utilities is against
the law. He advised management


to seek recourse under the law
for the outstanding maintenance
fees.
According to Mr Shurland, the
court proceedings were really to
get an understanding as to why
the problems exist with the con-
dominium association and some
owners. After hearing from
counsel, Magistrate Jones dis-
missed the summons and
ordered both sides to try reach
resolution outside the court.
If no common ground is
reached, she said, that the plain-
tiffs could then proceed with re-
filing a summons.
Several weeks ago, owners and
tenants at Sea Sun Manor North
had been forced to carry water in
buckets up to their apartments
for almost a month because of
the lack of running water at the
building.
However, at the time, man-
agement claimed that the water
was disconnected for non-pay-
ment of maintenance fees due
an outstanding balance of $5,000
on the water bill.
"It was unfair that we were
forced to live that way," said
apartment owner Kayla Pratt,
who complained of having to tote
buckets of water to wash dishes,
to flush the toilet, and to bathe,"
she said.
Mrs Pratt owns a two-bed-
room condominium and is sub-
ject to pay to $145 in mainte-
nance fees every month.
She said maintenance fees are
supposed to cover the water and
general maintenance of the
building, including the grounds.


Tanya Bain, the building's
office manager, told The Tribune
that some owners have been
delinquent in paying mainte-
nance fees and management has
been unable to meet its financial
obligations to the utility compa-
ny.
"We have no money on our
accounts to pay the water bill,
and unless owners pay their
maintenance fees we cannot pay
the bill," she said.
Maintenance fees at Sea Sun
Manor for an efficiency unit are
$45, for a one-bedroom unit they
are $93, and $145 for a two-bed-
room unit.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


TEST DRIVE & COMPARE





25 MKIA OPTIMAL


ON THE SPOT INSURANCE
FINANCING WITH AVAILABLE WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK


SANPIN MOTORS LTD.

Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377, 326-6464/5, 326-0013/4, 326-6382 Fax: 326-6315
Email: sanpin@hotmail.com

BEST PRICES, BEST SELECTION, BEST SERVICE, EVERYDAY, EVERY TIME


I








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


Five great dangers





look out for in 201


to


05


N THE movie Gladiator,
Emperor Marcus Aurelius,
faced with what he believed was
his imminent death, agonised over
the fate of Rome, the glory of
which he feared had faded because
of a great decline in the morals of
its public of officials, most partic-
ular its senators.
While General Maximus Dec-
imus Meridius, brilliantly por-
trayed by actor Russell Crowe,
romanticised the Rome he had
never seen as the "light of the
world", Caesar pointed out that
he had not seen what it had
become.
Many of us are like General
Maximus; we want to believe in
our nation. We want to see the


STRAIGHT UP TALK

ZH IVA R G O LAING


best in it. Contrary to popular
belief even politicians in opposi-
tion take no pride in the failing of
the nation at the hands of those
with whom they share different
political philosophies. They realise
only too well that the nation is the
incubator of us all and if it func-
tions poorly we all come out
undone.
Yet, pretense is not a game for
adults. Mature people must face
reality and the reality is that our


REWARD


offered for information resulting in the recovery
of a large brown dog with shadings of black on
his nose and around his eyes. The dog is an
adult male Rhodesian Ridgeback and is short-
haired with a distinctive ridge of hair on his
back and a small patch of white on his chest.
He is strongly built and stands about two and
one half feet tall at the shoulder.

AnN^one wih iCn formationis asked to telephone


beloved Bahamas is showing
severe stress in the faultlines of its
national life. We must be aware
of these strains and do our best to
address them. Here are five such
strains that we must watch for in
this New Year:
1) Public Corruption. Let's face
it in the years leading up to 1992
we Bahamians carried a heavy
burden of national and interna-
tional disrepute on our shoulders
because of claims of public cor-
ruption in our nation. While it is
true that a fair job was done
between 1992 and 2002 in cleaning
up our image, the annals of histo-
ry continued to record this blight
upon our reputation in public
affairs and from time to time,
there are those who are wont to
remind us of it and still, in fact,
see us in that light. It should be
our relentless quest to ensure that
we do not walk that way again.
Yet today, we stand in great dan-
ger of doing so. In recent times,
too many suggestions of impro-
priety in both the public and pri-
vate lives of public officials have
surfaced. These allegations stand
to bring great harm to the gains we
have made in this nation over the
past decade or so. Public officials
are no less human than other citi-
zens of the nation; nevertheless,
they hold a greater trust than oth-
ers and because they do, they are
more responsible and must be
more accountable.
It is a heavy burden for him to
carry, but the prime minister has
the ultimate responsibility of
guarding the integrity of the gov-
ernment of this land. After all, he
is its chief arbiter. The PM must
check his mates or they will cer-
.tainly ,heckFhim and us, as a.
n4atiop.
2) Cowardly Leadership. These


times call for leaders with courage,
particularly moral courage. A suc-
cessful leader, in either the public
or the private sector, must know.
what it is he or she is trying to
achieve;.embrace the wholesome
values and principles that will
enable them to achieve them; and
act in accordance with those values
and principles.
No leader who is afraid to be
unpopular with some people can
have the backbone it takes to put.
the principles that promote the
good of the many above politics
that promote the narrow personal
interests of the few. No leader can
be successful today that finds it
hard to make difficult decisions in
a timely fashion. No leader leaves
a lasting legacy to his credit that is
afraid to cut off his right hand or
pluck out his right eye for offend-
ing him.
A courageous leader must love
life more than limb and be will-
ing to enter into it physically lame
but morally whole rather than
physically whole but morally lame.
Cowardly leadership in 2005 will
promote public impropriety, eco-
nomic uncertainty and political
terrorism in our land.
3) Economic Malaise. The
Bahamas needs more than a good
economic year; it needs a great
economic year. This means avoid-
ing a year of jobless growth, that is,
one in which the economy grows
without producing many jobs. Pro-
jections are that the economy of
The Bahamas grew by three per
cent in 2004. This was a good rate
of growth. However, it is likely
that unemployment decreased
only marginally in the same year
and may still be near nine per cent,
down from about 10 per cent the
year before. A one percentage
point decrease in unemployment
for a growth rate of three per cent
will not bring the relief needed by
thousands of unemployed people
in this nation, especially in Grand
Bahama, displaced as a result of
two devastating hurricanes.
We need a more robust econo-
my in 2005, one in which domestic
and international investment


approvals translate into invest-
ment production and not merely
public pronouncements. If the
economy does not grow suffi-
ciently to bring employment relief
and better business profits in 2005,
our society will grow even more
uneasy than it was in 2004 and the
results could be considerably
unpleasant.
4) Drug Trafficking. Anyone
paying attention to the crimes
committed in 2004, particularly
murders among young people,
would clearly know that there is a
quiet storm occurring in the local
drug world. In fact, there is cause
to believe that drug trafficking
made a stealthy comeback in The
Bahamas last year. This is
extremely disheartening and we
must watch this trend closely. It
must be our sincere hope that in
2005 this trend is reversed, other-
wise the murder of more and more
young people, particularly young
men, will continue to transpire in
our country.
5) Global terrorism. Ever an
imminent threat in the modern
world, global terrorism can cripple
our fortunes more viciously than
any other human deed. As has
been stated by the World Market
Research Centre, a London-based
organisation that publishes an
annual Global Terrorism Index
that assesses country-risk in the
face of terrorism: "The nature of
global terrorism has changed dra-
matically since September 11,
2001. It has moved from a small-
scale, country-centred risk to a
global phenomenon with escalat-
ing human and financial costs."
As a nation that plays host to mil-
lions of international visitors, par-
ticularly US citizens, we must be
watchful always of matters in this
area. Indeed, our national defence
policy, which before could afford
to be passive about issues of inter-
national terrorism, must now put
the issue at the heart of-its aims
anid objectives. Its strategic
approach must regard matters of
immigration, drug trafficking,
money laundering and interna-


tional transportation as critical
concerns in the fight against glob-
al terrorism.
As Iraq moves toward its demo-
cratic elections at the end of this
month, we niust hope for the best.
We must hope that the terrorists
do not find success in their aims to
sabotage this effort and more suc-
cessfully spread their efforts of
destabilisation beyond the Mid-
dle East.
Returning to the movie The
Gladiator for a moment, Emperor
Marcus Aurelius sought to appoint
General Maximus "Protector of
Rome", empowering him to one
end and one end alone, to return
power from the hands of a cor-
rupt senate "back to the people
of Rome". As the story went,
Comedus, the emperor's impetu-
ous son, would have none of that;
he killed his father, the general's
family and almost the general him-
self. In the end, Maximus had his
revenge and put Rome in a posi-
tion to restore the integrity of its
government. We do not live in a
time of emperors and generals like
Aurelius and Maximus but the call
to do what they sought to do is
presently as urgent. This nation
must attend to those (strained
faultlines) fractures in its public
life. We must defuse this time
bomb this year and begin right
away.
THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK
Love thyself last: cherish those
hearts that hate thee;
Corruption wins not more than
honesty.
Still in thy right hand carry gen-
tle peace,
To silence envious tongues. Be
just, and fear not:
Let all the ends thou aim'st at
be thy country's,
Thy God's, and truth's; then if
thou fall's4t 0 Cromwell,
Thou fall'st a blessed martyr!
.(William Shakespeare's King
Henry VIII. Act iii. Sc. 2.)

zhivargolaing@coralwave.com


rM1imian


SON COmPTITIOl 9005


FHR ARE THREE EASY WAYS TO VOTE:
-1; IN NEW PROVIDENCE, CALL 326-3677
2.CALL THE TOLL-FREE VOTING HOTLINE AT 1-242-300-7664 FROM
3. VOTE ONLINE AT www.caciqueawards.com

THE TOP FIVE FINALISTS WILL PERFORM LIVE AT THE CACIQJUE AWAR
ON IANUARY 28, AND YOUR WINNERS WILL BE NAMED AT THE END C
DURING AN EXCITING GRAND FINALE!

VOTING DEADLINE IS JANUARY 12.


SECULAR
BAHAMIAN WAY
CATCH DA CRAB
IT AIN'T OVER
MR BUS DRIVER
MR GoFA
OH MY ANDROS
SHE WANT A THUG
SWEET BAHAMIAN MUSIC
TWO WRONGS DON T MAKE A RIGHT
YOU WRONG FOR THAT

GOSPEL
HOLD ON TO JESUS
I'M A SURVIVOR
JESUS IS MY DELIVERER
LORD I LOVE YOU

PEOPLE PRAISING HIM
PRAISE MEDLEY
VICTORY IrN JESUS
VICTORY IS MINE
WE ARE GOING UP








SOf 9th annual

eo
0


THE FAMILY ISLANDS


DS. INM GRAND RB \-ANA


)F THE1 SHOW.jMA 114U)i X /A I NlIt%
F THE SHOW



















STORIES


PHIL STUBBS
ELON MOXEY
ST ANNE'S CHOIR FEATURING KB
T'REZ HEPBURN
PHIL STUBBS
ELON MOXEY
KB
BRILANDERS
CLYDE PINDER
NOVIE


DA FAM
SWAIN
GOLDEN GATES WORLD OUTREACH MINI
ADRIAN EDGECOMBE AND
THE BAHAMAS HARVEST CHURCH CHOIR
SIMEON OUTTEN
SIMEON OUTTEN
TRACY TRACY
RACHEL MACKEY
TRACY TRACY


award.,W ~


4~.


Li


'JUNKANOO OR RAKE-AND-SCRAPE SONGS ONLY


IA







THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 9


Tsunamis and other natural disasters


O NE of the most fasci-
nating scientific pre-
dictions of recent years is that
the terrible Indian Ocean tsuna-
mi disaster which tragically
took over 150,000 lives this past
Boxing Day could be repeated
in the Caribbean in our lifetime.
Tsunamis are powerful sea
waves usually caused by under-
water earthquakes. They can
also be caused by volcanic erup-
tions, submarine landslides, and
the impacts of large meteorites.
Tsunamis have occurred
throughout recorded history and
may reach a height onshore
above sea level of 100 feet. An
extreme exception was the land-
slide-generated tsunami in
Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958,
which produced a 1,720-foot
wave.
A few years ago, scientists
from University College, Lon-


don, and the University of Cal-
ifornia estimated the extent and
size of the mega-tsunami that
could be triggered by a future
eruption of the Cumbre Vieja
volcano in the Canary Islands
off the west coast of Africa.
Under the right circum-
stances, they said, "a block of
rock approximately twice the
volume of the Isle of Man would
break off, travelling into the sea
at a speed of (over 200 miles per
hour). The energy released by
the collapse would be equal to
the electricity consumption of
the entire United States in half a
year."
Computer models say this
giant landslide would create the
biggest wave ever recorded,
which would travel across the
Atlantic faster than a jet. plane.
But, fortunately, they do not
expect this to happen overnight.
"We're looking at an event
that could'b-e'dcades or a 6cen-


feet from crest to trough. Flori-
da and the Caribbean could
receive 150-foot high waves
within nine hours of the land-
slide.

E experts say the vol-
cano's collapse will
occur during some future erup-
tion after days or weeks of earth
tremors. Eruptions of Cumbre
Vieja occur at intervals of
decades to a century or so. The
last big event was in 1949.
Although the year-to-year prob-
ability of a collapse is low, the
resulting tsunami would be a
major disaster with indirect
effects around the world.
Evidence for past catastro-
phes on this scale has already
been found in the Bahamas. Sci-
entists say that our archipelago
was swamped with sands and
boulders,123,000 years ago by a
giant tsunami produced'by a
volcanic collapse in the


I


tury away, but there will be a
degree of warning beforehand,"
according to Dr Simon Day of
the Benfield Hazard Research
Centre at University College,
London.
The greatest effects are pre-
dicted to occur, north, west and
south of the Canaries, a chain
of seven volcanic islands owned
by Spain. Ironically, legend has
it that they were formed when
the mythical continent of
Atlantis sank into the ocean.
On the west Saharan shore
waves could reach heights of 300


Canaries. These deposits include
boulders weighing up to 100
tons that were displaced up to
90 feet above sea level and at l
least half a kilometre inland.
According to Dr Day, the
Cumbra Vieja volcano is split-
ting apart and its western flank
is moving towards the sea: "The
geometry of this fault is compa-
rable to the shape of past col-
lapse scars, suggesting that even-
tually the mass of rock above
will fall into the ocean in a giant
landslide."
Landslides, by comparison
with the subsea earthquake that
caused the recent Indian Ocean
calamity, are much more com-
plex tsunami sources, experts
say. But their sheer scale and
speed when an island volcano
collapses with energies com-
parable to those released by the
impact of moderate-sized aster-
oids indicates that they should
produce very large waves.
Tsunamis travel at high
speeds in the deep ocean as
fast as jet aircraft and then
slow down and pile up, increas-
ing their height, as they enter
shallow water. Computer mod-
els predict that within nine
hours of the collapse of Cum-
bre Vieja, waves as high as 150
feet will strike the entire west-
ern seaboard of the Atlantic,
from Brazil to Canada....and
including the Bahamas.
But such a collapse is not
imminent, experts say. The
"half-life-to-failure" of the vol-
cano, if things continue as they
are, might be as much as 5,000
years but could be much less.
There was a small eruption in
1971, but evidence suggests no
significant risk that the volcano
will collapse spontaneously
without warning.
The Pacific is prone to earth-
quake-induced tsunamis caused
by the so-called "ring of fire"
volcanoes that girdle it. At least
.10 lethal big wayes. hqae.&truckt
Japan,'. awaii, Alaska,; Chl. ".
Nicaragn-ai.anrd New -Giinreai: -'
over thepast .100 years.', ri' -, *',
Two volcanic collapses in


Japan in 1741 and New Guinea
in-1888 --produced large-region-
al-scale tsunamis, with wave
heights of at least 45 feet and
perhaps as high as 90 feet with
significant damage recorded
over 600 miles away. And when
:he Indonesian volcano of
Krakatoa famously blew itself
apart in 1883, it generated a
wave that killed 36,000 people.
But the biggest volcanic
explosion of the past two mil-
ion years occurred on the island
of Sumatra (not far from the
epicentre of the earthquake that
caused the recent tsunami). And
there is substantial evidence to
show that it had a major impact
on human evolution.
The eruption of the super vol-
cano called Toba-triggered. a


global volcanic winter 75,000
-years ago, killing most of the
world's human population and
causing a genetic bottleneck.
DNA evidence suggests that all
races living today are a legacy of
this catastrophic event.

Modern humans are
thought to have
appeared in Africa about
150,000 years ago. But evidence
suggests that after Toba the
population was reduced to a few
thousand adults surviving in iso-
lated tropical pockets, mainly in
equatorial Africa.
When conditions allowed,
they began migrating from
Africa again, first to Indochina
and Australia, and then to the


Middle East and Europe.- Pro-
ponents of this theory say this is
why the six billion humans alive
today have very little genetic
diversity, implying a small and
relatively recent founding pop-
ulation.
As one scientist put it, "the
gene pool in Africa contains
more variation than elsewhere,
and the genetic variation found
outside of Africa represents
only a subset of that found with-
in the African continent.
"From a genetic perspective,
all humans are therefore
Africans, either residing in
Africa or in recent exile."


larry@tribunmedia.net


THE E-CLASS SALOONS





Mercedes-Benz


Your car.



Your trust.


Our responsibility



Drake Service Suspension I Alignment Eihaust

Oi, Lube Filler "OODYEAR TIRES"


*American Imported Cars Light Trucks Vans & SUi's

Complete Inspection Estimates before we start Ihe work
-.... 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU-----


MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD

Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941

Open: Monday Saturday
8am.5pm


Fax 326-4865 P.O. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas .

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS -4


"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
A Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.
A


THE TRIBUNE


"On the west Saharan shore
waves could reach heights of
300 feet from crest to trough.
Florida and the Caribbean
could receive 150-foot high
waves within nine hours of the
landslide."


FREEPORT JET WASH

&AUTO MARTLIMITED


AUTMTV 0ECNICAN


NEEDE

Mut ae 0inmm f5 .erseperec,

AS orF R T ainngcetiiat Is*n

mus '6eco putrLteate.


Apply by phone, 1-242-352-7441


II r ~I II I I


-----


J
-i
a
h
p
s
0
ti


"TOUGH CALL








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


FROM page one

teachers.
The teacher said the inci-
dents reported or observed by
the Sandilands School "usual-
ly involve boys more so than
girls, because when you look
at statistics, boys tend to have
more disabilities than girls
do."
The teacher added that boys
are more open to such physi-
cal violations, because unlike
girls, boys are usually allowed
a greater degree of freedom
and are not as protected or
sheltered.
The teacher shared a case
in point that involved a young,
retarded girl who had recently
contracted the AIDS virus
from her rapist, who was a
person she trusted.
The teacher contended that
many of the challenged stu-
dents become good targets for
sexual offenders, especially
after completing school with-
out having a job or appropri-


ate activities to keep them
occupied.
"There are a large number
of mentally ill young men and
women who when they are fin-
ished with school are not
involved in constructive activ-
ities and end up hanging
around without employment,
so they find their solicitation
or prostitution as a means to
make money."
The teacher claimed that
adult men are usually the main
culprits, soliciting sex from the
mentally challenged children.
The Tribune spoke with
Curlene Burrows, Principal of
the Sandilands School, who
refused to admit or deny that
such incidents had been
brought to her attention.
Mrs Burrows claimed she
would have to know The Tri-
bune's sources in order to
comment.
"I cannot speak to that,
because I would need to know
which cases you are referring
to and which teacher you
would have received such


information from."
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
said he has not been privy to
such incidents, "but that is not
to say that 'these cases have
not already been brought to
the attention of the police."
In an effort to "get to the
bottom" of these criminal acts
against the mentally retarded
students, Mr Hanna asked that
all necessary documented
information be brought to
police "in order to facilitate a
comprehensive investigation
into each case."
Mr Hanna, on behalf of the
Commissioner of Police,
promised that all necessary
measures will be taken to
bring these sexual offenders
to justice.
Mr Hanna said: "These inci-
dences are quite unfortunate,
because students attending the
Stapeldon School are already
facing challenges, and they do
not need the additional
encumbrance of sexual abuse
to debilitate them any further.
Therefore I would like to


invite any institution or indi-
vidual with information
regarding these cases to step
forward and allow the police
to take charge."
The Stapeldon School for
the Mentally Retarded, was
established in 1962. The fac-
ulty and administration have
over the years prided them-
selves in offering dozens of
challenged students an oppor-
tunity to hold jobs in skilled-
based areas and professions of
their choice.
In the past special students
have worked toward employ-
ment in the hotel industry,
retailing, landscaping and



Four men

in court

FROM page one

lawyers brought to Magis-
trate Linda Virgill's atten-
tion that their clients report-
ed that they were mistreated
and beaten across the body
by police while in custody.
Dwayne Evans, who rep-
resented himself, said he
was also brutalised. He
pointed out to the magis-
trate where he felt bruises
on his body.
Magistrate Virgill told the
men that the police will have
the opportunity to state
their side of the case during
future court proceedings.
The men were not required
to enter a plea and were
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison until their next court
appearance.
The four will reappear in
court on February 3 for a
preliminary inquiry) into the
murders.


child care. Agriculture and
horticulture have also been a
part of the Stapeldon's skill-
based curriculum.
Last year's crime figures for
sexual offences will not be
released until the end of this


week, however the most
recent statistics from 2003
have confirmed that there
were 111 reported rapes in the
Bahamas. Police said 50 per
cent of the victims knew their
assailants.


Police defend investigation
FROM page one
dations made to the AG's office by the police. However, he did
say that the AG's office has the final say in the conclusion of the
matter.
He also claimed that it is not unusual for the police to forward mat-
ters to the AG's office. He further commented that this case was not
the first rape case to be forwarded.
He said: "Once a complaint is laid against any citizen of the
Bahamas by another citizen, the police must conduct lines of inquiries
in order to prove that allegation.
"It is only at certain stages of the investigation will you pick up, or
invite, or arrest, for that matter, a suspect in order to put the questions
of that inquiry to that particular suspect," he said.
Mr Farquharson boasts that the four week investigation by police
was done "in record time".
He said: "I wish to assure members of the public that there was no
delay. We had to ensure that the investigation was done thoroughly
and professionally.
"There is no one above the law in this country and once com-
plaints are laid to the police, the police has an obligation to investigate
transparently and professionally, no matter how long it takes, in the
public's interest."
Police officially received a complaint about the rape allegation on
Sunday, December 5,2004.
As far as allegations made against a minister interfering with the
investigation, Chief Superintendent Marvin Dames said police were.
investigating the matter.
In the interest of due process, Mr Dames saidlie is unable to com-
ment on the situation.
"This is a very unique matter. We had both parties and represen-
tatives from both parties communicating with the public on a daily basis
with respect to this matter. You hear from one side today, the other
side tomorrow.
"We find ourselves in a very, very unique situation. Because we have
to appreciate and respect due process and the rights of individuals, we
cannot just carelessly reveal aspects of the investigations to the press
and members of the public as we receive it," he said.
Mr Dames said that police appreciate the "need to know from the
public" but there is a very delicate balance about what can be released.
Mr Farquharson thanked the Bahamian public for their patience and
understanding during the month-long investigation.
He assured the public that there was no political interference or pres-
sure from any special interest group to influence the police in its
investigation.


Architects, designers, contractors,

installers, cleaning professionals,

developers & property managers


presents


NATURAL STOrNE








Monday, January 10 at 6pm

19 Patton Street, Palmdale


GN-146

MINISTRY OF

TRADE AND INDUSTRY


THE PRICE CONTROL ACT
(CHAPTER 339)

THE PRICE CONTROL (LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2004



The Minister, in exercise of the powers conferred by section 3 of the
Price Control Actr makes ihe followingregulations -
1. These regulations may be cited as the Price Control (Liquefied


Citation.


Petroleum Gas) (Amendment) Regulations, 2004.


2. The Schedule to the Price Control (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)


Repeal and


replacement Regulations 1996 is repealed and replaced by the following Schedule:

of Schedule

to S. I. No.
109 of 1996.
"SCHEDULE

PART A

The maximum selling price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas where the sale is by

cylinder shall be as follows:



PLACE MAXIMUM SUPPLIERS' MAXIMUM DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE PRICE
$ $
1. IN NEW PROVIDENCE $41.00 per 100 lbs. $65.00 per 100 lbs..
& (delivered) (delivered)
GRAND BAHAMA or or
$0.41 per lb. $0.65 per lb.
(delivered) (delivered)

2. 'IN THE FAMILY $57.00 per 100 lbs. $73.00 per 100 lbs.
ISLANDS, EXCLUDING (including sea freight) (delivered)
GRAND BAHAMA or or

$0.57 per lb. $0.73 per lb.
(including sea freight) (including sea freight)


PART B


The maximum selling price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas where the sale is by
bulk shall be as follows:


PLACE MAXIMUM SUPPLIERS' MAXIMUM DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON PRICE PER U.S. GALLON
$ $
1. IN NEW PROVIDENCE $1.74 $2.76
& (delivered) (delivered)
GRAND BAHAMA
2. IN THE FAMILY ISLANDS, $2.43 $3.09
EXCLUDING GRAND (including sea freight) (including sea freight)"
BAHAMA



Made this 31 st day December, 2004
Signed: Leslie 0. Miller

MINISTER RESPONSIBLE FOR CONSUMER PROTECTION


Claims of sex solicitation involving





mentally-disabled students


I Is I a


MOM






SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
pk REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
M Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, Pro Golf Shop, GNC,
r Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
HOLIDAY FRUIT P1EtS & NUTS NOW AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
^ ^ ~.^^ ... .. '. -i .*


STORE MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
HARBOUR BAY ONLY


Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


11 .1


THRIFTY MAID
LONG GRAIN
RICE
5 LB




GENERIC,

BLEACH
128 OZ
2/$300


WINN DIXIE
CORN
FLAKES
18 OZ



JUMBO
ARROW PRINTER
HAND TOWELS
30
J -19


DEVON
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ

99


W/D
ULTRA THIN JUMBO
PAMPERS STAGE 1& 4
34 & 56 CT


CARIBBEAN

SUGAR
4 LBS

990


SUNBELT
2% PINE
CLEANER
28 OZ
2/$300


ASTOR
VEGETABLE
OIL
48 OZ
$269


SOFT-N-GENTLE

BARROOM TISISU
12 ROLL
$499


\iw, r -


CELLO
LETTUCE
S1 39
TOMATO
5X5 & 6X6
$139
I LB
POTATOES
WHITE 5.LB BAG


/ V. ~.. *~~333. 3
3 .~ 3
.4,.
A


W/D
REQ & NON FAT
YOOURTS ASSTD
FLAVOURS
2/$ 39
8 -.OZ
BAYS
ENGLISH MUFFINS
$ 99 T
6 CT


W/D
ORANGE JUICE


SLICE CHEESE FOOD
S $ 12-9OZ


.1,
.1:;


W/D
CORN ON THE COB
$249
a 6 CT
KIDS CUISINE
ASST FLAV
$299oz

ENSURE
ENSUREPLUHICACIUM,
HI PROTEIN IPEDMSURE
8 OZ
S*4 99


McVITIES
DIGESTIVE
BISCUITS
400 GR



GLADE
AIR FRESHENER
ASST'D SCENTS
9 OZ
2/$300


TOTINO'S
SUPER & 3 MEAT
COMBO ROLLS
S579
640- CT
W/D
ICE CREAM ALL :LAVOURS


MOTTS
JUICES ASSORTED
FLAV 9 PACK
9 PACK
$449


r i enH PAN
PEANUT BUTTER
CREAMY & CRUNCHY
12 OZ
s239


WISHBONE
SALAD DRESSING
ALL FLAVOURS
8 OZ
2/$300


., '. : . . .
THRIFTY MAID
RAMEN NOODLES ASST'D
FLAVOURS 3- oz ...............4/99
CRACKING GOOD
SALTINES 16- oz ..................$1.19
THRIFTY MAID
SPAGHETTI RINGS W/MEATBALLS &
REGULAR SPAGHETTI
W/MEATBALLS is- oz..................990
WINN DIXIE
CHUNK LITE TUNA
IN WATER 6.s oz ..................3/$1.89
WINN DIXIE
MAYONNAISE 32 oz ..............2/$3.00
NIAGARA
EASY IRON NON -STICK STARCH
LEMON, HEAVY &
turno blONAL 2o- oz ..............$1.99
HUNTS
SNACK 4 PACK &
PUDDING EACH ..........$1.69
LIBBY'S
LITE 4PAK MIX FRUIT & DICE
PEACHES..............O.....................$3.99


HUNTS
SNACK PACK
PUDDING4PAK
4 PAK
$169


F/A
SPAGHETTI &
MEAT BALLS
7.5 OZ
-990

BLUE RIBBON

iARBILIb RICE
5- LB
$199


GAIN
ULTRA 2
POWDER
15 USE
29- OZ

$339

JOY
LIQUID DETERGENT
BERRY ESSENCE ANTI
BACTERIA, INVIGORATING
&ORIGINAL
25 OZ



QUAKER
QUICK GRITS
WHITE
5 LB
$g49


DELI TOUFAYAN
SLICE HAM PITA BREAD
& URKETY ALL VARIETY
REAST $ 49
S9LB 12.- OZ
WHITE & YELLOW ALL VARIETY
AMERICAN PUDDING CREAM
CHm= m= CAKES
$399 $-399


LAY'S
VARIETY PACK
(24 PACK) CHIPS
24 PACK
S1 099L


NABISCO
CREAM OF
WHEAT
28 OZ
$369

CARNATION
EVAPORATED
MILK
14 OZ
2/ $129


CADBURYS


400 OR
3 99


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA (WATER)
6 OZ
3/$ 189


AQUAPURE
WATER REG
(NASSAU ONLY)
1 GAL

.990


MIX-N-MATCH
GOLD DEL, RED DEL &
D'ANJOU & BOSE PEARS
3/99 .LB
RED APPLES
3LB BAG
$@4 EACH
CALIFORNIA NAVAL
ORANGES
LB3
3/991,


I CZ! I I KI I"I `' '


I


I


I .l." T 4 - ,7 ', . I ..


I


I "UHOLJAPY, JANUAMY 0,'e ees4, I-AUI1= 11


I iZ A k vl-


7k!


I


I










S*1,9I| THIfH-.--} I/I f I ./I. A I I ARn A^ 200I ] T Bv- -OH E .....iB


Sears: work on schools hit by




hurricanes will be spee u


Minister asks for national conference to review Bahamas'
educational concerns and chart the way forward


...... V .... .... ', -,.. .. L.
* t,, . .1 ., ;-.. . .

A AN

SELECTROJACK


/


W. FA






A Giftfor the one that's
hard to please! W
A Gift for the one who has
everything!
A Gift that's sure to please!


fl ElectroJa
Town Centre Mall Phone: 356-(
Q ; 356-6206


-. ".*-, ." ,' r. '


- -1


















it 'Ole,~


ck
p206/356-5971 fax:


* -*4~. 1'tr..




* By DUDLEY BYFIELD
Bahamas Information
Services
FREEPORT Education
Minister Alfred Sears says
that work on storm damaged
Government schools on
Grand Bahama will be speed-
ed up following an interven-
tion by Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts which
unlocked a delay in the con-
tract process covering the
repairs.
Mr Sears. said everything
will be done to expedite the
restoration work especially at
West End, Martin Town,
Lewis Yard, and St Georges'
where the hurricane damage
was most intense.
And he has asked for a
national conference on edu-
cation involving the teachers,
administrators, school boards,
PTAs and all education
stakeholders, including our
corporate citizens, to review
the country's educational
concerns and to chart the way
forward.

Informed
He informed of a meeting
recently held with Mrs Fran-
cis Friend, of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers along with
Minister Bradley Roberts; Mr
Bradford Wildgoose, of the
Ministry of Works; Mr Cecil
Thompson and the Perma-
nent Secretary in the Ministry
of Education.
"We did an assessment of
all of the contracts on Grand
Bahama relating to all of the
schools, and we were able to
ascertain that in October pre-
liminary contracts were giv-
en to the contractors, all of
whom would have com-
menced their work, but the
formal contract process was
delayed within the Ministry
of Works."
Mr Sears said thanks to the
intervention of Minister
Bradley Roberts, the formal
contracts were to be signed
in late December and
endorsed by the Ministry of
Education. Work he said
should commence the first
week in January and all of
the contractors will be fully
mobilised.
The Education Minister
stated that they would move.
expeditiously to begin the
process for the designing of
new schools for West End,
Martin Town, Lewis Yard
and also for the building of a
junior high school for
Freeport.


M.



I-Ad


M EDUCATION MINISTER ALFRED SEARS


Minister Sears expressed
thanks and appreciation to
the BUT, teachers and
administrators for their part-
nership and response in.the
hurricane crisis.
"I want." he declared, "to
take this opportunity to thank
the BUT, especially Mrs
Francis Friend, for her'pair-
nership in responding to the
hurricane crisis and the
process of restoration.
"I also want to thank our
teachers and administrators
for having, in spite of. their
own personal challenges,
have gone into the schools,
helped with the cleaning, the
restoration of our schools and
also, most importantly, for
agreeing to work extra time,
that is to start school early
and go beyond 3 o'clock, and
also to go beyond the end of
term.
"As a country, we are
indebted to these profession-
als because they have shown
the true essence of patriotism
and commitment to the chil-
dren and to the future of our


country and I am indeed very
grateful.
"I take this opportunity to
appeal to all of our stake-
holders for patience, because
we need to stay focused and
not be distracted as we seek
to rebuild our educational
process.

Education
"At the .end of this year
(2004) I have asked that a
national conference on edu-
cation be held where all of
the stakeholders of education
will meet and discuss the way
forward in education, to
review the concerns, the dif-
ficulties as well as to share
best practices among our-
selves.
"So I ask," he ended, "for
the full support of all of our
teachers, administrators)
school boards, PTAs (Parent-
Teachers' Associations) and
our corporate citizens in the
launching and participation
in the national conference on
education."
?.KM


I 'Christian world'.


P to celebrate feast


of the Epiphany:


'A


2005 Es


The all new 2005 FORD ESCAPE empowers you with confident capability, It features an updated interior and exterior styling, smart new technology throughout,
and a super aggressive attitude, and you will appreciate the nimble driving dynamite, comfortable seating, and abundance of safety features, All new 2.3 L 4
cylinder engine rated at 153 HP Automatic, Alrconditlonlng, radio CD player, power locke mirror & windows, dual air bags, keyless entry.

Available now! So why wait

--6ai "-t- -


I The new leader of the pack.


FRIENDLY MOTORS LI
VISIT OUR WEBSITE: friendly motorsbahamas com


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
THE Christian world cele-
brates the feast of the
Epiphany on January 6. The
feast, also referred to as the
feast of manifestation, is tradi-
tionally celebrated on the
twelfth day after Christmas -
January 6th.
In the United States this
feast has been moved to the
Sunday between January 2 and
January 8.
The feast of Epiphany is the
time when the three kings pre-
sented the child Jesus with gifts
of gold, frankincense and
myrrh.
According to Father Delano
Archer, the feast of the
Epiphany brings to an end the
Christmas season. So on Thurs-
day the Church of the
Epiphany on Prince Charles
Drive will celebrate its feast of
title with a pontifical Eucharist.
Fr. Crosley Walkine, rector of
St. Anne's Parish, will be the
preacher.
The Anglican Church of the
Epiphany was started some 15
years ago on a porch in Nas-
sau east.
The pastor said there was a
need in the eastern section of
New Providence to bring the


area.
The parish community hp
continued to grow over thi
years.
"Our emphasis has been oh
youth, and we are extremely
pleased with the many wlih
have positively impacted the
life of the community," said Fr.
Archer.
"There are many challenges
for more resources, properly
trained manpower, and more
facilities to minister to til1
demands of human needs is
cause for more anxiety, but wv6
are confident that through o
faith God will provide,", l
said.
A part of the mission of t
Church of the Epiphany is
minister to the people of N
sau East.
Fr. Archer said the comm
nity regards it as a privilege
exercise ministry and is excit
and enthusiastic about the po
sibilities of the abundance
the harvest.
"Our invitation to all is
pray for us and help in any w|
you can as partners in this mi
sion and ministry of Jesi
Christ," said Fr. Archer.
Fr. Archer is the pastor
the Church of the Epiphany
and Fr. Ormand Wright, the


I.'
.1





I
'4










I

'I



5,,


RISEFvour


THE TRIBUNE


i


PAGE 2. TURSDA. JAUARY .200


i


' t


J1*r ..










E TI B J 2, P


RBDF Christmas


Carol Service


THE Royal Bahamas
Defence Force hosted its
annual Christmas Carol Ser-
vice on HMBS Coral Har-
bour. This year saw the return
of the service to the base fol-
lowing it being held in the
Adelaide and Coral Harbour
Communities over the past
three years.
The Force's Chaplain, Pas-
tor Prince Bodie, delivered the
Christmas Message, which
reminded those in attendance,
that God has a way of making
itmpossibilities possible.
: Thirty-four children from
the Elizabeth Estates Home
fgr Children, and the sur-
rounding area attended the


affect efforts for

U CUBA
--ONE of Cuba's best known dissidents said
'I~esday that renewed contacts between Cuba
irid European countries that are likely to kick
6i6n and other activists off the embassy cocktail
party circuit won't hurt their efforts to change
communist system, according to Associated
.fess.
p~Oswaldo Paya, lead organizer of the Varela
Project democracy drive, said that a policy by
uropean embassies in Havana to invite dissi-
0|ats to national day events for more than a
year had already served a purpose.
;'The EU had made the decision to invite us


RBDF Photo Shows: Com-
modore Dav) Rolle, Comman-
der Defence Force (centre),
Captain Raymond Farquhar-
son. Captain Coral Harbour (far
right), and Petty Officer Patrick
Musgrove (left). They are sur-
rounded by the children from
the Elizabeth Estates Home for
Children, and the surrounding
area, as well as from the
Nazareth Centre for children.
after being presented with gifts
during the Defence Force's
Christmas Carol Service.
(RBDF photo: Leading
Seaman Mark Armbrister)
service. A number of the
youngsters were encouraged
to render selections of their


*change in Cuba

as an expression of solidarity with the people of
Cuba, as a gesture of displeasure with the deten-
tion of our 75 brothers," Paya told The Associ-
ated Press.
Sentencing
Relations between Cuba and Europe chilled
after the island's government cracked down on
the opposition in March 2003, rounding up
and sentencing 75 dissidents to long prison
terms.
European nations were also troubled by the
firing-squad executions of three men who tried
to hijack a ferry to the United States.


,: Tui fcble into 2005 at


SNassau gymNastics!





SFREE classes for the


month of January!


Beginning January 4th, 2005
Open to new students only
Only offered on designated days
Restrictions apply


Call or stop by for more information!
Locations in Oakes Field & Seagrapes Shopping Centre
356-7722 / 364-8423


,NanuaU Nai(


www.nassaunastics.com
nassaunastics@ yahoo.com


A proud member of the Gymnastics Federation of the Bahamas


H vrsatile. Feel athletic driving Prices Starting at
s25odel and phisticted29 95


i--1 -----, ,. '





'- .:--- ":. :- T~ 5:),"."-.,' ",:;,' . : d:. ,V'...


-~


EXECUTIVE
A~ At 0 C V 731Wq,


Collin, Ave iSouih of 6th Terrace):
Open: Mon o Fri 8am 5:30. pm
Sit Sam 12 noon


IVBJ I U KS LIV i Te: 322-670516 Fax: 322-6714 ~~
AU FHORISEDTOYB(TA DEALER Salespersom ~B~ur3~Pinder,
Parti and .senice gusamnietd Pam PaIlsicius. Teirroll Cash

I~Ar. aMotor Maill,-Don Mackgy.B.~vd. U.7-29 *,fboh'i


Why should you log on to


The Tourism & Hospitality Information Network


T~ T W


... ..


...... VISIT US TO FIND
. ........ ... Tourism's top stories
Tourism's Who's Who
Industry events
Current tourism statistics
Ag,-nc ,:and local press clippings
InriLustr. reports
Rel,31':':d Pjhri, iras tourisrm sites
Baliarias newAspapers online


tourismbahamas.org,
a convenient research site for
. students, educators and anyone
interested in knowing what's
(olin0l on in oiur coLIuntr'S NDo.1
,, I'rus.iy. Up-to-date tourisri-
information at your fingertips.


I'd rather be driving my Toyota

:^ ,,:"'. k .W
-" "
'* -:'"
.-- , a -. @ : ";-..,: ': .. .':


Dissident: European contacts won't


':


[The Tribun


THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 133


"' "''"'~'''~'"


THE TRIBUNE


,PC-
-tmw-- ....







PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6,2005 THE TRIBUNE


L LANCAR AN


Bahamians

are set for

UNESCO

conference
FOUR young Bahamians will
represent the Bahamas at United
Nations Educaliun. Scientific and
Cultural Organisation
(UNESCO) Inter-Island States
Conference to be held later this
month in Mauritius, Minister of
Youth Sports and Culture Neville
Wisdom has announced.
Vailino Higgs. Akerro Lloyd,
Linda Hamniltin, and Frederick
Arnett will join youths from oth-
er island states to discuss issues
plrttinent 10 o young people. Under
the there, "'. the discussions will cover topics
such as poverty, preservation of
the ern iromuent. youth develop-
ment and preservation of culture
and national heritage.
From left are Patrick Bain,
senior youth officer, Ministry of
I south. Sports and Culture; Min-
ister N isdon: Valdino Higgs; and
Denise Bethel. project manager,
I NESCO Project in Gambier.
(BIS photo: Lorenzo Lockhart)


Doctors in Haiti




extend their




weeklong strike


w ~m
-
~ ---

-

.~

a S


- Am


-- o 0 --. I MEW


"Copyrighted Material-"



S- Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers
-Q


.MEND


Located: 19 Patton Street, Old Thompson Trading Buildingg
Palmdale, behind Quiznos off Maderia Street
326-TILE (8453) 326-KING (5464)


ft--


S
- a -
0 ~-
b ___ _______


Give Your Body Nature's Essentials with NATURA-VIGOR Vitamins


'A-


~F1


I


VITAM
IC0j{c


7'


2'


RY
13r


Using Pure Ingredients & Good Science To Make The Best Supplements On The Planet.

Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale, Soldier Road Tel: 242-393-7111


___ 5- go-
40..G- *
4b dns
-af w -m j

qp 40 1








'Mom-m. 4





5-


AMD mm- -qw
1a --moo*w ft-om
40M 0M 10 -
ft a- S- 4w
gme~*


E I E CENTUI
LI l. 200


II~LL~IB I r~-r~---~-~--C~sr,-


THE TRIBUNE


PbAGE 14, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005














ri- htd Maernia-l"- -




Sy icate onten


Available from Commercial News Providers"-


Warnings




over tsunami




charity scams


MIAMI
WITH private donations
pouring into charities, U.S. law.
enforcement officials say scam
artists claiming to represent
tsunami relief organizations are
using e-mails and telephone
calls to attempt to steal dona-
tions and swipe donors' identi-
ties, according to Associated
Press.
Several states and consumer
watchdog agencies have issued
warnings in recent days, noting
that an outpouring of generos-
ity for victims of the Indian
t, Ocean tsunami has opened the
door for con artists who want to
Spi\ upon Americjn philan-
throp .. ..
"\\c don't \"ant someone
who is charitable and is sup-
portive of the victims over there
to become a victim of identity
theft," said Bob Breeden, who
heads the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement's comput-
er crimes center.
Alerted
Agency officials alerted resi-
dents Tuesday after they
learned of an e-mail purport-
edly sent by a British group
'called "The Foundation for
Victims of Flood and Earth-
quake" and another requesting
aid to the "Tsunamis Disaster
Help Fur ds."
"With sympathy and heavy
laden hearts, we hereby appeal
I to your sense of generosity to
assist by donating any amount
you can afford," the latter
group wrote in an e-mail. Flori-
-" da officials said the e-mails
appeared to be suspicious and
patterned after fraudulent
appeals for donations in the
past.
Breeden said the agency had'
c not received any complaints but
Ld/


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighborhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.


wanted to be "ahead of the
curve" on potential scams after
learning that a British man had
pleaded guilty to sending phony
e-mails telling people that their
missing loved ones had died in
the tsunamis.
Florida officials said the solic-
itations could be misrepresent-
ing their intentions seeking
donations and be "phishing
scams." Under these schemes,
e-mails are used to trick recip-
ients into providing personal
information such as credit card
and Social Security numbers,
addresses and other informa-
tion that could put them at risk
,of identity fraud.
Tips
Similar warnings have been
issued in Alabama, Kansas,.
Maryland, Michigan, New
York, North Dakota, Rhode
Island and Washington state.
The Federal Trade Commission
and the Better Business Bureau
have also weighed in with tips
on how to properly assess char-
ities before making a donation.
"If you run a Google search
on tsunami and contribute,
you'll come up with over 60,000
sites," said North Dakota
Attorney General Wayne
Stenehjem. "Many of them are
brand new sites, and they're not
well established. People need
to be careful."
New York Attorney General
Eliot Spitzer's office encour-
aged people to donate directly
to charities instead of dealing
with telemarketers who keep a
large portion of the proceeds
they raise.
"We're asking people to
donate only to charities they
know and trust, rather than
something set up in a piecemeal
fashion," said Spitzer
spokesman Paul Larrabee.


U


THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 15


THET~RIBUNEi




PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6. 2004


S


Se


S


-t t1l l


lift


! .


Boxin

Jun r


Day Parade,


noo


............

4F


-H1,


S


Mike


r "'
so.


Aki


THE.TRIBUNEI


m








THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


SECTION -


business@100jamz.com


ss


1 b,,,, t ,y Bit t 1
, Digital B&W Copiers
* Digital Colour Copies
* Digital Colour Printers Xerox /
Tektrontx Brands
* Duplicators
* Copier Supplies
SAll products can be networked
or stand alone
* Authorized dealers for Xerox and Riso

tAMIa=


Exchange control changes





to reach Cabinet during Q1


Automated Clearing House set to
come to fruition by April and
boost payment system efficiency


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
proposed amend-
"r '_ to \.xtin
.c'..:,e controls
are hel ik tobe pre-
sented to the Gov-
ernment da ii-.i the 2005 first
qu- :'.: C ,i .... .].: g,_ er r, '
Jult.'n Firai-ni said yesterday,
adding that at present they still
ra:' C -o :' I I.. ing1" h'.,re
they are submitted to Cabinet.
Speaking with The Tribune
about a number of issues fac-
ing thi Cc rr.l Banl. Mr Fran-
cis declined to comment on
when the amendments could be
expected to go forward. He
added, though. that they were in
line with the Government's
position on exchange control
liberalisation.
Meanwhile, Mr Francis said


the drive to modernise the
domestic payment infrastruc-
ture through the development
of an Automated Clearing
House (ACH) should come to
fruition by April.
The ACH is an electronic
payment system expected to
provide a more modern, effi-
cient and safer cheque payment
mechanism throughout the
economy. It is intended to trans-
form a complicated and anti-
quated manual system which,
although it has performed well
for many years, is slow and
involves substantial risk.
The ACH is also expected to
accommodate direct debit and
credit transfers.
Mr Francis said: "By moving
to a more electronic system it
will speed up the payment
process, make it more efficient,
including [reducing] the cost of
service over time. It'will elimi-


nate the risk inherent in the sys-
tem, which is normally carried
by the public and will mean
putting in place a platform for
the development of an elec-
tronic banking system, one
where people do payments
online. It's a critical part of
that."
The Central Bank governor
said the public generally does
not think about the issue of
cheque payments and how
money is transferred from one
account to another, but the reg-
ulator had a responsibility to
ensure any risks were min-
imised. He added that with the
current platform there were
inherent risks in a system that
offered, at best, a complicated
process for the transfer of funds.
Government payments and
public sector salaries typically
represent 50 per cent of ACH
business volumes, and the Min-
istry of Finance had previously
signalled its intention to be part
of the process, given the poten-
tial synergies with the Govern-
See BANK, Page 2B


"sector says
S:
Bahaw. .'does not


needl-.jplegis atiton


ir Terms


Recommends

government
adopt UK law
rather than
its own Bill
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian private sec-
tor has urged the Government
to consider adopting the UK's
Unfair Terms Consumer Con-
tracts Regulations rather than
enact its own Bill, arguing that
the Bahamas "does not need
this legislation"
In their review of the pro-
posed Unfair Terms in Con-
sumer Contracts Bill, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and other private sector
bodies again described their


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Business Reporter
The Old Bahama Bay resort
in West End, Grand Bahama,
is expected to re-open in early
March after suffering millions
of dollars in water damage to
the property during Hurricanes
Jeanne and Frances, its chief
operating officer told The Tri-
bune yesterday.
Bob Kramm said the 54-room
and suite resort was fortunate
not to have sustained any struc-
tural damage during either hur-
ricane. Heavy flooding, though,
resulted in severe water dam-


"overriding concern" as the
power the proposed legislation
granted to the minister respon-
sible "while attempting to limit
the power of the courts".
Similar concerns had also
been expressed on the Govern-
ment's three other consumer-
related Bills the Standards Bill,
the Consumer Protection Bill
and the Weights & Measures
Bill.
In addition, the Chamber and
other bodies argued that "the
country does not need this leg-
islation" as common law prin-
ciples already provided con-
sumers with protection.
And their review said: "If the
Government feels it must pro-
ceed with legislation of this
nature, the United Kingdom
has a much more reasonable
application already in force
there that might be useful.
"The proposed Act is very
similar to the UK legislation
passed in 1999 Unfair Terms
Consumer Contracts Regula-


age to the resort's roof, sheet
rock and floorings, and also
caused widespread damage to
the landscape.
With the rebuilding effort on-
going, Old Bahama Bay had
experienced a time lag between
certain materials being ordered
and arriving on the island. Thus
a shortage of supplies and man-
power initially pushed the re-
opening into the first quarter of
the New Year.
Mr Kramm blamed the
impact of hurricanes on Florida
and other countries within the
Caribbean as delaying the deliv-
See HOTEL, Page 4B


tions with important differ-
ences."
The difference are that under
See LAWS, Page 4B


Julian Francis, Governor of the Central Bank


IM






'--
OLO 1.-- 1








HERE'S THE LOW-COST DIGITAL
COLOR COPIER/PRINTER THAT WON'T RAISE
YOUR COST FOR BLACK AND WHITE.


XEROX WORKCENTRE* M24
COLOR SPEED 13 COLOR PAGES PERMIT.
BaW SPE 24 8aW PAGES PER MIN.
RS P!. FIRSTCOPYOUTA10.4SEC.-FORCOLOR
VERSATILE ,. TWO-SIDEDC OPVING & PRINTING
HC. W i tsoN UPTO 1200 X 1200 DPI
MORE FUNCTIONS colon SCANNING AND OPTIONAL FAX
REuLIABILTY TOTAL SATISFACTION GUARANTEE


The reliable Xerox WorkCentre M24 digital color copier/pr
packs a lot into a very economical package. Its low prii
delivers brilliant color for less than 15 cents a page and yo
no premium for black and white. Just contact us at BBSL f
the colorful details.


TiIR DOCUMBNr Co


B




















winter
ce
u pay
for all


MANY
IX.


CALL NOW


Collins Ave. & 7th Terrace
P. 0. Box N-4950
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-9250
Fax: (242) 323-3581
www.bbsl.com


(I -


[u I Ia
i~~inc~- kitin~Lid,


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Old Bahama


Bay to re-open


in early March


Queens Highway
P.O. Box F-40731
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Phone: (242) 352-7022
Fax: (242) 352-7619
www.bbsl.com


I















Companies must focus


on IT to stay


connected


In the first of a new bi-weekly
column, Ian Hepburn of Bahamas-
based Providence Technology
Group identifies four areas firms
should consider for investments


Ready or not, 2005 is here.
Whether you consider your
business to be small, medium
or large, in today's "always on;
always connected" economy,
information technology (IT) is
. one of your most effective tools
for meeting the challenges and
exploiting the opportunities that
will come your way in 2005.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE






INTERNAL AUDITORS (2)
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT
A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the post of two (2) Internal Auditors in the Internal Audit Department,

The job executes various audit and investigation assignments as stipulated in the Schedule of Activities
formulated by the AGM Chief Inlernal Auditor; supervises and directs the activities of the Audit Clerks, and
offers technical assistance to the Assistant Internal Auditors. The internal auditor trains subordinate staff;
assists the External Auditors with joint efforts for.the year- end audit; producers audit programs; produces
audit and investigation reports as well as monthly and quarterly reports; assists the AGM-Chif Internal Auditor
with plans and corporate research.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not linuted to:

Produce audit programs and submit for approval of the Chief International Auditor
Conducts complete risk assessment for area being audited
Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with established audit programs.
This involves a complete assessment of the systems of internal control, risks exposures and the efficiency,
effectiveness and economic use of resources to achieve management objectives
Produces audit reports on audit concerns. their causes, effects and the audit recommendations in accordance
with the HA Standards
Conducts some audit investigations
Evaluate findings and produce investigations reports: exercising the IIA's ethical'standaids (especially
confidentiality). .
Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies, manpower efficiency and
new computer applications
Discusses audit concerns with the relevant Department/Section head and seek agreement to implement
recommendations. ..

The successful candidate should also possess:

*A Bachelors degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline and a professional accounting qualification
e.g. CA/CPA. ,
* Obtaining the CIA wduld be highly desirable.
* Five years post certification experience in auditing and general accounting with experience in interviewing,
producing reports and making verbal presentations.

Interested persons should apply by completing an application form, attaching a resume and contact information
for three professional references to: ATTN. Manager-Human Resources & Training, Bahamas Electricity
Corportaion, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, P.O.Box N-7509 Nassau. Bahamas on or before Monday, January
10,2005.


Here are four essential IT
investments you should give
serious consideration to in 2005.
Security
The start of a new year is an
excellent time to have an inde-
pendent assessment of the secu-
rity of your IT systems.
Too many companies believe
that "once secure; always
secure".
The problem is that new secu-
rity vulnerabilities and flaws are
uncovered frequently, leaving
your systems potentially open
to new methods of attack.
At the very least, have your
IT provider test and update
your firewall and virus protec-
tion software.
Also, have them test the
strength of your passwords to
ensure they are strong.
For businesses with sensitive
information, a security check-
up should be performed on a
quarterly, if not monthly, basis.
You'll be glad you did.
Disaster Recovery
If nothing else, the 2004 hur-
ricane season taught us that dis-
aster can strike at any time.
Fires and floods are even more
unpredictable and every bit as
destructive.
Even if your budget does not
allow for a full solution this
year, start by identifying your
most critical system and take
steps to ensure it can be quick-
ly recovered in an off-site loca-
tion.


Making IT work


by

Han

Hepburn


Providenc

TechnlogyGrou


A phased approach like this
may take you two or three years
to complete, but that's okay..
You would be finished by
now if you had started two or
three years ago.
Web-enable your Business
While the hype surrounding
the dot cornm frenzy has long
since evaporated, the underly-
ing web technology still offers
significant opportunities for
businesses to offer their services


to a global customer base, and
securely provide existing cus-
tomers with the information
they want at any time and from
anywhere.
In 2005, take a close look at
all your customer service
processes and invest a little time
and money into seeing how the
web can transform their effi-
ciency and enhance your cus-
tomers' experience.
See YEAR, Page 3B


Bank (From page 1B)


ment's e-commerce plans.
In its 2003 annual report, the
Central Bank said implementa-
tion of the ACH would reduce
the processing cycle for
Bahamian cheques, boosting
efficiency and reducing uncer-
tainty in private sector transac-
lions.
Reliance on cash and cheques
in the Bahamian economy
would also be reduced, as the
ACH enhanced direct payroll
debits, domestic e-commerce
and non-cash retail point-of-sale
transactions.
Meanwhile, Mr Francis refut-
ed any suggestion that the vari-
ous guidelines issued to banks
and trust companies were prov-


215fflK Colina Ld.
ii Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pr ng Information A Of ..

52wk-HI S2wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div S PIE Yield
1.49 1 10 Abac Markets 1 10 1 10 0.00 0 197 0000 NM 0.00%
8.40 7.25 Bahamas Property Fund 8.00 8.00 0.00 1.328 0.320 6.0 4.00%
.25 5.75 . ank of Bahamas 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.152 0.330 11.2 5.74%
0.85 .3. 053 Bencnmark '.. 085 0.85 0.00 -0.057 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.97 . 180. Bahamas Waste '- 1.80 1.80 0.00 0101 0.080 17.8 4.44%
1.00 0.91 British American Bank 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.007 0.040 13.0 4.17%
7.25 6.21. Cable Bahamas 7 10 7.10 0.00 0.510 0.240 13.9 3 38%
2.20 1.35 Coilna Holdings 2.20. 2.20 0.00 0.259 0.060 8. 2 73%
7.17 6.15 Commonwealth Bank 7.10 7.10 0.00 0.632 0.390 11.2 5.49%
1.50 0.35 Doctor's Hspital 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.228 0.000 6.6 0.00%
4.00 3.13 Farnguard 396 3.96 0.00 0.406 0.170 9.8 4.29%
970 98007' Fico 970 970 000 0649 0480 149 4.95%
7.49 .20 FirlstCarlbbean 7 49 749 000 0 513 0330 14 6 441%
8.60 8.00 Focol 800 800 0.00 0 710 0500 11 3 6 25%
2.25 1.99 Freeport Concrete 1 99 1 99 0.00 -0 089 0 000 N/M 0 00%
1038 990 ICD Utilities 9.89 989 0.00 0818 0405 12 1 4 10%
8.25 8.10 J S Johnson 822 822 0.00 500 0 785 0 550 10.5 6.81%
6.27 4 36 Kerzner Inlemational BDRs 5 85 5.85 0.00 0 245 0 000 24 5 0 00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 1000 10.00 000 0694 0 350 14 4 3.50%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid S Ask S Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S Div $ PIE Yield
1300 13 00 Bahamas Supermarkets 1300 14 00 16 00 1.328 0.720 10.5 5.14%
10.14 10 00 Caribbean Crossings (Prei 1000 10 35 1000 0000 0800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0 40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.103 0.000 NM 000%
4300 28.00 ABDAB 41 00 4300 41.00 2220 0000 194 0.00%
1600 13 00 Bahamas Supermarkets 1300 14 00 1300 1 105 0810 14.6 693%
060 0 35 RND Holdings 029 0 54 035 -0 103 0000 NIM 000%
62wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div S Yield %
1.1864 1 0787 Colina Money Markel Fund 1 186395"
2.0536 1.8154 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.0704***
10.2148 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.2148.****
2.1564 2 0012 Colina KSI Preferred Fund 2.156379"
1.0631 1.0000 Colina Bond Fund 1 063110""
BMSX ALL SHARE INDEX 19,Dec 02 -.1.000.00 YIELD- last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
62wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit
52wk-L-wew Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Pyweious Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dolly Vol. Number of total shliarei traded today : NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ -Divkidends perisharepailddJntat 2 months. NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closiag price dlv vded, t.the lasl... nont earnings FINDEX.- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock lndex. January 1. 1994 = 100
-AS AT SEP. 30.20041 :-AS 312004 .
* AS AT SEP. 24, 2004* AS AT NOV. 30, 20041 --AS AT NOV. 30, 2004


ing very onerous, saying the
industry had been actively
engaged in consultation during
their construction.
He did admit, though, that it
was possible one or two of the
guidelines related to highly
technical activities could be con-
siderably challenging.
Looking at the offshore sec-
tor, Mr Francis said of signifi-
cant importanceto the indus-.
try going forward would be the
its ability to move ahead with
the regulatory integration pro-
ject. The partial consolidation
or amalgamation of the sector's
, regulatory bodies would resolve
a number of issues that impact
the sector.'
Newly-appointed inspector of
banks and trust companies,
Michael Foot, is expected to
advise government on the way
forward in regard to regulatory
integration.
Mr Francis said no timeframe
had been identified tfor any
integration process, but it was
expected that when Mr Foot,
together with the support of sec-
tor regulators, had completed
a set of recommendations that
these would include such a
schedule.


In terms of the overall econ-
omy, Mr Francis said external
reserves, which-stood at $667
million as at December 31,
2004, were expected to grow
strongly heading into 2005, with
every likelihood that they ill
reach $750 million by the end of
the year.
Expressing reasonable opti-
mism about future economic
growth, Mr Francis said thatin
2005 Bahamians have the
opportunity to further develop
the economy and benefit from
past experiences in the past.
Mr Francis said: "This is a
great opportunity for the
Bahamas to build an economy,
to increase further the produc-
tive side of the economy by
investing and, by that, also
strengthening external reserves
and the ability to earn foreign
currency.
"It should also eliminate pri-
vate and public sector borrow-
ing. We have an excellent
opportunity this year in this
economy, and policy makers
have a good opportunity to send
a strong word to our compatri-
ots to make the best use of the
opportunities provided by the
economy."


V. 5--,F-'-4 ~b la -.5


ST.remendous Savings!


BTC has lowered ALL of it's long .distance rates Plus, we're offering even lower rates to your favorite
a" across the board! All long distance calls from any Caribbean locations when using our Bahamas
phone to anywhere in the world is now up to 70% Direct Card. This card will give extra super savings
les Long distance direct dialing from your cell, on calls especially to Jamaica and Haiti.
n hohe or office phone, Bahamas Direct Prepaid
. Card,and Debit Phone Card all cost less... a lot less!


Customer Hotline: 325-5500(Nassau) Toll Free: 1-242-300-1683 (Grand Bahama & Family Islands)


Working for youl"
www.btcbahamas.com
Rates available through 3rd February, 2005.


_IY


PAGE 2B, THURiSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNE'












Bahamas well-placed to deal


with


UN treaty's bank secre


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The .elimination of
bank secrecy
under the 2000
regulatory finan-
cial services regu-
latory regime has left the
Bahamas well-placed to cope
with the demands it may face
from the United Nations Con-
vention on Corruption, which
is expected to become effective
worldwide this year.
Under the UN convention,
which was ironically opposed
by many Western governments,
corruption suspects will no


longer be able to hide behind
bank secrecy laws, which are
not allowed to obstruct corrup-
tion investigations.
Article 40 of the UN Con-
vention deals specifically with
bank secrecy, stating: "Each
state party shall ensure that, in
the case of domestic criminal
investigations of offences estab-
lished in accordance with this
Convention, there are appro-
priate mechanisms within its
domestic legal system to over-
come obstacles that may arise
out of the application of bank
secrecy laws."
In addition, Clause 8 of Arti-
cle 46 on mutual legal assistance


requires that states "shall not
decline to render mutual legal
assistance pursuant to this arti-
cle on the ground of bank secre-
cy".
The Bahamas' 2000 regula-
tory regime effectively elimi-
nated bank secrecy, although
its still allows clients of this
nation's financial services indus-
try to retain their privacy and
confidentiality.
It also created a number of
mechanisms to allow for greater
cross-border supervision of
Bahamian-based financial insti-
tutions and better co-operation
with international regulators,
and included the creation of the


Financial Intelligence Unit.
As a result, the Bahamas is
likely to have too much diffi-
culty in complying with the UN
Convention, although interna-
tional media have described it
as likely to place offshore cen-
tres under even greater pres-
sure to disclose details about
bank accounts held in their
nations.
The Independent newspaper
in the UK said "financial bolt
holes" and "tax havens" would
face mounting pressure.
Most of the world's govern-
ments signed on to the conven-
tion in Mexico in December
2003. It comes into effect when
ratified by at least 30 govern-
ments, and this is expected to
happen before the next UN
Congress on Crime Prevention.
and Criminal Justice opens in
Bangkok on April 18.

Year
(From page 2B)
Productivity at Work
Last but by no means least,
take some time this year to
assess how well your staff are
making use of the technology
your business needs to succeed.
It is not uncommon to find
that most employees only make
use of 10 per cent to 25 per cent
of popular Microsoft Office
applications.
If you really want to succeed
in 2005 and well beyond, make
the investment to ensure that
your staff know what they are
doing.
No doubt there will be many
things tugging at your Budget
this year, but if an investment in
IT is not a part of your 2005
budget, you may well find your
business ill-equipped to max-
imise opportunities and meet
challenges head-on.
To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail makin-
gITwork@providencetg.com
About the Author:
Ian Hepburn is the founder
and managing director of Prov-
idence Technology Group, one
of the leading IT firms in the
Bahamas. Providence Technol-
ogy Group specialises in Net-
working Solutions, Consulting
& Advisory Services and Soft-
ware Solutions.


Alfred Sears, the attorney
general, previously told The Tri-
bune that while the Bahamas
was a signatory to the Organi-


station of American States
(OAS) anti-corruption treaty,
it had not signed on to the
UN's.


LEGAL NOTICE


THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)
LIQUIDATOR'S STATEMENT
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(6) OF THE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT



I, Diane E. Fletcher, Liquidator of ZELTWIG HOLDING FUND
LTD. HEREBY CERTIFY that the winding up and dissolution of
ZELTWIG HOLDING FUND LTD. has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.
Dated the 4th day of January 2005.

DIANE E. FLETCHER
Liquidator


ARASR GARDENS


Ardastra Gardens
requires

PART-TIME

CASHIER


Duties include monitoring the front
gate, running the snack bar and also
the gift shop.


Apply in writing
(NO phone calls)


Curator .
Ardastra Gardens
PO.Box N-4882
Nassau, Bahamas
LkkAAAi kk iAlAkkAAA,


PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS

VACANCY NOTICE


OPERATIONS MANAGER


Pepsi-Cola Bahamas is seeking application from suitably qualified
individuals to fill the position of Operations Manager. The position
oversees daily beverage production, maintenance, quality control and
logistics operations to ensure maximum productivity and profitability.

Successful applicant must have knowledge and experience in a
manufacturing environment preferably, or within the Food & Beverage
industry. A minimum of an Associate Degree and at least five years
supervisory experience with a proven record of strong mechanical
problem solving skills, communication skills, and interpersonal skills.

Please send resume to: Human Resources Manager
P.O.Box N-3004
Nassau, Bahamas


A rI4appe h.t Scho.

S' 3 A Ministry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
P.O. Box AB20210, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas


A now accepting app cations Ar


7Peadee Po4moa


*. BJC/BGCSE Literature, Music,
Spanish, Math, History, Office
Procedures, French, Science, Language



for the school year



January 2005

Applicants must be Born Again Christians and adhere to the
Statement of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel.
Teachers must also have at least a Bachelor's Degree in Education or
Teacher's Certificate and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident
of the Bahamas with work status.
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the school office at
Telephone 242 367-4777 or fax 242 367-5777 or email
rainbow@batelnet.bs

We use the A Beka Book Curriculum which emphasizes Christian
values as well as a very high standard of education and is approved by
the Bahamas Ministry of Education.
We seek to train the mind, gruide the person, and love the
personality of each child.


Sia44 a doas t44e44 apaie"& Oald. 2 ,76*a4 2:Is


1
4







1


THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE








E 4B T, J


Laws (From page 1B) Hotel (From page 1B)


the UK legislation certain types of contract domestic contracts;
insurance; land, securities and guarantees; employment; and con-
sumers as suppliers are excluded from falling under its provisions.
As a result, the Bahamian private sector is recommending that this
nation's Bill follow the same course.
The private sector review said: "If we are to introduce an Act of
this nature, surely the intent must be to enact legislation that is not
out of date before it is a part of our laws. Our recommendation is
that the Unfair Terms Consumer Contracts Regulations of Great
Britain, including exclusions, be considered for enactment in the
Bahamas."
A key private sector concern is that the Bill's Clause 8 is retroac-
tive, saying it "shall apply to all contracts entered into before, on or
after" it comes into law.
Instead, the private sector is recommending that this clause be
changed so that the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Bill
only applies to contracts entered into "on or after" it is enacted into
law.
Failure to amend Clause 8, the private sector warns, could pro-
duce a "dramatic effect" on the Bahamian business community.
Insurance companies were cited as being especially concerned,
since they are excluded under the UK legislation because insurance
contracts are entered into in 'utmost good faith'.
The private sector review said the Bill's definition of 'unfair
terms' was too subjective and left decisions open to "political
whim". It argued that the definition was an attempt to quantify
Common Law, and created powers that were "far too broad" and
could lead to abuses.
The review also recommended removing Clause seven (3), which
deals with the prevention of the continued use of unfair terms in a
consumer contract, on the grounds that it gave the responsible
minister rights which were exclusive to the courts.
Issue was also taken with Clause seven (7), which states that the
"Minister may arrange for the dissemination in such and manner as
he considers appropriate of such information and advice concern-
ing the operation of this Act as may appear to him to be expedient
to give to the public and to all persons likely to be affected by this
Act.
The private sector recommended that this clause either be
removed or altered to allow the minister to be sued for libel, argu-
ing: "If this means the Minister can make public pronouncements
on the legality of a contract term he should be open to a libel law-
suit if proven wrong by the court."
Apart from the Chamber of Commerce, other organizations
involved in the review included the Bahamas Employers Confed-
eration, the Bahamas Hotel Association, the Insurance Institute of
the Bahamas, the Bahamas Manufacturers Representatives &
Wholesale Association, the Small Business Association, the
Bahamas General Insurance Association, the Bahamas Motor
Dealers Association and Amnesty International.










THIS JOB AT



COULD BE




Ardastra Gardens is looking for an energetic, reliable,
Speople-oriented candidate to fill our TOUR
REPRESENTATIVE position on the Prince George
Dock. This position is part-time, requires flexible hours
Sand owning your own transportation is a must. Interest
in working with small, manageable animals and basic
computer knowledge is desirable but not necessary.
Salary is negotiable and based on experience.

Please send your application to
Sthe attention of the Curator, Ms.
Robyn Howard at P.O.Box N-4882
or deliver it to the admissions gate -1
at Ardastra Gardens.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.




TRADEINVEST ASSET
MANAGEMENT LTD.
A private Wealth Management Company and
medium-sized Family Office
Has an opening for an

ASSISTANT VICE
PRESIDENT ADMINISTRATION
Applicants must:
Be a qualified attorney, however, LLB or other law degree holders
will also be considered.
Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services
in any of the areas of trust, banking or investments.
Have the ability to draft or review sometimes complex legal
documents relating to special projects and to confidently
communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.
Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project,
coordinating its various parts and managing the team associated
with the same.
Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary
structures.
Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a
basic understanding of investment and financial transactions.
Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant
supervision.
Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.


ery of building materials, with
supplies diverted elsewhere due
to the heavy demand.
The designer materials used
to establish the resort as one of
the most luxurious on Grand
Bahama had made it more dif-
ficult to improve on what had
previously been in place during
the reconstruction.
But Mr Kramm said had it
not been for the second hurri-
cane, Jeanne, the resort would
have opened on January 1. The
75-slip marina suffered little
damage and was open on a lim-
ited basis.
However, Old Bahama Bay
officials had decided not to turn
the reservation system on until
they were completely sure all
the necessary supplies and
materials were be in place to
have the resort fully opera-
tional.
Despite the chaos created by
the hurricanes and the tempo-
rary gap in vistor numbers, Mr
Kramm said: "The Bahamas is
so well respected as a destina-
tion it will quickly rebound. I
think the first month occupancy
will be up and down, but then
stabilise as the season enters it
full swing."
With a number of new pack-
ages expected to greet visitors in
2005, Mr Kramm said one of
the initial experiences will
include an 'Explore Grand


Bahama' getaway that will
involve ties with another local
resort, Pelican Bay.
The package, which includes
a rental car, is aimed at helping
first time and return visitors
experience the widest range of
experiences the island has to
offer from a strong city envi-
ronment, with lots of shopping
and attractions, to destinations
a little more remote and slower-
paced that offer the feel of a
Family Island experience.
Beyond the resort facility,
Old Bahama Bay has a real
estate development arm that
offers single family homes and
condominiums, and is expect-
ed to include aspects of time-
share and fractional ownership
in the future. The property cur-
rently has an informal arrange-
ment in regard to timeshare
exchanges.
"In addition to restoration
efforts, we've advanced plans
to expand private ownership in
terms of land for sale and home
lots for sale, and we've com-
mitted to upgrades on the resort
experience that includes the
pool and beach, food and bev-
erage and entertainment activi-
ties," Mr Kramm said.
With a staff complement of
120 pre-hurricane, Mr Kramm
said officials were currently
evaluating the number that will
be needed once the resort re-


Professional assistance is foremost in having your special projects and
reports completed.... typeset, edited, professionally presented/bound in a
timely manner. Complement the efficiency of your services today!

Contact Copy & Design 242-427-9100



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that OVENS ALTIDOR, HOPE
TOWN, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NQTICE is hereby given that PIATRICK, GSTAYE GOLDENN
'ISLES ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Mirfister responsible for Natioiialify ahd Cifierihhipfbr
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not ber granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of DECEMBER, 2004 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GECSSION JONNASSAINT,
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.







ANSBACHER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Ansbacher in the Bahamas invites applications from
qualified individuals for:

INVESTMENT SERVICES MANAGER

Salary + Banking benefits + Performance Based
Incentive Scheme

Suitable candidates will have managed, acquired
and advised investment portfolios for at least 5
years. Core competencies will be the management
of a diverse range of investment portfolios, a strong
knowledge of diverse investment products and the
ability to generate new investment/ banking accounts
utilizing Ansbacher's established global distribution
network.

The degree individual will benefit from a
background in economics or finance and a CFA/
MBA will be advantageous. Excellent
communication skills, analytical skills and team
commitment are required.

Contact:

Human Resource Manager,
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O.Box N-7768,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Fax: 325-0524


opens. He said a deadline, ini-
tially slated for January 7, but
expected to be pushed back,
had been identified for employ-
ees to indicate whether they
want to come back to the resort.
Mr Kramm encouraged
employees to contact the prop-
erty as soon as possible, saying
he was aware that five staff
members had already indicat-
ed they were not going to
return.
With an aggressive growth
strategy that will see the prop-
erty double in size over the next
seven years, Mr Kramm said he
anticipates additional employ-
ees will be hired in the short to
medium term.
Meanwhile, employees that
were unable to work because
their normal jobs were impact-
ed by the storms were offered
alternate positions in the clean-
up process and contracting
phase.
Mr Kramm said some of the
management team was retained
on either a part-time or full time
basi,s and staff members that
worked in the marina's sales
team and in marketing were
kept busy during the entire peri-
od preparing for the re-open-
ing.
Of the line staff, some 25 per
cent were able to take advan-
tage of the work offered dur-
ing the clean up and contracting
process. Resort officials were
also able to assist a number of
employees to advance their lev-
el of training by getting alter-


nate positions in both Bahamas
and US-based resorts. A num-
ber of employees also left the
company completely when they
were fortunate enough to find
part-time and full-time job
opportunities outside the island.
Mr Kramm said an employee
entertainment troupe was cre-
ated that took part in a live
nativity scene and Christmas
show, and a group of 15 stayed
busy participating in the West
End Love Train, which toured
Florida raising money for hur-
ricane victims in'a show called,
A Salute to Motown.
Among the troupe's perfor-
mances was the Annual Inter-
national Boat Show in Florida,
where they earned some
$10,000 for relief efforts in
Grand Bahama.


To advertise in

The Tribune

call 322-1986


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)

HAWKE SERVICES S.A.
IBC N 46,934 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
International Business Companies Act N'46 of 2000, HAWKE SERVICES S.A.
is in Dissolution.
Any person having a Claim against the above-named Company is required on or
before the 12th January 2005 to send their name, address and particulars of their
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approved.
Rosana Hollins of 2B Mansion House, 143 Main Street, Gibraltar is the Liquidator,
of HAWKE SERVICES S.A..





WANTED

One Assistant Manager for an OBU. Job would
require complete control of Back Office Operations
and Compliance functions. Experience in AS 400
accounting system and SWIFT essential. Knowledge
of Hindi required. Monthly salary USD 1956/-. Fax
resume to 1-242-326-3969. Mail P.O.Box N-3118,
Nassau, The Bahamas


Large firm of Insurance Agents &
Brokers is presently considering
applications for the Family Island for



Branch Manager


Candidates should have:


completed the ACII


7 to 10 years experience in general
insurance


Excellent management skills


Strong communication skills


The successful candidate will receive


an excellent benefits


package.


If you are interested in the pursuance
of an exciting career, please submit
your resume, in confidence, to the
following by January 10, 2005 to:


c/o DA. 13344
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


Successful candidate will work directly with the President of
Tradelnvest in the management of complex private fiduciary
arrangements. Responsibilities include regular contact with overseas
affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals,
as well as legal counsel and advisors.
Applications may be delivered by hand and marked Private and
Confidential to:
The President-
TradeInvest Asset Management Ltd.
West Building,
Lyford Manor, Lyford Cay,
P.O. Box N-7776 (Slot 193)
New Providence, Bahamas
Applications must be received by 10th January 2005.


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNE











Fast track guidelines



for investment funds




Published by regulator


Guidelines that will regulate
the fast tracking of applications
for the licensing of investment
funds that target accredited
investors have been published
by the Securities Commission
of the Bahamas (SCB), it was
announced yesterday.
The fast track process, which
provides for approval within 72
hours of receipt of a complete
appliaction, has been facilitated
by the elimination of an exten-
sive due diligence exercise


undertaken in regular applica-
tions. While due diligence will
still be undertaken, it will now
take place following the granti-
ng of the licence, as is the prac-
tice in several competing juris-
dictions.
According to the Commis-
sion, the investment funds that
are covered by the guidelines
target investors who are expect-
ed to be knowledgeable of the
industry and capable of con-
ducting their own due diligence,


and on that basis, are believed
to require a reduced level of
scrutiny by the regulator. The
due diligence process is aimed
at ensuring that the applicant
and all related parties are fit
and proper for the performance
of their duties.
The guidelines are compre-
hensive and cover the various
requirements for licensing of
these investment funds and the
applications process. Specific
guidance is provided regarding


the nature and quality of docu-
ments required, as well as what
due diligence information will
be necessary on parties related
to the investment fund. Details
on the proper completion of the
application form are also pro-
vided. Once fully followed, the
guidelines are expected to prove
an essential element toward the
successful and timely consider-
ation of applications.
The guidelines can be viewed
on the SCB's website.


Hillary Deveaux, acting executive director
of the Securities Commission of the Bahamas

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WALNER LAMBA, FAITH AVE
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6th day of JANUARY, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

B & LE INTERNATIONAL LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisionsof Section 137(8)of the
International'Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 22nd December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock"
Liquidator
of
B & LE International Ltd.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HARVEY SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 20th December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
HARVEY SHIPPING LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HUMPHREY SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-namhed Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 20th December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
HUMPHREY SHIPPING LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

F.I.S.A. LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 22nd December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
F.I.S.A. LIMITED

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HORATIO SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 20th December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
HORATIO SHIPPING LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HENRY SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 20th December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
HENRY SHIPPING LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

DMIR INTERNATIONAL LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 22nd December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
DMIR International Ltd.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HARRY SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 20th December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
HARRY SHIPPING LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HUBERT SHIPPING LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that'the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 20th December, 2004.



Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
HUBERT SHIPPING LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

EASTERN ESTATES AND FINANCE
COMPANY LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 22nd December, 2004.


Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
EASTERN ESTATES AND FINANCE COMPANY
LIMITED

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

P & CD INTERNATIONAL LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 22nd December, 2004.



SLynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
P & CD International Ltd.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


Profits outstrip market


ag a- L dO -
-.P- -

a- -b



@aAvai

Av a


______ -- a e i


'.'Coyrigted:Material;


b -


label


--5

-1 -


40 4owl-qmm -


ISyndicated ,Content


le from Commercial News' Prov
_.. -_ W- f- -w -
-lf as .~
Ab -0 a * w__=Now~*
4M 4b 40_up_4=40 0=1
~ .- - ~-w- aA
0 0 4 w _ -
-.-40a anp4


dm s %v


410 0 ae odmb




-M* m dme 0 plbm
M 4= 14
p 0 an-ow
do=a
.08m wf~

Fies


MANAGEMENT TRAINEE
POSITIONS

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited, operators of City
Markets, Nassau has openings for the position of
Management Trainee.

The successful applicant will have at least 2 years experience
in retail management and 2 years experience in
merchandising, buying or marketing. The applicant will
have strong inter-personal skills, is a self-motivator and has
effective supervisory skills. The completion of secondary
school with a minimum of 3 BGCSE and some computer
literacy is required. The position requires the ability to work
a flexible schedule including weekends and holidays.

Salary and benefits will be commensurate with experience
and qualifications.

Please send a covering letter and resume together with
references from past employers, a picture and police
background check to the Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N-3738, Nassau, Bahamas.

No Phone Calls Please
SOnly qualified applicants will be contacted.


Class-action lawsuit



targets major airlines

ft de-w GPM -C- SB


- .4


.-ND a p- p4b
-NWq to- f-am

*0f S41 a b -- w

aw0-bNw-fq
-

*- -4111 "
-~ ~ *. m.40
-du -w
~ ~ ~ I op 0*
-mom% MW4M


4=0


- C


- twft cmm
_____ S.. ow4b -


asm-ow-NN 4-4w

OfwpS M-odo
m,- ao m, wwo


d-aa -aMM0Mb-

do- -400



aw -



* 0110411
MW -bdla, I P4
"a a w M

*f-a 0 f cWDOP4


4001.0

"N-- ~ -E *,lam
.gllqp 0 M 0N 0
wm4ko-0- -vdg 0
-. M--&4000
ft. 40. d

*nm a



db- 14- 7 -

too- -w-m



41= 4111 ~ ~ 0
* *wg
49DO a*
So400 4D *


Need to save?


Cable Beach: 327-5170
Frederick Street: 325-8591
Mackey Street: 393-8270
Paradise Island: 363-4225
Wuiff Road: 323-7459
Freeport: 352-6676


Michael saves with British American Bank
because they give the highest rate available.
Michael gets more interest on his savings
than savers with other banks.
Whatever your savings goals, reach them with
British American Bank. We offer several high
interest paying savings accounts and CDs.
Call or visit British American Bank today.
We WANT to help you save money.
We give you STRAIGHT talk.
QUICK answers.
COMPETITIVE rates.
FREE Internet Banking.
wwwbritishamericanbank.com
We're the bank for ALL your needs.

L f BRITISH
Nl AMERICAN BANK
WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE
British American Bank. A Fidelity Company
wssssm


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE





STAFF ACCOUNTANT
FINANCE DIVISION
A vacancy exists in the Finance Division for a Staff Accountant.

Applicants should have a minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounting in addition
to a professional accountancy qualification (ACCA, CPA, etc.) with 3-5 years
experience.

The successful candidate will be required to:

Assist in the management of the Finance Department which primarily
include: the preparation of disbursements; management of vendor accounts;
and management of payroll
Analyzed monthly financial information and reports
Evaluate and summarize the Corporation's current and project financial
position
Ensure timely reporting on specific and general departmental responsibilities;
and any other duties as assigned
Monitors compliance with generally accepted accounting principles

The incumbent should also have:

Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Strong analytical abilities and skills
*Effective leadership skills
Good time management, and
SStrong interpersonal and human relation skills

Interested persons should apply by completing an application form, attaching a resume
and contact information for three professional references to: ATTN. Manager-Human
Resources & Training. Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
P.O.Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas on or before Monday January 10, 2005.


BUSINESS


q


4b I


4=NNW


e


4100 -


--







THEICS T N IT


-~ w- -


-


i~
Ad


I'


Iwor


S-v
-WEUM9m


Cop


SyI

le.from


qw 4
Ob~


yri


am-a
*%. i


m


U


0_1___ b R......- -f
0 do-

.d Maera


indicated Content


,Commercia


-j


*-mob- -


4m 4nb 0


-4b.
0-
-- S


ph -
*
.4
a


News Pro


~. .0 ~
- ~ 0 *
* 0-


KTS


I


:0

ividers"




IL-


0 *a*m

0 -


-
~ -
r


LA


MXA


..mP3 r -


- .4


w -


S -oo .- .
ab 4 ~e00




Availab


I t" T I


THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2004, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


- -


am -OI







PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2004


> Industry Ethj ::
Mark Bridges,
Farrer & Co.

> Tax
Richard Hay.
Stikeman Elliott LLP


Katie Booth,
Rothschild Trust Co.


Philip Marcovici,
Baker & McKenzie

> 6q& .*

Barry Rider,
Beachcroft Wansbroughs


Jeffrey Everett,
Templeton Global Advisors Ltd.


Robert Lawrence,
Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP

> Regulation
Michael Foot,
Central Bank of The Bahamas


Ula. lie


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


"'


ilia
-Zvi


inm gstry


r


: 4 d ,$ a


.A Ff" CO.f .--,,RENCE VV'"I:;~~g;


Fo;

Association of International Banks & Trust Companies in
The Bahamas (AlB7)



The Central Bank ofThe Bahamas

Platinum

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited



Cable Bahamas Ltd



Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Higgs & Johnson

Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch Private Bank & Trust Ltd.

Lynx Wealth Management Systems

The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company (Bahamas) Ltd.

The Private Trust Corporation Limited
A

Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB)

Society ofTrust and Estate Practitioners (STEP)



Founding Partner

ASSOCIATION OF
INTERNATIONAL

AIBTBANKS &TRUST
=I COMPANIES IN THE BAHAMAS


LASIF f,
TITLE
FIRM


CITY.
'OUN
POSTA-l" CODE
BL PHt'
HOM.E,;:DNE
FAX


Are yo an emloyeeof a frm whch is r, o one o ffi


If' $700 1- per person



How ai-e you C Card

For payment by credit card visit our website at

Forpayment by make, payable to Tho Nassau Conferenc.e and rnail with a 0, Of YOLW
registration form to:
Anastacii Johnson
The Nassau Conferenci
Associadofi offficernational Banks Vrrust C01I)p,,jilie$ ill Tile Baham,-, ,
.1`0, Boy
I MmssauTho. Bahamas





THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 9B


-opyrightedI


-nSyndicatedc


Available from Commercial


News provides


South Africaedge




closer to victory




over England


.,NNW
-..- --m
mw4 mu


0
-

0~


* ______
0~ S
a.0 -

- 0


0 -
- ~. 0.
0
0~Q 0 ~ -


- a ~ a f
a.. 0


* -
*
* -- 0 --


0 0 -
- -
S - -
- 0 -
.~- *~
m a a


S

0 5-
- .5


4b


-RON


moo-~


* -- ~


-


d ab a -
-do.
.w duba


---nu




- ___ .ao


_ _


TRIBUNE SPORTS


* *41


,,






TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B. THURSDAY. JANUARY 6, 2005


Wishing for a Bahamas





on top of its game in 2005


* By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

THE New Provi-
dence Volleyball Asso-
ciation's New Year's
'Spike Fest' which was
set to kick-off this Fri-
day has been cancelled
after the New Year's
day Junkanoo parade
was pushed back a
week.
Officials of the asso-
ciation were looking
into postponing the
tournament until next
weekend, but say that
the annual tournamen-
t's concept will be lost.
The 'spike fest' was
designed to give stu-
dent-athletes studying
aboard an opportunity
to play against teams
in the NPVA's regular
season.
According to Paul
Farquharson, NPVA's
president, the post-
ponement of the
Junkanoo parades
played a huge factor in
the cancellation.

Parades
"So many persons
who play volleyball
are involved in both
Junkanoo parades, we
had to take all of this
into consideration
when we met," said
Farquharson.
"I know the college
players look forward
to this tournament,
and some of the regu-
lar season players
were excited about
playing after we had to
shorten our regular
season.
"This is a big disap-
pointment for us in the
association, because
we really wanted to
promote the sport, try-
ing to get the public
interested again."
Farquharson
revealed that the tour-
nament would have
been a "smashing"
success if the parades
weren't pushed back.

Majority
He said that the
association tried as
hard as they could to
host the tournament
but was sadden when
he learned that majori-
ty of the college play-
ers will be returning to
school after the
parade.
"I was sadden to
learn that some of the
college players would
be heading back to
school, we looked at
other avenues, howev-
er, postponing the
tournament was the
best alternative," said
Farquharson.
"We have several
other tournaments
planned for this year,
our corporate league is
still going to be in full
swing, as we look
towards starting this
league earlier.
"I must admit that
the volleyball season
has been receiving one
disappointment after
another but that will


make all of us
stronger.
"We are really trying
to build the sport, so
this year the public
can look at a full year
of volleyball. We invite
you to play."
The NPVA will be
taking volleyball into
the community start-
ing first with the
Urban Renewal Pro-
jects.


H APPY New Year.
Thank God that we
made it through.
Through his infinite mercies,
God has allowed us to see the
dawning of a new year, one that
I hope will be filled with a lot of
outstanding performances in
sporting circles and less con-
troversy off the playing field.
I pray that we all enjoy
peace, harmony and a healthy
life this year.
I always would like to make a
few wishes. Whether they come
true or not is up to the good
Lord. But I will put them out
there anyhow.
I wish that the sport of sail-
ing will, once and for all, come
together every fragmented
piece.
It's a much more beautiful
sight on the water when all of
the boats are competing on an
even keel.
I wish that every other
organisation out there that has
any gripes or differences, will
come around the table and iron
them out.
It would be a pity to see that
our athletes are once again
thrust into the background
because of disputes at the


STUBBS
.' : .. -..2 .'.. ..


OPINION


administrative level that should
really not exist.
I wish that, as he prepares
to return to the Atlanta Braves'
organisation, Angelo 'Jello'


Burrows will have such a fan-
tastic year that he will eventu-
ally break into the Major
League, even if he has to do it
as a pitcher instead of an out-
fielder.
We've waited long enough
for the fifth Bahamian to play
at the highest level of the sport
and Burrows has been knock-
ing on that door in the Braves'
minor league organisation.
I wish that this year we will
also see our fifth Bahamian to
play in the National Basketball
Association.
Anwar 'Slim' Ferguson came
close last year when he made
the Sacramento Kings' pre-sea-
son roster and got the chance to
travel to China with them. It
would be nice to see him get
picked up as a free agent with
any of the 30 teams in the
league.
I wish that Devard Darling
will get healthy enough to get
back on the field this year and
make some historic catches for
the Baltimore Ravens.
But with the transformation
that's going to take place with
the Miami Dolphins, it would-
n't be a bad idea to see Dar-
ling wearing their uniform.
I wish that the Bahamas


Associations' hopes





for the New Year


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SPORTING associations throughout the
country agreed that 2004 was a tremendous suc-
cess and are all looking forward to continue
bridging the islands through sports.
With the success athletes had on the interna-
tional and local arena, presidents are hoping to
establish the Bahamas as a force to reckoned
with.
BOXING Wellington Miller: "2004 was a
great year for amateur boxing, and we are antic-
ipating an even greater year in 2005.
"We were able to secure a scholarship in the
sport for Taureano Johnson, the first boxing
scholarship in the history of the sport. This
helped to open up doors for the federation and
the other boxers, helping to motivate them to
train and work harder.
"The Carifta games were a tremendous suc-
cess for the Bahamas once again, Taureano was
able to secure the best boxer in the English
speaking Caribbean title. He and a few others
later attended a 'box-off' for Olympic games. He
just missed qualifying for the games, losing by
two points on some technical errors.
"Our goal for the 2005 year is to prepare the
boxers from now for the 2008 Olympic games.
We are now working on our calendar, but I am
sure that the 2005 year will be an exciting one, as
we plan on inviting down several teams for
bouts.
"We also were able to promote the sport in
the local arena, some of the clubs held several
tournaments bringing the sport alive again."
TRACK AND FIELD- Desmond Bannis-
ter: "To my knowledge this was the greatest
year in track and field for the Bahamas. We
were able to capture our first individual gold
and bronze on the track from two outstanding
athletes, this really made a difference.
"What was particularly special was the fact
that the performances at the Olympic games
captured the eyes of all Bahamians everywhere.
"Once again we came out of an Olympic year
broke, so now we go into another year where we
have to send our athletes to the World Cham-
pionships. I am enthused about the accom-
plishments and what the athletes have achieved
but the funding for sports in the country is
almost a joke and can be disappointing to the
athletes.
"We are all thankful for those who did give,
even during the slow months. When we have
success like we have had this year we should
be able to let that turn into financial support.
"I can't leave out our junior athletes, they
were exceptional, representing their country to
the highest level. Persons like Grafton Ifill,
Aymara Albury and the many other junior ath-
letes are coming up in the ranks, these persons
will make their country proud this is what
boosts our confidence as we go into this year."
BASEBALL Greg Burrows: "As a newly
formed federation I believe we had an excel-
lent year, we were able to establish some long
lasting relationships with the Minister of Youth
Sports and Culture, bringing the sport back into
the limelight.
"We expanded on the relationship with the
other leagues, so overall I must say that the year


wet pus.
a "Thi eaw re

Puerto Rico and the hosting of this tournament
was an excellent exercise, it give our junior ath-
letes something to look forward 1o as weibead
into another year.
"Our national junior championships was great,
and as we move onto an election year I pray
that whoever is elected can continue on the
newly set tradition.
"So far we've seem the formation of a new
league in Eleuthera and Long Island is estab-
lishing a new league. There are two. leagues in
Grand Bahama.
"We are going to take the new year slow, but
we do have some tournaments planned, and we
are working closely to hosting several college
teams."
SPECIAL OLYMPICS Basil Christie:
"There is always special success in the Special
Olympics Association, we are filled with great
joy from the members.
"This was a slow year for us, we were able to
produce our fifth book, which highlighted the
year and we are looking forward to another suc-
cessful year.
"Our members weren't able to compete in
the annual national championships because of
the two hurricanes that hit the Bahamas, but
this year we are hoping to host several fun days
for them.
"For the first time the athletes were able to
travel to Jamaica to compete in the first annual
Caribbean games, and this year we have the
world games, a championship we are planning to
attend."
GOLF Neville Adderley: "This was an
incredible year for golf, our biggest highlights
were the hosting of the CACG tournament and
the success of our athletes.
"This year we are planning on hosting the
biggest Caribbean championships in May, a
tournament, which will have over 250 partici-
pants.
"We were we extremely excited about hosting
the CACG, the members of the association are
boasting of the accomplishment, especially after
we had to raise the money ourselves.
"This will be a busy year for us as we get set to
send a team into the Dominican Republic in
July and the 49th senior golf tournament in
August. We will also host the four course ratters
and will be sending someone away for training to
be certified. The certification will help us deal
with rules on the international and local level."
REGATTA Phillip McPhee: "Our
philosophy for the 2005 year is unity and
strength, as we look back at another successful
year.
"This was a very successful year, the actual
sailing on the water went very well, despite the
hurricane which cancelled some regattas.
"An introduction of new regattas brought
much excitement to the field as we tried to con-
tinue with the idea of introducing younger
sailors, building new boats.
"Georgetown has a new A class boat and C
boats, the building process has also slowed down
tremendously, so we are trying to encourage
the younger boat builders so they can keep it
alive.
"We have brought back togetherness of slope
sailing and want to bring it to the Olympic sail-
ing level."


Lawn Tennis Association will
assemble a solid core of young
talented players for the Davis
Cup tie this year.
We're in the American Zone
II and while we could use the
experience of veteran Mark
Knowles, I think we now have
the potential to get back to
zone one with the young guns. I
just think we need to give them
a chance to prove themselves.
I wish that Mark Knowles,
instead, will continue to focus
on the achievements he's mak-
ing on the ATP tour.
He and Daniel Nestor have
already won two of the four
Grand Slam titles. It would be
good to see them pull off the
French and Wimbledon titles
to complete the circle.
I wish that the Bahamas
Associations of Athletic Asso-
ciation's hosting of the Central
American and Caribbean
Championships will be a huge
success.
It would be, even more of a
thrill for the Bahamian public if
the BAAA can finally assemble
a women's 4 x 400 relay team
with the likes of Tonique
Williams-Darling, Christine
Amertil, Debbie Ferguson and
the Rigby twin sisters Tamara
and Tavara going on to win
the gold.
I wish that this will a ban-
ner year for the return of some
of our superstars in track and


field like Chandra Sturrup,
Sevatheda Fynes and Avard
Moncur.
They have all been sidelined
with injuries that have pre-
vented from performing to the
best of their abilities. The CAC
Championships and the IAAF
World Championships in
Helsinki, Finland could be their
chance to shine.
I wish for this to be the year
that we will finally get to see
the top notch professional box-
ing show that we have waited
for a long time in the Bahamas.
It would be good if First
Class Promotions could give us
the dream triple header on the
same card featuring Renaldo
'the Terminator' Minus versus
Sherman 'the Tank' Williams,
'Marvellous' Marvin Smith vs
Freeman 'the Natural' Barr and
Quincy 'Thrill-A-Minute' Pratt
vs Meacher 'Pain' Major.
I also wish, sincerely, that
God would grant Deborah
Dean, a rich, healthy life.
She is the mother of Chan-
dra Sturrup and is seeking
$100,000 to assist her in her
medical expenses to undergo
two separate surgeries in the
United States, starting next
month. My prayer is that those
of us with the financial gain can
come to her rescue before the
month is over.
Those are just some of
the items on my wish list for
2005.


kM


I I


112






0~


80)

z










E
4 )








E
0'

0


**A



> -4M


I

















TEXT


MESSAGING


is now available
as a paid service.
As of December 15th, 2004
QuikCell and Post Paid TDMA customers who
are currently testing SMS Text Messaging
Service need to apply between December 15th
and January llth 2005 in order to keep the
service.

PLEASE NOTE: Customers who do not apply
for this service will not be able to utilize
the Text Messaging feature as of
January 15th, 2005. A $10 activation fe
will be charged if service is deactiva













TEXT MESSAGING

Application Form
You may hand deliverto Drop Boxes in New Providence and Grand Bahama CTOs or fax registration
form to 393-9008/9 in New Providence. In Grand Bahama (242) 351-7682.
Last Nam e:.............................. First Nam e: .......................................
Telephone:(H) ....... ..............(W )............ ...................................
Cellular Num ber: ......................Em ail:........... .................................
SMS Text Messaging Packages
Packages Monthly Includes Additional
Light $5.00 100 text messages $.05 per message
Basic $14.99. 500 text messages $.03 per message
Premium $19.99 1000 text message $.02 per message
For more information call: (242) 302-7550 (New Providence) (242)352-5555 (Grand Bahama)
Family Island customers please contactyour local BTC Wireless office.

Customer Signature Date
Billing will commence on January 15th 2005. However, subscribers who exceed the Text Messages beyond their selected packages
may be charged an overage fee during the sign up period.
Note: All phones may not be able to send text messages. To determine if if your phone is able to send a text message please follow these steps. 1. From handset
menu select messages 2. Scroll to write or create messages (if this option appears the handset is capable of sending a text message.)


-yplSmpfi


I











J


We keep you in touch
with the world









THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


...- ..m7% -r'- va inal"


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE first fight of 2005 is
promising to be an action
packed event, as First Class
Promotions invite several
boxers from the United
States to take on some top
names in the Bahamas.
The fight, which is
scheduled for Saturday 8th
January, at the Sir Kendal
GL Isaac Gym is set to
have six bouts on the bill,
with the main and co-main
events fighting 12 rounds.
Fighting in the main
event for the Bahamian
Junior Middleweight title
is "Bahamian Bronze
Bomer" Jerome Ellis tak-
ing on Wilson "Kid Won-
der" Theophilie in the co-
main event, Meacher Major
"Pain" will go up against
one of two fighters from
the United States. Jer-
maine Mackey will also
fight one of the American
fighters.
Promoter Michelle
Minus said: "We are really
expecting a great showing
from all of the boxers, this
is the first fight for the year
so it is going to be great.

Brawl
"We are expecting the
main event to be a big
brawl, both of the boxers
were training hard over the
holiday for this fight.
"They've been trying to
get into the ring with each
other for like eight years.
They are looking forward
to this fight and have sent
harsh words and warnings
to each other."
This year's card will fea-
ture two boxers who will
be making their return to
the ring: Butler "Kid"
Freeport and Duran "Hard
.Mouth" Miller.
On the undercard will be
Dencil "Death" Miller fac-
ing off with Duran Miller;
Jerry "Big Daddy" Butler
against Freeport and
Richard "Hammer Pitt
going head-to-head with
David "Pace setter" Wal-
lace.
The winners from the
fight between Pitt and Wal-
lace will go up against
Major, a fight that has been
brewing up for a long time.
Minus added: "If you
look at the card you will
see how exciting and
intense the matches are.
All the fighters are ready
to step into the ring to
prove who is the best.
"I know sometimes the
fighters from the United
States fail to turn up, but
it is really not First Class
promotions fault.
"What happens some-
times is the fighters get
injured during training -
this happens to us so they
are really not at fault, we
understand their plight."


Ut


N


FULLY recuperated from his month long break o'er the Christmas
holiday, Mark Knowles is back in training in preparation for the long haul
for the 2005 ATP tennis tour.
Back in Los Angeles. California where he's training with his coach,
American Scott Da\is. Knowles said both he and his Canadian partner
Daniel Nestor decided to skip the first week of competition.
"We didn't play the first week because we had a short off season, having
played the World Championships late in the .ear, so we wanted to come out
to LA and practice before we "ent back on the tour," said Knowxles from
LA.
Coming off their banner year as the No.1 ranked team in the world,
Knowles and Nestor skipped the Qatar Ex\xonMobil Open in Doha where
they have %\on the title three times 1996. 2000 and 2001.
Instead they will go to S.dney. Australia to play in the Medibank Inter-
national that runs from January 10-16. They are scheduled to lea'e LA on
Thursday night to go "Down Under."
After Sydney, they will travel to Melbourne to pla. in the Australian
Open, the first Grand Slam of the Year. Knowles and Nestor won their first
Grand Slam title at the Australian Open in 2002 when they finished as the
number one team in the world.
They are coming off the No.1 spot in the world last sear after they won
their second Grand Slam at the US Open in Flushing Meadows. New
York.
But Knowles said they're not making the world ranking or winning
grand slam titles a priority this year.

Focus
"We would love to stay at that position and improve our game." he
stressed. "But we won't focus on the rankings. The rankings will come with
the results.
"Like always, we just want to try and win as many tournaments as we can
and improve if we can. That's the most important thing coming off the num-
ber one ranking."
However. Know les admits that. having ended the year at the top. the>
know that they will be the haunted whenever they step out on the court tlus
year.
"They're hungry, so we just ha\e to be ready when everybody plays
their best tennis against us." he stated. "That's all we are trying to prepare
oursel es tor."
\While Nestor spent his time in Canada. Know\ les said he had an awesome
time over the last month here at home.
"I don't get to be home that often, so it's really nice to be back home
and getting to talk to everybody. and everybody congratulating you.," he not-
ed.
"So being home w\as really special. I did the same usual stuff to take mi
mind of tennis and played golf. I also formed a relationship with the Aba-
co folks at Winding Bay. I went down there and relaxed a bit. So that "as
fun."
All fun aside, Knowles said he hasn't made an\ decision .et on whether
or not he will suit up to playv hen the Bahamas La" n Tennis Association
takes its team to the Netherlands Antilles to pla. in the fast round of the
American Zone II tie in March.
"It's something that I talked to Mar\ Shelley (the BLTA's president)
about, but I need to see what the plans are," Knowles said.
"'Foi me, I just need to see how it works with my schedule I \want to peak
for all of the major tournaments and the Grand Slams. If I do commit to
Da is Cup, I \ant to be a ailable for the entire \ear.
"But if I'm not going to be able to play all of the ties, then I
probably won't commit. I will look at the schedule and really consider
our team.
Knowles said he \ill make a final decision within the next week.


BUSINESS Tcronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY


eleda rorladEl


ihe-award within b iiqOsasr undhm.


Wedlfer:

4 CompetftivePrioing 4 G'eneltliliesmiTns

4 ReiableProducts AuthoredbIawlbTineletacian

* EacIntSee www.micronet.bs


"-WI-









THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


The Conquerors for Christ using


Junkanoo to praise,


worship God


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
Junkanoo for most of us is
considered a cultural
expression. But one group
is re-defining that and using
Junkanoo as a medium for
praise and worship unto God.
At the 2004 Sammy Thompson
Boxing Day Parade held on Satur-
day, The Conquerors for Christ, a B-
category group, paraded onto Bay
Street, and through dance, music and
brightly coloured costumes, the 250-
strong group brought the message of
the church directly to the streets.
Pastor of Creative Christian Arts
Ministries International, Henry Hig-
gins is the leader of this dynamic
group of Christian junkanooers from
various denominations, who paraded
underthe the theme, "Let Everything
That Have Breath Praise the Lord".
According to the group's synopsis
submitted to the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture prior to the
parade, they would come to bring
God's presence at the parade with
praise much more than singing song
but life-changing.
"The word praise is defined as to
show admiration for, to extol or com-
mend or worship of God when
expressed in word or song. All
through the word of God we are com-
manded and requested to give God
praise. It is in our praises that we
receive many answers and break-
throughs in our lives. It is important
that we praise God because he is our
maker, our provider, our sustainer,
our keeper, our healer and our salva-
tion. We come this time to show forth
the presence of God and to bring the
presence of God to our nation, our
city and this parade," according to
the group.
Formed out of a vision that was
given by God, says Pastor Higgins,
The Conquerors for Christ is an
avenue to win souls to God's king-
dom. "Through Junkanoo, we have
been able to pull some of the young
people in the Golden Gates area into
doing something positive instead of
using their time negatively."
The conquerors' shack is located
in the Golden Gates Shopping Cen-
tre, Blue Hill Road and serves as a
place to construct costumes as well
as a ministry station, according to the
pastor.
"In the shack the purpose was to
win souls, and 40 souls were minis-
tered to and were saved. That was
our purpose in the shack. Now, on
Bay Street, our purpose is to offer up
a praise unto the Lord through our
dance, our music, our costume, and
also to be able to minister through
the issuing of tracts. Over 1,000 tracks
were handed out on Saturday morn-
ing (at the parade)," said the pastor.
Partnering with Pastor Higgins, and
serving as the group's co-leader, is
his wife Dr Ann Higgins (nee Peter-
son), a well-known Christian dancer.
In an interview with Tribune Reli-
gion earlier this week, she said that
the formation of the Junkanoo group
was something that the Lord placed in
her husband's heart two or three
years ago, when he was the leader of
the choreographed dancers in the
Shell Saxons Superstars. "He pre-
pared himself to leave by training
people to take over in different areas
that he oversaw in that group. Then


Grupbinschrh esae oth tre


* HENRY HIGGINS, pastor of Creative Christian Arts Ministries International and leader of
The Conquerors for Christ, at the 2004 Sammy Thompson Boxing Day Parade.
(Photo: Down Home Entertainment)


he had a meeting and let them know
that the Lord placed it on his heart to
start a Christian Junkanoo group."
From a need that God placed on
his heart, Conquerors for Christ has
become an avenue for the positive
enrichment of young persons in the
community.
"In our shack, it's an environment
other than what they are used to -
with drinking, smoking. It's a posi-


tive environment where praise and
worship music plays all day,
(JOYFM)101.9 plays, and where fam-
ilies fathers, mothers and children -
can come out," says Dr Higgins.
Since their purpose for going onto
Bay Street is not to compete,
(although they must have impressed
the judges, placing fourth in the B-
category of 10 other groups) the shack
was always open to the public.


Dr Higgins tells the story of how
one young man, among many others
she noted, was ministered to at this
open-shack. He came from another
group, boasting a piece of his cos-
tume and proclaiming how his group
was going to "mash up" the other
groups at the parade. But one of the
members of the group confronted
the young man, explaining that it is
God who gives the gift and therefore


he should acknowledge God with that
gift.
"Then he said, 'boy, I ga' pray to
God to win'. But the minister took
the Bible and showed him what
prayer God wanted to hear from him,
that a prayer of worship unto Him.
He just told him that God wants you
to pray and give your life to Him so
he can use your gift.
"And man, when he found that out,
he was like, 'oh my god, I need y'all to
pray with me'. And so we prayed for
him and the next morning at nine
o'clock he was back in the shack ask-
ing for a costume," an excited Dr Hig-
gins recalled.
According to the Junkanoo leader,
the young man didn't want to return
to an atmosphere where men were
drinking. He was one of the first
members to have his costume com-
plete.
The group is made up of first-time
junkanooers as well as former
junkanooers who became saved at
some point and removed themselves
from Junkanoo, initially believing that
it was unholy for Christians to par-
ticipate, Dr Higgins notes.
And the leaders would find that
these were the sentiments of many inm
the community. The group would:
meet with opposition from many reli-
gious leaders who thought that Chris-
tians taking part in Junkanoo was
completely taboo, Pastor Higgins
notes.
But the Conquerors for Christ feel
t-that they are justified, as.Godis being
praised.
"Well you know as a pastor, I pat-
tern my life after Jesus Christ and if
you read the Bible, Jesus went into
the temple three times, twice he beat
the people out and one time he was
reading the word of God.
"I pattern my life after Jesus Christ
and here I go into the areas where I
come from. I was a person who used
to hang out in nightclubs and dis-
cotheques and parties, and I believe
(that) I am supposed to go back into
those areas and win souls to the king-
dom of God. They won't come into
the four walls of the church, and so I
have to go where they are and use
the avenue that they know so that
they will accept the message.
--So. I haven't changed the message
of salvation. I have just packaged it
differently. And of course there is
opposition. Anything you are doing
for God, there is going to be opposi-
tion. If not, it just ain't right," says
Pastor Higgins.
Tomorrow night, the Christian
group will be back on Bay Street giv-
ing praise to God, this time they are
"Callhng all Nations to Praise Him".
The group will be making a "prophet-
ic declaration" that those nations that
do not praise God will one day praise
Him. And nations that currently
acknowledge Christian beliefs will
continue to do so, Dr Higgins
explains.
The banner will feature flags of the
nations of the world and will depict
Jesus sitting on a throne with the
world in His hand. There will also be
angels around the throne blowing
trumpets.
According to the pastor, the vision
from God is to make the Conquerors
for Christ a group that shares His

See CHRIST, Page 3C


The Tribune


i c I I I Ir II







PAGE 0. THRSDA, JANUARY 62005THEIGIONN


Church Notes


Three-minute s


for


CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, January 9:
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Service
Wednesday, 7:30 pm Bible
Enrichment Session (Teacher:
Minister Deborah McFall)
Friday, 7:30 pm A Night Of
Praise
Saturday. 3 to 5 pm Girls
Brigade

CURRY
MEMORIAL
METHODIST
CHURCH
THE following services will
be held at the church on Zion
Boulevard, South Beach.
January 9,9:15 am Church
School, 10 am Divine Wor-
ship Service with Brother Carl
Knowles, 7 pm Divine
Evening Service with Pastor
Charles Lewis
First Monday of each month,
7:30 pm Men's Ministry, Sec-
ond & Fourth Monday, 7:30 pm
- Women's Ministry
Tuesday (except 2nd), 7:30
pm Bible Study
Thursday, 6:30 pm Music
Ministry Rehearsal
First & Third Friday of each
month, 7 pm Youth Ministry
Saturday, 6:30 am Prayer
Ministry, 2 pm Dance Min-
istry, 3 pm Jr Music Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
January 9,7 am Sung Mass,
10 am Sunday School and
Adult Bible Classes, 11 am -
Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Monday. 6:40 am Mattins


and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pastors'
Training, Laying A Solid Foun-
dation, Adult Band Practice
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrichment
Class, 7 pm Prayer Band and
Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice, 7
pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins and
Mass, 4 pm Confirmation
Classes, 6 pm St Ambrose
Guild, 6:30 pm Christian
Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm -
Youth Alpha (every third Sat-
urday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm Boys
Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm -
Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confessions

EAST
STREET
GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class, 11
am Morning Celebration, 7
pm Communion Service, 8 pm
- 'Jesus, the Light of World'
Radio Programme on ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Midweek
Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Conquerors
for Christ Club (Boys & Girls
Club), 8 pm East Street Youth
Fellowship Meeting
Saturday. 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting


victims of tunami,


nCeopyrighted Matenal


Available froyndicatel ontentws Providers"

Available from Commercial News Providers"


.-:- -- -'" -- ... "







Buy a Large

3-topping pizza,

Sget an order

of 10 Wings

Hfor


$1


95


BISHOP,
STEPHEN
STUBBS
MINISTRIES
THE organisation is sched-
uled to hold the following
events:
January 9 Bishop Antho-
ny Hatcher, of World of Faith
Outreach Christian Centre,
Rockledge, Florida, to preach
at 6 pm.
January 23 Dr Kevin King
to speak during 10 am and .6
pm services.
For further information, vis-
it:
www.restorationoflife.org

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK
YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the 11
am service and the Youth'
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com

CANAAN
BAPTIST
CHURCH
YOU are invited to the fol-
lowing services at the church in
Nassau Village:
Sunday, 11 am and 7:30 pm -
Divine Worship Service
Rev Eugene Bastian is the
senior pastor.

PARISH
CHURCH
OF THE MOST
HOLY TRINITY
THE church at 14 Trinity
Way, Stapledon Gardens, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 7 am The Holy
Eucharist, 9 am The Family
Eucharist, Sunday School, 6:30
pm Praise & Worship/Bible


Study, Evensong & Benedic-
tion
Tuesday, 7:30 pm The
Church At Prayer
Wednesday, 5:30 am Inter-
cessory Prayer, 6:30 am The
Holy Eucharist, 7:30 pm
For further information, call
(242)-328-8677 or visit our web-
site:
www.'holytrinitybahamas.org

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of January 9-15:
Sunday (FEAST:
EPIPHANY I THE BAP-
TISM OF OUR LORD), 7 am
- Sung Mass and Sermon, 10
am Family Eucharist & Holy
Baptism, 6:30 pm Evensong
and Teaching (Topic: What Is
The Bible?)
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM)
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital, 6:30 pm -
Marching and Concert Band
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm Vestry Meet-
ing, 7:30 pm Chorale Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm March-
ing and Concert Band, 7:30 pm
- Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6 am Sunrise Mass
and Breakfast, 7:30 pm Youth
Choir Practice
Saturday, 2 pm Acolytes
Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian
Campbell)

ST MARGARET'S
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Kemp Road
is scheduled to hold the follow-
ing worship services:
Sunday, 7 am Low Mass
and Sermon, 9:30 am Sung
Mass and Sermon, 6:30 pm -
Evensong, Sermon and Bene-
diction

FIRST
HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is


scheduled to hold the follow-"
ing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-,
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship .
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer &S
Praise Service, 7:30 pm Bible.
Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise 8&
Worship Service
* Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30 pm
- Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults
Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Men Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day Ser-
vice

UNITED FAITH
MINISTRIES
INT.
THE church in the Summer
Winds Plaza, Harrold Road, is
scheduled to hold the follow-
ing services:
Sunday, 8 am Morning Glo-
ry Breakthrough Service, 10:30
am Divine Worship Service
(Live broadcast at 11 am on
More 94.9 FM)
Morning Glory Prayer meet-
ing every Wednesday and Sat-
urday at 5 am
Tuesday, 7:30 pm Choir
Rehearsal
Every Wednesday, 7 pm -
Bible Study
Friday, 7 pm Youth Meet-
ing
For further information, e-
mail: ufm@bahamas.net.bs




Et -mi/l




your arI I ticles


-4


THE TRIBUNe.-


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


4do


UCb"Ce


Amms


I u, tody!






THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


RELGIO


Sermons at funerals, memorial




services 'all filled with hope'


: By CLEMENT JOHNSON
AS '04 rolled out and '05 crept in
many people had mixed emotions.
There were sighs of relief from those
'who lived to see another year, but their
,relief was tinged with sadness for fam-
Iily members and loved ones who did
:not make it to the New Year.
I In many churches throughout the
:country the names of the deceased
were read and a moment of silence
;was observed.
1 Many people traditionally make
SNew Year resolutions, which range
,from health-related issues to finan-
'cially sound decisions for the coming
,year. One of the major factors on each
:person's mind is the reality of their
:own mortality the day of their
'death, or the day the Lord returns.
I attended a number of funerals and
memorial services over the past two
'weeks, and the sermons were all filled
with hope. At one funeral in particular,














-IN
^ --.
^^Hl....7 ,.,.


the funeral for Ms Gladys Francis, who
was hailed as a hard working and ded-
icated employee, loving mother and
grandmother and one who contributed
to the development of nation build-
ing through the contribution of her
children.
Rev Stephen Thompson, pastor of
Transfiguration Baptist Church,
reminded the congregation of their
own mortality.
He said that Bahamians needed to
realize that God is the master of the
universe. It is he who is in charge of
life and death. He told the audience
that the attitude of Bahamians was
one filled with arrogance and pride,
where they were beginning to think
that they were better than others. He
said that we were all just a "lump of
graveyard dirt". The idea of our mor-
tality should keep us humble and
wanting to live and keep God's laws.
Many of us go to church, day in and
day out, yet the reality of our own


"Many of us go
to church, day in
and day out, yet the
reality of our own
mortality and the
need to live a decent,
honest and caring
life eludes us."
C Johnson


mortality and the need to live a decent,
honest and caring life eludes us. Hope-
fully in '05 we would resolve to
become better people. This can be
done once we improve our relationship
with God and Christ. We need to get
closer to our brethren.
Years ago a New Year's day poem
was discovered by an unknown author.
Let us hope it will bring comfort to
someone today.
A New Beginning
The old year ends, a new begins
With pages clean and new;
And what is written on each page
Will now depend on you.
You can't relive the year that's past,
Erasing every wrong;
For once a year or day is spent,
It is forever gone.
But don't give up in dark despair


If you have failed some test;
Seek God's forgiveness and resolve
Henceforth to do your best.
Resolve each precious day to do
Things good and kind and pure;
Though days and years may pass
away,
These things shall still endure.
You know not where your path may
lead
Nor what's beyond the hill;
But know that God walks at your
side,
If you will do His will.
All things are possible with God,
Though days be bright or dim;
So do your best and know that you
Can leave the rest to Him


author unknown


* MEMBERS of The Conquerors for Christ are
shown during the 2004 Sammy Thompson Boxing
Day Parade last Saturday. The 250-strong B-category
group paraded onto Bay Street, and through dance,
music and brightly coloured costumes, they brought
the message of the church directly to the streets.


(Photos: Down Home Entertainment)


Air-


op


Kf


fr


C
~


'i w


BEf TLY
" PRODUCTIONS LTD.
'Changing The World Through The Arts'


Presents


AA


Competition open to both Girls & Boys Ages 7 12 years old
Bahamian Citizens and those residing in the Bahamas for at least 6 months

Can your child sing, dance, dramatize, recite poetry, play musical instruments
etc., This is their chance to display their talents and win a

Grand Prize of $1000.00
Sign up Saturday, 8th January, 2005 at Wyndham Resort,
Cable Beach Upper Lobby Entrance 4 6 pm
********eeeeee *ee**eee*eeeeeeee ee**


* COLOURFUL A member of The Conquerors for Christ shows off his costume
during the parade.


Christ (From page 1C)
message through Junkanoo at themes
every parade. The objective, element
he adds, is to remain in the B- The p
category for two to three years where
and eventually build up to an group. ".
A-category group. "But the the peot
message will not change. The good.


will be of a spiritual
astor is excited to see
God will take this
All the responses from
p)le, the spectators, are
They say that it's


refreshing to see a group like
this on Bay Street. I believe
we made a positive impact and
I think that God is pleased.
And the vision He has given
us will carry on. I am just excit-
ed to see what God is doing."


i1.


x<


6~
V


I., *
-c


FQ-VAL


IV. :s


//


.-f: ",'-''~ "


x-






G 4 T I


YEARS

*BRATION


r POST
CEREALS
FRUIT & FIBRE/HONEY
COMB/ RASIN BRAN/
GRAINS/ WAFFLE CRISPS
$ 99
3 16-OZ'


(CHEFBOYARDEE'
SPAGHETTI
& MEATBALLS


TIM q ln - tv = Pm A RMI


PAR
EXCELLENCE

RICE


r SAUERS

MAYONNAISE


SBRUNSWICK


SARDINES


3 OZ

5/ !9


U 14.5 OZj


$289
48 OZ


r SUNCHY
MALT
TONIC
2/$ 19
1 12- OZj






r DOWNY
FABRIC
SOFTENER
$ 99
20 USES


SOFT & GENTLE'
BATH
TISSUE

$ 79
S4 ROLLS,

1 ,, 4 r,
-..lj] |[ I~f^

^^[~*rl)]]^*^


m


* B


Si
$2


KELLOGGS
TRI FUN PAK


r FRITO LAYS

CHIPS
2/8
1 -089*
^_____________J


c


99
43 02


4-
~E:.
9
~Ioo*~
9.
V

4.

9.
-9
.9.
-9
'9
'I
4
I~: ::
'A
"4
"A,
.4
.4
.4


CUALITYRIGHTS AND PfIcES gESM

r CARNATION
EVAPORATED

MILK
2/$ 129
LARGE
-i o m I I'! 10 r.ei*


Fl


uuEu
49z







WESSON
VEGETABLE/CORN

OIL


69


p..
9




t.
9
V



9-
-4'
* 9.
&


THE TRIE


PAG E 4C, TH URS DAY, JAN UARY 6, 2004


&,4qf 1-1 ti *


0411 Dl L I l


:ill;=1


I I kl.l k,






THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2004, PAGE 5C


I


E PLACE

FOR


MEAT
ER "GRILL MASTER
BEEF


PATTIES
5 LB BOX
$ 6 69


r DANISH PORK




PER LB


U.S. CHOICE
BONE-IN
STRIP
STEAKS
P$99
PER LB


U.S. CHOICE BONELESS
CHUCK
STEAK OR
ROAST
LB
-2 !9^-


L-P AIR ROEFOD* CM -af


COUNT MART


. IlRIST/AS DECORATIONS BLENDERS TABLE CLOTHES
TO)S RUGS PICTURE F4R.AMES
SHEET SETS WALL PICTURES
COMFORTERS FLOIIERS
IOAELS TELEPHONES
V.!. -







PAY LESS AT DISCOUNT MART
SEACC .F PT AME RICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISAAND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MA EYV rSTREET. TOP OF THELLTT HTer xt tn Suner Value) PHONRE: 393.-3411/393.69


GALAXY SLICED
CHEESE ................ $1.39
SARGENTO ALL FLAVOURS


SHREADED CHEESE.........


8 -OZ
$3.09 I
I


GREEN GIANT
16-OZ
MIX VEGETABLE........... $2.39
PILLSBURY ASST'D FLAVOURS
11.5 OZ
TOASTERS STRUDEL.... $3.39


SUPER VALUE ASST'D
GAL
-FRUIT DRINKS .......... $1.99


FROSTY ACRE


8 EARS


CORN ON COB ......... $2.59


".w ,.


bSCA

BiF- FRAP


LR MAYER OSCAR MI
FRANKS/ COT
BEEF FRANKS/ | | SALAD
IKS BUN LENGTH 12 -
389 f *f$
16 OZ


AYER -
TO
LMI
19
-.


WHOLE ROTISSERIE
CHICKENS
$799E
EACH


HONEY CREAM
POUND
CAKES
$ 99
a_ 8 -.00


ING RED DELICIOUS S HARVEST FRESH
TOES APPLES LETTUCE
S$299 1 HEAD
S LOOSE $ 3 -LB BAG |
HARVEST FRESH SWEET
GREEN D'ANJOU
WAS CABBAGE PEARS
-LB PER-LB
D 590 3/990


UNE,-


AUSTRALIAN
CHEDDAR

PER LB

99


:: ':-- ~"-~~-~ -^----' --- -- ---


. .... /


emmmmmemmm


MIS CUT
HICKEN
WINGS
PER LB

199,10


I
*I


I
i


.^l~


.T.I. I!






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


RELIGIONS


'Gloria'


concert to benefit


Don's medical


expenses


ll roads lead to
Christ Church
Cathedral on
Saturday, Jan-
uary 8 for a
7.30pm concert entitled "Glo-
ria". The concert will benefit
the medical expenses of Don
Campbell.
Organised by a group of
Don's friends, the concert will
feature the choirs of Christ
Church Cathedral, St George's
Anglican Church Senior Choir,
Blessed and The Highgrove
Singers.
"Don is a special person to
us and we are trying to sup-
port him during this time of
his life," said Adrian Archer,
one of the members of the
organising committee.
"God has blessed Don with
incredible gifts and as a musi-
cian he has used them not only
in his parish, Christ Church


Cathedral, but he has willingly
lent his voice to other church
groups and choirs, the Cursillo
movement and community
choirs."
Also appearing at the con-
cert will be soloists Allison
Mason, Candace Bostwick,
Bryan Thompson, Nikitta
Wells and Joann Fritz.
"In addition to the singers
we will also be featuring pianist
Yvonne Foulkes, flutist Celia
Hoare and organists Dr Spark-
man Ferguson and Julian
Jesubathem," said Arlene Her-
cules, coordinator of the event.
"Finally, the various choruses
will come to together to sing
two of Don's favourite pieces,
an arrangement of 'God and
God Alone' by Dexter Fer-
nander, led by Bryan Thomp-
son; and Rutter's 'The Lord
Bless You And Keep You'.
The concert is under the


patronage of Dean of the
Cathedral, the Very Rev
Patrick Adderley and Mrs


Adrian Archer, Antoine Bowe
and Julian Foulkes. Tickets for
the concert, priced at $25, can


"Don is a special person
to us and we are trying
to support him during
this time of his life."
Adrian Archer


* DON CAMPBELL


Adderley and will be directed
by Antoine Wallace, Archibald
Simms, Dexter Fernander,


be obtained from members of
the choirs, the Cathedral
Parish office or at the door.


'Letter of the Year'


* A CUBAN priest of the Afro-Cuban "Yoruba" religion, part of the Santeria tradition,
Lazaro Cuesta, explains his predictions and recommendations for 2005, known as
the "Letter of the Year," or "Oddun", during a news conference in Havana, Cuba, on
Tuesday.


Hundreds attend New Year's



Eve service at Zion Baptist


"The Saints, On High
Alert" Joel Cp.2
E By CLEMENT JOHNSON
HUNDREDS gathered at
Zion South Beach Baptist
Church from 9pm to midnight
on Friday, December 31, for
the annual Watch-night/New
Year's Eve service. They were
not disappointed for all who
came received a blessing.
The praise and worship, the
scriptural readings were all
inspiring. The message deliv-
ered by the senior pastor, Bish-
op B. Wenneth Davis, was
powerful.
Bishop Davis said that in this
confused world, amid differ-
ent people, the saints are sum-
monsed to be on high alert for
their own comfort and their
personal safety from the
onslaught of the devil, who is
bent on the destruction and
demolition of every conceiv-


able type.
"We have been threatened
from every side, above and
beneath and there is no hiding
place, no protection, and no
shelter save the Great Rock of
ages. He alone is our refuge
from the enemies of this life
and the next."
He said that the year 2004
was not without its challenges,
decisions and consequences.
"We have been introduced to
some relatively harsh realities,
some of which have been
mind-boggling, to say the
least."
He attacked the practices
of wizards and witchcraft, say-
ing it was on the rise. The spir-
it of ingratitude was also on
the rise, he said.
"The castigation of charac-
ter of notable citizens and the
embarrassing of family mem-
bers are allowed to go
unchecked, while some media
houses collect handsomely by


creating pain and division
among family members."
But, he said, the saints are
on high alert.
He concluded that all was
not well within the church as


tics still determines some very
sensitive issues with decisions
that are not in ways justified
by the sacred book. But the
saints are on high alert."
"Justice for all must be the


"We have been threatened from
every side, above and beneath
and there is no hiding place, no
protection, and no shelter save
the Great Rock of ages. He alone
is our refuge from the enemies
of this life and the next."
Bishop B Wenneth Davis


there seems to be too much
"church shopping and church
hopping and swapping. The
religious people have no spiri-
tual depth; we are still 'taking
from Peter to pay Paul'. Poli-


cry of the City," he said,
because on the global front,
for example the unfair election
in the Ukraine summonsed or
demanded a recall to the ballot
box. People all over the world


are hungry for power and will
stop at nothing to get power
and control.
He was hard also on the
appointment of people to posi-
tions of responsibility who are
inadequately prepared and
unable to perform assigned
tasks, but are allowed to
remain because of political
sway. "Check your places of
employment and they will sup-
port this statement," he said.
Bishop Davis told his con-
gregation that they are to be
the voices for those who can-
not speak. He said that global-
ly "stem cell research,
implants, the increase of the
HIV-AIDS epidemic at an
alarming rate, even in this, our
fair Bahamaland, is no joke.
Domestic violence and inces-
tuous activities seem to be at
an all time high and some
adults are content to keep it a
secret. The criminal element
in our country, especially the


murder rate, has left much to
be desired."
The amen's and the hal-
lelujah's were now bellowing
out as the bishop informed his
congregation of the challenges
held by 2005. He said that the
Church of Jesus Christ must
remain on high alert, because
all of our adversaries are not
consigned to the camps and
fortresses of the Hittites and
Jebusites. He said that God
needs people who will fast and
pray.
"After such devastation in
the Bahamas brought on by
two killer hurricanes, we need
recovery and restoration in
every area," he said.
He encouraged the nation
to cheer up, because God's
promises can be relied on. He
encouraged his congregation
to take God at his word and
embrace the challenges of
2005.


THE TRIBUNE


rra%







THE T R I B UE T H UY J R 6 PE L


youl.t Ortiente /

The Adventists
Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists .....


A after a recent review of the pastoral dis-
tricts in the Conference, the
Administration of the Bahamas
Conference of Seventh-day Adventists
announced the following changes that became
effective January 1, 2005: Pastor Michael A. .
Smith, assisted by Anson Albury, ministerial
intern, will be responsible for Grant's Town and Pa ii, Mi,:hael Sm.ih Anson Albury
Johnson Park churches. Pastor Peter Joseph will I
assume responsibility for the Hillview Church as
well as Real Harvest in Pinewood Gardens. Dr.
Hugh A. Roach will take the leadership of the
Good News Church, and Pastor Wilfred T.
Adderley will oversee Inagua, Adelaide and the
Johnson Road group. In addition to being Pastor Peter Joseph Pas-or Hugh Roach
responsible for the Breath of Life Church, Pastor i .
Jeremiah Duncombe take responsibility for..
Gambier. Dr. Michael D. Toote has assumed
responsibility for the New Providence and
Philadelphia churches on Soldier Road and
Elizabeth Estates, respectively. Pastor Eric D. r I
Clarke has been transferred to the Maranatha Pastor WIlfred Aerle Paor J Duncomo
Church on Prince Charles Drive. Assisted by .
Pastor Gary King. Pastor Paul Scavella continues
to lead the Living Faith and Parkgate Road
churches.


Bahamas Academy
Early Iearning Center
In New Facilities On Soldier Road
offers Christian Education for
Children ages 2 to 4
Call Today
323 8898


Paslor Paul Scavella


Paslor Gary King


www. bahamasconference.org


O n Sunday, January 9, 2005, at. 3:00 p.m., the ground-
breaking ceremony for Bahamas Academy multi-mil-
lion dollar new complex will take place at the new .
site on Marshall Road near Breath of Life Adventist Church.
The featured speaker will be Dr. Wendell R. McMillan,
Executive Secretary for the Adventist Church in the West
Indies. Opportunity will be provided for interested persons to
make contributions toward the project. Several lending institutions will be on hand
to offer loans to persons who desire to assist with the construction of the new facil-
ity. In the mean time special envelopes are available for persons who would like to
give their contributions in advance. These can be obtained from local Adventist
Churcehs7,Biahamas Academy on Wulff Road, and from the Adventist Headquarter,
Harrold Road. All former students are invited to attend this ceremony and support
the project.

Convention 2005
Continues Tonight at Hillview at 7:00 p.m.
with Dr Herbert Thompson as speaker. He
is the president of Northern Caribbean
University, Jamaica. He will speak on the
theme "United In Witness of Truth." Come
and receive a blessing from the power pace
preaching and inspiration music. Other
services are as follows: Friday night at
Hillview Church, Saturday morning, 8:45,
under the big tent on Marshall Road.
Children's Church will held on Saturday
morning at Berea Adventist Church, Blue
Hill Road. A special Youth Service will be held at Hillview
Adventist Church at 4:00 p.m. Saturday. All are invited.


A marriage seminar for married and engaged couples of all fiths
February 4-6, 2005
Nassau Beach Hotel
$50 Per Couple Early Registration
Register at Adventist Headquarters


Adventist Business Owners
and Professionals


Trade Show

February 27 & 28, 2005
Bahamas Academy Gym
Registration In Progress
Please contact:
Mary Knott at the Adventist Headquarters


Adventist Media

Watch Adventist Spotlight
Tuesday 8:00 P.M. Channel 12
Cable Bahamas

24/7 Christian Television

3ABN


r c-


_ I L


THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE








PAG 80, THURSDAYJIANUAR 6,20 TEIGIOHE TB


Ojurc of Qob of

NATIONAL PUBLIC
RELATIONS MINISTRY

S//i-


*


BISHOP DR. ELGARNET B.
RAHMING. D.D..J.P.
National O erseer


Teepons:32-39732-341o.Fa# 22309. & QAKO-S~ U 5:-Pi9..BOX N


,,a ,Is, r14 Is r',IIS rc/O 'JOt-. .-, Q'C ,4.d'


* To bear witness for Christ and His truth by
spreading the gospel throughout all of our
islands in all its fullness and power, to bring
about the rule of God in the hearts of men.
* Tb worship God in spirit in truth and in
holiness.
* Tb train, develop and equip our people for
Godly Living and Christian Service


through Bible Teachings. Seminars,
Specialized Courses and Conferences.
* lb fully embrace plurality of leadership in
all of its positive goodness.
* To love God totally and our fellowmen as
ourselves.
* To pay focused and specialized ministry
attention to the growth, de( elopment and


maturation of our children/) south.
* To accelerate our holistic outreach e% angel-
istic efforts with a %ie\\ to reach and touch
people everywhere in our Bahamas to the
up building of the kingdom and to the
groulh of the Church of God.
* To prepare our people for the return of the
Lord.


....~...


far


Evagel sm o e- hlrns Ministre
U ssion --ail iisre


"Hgh ri seS"


MUMM' Af .5
Elizabeth Estates Praise Team led by Associate Pastor Dwight Ferguson
Air9
ST


Ministers of Music, Michael Swann and Fie Fold DanceMinistri
Nathalie Bain in attendance, performs.


Its their 25th Silver Jubilee Year
and they are starting the year on a I ,
high note, the Tabernacle Concert ii ,
Choir hosted a marvelous gospel | i
concert Sunday night at the i I
Centre for the Performing Arts, ||
Shirley Street.
Known for their professionalism
and discipline, the choir has
blessed many throughout The
Bahamas and the United States
forging a name for themselves as
one of THE great among choirs!
TCC's repertoire which includes '.
contemporary choir favorites :
from renowned gospel recording
artists like; John P. Kee, Walter
Hawkins, Hezekiah Walker and
others have become a staple in
each choir fan's music library.
Sunday evening's concert was a
treat for church members, past
choir members and friends. Many

bers both financially and physi-
cally as they endeavour to com- tic
plete their first album recording.
Joining them with splendid per-
formances were the Praise Team
from Church of God, Lily of the
Valley Corner, Elizabeth Estates
Worship Team and Choir headed
by- Associate Pastor Dwight
Ferguson and Minister of Music
Michael Swann, Five-Fold
Ministry Dance Ensemble from
the Blue Hill Rd. Church and
Ministers Nadine and Alvin Moss
of Mt. Tabor Full Gospel Baptist
Church.
This delightful concert was mod-
erated by the anointed and
dynamic Psalmist Eileen Johnson
of the Church of God, Lily of the
Valley Corner.
5.


II I



:- -- -

1j:I


gi
Pray: ''Ate a





NATIONAL FAMILY MINISTRIES


Relationships...


We often feel alone in one rela-
tionships that should provide
the greatest companionship.
The Church of God of
Prophecy National Family
Ministries in conjunction
with Dr. Ron & Doris
Warford Trainers
from Great
Commandment/Intimate
Life Ministries
invites you to join them
February 5, 2005 Radisson
Cable Beach as they host a
More than Married workshop.
In this workshop you will build
on relational skills dedicated to
enriching marriages and deep-
ening your intimacy.
Topics covered include:
* Top Ten Intimacy Needs
* How to resolve painful emo-
tions


*How to Respond with True
Care
-Cultivating Romance and
embracing a healthy perspec-
tive on sexual intimacy
*The hindrances to healthy
relationships and relational
intimacy and
* Leaving Father and Mother
This workshop will enrich a
strong marriage, and can bring
healing to a wounded marriage.
Please contact Bishop Ghaly or
Angela Swann at 242 328-1181
or email pastorghaly@coral-
wave.com. Cost is $50.00 per
person (includes lunch and
Intimate Encounter
Workbook). Childcare is avail-
able on reservation basis.
SPACE IS LIMITED RESERVE
YOUR SPACE EARLY


COME
-. '- .


stalrits 1 8lh i


PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2005


I- %vit :%%%.oo b h m ,-r n i:eure- acnib


- ^._ -' : ;*." "


I ..'" .i L( a n.


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2004, PAGE 9C


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 6, 2005

1 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 | 9:00 9:30 110:00 10:30

B WPBT nnooses. Alive With progresftwo rovers on Mars. (N)
The Insider (N) Wickedly Perfect "Perfectly Pre- CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "4.0" (N) A (CC)
* WFOR n (CC) pared Apples" (Series Premiere) (N) "Who Shot Shediock" A Sherlock
A(CC) Holmes enthusiast is murdered.
Access Holly- Joey "Joey and Committed "The Will & Grace W & Grace Medium'Suspicions and Certain-
* WTVJ wood (N) (CC) the Taste Test" Return of Todd "Board Games "Back Up Dancef ties" (N) A (CC)
(N) A (CC) Episode" (N) A (CC) (A(CC)
Deco Drive The O.C. The Cohens try to accept North Shore Frane brings Tessa News (CC)
B WSVN Lindsay as a member of the family home to the annual family barbecue
after Caleb's revelation. (N) to meet his mother. (N)
Jeopardy! (N) life as we know it Sue makes a Extrem MakeoerAformer beauty PrimeTime Live Skilled surgeons
WPLG (CC) stunning admission; Dino sees a queen and a cop have are trans- struggle to separate conjoined twins
counselor to deal with his anger. fomned. (N) A (CC) Jade and Erin Buckles. (N)
(T) AmericanCold Case Files A 3-year-old boy Tie rst 48"A Serial Killer Calls"A serial killer calls Dog the Bounty
A&E Justce "Cruel provides police with evidence in a 911. (N) (CC) Hunter The
and Unusual" murder case. (CC) Sweep" (CC)
Hardtalk BBC World Talking Movies BBC World Kill or Cure? BBC World Asia Today
BBCW News News News
BET BET Style The Parkers A Girlfriends A Soul Food A (CC) Club Comic View
BET (cc) (CC)
(:00) The Nature Opening Night Jean-Pierre Perreaut: Giant Steps; "Duetto." (N) (CC) The National (CC)
CBC of Things (N)
(:00) Late Night The Apprentice A (CC) Dennis Miller Aisha Tyler. (N) Cover to Cover Host Uz Claman.
CNBC () (cc)
C:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN Cooper 360 (Cc)
Mad TV Elton John collaborates Reno 911! British Crank Yankers South Park Ned Drawn Together Shorties
COM with Saddam Hussein and others, police inspector (CC) and Jimbo host a Clara searches Watchin' Short-
A (CC) visits. hunting show. for love. (CC) ies (CC)
Cops "Mardi The Investigators "A Son's Re- Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators Maximum securi-
COURT Gras'02" (CC) venge: Edmund Kemper" (N) dence typrisons.
That's So Raven MODEL BEHAVIOR (2000, Comedy) Kathie Lee Gifford, Justin Tim- Lizzie McGuire Sister, Sister
DISN Raven is in an berlake, Maggie Lawson. A shy teen swaps identities with a glamorous Lizzie values Tamera feels in-
ad. (CC) young mode,. (CC) family time. (CC) ferior. A (CC)
This Old House Weekend Wood Works Sit- Home IQ Be Your Own DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
DIY Classics (CC) Handyman ting bench. Contractor cue cue
DW In Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus (In
W Tagestema Depth Tagestema German)
ED Dr. 90210 Mary-Kate & Ash ey Love Is in the Love Is in the Life Is Great- Dr. 90210
E! Heir Heir Brooke Burke
(:00) PGA Golf Mercedes Championships -- First Round. From the Plantation Course at Kapalua in Kapalua, SportsCenter
ESPN awaii. (Live)(CC) (Live)(CC)
(:00) PGA Golf Mercedes Championships First Round. From the Plantation Course at Kapalua in Kapalua, SportsCenter -
ESPNI Hawaii. (Live) Intl. Edition
Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock (Live) Back Stage The Holy Rosary Does Church St. Catherine of
EW N Lady Still Teach Sienna
FIT (:00)FitTV's No Opportunity Wasted "Navy The Extremists The Extremists Extreme Surviva Pressure" A
FIT TV Housecalls (CC) SEALs/AerialArt"1 ( n
Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
Totally Football Best Damn Sports Show Period (Live) (CC) The Sports List 1, Max (N) College Basket-

GO LF Playing Lessons Playing Lessons Playing Lessons Playing Lessons Playing Lessons Playing Lessons Mercedes Post
(:00) Weakest Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A Dog Eat Dog A (CC) Extreme Dodgeball II (N) (CC)
GSN Linkn(CC) (CC)
G4 ech (:00)The Screen Cheat Players Filter Judgment Day Filter Icons
S avers
(:00) Walker, Touched by an Angel "Last Call" ** PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE LETHAL LESSON (1989,
H ALL Texas Ranger Monica offers a miracle to several Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale. A student is accused of killing the
(CC) apathetic bar patrons. A (CC) son of Mason's friend. (CC)
Dream House Holmes on Homes "Kitchen Real Renos A Weekend War- Mission: Organi- Hot Property
HGTV "The Impossible Coleslaw" A (CC) single dwelling. riors Installing a zation Three-car "York" A (CC)
Lot" A (CC) patio cover. garage. (CC)
Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child This Is Your Day Life Today (CC Inspiration To- Inspirational
INSP (CC) (CCI day Programming
Yu-Gi-Oh! "Face Sabrina, the The Fresh Everybody Will & Grace Friends Monica Everybody
KTLA Off" (CC) Teenage Witch Prince of Bel-Air Loves Raymond Grace's mom and Rachel's Loves Raymond
The Big Head" A (CC) n (CC) dotes on Will. neighbor dies. "Moving Out"
DEEP FAMILY SECRETS (1997, Drama) Richard ** THREE SECIETS (1999, Drama) Jaclyn Smith, Tyne Daly, Nicole
LIFE Crenna, Angie Dickinson. A man's daughter tries to Forester. Three women each hope that a crash survivor is her son. (CC)
prove him innocent of murder. (CC) (DVS)
MD (:00) Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Deborah Norville Tonight (Live) Scarborough Country (Live)
MVISNBC (Live)(CC) mann (Live)
The Fairly Odd- SpongeBob Romeo! "Dueling Full House "Air Full House "We Fresh Prince of The Cosby
NICK Parents A, (CC) SquarePants A for Denise" Jesse" A (CC) Got the Beat" Bel-Air Show A (CC)
Complete Sav- Desperate Housewives A (CC) Without a Trace Malone and the News A (CC) News
NTV ages A (CC) team search for a teenaged boy.
(:00) Killer In- Hunting 201 Buckmasters The World of Guide To The Skiing USSA--Women's Slalom.
OLN stinct Beretta Outdoors From Aspen, Colo. (Taped)
SPEED Car Crazy Auto Racing Race of Champions. From Paris. Jimmie Johnson: Common Autorotica
SPEED Thread
Fulton Sheen Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (Live) (CC)
TBN Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Joey's Friends Rachel *s THE SWEET EST THING (2002, Comedy) Cameron Diaz, Christina
TBS Loves Raymond girlfriend gets kisses a job inter- Applegate, Selma Blair. A woman tries to track down a guy she met at a
A (CC) physical. (CC) viewer. (CC) dance club.
(:00) In a Fix Overhaulin' Actor lan Ziering has Against the Law "The Confession" Against the Law "Tracking a Killer"
TLC "Medieval been trying to trick out a 1968 Ca-
Kitchen" (CC) maro for years. (CC)
(:00) NBA Basketball Seattle Sonics at Washington Wizards. From MCI NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at San Antonio Spurs,
TNT Center in Washington, D.C. (Live) (CC) From the SBC Center in San Antonio. (Live) (CC)
Ed, Edd n Eddy Ozzy& Drix A Yu-Gi-Oh! A Codename: Kids Mucha Lucha ITeen Titans IStatic Shock A
TOON (cc) (CC) Next Door n (CC) I (CC)
TV5 LES EAUX TROUBLES (2004) Julie Debazac. Une Les Yeux dans Des oiseaux pour la mer (SC) TV5 Le Journal
T "femme enquite sur le meurtre.de son grand-pere. I'6cran
WTW (6:00) PM Edi- Storm Stories Storm Stories Evening Edition CC)
TW tion (CC) "Rogue Wave" (CC)
(:00) La Mujer Rubi Amor Real Aquiy Ahora
UNIV deMadera
(:00) Medical In- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit *** MEET THE PARENTS (2000, Comedy) Robert De Niro, Ben
USA vestigation Stabler and Benson investigate the Stiller, Teri Polo. A man spends a disastrous weekend with his lover's
"Progeny" (CC) murder of a.cabbie. (CC) family. (CC) .
VH1 AUSTIN POW- Plastic Surgery Obsessions A My Coolest Years "B-Boys and B- Fabulous Life Of... "Celebrity Kids"
V ERS: MYSTERY Girls" A A
Home Improve- In the Heat of the Night "By Duty Bound" Gillespie's enemies peg a WGN News at Nine A (CC)
WGN ment Brad gets a businessman to run for sheriff. A (CC)
paper route.
Everybody * SUMMER CATCH (2001, Comedy-Drama) Freddie Prinze Jr., Jessi- WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond ca Biel, Matthew Lillard. A baseball player falls for a woman who's out of Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Moving Out" his league. A (CC) & Mr, G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) WWE SmackDown! (N) A (CC) News
WSBK (cc)

H (6:15)** THE Inside the NFL A (CC) ** WELCOME TO MOOSEPORT (2004, Comedy) Gene Hackman,
H BO-E TRANSPORTER Ray Romano, Marcia Gay Harden. A man runs for mayor against a former
(2002) 'PG-13' president. A 'PG-13' (CC)


YOUR OWN ISLAND

Just the way you want it


- A'


Certified Member treet

A-BACO .-.
Tel 6 6
X367WOOD :
Don Macka Blvd
Certific 6-!> treet .^'-
AB C U" n i iiliiirl lil


THE LIFE AND ** 50 FIRST DATES (2004, Romance-Comedy) (:45) DISAPPEARING ACTS (2000, Drama)
HBO-P DEATH OF PE- Adam Sandier. Premiere. A man falls for a woman who Wesley Snipes, Sanaa Lathan. Two Brooklynites have
TER SELLERS has short-term memory loss. A 'PG-13' (CC) an on-again, off-again romance. 0 'R' (CC)
* I SPY (2002, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Owen Wil- (:15) * THE TRANSPORTER (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi,
HBO-W son, Famke Janssen. A spy recruits a boxer to helo Francois Berldand. A high-priced courier breaks his own rules of conduct.
him retrieve a stolen plane. A 'PG-13' (CC) 'PG-13' (CC)
(:15) ** MARVIN'S ROOM (1996, Drama) Meryl ** LAUREL CANYON (2002, Drama) Frances Mc- (:45) One Flight
H BO-S Streep, Diane Keaton. Illness spurs a reunion between Dormand, Christian Bale. A man's studious fiancee ex- Stand (CC)
two long-estranged sisters. A 'PG-13' (CC) periments with sex and drugs. A 'R' (CC)
:00) * DOWN PERISCOPE * DR. SEUSS' THE CAT IN THE HAT (2003) Mike * THE GODFATHER, PART III
M AX-E 1996, Comedy) Kelsey Grammer, Myers. Premiere. A mischievous feline invades the (1990, Drama) Al Pacino, Diane
Lauren Holly. A'PG-13' (CC) home of two children. A 'PG' (CC) Keaton, Talia Shire. A 'R' (CC)
(:15) *** GATTACA (1997, Science Fiction) Ethan ** WRONG TURN (2003, Horror) Desmond Harring- PASSION COVE
MOMAX Hawke, Uma Thurman. An outsider poses as a geneti- ton, Eliza Dushku. Inbred cannibals terrorize six 5: SEXUAL IN-
cally superior citizen. A 'PG-13' (CC) stranded motorists. A 'R' (CC) FERNO (2001)
CITY SLICKERS *i BARB WIRE (1996, Adventure) Pamela Anderson (:45) *v OCTANE (2003, Suspense) Madeleine
SHOW IN-CURLY'S Lee. iTV. A beautiful bounty hunter must choose sides Stowe, Norman Reedus. iTV Premiere. A woman tries
GOLD in a civil war. A 'R' (CC) to save her daughter from a cult. A 'R' (CC)
(6:15) ** ** FOR LOVE OR MONEY (1993, Comedy) Michael (:45) *x NOBODY'S BABY (2001, Comedy) Skeet
TMC COPS AND J. Fox. A concierge must chaperon a potential in- Ulrich, Gary Oldman, Radha Mitchell. Two brothers
ROBBERSONS vestor's mistress. A 'PG' (CC) have different plans for an orphan. A 'R' (CC)


II


;; r--*, ''*'* '**'


z x





lo
64 019'e1,911 fee


* .* 0 .


* 0 *


~393,9~g~e.Ig.e


I:IoIpII10101


i1


*1


lap0l0001(

4 J il l.* 0 0


'5


.9


of6filled
goo its$,.


0 0 o 00 0 0-.
t1w't 1'e11
vaOYals'
0 .00 0 00


0ii
.4
N


UA


*le


04


l"Copyrighte<


p I byI
Available frorn
eIo


M I*


indicated Co
i Commercial
*0|


4ateria
intent" I
News'Pre
oo* 49 6* l .i


4 0 e


too @' gtI q''iiJ 191111 f oo.e


t's *t't*S
* .0*


ig*4*g
0


'S ,t@~.S 4481
*.. 0.g 'S....


w"I 19111,111Sf04ofis 1040,44114


Sto.413 14,1


*9o


to*38.


I

I


p


p


11lt


Mfeel-r;




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs