For life and liberty

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
For life and liberty a story of battle by land & sea
Physical Description:
352, 32 p., 9 leaves of plates : ill., col. map ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Stables, Gordon, 1840-1910
Paget, Sidney, 1861-1908 ( Illustrator )
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Blackie & Son
Place of Publication:
London ;
Glasgow ;
Dublin
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Young men -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Capital punishment -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Battles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Generals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Revenge -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Ireland -- Dublin

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Gordon Stables ; with eight illustrations by Sidney Paget and a map.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue precedes and follows text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002393306
notis - ALZ8208
oclc - 223257854
System ID:
UF00084242:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text














































































C'-



:i~k ...


..,.., .















~s~f;-











i::







i


I .
r
I
r


4


. ../.-.













L'" .^- ^ <>2 > / as-^ '
I2
&:


b


: *7~


I



~f;:
.


i


. ..
t, :P
Jlj~--
-i
P
b
r
~ ::

"` n
3 ~:T


t; '~'~' rr

~9;~

s.






i'?-R

.


,-
1
tr ,i
IP ~t c
~")
''~'
r



















FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY

























BY DR. GORDON STABLES.


Westward with Columbus. With 8 page Illustrations by AL-
FRED PEARSE. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.
"Our author treats his subject in a dignified, historical fashion which
well becomes it, and we must place Westward with Columbus among those
books that all boys ought to read."-The Spectator.

'Twixt School and College: A Tale of Self-reliance. With 8
page Illustrations by W. PARKINSON. Crown 8vo, cloth ele-
gant, olivine edges, 5s.
"One of the best of a prolific writer's books for boys, being full of practical
instructions as to keeping pets, from white mice upwards, and inculcates in
a way which a little recalls Miss Edgeworth's 'Frank' the virtue of self-
reliance, though the local colouring of the home of the Aberdeenshire boy
is a good deal more picturesque."-Athenumn.

The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. With 4 page Illustrations.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2s. 6d.
"Pirates and pumas, mutiny and merriment, a castaway and a cat,
furnish the materials for a tale that will gladden the heartof many a bright
boy."--iethodist Recorder.



LONDON: BLACKIE & SON, LIMITED, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
































































"YOU ARE A TRUE SPECIMEN OF THE BRITISH MAN,"
SAID GENERAL STONEWALL JACKSON.









FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY


A STORY OF

BATTLE BY LAND AND SEA



BY

GORDON STABLES, M.D., R.N.
Author of "To Greenland and the Pole", "'Twixt School and College"
"Westward with Columbus", &c.


WITH EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS BY SIDNEY PAGLT
AND A MAP
















LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, LIMITED, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN
1896












CONTENTS.


BOOK I.


THE GATHERING CLOUDS.
CHAP. Page
I. REVERIE AND ROMANCE, . .. 9
II. WRITTEN ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE, . .. .20
III. FORT SUMMER FALLS, . . .. 28
IV. A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT, .. .... .37
V. THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN, . .. .47
VI. OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE FOR AMERICA, ... 56
VII. AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC,. . ... 66
VIII. MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER, ... .78
IX. CHASED BY A NORTHERN CRUISER, . 91
X. THE FIGHT WITH THE "DELAWARE", . .. 101


BOOK II.
THE BURSTING OF THE STORM.

I. ON THE LONG MARCH NORTHWARD,.. . .
II. FIGHTING THE FOREST FIRE, . .
III. AT THE OLD PLANTATION, . . .
IV. THE FEDERAL FLEET AND THE FORTS, . .
V. WAR BY SEA AND LAND, . . .
VI. THE STORY OF THE "MERRIMAC", .
VII. HARRY IN THE ENEMY'S CAMP, . .
VIII. A TUSSLE WITH ROAD-AGENTS, . .
IX. THE BATTLE OF MALVERN HILL, . .
X. THE GREAT STRUGGLE ON TIE POTOMAC, .. ..
XI. THE DEATH OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM BLOODWORTH,


S115
S126
. 138
.150
S164
. 174
. 187
. 199
. 213
. 228
. 239








vi CONTENTS.

BOOK III.

TO THE BITTER END.
CHAP. Page
I. LINCOLN PROCLAIMS FREEDOM TO THE SLAVES, 245
II. WHERE WAS FIGHTING JoEl? ... .... 256
III. A TRAGEDY IN FIVE ACTS .. ... .265
IV. WILD LIFE AT SEA-THE "ALABAMA", . 276
V. A DANGEROUS UNDERTAKING, .. .. 285
VI. CONDEMNED TO DIE, .... . . 295
VII. AT THE OLD PLANTATION ONCE AGAIN,. .. 306
VIII. LEE'S LAST STAND AT RICHMOND, .... .. 3.17
IX. FOR PLUNDER AND REVENGE, . . 328
X. WHEN THE CRUEL WAR WAS OVER, . .343











ILLUSTRATIONS.



Page
"YOU ARE A TRUE SPECIMEN OF THE BRITISH MAN," SAID
GENERAL STONEWALL JACKSON,. .... .Frontis. 233


OSMOND GIVES EVA THE FIRST NEWS OF THE WAR, 19

"I RE-BAPTIZE THIS GOOD SHIP THE MOSQUITO," SAID LUCY,
AND DASHED THE BOTTLE ON DECK, . .. 75

"YOU MUST DIE AT DAYBREAK," SAID CAPTAIN STUART;
"TAKE HIM AWAY, CORPORAL,. .. . .. .121

"ON AND ON THEY DASH AT A BREAK-NECK GALLOP THROUGH
THE FOREST FIRE," . 137

"SUDDENLY HARRY, WHO WAS RIDING ON AHEAD, CRIED
'HALT!'" .............. .... 201


CAPTAIN TROUVILLE TURNS UPON HARRY, AND BEADS HIM A
LESSON, . .. . 288

THE VICTORIOUS FEDERAL ARE WELCOMED BY THE WOMEN
OF RICHMOND, . .. ... 327



Map to illustrate the Civil War in America, 1861-65. 29















FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


BOOK I.
THE GATHERING CLOUDS.


CHAPTER I.
REVERIE AND ROMANCE.

HERE is a thread of romance in the warp or
weft of nearly every boy's life. I should
not care to have a boy as a companion in
my summer rambles who did not have that blue vein
of "romanticness" winding and curving through all
his nature, like the blue line that runs through the
best ship's canvas.
Well, I may be wrong, but it has long been my
opinion that there can be no true bravery without a
little dash of poetry, just to fire the blood. Even
savages, in every land in which it has been my lot
and luck to travel or sojourn-notably, perhaps, the
Indians of the western wilds of America-possess















FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


BOOK I.
THE GATHERING CLOUDS.


CHAPTER I.
REVERIE AND ROMANCE.

HERE is a thread of romance in the warp or
weft of nearly every boy's life. I should
not care to have a boy as a companion in
my summer rambles who did not have that blue vein
of "romanticness" winding and curving through all
his nature, like the blue line that runs through the
best ship's canvas.
Well, I may be wrong, but it has long been my
opinion that there can be no true bravery without a
little dash of poetry, just to fire the blood. Even
savages, in every land in which it has been my lot
and luck to travel or sojourn-notably, perhaps, the
Indians of the western wilds of America-possess







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


that quality, and this it is which gives dash and elan
to their battle charges, and lends a kind of music to
their voices as, spear in hand, they rush yelling on to
meet their enemies.
Well, if this romance be not present in a boy's life
when he is quite young, it will not develop as he gets
older, and he will never become a true soldier, that is,
a leader of men. There is another species of courage
which I have found to be very common among the
tribes in Eastern Africa, a courage that is born of a
kind of dreamy indifference to life. They fight as fights
the bull or the walrus, with a sort of stern stolidity
that often leads to victory from its very doggedness.
This kind of pluck is not unknown among the rank
and file of the British army, especially the English
portion of it; the Celtic divisions, as represented by
the Irish and Highland Scottish, having probably more
poetical fervour and dash, though, as records can prove,
not less staying power. But it is the very composite
character of our army which, in my opinion, renders
it the best that ever faced a foe or fixed a bayonet.
It is an army, too, that has its traditions, and its long
and glorious history to cheer it on and steel its heart
for action; an army that, well-generalled and properly
handled by its officers, is to all intents and purposes
invincible.
But now my hero comes upon the boards, and you






REVERIE AND ROMANCE.


will find him no exception to the general rule, for
Osmond did possess romance, and a spice of poetry too.
Mind you this, though, my hero's romance did not lead
him to do anything very ridiculous. He never had
any hankering after knight-errantry. It never oc-
curred to him to sally forth from his father's house or
hall for the purpose of rescuing distressed damsels
from the power of their would-be captors, nor to live
all alone, as I knew a boy do once, for a whole week
in a ruined castle. Nor did Osmond's poetry find a
safety-valve in deluging the table of unhappy editors
with silly and unwholesome verses. No, his poetry
and romance took quite another turn, and led him to
long for travel and adventure.
You will not think this very strange when I tell
you where he lived. Imagine to yourself, then, a
bonnie glen or valley in the south-west of Yorkshire,
with a brawling rivulet winding down through the
centre of it, spanned here and there with strong old-
fashioned Gothic bridges. Fields at each side sur-
rounded with lordly trees, the black-budded ash, the
sturdy oak, the broad-leaved sycamore, and the noble
horse-chestnut whose splendid flowers of pink and
white seemed to turn all the bees crazy in the merry
month of May. Imagine these fields rising up and up,
higher and higher, as they get further away from the
stream till they end in a ridge of wooded hills.







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


This sounds romantic, does it not? So does the
mention of sturdy old English mansions with chimneys
peeping through the trees, that may be seen here and
there on the brow of the glen. But low down, and
near to the middle of the valley, stands a long row of
brick houses. Well, they do not look so bad at a dis-
tance, and are quite in keeping with the scenery, but
if you enter and walk through this village, romance
and poetry take to themselves wings and fly away.
The buildings, it is true, are strong and substantial,
but the street itself is rutty and black, the pavements
are sadly out of repair, and at every doorway or in
the gutters play bare-legged, naked-armed children,
whose faces do not appear to have been washed nor
their "tousled" hair combed for a month of Bank
holidays. But here and there in this long street you
cannot help noticing "palaces" about which the less
we say the better, for they are devoted to the worship
of Bacchus, and the men and women around their
corner doors are far indeed from wholesome-look-
ing.
Supposing the season to be summer, we should
naturally expect to find the trees all smiling and
green in the glad sunshine, and many a lusty trout
leaping up here and there in the streamlet. Well,
time was when such a state of affairs really existed,
but it is not now, because for almost every mansion







REVERIE AND ROMANCE.


there is a mill, and the smoke from the chimneys
of these covers all the landscape with a sooty, black
veil, while their effluxions poison the once clear stream
so that ne'er a trout or minnow can live therein. So
the trees, instead of being green and fresh, are grimy
and almost brown, and even the grass itself looks
dry and harsh.
All these mills may certainly serve to represent a
portion of the wealth and riches of old England. I
grant you they do, but nevertheless it is not in such
a country as this that the goddess Poesy loves to
linger.
Yet it was here where our hero Osmond lived at
the time our story opens. Up yonder at the Mir-
fields he had spent most of his life, except just
latterly when the greater portion of the year had
been devoted to study in the classic old halls of
Eton.
Was it any wonder, I ask you, that young Osmond,
now in his eighteenth year, and reared among such
surroundings, longed at times for travel and wild ad-
venture? These longings were fed by the books he
read in his father's well-stored library.
Mirfields stood (and still stands) well up among the
rolling woods, higher up indeed than any other house
in the valley, and seated at one of the broad windows
of the library that overlooked all the wide glen,







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Osmond oftentimes of a summer evening, while the
sun sank livid or red through the western haze, would
indulge in reveries or dreams that were very far from
being unpleasant.
Sometimes his little sister Eva would steal in and
seat herself quietly on a cushion at his feet. On the
thick, old-fashioned carpet her footsteps would not be
heard, and her presence for a time, at all events, ap-
peared to be scarcely noticed by her brother.
Far, far beyond the Yorkshire hills-thus at times
did Osmond's reverie run-there were oceans and
seas on which his gaze had never yet alighted, sleep-
ing blue and peaceful under cloudless skies, or, when
wild winds blew, raised into billows, foam-topped and
furious, and raced before the tempest's blast. Yet
loud though the stormy winds might roar, the breath
of the ocean was ever sweet and pure, so that the
sea-birds screamed with delight as they were caught
up and whirled from wave to wave.
And the countries beyond the seas, what delightful
possibilities did they not present to this romantic
boy!
The time at which my story begins is after the
quelling of the terrible mutiny in India, and in the
autumn of the year 1861. In those days there were
fewer writers of boys' books than there are now; but
on his father's shelves, nevertheless, Osmond found






REVERIE AND ROMANCE.


many a story of travel and adventure that delighted
and thrilled him, with the authors of which he went
wandering away to far-off lands. He visited regions
of lakes and streams and primeval forests in the very
centre of Africa, and many an escapade he had among
the dark-skinned and implacable savages, while lions
not a few fell before the fire of his rifle by woodland
and stream. In imagination he chased the fleet giraffe
and stalked the lordly elephant through the dells and
dingles of sunny Africa. He even engaged in deadly
struggles with terrible pythons, and had his frail
canoe upset by a huge ungainly hippopotamus in a
river pool that was literally alive with horrid croco-
diles.
0, a fine thing is a good imagination, I can assure
you, reader! And Osmond could enjoy all the fun of
a fight with Patagonian savages or with the cannibal
canoe Indians of Tierra del Fuego without going a
step beyond his father's library.
Yet with all his longing to see life-real life-and
partake of wild adventure in foreign lands, Osmond
was not a very tall nor even a very resolute lad to
look at. For my own part I rather like to have tall
and rather handsome heroes in all my stories-men,
for instance, like Roualeyn, Gordon Cumming, the lion
hunter, or stalwart Donald Dinnie, the athlete. I like
such men, and yet I cannot forget that very many







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


of the world's greatest generals and conquerors have
been men of medium stature. Said the poet:-
"Were I as tall as reach the pole,
Or grasp the ocean with my span,
I must be measured by my soul;
The mind's the standard of the man."

No, Osmond was barely of medium height, but he had
a clear complexion of his own, dark blue Yorkshire
eyes, and a fearless open and intellectual countenance.
Perhaps Osmond was his mother's favourite, and he
spent much of his time in her society. Dick, on the
other hand, who was older than Osmond, and his only
brother, just as little Eva was his only sister, was
always with his father in mine or mill, at church or
market, or in the smithy itself. Two buirdlyy"
chiels they were, and "Yorkshire" all over. People
who looked after them, as they strode homewards
together of an evening, used to say that they looked
more like brothers than like father and son.
When I tell you that Mrs. Lloyd herself was a
pretty but fragile-like little woman, and that Eva was
just a juvenile edition of her mother, I have introduced
the whole family to your notice.
Stay a moment, though; there is one other who
deserves a passing word, namely Wolf, a splendid
specimen of the true-bred British mastiff, grand and
beautiful to a degree. Like a true-born Englishman,
( 182)






REVERIE AND ROMANCE.


Wolf was gentleness and kindness personified where
women or children were concerned, but a very demon
in fight, and a dog that would be faithful unto death
in protecting his master's property or safeguarding
his interests.
Eva was very fond and very proud, too, of her
clever brother Osmond. Clever to her he undoubtedly
seemed. Had he not gained honours at Eton? Could
anything be more glorious than that? Then he could
write fairy stories and verses also-poetry, Eva called
them-which, though they were never published, he
used to recite to her in the calm summer's gloaming,
causing her to cry one minute, only to burst into peals
of merry laughter the next.
Of course Eva loved Dick, her big, big brother also,
despite the fact that he always treated her like a child;
for when she ran down the avenue of an evening to
meet him, he used to pick her up and seat her right
on top of his left shoulder and thus march singing to
the house with her.
Osmond, on the other hand, treated her as a com-
panion and an equal. In his long walks through the
woodlands in summer she was always at one side of
him, and Wolf the stately at the other.
It is seldom that mastiffs take to retrievers' or
Newfoundlands' work, but Wolf could not only swim
well and powerfully, but fetch and carry also. Every
( 132) B







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


morning after breakfast, when the postman opened the
gate at the foot of the lawn, Wolf went bounding off
with gladsome sonorous bark to meet him. Then he
received the bag, and came trotting back to the house
with it. Nor would he deliver it up to anyone except
his master-Osmond. So the young man always had
the pleasure of sorting out the letters. There gene-
rally was one or two for his mother, and a whole
batch for his father and for Dick, but occasionally
there was one for himself also.
Now, young Osmond had cousins in America-
cousins on the Southern side of the great struggle that
was just then commencing, and cousins on the Northern
side as well.
These cousins, let me tell you, were not much to
Dick. He simply owned them, that was all, and if
the coming civil war was to affect him in any way, it
would be merely from a business standpoint.
But with Osmond, and even with Eva, it was totally
different. They constantly corresponded with their
cousins far beyond the sea, and the long letters they
received almost every month were couched in language
casting quite a halo of romance around the land of the
greatest republic the world has ever seen.
And so, when one morning Wolf came bounding in
as usual with the letter-bag and Osmond found therein
a very thick letter with American postage-stamps on



















11











Aw




























OSMOND GIVES EVA THE FIRST NEWS OF THE WAR.







REVERIE AND ROMANCE.


it, his face positively glowed with joy and excite-
ment.
He somewhat unceremoniously threw all the other
letters on the table in front of his brother Dick, and
with a meaning glance to Eva, who immediately fol-
lowed him, ran off at once to the library.
"Why," he cried; "why, Eva, what do you think?"
He had read a portion of the letter to himself.
"I don't know-do tell me."
No, guess."
I can't and won't. Don't keep me in suspense, Os.
I know from your face the letter contains good news."
"0, it isn't only good news; it is glorious news!
Glorious! Lie down, Wolf; what do you know about
it?
"First and foremost, Cousin William and Cousin
Harry have both become soldiers, and neither of them
is much older than I am, you know, if any."
"0, stop, Os, stop, I don't want you to tell me
what is in the letter. That's not the proper way to do.
Just read it out, and Wolf and I will listen."
Well, here goes," said Osmond.
Then he commenced to read.







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


CHAPTER II.

WRITTEN ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE.

HURRAH! Hurrah! Hurrah!'" commenced Osmond,
his eyes on his cousin's letter.
But Eva laughingly interrupted him.
"Why, Os," she cried, "the letter doesn't begin like
that, I'm sure."
"Oh, but it does. The three words are written in
large letters, and in one line right at the beginning.
See for yourself."
"So they are," said Eva, laughing.
"' Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!
"'My dearest Osmond, likewise Eva, whom I am
coming across the herring-pond to marry some of
these days after we have finished whipping the
Northerns. This is written on the field of battle and
on the evening of a great victory. Stay, I declare that
I have forgotten to write down the date. It is the
21st of July, 1861, then, a day that will henceforth be
known as the glorious 21st.
"'Every now and then as I write, the joyous shouts
of my brother soldiers come pealing on my ear, and
I have to leave off for a minute or two just to join
them.
"'Hurrah! hurrah! hurrah!






WRITTEN ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE.


"' The wonder is that you haven't heard our shouts
of victory, our pomans of triumph, even right away in
the middle of dull and drowsy old England.
"'N.B. The above, dear Osmond, is a joke; for out
here in the sunny south of what was once the one
great Republic, but is now virtually two, we all love
England. And we sincerely hope and expect that
before many weeks are over Great Britain, as you love
to be called, will recognize the Confederates as a bel-
ligerent power, and who knows but that, after we have
whipped the North, and become ourselves a nation,
Britain and our new Republic may enter into an alli-
ance, offensive and defensive. Then, Osmond, with
you at one side of the Atlantic and us at the other,
won't we make the world sit up, just!
"('No, thank you; I don't want any supper. I've
had my fill of fighting and glory; but look here,
Nathaniel, you may bring me about a quart of coffee.
Just set it on the drum yonder. There is a bullet-hole
right through the head, so we may as well make a
table of it, for it will never sound the assembly
again.')
"'The above sentence, dear cousins, is spoken to Nat,
my soldier-in-attendance-I myself am an officer, and
so you'd soon be too, if you were out here. Why don't
you come and join us? For honour and glory, you
know. We have more than one soldier of fortune






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


among us who hails from England or Scotland. When
I look up I see one now-a right good fellow. He has
fought all over the globe, and I believe he bears a
charmed life. Oh, can't he fight, just! And so coolly
too! To-day, on the plateau, while the battle raged its
fiercest, while cannon roared, while rifle volleys seemed
to tear the very clouds into tatters, I happened for a
second only to glance towards bold M'Clellan's corps.
This corps was standing by to resist Keyes' charge up
the slope. M'Clellan was standing on its right. He
had tucked his drawn sword, which had already drank
blood, under his left arm, as if it had been an old
umbrella, and was quietly lighting a cigar. But next
minute, nay, in less time than that, my Osmond, that
sword was once more pointed aloft, and in the direction
of the foe.
"'Give it to 'em, boys,' he shouted. 'Give 'em fits.
Hurrah!'
"'And Keyes was hurled backwards down the slope,
bravely though he and his men had sought to gain the
brow of that blood-stained plateau.
"' And this brave fellow is now making coffee not far
from where I write-making good coffee and frying-
pan hagglety; and it was he who sent to ask me to
come to dinner.
"' My dear cousins, Osmond and Eva, you will, I am
sure, forgive me if I write in a somewhat rambling and






WRITTEN ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE.


disjointed manner in this letter. There is such a din
all round me, and I haven't much light either. But
I have far more to tell you than ever I could get into
one single letter.
"'William, who is captain of a company, is not far
from me at this moment. His men, strangely enough,
are nearly all Irishmen. In the field of battle none
are more daring, none more steady. Your great poet
says, they
Move to death with military glee'.

But to see them now, sitting or lying around the camp-
fire, or cooking their rations, talking, laughing, singing
as merrily as match-girls, you wouldn't think that not
many hours ago they were hand to hand in fight with
a desperate foe. I'm not sure either, Osmond, that
there aren't what you'd call Irish rebels in that merry
corps. Now, for instance, that song which yonder half-
clad soldier is trolling forth, with manly voice and
plenty of brogue, was never written for this war:-

'Step together, boldly tread,
Firm each foot, erect each head;
Fixed in front be every eye,
Forward at the word
Advance i'"

Just at this portion of the letter Osmond lifted up
his eyes. They were sparkling with excitement, and






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


in strange contrast to those of his sister Eva. There
was a look in hers that spoke of wonder as well as
sorrow. Eva, you must know, was barely fifteen, very
pretty and very merry at most times, but a perfect
little woman nevertheless, as most girls are who have
no sisters and are the constant companions of their
elders. Details of fighting and stories of war had not
the same interest for her, therefore, as for her roman-
tic brother. She was of a somewhat practical turn of
mind too, so when Osmond now exclaimed with a con-
siderable degree of animation:-
Oh, Eva, wouldn't I like to be there, just, fighting
side by side with cousin Harry in the glorious cause!"
Eva made answer, "But what is the glorious cause?
What are they fighting for?"
"Eh! what?" replied Osmond, somewhat taken
aback. "Ahem! the cause, did you say? Well, we
haven't come to that yet. But you may be sure the
cause is glorious, else Harry and Will wouldn't fight
for it. I'll read on. Let me see, where was I?"
"'Forward at the word Advance!'" said Eva,
prompting him.
"Oh, yes, to be sure. Ahem!
"'I daresay, Osmond,' the letter ran on, 'you are
like me. You don't care a very great deal about poli-
tics. Politics is a fine thing, I don't doubt, but I guess
it's got to take a back seat as soon as the sword is






WRITTEN ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE.


drawn, which it very courageously does; for most of
the long-jawed buffers you hear shouting at Washing-
ton are said to be the biggest cowards out in the smoke
of battle, unless they are allowed to get in behind a
barricade, and lie face downwards! But, nevertheless,
I daresay you would like to know how we, the Con-
federates, came to draw swords against the Union, and
how my brother and I have donned the bonnie gray
uniform, and drawn the sword; and how even my dear
father, your uncle, though long past sixty, holds a com-
mand somewhere in Virginia.
"' Well, Cousin Osmond, as far as I can make it out,
we are fighting because the Northerners are trying to
force upon us such laws as no one with the feelings of
a gentleman would consider himself justified in obey-
ing.
"' Mind you this, cousin, none of us Southerners wish
to uphold slavery in the very worst sense of the word.
You may roam through almost all our fair land, and
see or hear absolutely nothing of the misery, the
moaning, the groaning, the clank of chains, and re-
volver-like crack of the lash, that Mrs. Harriet Beecher
Stowe makes so much of in her milksop story of
Uncle Tom's Cabin.'"
Oh!" cried Eva, interrupting him, with tears in her
eyes; "I love it, Os, I love it, I love it. He mustn't
write so about dear Uncle Tom."






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


So do I, Eva; but let me read on.
"' All that is moonshine, and even our ministers out
here, cousin, tell us, and try to prove it too, that negroes
were made and meant to be servants to white men.
And they like to serve us too, I can assure you. Oh,
dear Osmond, there wasn't a happier race of blacks in
all the States than ours were just before the outbreak
of this cruel war. Massa, my father, was all the world
to them, and so were the young folks-my brother
Will, my sisters, and I. Dear old Auntie Lee, as we
called her, and white-haired Uncle Neile, they nursed
us when we were mere pickaninnies. We romped and
played with their black children; rolled with them on
the grass by the old cabin door; fished with them in
the runs; hunted the woods with them and the dogs
for the 'possums, and helped to eat the 'possums too
in the cabin where old Uncle Neile had cooked them.
Dear days that are gone, days of auld lang syne!
Just because we are a little older, and the war has
broken out. Only that and nothing else. But

We hunt no more for the 'possum and the coon
By the meadow, the stream, and the shore.
We dance no more by the glimmer of the moon,
Near the bench by the old cottage door.
The day goes by like a shadow o'er the heart,
With sorrow where all was delight;
For the time has come when the darkies have to part,
Then my old Kentucky home, good-night.'






WRITTEN ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE.


"' But, cousin mine, the darkies are not going to part
yet. You bet! But even were the tables to be turned,
and were the Federals to whip us instead of our whip-
ping them, and were President Lincoln to declare their
emancipation, I feel sure we would be none the worse
off, for not a black man, woman, or child would leave
our plantation.
"' But it does seem hard that a Southern gentleman
should not be allowed to travel with his servants
through the Northern States. We all felt the injus-
tice of the laws they have been trying to force on us.
We all feel it now, dear Osmond, and that is why we
have left the old plantation. We have Davis-dear
Jeff we call him-for our President, and we are going
to fight for him and freedom as long as there is a shot
in the locker or a cartridge left in our belts.
"'Having drawn the sword, we have thrown away
the scabbard, and I guess that means biz. It is sad for
those we leave behind on the old plantation, sad for
mother and sisters, I mean; but dear mum is, I think,
a bit of a Spartan at heart, and although her tears
may flow, she would rather we were here on the war-
path than living at home in ease and luxury.
"'The very last song I heard my youngest sister
sing, Osmond, was that old Jacobite one with its sad,
sweet, but brave air, 'He's ower the hills that I lo'e
weel', and one verse I thought was so appropriate to






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


our cause and to our family, I do not wonder that dear
Looie's eyes were moist as she sang it.
My father's gane to fight for him,
My brothers winna bide at hame.
My mither greets and prays for them;
But 'deed she thinks they're no to blame.'

"'Well, Osmond, this is the eve of our first real
battle, but not of our first fight; and before I tell you
what I know of Bull Run, I must tell you something
about Fort Sumter, because the doings there really
commenced the war.
"'Now, I think the capture of this fort was just a
real plucky thing. But mind you this, Osmond, we
mean to take all the forts and all the coast defences,
and we mean to take the completes possession of the
Mississippi River, and we mean to capture Washing-
ton, ay, and to hold it too, and to dictate our terms of
peace to the Federals from the capital itself. You'll
see. But now about Fort Sumter.'"



CHAPTER III.

FORT SUMTER FALLS.

EVA crept a little closer to the side of her favourite
brother, so that she could lean one arm on his
1 Weeps.































































MAP TO ILLUSTRATE

THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA

1861-1865.


Scale afiEngishliiles.
o0 100 200 a0 0 --


BLACKIE & SON LIMITED, LONDON G-rASOW & EiINBTIJR EO


~-1-


70
^ -


"TH


~


.. ... R 5 I .. .. .. .
. .. ..





r-, -----\ I






FORT SUMTER FALLS.


knee and look up into his face as he read the rest of
Cousin Henry's letter.
Wolf, too, appeared to be interested, for he sat at
Osmond's left side, and rested his enormous head on
his other knee. Thus encouraged, Os read on.
"' I am sure, my dear cousin, that you don't know a
great deal about the geography of the American
States. If you do you must be a great exception to
the general run of young fellows of your age. There-
fore, I beseech you to possess yourself of a good
skeleton map as soon as you can. Because you will
then be able to follow the fighting1. I say a skeleton
map, because most of what are called maps are so
stuffed with unimportant villages and towns that look-
ing for the place you want is just like searching for a
bit of orange-peel in a well-made and rich Christmas
pudding.'
"Give me that big atlas," said Osmond to his sister.
Eva rose and found it, and staggered back to the
window with it, and Os opened it at North America,
supporting its weight on Wolf's great head.
Wolf didn't seem to care a bit.
"'Now, Os,' the letter continued, 'I shall sup-
pose that you have a map before you. Well, you will
easily find New York Bay. If, then, your eye goes
1 The author has done his best to supply the reader with a map of this
sort, in which he places only the towns, rivers, &c., that are needed to
explain the narrative, and nothing that may tend to confuse the eye.







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


southward past Sandy Hook and Monmouth, you will
soon come to the great Bay of Delaware. Southwards
still, and you will round Cape Charles and find your-
self in the wonderful Bay of Chesapeake. You will
note that it goes stretching away almost directly north
ever so far. Towards its head you will find the City
of Baltimore, and you will be surprised to discover
that Chesapeake here lies inland from the Bay of
Delaware, the State of that name lying between lower
down-south, I mean. You will please observe that
the Potomac river branches off to the left, going on-
wards up to Washington itself. (The word Potomac
has the accent on the second o, not the first. It isn't
pronounced Potomac, as you Britishers call the famous
river, but Potohmac.) Well, Osmond, dear coz, if
you look in through the State of Virginia on the east
-and you may as well do so now as at any other
time-you can't fail to find Richmond. Spot that,
please, because that is the Confederate capital. There
is Fredericksburg also on the Rappahannock, and the
Shenandoah River and the Blue Ridge Mountains.
Better keep those in mind, because if ever the Federals
get that way they're going to find some fighting in
front of them; and I guess they'll leave their scalps
lying about in these districts.
"' But bring your gaze seawards again past Fortress
Monroe and Cape Henry, and south away past Albe-







FORT SUMTER FALLS.


marle Sound, Wilmington, in South Carolina, and then
Charleston Bay or harbour.
"'What a long way south from Washington,' you
will naturally observe. 'What right had the Northern
States with a fort down there anyhow?' Well, that is
what I want to know.
"' South Carolina, you must know, Osmond, has been
called the Game-cock State because it seceded so boldly
in the month of December, and by its courageous con-
duct forced the other and wavering States to follow
its example.
"'Well, the State of South Carolina having 'seceshed',
as the Feds term it, the 'seceshers' naturally expected
that the Northern forces would clear out of the forts
bag and baggage, to prevent a collision with the
Southern troops.
"'But they were disappointed.
"'You see Major Anderson was commander of the
Federal forces at Charleston, and had had his head-
quarters at Fort Moultrie, but he now transferred
his soldiers and his command to Fort Sumter, which
he rightly considered a far stronger place.
"'Well, the South Carolina folks, through their
Governor, remonstrated with the Northern Govern-
ment at Washington-Buchanan then being President
-but in vain.
"'By and by Lincoln came into power, and once







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


more delegates went to Washington, asking for a
peaceable separation of the seceding States, and the
removal of Federal garrisons from Fort Sumter and
Fort Pickens in Florida. These two places of all the
strongholds on the Confederate sea-board alone dis-
played the stars and stripes.
"' Lincoln did not see his way to accede to the pro-
posal, but the matter hung fire for a time, and the
Carolinians had to subsist upon hope: not a very
satisfying dish, I may tell you.
"' Meanwhile, somewhat szb rosa, an expedition was
being fitted out for the relief of Fort Sumter.
"'You may wonder how I found all this out, Osmond.
Well, it is only lately I have done so, and the birdie
who told me may have been one of our prisoners, or I
may have gained the information in a letter from our
cousins Tom, John, and Charlie, who are fighting on
the Federal side, you know. I am not going to tell
you, Os, but if you ever come out here you will
know all and more. As early as January a steamer
called the Star of the West, under command of Captain
John MI'Gowan, had been despatched with provisions
and men to relieve the garrison of Fort Sumter, but
the batteries of the Confederates opened upon him,
and he was obliged to retire.
"' But now, on the 1st of April, President Lincoln
determined to succour the fort at all hazards. Charles-






FORT SUMTER FALLS.


ton should no longer be a menace to the States of the
Union. So he commissioned the big frigate Powhattan
for service. She was then lying at New York.
Captain Fox, a thorough navy sailor, was to have
charge of the relief, and besides, was to command
several other craft. They were a nondescript kind of
lot, all of different sizes, and, singularly enough, they
didn't all sail at the same time for the rendezvous.
The Powihattcn started about the 6th, and the others
followed day after day up to the 10th, Captain Fox
himself taking passage in the Bristol.
"'Now the failure of this expedition and the con-
sequent loss to the Federals of Fort Sumter seems to
have been owing to treachery, or to some stupid mis-
take. A heavy gale of wind arose, but even this
would hardly have prevented the relief of the fort
and its halfstarving garrison had the Powhattan
arrived in time with the men or stores, and para-
phernalia generally.
"' All honour be given to a brave enemy, and I must
say that Captain Fox did all in his power to assist
the garrison, but when he arrived and got the rest of
his fleet together he found that the battle was already
begun.
"'The facts are these, dear cousin, the President-
Davis, I mean, that is our dear king, you know-got
an inkling that Fox's expedition was on the wing and
(M 132) C






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


hurrying south to the garrison's relief, so he at once
sent General Beauregard, a well-known engineer, to
take command of the batteries of Charleston.
"'Finding them strong enough for anything, this brave
soldier at once sent a message to Major Anderson, de-
manding his surrender. This was on the llth of April,
and the invitation to give up the fort was promptly
but politely declined. At midnight an ultimatum was
despatched, but this was also refused, and so at day-
dawn of April 12th the shore forts opened fire on
Sumter.
"'Many a time the windows of Charleston had
rattled to the fire of mimic warfare, but all was now
deadly earnest, for the muttering thunder of those
great guns proclaimed the outbreak of the terrible
storm of civil war, that has now burst in such fury
over our dear native land.
"' The fort replied on both sides to the guns of the
Confederate batteries, and shot and shells burst, and
screamed, and roared over the water, the battle being
described as furious.
"'It was a bad time for the Federals in that fort,
Osmond, for more than once it was seen to be on fire,
and it turned out afterwards that although the garrison
were short of ammunition, they were so afraid of an
explosion, that they threw much of what they had into
the water.






FORT SUMTER FALLS.


"'Well, all that day the battle raged, and though peace
reigned when darkness fell, the bombardment was re-
commenced at daybreak with redoubled fury.
"'All this could only have one ending; and so, having
done his duty, like the brave soldier he undoubtedly
was, Major Anderson surrendered. But not before the
stars and stripes were actually shot away amidst a
perfect storm of shot and shell.
"'Several times, I am told, Captain Fox, who must
have spent a terribly anxious time, attempted to come
in upon the 13th, but a heavy sea ran, the fog was
rather thick, and the forts were all enveloped in a
cloud of dense smoke. Moreover, without the Pow-
hattan frigate he could do absolutely nothing.
"' So on the 14th, the day after the surrender, Major
Anderson and his garrison embarked on board the
Baltic and sailed away to the north, while our fine
fellows took possession of the fort, the first-fruits of
victory in what is going to be a glorious though
terrible war.
"'So fell Fort Sumter, Cousin Osmond, and having
told you so much, I shall re-trim my lamp and drink
my coffee.

"'That coffee was good, Cousin. Ah, there is no-
thing like war and the excitement of battle for giving
one an appetite!






36 FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.
"' Well, Os, as soon as the news of the fall of the fort
got up north, I am told that the fwrore it excited was
simply immense. War! war! war! was the cry. War
to the knife! War to avenge the insult to the brave
old flag that had been so ruthlessly dragged in the
dust!
"' War, yes; and they are going to have it too, more
than they may care for. But I was told also that the
enthusiasm of the Federals was now really very great,
and that each Northern state vied with the other as
to which should send the largest number of recruits,
and send them most quickly. President Lincoln, it is
said, only called for seventy-five thousand, but over
one hundred and ten thousand presented themselves
for enrolment!
"'Probably the next bloodshed in this war-though
it could not be called a battle-took place in Baltimore.
"'This happened only six days after the fall of Fort
Sumter. The first division of volunteers was hurrying
from Massachusetts in the far north to the Federal
capital, and were marching through Baltimore streets
towards the station for Washington, when they were
attacked by a furious mob. They fired, and then the
riot became a terrible pandemonium. The Federals
had to fight their way to the station, and even after
they had embarked they fired upon the mob on the
platform from the carriage windows. The mob replied







A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT.


with pluck and determination, riddling the carriages
with bullets, and killing or wounding not a few of the
Federal volunteers. But the train got steam up at
last, and comparative peace succeeded her departure.
"'Baltimore, you know, Osmond, or will know if you
glance at your map, is a charming city in Maryland,
and it was thought for a time that it would join with us.
"'Kentucky, you will note, lies to the west and a
trifle to the south of Virginia, part of which country
is on the sea-board, so to speak. The governor of
Kentucky has done a very foolish thing, as you should
know. In this state the younger men are wild for
war, but the older and more sedate prefer to remain in
the union. And so the governor has declared the
state neutral, and warns us that we must not fight in
his sacred territory. Just as if any state so situated
could be neutral in a great struggle such as this is
going to be.
"' But we shall soon see.'



CHAPTER IV.

A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT.

W ELL, Osmond,' the letter went on, 'calling for
recruits is a game that two can play at, and
our brave and kindly Jeff Davis has not been behind-







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


hand. He, too, called for recruits, and so quickly was
he answered, that very soon indeed this President had
an army fit to cope against any force the Northerners
were likely to bring.
"'I'll never forget the excitement in the little town
that lay not far from our plantation on the north-
western borders of South Carolina, ay, and the enthu-
siasm on the plantation itself, when the order for
recruiting reached us. I believe that father, Will, and
I were among the very first to join. Yes, we would
have to leave our dear old home behind us, leave
mother and sisters in sorrow and tears, but we were
going to fight for our native state, fight for our free-
dom, and, indeed, for our very lives, and the lives of
all that were dear to us. We would not be away long,
we told those dear ones. Victory would soon be ours,
for against us no enemy could possibly make a long
stand.
"'The slaves, we knew, would remain loyal whatever
happened, and there was big, brawny John M'Donald,
our manager, whom they looked up to as a kind of
second master.
"' I'll be a father to them all,' he told us as he shook
hands. 'And I only wish,' he added,' I could gang wi'
ye mysel'. Man, boys! my very fingers are itchin' to
get a grip o' some o' they Feds.'
"'And so we left. I say nothing more about the







A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT.


parting, the kisses, the prayers, the tears. It is all
too recent, and tends to unman one.
"' The streets of our town, when we reached it, were
filled with the populace, and they seemed to have
taken leave of their senses.
"'They were shouting, singing, waving their arms
aloft, shaking hands, ay, and weeping in their very
excitement. But, Osmond, I am proud and happy to
tell you that I scarcely saw a single young fellow
under the influence of drink.
'" It was night when we joined the dep6t. We knew
the commandant, and he did all he could for our
comfort. Our beds were not beds of down, however,
nor have they been since, nor will they be until we
whip the Federals finally, and make peace in Wash-
ington.
"'We were paraded next day, and drill was com-
menced in earnest. Well, it was somewhat of a rough
parade. Accustomed as you are, my dear cousin, to
your faultlessly dressed regiments, with snowy belts,
glittering accoutrements, and coats of scarlet, you
would have stood aghast on first beholding our parade.
"'We had arms served out to us that first day, but
it was more for fashion's sake than anything else. It
would have been better to serve out jackets, shirts,
hats, or shoes. But then there weren't any, you know;
and most unkempt, uncouth tatterdemalions some of







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


us were. But one thing would have pleased you-the
look of determination and defiance on every face.
"'After we had been put through our preliminary
facings, the commandant, a gray-bearded old soldier,
made a kind of a speech, as he puffed away at a big
cigar.
"'Boys,' he said, 'I guess we ain't a great deal to
look at, just yet. But such as we are, President Jeff
Davis is welcome to us. We ain't much to look at,
but we'll trim down, you bet. We've got to march in
a few days' time to the north and the east, and by and
by we've got to meet the Yankees. They call us Rebs.
Wall, I guess we'll show 'em what Rebs can do. We've
got to beat 'em, we've got to lick 'em, we've got to
whip 'em into teetotal skirrie-mush, and if there's a
single man in this here regiment that feels he hasn't
the heart to take part in the whipping-match, why, let
him fall out. What! nobody falls out? Boys, we're
all going to fight. Hurrah!'
"'The commandant waved his cap aloft, and such a
wild cheer rent the sky as I never heard before, and
haven't since. The street urchins joined in, and the
girls too, yes, and the very babies in arms waved their
wee red chubby fists, and joined the wild shout and
laughed and crowed, as if it were the best fun imagin-
able.
"'Well, to make a long story short, father and Will






A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT.


and I got each the rank of officer, and in a few days'
time we were en route for the neighbourhood of
Richmond.
"'Our ranks were swollen as we marched onwards,
and very soon we were a very respectable little army
-in numbers, that is, and, I may add, in spirit and in
daring as well.
"'I do not mean to say, Osmond, that every man
among us was imbued with a purely patriotic spirit.
Far from it. There were in our ranks both good and
bad. There were spirit-drinking ne'er-do-weels who
had joined the service by way of a change, or because
they were stone-broke and hadn't a cent wherewith to
bless themselves; there were tramps by the dozen, the
wretched and idle castaways of the world, who had
joined us as a mere matter of business and speculation,
that is, with a lively eye to booty; there were men
who had quarrelled with their wives-poor fellows!
and boys who had been jilted by their sweethearts-
these last were fond of meandering around the camp
alone after nightfall and quoting poetry by the fur-
long-and last, if not least, there were desperadoes
from Texas, from Mexico, and the far south generally,
swaggerers as a rule these were, but fond of fighting,
even for fighting's sake.
"'On the whole, however, I think that in our regiment
the good prevailed.







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


"' I must say that we all set ourselves heart and soul
to learn the drill, and all the outs and ins of camp-life
as soon as we possibly could, and the first time we
were inspected by a real live general he expressed
himself very pleased with our appearance and, as he
phrased it, 'our soldierly bearing'. I know that
these last words made our rank and file proud. I
looked along my company as the general uttered
them, and I was proud to see-yes, proud is the word,
my boy-to see every man, mechanically, as it were,
brace himself up more squarely, while every eye grew
brighter and every brow was lowered, as if each man
had registered a vow there and then to do or die in
the glorious cause.
"'We had not been a week on the road before strag-
glers began to drop in from the north. Mostly deserters
these were from the Federal ranks. Now deserters as
a rule receive no very gushing welcome from the
regiments they honour with a visit. But these men
were not ordinary deserters. They really were Southern-
ers at heart, who had enlisted in Federal regiments,
but had taken the earliest opportunity of getting away.
"' But they brought with them some ugly stories of
the Northern soldiery, which I am sorry to say,
Osmond, were greedily listened to and unhesitatingly
credited.
"' The Federals, they said, looked forward to victory.






A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT.


They believed that we could never fight, never stand
before them; that we possessed no more courage than
as many boarding-school girls; that we were mere
butter-and-bread soldiers, and would fly before the
Northern army. And, said the new-comers, the
determination of the Northern soldiers, officers as well
as men, is to plunder, to slay, to sack, and to burn.
They had only one motto, and that was:-

'Booty and Beauty!'

"'This is horrible, but I for one do not believe it,
neither does Will; and, besides, I am sure that our dear
cousins in Northern Ohio, Tom and John and Charlie,
would never fight side by side with men who had such
a dreadful motto as that.
"'But oh, dear Osmond, does not civil war seem to
be a terrible thing, when one has to draw the sword
against one's own flesh and blood? Soon may it end,
I say. That is, you know, the sooner we beat the
Feds out of their skins the better.
"' Well, dear boy, if I have given you to believe that
to-day's battle is the first real fight, I think I am
right, but more than a month ago the deserters told
us that success had already crowned the arms of our
foes.
"'This is the news they brought.
"'Our people have been obliged to abandon the







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


attempt they at first considered feasible,-that is, of
marching right into, and seizing Washington.
"' Secondly, on the south bank of the Potomac, and
about fifty miles north-west of Washington, lies, or
rather stood, the arsenal of Harper's Ferry. The
Virginians-our fellows-attacked this place, and the
officer in charge set fire to it; but after despoiling it,
the Southerners abandoned it to the Federals. Folly!
"'Thirdly, although the Virginians seized the great
navy yard of Gosport near Norfolk they, curiously
enough, left Fortress Monroe on Chesapeake Bay in
the possession of the enemy. This fortress would
have been, if held by us, of the greatest advantage,
strategically considered. N.B.-You will notes my
cousin, that I am quite a soldier already. No one but
a soldier could use such a scientific phrase as that last
-' strategically considered'.
"'But, joking apart, Os, the capture of the navy yard
is something immense. It contains foundries, docks,
ship-building yards, and a huge arsenal. About a
million pounds of gunpowder have fallen into our
hands, five hundred Dahlgren guns, and any quantity
of shot and shell. Hurrah! for our brave Virginians.
"'Fourthly, if the deserters are to be believed,
General M'Dowell, the commander-in-chief of the
Federal forces, has been driving our troops like as
many sheep right before him down south.






A BRAVE BUT RAGGED REGIMENT.


"'The last news brought by a runaway would have
been funny if it had not been quite so sad. I give it
to you for what it is worth, Osmond, and I myself am
willing to believe just half of it-the second half, mind
you. But first I want you to write three names upon
the tablets of your memory, because you'll hear of the
men again-
General M'Clellan.
General Rosecrans.
General Butler.

"'Well, the first half of the story is this:-The Generals
M'Clellan and Rosecrans, about the first week in July,
defeated the Confederates, that is our side, at Rich
Mountain, killed two hundred, and captured seven
guns, and a thousand prisoners. But the deserter
who told us this, and said that he himself was in the
fight, told us also that the Federal forces were as ten
to one, so the North has not much to boast of, even if
it be true.
"' The second half of the story is the one generally
credited by us, and it is just here where the fun comes
in. For there was lying within ten miles of Hampton
-the headquarters of the Federals-a Confederate
camp of about a thousand men. On the 9th of June,
bold General Butler determined to attack this camp.
So he issued from Fortress Monroe at night in two
strong divisions. These two took different routes in






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


order to surprise the 'Rebs' from two directions, and
so confuse and confound them.
"'As ill-luck (for Butler) would have it, neither of
the two divisions found the 'Rebs'. But they found
each other, and, forgetting the watchword, naturally
supposed they had met the foe. So at it they went,
hammer and tongs, and many were killed on either
side before the mistake was discovered. The pity is,
Osmond, they did not annihilate one another like the
Kilkenny cats.
"' After the mistake was discovered they combined,
and, coming upon the position of the Confederate
camp, attacked in force, but the Federal Major Win-
throp, while gallantly leading the charge, was shot
dead by a Confederate drummer-boy, and soon after
this the Federals were in full flight back to their
fortress, badly beaten and wholly demoralized.

"'And now, Osmond, we come right away to the
battle at Bull Run. And I am just going to tell you
all I know about it straight away. But this, mind
you, isn't a very great deal, because no one can be in
two places at the same time, and one can't describe
much more than one actually sees.
"' But before beginning this I happened to saunter
towards our General Beauregard's headquarters. He
was writing a despatch on the top of a drum, but gave






THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN.


me a kindly welcome, and told quite a deal that I
didn't know, and this information I am now going to
impart to you.'"


CHAPTER V.

THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN.

W AIT a moment, Osmond," cried Eva, her eyes
sparkling with a kind of merry mischief.
She rose as she spoke, and going to the sofa, picked
up a newspaper, with which she returned to her seat
by her brother's knee.
"Can this be true?" she said, smiling.
"Read it, Eva, and I'll tell you."
It is printed in the Daily Tickler, anyhow, and is
headed:-' The Battle of Bull Run', and runs as
follows:-'This terrific fight between the almighty
Federal forces and the tatterdemalion legions of the
sunny South might better have been called the battle
of cows' run. At first both armies appeared equally
surprised that they had met at all. Then it seemed
to occur to them that they had met to fight. So they
went for each other with all the vim and pluck of a
pair of pug dogs. By all accounts the fighting was
awful, for they kept on from morn till dewy eve, with
the splendid result that no less than five were killed






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


and nine wounded. But for the presence of some
Scotch and Irish, it is stated that no one would have
been either killed or wounded. At sunset, both armies
were in full retreat in opposite directions. The conse-
quence is that both claim the victory, and both are
welcome to it; but at this rate the Civil 'War' must
last for a thousand years at least, then the millennium
will come.'"
"Well," said Osmond, laughing, "the Daily Tickler
goes in for being a funny pennyworth, and no doubt
an occasional joke improves a paper of this sort; but
let me read more of Harry's letter."
"Go on, then," said Eva.
"'I fear,' continues Cousin Harry, 'that you are
already heartily tired of my long letter, but I'll be as
brief as I can. One's first battle, you know, must
always be considered an event in one's life, like a girl's
first ball.
"' I daresay, Osmond, I must tell you the meaning of
the name 'Bull Run'. A 'run' is American for a
smallish river, and Bull Run, rising among the moun-
tains away west and Shenandoah way, and receiving
several tributaries in its flow, falls into the wide part
of the Potomac below Washington and Alexandria.
"' The course of the stream Bull Run is about from
north-west to south-east, and latterly due east. It
receives from directly north the Cub Run, and this






THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN.


flows past the village of Centerville, then held by
Federal.
"'Our position before the battle was on the south
side of the Bull Run, with the railway bridge on our
right, and a stone or turnpike bridge on our left.
"'Right athwart our rear ran the railway from
Shenandoah Valley through the Gap to Manassas
Junction. Now Johnston, one of our generals, had
been sent to the Shenandoah to defend it against a
supposed advance of the Federals in that direction, the
Federal general, Patterson, being opposed to him; but
finding it was only a feint, he made haste to get back
on to Manassas Junction with the troops, to assist
General Beauregard of Sumter fame, who there had an
army of 20,000 men, with his right stretching towards
Alexandria and the Potomac.
"'The Federal general M'Dowell had nearly 25,000
men in front of Washington, extending from the Chain
Bridge to Alexandria. As early as the 16th, M'Dowell
had received orders to attack Beauregard, and he
advanced with 25,000 with this intention. We are
told by prisoners that on his way to Centerville, which
we had fallen back from, the weather was terribly hot,
and the army, which was little better than a mob in
gay uniform, moved on singing and joking, sometimes
even stopping and scrambling for blackberries by the
wayside.
(M132) D






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


"' M'Dowell's game seemed to be to turn the Con-
federate left with all the power he could command,
and thus strike at the railway, and prevent Johnston
from getting up. Many of his troops, however, who
had been only enlisted for three months, discovered
that their time was up, and took French leave. Fight-
ing was not to their taste.
"' However, it appears that M'Dowell did all a brave
man could under the circumstances. His two generals,
Tyler and Hunter, were perhaps a little slow in their
movements. Had they been able to come to the scratch
on the 19th, or even the 20th, matters might have
ended somewhat differently; at any rate, the Federals
would have had a better chance. But on the 20th
Johnston had already joined Beauregard, a fact of
which M'Dowell was not cognisant.
"'Well, Osmond, our left flank extended up the
stream past the stone bridge towards the ford called
Sudley's Spring, and you see the plan was this:-Tyler,
and M'Dowell's other generals, Hunter and Heinetzel-
man, were to be on the move on Sunday morning, the
21st, by two o'clock: Tyler was to march upon the
stone bridge, and hover about there as if making
ready to cross, but in reality only feinting, and wait-
ing till the other Federal generals, with a strong force,
should get up and cross the stream at Sudley's Spring.
He would then commence to cross in reality, just as






THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN.


Hunter and Co. 'came down like a wolf on the fold',
attacking us in left flank and rear.
"' It was prettily arranged. But we were not going
to be idle, for we knew that as soon as Federal
General Patterson, who had been keeping Johnston in
check in the Shenandoah Valley, missed him, he would
hurry down to join M'Dowell. Our plan, then, was
to try to smash M'Dowell first.
"' But we were not quite in time to take the initia-
tive.
"' I think you must know, Osmond, that some of our
fighting ancestors, Scotch and English, would have
pushed on over the stream that very night-it was
moonlight, and there were several fords. However,
they lay still in camp.
"'Both Will and I knew that a great battle was to
take place next morning. About ten last night I met
my dear brother, and all by ourselves we went for a
stroll in the moonlight. We knew the pass-word, so
of course there was no danger.
"'We passed quietly through a portion of the great
camp. The men sat or lay here, and there, and anyhow,
mostly smoking and yarning. A few, I believe, were
praying. But the men, as a whole, gave us the im-
pression of being unusually hilarious. Laughing,
joking, and singing were heard on all sides.
"'Mostly bluff,' brother Will said to me quietly.






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


'They are trying to hide their anxiety and fears for
the morrow.'
"'I said nothing, and presently we climbed a little
eminence and sat down on a stone. I looked upwards.
The sky was mostly clear and starry, but ever and
anon a cloud passed over the moon's clear disc. Before
us was the valley of the stream, with a yellow haze
lying close over the water; behind us the forests
around Manassas, and away to the west, and but
dimly seen, the everlasting hills.
"'But for the murmur uprising from the camp the
silence would have been striking, for not a leaf or
blade of grass stirred in the air.
"'Mostly bluff, brother!' Will repeated.
"'Don't you feel afraid, Will?' I asked.
"'Henry, I know you do. Nay, I shall not call it
fear, but only anxiety, and though older than you, I
do not wish to die to-morrow. I am not ready. Nor
do I wish to leave my sisters and mother.'
"'I was silent.
"'Harry,' he said presently, 'let us kneel down
beside this stone and pray. We needn't pray aloud.'
"' We did not pray aloud, Osmond, but you know
that God, who heareth in secret, can openly reward.
"' After we sat up we sang a simple psalm. It was
not one of those that invoke the God of Bethel to
pour down destruction and vials of wrath upon our







THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN.


enemies. Our enemies, after all, were our country-
men and our brothers. And there, last night, beneath
the moon and holy stars, we could not help feeling
this.
"' What shall we sing?' I said.
"'Be merciful,' answered Will laconically. 'Tune
MJartyrdom,' he added.
"'And so we lifted up our voices and sang:

"' Be merciful to me, 0 God;
Thy mercy unto me
Do Thou extend; because my soul
Doth put her trust in Thee:

"'Yea, in the shadow of Thy wings
My refuge I will place,
Until these sad calamities
Do wholly overpass.


"'0 Lord, exalted be Thy name
Above the heavens to stand;
Do Thou Thy glory far advance
Above both sea and land.'

"' The last notes had hardly died away when we
were conscious that we were not alone. A footstep
advancing was heard behind us. We grasped our
revolvers, and stood on the qui vive.
"'No need, Osmond, no need. It was Father!
"'Dear boys,' he said, 'and so I have found you?'
"' I don't know, dear cousin, what came over me just






FUR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


then, but I grasped the hand he extended to me, and
burst into tears.
"'But I must do myself the credit of saying, Os,
that I did not weep to-day. Many there may have
been who shed tears last night as well as myself, but
in the battle of to-day I saw nothing but deeds of
valour all around.
"'Well, although Tyler did not get to the Stone
Bridge so soon as he expected, nor Hunter and Co. to
Sudley's Spring, they reached these points quite early
enough for us. A feint had been made at Beauregard's
right, which might, however, have developed into a
battle-centre had he weakened his force at this point
to come to our assistance. Though he soon discovered
that the main attack was to be on our left, he feared
to help us.
"' So by mid-day our flank was turned, and we were
being thrust back before one o'clock. It was at this
critical moment that our brave Jackson, who was in
reserve, was ordered up.
"' He took possession of a pine-covered ridge or
plateau betwixt our main army and Sudley's Spring,
where we were being discomfited. Up the slope to-
wards this plateau came the stragglers from our left,
fleeing-I fear that is the right word-before
M'Dowell's furious Federals. Bee, one of our generals,
addressed Jackson,






THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN.


"'They are beating us, general,' he cried.
"'Then we'll give them the bayonet,' answered
Jackson.
"' The words inspired General Bee. Sword in hand,
he now rallied his men.
"'Yonder,' he cried, 'stands Jackson like a stone
wall.'
"' Hurrah for Stonewall Jackson!' shouted the men.
"'This turned the tide of battle, and when at last
sturdy 'Stonewall Jackson', as the men are going to
call him, was reinforced by Kirby Smith with 2000
fresh soldiers, and Beauregard ordered a general
advance, the battle for a time became furious.
"'But soon the Federals appeared cowed and panic-
stricken, and began to retreat. That retreat ended in
a rout, Osmond. Oh, we were wild, wild now, my
cousin. Our swords and bayonets had drank blood.
All fear was banished; in its place was wild enthu-
siasm or exultation.
"' How the cannons thundered! How deadly was
the song of the rifles, and the zip-zip-ziping of the
bullets. Just then, Osmond, war seemed to me the
most natural thing in creation, and certainly the most
glorious,
"'But our victory was soon assured.
"'Our cavalry put the fear of death upon the enemy,
and they fled for dear life. We pursued them towards






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Leesburg and Centerville till the darkness of night hid
them from our view, capturing arms and field batteries
and standards.
"'I must now close my letter, dear cousin, for the
night is far spent, and none of us knows what the
morrow may have in store for us.
"' Our loss did you say? About 400 killed and 1500
wounded. The enemy lost more. But, oh, Osmond, I
thank the dear Lord to whom we sang last night that
Father and Will are safe and sound.
"' God bless you, Os, my boy, and my sweet little
cousin Eva.
"'Good-bye, good-bye! Hurrah, hurrah!'"
So ended this heroic letter.
If it seems in some degree bombastic, the reader
must remember that the writer was little more than a
boy.


CHAPTER VI.

OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE FOR AMERICA.

IT was the middle of August when Eva and Osmond
received that long, bold letter from their cousin
Henry, and Osmond soon after began to make pre-
parations for entering Oxford. At least he was sup-
posed to be doing so. Indeed, he ought to have been
studying all summer






OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE FOR AMERICA. 57

I fear, however, that study was not very much in
Osmond's way. The weather, he told his mother,
oppressed him very much, and he seemed to be always
under it. When it was hot and sultry he could not
read. It was so much better and more delightful to
take his stick in his hand and, with great Wolf by his
side, journey far away over the hills to another glen,
where there was no smoke and plenty of wild birds
and wild flowers. He generally took a botanical case
over his shoulder, thus making himself and other
people believe that he was studying botany. The
botanical case was full when he started, for it con-
tained his own and Wolf's luncheon, but I fear it was
empty when he returned. Well, after all, hot weather
does make one sleepy, and books of science appear
doubly dull when one feels thus.
When it rained Osmond gave up all thoughts of
work, and preferred remaining in a room ironically
called his study. He just lay on the sofa and read
books of adventure or Walter Scott's novels or poems.
Nice preparation this for entering the university
in October, you will say. Perhaps, but between you
and me and the binnacle, when the end of August
came, Osmond had no idea of entering the university
at all.
The truth is, that since he had read that letter of
Henry's, the desire to cross the Atlantic and to become






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


a soldier in the Southern cause had become almost too
strong for his reason. He fought and struggled against
it, but all to no purpose. Even in his dreams he was
fighting side by side with his American cousin and
gallantly leading on a company of "the boys" to
death or victory.
One autumn day he sat poring over a book of higher
mathematics until his senses began to reel. I question
very much if he understood anything of what he had
been reading. Anyhow he shut the book with a bang
at last, and then flung it right to the other end of the
room.
Wolf got up with rather a sad expression of coun-
tenance, and, after retrieving the book, laid it solemnly
on his master's knee.
"Look here, Wolf," said Os, "I tell you I won't and
can't. I am going to be a soldier-I am bound to be a
soldier. There is no use fighting against fate any
longer. What think you, Wolf?"
Wolf wagged his tail.
"My father and mother won't consent to my going
over to help Cousin Henry, I know. They want me
to enter one of the learned professions. They have
given me my choice. But what care I for learned
professions. The law is too harsh and dry. Medicine
is too sloppy, and as for the Church-why, I'm not
good enough. So there! And," he went on, laying






OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE FOR AMERICA. 59

his hand on his great dog's head, "you remember,
Wolf-of course you do-these lines in Shakespeare's
Julius CGesar:
"' There is a tide in the affairs of men
Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune:
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.'"

Again Wolf wagged his tail as if the matter were
as plain to him as a pikestaff.
"I'm going straight away over the herring pond,
Wolf. I don't know yet how I'm going to get there.
I only know I am going, and you can come too, if
you're a good dog."
Wolf jumped up, put a paw on each of Osmond's
shoulders, and licked his cheek.
"Very well, Wolf-a bargain's a bargain. Now,
here is a letter from Kenneth Reid, a very dear Eton
friend of mine, inviting me to Liverpool to spend a
few days with him. Wolf, I'm going there, and after
that we'll trust to something turning up."
Osmond's parents had no objection to his Liverpool
trip, though little Eva was very sad.
He packed his traps that day.
Ah! little did his mother think when she kissed
him good-bye next morning, that long eventful years
must elapse before she would see her boy again, if ever
she did.







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


But as for Eva, coming events seemed to cast their
shadows before, and she threw her arms around his
neck and melted into an agony of tears when he came
to say farewell.
O," she wept, "I shall never, never see my brave
brother again. I know where you are going, Os-O,
I know, I know."
"Hush, hush, Eva. O, pray don't breathe a word of
what you think to father, mother, or Dick."
Her grief almost unmanned Osmond, but he managed
to tear himself away at last, with a terribly big lump
in his throat, and more moisture in his eyes than he
considered it right that a soldier of fortune should
show.


Kenneth Reid was at the station to meet him, and
a carriage was waiting to drive the two of them away
to Kenneth's home in the suburbs.
His welcome here was a very warm one. Kenneth
was about Osmond's age, but he had many younger
brothers and sisters, and all were rejoiced to see one
whom they had heard so much about.
That very night in their bedroom, Osmond made a
confidant of Kenneth.
He commenced by reading to him the whole of
Henry's heroic letter.
Then he painted a soldier's life while on the war-






OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE FOR AMERICA. 61

path, until Kenneth's eyes sparkled and his face glowed
with excitement. Osmond fired his best shot last.
"And I'm going out to join, Harry!" he said.
You, Osmond,-you, old fellow!" cried Kenneth.
Yes, me," said Os, in beautiful defiance of grammar,
" me and Wolf there."
Have you money? And how will you go, and will
your parents permit you?"
"I haven't much money, Kenn. But I have 13,
12s. 6d. saved from pocket money. I have a good kit.
I'll go in the cheapest way I can. I don't care if I
have to work my passage out. I'll write to my parents
just before the ship sails, and ask their forgiveness."
After this and till long past twelve o'clock, Osmond
continued to tell his friend all about the honour and
glory attached to a soldier's life.
"Are you asleep, Kenn?" he said at last.
No, old man, only thinking."
Then Kenneth got up out of his own bed, and ap-
proached that of Osmonds.
Osmond," he said, and he looked very serious as he
held out his hand, which his friend took in his.
"Yes, Kenn."
Osmond, you're not going alone."
"No, I'm taking honest Wolf there."
"Yes, and you're taking me!"






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


That night I believe both those boys-well, they
were little else-slept only to dream of
battles, sieges, fortunes,
of most disastrous chances,
Of moving accidents by flood and field,
Of hair-breadth 'scapes i' the imminent deadly breach.

Yet, strange to say, when they awoke next morn-
ing, instead of the sunlight banishing all their ro-
mances and resolves, it appeared but to confirm them.
It is due to myself to say, and to say in this very
place, that I am but the historian of Osmond and his
friend Kenneth, and that I by no means approve of
their determination to go abroad in search of adven-
tures without the consent of their parents. Yet such
things have been done before, and I greatly fear they
may be done again. I have only one thing to say on
their behalf-namely, that the American Civil War
took great effect on the minds of juvenile Britain. I
was a boy in those days myself, and well remember it.
Now, just three days after they had made their
romantic resolve, Os and Kenn had a kind of an
adventure down at the docks, where they had taken to
wander, in order to look at the ships and build castles
in the air.
One very large and handsome steamer, lying a little
way off, and evidently taking in cargo and preparing
for sea, particularly attracted their attention. She






OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE FOR AMERICA. 63

was a screw, and was well rigged with tallish iron
masts, and evidently meant to do a good bit of sailing
when wind and weather permitted.
"Look!" said Kenn, who was more of a sailor than
Osmond. "She has already hoisted the Blue Peter,
which means, you know, that she will soon sail."
"That's so," said Osmond.
"And this is a boat coming from her," continued
Kenn. "Evidently the captain's. That is he sitting,
tiller-ropes in hand, in the stern-sheets."
Presently the boat-a very prettily painted one
and almost new-rasped alongside of the steps, and
the officer sprang on shore. He was a tall, powerful-
looking man of apparently fifty years of age, with a
sprinkling of gray in his pointed beard.
"Hullo! young fellows," he said, as soon as he
came up the steps. "Excuse me addressing you, but
I couldn't pass that dog without a word. May I pat
him? He won't scupper me, will he?"
"No," said Osmond proudly. "Wolf is very kind,
but when there is any reason to fight, why he goes at
it like a steam ram."
"Ha! ha! ha! Just like an Englishman. Well
spoken, boy. I like the looks of you as well as your
dog. Wish I had a score of young fellows like you on
board the saucy Kathleen O'Mara yonder."
A sudden thought occurred to Osmond like a flash.






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Are you going to the States, sir?" he said.
The officer didn't reply, but he looked Osmond up
and down.
"Why do you ask, boy?"
We're not boys-we're young men, and I want
to go to the Southern States to be a soldier, because I
have cousins there, and Kenneth here is my friend, and
is coming along for company's sake."
"Is that true? No tricks? No kid ?"
Osmond's face flushed with anger.
We are gentlemen's sons," he answered, "and we
would not tell a mean lie to save our lives."
Forgive me, boys-forgive me. I am going to my
lodgings not far from here. Come with me and we'll
talk it over."
They were soon all seated together in a cosy room,
the captain of the Kathleen O'llMar indulging in a
weed.
"Well, now," he said, "I don't like taking you,
but if I don't some one less respectable may. And I
would be kind to you. Yonder is my ship-a Britisher,
and bound, cleared in fact, or nearly so, for the East
Indies. But if you come with me, not forgetting that
lovely dog, you shall walk the decks of a ship bound
for Charleston in less than a fortnight. When can
you be ready?"
When must we?"







OSMOND DETERMINES TO MAKE F1OR AMERICA. 65

To-morrow night."
We'll be here."
"Bravo! You're true Britishers. Shake hands with
Captain Brewer, of the Kathleen O'M3lara-and, look
here, say nothing about this interview to any one."
Then they talked for half an hour on different sub-
jects, after which they parted.
"I say, aren't we lucky?" were the first words that
Osmond spoke to his friend when once more on the
street.
"That we are. And now we have only to prepare.
I have 15."
"O!" cried Osmond, "I do believe, Kenn, we never
asked Captain Brewer what our passage money would
be."
"Well, really no. How stupid! But with one thing
and another I quite forgot."
"Never mind," said Osmond, "we'll meet the cap-
tain and chance it. He seems a decent fellow. We
will just tell him all, and if he turns us back, why, it
can't be helped."
That night they quietly packed their boxes. They
also wrote letters-long ones-to their parents. Os-
mond wrote to Eva also.
Next morning at breakfast they announced their
intention of running over to spend a few days with a
friend near New Brighton.
( M 132 ) E






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Alas! that heroes of mine should ever tell a fib-
even a little white one. Just for the time being I am
a trifle ashamed of them.
But the letters they wrote went some way towards
making amends, and I hope their future conduct as
soldiers of fortune will not be such as shall cast a slur
upon the proud name of Englishman.



CHAPTER VII.

AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.

IT was late before Osmond and his friend Kenneth
got on board, but soon afterwards the Kathleen
O'Mara slipped away from her moorings and began
working seaward.
The night was beautifully clear, with a bit of a
breeze blowing straight in from the west, and a bright,
round moon fighting aloft with little clouds that ever
and anon tried to obscure her silvery disc, but seemed
to melt away as they touched her.
Osmond and Kenneth were both on the quarter-
deck, and the captain was on the bridge, but as soon
as he had put things a bit straight, and had finished
piping orders down to the engine-room, he came below.
He approached the young men-as they chose to be
considered-laughing and rubbing his hands







AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.


"Look here, lads," he said, "you're enjoying the
moonshine, I reckon."
"It really is a goodly sight, as Byron would have
said." This from Osmond. "That moon, sir, sailing
through the snow-white clouds."
"0, bother the moon!" interrupted Captain Brewer.
"She's a fraud. You must know that I always under-
stood she was made of green cheese. Well, young sir,
being at Greenwich last summer, I had the chance of a
peep through a big Observatory spy-glass. 'Shall I
turn her on to Jupiter or Sirius?' said the boss-in-
waiting. 'Jupiter and Sirius be blowed!' says I; 'turn
her on to the moon; I want to see for myself if she is
made of green cheese.' Well, young friends, I had a
look accordingly."
"And was it green cheese?" said Osmond laughing.
"No, sir, not a bit of it. It was Gruyere, right
enough. I saw the holes1 as plain as you please, sure
as I'm a living soul and my name's Ben Brewer.
"But come, lads," he continued, "I didn't drop down
from the bridge to teach you astronomy, but to warn
you to turn in. Osmond, I know you are a poet by
the build o' your figure-head, nevertheless I assure
you that Father Neptune doesn't respect even poetry
and romance. Soon's we open out a sea-way, and that

I The surface of the moon is indented with what appears to be the open-
ings of extinct volcanoes.






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


won't be long with this wind, it'll be a bit choppy, and
then-well, you had better turn in. I'll give you half
an hour to chat with my wife and little daughter;
you'll find them below, then you'll bunk up. Hear?"
"Yes," said Osmond, "but I had no idea there were
ladies on board. And we haven't any dress clothes,
have we, Kenn?"
"Never a stitch!"
"Ha, ha!" laughed the jolly skipper. I knew I'd
take the wind out of your trysails, and bring your
square sails all a-shiver. But keep your minds easy,
boys. We don't dress for dinner on board the bold
Kathleen O'Mcara. Down below with you. Off you
rip."
The saloon was a very beautiful room indeed,
though by no means large, and most tastefully fur-
nished with mirrors, flowers in vases, and curtains; it
looked as much like a lady's boudoir as anything else.
Mrs. Brewer, book in hand, was reclining on a sofa,
but she raised herself and gave the boys, who looked
a little shy, a smiling and kindly welcome.
Osmond noticed that she was beautiful, with soft
dark eyes, red full lips, and teeth like pearls. Not at
all old looking, although, strange to say, her hair was
as white as snow or nearly so.
"Mrs. Brewer, I-" began Osmond, and then stuck
fast.






AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.


"Mrs. Brewer, I-" began Kenneth, but he stuck
fast also, and blushed a little, as innocent boys will
sometimes.
Mrs. Brewer laughed a silvery laugh.
You didn't expect to meet ladies on board?" she
said.
"No, really I-I-I-"
"Let me introduce you to my daughter, anyhow."
She waved her hand as she spoke.
The boys looked round.
Sitting on a big easy rocking-chair, with her legs
drawn up like a kangaroo's, was a very pretty child
some twelve summers' old. Yes, I must say summers;
winters could have had nothing to do with Lucy
Brewer's life, surely.
Her long hair-very long and straight it was-
hung carelessly on her shoulders, and her eyelashes
swept her cheeks as she looked down to carefully fold
a leaf in her book before she shut it. Then she turned
her large Spanish-like eyes first on Osmond, then on
Kenneth,-so coolly too!
Boys," she said, and she looked as wise as a little
old woman-" boys, you don't look over happy, either
of you. Now just take stools right away and sit down
as close to the fire and me as you can get without
fighting about us. I can make you both feel at home
in less than no time. Dr. Peter Podophyllon has got






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


to murder old Miss Wanlaoe before Mother moves off
that sofa. So she won't be in the ring to-night."
Murder?" said Osmond. "I don't understand."
0, you funny boy! But, there, don't look so
scared. It's in the story-book she is reading."
"Now I understand."
Osmond was about to sit down when with one
bound Lucy sprang off the chair, leaving it swinging
to and fro. She darted past the boys, and next
moment was kneeling beside great Wolf,-who had
just looked in,-with both her arms around his neck
and her cheek to his ear.
"Oh, what a darling!" she cried. "I declare the
tears have come to my eyes. This is the dog Father
told me about. 0, Mother, look!
"Now, boys, make room for Wolf on the bear's
skin. I hereby install him as first favourite on board
the brave ship Kathleen O'Mara."
And so this strange child rattled on for fully five
minutes in a way that would have astonished, perhaps
even shocked, the British Mrs. Grundy. But never-
theless, both Osmond and Kenneth soon found them-
selves perfectly at home. The time flew very quickly
by.
The black steward came in all too soon, Osmond
thought, to say that the lamp was lit in their state-
room.






AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.


So they took the hint, said good-night somewhat
reluctantly and retired, Wolf following close at their
heels.
Fires were banked, and the Kathleen O'MJcara went
staggering down the Irish Channel on a beam wind.
The sea was choppy or lumpy, and the breeze so high
that it quite blew the wave tops off, and sent them
flying inboard like spray from a cataract, as high as
the top of the funnel itself.
Osmond and Kenneth had not forgotten to bring
oilskins with them, and natty little sou-westers. They
were on deck next morning, before breakfast, with
Wolf, but, truth to tell, neither had very much appetite.
They determined to fight Mr. Mal de Mer 1, however,
and this is really the only way to get clear of the
gentleman. Just bounce him, and he'll be bounced.
Give in to him, and he'll stick to you like a thistle-
burr to a Highland plaid. Wolf didn't know what to
make of the situation; he went flopping and walloping
about in the most uncouth and wondrous fashion, but
when the sailors laughed at him, Wolf laughed too,
and he had a splendid big mouth. When he smiled.
the smile seemed to extend all the way down to his
tail. This was more apparent than real.
By and by Lucy came up. She was arrayed in a
very pretty ulster and sailor's hat, and as she looked
1 Sea-sickness.






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


a little subdued Osmond thought the child must
be ill.
He lifted his hat and hoped she was not. As he did
so the ship gave a lurch that landed him on all-fours
in the lee scuppers. Then Lucy laughed, till the
binnacle seemed to ring.
"Oh, no," she answered, "I'm not ill. I'm a regular
old sailor. But, poor boys, you both look pale. Oh,
I know what will make us all happy."
"What?"
"Breakfast."
The black steward came up just then and rang a
big bell, and the quarter-deck people went below at once.
Wolf went too.
But for the fact that the cups and saucers and delf
generally were rather fidgetty, the breakfast was a
most comfortable one, and everybody seemed to do
justice to it. When it was over, Captain Brewer lit
his cigar, and beckoned Osmond and Kenneth to
follow him. He led the way into an after cabin or
office, where a tall, raw-boned man was seated with a
slate on his knee working out a sum of some sort. So
thought Osmond, but it really was the reckoning.
My mate," said Captain Brewer, and the mate re-
turned the boys' salute.
Be seated, lads, and we'll talk. Osmond, I know
you want to ask some questions."






AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.


Yes, I do," said Os promptly.
Well, heave round."
We want to know how much our passage money
will be. We are poor, and should like to work it."
"Passage money? Eh? Why, boys, I and the
Southern States will be in your debt very much in-
deed. So consider yourselves our guests."
A thousand thanks. Kenneth, aren't we in luck?"
"That we are," said Kenn.
"Now, sir, one other question. We shall indeed be
sorry to leave this ship, but we should like to know
where and when we are to meet the Confederate
vessel."
"Look here, lad, this is the Kathleen O'Mara, and
she is loaded with the munitions of war. We touch
first at Nassau, and there you will soon find yourselves
on board the good ship Mosquito, bound across the
herring-pond for Charleston harbour, where we hope
to land you safe and sound. Meanwhile, keep your
mind easy about parting. We like you; and, believe
me, lads, the we includes my wife and Lucy both.
Ah! there isn't much to beat an Englishman, after all.
But how do you like the looks of our crew?"
I'd rather not say."
The mate looked up and laughed.
"Well," said Os, "with a few exceptions they're
a cut-throat looking lot."






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Never mind; they are only twenty-two. We were
obliged to take Spaniards, Italians, and Finns, just
dock refuse; only, among them there are three good
Englishmen and one brave and brawny Scot."
In good time the steamer made the port of Nassau,
and here additional cargo, in the shape of rifles, was
taken on board. Quite a large consignment of
cases.
Osmond looked in vain for the Mosquito. But on
the third day, and a short time before sailing, all
hands were called aft.
"Is steam up?" said Captain Brewer, addressing the
assistant engineer.
"Yes, sir."
"Then go ahead."
The vessel under the mate's pilotage began at once
to forge ahead.
"They'd have fleet steeds that would follow," said
Brewer, waving his hand shorewards.
Almost at the same moment up from the saloon
came Lucy herself. She was dressed all in white,
with flowers in her hair, and looked, as Kenneth after-
wards told Osmond, as pretty as a pantomime.
She bowed to all with perfect sang froid, then, with
her father's assistance, she mounted on top of the sky-
light, while her mother handed her a little bottle of
wine.






'I


/I
pI
-I-1


I4w


M132
"I RE-BAPTIZE THIS GOOD SHIP THE MOSQUITO," SAID LUCY,
AND DASHED THE BOTTLE ON DECK.






AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.


She lifted this high in the air, while in her childish
treble she spoke as follows:-
I 're-bap9tize this good ship the Mosquito;" here she
dashed the bottle on deck. It was port, and the stream
that flowed leeward from the centre of the deck
Osmond could not help thinking was very like blood.
Little did he think, however, that the snowy whiteness
of those timbers was before long to be stained with
real blood.
Men," continued the child, raising her voice, you
are now in the service of the Confederate States of
America, and we trust you will serve your new
country right loyally and faithfully. Up with the
bonnie blue flag. Hurray!"
Up went the flag in a ball that broke prettily at the
gaff and went floating out in the breeze, while at the
same time a gun was fired. Everybody joined that
cheer, repeating it again and again.
Then Lucy leapt down, and Osmond hastened to
congratulate her, telling her how charmingly she had
spoken, and how pretty she looked.
Lucy did not seem to pay much attention, but went
off romping along the deck with Wolf.
It is needless to say that Captain Brewer at once
ordered the black steward to splice the main brace.
That very afternoon the Mosquito showed her teeth,
for two Dahlgren guns were mounted on the quarter-






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


deck and a very large pivot gun forward. Ammuni-
tion too was got up, and it was evident to our heroes
that if any Northern privateer ventured to chase them
the Mosquito might run away, but even while running
she would sing a song that would considerably startle
the Yankees, or at all events astonish them.
The good ship Mosquito-the name was already
painted on her bows, and on her boats and life-buoys
-now stood straight away across the Atlantic, keep-
ing well to the south, however, for the captain had
no wish to meet many ships, whatever they might
be.
Even the Confederate flag, having done its duty and
asserted itself, was once more furled, and everybody
on board appeared to settle down to the ordinary
quiet routine of ship life. A good look-out, however,
was kept both night and day, and whenever a strange
sail was seen, she was scrutinized most anxiously, and
if she looked at all suspicious, orders were given to
give her a wide berth.
Meanwhile, our young soldiers of fortune found life
on board very pleasant indeed. Lucy made no secret
of her partiality for Osmond and Wolf. She was
altogether very innocent and naive, this child of the
Southern States; and yet she had the queerest ways
with her and said very droll things at times. It has
always appeared to me that an American girl of only






AFLOAT ON THE WIDE ATLANTIC.


seven knows as much and is quite as clever as an
English or Scotch lassie of fifteen.
After a spell of silence, quite unusual for Lucy, she
one day said to Osmond, who was reading The Lady
of the Lake to her on the quarter-deck:
"I should like so much to know Eva, your sister."
"Why, Lucy?"
"Because I envy her so. Oh,. shouldn't I like to
have you for a brother! You are so handsome, and
I'm sure you're brave. Only," she added after a pause,
while a far-away dreamy kind of look came into her
eyes, "who knows, but that when I grow up you
may take it into your head to marry me; and I'm sure
a husband is even nicer than a big brother. But read
on, Osmond, where were you? Oh, yes, I remember,
and I'm sure so does Wolf-
Oh still I've worn
This little tress of yellow hair,
Thro' danger, frenzy and despair !
It once was bright and clear as thine,
But blood and tears have dimmed its shine.'


" Read on, Osmond. Read on."






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


CHAPTER VIII.

MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.

OR a whole week the voyage of the Mosquito was
quite idyllic.
So, at all events, our romantic Osmond considered
it; while Kenneth himself appeared to be almost as
happy as the day was long. Wolf spent most of his
time romping up and down the deck, and retrieving
belaying-pins thrown for him by some of the hands,
or sunning himself on the weather-side of the quarter-
deck.
Strangely enough, Wolf had his favourites among
the men, and they were chiefly the men whom Osmond
himself liked and felt he could trust. Dogs are indeed
readers of character, and they seldom if ever make a
mistake.
The weather continued to be all that a sailor's heart
could desire. Hitherto it had been unnecessary to get
up steam since the day the good ship left Nassau. A
spanking breeze blew some points abaft the beam, the
sky was clear and blue, and the sunshine laughed in
every rippling wave.
It would be wrong to say that Osmond and Kenneth
did not let thoughts of home intervene at times to mar
their happiness. They often spoke of those they had left






MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.


behind, and who perhaps still mourned their strange
departure. But they assured themselves, and told each
other it was all for the best, and it would all come
right in the long run.
Youth, you see, is ever hopeful.

One night, about eight days after the Mosquito had
lost sight of land, and shortly after Lucy and her
maid-a faithful little black lass-had gone to their
cabin, Osmond was coming along the main deck from
forward. He was threading his way through a dimly-
lighted passage between the ship's side and the boxed-
up engines, and got midships, when he heard his name
called, the voice coming from above his head.
Here was a cabin, Lucy's in fact, though Os had
never known of its whereabouts before.
He looked up, and lo! there was Lucy herself lean-
ing head and shoulders over a kind of port, that
opened into the passage. She was in her night-dress,
and laughing right merrily.
"This is my cabin and nursie's, you know. She
sleeps in the bunk right below me.
"I cannot ask you in," she continued, with innocent
politeness, "because I'm in bed, you know; but oh,
Osmond! wouldn't it be jolly to do Romeo and Juliet
just here. The balcony scene, you know. I remember
most of it, don't you?"







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


A little, I think," said Osmond, smiling.
Well, I'm Juliet, and I've just called you back like
this:"

Juliet. Romeo!
Romeo. (Osmond.) My dear!
Juliet. I have forgot why I did call thee back.
Romeo. Let me stand here till thou remember it.
Juliet. I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
Remembering how I love thy company.
Romeo. And I'll still stay, to have thee still forget,
Forgetting any other home but this.
Juliet. 'Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone:-
And yet no farther than a child's pet bird,
Who lets it hop a little from her hand,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again.
So loving-jealous of his liberty.
Romeo. I would I were thy bird.
Juliet. Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing;
Good-night, good-night Parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good-night till it be morrow.
Romeo. Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast!

How much more Osmond might have said may
never be known, for within Lucy's cabin a voice was
now heard uttering words that I have never read in
any edition of Shakespeare.
"You naughty chile! Lie down and sleep this
momen', else I go plenty quick dileckly and tell you
modder! Lie down, chile!"
Lucy disappeared so speedily that it amounted to a






MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.


sudden withdrawal of the play, and so the scene
ended.


Romeo and Juliet is a love drama, but an actual
tragedy was to be enacted on board ere morning light
-woe in my heart that I should have to speak of it!
When a boy, on reading of massacres and mutinies
which had taken place long ago, I have sometimes
asked my tutor, "Could these things happen now-
adays, sir?"
Oh, no!" he used to reply, "the world is far better
and far wiser in our day."
But many a time and oft since then have I come to
the conclusion that though our laws are more numer-
ous and more stringent, the human heart is quite the
same, and human passions only require to be let loose
to make many murders possible, and that massacres
and atrocities on a far greater scale, and even more
devilishly cruel than any that have ever occurred in
the middle ages may take place, even in this year of
grace, eighteen hundred and ninety-five.
Now there is, it seems to me, a Providence that
watches over those who trust therein. At all events,
men, whatever they may propose, appear to be under
the dispensation of God. 'Tis He who fixes our
destiny.
Osmond had reached his own cabin, and found that
(M 132) F






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Kenneth had already turned in. He had nearly un-
dressed when he found that he had dropped a small
trinket from the end of his watch-chain. It was of
no great worth, but he valued it very much, because it
had been Eva's gift to him on his last birthday.
He told Kenn of the loss, adding-
"I remember playing with it as I talked the balcony
scene with Lucy. I'll run back and see if I can't find
it. I shall put on my coat of darkness and my shoes
of silence," he added laughing, as he drew on a brown
dressing-gown and a pair of list slippers.
He walked very gently and softly, lest he should
disturb Lucy. He soon arrived beneath the balcony,
as he called it in his own mind, and, bending down,
felt around, for the light was now extinguished in the
passage.
Yes, here it was, all safe and whole. How lucky!
he thought, and was just about to retire when the
sound of low voices fell upon his ear. They came from
two figures he scarce could see, and who were standing
well forward; but as the speakers were well known to
him as two of the worst men in the ship, one a Finn,
the other a hulking black-browed Italian, he thought
himself justified in trying to listen.
He crept nearer to them, hugging the bulkhead of
the passage as he did so.
Their backs were towards him, and this was fortun-






MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.


ate, for doubtless the fellows were armed, and the knife
between his ribs would have been Osmond's portion
had he been discovered.
"Der iz no time like de prizent." It was the Finn
who spoke. Ha, Antonio, if faint-hearted you iz, I
zay-bah!"
"And it is ol ready you are?" said the Italian.
"Reddy? Yez, we iz all reddy. We iz vivteen
(fifteen) men to seven. Ha, ha, victory iz ours, zure
enough."
"Den I veel come too. It ees not murder."
"No, we takes ze ship from our enemies. We takes
her in ze name of ze Federal navy. Ha, ha! We kills
men, p'r'aps. Bah! again I zay it iz but in fight. No,
Antonio, it iz not murder, it iz war.
"First," he added, we kills ze tree Englishmans
and ze ugly Scot."
"Bravo! And de time and place?"
"Four bells, ze middle watch. Voxle head."
Osmond started.
How nearly that start was to being his last!
He dropped Eva's charm.
He dared not stoop after it, but hugged the bulk-
head more closely, and stood there trembling.
"Hark! I heard von zound."
"No, no," said Antonio, "it was but de little one
stirring in bed. She you veel not slay?"






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


"Bah! Come, Antonio. Come, in two hour we go
on ze deck. Let uz sleep."
"Wretches!" thought Osmond, "who can go quietly
to sleep and awake but to commit foul murder."
He waited until the coast was clear, then glided
silently aft once more, not, however, before he had
stooped again and picked up his little sister's keep-
sake, which he would ever more look upon as indeed
a charm.
He dropped into his own cabin first, and in whispers
told Kenneth about his discovery and the projected
mutiny.
He next sought out the captain. Luckily he had
not yet turned in, but sat in the saloon smok-
ing.
"The cut-throat villains!" said Captain Brewer.
"It is easy to see what they mean. They want to
seize the ship and take her as a prize to New York,
hoping to receive a great reward. I will hang them
at the yard-arm!"
"We will have to catch them first, won't we, sir?"
said Osmond quietly.
"Yes, and catch them in the act. Thank God, we
shall be prepared."
At first Captain Brewer thought it would be best
to make the Finn and Antonio prisoners at once, but
this plan was given up as unpractical. They thought






MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.


of another, and this other was carried out to the
letter.
By and by, therefore, Osmond bade the captain
good-night, and retired to his own cabin. He put out
the light, and soon after Brewer himself rang for the
steward. While telling him quietly to extinguish the
lights, he managed at the same time to give him an
inkling of the state of affairs, and hinted also where
he would find revolvers and cartridges.
Soon after the middle watch-in which were the
principal mutineers-was called, all was silent on deck
save the steady tramp, tramp of the men on duty.
The three Englishmen and the Scotchman had
turned in. As they were respectable, faithful fellows,
the captain had given them a cabin to themselves, for
they did not care to mix with the common herd.
And now Brewer went creeping forward himself, and
entered Lucy's cabin. He was successful in waking
the nurse without frightening her.
He quickly told her of the coming mutiny, and bade
her follow him. He lifted Lucy up and bore her aft,
placing her in the cabin beside her mother. The poor
child did not once awake.
The next thing was to arouse and bring aft the
Britishers.
This the steward-big Sambo-undertook to do.
Meanwhile, fully armed and prepared for either battle







FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


or siege, the captain, with Osmond and Kenneth,
waited anxiously in the dark saloon. If they spoke
at all, it was but in whispers.
But how very anxiously they listened now, near the
doorway, for Sambo's signal.
Luckily it had come on to blow a little, and the
watch on deck were shortening sail. Yet, doubtless,
a watch was being kept below, and, if in awakening
the Englishmen the slightest noise was made, matters
would doubtless be precipitated with a terribly fatal
result.
What a long, long time Sambo seemed absent!
Would he never, never come! Hark! though, there is
a gentle tapping with nails on the saloon door, a pass-
word is whispered, and Sambo enters.
"Yes, sah," he whispers, "all heah, sah, and de two
injuneers too, Massa."
"Good, Sambo; I won't forget you."
They were now twelve in all, including the mate,
and the mutineers, with two stowaways and the cook,
would number about twenty.
The odds were heavy, for those cut-throat fellows
were desperadoes of the worst water. They would be
fighting, too, with the rope around their necks, and
doubtless it would be a hard and hand-to-hand tussle,
a fight to the very knife's hilt.
It wanted still an hour to the time of rendezvous,






MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.


and to facilitate their plans the mutineers had evi-
dently made the ship very snug by taking in all
necessary sail.
It had just gone two bells.
"Another weary hour to wait!" whispered Osmond
to Kenneth. "My heart is beating muffled drums.
Are you afraid?"
Yes, I am anxious."
Hardly had he spoken before a wild shout arose
near to the fo'c's'le-head. It was evident that the
fellows had missed the Englishmen, and thus found
out that their plans were discovered.
The noise and the shouting came aft and aft and
aft. Now footsteps are heard running overhead and
descending the saloon companion.
"Surrender! Bail up!"
That is the command as the butt-ends of rifles
thunder at the barricaded door.
A volley aimed at the door by those within changes
the aspect of matters somewhat. One man is heard
to fall. The others, with terrible threats and curses,
draw off.
The saloon has at each side of it a doorway. One
is the first mate's cabin--the second mate is a
mutineer-the other is the office, and a third door
leads to the store-room. The captain quickly passes
the word to take possession of these rooms.






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


None too soon. For a volley is quickly fired in
through the skylight, which has been hastily thrown
open; a most unlucky thing for the mutineers, for the
moon has arisen, and their heads can be seen.
No one below is hurt, and they need no command
to cause them to return the fire. Rc-ack-rack-rack-rack
go the revolvers, like the noise a rent and riven
mainsail makes in a gale of wind.
More than one mutineer is killed, and, horrible to
relate, hangs dead over the skylight.
The silence that follows is broken only by the
groans of the wounded on deck, and by the patter of
blood on the saloon table coming from the corpses
hanging above.
What would have been the next move of the
mutineers I cannot pretend to say, for something now
occurred which was altogether unlocked for.
The boys' cabin or state-room was just outside the
saloon and forward from the mates', with only a bulk-
head between, and it would seem that some of the
would-be murderers had intended entering this in
order to fire through the bulk-head.
Little did they know how it was guarded. For
brave Wolf had been forgotten, and was the sole occu-
pant of the state-room.
As soon as Osmond heard the wild and frightened
shouts of the men and awful "habbering" noise of
I-






MUTINY ON BOARD THE BLOCKADE-RUNNER.


Wolf, who had evidently seized a man by the throat,
" Oh, my dog, my dog!" he cried.
"Kill him! kill the beast!" shouted the mutineers.
There was now the sharp ringing of revolvers, but
Wolf's "habbering" still went on, though in the midst
of it the poor dog had uttered a half-smothered cry
of pain.
"They're killing my dog!" cried Osmond now. "I'll
save Wolf or die!" He seized a lantern that had been
darkened, turned the light on the door, undid the
fastenings, and, sword in hand, rushed out.
All this took but a few seconds.
"Hurrah, men!" shouted the captain. "Now for
the charge! Sambo, hold up the other light!"
Sambo did as he was told, and so determined was
the rush now made that the mutineers broke at once,
and fled on deck, pursued by the captain and his
followers.
The foe rushed forward, but stopped when about
midships and fired a volley.
Alas! the head engineer dropped dead at Brewer's
feet, and Osmond himself fell, shot through the
body.
The volley was returned with good-will neverthe-
less, and the shrieks forward told that it had taken
effect.
Next moment big Sambo with a capstan-bar was






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


laying around him like a giant, and more than one
man fell beneath his blows.
"We surrender! We surrender!" This was now
their cry.
Lay down your arms then. I'll hang the first man
that dares to move a muscle after I say one, two,
three."
One, two, three."
Rifles and revolvers fell rattling on the deck, and
in ten minutes' time all the mutineers not killed or
wounded were securely bound hand and foot.
When daylight appeared, a census was taken, and
it was found that no less than five of the enemy,
including the second engineer, were killed, and three
wounded.
The engineer was the only one killed among the de-
fenders, but one Englishman was so seriously wounded
that he died before night. The two other Englishmen,
with Sambo and poor Osmond, to say nothing of
honest Wolf, who had a bullet wound in his leg, made
up the list.
The unwounded prisoners were set free as far as
their legs were concerned, and led aft.
"Now, men," said Captain Brewer sternly, "you can
see that your game is up."
"We do. We do."
"Well, you can have your choice. I will either






CHASED BY A NORTHERN CRUISER.


permit you to return to duty, and give you up when
we reach Charleston, or hang you now, one and all."
"Let us go to duty. Let us go to duty."
"Yez," cried the Finn, "zat iz bezt."
Captain Brewer promised furthermore that if they
were faithful and obeyed every command, they should
be leniently dealt with by the Confederates at Charles-
ton.
"And now," he continued sternly, as he turned to
the first mate-the second mate was dead-" the ship
will not be safe while those two men are alive."
He pointed to the Finn and the Italian as he spoke.
"Let the others free and let them at once reeve
block and tackle to the main-yard arm and hang these
villains."
In spite of their pleading cries for mercy, in less
than twenty minutes' time the unhappy wretches
were swinging dead in the cool morning air.




CHAPTER IX.

CHASED BY A NORTHERN CRUISER.

OSMOND'S wound, though a very painful one, was
not dangerous.
It threw him on his beam-ends for a time, however,






FOR LIFE AND LIBERTY.


Yet many a young fellow, I believe, would go through
as much to be so tenderly nursed and cared for as he
was, both by Mrs. Brewer and gentle Lucy.
And Lucy had another patient, namely Wolf. The
captain had managed to extract the bullet from his
thigh, an operation to which he had submitted quietly.
Steam was now got up, for the ship, owing to the
deaths in the mutiny, was somewhat short-handed for
sailing.
Kenneth volunteered to do what he could, and a
very able assistant engineer he made.
There was no attempt to renew the mutiny, and so,
fine weather continuing, in due time they found them-
selves within a measurable distance of Charleston.
They had to be doubly on their guard now, for
Yankee cruisers were plentiful enough in these waters,
watching the commerce of the Southern States.
When not in his friend Osmond's state-room, Kenneth
Reid was very frequently with Captain Brewer, either
walking the bridge or on the quarter-deck, and very
much indeed did the lad enjoy his conversation and the
yarns he used to spin. Brewer was exceedingly good-
natured and kind-hearted, and had taken a great fancy
for Kenneth and Osmond, as well as for Wolf.
Wolf reciprocated the skipper's affection, and seemed
to be quite content to walk steadily alongside of him
for a whole hour at a time. Big, brave men are often