• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Frontispiece
 The ugly duckling
 The little pine tree
 The little match girl
 Little Red Riding-Hood
 The apples of Idun
 How Thor got the hammer
 The hammer lost and found
 The story of the sheep
 The good ship Argo
 Jason and the Harpies
 The brass bulls
 Jason and the dragon
 Back Cover






Group Title: A primary reader : : old-time stories, fairy tales and myths retold by children
Title: A primary reader
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084240/00001
 Material Information
Title: A primary reader old-time stories, fairy tales and myths retold by children
Alternate Title: Old-time stories, fairy tales and myths retold by children
Old time stories retold by children
Physical Description: 136 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Smythe, E. Louise ( Emma Louise ), 1858-
Perkins, Lucy Fitch, 1865-1937 ( Illustrator )
Werner School Book Company ( Publisher )
Werner Company
Publisher: Werner School Book Company
Place of Publication: Chicago
New York
Manufacturer: Werner Co. Printers and Binders
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Mythology, Classical   ( lcsh )
Mythology, Norse   ( lcsh )
Readers (Elementary) -- 1870-1950   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's stories
Readers   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Ohio -- Akron
 Notes
General Note: Some illustrations signed L.F. Perkins.
Statement of Responsibility: by E. Louise Smythe.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084240
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235110
notis - ALH5552
oclc - 26082048

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Frontispiece
        Page 6
    The ugly duckling
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The little pine tree
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The little match girl
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Little Red Riding-Hood
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The apples of Idun
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    How Thor got the hammer
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The hammer lost and found
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The story of the sheep
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    The good ship Argo
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Jason and the Harpies
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    The brass bulls
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Jason and the dragon
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text































The Baldwin Ubrary
Univerity
~Lmof
Flid


7 1_ I


, /


Aa7







A PRIMARY READER




Old-time Stories, Fairy Tales and Myths
Retold by Children



BY
E. LOUISE SMYTHE


CHICAGO NEW YORK
WERNER SCHOOL BOOK COMPANY












































COPYRIGHT, 1896, BY
WERNER SCHOOL BOOK COMPANY.

O Iunn 9t-i.. E..








PREFACE.

This book originated in a series of little reading lessons pre-
pared for the first grade pupils in the Santa Rosa public schools.
The object of the lessons was three-fold: to provide reading
matter for the little ones who had only a small vocabulary of sight-
words; to acquaint them early with the heroes who-have come
down to us in song and story; and to create a desire for literature.
It has been my endeavor to follow Dr. G. Stanley Hall's
suggestions in his monograph, How to Teach Reading," where
he asks for true child-editions, made by testing many children
with the work piece-meal and cutting and adapting the material till
it really and closely fitted the minds and hearts of the children."
Various stories were given to the pupils; discussions followed.
After a time the story was produced orally by the children.
Notes were made on expressions used and points of interest
dwelt upon. Later the story was either written on the black-
board or mimeographed and put into the pupils' hands to read.
It gave great delight to the children to recognize an old
friend in a new dress, and as interest was aroused, but little
difficulty was encountered in recognizing words that were indeed
"new in their sight vocabulary, but old servants in their oral
vocabulary.
The spirit of the book may be illustrated by referring to
the roast turkey in the story of The Little Match Girl. The
'story was told as dear old Hans Christian Andersen gave it to
the little German children of fifty years ago. But American
children have a different idea of the fowl which graces the table
at Christmas time. The story as it came from the lips of the chil-
dren referred to the turkey," and "goose"' was used in only
one instance. As the story was to appeal to our children, the
word was changed to suit their ideas.







PREFACE.


Again, in the story of Red Riding-Hood we preferred to use
the German ending, as it leaves a far happier impression on the
minds of the children than the accepted English version. The
incongruity of the wolf's swallowing whole the grandmother and
child does not destroy the child's enjoyment of the story, while
the happy release of both grandmother and little girl forms a
suitable close.
Also, as this old story handed down in so many languages is
an interpretation of one of the Sun myths, it seems better to
cling to the original, especially when it meets so entirely with
the child's approval.
Before presenting the Norse myths for reading, they had
been the subject of many conversations, queries and illustrations.
Some were even dramatized-in a childlike way, of course.
Detailed descriptions of Mt. Ida, Asgard, and some of the
principal heroes, were given. But, though the little audience
seemed interested in the introductory remarks, these never came
back when the children were called upon to reproduce the story.
The narrator at once plunged into the story part. It is for this
reason descriptions of heroes and places have been omitted in
these stories. It is thus left for each teacher who uses this book
to employ her own method of introducing the gods of the hardy
Norseman to her pupils.
The following works will be found useful and quite avail-
able to most teachers: Andersen's Norse Mythology, Mabie's
Norse Stories, Mara Pratt's Stories from Norseland, Fiske's
Myths and Myth Makers, Taylor's Primitive Culture, Vol. I.; and
Longfellow's Poems.
Hoping these stories will interest other children as they
have interested those who helped build them, I send them forth.
E. LouISE SMYTHE.
Santa Rosa, California.















CONTENTS.


THE UGLY DUCKLING.....

THE LITTLE PINE TREE .

THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL .

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD .

THE APPLES OF IDUN.....

How THOR GOT THE HAMMER .

THE HAMMER LOST AND FOUND.

THE STORY OF THE SHEEP .

THE GOOD SHIP ARGO . .

JASON AND THE HARPIES ..

THE BRASS BULLS . .

JASON AND THE DRAGON . .


7

'9

. 25

S 34

. 42

S 59

84

102

. io8

S 112

. 9II

. 131
























































THEY DRESSED THOR LIKE FREYJA. (Page 93).









THE UGLY DUCKLING,


under broke
keep only
warm ugly

A duck made her nest
leaves.


does
turkey
water

under some


TIE DUCK'S NEST.







She sat on the eggs to keep them
warm.
At last the eggs broke, one after
the other. Little ducks came out.
Only one egg was left. It was a
very large one.
At last it broke, and out came a
big, ugly duckling.
"What a big duckling!, said the
old duck. "LIe does not look like
us. Can he be a turkey? We will
see. If he does not like the water,
he is not a duck."


mother jumped duckling
splash swim bigger.
called began little







The next day the
took her ducklings to


mother duck
the pond.


A


THE DUCK TAKES HER DUCKLINGS TO SWIM.


Splash! Splash! The mother duck
was in the water. Then she called
the ducklings to come in. They all
jumped in and began to swim. The
big, ugly duckling swam, too.
The mother duck said, "He is not
a turkey. He is my own little duck.







He will not be so ugly when he
is bigger."

yard alone while
noise hurt that
eating know want
Then she said to tne ducklings,
"Come with me. I want you to see
the other ducks. Stay by me and
look out for the cat."
They all went into the duck yard.
What a noise the ducks made!
While the mother duck was eating
a big bug, an old duck bit the ugly
duckling.
"Let him alone," said the mother
duck. "He did not hurt you."















"HE DID NOT HURT YOU," SAID TIE MOTHER DUCK.


"1 know that," said the duck, "but
he is so ugly, I bit him."


lovely
walked


help
bushes


there
afraid


The next duck
"You have lovely
are all pretty but
ugly."


they met,
ducklings.
one. He is


said,
They
very





1.2


iiiii I I ,i iiiii 11-1- Im







"YOUR CHILDREN ARE ALL PRETTY EXCEPT ONE."
The mother duck said, "I know he
is not pretty. But he is very good."
Then she said to the ducklings,
"Now, my dears, have a good time."
But the poor, big, ugly duckling
did not have a good time.
The hens all bit him. The big
ducks walked on him,







The poor duckling was very sad.
He did not want to be so ugly. But
he could not help it.
He ran to hide under some bushes.
The little birds in the bushes were
afraid and flew away.


because house would
away hard lived

"It is all because I am so ugly,"
said the duckling. So he ran away.
At night he came to an old house.
The house looked as if it would fall
down. It was so old. But the wind
blew so hard that the duckling went
into the house.













-S I


.. .

4 '.-IL---


THE UGLY DUCKLING FINDS THE OLD HOUSE.

An old woman lived there with
her cat and her hen.
The old woman said, "I will keep
the duck. I will have some eggs."


growl
corner


walk
animals


The next
duckling and


day, the
began to


cat saw the
growl.





15

The hen said, Can you lay eggs?"
The duckling said, No."
"Then keep still," said the hen.
The cat said, c Can you growl?"








THE CAT SAID, "CAN YOU GROWL?"

SNo," said the duckling.
"Then keep still," said the cat.
And the duckling hid in a corner.
The next day he went for a walk.
He saw a big pond. He said, "I
will have a good swim."






But all of the animals made fun
of him. He was so ugly.


summer away cake
winter swans spring
flew bread leaves

The summer went by.
Then the leaves fell and it was
very cold. The poor duckling had
a hard time.
It is too sad to tell what he did
all winter.
At last it was spring.
The birds sang. The ugly duck-
ling was big now.
One day he flew far away.











Imp








f& :'-= I-i,b --
If II tilt-


"Oil, SEE THE LOVELY SWAI\!





18
Soon he saw three white swans
on the lake.
He said, "I am going to see those
birds. I am afraid they will kill
me, for I am so ugly."
He put his head down to the
water. What did he see? IHe saw
himself in the water. But he was not
an ugly duck. He was a white swan.
The other swans came to see him.
The children said, "Oh, see the
lovely swans. The one that came
last is the best."
And they gave him bread and
cake.
It was a happy time for the ugly
duckling.









THE LITTLE PINE TREE.


pine
woods
fairy


leaves
needles
gold


other
better
sleep


A little
woods.
It had no
The little
like needles.
the woods
want leaves,


pine


tree


was in the


leaves. It had needles.
tree. said, "I do not
All the other trees in
have pretty leaves. I
too. But I will have


better leaves. I want gold leaves."
Night came and the little tree
went to sleep. A fairy came by
and gave it gold leaves.





























THE FAIRY GIVES THE PINE TREE GOLD LEAVES.


woke cried glass
little again pretty







When the little tree woke it had
leaves of gold.
It said, "Oh, I am so pretty! No
other tree has gold leaves."
Night came.
A man came by with a bag. He
saw the gold leaves. He took them
all and put them into his bag.
The poor little tree cried, "I do
not want gold leaves again. I will
have glass leaves."

night sunshine bright
looked wind blew
So the little tree went to sleep.
The fairy came by and put the
glass leaves on it.







The little tree woke and saw its
glass leaves.
How pretty they looked in the
sunshine! No other tree was so bright.
Then a wind came up. It blew
and blew.
The glass leaves all fell from the
tree and were broken.



again green
goat hungry
Again the little tree had no leaves.
It was very sad, and said, "'I will not
have gold leaves and I will not have
glass leaves. I want green leaves.
I want to be like the other trees."







And the little tree went to sleep.
When it woke, it was like other
trees. It had green leaves.
A -goat came by. He saw the
green leaves on the little tree. The
goat was hungry and he ate all
the leaves.


THE GOAT EATS THE GREEN LEAVES.


-. )A j-







happy best
Then the little tree said, "I do
not want any leaves. I will not
have green leaves, nor glass leaves,
nor gold leaves. I like my needles
best.7






THE PINE TREE WITH NEEDLES.

And the little tree went to sleep.
The fairy gave it what it wanted.
When it woke, it had its needles
again. Then the little pine tree
was happy.








THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL,

almost match across
dark running bare
year slippers fell

It was very cold. The snow fell
and it was almost dark.
It was the last day of the year.
A little match girl was running
in the street. Her name was Gretchen.
She had no hat on.
Her feet were bare. When she left
home, she had on some big slippers
of her mama's. But they were so
large that she lost them when she
ran across the street.







apron curly lights
bunch about smelled
could matches cooking

Gretchen had a lot of matches in
her old apron.
She had a little bunch in her
hand.
But she could not sell her matches.
No one would buy them.
Poor little Gretchen!
She was cold and hungry.
The snow fell on her curly hair.
But she did not think about that...
She saw lights in the houses.
She smelled good things cook-
ing.







She said to herself, "This is the
last night of the year."



knew window fire
money even pile
Gretchen got colder and colder.
She was afraid to go home. She
knew her papa would whip her, if
she did not take some money to
him.
It was as cold at home as in the
street. They were too poor to have
a fire. They had to put rags in the
windows to keep out the wind.
Gretchen did not even have a bed.
She had to sleep on a pile of rags.






28


frozen c
lighted t
near t

She sat down


1a
;h
,h


indle sitting
bought stove
Link step

on a door step.


GRETCHEN ON THE DOOR STEP.


little hands


were almost


Her
frozen.





29
She took a match and lighted it
to warm her hands. The match
looked like a little candle.
Gretchen thought she was sitting
by a big stove. It was so bright.
She put the match near her feet,
to warm them. Then the light went
out. She did not think that she
was by the stove any more.



another dishes roast
table cloth ready
fork knife turkey
Gretchen lighted another match.
Now she thought she could look
into a room. In this room was a table.







A white cloth and pretty dishes
were on the table. There was a roast
turkey, too. It was cooked and ready
to eat. The knife and fork were in
his back. The turkey jumped from
the dish and ran to the little girl.
The light went out and she was
in the cold and dark again.


Christmas candles
many until
Gretchen lighted another match.
Then she thought she was sitting by
a Christmas tree. Very many can-
dles were on the tree. It was full
of pretty things.







Gretchen put up her little hands.
The light went out.
The lights on the Christmas tree
went up, up-until she saw they
were the stars.



grandma never before
dying going been
Then she saw a star fall.
"Some one is dying," said little
Gretchen.
Her grandma had been very good
to the little girl. But she was dead.
The grandma had said, "When a
star falls some one is going to
God."





32
The little girl lighted another
match. It made a big light.
Gretchen thought she saw her
grandma. She never looked so pretty
before. She looked so sweet and
happy.

take goes
"0 grandma," said the little girl,
"take me. When the light goes out
you will go away. The stove and
the turkey and the Christmas tree
all went away."
Then Gretchen lighted a bunch
of matches. She wanted to keep
her grandma with her. The matches
made it very light.





33
The grandma took the little girl in
her arms. They went up, up-where
they would never be cold or hungry.
They were with God.



found next burned
dead froze death

The next day came.
Some men found a little girl in
the street. She was dead.
In her hand were the burned
matches.
They said, "Poor little thing, she
froze to death."
They did not know how happy she
was in heaven.








LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.

six take cake
coat butter basket
hood always off

When May was six years old, her
grandma made her a red coat with
a hood. She looked so pretty in it
that the children all called her
"Red Riding-Hood."
One day her mama said, "I want
you to take this cake and some
butter to grandma."
Red Riding-Hood was very glad to
go. She always had a good time at
grandma's.






































































LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD AND HER MOTHER.






36

She put the things into her little
basket and ran off.



wolf mill shall
going first wood

When Red Riding-Hood came to
the wood, she met a big wolf.


SHE MEETS THE WOLF.






"Where are you going ?" said the
wolf.
Red Riding-Hood said, "I am going
to see my grandma. Mama has made
her a cake and some butter."
"Does she live far ?" said the wolf.
"Yes,~ said Red Riding-Hood, "in
the white house by the mill."
"I will go too, and we shall see
who will get there first," said the wolf.

short flowers soft
stopped tapped pull
pick voice string
The wolf ran off and took a short
way, but Red Riding-Hood stopped to
pick some flowers.





38
When the wolf got to the house,
he tapped on the door.
The grandma said, "Who is there?"
The wolf made his voice as soft as
he could. He said, "It is little Red
Riding-Hood, grandma."
Then the old lady said, "Pull the
string and the door will open."
The wolf pulled the string and the
door opened.
He ran in and ate the poor old
lady.
Then he jumped into her bed and
put on her cap.

tapped thank dear
arms hug called







When Red Riding-Hood tapped on
the door, the wolf called out, "Who
is there ?" Red Riding-Hood said,
"It is your little Red Riding-Hood,
grandma."
Then the wolf said, "Pull the
string and the door will open."
When she went in, she said, "Look,
grandma, see the cake and butter
mama has sent you."
"Thank you, dear, put them on
the table and come here."



better hear eyes
ears how teeth
ate cruel poor







When Red Riding-Hood went near
the bed, she said, "Oh, grandma,
how big your arms are!"
"The better to hug you, my dear."
"How big your ears are, grandma."
"The better to hear you, my dear."
"How big your eyes are, grandma."
"The better to see you, my dear."
"How big your teeth are, grand-
ma!"
"The better to eat you."
Then the cruel wolf jumped up
and ate poor little Red Riding-Hood.



just hunter scream
killed heard open






41
Just then a hunter came by. He
heard Red Riding-Hood scream. The
hunter ran into the house and killed
the old wolf.


THE GRANDMOTHER, THE HUNTER AND LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.
When he cut the wolf open, out
jumped Little Red Riding-Hood and
her grandma.








THE APPLES OF IDUN,

once hills field
journey rocks cattle
walked pieces three

Once upon a time three of the
gods went on a journey.
One was Thor and one was Loki.
Loki was ugly and mean.
The gods liked to walk over the
hills and rocks. They could go very
fast for they were so big.
The gods walked on and on.
At last they got very hungry.
Then they came to a field with
cattle.




































THOR, LOK ND ANOTHER GOD TAKE A WALK.

THORN, LORI AND ANOTHER OOD TAKE A WALK.






44
Thor killed a big. ox and put the
pieces into a pot.


meat share talking
cross eagle right

They made a big fire but the
meat would not cook. They made
the fire bigger and bigger, but the
meat would not cook.
Then the gods were very cross.
Some one said, Give me my
share, and I will make the meat
cook."
The gods looked to see who was
talking. There in an oak tree was
a big eagle.




















































THE THREE GODS TRY TO COOK THE OX.







The gods were so hungry that
they said, "Well, we will."



supper stuck enough
minute claws stones
pole against flew

The supper was ready in a minute.
Then the eagle flew down to get
his share. He took the four legs
and there was not much left but the
ribs.
This made Loki cross for he was
very hungry. He took a long pole
to hit the eagle. But the pole stuck
to the eagle's claws. The other end
stuck to Loki.





47
Then the eagle flew away. He did
not fly high. He flew just high
enough for Loki to hit against the
stones.

please giant flying
tried feathers suit

Loki said, "Please let me go! Oh,
please let me go!"
But the eagle said, "No, you tried
to kill me. I will not let you go."
And the eagle hit him against the
stones.
Loki said again, "Please let me
go!"
But the eagle said, "No, I have
you now."







Then Loki knew the eagle was a
giant and not a bird.
This giant had a suit of eagle's
feathers. He was flying in his eagle
suit when he saw Loki.


city beautiful apples
felt growing young

Now the gods lived in a city
named Asgard.
In this city Idun kept the beau-
tiful golden apples. When the gods
felt they were growing old, they ate
the apples and were young again.
The giant wanted to be like the
gods. So he said to Loki, "I will












vkJ
AS


ma


IDUN WITH HER APPLES.







let you go, if you will get me the
apples of Idun."
But Loki said, "I can't do that."


bumped gate putting
stayed golden morning

So the eagle bumped him on the
stones again.
Then Loki said, "I can't stand
this. I will get the apples for you."
Loki and the eagle went to the
city. The eagle stayed by the gate,
but Loki went into the city. He
went up to Idun. She was putting
the apples into a beautiful golden
box.








































































LOKI AND IDUN.





52
Loki said, "Good morning, Idun.
Those are beautiful apples."
And Idun said, "Yes, they are
beautiful." "I saw some just like
them, the other day," said Loki.



strange show
bring picked

Idun knew there were no other
apples like these, and she said,
"That is strange. I would like to
see them."
Loki said, "Come with me and I
will show them to you. It is only
a little way. Bring your apples with
you."







As soon as Idun was out of the
gates the eagle flew down. He
picked her up in his claws. Then
he flew away with her to his home.



after pale falcon
passed story began
Day after day passed and Idun
did not come back. The gods did
not have the golden apples to eat,
so they began to get old.
At last they said, "Who let the
apples go?"
Then Loki looked pale and the
gods said, "Loki, you did it." And
Loki said, "Yes, I did."
















































THE GODS ASK WHERE IDUN I.
TH] GODS ASK WHERE IDUN IS,







He did not tell a story that time.
Then Loki said, "I will get Idun
and the apples back, if I may have
the falcon suit."


changed faster

The gods said, "You may have
it, if you will bring the apples
back."
Loki put on the falcon suit and
flew away. He looked like a big
bird flying.
When Loki came to the giant's
home, he was glad the giant was not
there. He changed Idun into a nut
and then flew away with the nut.

































































THE GIANT SEES THE BIRD FLY AWAY.





57
When the giant came home, Idun
was gone. The golden apples were
gone, too.
Then the giant put on his eagle
suit and flew after Loki.
Loki heard the eagle coming. Loki
flew faster.

breath over changed
walls blazed burned
Poor Loki was all out of breath.
The eagle flew faster and faster.
Then the gods got on the walls
to look for Loki. They saw him
coming and the eagle after him.
So they made fires on the walls.
At last Loki flew over the walls.





58
Then the gods lighted the fires.
The fires blazed up.
The eagle flew into the fire and
was burned.
As soon as Loki put the nut down,
it changed to Idun.
The gods ate the beautiful golden
apples and were young again.








HOW THOR GOT THE HAMMER,

proud porch lying
journeys tricks wife
always alone asleep
Sif was Thor's wife.
Sif had long golden hair. Thor
was very proud of Sif's golden hair.
Thor was always going on long
journeys. One day he went off and
left Sif alone. She went out on the
porch and fell asleep.
Loki came along. He was always
playing tricks.
He saw Sif lying asleep. He said,
"I am going to cut off her hair."
























































LOKI CUTS SIF'S HAIR OFF.







So Loki went up on the porch
and cut off Sif's golden hair.


where around crying
answer found somebody

When Sif woke up and saw that
her hair was gone, she cried and
cried. Then she ran to hide. She
did not want Thor to see her.
When Thor came home, he could
not find Sif.
"Sif Sif!!" he called, "Where are
you ?"
But Sif did not answer.
Thor looked all around the house.
At last he found her crying.
































































62 "OH, THOR, ALL MY HAIR IS GONE!"





63
"Oh, Thor, look, all my hair is
gone! Somebody has cut it off. It
was a man. IHe ran away with it."


angry mischief right
getting cutting something

Then Thor was very angry. IIe
said, "I know it was Loki. He is
always getting into mischief. Just
wait until I get him!"
And Thor went out to find Loki.
Pretty soon he found him.
Thor said, "Did you cut off Sif's
hair ?" Loki said, "Yes, I did."
"Then you must pay for cutting
off my wife's hair," said Thor.

































































64. "DID YOU CUT OFF SIF'S HAIR?"







"All right," said Loki, "I will get
you something better than the hair."


ground thumb beads
dwarfs crooked crown
worked

Loki went down, down into the
ground to the home of the dwarfs.
It was very dark down there. The
only light came from the dwarfs'
fires.
The dwarfs were ugly little black
men. They were not any bigger than
your thumb. They had crooked backs
and crooked legs. Their eyes looked
like black beads.















































































I.OKI AND TIE DWARFS.







Loki said, "Can you make me a
gold crown that will grow like real
hair ?"
The dwarfs said, "Yes, we can."
So the busy little dwarfs worked
all night.


morning
spear
ship
nobody


showed
wonderful
standing
stepped


laughed
three
brother
else


When morning came
gave Loki his crown of
They gave him a spear
too.


the dwarfs
golden hair.
and a ship,






























































THE DWARFS BRING TO LOKI THE SHIP, TIE SPEAR AND THE CROWN OF HAIR.






Loki took the things up to Asgard,
where the gods all lived.
Then the gods all came up to him.
He showed them the things.
The gods said, "They are very
wonderful."
And Loki said, "Oh, nobody else
can make such things as my little
dwarfs."
A little dwarf, named Brok, was
standing near by. He heard Loki
say that. Then he stepped up and
said, "My brother can make just as
good things as these."
Loki laughed and said, "If you
can get three things as wonderful
as these, I will give you my head."





































































BROK TELLS LOKI THAT HIS BROTHER CAN MAKE BETTER GIFTS.







anywhere misses
spear mark

Brok went down into the ground
where his little dwarfs were working.
Brok's brother was named Sindre.
He said to his brother, "Loki says
that you can't make such nice things
as his dwarfs can. He said that he
would give me his head if I could
get him such wonderful things as
his."'
This made the dwarfs angry. Their
eyes grew big. They said, "He will
see what we can do."
Sindre wanted to know what the
wonderful things were,





72
Brok said, "Loki has a golden
crown that will grow like real hair.
A ship that can go anywhere. A
spear that never misses the mark."
"We will show him," said the
dwarfs.

burning blow pigskin
bellows blew blowing
The dwarfs soon had the fires
burning. Then Sindre put a pigskin
into the fire.
He gave the bellows to Brok and
said, "Now blow as hard as you
can."
Then Sindre went out.
Brok blew and blew.







A little fly came in and bit him
on the hand.
The fly bit him. so hard that Brok
thought he would have to stop blow-
ing, but he did not.
Then Sindre came back. He took
out a golden pig from the fire.


stand lump ring

He next put a lump of gold into
the fire.
He said to Brok, "Blow and blow
and blow, and do not stop."
Then Sindre went out again.
So Brok blew as hard as he
could.







Then the same fly came in and
bit him again.
Brok thought that he could not
stand it, but he kept on.
When Sindre came back, he took
a gold ring from the fire.


hard forehead brush
iron blood hammer
handle spoiled mean

Then Sindre put a lump of iron
into the fire.
He said to Brok, "Now blow as
hard as you can."
.And Sindre went out. Brok blew
and blew. The same mean fly came







again, and bit him on the forehead.
It bit so hard that the blood ran
into his eyes.
Brok put up his hand to brush
away the fly.
Just then Sindre came back.
He took a hammer out of the fire.


THE DWARFS WITH TIE GOLDEN PIG, THE RING AND THE HAMMER.


There!" he s
almost spoiled it.


aid, You have
The handle is







too short, but it cannot be helped
now."


hurried proud
came pocket

Brok hurried up to Asgard with
his things.
All the gods came around to see.
Then Loki came up to show his
things.
He put the crown of gold on Sif's
head and it began to grow like real
hair.
He gave the spear to Odin and
said, "This spear will never miss its
mark."



































A--


4'


d; 1

\1r


S'F WITH THE GOLDEN CROWN.


~ ~


....

si:
!Z;T






Then he took out the ship. He
said, "This is a wonderful ship. It
will sail on any sea, and yet you
can fold it up and put it into your
pocket."
Loki felt very proud, for he
thought his things were the best.



fold sail afraid
sorry each ring
shining faster gave

All the gods felt very sorry for
little Brok. They thought Loki's
things were fine. They were afraid
Brok's would not be so nice.









































































BROKE SHOWS HIS THINGS TO THE GODS.






They said, "Now, Brok, show your
things."
Brok took out the gold ring. He
said, "Each night this ring will
throw off a ring .just like it. He
gave the ring to Odin.
Then Brok took out the golden
pig. He said, "This pig can go
anywhere, on the ground or in the
air. It can go faster than any horse.
If the night is dark, the shining pig
will make it light."

flost giants
turned blowing
Then Brok showed the hammer.
He said, "This is not a very pretty










t-

-;-~---


THOR WITH HIS IlAMMER.

hammer. When I was making it,
Loki turned himself into a fly and
made me spoil it. The fly bit me
so hard that I had to stop blowing.
So the handle is a little short. But
it is a wonderful hammer. If you
throw it at anything, it will hit the
mark and come back to you."





82
The gods picked up the hammer
and passed it around.
They said, "It will be just the
thing with which to keep the Frost
Giants out of Asgard."


touch neck
without way
The gods said, "Brok's things are
the best."
Brok gave the hammer to Thor.
That is the way Thor got his won-
derful hammer.
Then Brok said to Loki, "You
said .1 could have your head if my
things were the best."







And Loki was angry and said,
"Yes, I told you that you could
have my head. But you can't touch
my neck."
Of course, Brok could not get his
head without touching his neck.
So Brok did not get Loki's head.


THE FROST GIANT.








THE HAMMER LOST AND FOUND,

everything planned
The Frost Giants did not like the
sunshine. They did not like to see
the flowers. They did not like to
hear the birds sing. They wanted
to spoil everything.
The Frost Giants wanted to get
into Asgard. But they did not know
how. They were afraid of Thor and
his hammer. They said, "If we can
only get the hammer, we can get
into Asgard."
They talked and planned all night.
At last one Frost Giant said, "I










































































THE FROST GIANTS TALKED AND PLANNED ALL NIGHT.






know how we can get the hammer.
I will dress in a bird suit. Then I
will fly up to Thor's house and get
the hammer."

Freyja
The next night the Frost Giant
flew into the house while Thor was
asleep.
He took the hammer and flew
away with it.
When Thor woke, he put out his
hand to get the hammer. It was
gone.
He said, "Loki, the hammer is
gone. The Frost Giants have taken
it. We must get it back."









































































THE FROST GIANT FLEW INTO THE HOUSE WHILE THOR WAS ASLEEP.






Loki said, "I can get it back, if
Freyja will let me have her falcon
suit."
So he went to Freyja and said,
"Will you let me have your falcon
suit ? I can get the hammer back
if you will." Freyja said, "Yes, of
course I will. If I had a gold suit
you could have it. Any thing to
get the hammer back."


people city Thrym
strange buried eight
miles deep falcon

Loki took the falcon suit and put
it on. He flew over the city. All








































































LOKI IIORROWS THE FALCON SUIT.







the people saw him flying. They
said, "What a strange bird!"' They
did not know that it was Loki going
for the hammer.
When Loki came to the city of the
Frost Giants, he took off the falcon
suit. He walked and walked until
lie came to Thrym's house. Thryn-
was the giant who took the hammer.
Thrym was sitting on the porch,
making gold collars for his dogs.
When he saw Loki, he said, "What
do you want ?"
Loki said, "I have come for the
hammer."
The old giant laughed and said,
" You will never get that hammer.







It is buried eight miles deep in the
ground.
"But there is one way you can get
it. I will give you the hammer if
you get Freyja for my wife."


clothes shook necklace

So Loki went back to Asgard.
Thor said, "Well, did you get the
hammer ?"
S"No, but we can get it if Freyja
will be Thrym's wife."
Then they went to Freyja's house.
They said, Put on your very best
clothes and come with us. You must
be Thrym's wife."







Freyja said, Do you think I will
be the Frost Giant's wife? I won't
be his wife."
Thor said, "We can get the ham-
mer back if you will."
But Freyja said, "No, I will not
be his wife."
Loki said, "You will have to, if
we get the hammer back."
Still Freyja said, "I will not go."
And she was very angry. She shook
so hard that she broke her necklace
and it fell to the floor.



bride braided wagon
vail servant goat







Then the gods said, LThor, you
must dress like Freyja. You will
have to play you are the bride.'i
Thor said, I won't do it. You
will all laugh at me. I won't dress
up like a girl."
They said, "Well, that is the only
way we can get the hammer back."
Thor said, "I do not like to dress
like a girl. but I will do it." Then
they dressed Thor up like Freyja.
They put on Freyja's dress, neck-
lace and vail, and braided his hair.
Loki said, "I will dress up too,
and be your servant."
They got into Thor's goat wagon
and went to the Giants' home.





























































94 THOR ANT ).104 AP'PROACII TIHE HOUSFS OF THE GIANTS.







dinner salmon mead
whole thirsty barrels
When the Frost Giants saw them
coming, they said, "Get ready, here
comes the bride! We will sit down
to the table as soon as they come."
The dinner was ready on time.
The table was full of good things.
All sat down.
The bride ate a whole ox and eight
salmon before the others had a bite.
She must be very hungry," the
Frost Giants said.
"Yes," Loki said, she was so glad
to come. She hasn't eaten anything
for eight days."
Then they brought in the mead.








































































THOR AND LOKI MET BY THRYM.





97
The bride drank three
mnead.
"How thirsty she is!"
Frost Giants.
Loki said, "Yes, she
thirsty. She was so glad
She did not drink anything
days."


barrels of


said the


is
to
for


very
come.
eight


kiss stepped whirled
lifted shone lap

Old Thrym said, "I had every
thing I wanted but Freyja. Now I
have Freyja."
And Thrym went to kiss the bride.
He lifted her vail, but her eyes
shone like fire.


g




































































THRYM PUTS THE HAMMER IN THOR'S LAP.




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