Teddy and Carrots

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Material Information

Title:
Teddy and Carrots two merchants of Newspaper row
Physical Description:
225 p : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Otis, James, 1848-1912
Rogers, W. A ( William Allen ), 1854-1931 ( Illustrator )
Estes & Lauriat ( Publisher )
C.H. Simonds & Co ( Publisher )
Colonial Press ( Printer )
Geo. C. Scott & Sons
Publisher:
Estes and Lauriat
Place of Publication:
Boston
Manufacturer:
Colonial Press ; C.H. Simonds & Co. ; Electrotyped by Geo. C. Scott & Sons
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Physicians -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Newspaper vendors -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Revenge -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by James Otis ; illustrated by W.A. Rogers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002394836
notis - ALZ9743
oclc - 02220735
lccn - 12034818
System ID:
UF00084235:00001


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TEDDY AND CARROTS LEAVE THE TOMBS."


. -









TEDDY AND CARROTS




TWO MERCHANTS OF NEWSPAPER ROW






By JAMES OTIS
AUTHOR OF
"JENNY WREN'S BOARDING-HOUSE,"
"THE BOYS' REVOLT," "JERRY'S FAMILY,"
"THE BOYS OF 1745," ETC.


ILLUSTRATED BY
W. A. ROGERS






BOSTON
ESTES AND LAURIAT
PUBLISHERS




























Copyright, z895 and 1896
BY THE CENTURY Co.

Copyright, z896
BY ESTES AND LAURIAT
All rights reserved



















Colonial puzss:
C. H. Simonds & Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A.
Electrotyped by Geo. C. Scott & Sonis
























A NEWCOMER.



THE ASSAULT .



THE ARREST



THE PRISONER



A SUGGESTION



THE TRIAL .



THE WARNING



THE PARTNERS


CONTENTS.






CHAPTER I.

. CHAPT .ER II.

CHAPTER II.



CHAPTER III.



CHAPTER IV.
. . .CHAPTER .

CHAPTER V.



CHAPTER VI.



CHAPTER VII.



CHAPTER VIII.
. . . .







vi CONTENTS.



CHAPTER IX.'

THE PRODIGAL'S RETURN . .

CHAPTER X.

SKIP'S VENGEANCE . .. .

CHAPTER XI.

A FRIENDLY ARGUMENT . ..

CHAPTER XII.

CARROTS'S CHARITY . . .

CHAPTER XIII.

A MEDICAL FRIEND . .

CHAPTER XIV.

THE PLOT . . .

CHAPTER XV.

THE CONFLAGRATION . .

CHAPTER XVI.

THE CHALLENGE . ..

CHAPTER XVII.

PROSPERITY . . .


PAGE


. . 121



. . i35



. . I49



. . 162



. . 176



. . 187



. . 20X



. . 213













LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.





PAGE
TEDDY AND CARROTS LEAVE THE TOMBS" . Frontispiece
"' YOU 'D BETTER MIND YOUR EYE, IF YOU COUNT ON STAYING'
ROUND THIS CITY VERY LONG!' SAID SKIP" 15
TEDDY IS ARRESTED, WHILE HIS ENEMIES ESCAPE . 29
" Now, THEN, WHAT DO YOU WANT, YOUNG CHAP ? THE OFFI-
CER ASKED" . .. .. 33
TEENIE MASSEY'S EVENING CALL AT CARROTS'S RESIDENCE 53
"'IT WAS JEST LIKE THIS,' SAID CARROTS . 62
TEENIE BRINGS THE COMMITTEE'S" WARNING . .89
AN EXACT COPY OF THE COMMITTEE'S" WARNING . 92
"I SAID I KNEW A BOY, AN' I SHOWED HIM RIGHT UP" 105
"WHY, HE WAS ALL OVER THAT PASTURE QUICKER'N YOU
COULD WINK!" .. . . ... 117
CARROTS FALLS INTO THE HANDS OF THE ENEMY .. 127
TEDDY DEFENDS HIS PARTNER . . 143
IKEY BEFORE THE GROCER'S WINDOW . . 155
THE BOYS AT THE DOCTOR'S DOOR .. . 171
" HOW DID YOU KNOW CARROTS LIVED HERE ?' TEDDY ASKED,
STERNLY" . . . 197
"WHAT ARE YOU YELLIN' LIKE THAT FOR?' SAID SID" 209
" CARROTS DISPLAYS THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MESSRS. THURS-
TON AND WILLIAMS" . . .. 217
PROSPERITY . . . .... ... 221


r -











TEDDY AND CARROTS.




CHAPTER I.

A NEWCOMER.

"SAY, boys, come 'round over here by the fountain,
an' I'll show you something!" Skip Jellison shouted
to a party of his friends who were seated on a curb-
stone, not far from the Newsboys' Lodging House,
gravely discussing a business proposition which had
been made by Sid Barker.
What's the matter?" Reddy Jackson asked, re-
placing his fragment of a hat.
Come over here; an' you must be quick about it, or
the show will be ended."
Skip was so excited that his acquaintances and
friends concluded it must be something of consider-
able importance to cause him to move in such a
lively manner, and they followed him a short distance
down the street, until it was possible to have a full
view of the fountain.
There the cause of Master Jellison's agitation could
be seen.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Seated on the edge of the iron basin, with a news-
paper parcel unrolled in front of him, was a boy,
apparently about twelve years of age, who, to the
newsboy spectators, looked painfully neat and clean.
Skip and his friends saw that the boy was a stranger
in the city.
The newcomer had taken from their newspaper wrap-
pings a small cake of yellow soap, and a piece of
cotton cloth.
Laying these on the iron edge of the fountain basin,
he calmly proceeded to wash his face and hands, using
a plentiful amount of soap; and then, to the intense
astonishment of the spectators, applied the impromptu
towel vigorously.
"Well, that feller's too good for down-town!"
Skip said, in what he intended for a sarcastic tone.
He b'longs up at the Fif' Avenoo."
Oh, he 's jest got in from the country, an' is goin'
to buy Brooklyn Bridge," Sid suggested.
Look at him! Jest look at him!" Skip cried, in
mingled excitement and anger that the boy should be
so criminally neat.
The stranger had taken from his valise of paper a
comb, which he calmly proceeded to use, the water
in the basin serving as a mirror; and then, to the
surprise and disdain of the spectators, he gave his
clothes a vigorous brushing with a whisk-broom.
"Well, see here!" and Skip spoke in the tone of
one who is uncertain whether it is best to laugh or
be angry, that feller's making' me tired. S'pos'n' we





A NEWCOMER.


go over an' give him a shakin' up, jest for fun. Come
on!" and Skip led the way across the street at full
speed.
The stranger looked up calmly when they ap-
proached, but betrayed neither -astonishment nor
alarm; and Skip involuntarily halted a few paces away,
as he asked, gruffly: "Say, young feller, what 're you
trying' to do ? "
"Can't you see ?"
"I thought I did; but these chaps here made sure
there must be some mistake about it."
The boy gazed critically at those who were surround-
ing him, and then replied:
"Well, 'cordin' to the looks of the whole crowd, I
should think you might be s'prised to see a fellow wash
his face an' comb his hair."
"Now, don't get too fresh," Sid said, threateningly,
as he stepped forward to Skip's side. We didn't
come here to git the 'pinion of any country jay."
Then why did you want er know? "
"'Cause. Say, you'd better mind your eye, young
feller, if you count on stayin' 'round this city very
long. There was a chap jest like you come down here
last week trying' to put on airs: an' his folks are huntin'
for him now."
Well, you need n't be worried anybody '11 be looking'
for me, 'cause there 's nobody wants to know where I
am. So go ahead, if I've been doin' anything you
perfessors don't like."
Sid apparently decided that it was hardly advisable





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


for him to make too many threatening gestures, be-
cause the stranger was not at all disturbed by them, and
even seemed disposed to court the possibly dreadful
encounter.
He finished brushing his clothes, and then packed
his valise," by rolling the different articles carefully in
the newspaper. Then, instead of going away, as Skip
and his friends seemed to think he should have done as
soon as they arrived, he stood with his hands on his
hips, as if waiting for them to take their departure.
For a minute no one spoke, and the silence was really
painful.
The newsboys were mentally taking the measure of
this stranger who appeared ready to defy them; and
the latter finally asked, impatiently: "Well, what 're you
fellers counting' on doin'? I reckon I 'm no great sight
for you to stand looking' at."
Do you live here ? Skip asked.
"I 'm goin' to now. Had it tough enough getting'
here, an' don't feel like leaving' till I 've found out what
there is in this city."
"Where did you come from ?"
Up Saranac way."
Rode down in a parlor-car, I s'pose."
"Then you s'pose wrong, 'cause I walked."
"You don't look it." And once more Skip scruti-
nised the stranger carefully.
"I don't reckon I do. I count on keeping' myself
kind er decent. It does n't cost anything for a feller to
wash his face, comb his hair, or have his clothes clean,









Ill,!,


I i
*.~.II




*


Sx"


"'YOU'D BETTER MIND YOUR EYE, IF YOU COUNT ON STAYIN' ROUND THIS CITY VERY LONG'
SAID SKIP."





A NEWCOMER.


an' there 's many a time when it '11 put him through in
great shape."
Goin' to live on the interest of your money, I s'pose ?"
Well, you s'pose right this time," was the quiet
reply. That's my calkerlation; but it 'll be on what
I earn, not what I 've got."
Dead broke ? "
Not quite," and the boy took from his pocket a
number of pennies, holding them in one hand, while he
guarded himself against a possible attack. There
were twenty of 'em when I come 'cross the ferry, an'
I believe none of 'em have got away since."
What are you goin' to do here ? Sid asked, begin-
ning to fancy that possibly this stranger was a boy whom
it would be worth his while to cultivate; and, in order
to show his friendliness, he seated himself, in a studied
attitude of careless ease, on the edge of the basin, while
the others immediately followed his example.
Whatever will bring in money enough for my keep,
an' a little over."
Thinkin' of selling' papers ?" Reddy asked.
I reckon that '11 be 'bout the first job, 'cause I 've
got to make money enough for my supper, or dig too .
big a hole in my capital."
What's your name ?"
Teddy Thurston."
Do you s'pose the fellers down here, what run the
newspaper business, are goin' to have you coming' in
takin' the bread an' butter out er their mouths ?" Sid
asked, angrily.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


"No, I don't reckon they will; but you see I 'm not
after that exac'ly. You fellers '11 never find me trying' to
get your bread an' butter; but I'll tell you what you
can count on for a fact," and now the stranger spoke
in a very decided tone, I 'm reckonin' on stickin'
to the newspaper business, if there's any money in
it, jest as long as I want to. I did n't travel all the way
down here to get scared the first day. You see, I
bigger it 'bout like this: Sam Thompson, he came to
the city last summer, an' some fellers I don't know
whether it was you or not -made it hot for him. It
was n't more 'n a week before he was glad to walk back,
although he came down in the cars. Now, I thought
I'd begin right where Sam left off: I'd walk the first
way, an' then, perhaps, stand a better chance of ridin'
the other, if I had to go; but it's got to be boys what
are bigger than I am to scare me out er the plan. I've
come to stay."
Oh, you have ? and there was no mistaking the fact
that Skip was sarcastic. We may have something to
say 'bout that."
Then you want er talk quick, 'cause after I 'm set-
tled down, it 'll be a pretty hard job to make any trade
with me."
"Where you goin' to begin business ?"
I don't know yet. I '11 look 'round a while, an' catch
on before night, somewhere. I reckon there are fellers
in this town that would show a green hand how to get
his papers, an' where the best places were, eh ?"
That's jest 'cordin' to how you start in, young fel-





A NEWCOMER.


ler," and Sid arose to his feet in order to make his words
more expressive. If you want to go to work, an' mind
your eye, I don't know but it can be done; but you
won't get along this way. You 're putting' on too many
frills that's what's the matter with you, an' they '11
have to be taken off."
Well, perhaps they will; and Teddy turned as if to
leave his new acquaintances. You see, I 'm pretty
green, an' may be counting' on doin' too much. I '11 try
it a spell, anyhow."
We allers 'low, when it's 'greed a new hand can go
to work, that he stands treat the first thing."
"Oh, I see! Well, I don't have to do that, 'cause it
ain't been 'greed yet. When I want you fellers to tell
me what I can do, perhaps I may come down 'cordin' to
your idees; but jest now I 've got too much business on
hand; and the stranger walked away, as if these young
gentlemen, who claimed to control the newspaper busi-
ness of New York City, were of no especial importance
in his eyes.
Look here, fellers," Skip said wildly, for he always
contrived to work himself into a state of intense excite-
ment over the most trifling matters, the way he 's goin'
on now, he 'll be the boss of Newspaper Row before
morning 'less we take a hand in it."
What are you goin' to do? Sid asked in much too
quiet a tone to suit his excited friend.
Thump his head the very first time he tries to sell a
paper, to start with, an' run him out er town before ter-
morrer night."






20 TEDDY AND CARROTS.

* I don't see how you can tackle him now when he
ain't doin' anything."
Of course not; but he brags he 's goin' to; an' the
first time he tucks a bundle of papers under his arm, I '11
give him one to remember! "
Look out you don't git it the same 's you did last
week, over in Brooklyn!" Teenie Massey cried, in his
shrillest tones, which hardly ever failed to excite Master
Skip's anger.
Don't you mind how I got it over in Brooklyn I 'll
tend to my business; you tend to yours. If we waited
for you to do anything, we 'd all be bald-headed," was
Skip's answer to this taunt; but Teenie was not at all
abashed. It was his favourite amusement to arouse
Skip's anger, and rely upon his diminutive stature to
escape a whipping; for Master Jellison prided himself
upon his ability to flog any fellow of his size in New
York. "You fellers meet me in front of The Times
office at noon, an' I'll show him up in great shape, 'less
he comes to hisself before then, which I reckon he will,
'cause he '11 never have the nerve to stand up ag'in' the
whole crowd of us," said Skip.
Meanwhile the stranger was apparently giving no
heed to the young tyrant who had decided it would be
impossible for him to remain in the city; but continued
on his way down-town, ignorant of, and, perhaps, careless
regarding, the fact that he was to be debarred from earn-
ing a livelihood by selling newspapers, if Skip Jellison's
power was as great as he would have others believe.












CHAPTER II.


THE ASSAULT.

THE appearance of the clean-looking boy, even though
his clothes were rather shabby, attracted no particular
attention among the small army of newsboys and boot-
blacks to be found in the vicinity of City Hall Park;
and Teddy Thurston was enabled to survey the scene
.around him without interruption.
. During a few moments he interested himself in what,
to the country lad, must have been a bewildering scene;
and then, mentally pulling himself together," he began
to watch the young gentlemen who were selling papers.
Near by him were several bootblacks who appeared
to be doing a flourishing business; and he said to him-
self, jingling the coins in his pocket, as if trying to revive
his courage:
If I had money enough to buy brushes an' a box, I
believe I 'd black boots for a while. It seems as if there
was a good deal of profit in it. One .of those fellows
has earned fifteen cents since I stood here, an' I 'm sure
the paper-sellers are n't doin' so well."
Just at that moment a small boy, with particularly
red hair, and a stubby nose on which was a large smudge
of blacking, finished his work of polishing a gentleman's





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


boots, and pocketed with an air of satisfaction the three
extra pennies Wvhich had been given him.
Then, standing very near Teddy, he whistled in the
most contented manner possible.
The boy from Saranac looked at him a moment, as if
trying to decide whether the city fellow would be willing
to give the desired information, and then asked:
Say, what do the brushes cost ? "
I paid Ikey Cain forty cents for these two," the
stranger replied without hesitation, as he displayed the
articles last mentioned. They 're good ones. I could n't
have got 'em less 'n a dollar down on Fulton Street."
That settles me," Teddy said, as if speaking to him-
self ; and then, without particular animation, he inquired,
"What's the cost of the boxes ?"
Oh, the fellers don't buy these; they make 'em. All
you 've got to do is ask some man in a store for one, an',
if he gives it to you, find a chunk of wood an' whittle out
this top part. It's the blackin' what takes the profits
off. I paid twenty cents for that bottle last Monday,
an' it's more 'n half gone already."
Teddy ceased jingling his coins, and was about to turn
away, when his new acquaintance asked: Was you
thinking' of shinin' ? "
Eh?"
I mean was you goin' inter the business ?"
No, I can't; have n't got money enough. I reckon
I 'll have to sell papers for a while."
"You '11 be jest as rich," the small boy said as he
added another smudge of blacking to his nose by rub-





THE ASSAULT.


bing it in a thoughtful manner. "You see, when it
rains, the fellers can sell papers all the same; but we
have to lay off 'cause nobody wants their boots shined
in wet weather. Where do you live ?"
"Well, about anywhere, now. You see, I jest come
down from Saranac, to find out how I could earn my
livin'."
What was you doin' up there ?"
I worked for Farmer Taylor a spell, but he would n't
give me more 'n my clothes; an' when a feller has to
work a year on the farm for sich a rig-out as I've got
here, it don't seem as if he 'd get rich very soon."
I ain't so sure," the boy with the blackened nose.
said, as he surveyed the stranger. "You seem to be-
rigged out pretty swell, an' I guess they fed you well
enough gave you all you wanted, eh ? "
Oh, yes, I got enough to eat, an' a fair place to
sleep in; but it seems as though a feller like me
ought er have more 'n that, if he works hard all day for
it."
Well, I s'pose he had; but you see there 's a good-
many times when business is dull 'round here, an' if you
have n't got the cash to pay right up to dots for a room,
you'll have a chance to sleep where you can. I've been
thinking' of goin' on to a farm, myself; but I don't seem
to get ahead fast enough to make a break."
Teddy was rather pleased with his new acquaintance.
The red-haired boy was the first in the city who had
treated him with the slightest degree of friendliness, and
it would have been gross carelessness to neglect him.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


What's your name ? he asked, as he moved slowly
toward one of the benches, with an air which invited
the bootblack to sit down.
Well, it's Joseph Williams; but nobody 'round here
calls me that. The fellers sing out Carrots' when they
want me, 'cause you see my hair is red."
Yes, I could tell that in the dark," Teddy said with
a smile, as he looked at Master Williams's flame-colored
head.
I don't care what they call me. If it does 'em any
good to sing out Carrots' whenever I go by, why, let
'em do it. But that's what makes me think 'bout goin'
to farmin'."
"What is ? "
"'Cause they yell so much 'bout carrots. I don't know
as I 'd like sich things, for I never eat any; but it seems
as if a feller that's so red-headed as I am b'longs in the
country."
I don't know how you make that out."
"Neither do I; but that's the way it looks to me.
Must be nice to be where there's grass, so's you can
get up in the morning' an' run 'round in the fields."
Yes; but that's what you would n't be doin'. If
you was livin' on a farm you'd have to hustle, an' there 's
enough work in the morning' without running' 'round the
fields, I tell you."
"What did you use ter do? "
"Well, first place, I fed the cows. We did n't keep
any sheep; but I looked after the losses an' pigs, an'
then there was a pesky little calf that gave me lots o'





THE ASSAULT.


trouble. But look here," Teddy added quickly, there 's
plenty of time for me to tell you 'bout a farm. Jest now
I want er do something' to earn my livin.' Can you show
me where to get some papers ? "
"Are you goin' into the business sure ?"
"Only for a little while. I don't count on selling'
papers all my life. You see, I 'low to make money
enough so 's I can go inter something' regular for myself."
Oh, you do, eh ? and Master Carrots indulged in a
bit of sarcasm. Well, I reckon it '11 be a pretty long
while before you earn that much. You '11 be mighty
lucky to have all you want er eat, an' a place to sleep.
What have you got in your pocket ?"
Nothin' pertic'lar. That's my baggage," and, in
order to prove his friendliness toward the red-haired
stranger, Teddy displayed the contents of the newspaper
parcel, greatly to the surprise of his new acquaintance.
"What's that little brush for ? "
"Why, to clean my teeth, of course."
Carrots looked at his new friend in surprise which
amounted almost to bewilderment.
Well," Teddy asked, what's the matter ?"
Well, seems as if you was putting' on a good deal of
style for a feller that has n't got money enough to buy
the outfit for the bootblack trade."
I don't know as there 's anything so queer 'bout
that; but you fellers seem to think there 's no call to
keep yourselves looking' clean."
"Well, you see, we don't claim to be swells."
Yes, so I see," Teddy replied; then he added: Say,





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


these fellers seem to be selling' a good many papers.
S'pos'n' you show me where to buy some ?"
All right; come along; and, slinging his box over
his shoulder, Carrots started across Printing House
Square, threading his way in and out of the vehicles
in a manner which seemed to Teddy almost criminally
reckless.
More than once, before the short journey was ended,
did the boy from Saranac fancy he would be trampled
under the feet of the horses; but, by dint of his own
exertions, aided now and then by a vigorous pull from
his guide, he was soon standing in an ill-ventilated
room, where half a dozen fellows were clamouring for
round flat pieces of brass.
Here- I don't want those," Teddy said, as Carrots
led the way to the desk where the disks were being
sold.
But you 've got to have the checks if you count on
getting' papers. Give me your money. How many do
you want ? "
- I '11 take twenty cents' worth, anyhow, an' see what
I can do with them as a starter;" and Teddy handed
the pennies confidently to his new acquaintance.
Carrots laid the coins in front of the busy man at the
desk, received the bits of brass, and with them went to
the counter on which large numbers of newspapers
were lying, where he received Teddy's first stock in
trade.
"Find out what the news is, an' yell the best you
know how," Carrots said, pushing the young gentleman





THE ASSAULT.


from Saranac toward the street-door; and five minutes
later the new merchant was following his friend's advice
to the letter, by crying his wares in such a manner as
excited the mirth of the other dealers.
It seems to me I ain't doin' this jest right," Teddy
said to himself, and then he waited a moment, listening
to the more experienced venders.
It was not long before he succeeded in imitating
their cries, and had already sold four papers when Skip
Jellison, who was accompanied by his friends Sid
Barker and Teenie Massey, appeared in view.
"There he is!" Teenie cried in his shrillest tones.
"Now let's see you go for him! He 's actin' as if he
owned the whole town !"
Skip prepared for battle by rolling up his coat-sleeves,
and settling his dilapidated cap more firmly on his head.
Then, running swiftly forward, he confronted Teddy as
he was on the point of selling a paper to a gentleman
through a horse-car window.
Skip did not wait to be attacked, for he believed in
striking the first blow as a means of confusing the
enemy; and, before Teddy recognized the boy who had
threatened him, he received a severe blow in the face
which caused him to reel backward.
The paper fell from his hand, the horse-car continued
its way, and this important transaction in news was
nipped in the bud, to the serious loss of the young
merchant.
Teddy was bewildered for an instant, as Skip had
expected, and he did not recover his self-possession





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


until Master Jellison had struck him once more, this
time without serious effect, since the blow, being a hasty
one, glanced from the boy's shoulder.
It sufficed, however, to throw Teddy's stock of papers
into the mud of the street, thereby ruining several so
that they would not sell to fastidious customers; and
this, more than the injury received, aroused Teddy's ire.
The boy from Saranac may have been ignorant con-
cerning the customs of the city, but he was thoroughly
well aware that it was necessary to defend himself; and,
an instant later, Skip found he had quite as much on
hand as he could attend to properly.
Teddy, giving no heed to his wares, struck out with
more strength than science, and forced his adversary to
beat a swift retreat.
Now you 've. got it!" Teenie shrieked, as if de-
lighted that Skip had met an opponent who was a
match for him.
But Skip paid no heed to Teenie, and, raising his
fists as an invitation to Teddy to come on," awaited
the conclusion of the battle, confident as to who would
be the victor.
Teddy had no idea of holding back; for this attack
was but the beginning of a series which was intended
to drive him out of business, and it was necessary it
should be repulsed if he wished to earn his livelihood
by the sale of newspapers.
Therefore he advanced boldly, and aimed what was
intended for a stinging blow at his antagonist's face;
but it was met by Skip's arm, and, before Teddy could





THE ASSAULT.


raise his hand again, Teenie squeaked loudly and shrilly
enough to have been heard at the post-office:
Cops! Hi, fellers, here's de cops!"
Teddy was wholly at a loss to know what was meant
by this cry, although he
., --under-tood it was one
,. .-^ -,.- :- .- of warninii i and a-; he
,-... .--.-- '. looked around to a>cer-
r "'- tain the cause, Skip
i. "turned and immediately





A _.










TEDDY IS ARRESTED, WHILE HIS ENEMIES ESCAPE.

started at full speed across the park, intent only
on escaping from the blue-coated guardians of the
peace.
With a cry of triumph, Teddy followed in pursuit;
but before he had traversed twenty yards a heavy hand





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


was laid upon his shoulder, and he found himself in the
clutches of one of the park guards.
I 've made up my mind that this sort of thing 's been
going on long enough," the officer said, shaking the
boy from Saranac, as he led him toward the approach-
ing policeman. You little ragamuffins seem to think
this park 's kept for you to fight in, but now I 'm going
to show you what's what."
Just let me get hold of the fellow who knocked my
papers in the mud, and I'll show you what's what!"
Teddy cried, not understanding that he had been
arrested. "They are n't goin' to drive me away from
this town, if I know myself."
Well, now there won't be anybody able to do that
till after you'settle with the court," the guard said, as he
handed his prisoner over to the policeman; and Teddy's
face grew pale as he realized that his attempted
entrance into the business community of New York
City was to be checked in an ignominious manner.










CHAPTER III.


THE ARREST.

THE policeman marched Teddy along while he
whistled a remarkably merry tune, which the young
prisoner thought out of place.
If anybody had shown sufficient curiosity regarding
him to have asked Teddy if he had any friends in the
city, his reply would have been that he had none; but
he would have been wrong, as events proved.
Master Joseph Williams, otherwise known as Carrots,
had witnessed the affray from a distance, but was not
able to take an active part in it during the brief time it
lasted, owing to the fact of his being occupied just at
that moment in blacking a customer's boots. But when
Teddy had been dragged less than a block on the road
to his dungeon cell" by the whistling officer, he had
completed his task, and, what was more to the purpose,
received therefore the amount of money which it was
customary to expect.
Now this boy from Saranac had no claim upon the
red-headed, blackened-nosed young bootblack; but, de-
:spite the fact that Carrots's face was not cleanly, and
that his general appearance was generally disreputable,
he was ever ready to assist others.
Slinging his box over his shoulder, he ran to the
31





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


scene of the assault just in time to rescue Teddy's stock
of newspapers from beneath the feet of a dray-horse, and
followed with all speed after the officer and prisoner.
Teddy, plunged into a very Slough of Despond,"
was suffering himself to be taken through the streets
like a criminal, when he was startled by hearing a
hoarse whisper directly behind him; at the same instant
his hand was grasped by another.
"Say, can't you wriggle out er that cop's fist ?"
Carrots asked. But Teddy shook his head mournfully.
This is what comes of bein' brought up in the coun-
try," the bootblack muttered to himself, regretfully.
Don't lose your pluck," he said aloud. I'm goin'
to stand by you through this thing, 'cause it's all come
out er that Skip Jellison's gang, an' he 's forever picking'
on somebody."
I don't know what you can do," Teddy replied,
mournfully, speaking in an ordinary tone. Then, glanc-
ing around, the policeman noticed that his prisoner was
holding a conversation with a seeming friend.
Now, then, what do you want, young chap ?" the
officer asked.
Nothin' at all," said Carrots. It ain't ag'in' the law
to speak to a fellow, is it, when he 's walking' through the
streets?"
"Is this boy a friend of yours ?"
Bet your life he is, officer! Carrots replied, ear-
nestly. "Why, we 're jest like twins. You don't s'pose
I 'm goin' to see him lugged away when he ain't been
doin' nothing' at all, do you ?"









k.44T.
A


-r4


^^p"^-.
-:- ,-


"'NOW, THEN, WHAT DO YOU WANT, YOUNG CHAP ?' THE OFFICER
ASKED."





THE ARREST.


If you boys who loaf near City Hall keep on doing
this 'nothing at all' business, more of you will be
arrested before a great while," the officer said, grimly.
" You seem to think that park's made for you to fight
in, but it won't take long to show you you're mistaken."
But this fellow was n't fighting, Carrots replied in a
positive tone. I was only a little ways off when Skip
Jellison come up, hit him a clip, an' knocked his papers
out er his hands. What kind of a duffer would he be
if he had n't tried to square things ? The only trouble
is, he did n't have a chance to do any fighting' before
that crooked-nosed park guard got hold of him. Say,
it don't seem to me jest right that a regular policeman
should help that gray thing along in the way he's
actin'."
Why don't you come up before the commissioners,
and give them an idea of how the police force of the
city ought to be run ?" the officer asked, sarcastically.
"Well, I would; but you see, I ain't got the time.
When a feller's doin' sich a business ez I am, it keeps
him right down to dots," Carrots replied, gravely.
It's really a pity, the way you must be rushed," the
officer said, with a laugh; and, made bold by this
apparent friendliness, Carrots ventured to make a
request.
"Say, where are you goin' to take him ?"
Down to the station-house, of course."
"Well," said Carrots, "it would n't be any harm if I
walked alongside of him, an' talked over a little busi-
ness, would it ? "





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


It's nothing to me, so long as you don't help him
escape.
You need n't be 'fraid. I would n't raise my hand
againstt you, 'cause you're a pretty good kind of a man;
an' that sort is mighty scarce 'round this part of the
city."
I suppose, now that I have won your good opinion, it
won't be long before I 'm a captain, will it ? the officer
asked, laughingly.
If I had my way, you'd be a general before night;
but I ain't standing' in with the commissioners like I
ought to be," Carrots said, with mock gravity.
Then -for they were getting dangerously near the
station- he whispered to Teddy:
Look here, old man; you want ter keep your upper
lip mighty stiff jest now, an' I '11 get you out er this
scrape somehow. I s'pose there '11 have to be a regular
trial down to the Tombs, and I '11 bring the fellers there
to swear you didn't do anything. We '11 show up that
Skip Jellison gang in great shape to-morrow morning ,
'less I can coax you off from this cop."
"It's no use to try it," "Teddy replied, mournfully.
I reckon I '11 have to go to prison."
Now see here, that's just the way! You fellers
from the country ain't got any sand about you, that's
what's the matter. Don't get down in the mouth over
this thing, 'cause, as I said before, I 'm goin' to see you
through."
But what can you do against a lot of policemen ?"
"Wait and see. P'r'aps I have n't lived in this city





THE ARREST.


a good many years, an' don't know how to fix things! "
Carrots replied, as if he were positive how the matter
might be arranged; yet at the same time he had not
the remotest idea what it would be possible to do
toward aiding this boy.
Teddy was not reassured by the remark.
Although a stranger in the city, he knew that young
Carrots would not be able to do very much to help him,
and felt sure his business career was ruined.
How much money have you got?" Carrots whis-
pered.
Not more 'n ten cents. You see, I had jest begun
to sell papers when they nabbed me. How much do
you want ?"
I 've got enough. I was only thinking' 'bout you.
Here, take this; it may come in handy before morning ; "
and the bootblack pressed several coins into the
prisoner's hand.
I don't want it," Teddy replied, as he attempted in
vain to return the money. You mustn't give your cash
away like this; an' besides, what good will it do me ?"
"That's jest what we don't know. It's allers better
to have a little stuff in your pocket, no matter what
happens. I 've got your papers, an' am goin' to sell 'em,
so I 'll get my money back. You jest let me run this
thing, an' see how quick we '11 have it shipshape."
There was no opportunity for further discussion, for
by this time the three had arrived at the door of the
station-house, and Carrots, who had a wholesome dread
of such places, made no attempt to enter.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


I '11 see you to-night if they hold on to you; but if
the sergeant turns out to be an easy kind of a feller, an'
lets you go, come right up to City Hall to find me."
I reckon there won't be any chance of his getting on
the streets this afternoon," the officer said, as he halted
for a moment to give his prisoner's friend a bit of
kindly advice. He '11 have to go down to the Tombs
for trial in the morning, and if you boys can prove that
he was n't really fighting, but only trying to prevent
another fellow from taking his papers, he '11 stand a
good show of slipping off. I '11 see that the case is n't
shoved very hard."
"You're a dandy! Next time you want your
boots shined, come right where I am, an' if I don't
do it for nothing' it 'll be 'cause my blackin' has run
out!" Carrots cried, enthusiastically; and then, wheel-
ing suddenly, he ran at full speed in the opposite
direction.
It seems to me I 'm getting' a pretty big job on my
hands," he muttered to himself when he was at Printing
House Square once more. I 've promised to help that
boy out er this scrape, an' don't see how it's goin' to be
done. The fellers won't dare to go up and say any-
thing against Skip Jellison, 'cause he 's sich a terrible
fighter: guess he can get the best of anybody 'round
here in less 'n three rounds. I wish I dared to tackle
him! I don't. believe he can do as much as he makes
out." Then Carrots suddenly bethought himself of the
papers which yet remained under his arm, and added,
" Jiminy! I 'most forgot 'bout these. It's time they





THE ARREST.


were worked off, or else they 'll be too old to sell;" and
soon he was crying the news again.
Half an hour later, the substitute newsboy was hailed
by Teenie Massey, who asked:
"What are you up to now, Carrots? Shifted busi-
ness ? "
Say, Teenie, was you 'round here when Skip Jelli-
son hit that feller from the country ? "
"Yes; an' if the cops had n't come along so soon
Skip would have been sorry he tackled sich a job. I
believe that new feller can fight."
"So do I; but he did n't stand any show at all, the
way things were. These are his papers, an' I 'm selling'
'em for him."
Where is he now ? "
Jailed."
"Well, that settles him."
"I ain't so sure of it. You know, an' I know, an' all
the rest of the fellers know, that Skip Jellison did n't
have any business to run 'round punchin' him jest
'cause he was a new hand. I 'm goin' to see if there
ain't some chance of getting' him clear."
What '11 you do ? Break into the station-house, an'
pull him out ? Teenie asked excitedly, believing any of
his friends capable of doing such a thing, because of
the style of reading in which he indulged, wherein
such, deeds are often performed, in print, by the smallest
and most feeble boys
Well, I don't count on doin' quite so well as that,"
Carrots replied, thoughtfully rubbing his nose once





TEDDY AND, CARROTS.


more, and thereby adding to the smudge of blacking
which already nearly covered his face. "I kind er
'lowed we 'd get a lot of the fellers, an' go down to
court ter-morrer morning' when he 's brought up, so 's
to tell the story jest as it is. The judge is bound to
let him off then, an' I would n't be s'prised if Skip
Jellison found hisself in a scrape."
Teenie shook his head very decidedly.
Don't think it can be done, eh ?"
"Who 're you goin' to get to tell that yarn in court ?
Skip would about knock the head off er the feller that
did him that turn "
I know that. He is terrible! He 's jest terrible!"
Carrots replied, reflectively. But I don't see why it is
the fellers 'round here let Skip jump on 'em so! If
three or four of us turned to, we could thump him, and
do it easy; an' yet all hands lie down like lambs when-
ever he happens to want to wink."
"Why don't you give him a pounding ? "
"You see, I can't do it alone. I 'd be willing' to go
in if anybody 'd start in with me, 'cause it 's got pretty
nigh time something' was done, or else that feller '11 own
the whole town. Say, will you go down to court with
me, an' tell what you know 'bout this thing ? "
Teenie gazed at his toes several seconds before
replying, and then said:
I don't know whether I '11 have time, Carrots; but
I '11 see you to-night, an' let you know."
Carrots muttered to himself as his acquaintance was
lost to view among the crowd of busy pedestrians:






THE ARREST


That feller's pretty nigh scared out er his life
'bout Skip. There ain't any use thinking' he '11 help
in this trouble."
Half an hour later, when Carrots had disposed of
the stock of papers purchased by Teddy, and was
congratulating himself, Skip Jellison approached, look-
ing very fierce as he asked in a threatening tone:
See here, Carrots, what is it you are up to now ? "
Me? Carrots replied, in surprise. Why, I 'm
shinin' boots same 's ever."
"Now don't try to be too smart! You know what I
mean."
"Well, if I do I 'm a duffer. What are you driving'
at, Skip, anyhow ? "
"Ain't you been tellin' what you was goin' to do
to help that feller from the country that I settled this
forenoon ?"
Did n't strike me as if you settled him very much.
If he 'd had half a chance, he 'd 'a' settled you."
"You 've got to be took down a peg or two," Skip
said threateningly, as he doubled his fist and bran-
dished it before Carrots's face.
Want ter git another feller 'rested, do you ? Well,
I ain't going' to fight."
"You 'd better not, if you know what's good for
yourself."
I won't scrap 'cause I don't want to git jailed; but
you can't frighten me, no matter how bad you jump
round."
Look out for yourself, that's all I 'm sayin',"






42 TEDDY AND CARROTS.

Master Jellison replied angrily. I 'm watching' you,
an' the very first time you go to meddlin' with that
feller 'from the country, what's got to be drove out
this city, I '11 make you sorry for it! "
It's very polite o' you to give me a friendly warn-
in'," Carrots replied, in the most innocent and pleasant
tone.
Skip had nothing more to say, but walked away with
a dignity befitting one who considers it his mission
in life to regulate the business affairs of a large city.










CHAPTER IV.


THE PRISONER.

ALTHOUGH Carrots had pretended that Skip's threats
neither frightened nor disturbed him, he was thor-
oughly uncomfortable in mind.
He knew by past experience what Master Jellison
could and would do, with no provocation whatever,
save only a desire to exercise that authority which he
had assumed.
Carrots believed, however, that in case of an en-
counter with a boy who was ready and forced to defend
himself, Skip would not prove so great a master of the
"manly art of self-defense as he claimed to be.
But such a champion had not as yet been found.
Teenie Massey had chanced to be in Brooklyn about
a week before the arrival of Teddy in the city, and
upon his return home he had stated that he had seen
Master Jellison attack a boy not nearly so large as
himself, on Pineapple Street in that city, and receive
a sound beating.
He was n't in it at- all, from the time they begun,"
Teenie had stated to his friends; and on more than
one occasion he had referred to this defeat in the
presence of Skip himself.
It is but fair to say, however, that Skip Jellison





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


positively denied the truth of any such statement. In
explanation of the blackened eye and badly swollen
lip he brought from Brooklyn, he announced that he
had been set upon by a crowd of young ruffians.
Of course a feller 's goin' to get some clips when
he tackles a dozen or fifteen fellers at once," Skip ex-
plained to an admiring audience, shortly after Master
Massey's story had been noised about the streets;
" but every one of 'em got it worse 'n I did, an' it was n't
more 'n five minutes before all hands were running'
lickertysplit up Fulton Street. I reckon they did n't
stop till they got to Prospect Park. Teenie wants
to make out a good story; but it's all a whopper, an'
he knows it."
Now, although Carrots believed- that Master Massey
had told the truth in regard to what really occurred
in Brooklyn, Carrots did not feel competent to take
upon himself the task of cowing the bully; and he
felt reasonably certain Skip would carry his threats
into effect should occasion arise.
Carrots was also quite positive the occasion would
arise, because he did not intend to desert Teddy.
I 'm goin' right ahead with what I 'greed to do,"
he said to himself. If Skip wants to thump me for it,
I s'pose I '11 have to let him."
These reflections were interrupted by Reddy Jack-
son, who asked, as he approached and halted in front
of Carrots:
Seen Skip lately ?"
"He jest went away. Been' round, kinder reg'latin'





THE PRISONER.


the town. Goin' to rest hisself, 'cause he 's most played
out working' so hard."
Did he tell you anything ? "
Yes; thought I was rather meddlin' with his busi-
ness; but I don't see how that is."
Now look here, Carrots; I 'm a friend of yours, an'
don't want ter see any trouble come out er this thing.
Skip 's jest wild 'bout what you 've told the other fellers,
an' I reckon he '11 do as he says if you try to help that
feller what got 'rested."
"You 'lowed you was a friend of mine, did n't you,
Reddy ?"
"That's what I said."
"Well, then, why don't you show it by helping' me
stand up againstt sich a bully as Skip Jellison is, 'stead
of coming' here and tellin' me what he 's goin' to do ?
To hear some of. you fellers talk, anybody 'd think he
was a regular rhinoceros huntin' 'round to eat folks.
Now, it's jest like this: I 've got to help that feller,
'cause I promised him."
But you don't even know who he is."
I did n't ask him to write out a history 'bout his-
self, an' swear to it, so 's I could tell you fellers; but
he 's like all the rest of us, got to hustle for a livin',
an' has come down here to do it. Now what. busi-
ness is that of Skip Jellison's ? He does n't own this
town ain't even got a mortgage on it yet he
makes out this feller can't stay, an' tries to lick him.
Now, I s'pose you think it's mighty smart to try an'
shove that country feller down ? "





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


You don't know anything 'bout it, Carrots. He
put on more frills this morning' than you ever saw in
a circus procession. We ain't goin' to stand that; of
course not."
I s'pose it broke your heart 'cause his face was
clean, did n't it ? And it was apparent from Carrots's
tone that he was losing his temper.
Oh, well, go ahead, an' see how you '11 come out,
that's all. I jest thought I 'd tell you so's you
would n't get into a fuss with Skip; but if this is the
way you 're goin' on, why, let her flicker, for all I care."
I'm much obliged to you for bein' so willing ; an'
when I want another favor I 'll call 'round an' see
you," Carrots replied, as he turned on his heel, while
Reddy walked rapidly away.
"It looks as if I 'd got to put this thing through
alone," Carrots said to himself; an' if that's so, it '11
be a good idea for me to keep away from where Skip
is, 'cause if he should get a whack at me, I 'm afraid
I would n't be in a condition to do much of anything
for a day or two."
Carrots visited all of his acquaintances in whom
he felt he could confide, trying to enlist their sym-
pathies in the work which he had undertaken.
Unfortunately for his purpose, however, he did not
find any who were willing, simply because of the
stranger, to brave the doughty Skip's wrath; and
nearly every one advised Carrots to "give it up be-
fore he got into trouble."
Not until nearly nightfall was the well disposed





THE PRISONER.


bootblack willing to cease his efforts in this particular
direction.
Then he repaired to a certain restaurant on Baxter
Street, where he appeared to be well acquainted with
the waiters, and called for a hearty meal of corned
beef and potatoes, at the expense of fifteen cents-
an unusual amount for him, as could have been told
by the remark which the waiter made.
"Ain't you spreadin' yourself some to-night, Car-
rots ?"
"Well, it does look a little that way; but, you see,
I 've got a lot of business on hand, and I need to
be braced up a bit."
"Bought out some other bootblack, or found a
bigger line of customers ? "
Well, no;' I 'm buyin' stocks now. The Wall
Street men are kind er 'fraid I '11 down 'em, an' they 're
making' me hustle."
"Oh! gone into the Stock Exchange, eh ?"
Well, I have n't been any further than the gallery
yet; but that's all right. You don't want ter put in a
piece of pie with this corned beef, an' take the chance
of a rise in Western Union for the pay, do you?"
"No, I guess not. It would be too much like
speculation. "
"Well, I did n't s'pose you would; but I 'm coming'
'round here in the morning' to give your boss some
points about running' his business," Carrots replied;
and, handing over his money, he walked with a
majestic air into the street.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Having thus refreshed the inner man, Carrots bent
his way in the direction of the station-house.
It was his intention to ask for an interview with the
prisoner who had been arrested in City Hall Park, and
he felt extremely doubtful whether this request would
be granted, until he entered the building and recognized
in the sergeant behind the desk an old customer.
His surprise at meeting a friend, when he had ex-
pected to see the stern visage of a mere servant of
justice, was quite as great as it was pleasing; and he
marched up to the desk and said, familiarly:
If I 'd knowed you was here, I 'd 'a' come before."
I don't want my boots shined now. See you out-
side in the morning," said the sergeant.
But I ain't shinin'; I 'm on business."
Oh, you are, eh ? Well, what's up ?"
"One of the pleecemen 'round City Hall arrested a
feller this morning' what had jest walked down from.
Saranac; an' it's all wrong, I tell you,-all wrong."
He 's a friend of yours, I suppose ? "
Well, you can't exactly call him that. I never spoke
to him till jest before this thing happened. I want ter
git him right out, on 'portant business."
"I 'm afraid you will have to wait a little while, and
explain the whole affair to the judge in the morning. I
have n't any authority to do a thing like that."
"Could n't you fix it with the judge ? "
"No, indeed," the officer replied, laughingly. The
best way is for you to go to the court yourself, and ex-
plain how it happened, unless he is really guilty, in





THE PRISONER.


which case I suppose he will have to go to the Island.
I fancy a week up there would n't do him any harm."
But, you see, it was jest this way "-and Carrots
assumed an attitude such as one takes when about to
begin a long story.
"Never mind it now. I can't stop to listen; and,
besides, it would n't do any good."
Carrots looked up as if surprised that an old friend
should assume a dictatorial tone, and then, suddenly re-
membering that he had another favour to ask, added:
"Well, you can let me see him, can't you ?"
"What good will that do ? "
"Why, I jest want to brace him up a little. You see,
he 's pretty green, an' he must be feeling' awful bad by
this time. I won't stay more 'n five minutes, if you '11
let me see him."
All right; go down-stairs. You '11 find him in one
of the cells; and if the turnkey says anything, tell him I
sent you."
Carrots did not wait for further instructions; but,
fearful lest the permission should be withdrawn, hurried
down the stairs at once, and was making a tour of the
cells with the purpose of finding his friend, when the
officer in charge stopped him.
What do you want here ?"
The sergeant sent me down to see a friend of mine,
that's all; an' I 'm looking' for him."
The boy they brought in this noon ?"
That 's the very one."
He 's over there; third cell from the end."





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Carrots walked quickly to the place, looked in
through the grated door, and saw Teddy lying on a
wooden bench, which served the double purpose of a
seat and a bed. The young prisoner's face was covered
by his hands.
Come, old man," Carrots said, soothingly, "you ought
ter have more sand than to give up like this. Besides,
ain't I here to help you ?"
Teddy leaped to his feet immediately, and came to
the door, through which Carrots thrust a very grimy
hand as he said:
Shake hands! Brace up, an' have some style about
you! I 've been 'tendin' to your business pretty nigh
ever since you was gone, an' thought I 'd jest run in to
let you know everything will be all right; but you '11
have to stay here till morning. "
Till morning' ? Teddy repeated in dismay.
Yes; that ain't sich a very long while, an' it '11 take
me till then to get things fixed."
"How did they happen to let you in ?"
"Oh, you see, the sergeant is an old friend of mine.
I 've blacked his boots, on an' off, for 'most a year."
Then Carrots, with the hope of cheering his friend,
began to explain what might be done toward effecting
the prisoner's release; and when it was time to bring
the interview to a close, he had so far succeeded that
Teddy was really quite hopeful, believing there was no
serious obstacle in the way of his freedom.
Bidding Teddy adieu, Carrots left the station-house.
It was now so nearly dark that Carrots turned in the





THE PRISONER.


direction of his own home, for the purpose of gaining as
much rest as possible before beginning what looked like
a hard piece of work.
Now Carrots was a householder in his own right, or
at least by right of discovery.
More than one of his acquaintances had been
eager to know where he lived; but he avoided all
questions on the subject, save to one person- Teenie
Massey.
In 'addition to his being a trusted friend, Teenie lived
with his parents; therefore, when Carrots revealed the
secret, it was with the knowledge that Master Massey
would not wish to share the dwelling with him.
To avoid interference, Carrots always approached his
home in the most cautious manner, and this occasion
was no exception.
He walked leisurely along in the direction of Canal
Street, as if going nowhere in particular, for the pur-
pose of misleading any friends whom he might meet;
and, on arriving at an alleyway which ran between two
shops, he halted for an instant to make sure the coast
was clear.
He recognized no one in the immediate vicinity, and,
wheeling sharply around, ran swiftly up the narrow
passage, climbed over a board fence, and dropped lightly
into a yard in the rear of a business establishment.
Here was an enormous collection of packing-cases,
some stacked in regular order, and others lying care-
lessly around wherever they might have chanced to fall
when taken from the shop by the employes. To Car-





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


rots, however, the yard was as familiar as any of the city
streets.
He knew exactly where each case should be, unless,
perchance, there had been some addition made to the
collection since his departure from home; and, although
it was dark, proceeded without difficulty until he arrived
at one corner of the yard, where, by pulling out an
unusually large box, he disclosed a narrow passage run-
ning along the side of the fence.
It was not possible to walk upright through this
opening, owing to the lumber above; but, once Master
Carrots arrived at the further end, he found as snug and
comfortable a dwelling as it would be reasonable for
any boy in Master Carrots's walk of life to desire.
Two cases, facing each other at an interval sufficiently
wide for a small person to enter, formed an apartment
four or five feet square; and, although it was impossible
for Carrots even to stand erect, he could sit or lie down
in a most comfortable fashion.
A small bundle of straw, taken from some of the
other cases, made a bed for the bootblack; and directly
opposite this impromptu couch were Carrots's house-
hold treasures.
A bottle which served as a candlestick, a cigar-box
as pantry in case he chanced to lay in a stock of provi-
sions, a well-worn brush, several empty blacking-boxes,
and a miscellaneous collection of odds and ends, were
packed in one corner with the utmost neatness.
On arriving at his home, Carrots lighted the candle
in order to render the apartment more cheerful; and





























































TEENIE MASSEY'S EVENING CALL AT CARROTS'S RESIDENCE.





THE PRISONER.


then he sat down with his chin in his hands, trying to
decide how it would be possible to keep the promise
made to Teddy.
Before he had succeeded in solving the problem, how-
ever, a shrill whistle was heard from the alleyway, and
Carrots muttered to himself as he crawled through the
passage out from among the boxes:
I wonder what Teenie Massey wants? A feller
that's got so much business on his hands as I have
can't 'ford to waste a great deal of time with visitors."
Hi! Carrots, are you there ? Teenie asked.
Of course I am! Where do you s'pose a feller
would be at this time of night ?"
"I 'm coming' over! "
"Well, come, then; an' don't make so much noise
about it. Nobody knows who may be 'round here;"
and Master Carrots retraced his steps to the packing-
case dwelling.










CHAPTER V.


A SUGGESTION.

IT could be understood that Teenie was a frequent
visitor by the familiar manner in which he threaded his
way amid the obstacles before reaching Carrots's very
retired residence.
Old man," said Teenie, this is ever so much nicer
a place to live in than a regular house."
Yes," the host replied, grimly; "'specially when the
nights are cold, or it rains. I s'pose you 'd rather have
the water coming' in on you than not, when you 're
asleep, would n't you ?"
"Well, I did n't mean it jest that way," Teenie re-
plied; but when you get in here an' have the candle
lighted, it allers seems mighty fine. I got mother to let
me come down an' stay all night with you."
There! that's jest what I thought you was up to,"
Carrots said, in rather a cross tone.
Why, what's the matter ? Don't you want me ?"
Teenie asked in surprise.
"Of course I 'm glad to have you come, Teenie; but
I am busy to-night, an' talking' with you is bound to up-
set things."
What are you doin' ? "
"You see, I took the job of getting' that feller from
56





A SUGGESTION.


Saranac out er the station-house; an' it's goin' to be a
pretty hard one, I 'm 'fraid, as things are looking' now.
If I can get him clear of the scrape, you '11 see some fun
one of these days, 'cause this thing ain't goin' to stop
here, I '11 tell you that. I only wish I knew what ought
ter be done."
"How have you been trying' to fix it ? "
"Well, I 've talked with some of the fellers that saw
the row, to get 'em to go down to court an' tell how it
happened; but they 're so terribly 'fraid of Skip they
don't dare to say their souls are their own."
Well, I do," Teenie replied, bravely. I saw the
whole of the scrap, 'cause I was there before it began."
Will you tell that when the chap 's brought inter
court to-morrow morning' ? "
'Course I will, if you '11 stand by me in case Skip
tries to come his funny business; 'cause that's what he
says he 's goin' to do to anybody who helps the feller
from the country."
I '11 stand by you, Teenie, if that's what you want;
an' if we do get Teddy clear, there '11 be three of us.
Skip won't dare to tackle as big a crowd as that."
"No; but you see the feller ain't out, an' I can't
bigger how it's goin' to be done."
We '11 tell the judge jest what we saw."
I don't believe we '11 get the chance. They would n't
let you go anywhere near him, 'less you had a lawyer."
We 've got to fix it somehow."
Why not get a lawyer ? "
Now you 're goin' crazy, Teenie Massey. It costs





TEDDY AND CARROTS


as much as a dollar to get one of them fellows to go to
court. They come high!" o
Don't you s'pose you could hire one, an' let him
take it out in trade ?"
By jiminy! I never thought of that. I wonder if I
could n't? "
It would n't do any harm to try. I sell papers to a
man that would come an' 'tend to the whole business, I
guess, if you 'd 'gree to black his boots so many times a
week."
I 'd 'gree to black him all over, if he 'd do what I
want. Where does he hang out? "
I '11 show you in the morning Been to supper ? "
"Yes; had a little spread up to Delmonico's. It
was n't much, an' charlotte roosters an' sich things as
that ain't fillin', you know."
I kinder thought you might be hungry, so I got
mother to do up a lunch." And Teenie drew from his
pocket a small parcel of cold roast meat, adding to it
from another pocket five boiled eggs.
"Say, we '11 have a regular lay-out, won't we ? Carrots
said, as he surveyed the food with the keenest pleasure.
Now I reckon you can kind er ease up on your
business long enough to 'tend to this stuff, can't you ? "
Teenie answered.
Well, I should say so! You 're a brick, Teenie, an'
I wish you 'd come every night."
Business would have to be pretty good if I was goin'
to have such a spread as this right along. I 've been to
supper, so you pitch in."





A SUGGESTION


S'pose we put it away for a while ? It has n't been
so long since I ate that lot o' quails, you know; and I
can hold on a spell, an' we '11 be hungry before we 're
ready to go to sleep."
Teenie was satisfied; and he reclined carelessly in
one corner of the packing-case home, enjoying himself
to the utmost.
Carrots followed his example, and soon the two were
busily engaged discussing the probable outcome of
Teddy's case, as well as the possibility of engaging a
lawyer upon the condition of his being willing to accept
the fee in trade."
Not until a late hour was the lunch disposed of; and
then, nestling into the straw, the two were ready for
slumber.
Owing to the peculiar location of his home, and the
necessity of keeping his whereabouts a profound secret,
Carrots was obliged to arise at a very early hour, in
order to leave the residence before any of the clerks in
the shop should arrive. Therefore it was that the host
and his guest were on the street shortly after sunrise.
Of course it would have been folly to look for the
attorney in his office at such an hour, and the possibility
of doing any business before seven or eight o'clock was
so slight that Carrots, with the recklessness of a spend-
thrift, invited his friend to a breakfast at Mose Pear-
son's, even though it involved an expenditure of fully
one-fifth of his entire wealth.
"We '11 kind er need something' to brace us up," he
said, in explanation of his generous invitation.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


As a matter of course, Master Massey was not proof
against the kind hospitality, and so he very willingly
followed his friend to Mr. Pearson's establishment,
which was located in the basement of a dwelling on
Baxter Street.
When the boys, leisurely, and with the air of capital-
ists, sauntered out on the street once more, they looked
thoroughly contented with the world in general, and
themselves in particular.
"We 'd better get up somewhere near the lawyer's
office before that Skip Jellison comes 'round," Teenie
said.
Carrots recognized the wisdom of this advice at once;
and the two, keeping a sharp lookout lest Master Jel-
lison should spring upon them unawares, made their
way to Centre Street, where for an hour and a half they
waited in the hallway of the building in which the
lawyer with whom Teenie was acquainted had an
office.
On his arrival it was evident the gentleman did not
recognize them as two possible clients, for he passed
without even a nod to the boy who claimed to be his
friend, entered the office, and closed the door behind
him.
Why, he does n't even know you!" Carrots ex-
claimed, in a tone of reproach.
Oh, yes, he does; but you see it's kind er dark in
here, an' I s'po.se he could n't see my face very well, or
he did n't notice."
What are you goin' to do 'bout it ?"





A SUGGESTION


"Wait till he gets settled, an' then we '11 go up an'
call on him. You do the talking while I stand back
an' 'gree to all you say."
Now that they were where the scheme could be
carried into execution, Carrots was by no means confi-
dent it would be a success, and actually felt rather timid
about making the attempt; but, urged on by Teenie, he
finally mustered up courage to open the door of the
office. He stood on the threshold, gazing first at the
attorney and then back at his friend.
Well, what do you want ? the gentleman asked,
looking inquiringly at the boy.
This question appeared to restore to Carrots a certain
portion of his self-possession, and he entered the room,
standing in the middle of the floor as he beckoned to his
friend to follow.
"What do you want ? the lawyer asked again, impa-
tiently.
"Well, you see I come we want-"
Out with it. What did you come for ? "
Teenie nudged his friend from behind, as a sign that
he should speak up promptly; and Carrots, catching
his breath much as one does after a plunge in cold
water, began:
There's a feller what walked down from Saranac,
that's goin' to be took inter the Tombs court this
morning' for fighting' in City Hall Park, an' we've come to
see how much it would cost to hire you to git him out."
I might defend him, but I could n't agree to get him
out. That depends on the judge."




TEDDY AND CARROTS.


"Well, you could make the talk, an' I reckon when
the thing's put up right they '11 have to let him go,
'cause he did n't do anything."

























"'IT WAS JEST LIKE THIS,' SAID CARROTS."

"Suppose you tell me the whole story, and I shall be
better able to judge what they may be obliged to do."
It was jest like this: You see, Skip he come up an'
hit Teddy in the jaw, and Teddy tried to hit back.





A SUGGESTION.


Skip let out with a left-hander; Teddy warded it off.
Then Skip jumped; down went the papers. Skip got
frightened of a cop; he started to run, Teddy after him,
an' Teddy was 'rested, and that's all there is 'bout it."
That may be the whole of the story; but I must
confess I dori't understand it yet."
"Why, it's plain enough. You see, Skip he struck
out, an' Teddy warded it off "
Now wait a moment. Tell me which boy is
arrested."
Why, Teddy, of course. You don't s'pose we 'd
come here if it had been Skip? I wish it was. He 'd
stay there a good while, for all I'd care."
Who is this Teddy ? "
He 's a feller what walked down from Saranac, an'
got here yesterday morning ; but jest as he was goin' to
sell papers up jumped Skip, 'cause he thinks* he owns
the whole town, an' 'lowed he was goin' to clean Teddy
right out. Now, I never did think Skip could fight any
great deal, 'cause how was it when he was over to
Brooklyn, an' that feller tackled him?"
"Try to tell me the story as I want to hear it. You
say Teddy was arrested ?"
Why, it's worse 'n that! He 's in the station-
house !"
Certainly; if he is arrested. On what charge was
he taken ? "
"-Eh?"
I mean why did the officer take him ?"
"Why? 'Cause the park policeman said he was





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


fighting ; but he was n't. He was only beginning He
might uv licked Skip, too, if they 'd let him alone. I
know by the way he put up his hands."
Then it seems, according to your story, that he
really was fighting."
How could he, when he had n't even commenced ?
Skip hit him, an' knocked the papers out er his hands,
an' then he was goin' to lick Skip, but did n't have
time."
The attorney was a patient man, and, possibly, the
boy's manner of telling the story amused him; therefore
he continued asking questions, preventing any detailed
account of previous quarrels which Skip might have
had, until he was in possession of all the important
facts, when he asked:
Do you know what a lawyer usually charges for
such a case as this ?"
"Now you're coming' right down to dots!'" Carrots
said, beginning to feel more at ease since the attorney
treated him in such a friendly fashion. You see, this
feller has n't got any money, an' I don't claim to be
a millionaire myself. I know lawyers charge a good
deal for doin' a little o' nothing ; but I thought if you 'd
kind er take it out in trade, we might make a bargain."
What business are you in ? "
I shine boots; an' if you '11 get this feller out er the
scrape, I'll come in here an'.black your boots every
morning' this year, for nothing You can't make a better
trade 'n that if you should look 'round a good while."
That is quite a contract you are proposing."





A SUGGESTION


I know it; but you see I want ter make it an object
for you to get Teddy out."
That can be done only in the proper manner. The
question is whether you have any witnesses to prove
that this boy was not really fighting, and that he had
sufficient provocation to excuse his trying to thrash the
other one."
Sufficient what ? "
Provocation. That is, whether what had been done
was enough to warrant an attempt to whip this other
boy; for, as I understand it, that is really what he did
try to do."
"Why, of course; he had to. How 'd you like it if a feller
sneaked up an' whacked you in the face when you was n't
doin' anything, an' knocked your papers in the mud."
"It would n't be very pleasant, I '11' admit; but how
can you prove that such was the case ? Who saw the
beginning of the trouble ?"
I did, an' Teenie, an' lots of other fellers; but they
would n't dare to tell it for fear Skip might thump 'em.
He calls hisself a fighter."
Then you two are willing to run the risk, and tell
your story in court, are you ? "
Of course we are; but will you go an' get him out ?"
Suppose I should take this case, and spend an hour.
or two on it, how do I know you would come here each
morning to black my boots, as you propose ? "
How do you know? Why, ain't Teenie here, an'
don't he hear what I say? That's enough to make
a trade if you 've got a witness, ain't it ?"





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


"Yes, I suppose it is," the lawyer replied, laughingly.
I don't see any other way for me but to take the case.
Go to the Tombs, and wait there until I come."
You '11 be sure to be on hand before they bring him
down, eh ? "
I won't neglect it."
With this assurance the boys left the office, and, once
on the outside, Carrots said to his friend, in a tone of
relief:
"Well, now that's fixed, an' I guess we need n't
bother any more 'bout Teddy's getting' out; but there 'll
be an awful row when Skip hears what we' ve done, an'
you an' I 've got to stand right alongsidee of each other if
he tries any funny business. We must look out for him."
This suggestion that they would stand together
against Teddy's- enemy was far from displeasing to
Master Massey.
In the seclusion of the packing-case home he could
talk boldly about what Skip might yet be able to do;
but once on the street, where it was possible to meet
the bully at any moment, the matter assumed a different
aspect, and he began to realize the danger in which he
had thus voluntarily.placed himself.
It won't do for us to hang 'round here, 'cause he 's
. likely to come any minute," Teenie said, in a tremulous
tone. I think we 'd better go down to the Tombs, an'
then we '11 be on hand when the lawyer wants us."
This was a very good idea, and Carrots led the way
at a rapid pace, both taking heed lest they should acci-
dentally meet Skip.











CHAPTER VI.


THE TRIAL.

CARROTS and Teenie succeeded in reaching the
Tombs without being intercepted by Skip; and once
there, they were unable to determine whether the court
was in session.
In the vicinity of the judge's desk a number of men
were standing, apparently talking on different subjects,
and in the seats reserved for the spectators a few unfor-
tunate-looking persons lounged.
Well, the feller ain't been brought in yet, that's
certain," Carrots said, gazing around the room in a vain
search for his new acquaintance.
"Do you s'pose they will put handcuffs on him?"
Teenie asked, in a tone of awe. I reckon he 'd be jest
about crazy if they 'd send him up to the Island."
It would start 'most anybody up to take a dose like
that; but of course it won't happen now we 've got the
lawyer. I tell you he '11 be s'prised to see how we 've
fixed things, won't he ?"
Indeed he will; an' Skip '11 be hoppin' mad when
he knows. We want ter keep pretty close together
while we 're working' this."
The conversation was interrupted by the entrance of
the sergeant who had been seen at the station-house,





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


and Carrots went swiftly toward him, asking, as he
halted in front of the officer:
Did you bring that feller down yet ?"
He will come in the van with the rest of the pris-
oners.
You won't forget that you promised to try an' fix it ?"
I said I would see that the officer was n't hard on
him. I can't fix anything. Have you got your wit-
nesses here ?"
Yes; Teenie 's one, an' I 'm another, an' we 've hired
a regular lawyer."
"You have? Who?"
A man by the name of Varney."
"Well, if he is coming I reckon you will be all right,
unless you have a bad case; and from what the rounds-
man told me the fighting did n't amount to much."
"There was n't any of it! You see, Skip he give
Teddy one in the face, an' then sent in a left-hander,
an' Teddy he-"
Never mind the story. I don't want to hear it, for
I have n't the time," the officer said, as he started toward
the judge's bench.
Half an hour elapsed, and then the boys suddenly saw
their new friend within a sort of iron cage at one end of
the room.
There he is! Teenie whispered, excitedly. How
do you s'pose he got in without our seeing' him ?"
Carrots stood erect and gazed at the prisoner a
moment, as if debating whether to approach him or not.
Teddy presented a most forlorn appearance, standing





THE TRIAL.


aloof from the other prisoners as far as possible, and
-clinging to the iron bars, his usually clean face begrimed
with dirt, through which the flowing tears had plowed
tiny canals until he looked not unlike a small-sized
Indian in war-paint.
This picture of sorrow made a deep impression on
Carrots's tender heart, and, regardless of whether he
might be able to regain his seat, he marched toward
the prisoners' cage.
Teddy had seen him coming, and stepped forward in
the hope of speaking with this boy who had proved him-
self to be a real friend; but before a single word could
be uttered, the officer interrupted the visitor by saying
roughly:
Get back there! "
But I've got to talk with that feller."
"Get back there! Do you hear what I tell you?"
and he made a threatening gesture which was not at all
terrifying to the self-possessed Carrots.
I 've got to talk with this feller; he's a friend of
mine, an' I ain't seen him since last night. He 's goin'
to get right out, too, 'cause he did n't do anything, an'
wouldn't have been brought here if he'd had sense
enough to run when they hollered 'Cops!' It was jest
this way: Skip, he struck out an' hit him in the face, an'
then come in with a left-hander "
Carrots had been advancing while speaking, and at
this point the officer seized him by one shoulder, spin-
ning him around until he was heading in the direction
from which he had come.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


"If you make any attempt to speak to that boy, I' ll
put you in with him!. What are you doing here, any-
how ? Are you a witness ? "
Course I am. What else do you s'pose? Why,
I've got to tell the judge all 'bout how this thing hap-
pened. You see, I was right there, an' when Skip come
in with a left-hander, an' Teddy he warded it off -"
Carrots did not finish the sentence, for the officer
gave him a push which might have thrown him head-
long but for the fact that Teenie chanced to be in the
way, and thus prevented the fall.
I guess we'd better get back to the settee," Carrots
said, looking at the officer an instant, as if to make out
whether the latter was really in earnest in this last
movement.
Carrots was whispering to Teenie his opinion of the
officer in charge of the prisoners when the lawyer
arrived; and then for the first time did Teddy's friends
learn that court had been in session all the while since
they entered.
It was a positive relief to see the attorney; and, lest
the latter should think those who employed him had not
followed the directions given, Carrots made his presence
known by going up to the gentleman in the most confi-
dential manner, and announcing cheerfully: We 're
here."
Yes, I see you are. Sit down. I '11 call you when
you 're wanted."
"But are you sure you remember what I told you
'bout how it happened ? You don't want to forget that





THE TRIAL. 71

Skip jumped in an' hit Teddy in the face, and then come
in with a left-"
You shall be asked to tell that story, my boy, pres-
ently; but just now I don't care to hear it, and have n't
the time. Sit down until your name is called."
I 'm afraid that lawyer don't 'mount to much," Car-
rots whispered to Teenie as he obeyed the gentleman's
command. It seems like he 's putting' on a good many
airs, an' don't want ter listen to how the thing happened.
Now I don't believe any man can fix it with the judge,
'less he 's got the whole thing down fine."
The sergeant said he was all right, an' he ought ter
know; so I reckon we can 'ford to wait," Teenie replied,
contentedly.
It seemed to the impatient Carrots as if it must have
been nearly noon when he heard the clerk call the name
" Theodore Thurston; and, an instant later, the young
prisoner from Saranac was conducted to the dock.
Almost at the same moment Skip Jellison, accompa-
nied by several of his most intimate friends, entered the
room, and immediately became aware that Carrots and
Teenie were in attendance.
Without hesitation, and, as if such scenes were per-
fectly familiar to him, Master Skip approached Teddy's
friends in an easy, careless fashion, as he asked:
What are you two doin' here ? "
Came down to see how the new feller gets along.
Don't s'pose you 've got any objections have you ?"
Carrots replied.
I don't know whether I have or not."






TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Well, after you find out jest give me the word, 'cause
we 're bound to dust whenever you give us the tip."
It was evident to Master Jellison that Carrots was
speaking sarcastically, and he took no further notice of
this insolence, save to say, warningly:
You want to mind your eye, that's all! The feller
what tries to help that chump along is goin' to get inter
trouble."
Same's you did over to Brooklyn the other day,
eh ? Carrots asked coolly.
Wait till I catch you outside, an' we '11 see if you 've
got anything more to say 'bout Brooklyn!" And with
this threat Master Jellison and his friends advanced to a
settee nearer the judge, where they seated themselves
with a great show of what was probably intended to be
dignity.
"He's come to see if we're goin' to tell anything
'bout the row," Teenie whispered; and it could plainly
be seen that Master Massey was very much frightened
regarding the probable outcome of thus attempting to
aid the stranger.
At that moment Carrots was startled out of his self-
possession although he had come especially as a wit-
ness by hearing his name called in a loud tone.
Three times the clerk shouted "Joseph Williams,"
and then Carrots exclaimed:
By jiminy! he means me, does n't he ?"
"Of course he does. Go 'long quick, or else that
feller '11 be up on the Island before they know you're
here," said Teenie.





THE TRIAL.


It was necessary the witness should pass Skip Jellison
on his way to the stand; and, in so doing, he saw Teddy's
enemy scowl and shake his fist in the most threatening
manner.
Don't get excited," Carrots stopped long enough to
say. "You're coming' out of it all right, even if you
don't feel very good now."
Then he continued on until some one directed him
which way to go; and for the first time in his life he
laid his hand on a Bible, and swore to tell the truth,
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth."
If, as is extremely probable, Skip had come for the
purpose of hearing what was said, he was disappointed,
as are nearly all the visitors to the Tombs court, where
it is an impossibility for one on the spectators' benches
to distinguish any remark made either by the judge or
the witness, unless the latter chances to have a particu-
larly clear voice.
Those inside the railing, however, could understand
quite distinctly all that was said; and, judging from
their mirth, Carrots's examination must have been to
them an amusing one.
On being asked his name, the witness replied, Car-
rots; and then the judge glowered down upon him
until he realized that he previously answered to that of
SJoseph Williams."
After having made the proper correction, and before
it was possible for any one to ask him a question, Car-
rots leaned toward the magistrate in a confidential and
friendly manner, as he began:





TEDDY AND CARROTS


You see, Judge, it was jest like this: Skip he jumped
in an' hit Teddy one in the face, an' then come back
with a left-hander; but Teddy warded it off, an' then-"
"Stop!" the judge cried, severely. "When I want
you to tell the 'story I will ask for it. Did you see this
boy fighting in the park ? "
He was n't fighting' at all. He did n't have time, for
the park policeman caught him. You see, it was jest
this way: Skip he jumped in an' smashed Teddy in the
face, an' then come with a left-hander "
Again was the witness interrupted; and this time Mr.
Varney stepped forward to where he could say in a low
tone to Carrots:
"You must simply answer the judge's questions -
not attempt to tell the story yourself."
Yes, sir; but how '11 he know what's what if I don't
give him the whole right through ? Carrots asked in a
hoarse whisper.
Attend to what he says, and don't try to tell any-
thing else."
What was this boy doing when the policeman
arrested him?" the judge asked, as he looked sternly at
the witness.
He was n't doin' nothing 'cause he did n't have time.
You see, Skip run as soon as he hit him, an' knocked
his papers down, an' then -"
Did the prisoner go in pursuit of the boy whom you
call Skip?"
Course he did; 'cause, you see, Skip knocked his
papers in the mud, an' hit him once in the face; an' he





THE TRIAL.


would have come in with a left-hander, if Teddy had n't
warded it off."
What was the prisoner doing when this boy struck
him ?"
He was selling' a paper to a man in a horse-car. You
see, Skip he 'lowed that Teddy could n't run the busi-
ness in New York; but Teddy he walked 'way down
from Saranac jest to get a livin', an' Skip don't have any
right to tell fellers whether they 're to work or not."
"Had the prisoner said anything to this boy who
struck him ?"
No; you see, he did n't have time. Skip jumped
right in an' hit him once in the face, an'-"
Now, don't tell that story again, Had there been
any quarrel between these two ? "
No, sir; you see, Teddy did n't come in town till
this morning an' he never knew Skip from a side of sole-
leather."
Is he a friend of yours ? "
Well, I s 'pose he is," Carrots replied, hesitatingly.
"You see, when he got into trouble, somebody had to.
help him out, an' there did n't seem to be anybody willing'
but me. He ought ter be my friend if I 'm goin' to
black the lawyer's boots a whole year jest to pay for this
racket."
If your honor will allow me, I will tell the story as I
have managed to extract it I use the word 'extract'
advisedly -from this witness and his friend," the lawyer
said, as he advanced a few paces amid the smiles of all
those near the bench.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Do you wish to explain about your fee?" the judge
asked, laughingly.
Perhaps that is hardly necessary, since lawyers are
seldom known to refuse anything offered in the way of
payment. That was the proposition made by the wit-
ness and witnessed by his friend."
Then the attorney related what had occurred in his
office, to the no slight amusement of those who could
hear him; and, when he concluded, the judge turned to
Carrots again, looking very much more friendly than
before.
Then you assure me on your oath that the prisoner
.did not fight with the other boy in City Hall Park ? "
Why, no; how could he? He did n't get the
chance. You see, Skip hit him in the face, an' then
come in with a left-hander; but Teddy warded it off, and
then Skip run. The policeman grabbed Teddy too
quick, you see. I reckon he 'd have paid Skip off in
great shape, 'cause I believe he can do it."
Then you admit that he would have fought if he had
had the opportunity ? "
Of course he would! S'posin' a feller smashed you
in the neck, an' knocked your papers in the mud,
would n't you fight ? I guess you would "
I will do the questioning, and you can confine your-
self to answering,".said the judge.
That's all I was doin', sir," Carrots replied, a trifle
abashed by the change which came over the judge's face
at his free manner of speaking.
Then it seemed as if the witness was entirely for-





THE TRIAL.


gotten. Nobody paid the slightest attention to him
until fully five minutes later, when the lawyer beckoned
for him to come down from the stand to where he was
speaking in a low tone with Teddy.
You can go now," the gentleman said; and I shall
be curious to learn how long you will keep the promise
made in regard to blacking my boots."
Well, what are you goin' to do with Teddy ? Car-
rots asked, a look of disappointment coming over his
face as he fancied that the prisoner was not to be set free.
He has been discharged. It is all right now. Go
out with him, and be careful not to get into any more
trouble on the street, for it might go hard with you if
either came here the second time."
He 's discharged did you say ? Carrots repeated.
" Does that mean he can go anywhere he wants to ?"
Certainly."
"Well, you're a dandy! I'll live right up to the 'gree-
ment I made, an' don't you forget it!" Carrots replied
enthusiastically, and then, as the lawyer turned away,
presumably to attend to his own business, the amateur
Good Samaritan led Teddy from the room, closely fol-
lowed by Teenie, who said, when they were once more
on the outside of the building:
It won't do to loaf 'round here. Skip Jellison an' his
gang were jest getting' up when I come out. They 'll be
after us if we don't dust 'mighty lively."
"Let's go down by the ferry, -where we can kind er
straighten things, an' see what we 're goin' to do," Car-
rots suggested.





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Teddy was not disposed to run from the enemy; but
his companions insisted it would be more than foolish
to risk an encounter, and he allowed himself to be led
away at a rapid pace.
Why not go over to your house, Carrots ? Teenie
asked. They'll never find us there."
I could n't get in without somebody seeing' me, an' I
don't want to give the snap away, else the whole thing
will be broke up. We can do all the chinnin' we want
ter 'round the ferry."
Seems to me I ought ter go to work. I can't 'ford
to fool so much time away now, after I've been kept
still so long," Teddy said, gravely. I came here
counting' on making' money enough every day to live on,
an' began by losin' my stock the first thing."
"You ain't lost it yet. I sold every one of your
papers, an' have got the money in my pocket to give
you.
You 're a mighty good feller, Carrots; an' if ever
I can do anything to help you, I'll be glad of the
chance."
All I ask is that you stand alongsidee of me when
Skip an' his crowd come 'round, 'cause I 'll need a
friend pretty bad then."
"He sha'n't touch you when I 'm near; but I don't
see how it's goin' to be stopped, if they 'rest fellers for
fighting' in the city," Teddy replied, in a tone of per-
plexity; and straightway the three were plunged
into a maze of bewilderment that the law should
interfere by arresting a fellow when he attempted





THE TRIAL. 79

to defend himself, and allow the beginner of the
trouble to go free.
It seemed to be one of those tangles in the web
woven by Justice which older heads than theirs have
failed to unravel.











CHAPTER VII.


THE WARNING.

As a matter of course, business was not to be
thought of on this day, and for two very good reasons.
First, there was every cause to believe Skip Jellison
and his followers would do all they could to prevent the
boy from Saranac from engaging in any business; and
secondly, because it seemed absolutely necessary Carrots
and his friends should discuss the situation.
The boys were forced to earn such food as they
might need, or go hungry, and yet Skip Jellison would
try to prevent their doing business on the street.
Of course they could stand up and battle for their
rights, probably receiving assistance from some of those
boys whom Master Jellison had disciplined by the same
methods pursued with Teddy; but such a struggle
would hinder their business affairs.
If it became necessary to fight every time Teddy
sold a paper, not only would the money-making be
sadly curtailed, but danger 'of arrest would be very
great.
I 'reckon I would n't get off as easy if I was hauled
up before that judge ag'in," Teddy said to his compan-
ion when the two had taken leave of Teenie Massey,
and were walking in the direction of the water-front.
8o





THE WARNING.


" But I don't see how I 'm goin' to get along without
fighting 'less I 'm willing' to lie right down an' let Skip
Jellison tread on me."
"See here!" Carrots said, suddenly, as if believing he
had -a thoroughly good plan in mind. You've allers
lived on a farm, have n't you ? "
"Yes."
Well, now I have an idea it would be nice to stay in
the country. S'posin' you an' me go right off an' get a
job on some farm. That would settle Skip in great
shape, an' we 'd have a mighty good time."
It would settle Skip, there 's no question 'bout that,"
Teddy replied. But when it comes to havin' a good
time, you 'd find you 'd made a big mistake. I 've had
all the farmin' I want. A feller never 'd get ahead in
the world if he worked round for nothing' but his board
an' clothes on a farm."
You can't get even that much in the city, 'less you
have money to start a regular stand."
"That's jest it! That's jest what a feller wants to
do! He ought ter make up his mind he's goin' to
have a place, an' buy it. After that he can 'low to have
a store, an' get one, too. All -he has to do is to work
hard, an' save his money for a while."
*" I don't know 'bout that," Carrots replied, with a
grave shake of his head. I 've tried as hard as any
feller to get 'long, but don't own more 'n ninety cents in
the world to-day."
Well, I 'm going to try it in the city till I make up
my mind it can't be done, an' perhaps then I 'd be willing'






TEDDY AND CARROTS.


to go out on a farm; but it 'll be a good while before
that time comes, Carrots. Where are you goin' now ?"
"Down on one of these piers, where we can talk
without Skip's crowd sneakin' up on us."
By this time they were near Fulton Ferry, and Carrots
had but little difficulty, familiar as he was with the local-
ity, in finding what he sought.
A pile of merchandise near the end of a pier afforded
many convenient openings in which two boys could
stow themselves snugly away without fear of being
seen; and, entering one, Carrots proceeded to make
himself comfortable by crawling to the very farthest
corner, and there lighting a cigarette.
Say, you're an awful good feller, Carrots," Teddy
began, as if he had suddenly made a ,very important
discovery. You've taken right hold to help me, jest
the same's if we 'd allers knowed each other, an' done a
good deal more 'n any chum of mine I ever had. Now,
I don't see any way to pay you back yet awhile."
I don't want to be paid back," Carrots replied, de-
cidedly. I tried to help you through this thing, 'cause
it was a shame to let Skip Jellison have his way, as he
allers counts on; an' what I 've done is n't much."
"Indeed it is. I'd been on my way to jail now, if
you had n't taken hold of this thing. We've got to
straighten matters somehow. In the first place, I want
to give back the money you handed me when I was
'rested."
Better keep it. It may be two or three days before
we can do any work."




THE WARNING.


But I'd rather start square," Teddy replied, as he
counted out the pennies which he had kept carefully
apart from his own hoard, and literally forced them
upon his companion.
"Well, if you're goin' to square up so straight, I've
got a little settlement to make," and Carrots began a
problem in arithmetic, using a bit of smooth board as
paper, and making the figures thereon with a very short
fragment of a lead-pencil. "Now, I sold them papers of
yours, and here 's the money," he added.
But some of 'em was so muddy you could not have
sold them," Teddy objected.
Yes, I did; every one. You see, I wiped the mud
off, an' then folded em' inside, so's it would n't show. It
don't pay to let papers spoil jest 'cause there 's a little
-dirt on 'em."
But it is n't right I should take it," Teddy replied,
gravely. You stopped your work yesterday and to-
day jest to help me along, an', of course, have n't earned
a cent. Now, the best way will be to give me what I
paid out for the papers, an' take the profit yourself,
'cause it really b'longs to you."
I won't do anything of the kind," Carrots replied, in
a tone of determination. It ain't certain as I should
have worked yesterday."
Course you would. You'd begun when I first saw
you, an' had earned some money."
Well, then, that's jest it! I got enough yesterday
to keep me, an' by night we '11 have some plan to get
the best of Skip Jellison."





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Teddy insisted that his companion should take the
profits resulting from the sale of the newspapers, and
Carrots quite as strongly refused to do anything of the
kind; therefore the matter necessarily remained unset-
tled, the boy from Saranac holding the money in trust,
as it were.
Have a cigarette ? Carrots asked, with the air of a
man of leisure, as he pulled several from his pocket.
"I don't want any, Carrots. I never smoke."
"What ? "
I don't smoke, and what's more, I ain't goin' to.
After all you 've done for me, it seems kind er tough
that I should turn 'round an' talk to you 'bout spending'
money; but there's one of the very reasons why you
ain't got a stand. Instead of hustlin' to make a nickel,
you spend one buyin' cigarettes, or else waste a good
deal of time standing' on the street smoking It would
make a big difference if you did n't like sich things; an',
besides, it hurts a boy to smoke 'em."
Carrots looked at Teddy in surprise.
He failed to understand why a fellow could not
amuse himself smoking cigarettes, and was thoroughly
bewildered to hear an argument made as to the
expense.
Well, I'll be jiggered! It looks to me like as if you 'd
come down here trying' to be awful too good. I wish
I had money enough to buy a glass case to put you in.
I reckon I could sell the lot up to the museum."
"That's right; laugh jest as much as you 've a mind
to, Carrots. You can't make me mad after all you've





THE WARNING.


done; but what I said is true, jest the same, an' don't
you forget it."
All right," Carrots replied, placidly. I reckon it
won't cost very much till these 're gone; so s'posin' we
talk 'bout how we 're going inter business ? Skip 's got
it in for me now, an' I '11 have to shin 'round as lively
as you do."
There's only one thing 'bout it. We must 'tend to
work the same 's if he was n't livin '."
But he '11 jump down on us, an' then we '11 get into
another fight."
I s'pose that's so. Ain't there some place in the
town jest as good for paper-sellin' as 'round the City
Hall?"
Well, I don't know. You see, I 've allers worked
there, an' am 'quainted with the fellers, so it seems to
me it's 'bout the only spot. If you should try down by
South Ferry, or 'round here anywhere, everybody 'd do
their best to drive you out, same 's Skip did. I belong
up to City Hall, so they can't shove me away from
there; an' the' bootblacks in any place else would raise
a row if I come takin' trade away."
It don't seem as though they 'd dare to do such
things," said Teddy, thoughtfully. "You 've as much
right on one street as another."
That's the way I s'pose it looks to a stranger; but
it ain't so, jest the same. Now if a new feller come
where I was working' I 'd turn in with the others to
drive him off, of course."
Then how does a new boy like me start ? "





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


He has ter hustle, an' take it rough, same 's you 're
doin'. When the others find out you 're bound to stick,
they 'll let you alone."
Then, in that case, the sooner we 'tend to business
the better. If we 're goin' to have a row, let's get over
with it as soon as we can."
That's what I was counting' on; but I '11 tell you
we'd better not work to-day. It's no use to rush, an'
by to-morrow Skip '11 be over his mad fit a little, most
likely. He won't do anything but hunt for us till night,
an' in the morning' he '11 need money so bad he'll have
to go to work."
Teddy realized that Carrots's advice must be good,
since he was thoroughly acquainted with the ways of
the city; yet at the same time he was impatient because
of the enforced idleness when it seemed necessary he
should be at work.
Then Carrots proceeded to explain to his newly-made
friend some of the peculiarities of his associates, and
gave him an insight into their manner of living.
"Now I 'm counting' on your takin' half of my house,"
Carrots said. You see, you 've got either to go to the
Newsboys' Lodging House, or else hire a room some-
where, if you want ter swell, an' that's dreadful expen-
sive. When the weather ain't too cold, boys can sleep
'round 'most anywhere."
How does it happen that you have a house ? Do
you live with your folks ? "
I ain't got any, an' never had; but the place where
I stop is mighty swell, I can tell you, though we can't





THE WARNING.


go home till after dark, 'cause I don't want the folks
what hire the property to think I came for the rent."
Teddy was mystified by this reply; but thought it
advisable not to ask for particulars.
I suppose you get your grub anywhere ? he said,
interrogatively.
Yes, when I 've got the money. When I ain't, I go
without. Seein' 's how neither of us has had any break-
fast, what do you say to huntin' for a place where we
can git five-cent soup ? "
This seemed to Teddy like a necessity, inasmuch as
he had had neither supper nor breakfast, and a few
moments later the boys were busily employed over two
plates of soup.
When the meal was ended the two, whose only busi-
ness on this day was to keep beyond the reach of Skip
Jellison, walked up-town that Teddy might see as much
of the city as possible during his enforced idleness, and
they did not return until a late hour.
After a great many precautions, and an unusual
amount of scurrying to and fro, Carrots conducted his
friend to the residence in the rear of the shop, and was
delighted by hearing it praised in no stinted terms.
It's great! Teddy said, approvingly. "A feller
that 's got a place like this don't need to hire any rooms.
I 'd rather have it than a regular house, any day."
"So had I," the proud proprietor replied; "but one
thing is that you can't get here in the daytime. I
reckon if they knew a feller was livin' in these boxes,
they 'd fire him out."





TEDDY AND CARROTS.


Then Carrots brought forth such of the provisions as
had been left over from the previous evening's feast;
and before he had finished this task a shrill whistle from
the alleyway caused him to leap to his feet quickly, as
he exclaimed:
Now, there 's Teenie Massey ag'in! I do wish he 'd
stay away once in a while. There won't be any room
for three of us to sleep here, an' I'm goin' to tell him so."
As he ceased speaking Carrots gave vent to a pro-
longed whistle, and a few seconds later the sound as of
some one climbing over the fence told that Master
Massey was in what might be called the vestibule of
Carrots's residence.
It was evident that Teenie was not wholly at ease
when he made his appearance. Even one who had
never seen him before would have understood there was
something on his mind, and he greeted his friends in
such a peculiar manner as to cause Carrots to ask:
"What's the matter with you ? Ain't any of your
folks dead, is there ? "
Oh, I 'm all right," Teenie replied. "What made
you think there was anything wrong ? "
"Why, you look so kind er queer."
Teenie was silent for a few moments, as if revolving
some weighty question in his mind, and then, with the
air of one who is determined to have the worst over,
said:
".Look here, Carrots! I 've allers been a friend of
yours, ain't I, even if I have stood in with Skip Jellison
once in a while ?"














































TEENIE BRINGS THE "COMMITTEE'S" WARNING.





THE WARNING.


"Course you have, Teenie. What's troublin' you ? "
You might think I was n't actin' jest square, so I
wanted to have it straight."
Have what straight ? Carrots asked impatiently.
"'Bout how you an' I stand. Now, you see, I met
Skip this afternoon-"
Did n't tell him where I lived, did you ?" Carrots
asked, sternly.
"Course not. What do you take me for? But he
had "a good deal to say 'bout you."
If he don't ever hurt me any worse 'n he can with
his tongue, I reckon I '11 get along all right."
He says he 's goin' to drive both of you fellers out
er the city, if he don't do anything else the rest of the
year."
Then he '11 have a chance to get through with a
good bit of loafin', for we 're not goin' to get up an' dust
jest to please him."
But he 's awful mad."
"That don't hurt me any. He can boil over if he
wants to, for all I care."
Well, now, Carrots, he wanted me to do something ,
an' I could n't get out er promising. "
"What was it ? the host asked, impatiently.
"You won't get mad ? "
"Course not, 'less you 're givin' something' away ag'in
me.
He wanted me to bring a letter down here. You
see, he kind er thinks I know where you live, an' so he
told me I 'd got to take it. I could n't help myself,





92 TEDDY AND CARROTS.

Carrots, 'cause he hung right on, an' jest as likely 's not
he 'd have given me a thumpin' if I had n't done it."
Oh, that's all right. Fish up your letter."
Teenie drew from his pocket a piece of soiled paper
and gave it to Carrots, who, with the candle in his hand,
opened it carefully and with an air of the utmost gravity.
Fortunately, so far as the better understanding of this
story is concerned, the important document was pre-
served by Teddy; therefore we are enabled to give an
exact copy of it:











CHAPTER VIII.


THE PARTNERS.

IT was fully five minutes before Carrots succeeded in
deciphering the letter brought by Teenie, and then he
pretended to treat the matter as a huge joke.
Why, Skip must have spent pretty nigh the whole
day getting' up that thing," he said, as he handed the
missive to Teddy. I wonder what he made the moon
there for ?"
Moon?" Teenie repeated. "Why, he told me it
was a skull, with a dagger underneath it and with bones
on the sides, same 's pirates have on their flags; an' the
two coffins was for you an' the other feller."
"Who are the two duffers down there at the bottom ?
A couple of pirates ? "
No; they 're the committee," Teenie explained. I
s'pose one of 'em 's Skip, an' the other 's Sid."
So Sid 's taken a hand in this; he 's gone to driving'
boys out er the town, has he ? Well, Sid 's a nice plum
to do anything of the kind! 'T is n't more 'n a month
ago since he was getting' right down on his knees,
coaxin' Skip to let him stay to black boots. It would
be a mighty long while before I 'd ask Skip Jellison to
'low me to do anything! "
Them two are awful thick now. Kind er stand in
93






TEDDY AND CARROTS.


pardners, I reckon. Sid says he 's goin' to run Fulton
Ferry on the Brooklyn side, an' Skip 's to take care of
this end, as soon as they drive the feller from Saranac
away.
"Oh, they are, eh ? Well, perhaps it '11 be a good while
before they finish up the job they 've got on hand, so I
guess they won't hurt theirselves working' this season.
What do you think about it, Teddy ? "
The young gentleman from Saranac made no reply,
but folded the paper carefully and put it in his pocket,
as if for future reference.
"What 're you goin' to do 'bout it?" Teenie asked,
so earnestly that Carrots looked at him suspiciously.
Do 'bout it ? the latter replied. Why, let him go
ahead. What else can we do ? I 've seen a good many
better-lookin' pictures than he made there, an' if that's
all he does he won't hurt anybody."
But see here, Carrots: Skip says you 'll have to
leave this town if you stand in with Teddy, an' he 's
goin' to make it awful hot."
"Well, I s'pose if he can do that he will; so what's
the use talking' 'bout it ? We can't help anything, as I
see."
Teenie understood that his friend was not absolutely
satisfied regarding his connection with the matter, and
therefore refused to make any explanation as to what
his future course might be. This lack of confidence
troubled the messenger; for Carrots was a particular
friend of his, and he did not wish anything to impair the
kindly feeling existing between them.





THE PARTNERS.


So he was glad when Carrots said:
I ain't blamin' you, Teenie; but I can tell you one
thing sure: what ain't known can't be told. If Skip
Jellison should 'low he was jest about goin' to thump
the life out er you if you did n't repeat everything I
said, why, you might have to give up. So I don't think
it's best for us to have any talk. Of course I 'm sure
you won't tell where I 'm livin'."
I would n't say a word 'bout that, Carrots, an' you
know it."
I believe you, Teenie, I believe you; but you under-
stand how things are working Teddy an' me are in a
pretty bad hole jest now, an' we 've got to be careful. If
you could kind er tell us once in a while what Skip was
thinking' of doin', it might help along; but I won't ask
it in case you're 'fraid, 'cause I don't want ter get any
other feller in a scrape."
I '11 do all I can, Carrots; an' now I reckon I'd
better be goin'. Mother told me I must come home
to-night."
All right, old man. Be sure, when you get on the
street, that Skip ain't watching' so 's to find out where
you 've been."
He can 't be 'round here, 'cause I went up to supper
first, an' walked right down from the house without see-
in' him."
Then Teenie took his departure, and the victims of
Master Skip's wrath were left alone to discuss the situa-
tion, which was certainly beginning to look serious for
them.