• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Index of first lines
 Nursery rhymes
 Back Cover






Group Title: Red nursery series
Title: All the prettiest nursery rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084149/00001
 Material Information
Title: All the prettiest nursery rhymes and some new ones
Series Title: Red nursery series
Physical Description: 128 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sinclair, J. R ( Illustrator )
Sunday School Union (England) ( Publisher )
Morrison and Gibb ( Printer )
Publisher: Sunday School Union
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Morrison & Gibb
Publication Date: 1896?
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1896   ( local )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1896   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Netherlands
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note: Cover printed in Holland.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
Statement of Responsibility: with illustrations by J.R. Sinclair and others.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084149
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221101
notis - ALG1319
oclc - 232606071

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Half Title
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Index of first lines
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Nursery rhymes
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

........ ..





























RN.









. ....

...........

7x







i1- < V U
I.A

-~t e '- D--




-et 1


ALL THE PRETTIEST

NURSERY RHYME5


Wf


~~FPy
/X/ -/"PL


7 "'y
a-2


11













































Ride a Cocik Hor-se
To Banhur.N Cross.
To see a Fine LadN
Ride on a White Hoirse
Wkihh Rings on Her Fingirs,
And Bells on 11cr Toes,
She shall hnae Music
%%licre-Lr she nes.







bx E PRerI, ,



NURSERY RHYMES
and

SOME NEW ONES


With Illustrations by
J. R. SINCLAIR AND OTHERS


LONDON
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION
57 & 59 LUDGATE HILL, E.C.



















































MORRISON AND GIBB, PRINTERS, EDINBURGH.

























INDEX OF FIRST LINES


Little Miss Muffett
I had a little husband, no
bigger than my thumb
There was a crooked man,
and he went a crooked mile
Where are you going, my
pretty maid ? .
Old Mother Hubbard went to
the cupboard .
Monday's child is fair of face
Eight Little Eskimos, drawn
by Cousin Belle .
Goosey, goosey, gander,
whither shall I wander?
The rose is red
A frog he would a-wooing
go
Hush-a-bye baby, on the tree
top
Hie away, hie away, dear
little cry-away .
See-saw, sacaradown
The Queen of Hearts


Curly locks, curly locks
Queen Marguerite went to a
party .
The lion and the unicorn
I saw three ships come sailing
by
Jack Sprat could eat no fat
I gave my dolly a pill, pill,
pill .
I saw a ship a-sailing
Little Jack Horner sat in the
corner
Dada made me a fox
Little Boy Blue, come, blow
your horn .
Winter, the wizard, was gruff
and grim
The man in the moon
Tom, he was a piper's son
One, two, buckle my shoe
Little Tom Tucker
Three children sliding on the
ice








INDEX OF FIRST LINES


PAGE
Oh, in Topsy Turveydom
have you been 42
Old King Cole 43
The north wind doth blow 44
I love sixpence, pretty little
sixpence 45
Hiccory, diccory, dock 45
The dog, and the frog, and
the gander agreed 46
Little Polly Flinders 47
There was a little man 47
Georgie Porgie, pudding and
pie 47
There was an old woman
tossed up in a basket 48
High diddle ding 48
This is the house that Jack
built 49
There were three jovial
Welshmen 54
There was an old woman who
lived in a shoe 60
Ding, dong, bell, Pussy's in
the well 60
Hark, hark! the dogs do
bark 61
A cat came fiddling out of a
barn 61
Who killed Cock Robin? .62
Bye, Baby Bunting 69
Hot cross buns, hot cross
buns .70
Bell horses, bell horses, what
time of day ? 70
Multiplication is vexation 70
Cock-a-doodle-doo! 72


PAGE
Lady-bird, lady-bird 73
Please to remember the fifth
of November 74
Mary, Mary, quite contrary 74
This is the pie that Kate
made! 76
Pat- a cake, pat- a cake,
baker's man 77
To-whit! to-whit! to-whee 78
Tit, tat, toe 8
Five little owls in an old elm
tree 81
Hey diddle diddle 82
There was a man, in double
deed .84
Three blind mice 84
Round and round the sundial 85
Oranges and Lemons 86
Rain, rain, goaway 87
This pig went to market 87
The old woman and her pig 88
Trot, trot, to market 97
Little Bo-Peep has lost her
sheep 98
Diddlety, diddlety, dumpty 98
Whispering lips and wander-
ing looks 99
Tell-tale Tit! 99
Bow-wow-wow! 1oo
Pussy cat, Pussy cat, where
have you been? 10oo
There was a little man, and
he had a little spoon Io0
One sunny afternoon,-'twas
the middle day of June 102
As I was going to St. Ives Io7









INDEX OF FIRST LINES


Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall
Rub a dub dub
Cross Patch, draw the latch.
Sing a song of sixpence
"Well, I declare!" said
Timothy Dare .
Pitter patter falls the rain
Jack and Jill went up the hill
Ba-a, Ba-a, black sheep, have
you any wool? .
See-saw, Margery Daw
A fat little boy had a rake
What are little boys made of,
made of?. .
There was a man, and his
name was Dob .
Fe, Fi, Fo, Fum! .
I love little Pussy .


PAGE
Four-and-twenty tailors went
to kill a snail 118
Here we go round the mul-
berry bush 118
From morning to evening a
stout little man 119
Afternoon tea 120
Three little mice, a little trap 121
Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy
was a thief. 121
There was an old woman had
three sons 122
Blow, blow; snow, snow 122
One, two, three, four, five 124
I am the little New Year,
ho, ho 124
The Spider gave a ball .25
Old Mother Goose 126































: ?_ --. ... _'_



IL-












He went to the brook and shot a little duck.-Pagfe 47.










,A11 the prettiest )Nursery ~t1ynres

AND SOME NEW ONES


Little )Viiss )Vluffett
ITTLE Miss Muffett
Sat on a tuffett,
Eating of curds and whey;
There came a great spider,
Who sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffett away.
II






NURSERY RHYMES


3 had a little husband

HAD a little husband, no bigger than my thumb;
I put him in a pint pot, and there I bid him
drum.

I bought a little horse that galloped up
and down;
I saddled him, and bridled him, and sent
him out of town.

I gave him some garters, to garter up
his hose,
And a little pocket-handkerchief to wipe his pretty
nose.



There was a Crooked jaan
HERE was a crooked man, and he went a
"hy crooked mile,
He found a crooked sixpence, against
a crooked stile; ,
He bought a crooked cat, which caught /
a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little
crooked house.






NURSERY RHYMES


'Where are you going, my pretty jYiaid ?

" [ HERE are you going, my pretty maid?"
S I'm going a-milking, sir," she said.
"May I go with you, my pretty maid ? "
"You're kindly welcome, sir," she said.


"What is your father, my pretty maid?"
"My father's a farmer, sir," she said.
" What is your fortune, my pretty maid?"
"My face is my fortune, sir," she said.
"Then I won't marry you, my pretty maid."
"Nobody asked you, sir," she said.






14 NURSERY RHYMES

Old )Yother iubbard


j1 i:


"~l~g~HB~
'-







NURSERY RHYMES


LD Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone;
But when she got there the cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.
She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back T --..
The poor dog was dead. "


She went to the joiner's
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The poor dog
e,. was laughing.


.:. ....... ---; --
--'c~~"-''; :;;~;~.--~i~-l~~-~ -


1-0







NURSERY RHYMES


She took a clean
dish
To get him some
tripe,
But when she came
back
He was smoking
a pipe.


She went to the
hatter's
To buy him a hat,
But when she came
back
He was feeding the
cat.

She went to the
tavern
SForwhitewine
and red,
But when she
came back
The dog stood
on his head.







NURSERY RHYMES


Shewenttothe
fruiterer's
To buy him
some fruit,
But when she
came back
He was play-
ing the flute.

She went to
the barber's
To buy him
a wig,
But
I


i:.
* -*'t j


When she came back
Ie was dancing a jig.


She went
to the
cobbler's
,/., To buy
S/ him some
[ /s shoes,
\ 'But when
\' she came
back
He was
reading
the news,






NURSERY RHYMES


She went to the
hosier's
To buy him
some hose,
But when she
came back
H' ,~, Hi e was dressed
S in his clothes.



/.- .... ,
,4 4 1,J'I



She went to the
tailor's
To buy him a I '
coat,
But when she came .
back
He was riding L1
a goat. --- .d i







NURSERY RHYMES


L'. r.
'-i ,i


.1,:j


The dame made a curtsey,
The dog made a bow;
The dame said, "Your servant,"
The dog said, "Bow-wow."


I~-----------------"~-==---L-S






NURSERY RHYMES


Days of girth
SONDAY'S child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child is loving and giving,
Saturday's child works hard for its living,
And a child that's born on the Sabbath day
Is fair and wise and good and gay.

--. l-b;l -,--


Eight Little Eskimos
IGHT little Eskimos, drawn by Cousin Belle;
Eight little Eskimos, learning how to spell;
Learning how to read about the furry Polar
bear,
The great splashing whale, and the timid white
hare.

Eight little Eskimos, standing in a ring,
Eight Little Eskimos, learning how to sing.
What they're going to sing about, I really cannot
tell-
They're only in a picture that was drawn by
Cousin Belle.































"_" -- I ..




I..L-O.-- _T -H.
T 'In'

















EIGHT LITTLE ESXI'MOS, LEARNING HOW TO SPELL







NURSERY RHYMES


A~-

~J -,

1'-
'> "



pt1<


Goosey, Goosey, Gander

v OOSEY, goosey, gander,
' whither shall I wander?
Upstairs, and downstairs, and
in my lady's chamber.
There I met an old man, who
would not say his prayers,
I took him by the left leg,
and threw him downstairs.


Valentine's jay
HE rose is red,
The violet's blue,
They are sweet,
And so are you!







NURSERY RHYMES


FROG he would a-wooing go, ,
Heigho! says Rowley,
Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon, and
spinach,
Heigho! says Antony Rowley.

So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho! says Rowley,
And on the road he met with a rat.
With a rowley powley, etc.

"Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,"
Heigho! says Rowley,
" Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see?"
With a rowley powley, etc.

When they came to the door of M'[.iiusy's hall
Heigho! says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock and they gave a loud :.1l.
With a rowley powley, etc.







24 NURSERY RHYMES





















"Yes, kind sirs, I'm sitting to spin."

"Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within?"
Heigho! says Rowley,
"Oh yes, kind sirs, I'm sitting to spin."
With a rowley powley, etc.

"Pray, Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some beer? "
Heigho! says Rowley,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer."
With a rowley powley, etc.







NURSERY RHYMES


"Pray, Mr. Frog, will you give us a song?"
Heigho! says Rowley,
" But let it be something that's not very long."
With a rowley powley, etc.
"Indeed, Mrs. Mouse," replied the Frog,
Heigho! says Rowley,
"A cold has made me as hoarse as a hog."
With a rowley powley, etc.


SI'll sing you a song that I have just made."
"Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog," Mousey said,
Heigho! says Rowley,
"I'll sing you a song that I have just made."
With a rowley powley, etc.
But while they were all a merry-making,
Heigho! says Rowley,
A cat and her kittens came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, etc.








26 Ni ,Z'SERY Ril YMES

','. cat she seized the rat '.' the crown,
Hr ,I says R1. ., ,...
The kittens i1'. J p....1 :.. little mouse down.
\\ ii -I a rowley -.' etc.

T -1.;: -r.i TI. F-- in a terrible fi t.
H,-- ,. says r v... -,
-,~ .. up.. vup hat .ni he wished them good-

V,. a : .. -,- -.J,.-.,. etc.


-
i- _. -C ,, h p
... ,,-. ,,r _. ,.- .. -- -. .









": a as ;k '- -- =, =4 ",% 1.
A ,a up.
,' i .. 'i r. -- .- ,1 -.-' -1 .


-. -- - -







L a'~l I. I _~ i;







NURSERY RHYMES


So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho! says Rowley,
The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee!
With a rowley powley, gammon, and
spinach,
Heigho! says Antony Rowley.


I ush-a-pye,


Paby


USH-a-bye; baby, on the tree top,
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;


Do n .L e :..i d :-- -. the ,-.::-d will
Down comes :r.s and V:." and all.


- d







NURSERY RHYMES


Sush-a-Dye

IE away, hie away, dear little cry-away,
1- Into the sleepy land, why don't you fly
away?
Now in the west the sunbeams all die away,
While I sing softly a sweet, simple bye-away.
Rock away, rock away, fold the small frock away,
Pick up the picture book, put every block away;
Now the tired shepherd is leading his flock away,
Folded in mother's arms baby shall rock away.
Croon away, croon away, set cup and spoon away,
Shadows of evening have driven warm noon away;
Sailing through stars floats the boat of the moon

Lower and lower sinks my tender tune away.
Sleep away, sleep away, now no more weep away,
Danger and fear from his cradle shall keep away,
Till o'er the hill-tops the morning shall peep away,
Then once again shall my baby boy creep away.


The W9ay to London
EE-SAW, sacaradown,
M9 Which is the way to London town?
One foot up, the other foot down,
That is the way to London town.






NURSERY RHYMES


The Queeq of Iearts

HE Queen of Hearts
She made some tarts
All on a summer's day;
The Knave of Hearts
He stole those tarts,
And took them clean away.

The King of Hearts
Called for the tarts,
And beat the Knave full sore;
The Knave of Hearts
Brought back the tarts,
And vowed he'd steal no more.



Curly Locks

6,URLY locks, curly locks,
S Wilt thou be mine?
Thou shalt not wash dishes;
Nor yet feed the swine.

But sit on a cushion,
And sew a fine seam,
And feed upon strawberries,
Sugar, and cream.






NURSERY RHYMES


Queen )Viarguerite went to a party

.OUEEN MARGUERITE went to a party
As Mabel and I went to bed;
She wore a white gown,
And a pretty gold crown
On the top of her dear little head.
She didn't come back till next morning,
And her crown had tipped over her nose;
But her eyes were as bright
As the stars are at night,
And her face was as fresh as a rose.
She laughed as she told ,us about it,
And of all the strange folk who were there;
How she talked on the lawn
To a pink and blue fawn,
And a guinea-pig combing its hair.
How Dash, in a hat trimmed with daisies,
Played musical chairs with a wren;
How the man in the moon
Sang a Japanese tune,
While an elephant danced with a hen.
Her dolls played croquet with a rabbit
Whose ears were embroidered with thread,-
Where they'd ravelled in spots
He had tied them in knots,
Which gave him a pain in his head.






NURSERY RHYMES


Fresh chocolates blossomed on bushes
That had travelled for miles upon miles;
Young grasshoppers pumped
Lemonade as they jumped,
And recited a lesson with smiles.
Tho' the ice-cream looked very delicious,
And was baked till 'twas softer than dough,
She had only a taste,
Because she made haste
When some peacocks screamed out, "You
must go!"
It was quite an unusual party,
But yet not so strange as it seems,
For your friend, Mrs. White,
Has a party each night
At her house in the Country of Dreams.


The Lion and the Unicorn
HE lion and the unicorn
Were fighting for the crown;
The lion beat the unicorn
All round the town.
Some gave them white bread,
And some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum-cake,
And sent them out of town.






NURSERY RHYMES


)New Year's Day
SAW three ships come sailing by,
Sailing by, sailing by,
I saw three ships come sailing by,
On New Year's Day in the morning.

And what do you think was in them then ?
In them then? in them then?
And what do you think was in them then ?
On New Year's Day in the morning?

Three pretty girls were in them then,
In them then, in them then,
Three pretty girls were in them then,
On New. Year's Day in the morning.

And one could whistle and one could sing,'
And one could play on the violin,
Such joy there was at my wedding,
On New Year's Day in the morning.



3ack Sprat
pACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean;
And so betwixt them both, you see,
They made the platter clean.






NURSERY RHYMES


Foor polly is 311
SGAVE my dolly a pill, pill, pill,
But all the same she is ill, ill, ill;
I gave her a powder, I put on, a plaster,
But her poor little pulse beats faster and faster.


Oh, fly for the doctor, fly, fly, fly!
Make haste, or dolly will die, die, die!
And when she is dead you can't make her live,
No matter how many powders you give.
So go for the doctor, quick, quick, quick!
And tell him my dolly is sick, sick, sick;
And tell him my heart will be broken to bits,
Unless he can cure my poor dolly of fits.






NURSERY RHYMES


The Ship
SAW a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing on the sea;
And, oh, it was all laden
With pretty things for thee!
There were comfits in the cabin,
And apples in the hold;
The sails were made of silk,
And the masts were made of gold.
The four-and-twenty sailors,
That stood between the decks,
Were four-and-twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.
The captain was a duck,
With a jacket on his back;
When the ship began to move,
The captain said, "Quack! quack!"



Little 3ack corner
fjITTLE Jack Horner sat in the corner,
t_" Eating a Christmas pie;
He put in his thumb, and he pulled out a plum,
And said, "What a good boy am I!"







NURSERY RHYMES 35






NURSERY RHYMES


Dada vYiade jie a fox

ADA made me a fox
And a little painted man,
Out of a sardine box
And an old tomato can.
He made a little nag,
Some sheep, a cow, and a pig;
A soldier with his flag,
And a lawyer with a wig.
A pretty puppy dog,
A castle-keep and a house;
A yellow jumping frog,
And a tabby cat and a mouse.
Wasn't my dada clever,
To make them from box and' can?
Do you think there was ever
So wonderful a man?


Little Poy glue

1 ITTLE Boy Blue, come, blow your horn;
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in
the corn.
Where is the boy that looks after the sheep?
He's under the haycock, fast asleep.







NURSERY RHYMES


'inter, the Vizard

INTER, the wizard, was gruff and grim;
He saw how the little ones frowned on
him.
"Do they think," he cried, "that the flowers are
dead,
Just because they are sent to bed?"
And he blustered and blew with much ado
To find how little the children knew;
But in the night with a pencil white
Upon their window a sketch he drew.

Lovely it was in the morning sun:
Who can say just how it was done?
"Ah!" said Daisy, and "Oh!" said Don,
"Here are the flowers with their night-clothes
.on!"


he jlaan in the jYooq

,HE man in the moon
-- Came tumbling down,
And ask'd his way to Norwich;
He went by the south,
And burnt his mouth
With eating cold pease-porridge.






NURSERY RHYMES


Zorr, he was a Piper's
OM, he was a piper's son,
He learned to play when he


SoF


was young;


But all the tune that he could play,
Was "Over the hills, and far away"






NURSERY RHYMES


Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That well he pleased both girls and boys,
And they all stopped to hear him play,
"Over the hills, and far away."

Tom played his pipe with so much skill
That those who heard could never keep still;
Wherever he came they began to dance,
And even the pigs would after him prance.

As Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began to play;
So Doll and the cow danced ,"the Cheshire
round,"
Till all the milk was spilled on the ground.

He met Old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,
He used his pipe and she used her legs;
She danced about till the eggs were all broke,
She began to fret, but he laughed at the joke.

He saw a cross fellow was beating an ass,
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes, and glass;
He took out his pipe and played them a tune,
And the jackass's load was lightened full soon.






NURSERY RHYMES


One, Two, Puckle my Shoe

NE, two, buckle my shoe;
Three, four, shut the door;
Five, six, pick up sticks;
Seven, eight, lay them straight;
Nine, ten, a good fat hen;
Eleven, twelve, dig and delve;
Thirteen, fourteen, maids a-courting;
Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the kitchen;
Seventeen, eighteen, maids-in-waiting;
Nineteen, twenty, my plate is empty.





little ZorrnI ucker

LITTLE Tom Tucker
SSings for his supper;
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry
Without e'er a wife?






NURSERY RHYMES


'hree Children Sliding on the Jce

HREE children sliding on the ice
Upon a summer's day,
It so fell out they all fell in,
And the rest they ran away.

Now had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny
They had not all been drowned.

You parents all that children have,
And you, too, that have none,
If you would have them safe abroad,
Pray keep them safe at home.







NURSERY RHYMES


H, in Topsy-Turveydom have you been,
Where the grass is blue and the sky is green,


(4-
11 Ksk. -






NURSERY RHYMES


And cats rush off pursued by mice,
And sweets are nasty and physic's nice?

There the moon all day gives a splendid light,
While the sun has a fancy to shine by night;
And children are fonder of work than play,
And the merry are sad and the grave are gay.

Moreover, I've heard, or have somewhere read,
That every one walks on his hands or his head;
Wears boots on his fingers and gloves on his
toes,
And plays the guitar with the end of his nose.

'Tis a curious country, you all must confess,
But you never will get there-no, never! unless
You somehow persuade, upon Valentine's Day,
Some learned Professor to show you the way.




Old King Cole

LD King Cole
Was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
And he called for his pipe
And he called for his glass,
And he called for his fiddlers three!






NURSERY RHYMES


The jNorth Wind doth glow


HE north wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin do then?
Poor thing !

He'll sit in a barn,
To keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing,
Poor thing!






NURSERY RHYMES


3 ove Sixpence
LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.
Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.
Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence,
I love twopence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.
Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife?
I have. nothing, I spend nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.



1iccory, Diccory, pock

ICCORY, diccory, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one, and down he run,
Hiccory, diccory, dock.






NURSERY RHYMES


The pog, the Frog, and the Gander


HE dog, and the frog, and the gander agreed
To punish MacTabby, the impudent cat;
And, one afternoon, they were lucky indeed
To find her asleep on the scullery mat.

They caught her and carried her off to the stocks,
And vainly she struggled, so strong were her foes;
Then when they had whipped her, they took off
her socks,
And ordered the field mouse to tickle her toes.






NURSERY RHYMES


Little Jolly flinders
_ ITTLE Polly Flinders
t--- Sate among the cinders
Warming her pretty little toes!
Her mother came and caught her,
And whipped her little daughter
For spoiling her nice new clothes.



There was a little jYarq


i-IHERE was a little man,
(^ And he had a little gun,
And his bullets they were made of lead,
He went to the brook
And shot a little duck
Right through the head, head, head!


lead, lead!


Georgie Porgie
EORGIE PORGIE, pudding and pie,
SKiss'd the girls and made them cry.
When the girls came out to play,
Georgie Porgie ran away.






NURSERY RHYMES


The Old \Vomar tossed ir a Pasket

HERE was an old woman tossed up in a
basket,
Ninety times as high as the moon;
And where she was going, I couldn't but ask it,
For in her hand she carried a broom.

"Old woman, old woman, old woman," quoth I,
O whither, O whither, O whither so high?"
"To sweep the cobwebs off the sky!"
"Shall I go with you?" "Ay, by and by."



The parliament Soldiers are gone
to the Ying

IGH diddle ding,
Did you hear the bells ring?
The Parliament soldiers are gone to the King.
Some they did laugh, some they did cry,
To see the Parliament soldiers pass by.






NURSERY RHYMES


.li'
I. I''


I, K .:~~"

;r- J-i11


& J17I5 T5 III


^^y'~~ -i-l[c e l< built .
, .- --- -
r.V.thlc T ^ ^ Y


Sbuilt. TljqjAL"'

\ h1 clte aN pf 6


EShcil-t Killed k l AT I F


h^- ^ Yi ^^^ .tPjE:
1 V cute tle Cl
at C/LI t< buil- t 1- o
LC T~ 4cyb


L C.h' P


-;' -..
0-


T11C M\Ek A\, -1 ;' iY


- 'I


",1 /II ,q






NURSERY RHYMES


-)I \~ Ii_'A th~e. DOG
C)
S1l.i t>~7orr ed tle CAT

_j\2:~- I'Thc~ wt~he ]VALT~

':11ct I IC > cfl {J T c t\ E



-rie -ree fVL Te PA
tF~.i -Ic ire Uc-fe 6~L ( 3-i
I~~; C3 Or; ed',D r r9;

CA e



I,___at__ i __-file us *1 '' '
-11, CX Al d






NURSERY RHYMES


.& 15 i s s f IVlA DL cWal l forlornr
,;; : F:n' Iklicc1 Th-e COy!J GJin-h
'l rI-s crumqpled. holr
~~1 ah toss5 cc iFe Do-
&jo-Loor riecl f1- cRCAT

i %I IVi~aj, a-re The. I'h \/LT



11"t 4CA l,./ J9 fie I,-(ou3
Sr s, A- 1-v1/I
11 I- Tterec1 arwct I-orr


.r)?d~ I\P_ cC[ t Ile 1-;,/,. j C) EJIi
rl1"1~ ~~forlo rrtL
that T~'i
VLQ jo~ed tfl~e IDoG ,
Ifjlat w~orri el. -tile CAT
VICTht K~ilHld ThC RKAT -t ----

,thcd lay irg the Hlouse
Vi] TAc~JA -Ir~l- C~c~ uirt, '-






NURSERY RHYMES


Il~~o~rr~c .j~E A~Ial) Iaffereclaid-rorij
* Sv~ Snared I-Ie J\o J cil IMterI os r
lic i mi I Coy'a Alle (a w l tuq -d





-i 1 fMLT- ~
[1, 1 T 1ouse

i;i.y;Z,







NURSERY RHYMES


1 'is Co-t~c PV,1Uoail ;Qaei? ao5r?

f ti' 11carr~ed tijC MAO J patiWrect ed a.1 1-br?

f 17 od: rq I 1,,e cl e (o w ,j1 -Vl c.r uml
{I~ccr Ytos Cl +e Doc,

-4 ~ ~~ i6v Q~~1 Iel-1 AT.
'I {47cr ~ce liie TAALT





:7a 1Jpr ll tr c l-llOet.1\AN cdl

ij4L CAT
T il' e -o- ,a z l e cr! T
i -~-)cl~ ~o ~ -W\AW a\hl ll I-c~trared,



IN jlj& wor ie(A t~e C"\T \4

at17~r'e -71-je 11 P\ LT

IhcA lc~y~.. .e .. ous....

:1 ,-..~:JCI~ui






NURSERY RHYMES


The Three 3ovial Welshmen

HERE were three jovial Welshmen,
As I have heard them say,
And they would go a-hunting
Upon St. David's Day.

All the day they hunted,
And nothing could they find
But a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing with the wind.

One said it was a ship;
The other, he said nay;
The third said it was a house,
With the chimney blown away.

And all the night they hunted,
And nothing could they find
But the moon a-gliding,
A-gliding with the wind.

One said it was the moon;
The other, he said nay;
The third said it was a cheese,
And half of it cut away.





















































One said it was a ship; the other, he said nay;
The third said it was a house, with the chimney blown away.







NURSERY RHYMES





-, ------


One said it was the moon; the other, he said nay
The third said it was a cheese, and half of it cut away.


And all the day they hunted,
And nothing could they find
But a hedgehog in a bramble bush,
And that they left behind.


The first said it was a hedgehog;
The second, he said nay;
The third it was a pincushion,
And the pins stuck in wrong way.





































































The first said it was a hedgehog; the second, le said nay;
The third it was a pincushion, and the pins stuck in wrong way.


C_ I


! l: I 1 1








NURSERY RHYMES


And all the night they hunted,
And. nothing could they find
But a hare in a turnip field,
And that they left behind.




The first said it was a hare;
The second, he said nay;
The third said it was a calf,
And the cow had run away.


The first said it was a hare : the second, he said nay;
The third said it was a calf, and the cow had run away.


~'"'''
-~
~c;-~
~ ~-~-~-~--~-~-="-;
-.----::~ -~-----
------
ir--;-l-------.
i--;i----.---=----~-~-T












S-AI


K~6.


One said it was an owl; the other, he said nay;
The third said 'twas an old man, and his beard growing grey.






NURSERY RHYMES


And all the day they hunted,
And nothing could they find
But an owl in a holly tree,
And that they left behind.
One said it was an owl;
The other, he said nay;
The third said 'twas an old man,
And his beard growing grey.


There was an Old 'Voman who
lived ir a Shoe
"HERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe,
Ct She had so many children she didn't know
what to do;
She gave them some broth without any bread,
She whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.



Ding, pong, Dell
ING, dong, bell, Pussy's in the well.
Who put her in? Little Tommy Green.
Who pulled her out? Little Tommy Trout.
What a naughty boy was that,
Thus to drown poor Pussy Cat.






NURSERY RHYMES


(Iark, > ark! the )ogs do Parl




SARK, hark!
The dogs
do bark,
The beggars are
coming to town :
Some in rags,
Some in tags,
And some in
velvet gown.






,A Cat came fiddling
CAT came fiddling out of a barn,
With a pair of bagpipes under her arm;
She could sing nothing but "Fiddle cum fee,
The mouse has married the humble-bee";
Pipe, cat,-dance, mouse,
We'll have a wedding at our good house.






NURSERY RHYMES


Cock Robir ?


S HO killed
S Cock Robin ?
"I," said the
Sparrow,
"With my bow
and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin."


"I," said the Sparrow, "with my bow and arrow."


Vrho Krilled







NURSERY RHYMES 63


Who saw him die?
I," said the Fly,
"With my little eye,
I saw him die."'

"I," said the Fly,
"With my little eye."

Who caught his blood?
I," said the Fish,
"With my little dish,
I caught his blood."







NURSERY RHYMES


Ii


Who'll make his shroud?
"I," said the Beetle,
"With my thread
needle,
I'll make his shroud."


and


Who'll dig his grave ?
"I," said the Owl,
"With my spade and
show'l,
I'll dig his grave."


"I," said the Owl,
"With my spade and show'l.







NURSERY RHYMES

Who'll be the Parson?
"I," said the Rook,
"With my little book,
I'll be the Parson."


"I," said the Rook,
"With my little book."


Who'll be the Clerk ?
"I," said the
Lark,
"If it's not in
the dark,
I'll be the Clerk."


"I," said the Lark,
"If it's not in the dark."







NURSERY RHYMES


Who'll carry him to the grave?
I," said the Kite,
If it's not in the night,
I'll carry him to the grave."






*.,- -



















"I," said the Kite,
"If it's not in the night."







NURSERY RHYMES


Il rl



Who'll carry the link? i
"I," said the '
Linnet,
"I'll fetch it in
a minute,
I'll carry the link."




I," said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute."




SWho'll be chief
mourner ?
V, sd I," said the
Dove,
x("For I mourn
.for mylove,
I'll be chief
mourner.


"I," said the Dove,
"For I mourn for my love."







NURSERY RHYMES


Who'll sing a psalm?
"I," said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush,
"I'll sing a psalm."


"I," said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush.



Who'll toll the bell?
I," said the Bull,
"Because I can pull,
I'll toll the bell."


"I," said the Bull,
"Because I can pull "







NURSERY RHYMES


All the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and a-sobbing,
When they heard of the death
Of poor Cock Robin.


i, ,, "' I
,.' '-" e^ ,' '" __ -,,

All the birds of the air fell a-sig-hing- and a-sobbing-.


Dye, baby Punting

AYE, Baby Bunting,
Father's gone a-hunting,
Mother's gone a-milking,
Sister's gone a-silking,
Brother's gone to buy a skin
To wrap the Baby Bunting in.







NURSERY RHYMES


"Iot Cross -un5


OT cross buns, hot cross
buns,
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns.
If your daughters don't like them,
Give them to your sons,
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns.


Dell 'orse5
ELL horses, bell horses, what time of day?
One o'clock, two o'clock, off and away.




jiultiplicatioq is Vexatioq

7 ULTIPLICATION is vexation,
Division is as bad;
The Rule of Three puzzles me
And Practice drives me mad.


~=~=--5=







NURSERY RHYMES 71














jPi


.. 11


II;


THE FRULE OF THREE PUZZLES IME.


I' ~I'1'' I






NURSERY RHYMES


Cock-a-doodle-doo


OCK-A-DOODLE-DOO
M- y dame has lost her shoe;
My master's lost his fiddling-stick,
And don't know what to do.

Cock-a-doodle-doo!
What is my dame to do?
Till master finds his fiddling-stick,
She'll dance without her shoe.


7 \RM







NURSERY RHYMES


Cock-a-doodle-do!
My dame has lost her shoe,
And master's found his fiddling-stick,
Sing doodle doodle-doo!

Cock-a-doodle-doo!
My dame will dance with you,
While master fiddles his fiddling-stick,
For dame and doodle-do.




ady-Pird,

ly away 0ome

S ADY-BIRD, lady-bird,
Fly away home,
r, Thy house is on fire,
S thy children all gone:
All but one whose name
is Ann,
And she crept under the
pudding-pan.






NURSERY RHYMES


The Gunpowder

1- A


'Zreason


Flot


LEASE to remember the fifth of November,
S The Gunpowder treason plot;
I see no reason why Gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot.


JViary, jiary, quite Contrary
ARY, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
Silver bells and cockle-shells,
And pretty maids all in a row.








NURSERY RHYMES


Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?






NURSERY RHYMES


The Fie that late made




THIS is the Pie that Kate made!




These are the apples so ripe and red,
Cut into quarters and put to bed
In the wonderful Pie that Kate made.

77 f.7 -7 ]







This is the crust so soft and light,
Put in the oven and baked just right,
That covered the apples so ripe and red,
Cut into quarters and put to bed
In the wonderful Pie that Kate made.






NURSERY RHYMES


And these are the hungry girls and boys,
Fond of laughter and fun and noise,
Who ate up the crust so soft and light,
Put in the oven and baked just right,
That covered the apples so ripe and red,
Cut into quarters and put to bed
In the wonderful Pie that Kate made.





FPat-a-Cake

VAT-A-CAKE, pat-a-cake, baker's man,
& Bake me a cake as fast as you can;
Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with B,
And put in the oven for baby and me.






NURSERY RHYMES


Who Stole the Pird's )Nest?

" 0-WHIT! to-whit! to-whee!
Will you listen to me?
Who stole four eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made?"


"Not I," said the Cow, moo-oo!
"Such a thing I'd never do.
I gave you a wisp of hay,
But did not take your nest away.
Not I," said the Cow, moo-moo!
"Such a thing I'd never do."


"Bob-o-link! Bob-o-link!
Now, what do you think?
Who stole a nest away
From the plum-tree to-day ?"


"Not I," said the Dog, bow-wow!
" I wouldn't be so mean, I vow.
I gave some hairs the nest to make,
But the nest I did not take.
Not I," said the Dog, bow-wow!
"I would not -be so mean, I vow!"







NURSERY RHYMES


"Coo-coo coo-coo! coo-coo!
Let me speak a word or two:
Who stole that pretty nest
From little Robin Redbreast?"


"Not I," said the Sheep; "oh no,
I would not treat a poor bird so;
I gave the wool the nest to line,
But the nest was none of mine.
Baa! baa!" said the Sheep; "oh no,
I wouldn't treat a poor bird so."


Caw! caw!" cried the Crow,
"I should like to know
What thief took away
A bird's nest to-day."


"Chuck! chuck!" said the Hen,
"Don't ask me again;
Why, I haven't a chick
Would do such a trick.
We all gave a feather,
And she wove them together.
I'd scorn to intrude
On her and her brood.
Chuck! chuck!" said the Hen,
" Don't ask me again."






NURSERY RHYMES


"Chirr-a-whirr! chirr-a-whirr !
We will make a great stir.
Let us find out his name,
And all cry-For shame!"

A little boy hung down his head,
And went and hid behind the bed;
For he stole that pretty nest
From little Robin Redbreast;
And he felt so full of shame
He did not like to tell his name.





Ot, Tat, Toe

IT, tat, toe,
My first go,
Three jolly butcher boys
All in a row;
Stick one up,
Stick one down,
Stick one on the old man's crown.






NURSERY RHYMES


five Little Owls

: ;.- VE little owls in an old
elm tree,
-'' : Fluffy and puffy as
owls could be,
Blinking and winking
with big round eyes
a-. _..'., ,: At the big round moon
''' '' that hung in the skies:
As I passed beneath, I
could hear one say,
'There'll be mouse for
supper, there will, to-day!"
Then all of them hooted, "Tu-whoo, Tu-whoo!
Yes, mouse for supper, Hoo hoo, Hoo hoo!"


Five little kittens curled up to rest,
Five little kits in a snug, warm nest,
Five little bundles of softest fur,
Each one purring a gentle purr.
And one of them sang as I passed that way,
"We'd mouse for dinner, we did, to-day!"
While four little kits chimed in with glee,
"Yes, mouse for dinner and mouse for tea!"






82 NURSERY RHYMES




Tey piddle piddle

EY diddle diddle,
The cat and the
fiddle,







p N












The cow jumped over the moon;







NURSERY RHYMES


The little dog laughed to see such sport


And the dish ran away with the spoon.






NURSERY RHYMES


There was a jYan, inR double peed

HERE was a man, in double deed,
Who sow'd his garden full of seed;
And when the seed began to grow,
'Twas like a garden full of snow;
And when the snow began to fall,
'Twas like a bird upon the wall;
And when the bird away did fly,
'Twas like an eagle in the sky;
And when the sky began to roar,
'Twas like a lion at the door;
And when the door began to crack,
'Twas like a stick across your back;
And when your back began to smart,
'Twas like a penknife in your heart;
And when your heart began to bleed,
You're dead, and dead, and dead indeed.



Three Dlind Vlice

HREE blind mice,
See how they run!
They all ran after the farmer's wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving lnife!
Did ever you see such fun in your life
As three blind mice?






NURSERY RHYMES


Tound the Sundial

OUND and round the sundial,
In a merry ring,
Dance the happy children,
While they gaily sing:
"Pussy, pussy, pussy dear,
Tell us what you're doing here ?


. - r ,- q ,.-" .,-.lif, ,, -
"Do you want to know, puss,
If it's time for tea;
Time for saucers full of milk,
Sweet as sweet can be?
Tell us what the hour is now!"
Cried Miss Pussy-cat, "Miaow!"






NURSERY RHYMES


Orarge5 and l emon5

RANGES and Lemons,
Said the Bells of St. Clement's.
You owe me five shillings,
Said the Bells of St. Helen's.

When will you pay me?
Said the Bells of Old Bailey.
When I grow rich,
Said the Bells of Shoreditch.
When will that be?
Said the Bells of Stepney.
I do not know,
Said the great Bell at Bow.
Two sticks in an apple,
Say the Bells of Whitechapel.
Half-pence and farthings,
Say the Bells of St. Martin's.
Kettles and pans,
Say the Bells of St. Ann's.
Brickbats and tiles,
Say the Bells of St. Giles.






NURSERY RHYMES


Old shoes and slippers,
Say the Bells of St. Peter's.
Pokers and tongs,
Say the Bells of St. John's.
Here comes a candle to light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop-off-the
-last-man's-head.


iain, Pain, go away

S AIN, rain,
M Go away,
Come again
Another day;
Little Johnny
Wants to play.


This pig went to markett

SHIS pig went to market;
This pig stayed at home;
This pig had plenty to eat,
But this pig had none;
And this little pig said, "Wee, wee, wee!"
All the way home.






NURSERY RHYMES


The Old \0oman and her ]Pig


She found a little crooked sixpence.


N old woman was sweeping her house, and
she found a little crooked sixpence. "What,"
said she, "shall I do with this little sixpence?
I will go to market, and buy a little pig."
As she was coming home, she came to a stile;
but the piggy would not go over the stile.







NURSERY RHYMES 89

She went a little farther, and she met a dog.
So she said to the dog-

"Dog, dog, bite pig!
Pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."


But the dog said-" I shan't bite pig."


-, ~'0


-- ,=1


"Dog, dog, bite pig "







NURSERY RHYMES


She went a little farther, and she met a stick
So she said-
"Stick, stick, beat dog!
The dog won't bite the pig;
The pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the stick said-" I shan't beat dog."




\.- '>"- 'l .1 "-'. r ,i ,. ,, .'
i .. ,i
s _,' ," ,.,," ~ .'- ...... ^ !






.. ^ ..., I I. ,
-'sd











"Fire, fire, burn stick!
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig,;
The pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."







NURSERY RHYMES


But the fire said-" I shan't
burn the stick. The stick
never did me any harm."




She went a little farther,
and she met some water.
So she said-


"Water, water, quench fire!
The fire won't burn the stick;
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig;
The pig won't get over the
stile;
And I shan't get home to-
night."


But the water said-"I
shan't quench the fire. The
fire never did me any harm."


"Fire, fire, burn stick "







NURSERY RHYMES


She went a little farther, and she met an ox.
So she said-

"Ox, ox, drink water!
The water won't quench the fire;
The fire won't burn the stick;
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig;
And I shan't get home to-night."


But the ox said-" I shan't drink the water.
The water never did me any harm."


" Ox, ox, drink water "







NURSERY RHYMES


She went a little farther, and she met a butcher.
So she said-
"Butcher, butcher, kill ox!
The ox won't drink the water;
The water won't quench the fire;
The fire won't burn the stick;
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig;
The pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the butcher said-" I shan't kill the ox.
The ox never did me any harm."


"Butcher, butcher, kill ox !"







NURSERY RHYMES


She went a little farther, and
she met a rope. So she .said-

Rope, rope, 'hang butcher!
7 The butcher won't kill the ox;
The ox won't drink the water;
The water won't quench the fire;
The fire won't burn the stick;
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig;
The pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."

But the rope said--"I shan't
o hang the butcher. The butcher
"Rope, rope, hang
butcher" never did me any harm.

She went a little farther, and she
met a rat. So she said-
" Rat, rat,- gnaw rope;
The rope won't hang the butcher; :-
The butcher won't kill the ox;
The ox won't drink the water;
Rat, rat, gnaw
The water won't quench the fire; rope!"
The fire won't burn the stick;
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig;
The pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."







NURSERY RHYMES


But the rat said-" I shan't gnaw the rope.
The rope never did me any harm."

She went a little farther, and she met a cat.
So she said-
"Cat, cat, kill rat!
The rat won't gnaw the rope;
The rope won't hang the butcher;
The butcher won't kill the ox;
The ox won't drink the water;
The water won't quench the fire;
The fire won't burn the stick;
The stick won't beat the dog;
The dog won't bite the pig;
The pig won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."










"I will kill the rat."

The cat said-" If you will give me a saucer
of milk, I will kill the rat."






NURSERY RHYMES


So the old woman gave the cat the milk, and
when she had lapped up the milk-

The cat began to kill the rat;
The rat began to gnaw the rope;
The rope began to hang the butcher;
The butcher began to kill the ox;
The ox began to drink the water;
The water began to quench the fire;
The fire began to burn the stick;
The stick began to beat the dog;
The dog began to bite the pig;
The pig jumped over the stile;
And so the old woman got home that night.



cxc.
;,.,.n '

"I ",,
i .' .,. 1 ,., .,' :."'"'


And so the old woman got home that night.







NURSERY RHYMES


Trot, Trot, to )Varket

SROT, trot, to market,
(- Like the grown-up folk;
Baby mounts his pony,
'Neath the garden oak.
There's no horse for riding
Safe as mother's knee,
No roof so pleasant
As the wide-spreading tree.

Trot! Canter! Gallop!
Off to the town,
Sv. i,-rin. backwards, forwards,
Dancing up and down.
All the leaves are laughing
As he rides along,
Merry birds are chirping,
Mother sings a song:-

"Sing a song of blue eyes,
Mother's little Trot,
Summer skies and harebells,
And forget-me-not.
A blue, blue river,
Winding to the sea,
And a blue-eyed darling,
Here on mother's knee."






NURSERY RHYMES


little 0o-peep

(4ITTLE Bo-Peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, and they'll come home,
Dragging their tails behind them.

Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they were still a-fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found them indeed, but it made her
heart bleed,
For they'd left all their tails behind them.




Iiddlety, piddlety, pumpty

IDDLETY, diddlety, dumpty,
The cat ran up the plum tree;
Half a crown, to fetch her down,
Diddlety, diddlety, dumpty.




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