• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The merry five
 Donald hides
 Santa Luzia
 Learning to swim
 At the beach
 Fishing for Weezy
 Going into camp
 The little miners
 The bee-ranch
 Five young poets
 Molly a heroine
 The street masquerade
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Silver gate series
Title: The merry five
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084134/00001
 Material Information
Title: The merry five
Series Title: Silver gate series
Physical Description: 155, 2 p., 8 leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Shirley, Penn, 1840-1929
Davidson, Bertha G ( Illustrator )
Lee and Shepard ( Publisher )
Berwick & Smith ( Printer )
C.J. Peters & Son
Publisher: Lee and Shepard
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Typography by C. J. Peters and Son ; Berwick and Smith
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Swimming -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fishing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Camping -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Outdoor life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Twins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations by Bertha G. Davidson.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements precede and follow text.
Statement of Responsibility: by Penn Shirley.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084134
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237457
notis - ALH7944
oclc - 232334729

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    List of Illustrations
        Page 6
    The merry five
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Donald hides
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Santa Luzia
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Learning to swim
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 52a
    At the beach
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Fishing for Weezy
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 74a
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Going into camp
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
    The little miners
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The bee-ranch
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 108a
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Five young poets
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Molly a heroine
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 136a
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    The street masquerade
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 152a
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Advertising
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text





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BOOKS BY PENN SHIRLEY



LITTLE MISS WEEZY SERIES
Three volumes Illustrated Price per volume
75 cents
Little Miss Weezy
Little Miss Weezy's Brother
Little Miss Weezy's Sister

THE SILVER GATE SERIES
Illustrated Price per volume 75 cents
Young Master Kirke
The Merry Five
Complete Catalogues free

LEE AND SHEPARD Publishers BOSTON



















































" Mamma has found her lost baby."
Page 27







THE SILVER GATE SERIES


THE MERRY FIVE






BY
PENN SHIRLEY
AUTHOR OF LITTLE MISS WEEZY LITTLE MISS WEEZY'S
BROTHER' "LITTLE MISS WEEZY'S SISTER"
"YOUNG MASTER KIRKE


BOSTON
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
10 MILK STREET




























COPYRIGHT, 1896, BY LEE AND SHEPARD



All Rigtis Reserved



THE MERRY FIVE























TYPOGRAPHY BY C. J. PETERS & SON, BOSTON.

PRESSWORK BY BERWICK & SMITH.


















CONTENTS


CHAPTER PAGE
I. THE MERRY FIVE . .... 7
II. DONALD HIDES . . .20
III. SANTA LUZIA. .... .. .30
IV. LEARNING TO SWIM ....... 42
V. AT THE BEACH . . 53
VI. FISHING FOR WEEZY . . 67
VII. GOING INTO CAMP .. . . 79
VIII. THE LITTLE MINERS ... .. .. 91
IX. THE BEE-RANCH . ... .. .104
X. FIVE YOUNG POETS ... .117
XI. MOLLY A HEROINE. ... .128
XII. THE STREET MASQUERADE . .. .142




















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS




" MAMMA HAS FOUND HER LOST BABY .. Frontispiece

''YOU'D BETTER LET HIM GO TO SANTA LUZIA," page 32

PAULINE AND MOLLY WERE SWINGING IN A
HAMMOCK ....... .... page 53

THE BOYS BORE THE CHILD ONWARD . page 75

THE TWINS SPRANG FROM BEHIND THE TALL
SYCAMORE.. ... page 90

"AREN'T YOU AFRAID OF BEING STUNG?" .age 109

"STOP THE CAR I" SCREAMED MOLLIE age 137

THAT INQUISITIVE LITTLE DOG . .page 153












THE MERRY FIVE


CHAPTER I

THE' MERRY FIVE

THE Merry Five were Molly, Kirke, and
Weezy Rowe, and their twin comrades,'Paul
and Pauline Bradstreet, who lived over the
way. Paul, Pauline, and Molly were now
fourteen years old, Kirke was twelve, and
little Miss Weezy seven. The story begins
with the Rowes at luncheon-time.
0 papa! I'm so glad we're going to the
beach," cried Molly, laying down her fork.
"And I'm glad we're going to be so near
Captain Bradstreet's camp," added Kirke,
flourishing his napkin. "Oh! we shall have
a famous outing."





THE MERRY FIVE


Exquit! chirped Weezy, not at all sure
what an outing might be, only that it must
be something jolly.
"Me too, mamma," lisped Baby Donald,
paddling with his spoon in his bowl of milk.
Mr. Rowe had caused this unusual excite-
ment by reading aloud a letter from Mrs.
Kitto, who kept a boarding-house at Santa
Luzia. The letter stated that she had received
Mr. Rowe's note of inquiry, and that if he
desired it, she would take himself and family
as boarders on the following Wednesday.
"You do desire it, papa; don't you ? added
Molly eagerly.
"If your mamma does, my daughter."
"It will be difficult to leave so soon,"
remarked Mrs. Rowe, thoughtfully stroking
Donald's restless fingers.
"But we children can help," said Molly
quickly. "We have helped a great deal
since vacation; now, haven't we, mamma ?"






THE MERRY FIVE


"Certainly you have, my dear," returned
Mrs. Rowe with a smile. Did Molly remem-
ber that this vacation was as yet hardly two
days old ?
The first thing that Molly did after luncheon
by way of helping, was to run across the street
to Captain Bradstreet's to signal to Pauline in
the cheery trill that all school-girls know.
"Mrs. Kitto can take us, Polly!, We're
going Wednesday she cried, as Pauline came
dancing out, her long hair floating behind her
like a black flag.
"You are, Molly? Papa says we sha'n't be
off before the first of next month. But he
has partly promised to let Paul and me stop
at Santa Luzia on the way."
"0 Pauline, how perfectly lovely !"
"I didn't believe he'd ever think of such
a thing," said Pauline, braiding her hair.
"He's so silly about us twins since mamma
died. Can't bear to have us out of his sight."





THE' MERRY FIVE


"I don't wonder, Polly, I'm sure." Molly's
eyes glowed with pity, as they always did
when Pauline spoke of her dead mother. She
longed to tell Pauline how sorry she was for
her, but the words would not come. What
she did say was only this, "Your shoe-string's
untied, Polly, the right one."
"Is it? Well, it might as well be the
right as the left. It's sure to be one or the
other," returned easy-going Pauline, stooping
to fasten the offending lacing.
"Oh! won't it be delightful if you and Paul
can come to Santa Luzia, Polly ? I '-ope you
can stay at Mrs. Kitto's a whole week."
"Thank you, Molly dear, and I Pauline
had been about to say that she hoped Molly
and Kirke would stay at least that length of
time at the camp; but suddenly remembered
that there might not be room enough for
them. She must ask her father.
"I- I suppose Auntie David will meet us





THE MERRY FIVE


at Santa Luzia," she said, to finish the sen-
tence.
"What does make you call her Auntie
David, Pauline? You've never told me."
"Oh, Paul and I began to call her that
when we were little snips, and we've done
it ever since. Auntie doesn't mind. Her
name is Davidson, you know. She married
Uncle John Davidson."
"Will Mr. Davidson come to Santa Luzia
too, Polly?"
"Oh, no; Uncle John has gone East. He
goes Est- every summer on business, and
then iuntie comes to live with us. Lucky
for Paul and me; lucky for papa too Auntie
David is papa's only sister. I believe he
thinks she made the world !"
"Well, I must skip back," said Molly, with
an important air. "Kirke has gone over to
Mrs. Carillo's to see if Manuel wants to keep
Kirke's cart and burro while we're away;




THE MERRY FIVE


and mamma may want me to do some er-
rands."
All the rest of the week there was a pleasant
bustle in the Rowe household, the bustle of
preparing for a journey.
"We're going to ride in the cars," little
Miss Weezy explained to all callers. "We're
going to Sandy Luzia. It's 'most a hundred
miles."
The little maiden was very busy these days;
for she had to hunt up her scattered dolls,
many of them having strayed out of sight.
Mr. Rowe, though still far from strong,
was very busy too.
"I must drive over to the gardener's this
morning to instruct him in regard to the hedge,"
he said to Mrs. Rowe the next Monday.
Shall we shut up Zip ? asked Mrs. Rowe,
as she brought her husband a glass of milk.
"No, my dear," Mr. Rowe smiled. "Let
the little Mexican follow. I believe his dog-





THE MERRY FIVE


ship thinks none of the family can be trusted
anywhere without him."
As soon as Mr. Rowe had gone, Mrs. Rowe
hastened to call Molly from the book she was
reading.
"Come, Molly, while papa is away we will
begin our packing. Please ask Hop Kee to
take the largest trunk from the store-room,
and set it down in the upper hall in front
of the grate."
Molly put "Alice in Wonderland" upon the
table with a little sigh, and walked out to
the kitchen rather more slowly than a girl
ought to walk when she goes on her mother's
errands. She was thinking about Alice and
that surprising rabbit. What would he do
next ?
"Now, children, you can collect the articles
that you cannot do without," said Mrs. Rowe,
after the trunk had been placed before the
unused grate. "The necessary articles must




THE MERRY FIVE


be put in first, for we sha'n't have room for
everything you'd like."
Kirke immediately brought his tennis-racket,
his foot-ball, and his jointed fishing-rod, and
flung them into the trunk.
"I must have my tool-box, too, mamma,
and the ship I'm rigging, and -
"Any clothes, Kirke ?" interrupted Molly
mischievously, as she appeared with an armful
of bathing-suits.
Kirke had not thought of clothes; and when
these had been hunted up, and laid smoothly
over the bathing-suits, he grudged them the
space they occupied.
But his mamma did not let him remain idle.
"You may get the hammock next, Kirke,
and papa's afghan and pillows."
Kirke skipped down-stairs two steps at a
time, and speedily returned with the hammock
slung over his shoulder, and bulging in a very
peculiar manner.





THE MERRY FIVE


"Here's a big hang-bird's nest, mamma.
It has one wee bird in it. Do you want to
see the fellow hop ? "
"0 Kirke! what made you bring Donald
here now?" said Mrs. Rowe, with a vexed
laugh, as Kirke spilled his baby brother at
her feet.
Donald scrambled up, and rested his chin
on the edge of the trunk to see his mamma
put in the sofa-pillows, and spread blankets
over them. "P'itty 'itty bed," said he.
"So you think that's a bed do you, little
brother ? cried Kirke, much amused. "It
does look like your cribby, that's a fact."
"P'itty 'itty mamma," pursued the young
rogue, throwing his arms about his mother's
neck, partly because he loved her, partly be-
cause he feared she was going to send him
away.
"There, sweetheart, that will do," said she
at last, between his kisses. Mamma is busy




THE MERRY FIVE


now. Brother must take little Donald down-
stairs."
"Pit-a-bat, pit-a-bat," pleaded the baby.
He saw he must go, and, as that was the
case, preferred to go in state, riding on his
brother's back.
"Well, pick-a-back it is, then," exclaimed
Kirke, slinging the teasing child across his
shoulders. In the lower hall he met Captain
Bradstreet and Pauline.
You're the very young man I want to speak
to," cried the cheery captain; I want -
"Now, papa, Kirke's not so very young,
I'm sure," interrupted Pauline archly.
Captain Bradstreet chuckled as though his
motherless daughter had made a witty remark.
"True, my little girl, Kirke's not so very
young; but then, on the other hand, not so
old as he may be later."
"I'm going on thirteen, Captain Bradstreet,"
said Kirke, jealous for his own dignity.






THE MERRY FIVE


The captain chuckled again, and wiped his
sunburned face so hard that Kirke half looked
for a crimson stain on the white pocket-hand-
kerchief.
"Yes, yes, to be sure, you'll overtake your
father before long, Kirke. Hop Kee says
your father's not at home."
"No; papa has gone to Mr. Gleason's, Cap-
tain Bradstreet."
"We've come, Pauline and I, to engage
you and that big sister of yours to visit us
at our camp when we're settled in it. Pauline
won't sleep a wink till this thing's arranged.
Can we see your mother?"
Kirke set Donald down upon the floor, and
hastened to the upper hall, where Molly was
capering about in the wildest excitement.
"O mamma! did you hear what Captain
Bradstreet said ? Did you hear ? He wants
Kirke and me to make a visit at his camp -
I never made a visit at a camp in my life!"





THE MERRY FIVE


"Yes, mamma," said Kirke, in the same low
tone, Captain Bradstreet wants to ask you if
Molly and I can go. Came on purpose."
O mamma! you'll say yes; won't you ? "
begged Molly.
Mrs. Rowe was hastily laying aside her
apron.
"We'll ask papa, Molly. Captain Bradstreet
is certainly very kind."
"I don't think Captain Bradstreet's kind-
I don't think he's kind a bit," muttered little
Miss Weezy, as the others went down-stairs.
"Never 'vited me at all! Didn't I 'vite him
to my seven-years-old party, ice-cream to it
too? 0 dear, dear, dear!"
Unloading an apronful of dolls in a heap
by the trunk, offended little Weezy stole down
the back staircase into the garden to confide
her sorrows to Ginger, Molly's yellow kitten.
Captain Bradstreet said I was a nice, sweet
little girl; he said it two times, he truly did.





THE MERRY FIVE


And now he's gone and asked Kirke and
Molly to go to his -to his something oh,
yes, he's asked them, and never asked me."
Ginger purred softly, and rubbed her head
against her little mistress's feet; but Weezy
could not be comforted. What a 'miserable
old world it was to be sure, where captains
called you nice, sweet little girls, and then
went and didn't invite you to their to their
- she couldn't quite remember what.
Grown-up people liked big boys and girls
like Kirke and Molly; they didn't like little
ones like herself and Donald.
Poor little Donald, he was crying too. She
heard him. What was he crying about ?
Weezy wondered. And where was he? He
seemed a great way off, by the sound, 'most
up in the sky. Why didn't somebody find
him and make him happy?




20 THE MERRY FIVE


CHAPTER II

DONALD HIDES

"WEEZY, Weezy, is Donald out there .a
the garden with you?"
This was Molly calling from the back
porch.
"No, he isn't," answered Weezy, in a dis-
couraged tone.
"He's screaming himself hoarse, Weezy,
and we can't find him anywhere in the
house."
"I haven't seen him." Weezy walked
slowly toward her sister. "Has Captain
Bradstreet gone, Molly?"
"Yes, Weezy, and Pauline."
"Did Captain Bradstreet say"-
"Maybe Donald followed Pauline and her





DONALD HIDES


father home, Molly," suggested Mrs. Rowe
from the doorway.
"No, mamma, I've been over to ask. I
couldn't hear Donald on that side of the
street, either. He must be in this house."
"Then, I'd like to know where, Molly," ex-
claimed Kirke, springing out upon the porch.
"I've dived into all the wardrobes and under
all the beds."
His face was crimson, and his hair on end
like the spines of a sea-urchin. A cobweb
dangled from his coat-sleeve.
"Have you looked in the sideboard, Kirke."
"No, I haven't, Molly; and I haven't looked
in the salt-cellars."
"Oh, you funny boy! tittered Weezy, who
regarded the search as a protracted and
rather diverting game of hide-and-go-seek.
Mrs. Rowe, on the contrary, was becoming
seriously troubled.
"Where can the darling be, Molly?" she





THE MERRY FIVE


cried, rushing back into the house, and hurry-
ing from room to room. "I can hardly hear
his voice now. How faint it has grown!"
"It is loudest here in the hall, mamma,"
said Molly, who had run ahead, and halted
abruptly at the foot of the front stairway.
"Donny is up chimney, I guess," cried
little Louise, dancing to the fireplace.
"Nonsense, Weezy; do you think he is a
bat?" retorted Molly.
Kirke dropped on his knees before the
hearth. He had been stuck in a chimney
once himself, and the recollection always made
his flesh creep.
"If Donald has crawled up this flue, Molly,
it's no laughing matter, let me tell you."
"What are you talking about, Kirke? Don-
ald couldn't crawl up that flue; it is alto-
gether too small."
"I'm not so sure, Molly. Don can squeeze
through a knothole."





DONALD HIDES


"Donald, Donald darling," called Mrs.
Rowe shrilly. Where are you, Donald?
Tell mamma."
A plaintive, muffled wail floated down the
air.
"Tum, mamma, tum."
"Donald is in the chimney, mamma! Oh,
I'm so afraid he is in here!" groaned Kirke,
trying to gaze into the chimney's blackened
throat.
But he only bumped his head against
the andirons and twisted his neck for
nothing.
"There are bricks in the way, mamma,
stacks of them. I can't see a single thing."
"Tum, oh, tumr!" cried the choked voice
again; and this time they were sure it came
from above them.
But did it actually proceed from the throat
of the chimney? It was Mrs. Rowe who
first thought of the unused grate in the





THE MERRY FIVE


upper hall. Might not Donald have wedged
his restless little body into that? He was
constantly teasing to go up on the roof.
"Here I am, dearest, mamma is here," she
called, mounting the staircase, the children
at her heels, and stumbling across the clothing
that strewed the floor.
Before the grate stood the large trunk she
had been packing. She had left it open, and
now it was closed; but she was too agitated
to notice the change.
"Quick, Kirke, this trunk is in the way.
Help me move it out from the grate."
Kirke laid hold of the handle nearest.
"What a heavy trunk, mamma! What
makes -
At that moment there was a stifled cry
of "Mamma, mamma!"
Kirke jumped as if he had been shot, for
the words seemed spoken directly in his ear.
"Donald's in the trunk," he roared, letting






DONALD HIDES


go the handle. "The little monkey is in the
trunk!"
"He's packed himself, Donny's packed
himself!" shouted Weezy, hopping about on
one foot. "What an ever-so-queer baby!"
Molly flew to the trunk, but it was fastened.
"Oh, this lock! This hateful, hateful
spring-lock. Where is the key ?"
"I left it in the lock. I know I left it in
the lock," exclaimed Mrs. Rowe, groping has-
tily about the carpet. Help me, children,
do help me find it!"
Tum, mamma. Why don't oo tum ?"
The voice was very low, oh, very, very low,
little more than a sigh.
"Yes, yes, my baby; mamma will come."
Mrs. Rowe was yet hunting the key, and
hunting to no purpose.
"Bring a hammer, Kirke," she cried hur-
riedly. Bring a screw-driver no, a chisel.
Call Hop Kee."





THE MERRY FIVE


It seemed centuries before Kirke returned
with the tools; in reality it was only three
minutes. Then Hop Kee came flying in as
though fired from a sling or swung by his
own long pigtail. Behind him appeared Cap-
tain Bradstreet and Pauline to learn if Donald
had been found; and among them all the
trunk was speedily opened.
Little Donald lay upon the pillows gasping
for breath, and clasping in his chubby hand
the missing key.
"Peepaboo, Donny! Peepaboo !" cried
Weezy.
But the released prisoner did not answer.
Mrs. Rowe caught the pale, limp little fellow
to her breast with a sob of thanksgiving.
Mamma is here, my baby. Did you think
mamma never, never would come ?"
The child snuggled close in her arms, too
exhausted to utter a word.
'.' Look up, dearest; mamma has you!





DONALD HIDES '


Smile, mother's darling, mamma has found
her lost baby."
"Yes, praise God! You've found your boy,
Mrs. Rowe, and found him not one minute
too soon," muttered Captain Bradstreet, throw-
ing up the windows. If he had not made
himself heard, he might have shared the fate
of Ginevra."
"Don't mention it, Captain Bradstreet,"
shuddered Mrs. Rowe. "The story of Gi-
nevra flashed into my mind the moment I
discovered where Donald was."
"Who was Ginevra, anyway, Molly ?" asked
Kirke, a little later.
The Captain and Pauline had gone, Mr.
Rowe had come home, and the color was
returning to Donald's cheeks.
"Oh! don't you know, Kirke? Why, Gi-
nevra was that gay young bride,- Italian, I
believe, -who ran off after her wedding, and
hid herself in a chest."




THE MERRY FIVE


"What did she do that for?"
"Why just for fun, to make the guests
hunt for her. They were all playing hide-
and-go-seek."
"Well, what next, Molly?"
"And the chest had a spring-lock."
"Oh! I see."
"Yes, the springiest kind of a spring-lock;
and the poor little bride was no sooner inside
the chest than the lid snapped down on her.
There she had to stay; and she wasn't found
for a hundred years ? "
"A hundred years!" echoed Weezy, in
dismay. "0 Molly! didn't she have anything
to eat for a whole hundred years ?"
"I guess she didn't want anything to eat,
Weezy," said Kirke, with a sly wink at Molly.
" Not toward the last of it, anyway. I guess
she had lost her appetite."
0 Kirke! you wretched boy," said Molly.
But Kirke's shocking sarcasm had been




DONALD HIDES


quite lost on Weezy. She had picked up a
box-cover from the, flo6r, and was fanning
Donald as he lay across his mother's lap.
"Did you think that was a truly, truly little
bed, Donald?"
Donald nodded drowsily.
"Babies shouldn't go to sleep in trunks.
Oh, you droll, droll little brother!"
Weezy's remark had called up a painful
memory, and Donald's lip began to quiver.
"Don't wike p'itty 'itty bed. All dark.
Mamma all gone."
"We won't talk about it, darling," said Mrs.
Rowe, kissing the tear-stained face. "Here
you are in sister's arms, and sister shall sing
to you. What do you want to hear her sing ? "
"Sing Robbitty-bobbitty," replied Donald,
swallowing a sob. And Weezy piped up in
a clear, sweet treble:-

"Robinty-bobbinty bent his bow
To shoot a pilcher and killed a crow."




THE MERRY FIVE


CHAPTER III

SANTA LUZIA

"HERE comes Miss Hobbs, mamma, rolling
along with the clothes-basket."
Wednesday morning had arrived, and Kirke
was upon the side porch helping his mother
strap her grip-sack. Miss Hobbs was bring-
ing home some starched clothes too fine to
be laundered by Sing High, the "wash-man;"
and beside her walked her roly-poly niece
and nephew, Essie and Harry.
"I aren't leave them at 'ome by their
little selves, Mrs. Rowe," she wheezed in
mounting the steps. "Hessie is that con-
triving of mischief, an' such an obstinate
child."
Essie hung her head, though not too low





SANTA LUZIA


to see the banana that Mrs. Rowe presently
brought her.
"What do you say, Hessie? For shame!
Can't you thank the lady ?"
"Tank oo," mumbled Essie in the- act of
skinning the fruit with her sharp little
teeth.
"That's a good gell, Hessie. You and
'Arry must heat your bananas 'ere on the
porch while I carry in the clothes.
"If you'll believe it, Mrs. Rowe, that
rogue of a Hessie ran away again yesterday,"
she continued, following Mrs. Rowe into the
side hall. "A beastly race she led us. She
tired 'Arry hall out."
"Harry looks delicate this summer," re-
marked Mrs. Rowe, as she began to sort the
clothes into piles.
"'Arry's fat, Mrs. Rowe, but he isn't
rugged. If I could lay 'ands on the gold
I've buried I'd take him away for his health. "
\\




THE MERRY FIVE


"Why can't Miss Hobbs get her gold,
mamma?" whispered Weezy, coming in just
then. "Can't Kirke and I dig it up for
her ?"
"Miss Hobbs means, dear, 'that she has
spent her money for land that she cannot
sell, and so she can't afford to take Harry
into the country this summer."
"You'd better let him go to Santa Luzia
with the Rowe family," laughed Kirke, as
-his mother gave him some garments to' carry
up-stairs. "Let him go, and I'll see to him."
"Thank you, Master Kirke," Miss Hobbs's
ample sides shook merrily, but while
you're seeing to 'Arry who'll see to you?"
Kirke looked nettled, especially when she
went on to say, "No, no, your ma'll have
enough young folks to keep steady without
havingg my 'Arry."
Mrs. Rowe smiled thoughtfully at these
jesting remarks. A fortnight at the beach









/ 1; ,


I.,


"You'd better let him go to Santa Luzia."


Page 32





SANTA LUZIA


would doubtless be a benefit to the ailing
child. Could this be arranged? She must
consider the question.
"We are all fond of Harry," she remarked,
in handing Miss Hobbs the empty basket.
"He's a good little boy."
"Oh, 'Arry's decent, Mrs. Rowe," responded
Miss Hobbs, with a complacent glance at the
hall clock.
"The clock is too fast, Miss Hobbs."
"Is she ? I thought she must be quite
a few minutes on; but we won't stay to hin-
der you." And Miss Hobbs tied her sun-
bonnet.
"You'll come around again this afternoon,
Miss Hobbs, to close the house?"
"For certain, Mrs. Rowe. I'll close the
house and take charge of the key."
"Which key, Miss Hobbs? Hop Kee, or
door-key?" asked Kirke, with mock inno-
cence.





THE .MERRY FIVE


"Not Hop Kee, you may rely on that,
Master Kirke," retorted Miss Hobbs, putting
on her shawl as if it had been a bandage.
"I wouldn't take charge of a Chinaman for
all the teapots he could break."
"Hop Kee will work for the Bradstreets
while we're away, Miss Hobbs."
"So there is where he's going. I knew
the captain's housekeeper was sick."
"And when the family move into camp,
they'll take Hop Kee along with them."
Captain Bradstreet's name had reminded
Weezy of her old grievance.
"O Miss Hobbs! Captain Bradstreet has
'vited Kirke and Molly to go into that camp
thing, and he hasn't ever 'vited me," she
complained, holding the door ajar for Miss
Hobbs to pass out. "I don't think it's fair."
"Never mind, little woman! You'll have
your share of invitations before many years,"
Miss Hobbs gave the others a wise look.





SANTA L UZIA


"I'm sorry to 'ave you all go; but I 'ope
you'll 'ave a good summer, and I pray the
Lord'll keep you well and 'appy."
"Oh! He will; He always does," answered
little Miss Weezy for the family. "Good-by,
Miss Hobbs."
After that Harry and Essie came in with
sticky hands and faces to make their farewell
speeches; and then their Aunt Ruth waddled
homeward between them like a plump mother-
duck between two plump ducklings.
They were met. at the corner by a hand-
some, dark-eyed Spanish boy. It was Man-
uel Carillo, coming to take away Kirke's
burro and cart to keep during vacation.
"You'll be good to Hoppity, this summer,
won't you, Manuel ?" said Kirke playfully,
as he helped him harness the sleek gray
burro into the trig gray cart. "You won't
be mad with him because he threw you and
broke your leg."





THE MERRY FIVE


"Mad? Oh, no! that's all right."
Manuel grinned, and slapped the limb in
question to show how strong it was.
"Hoppity ought to help you carry around
your newspapers to pay for that bad trick of
his. Now, oughtn't you, Hoppity? said
Kirke, giving the little beast a parting love-
pat.
Kirke was glad to lend Manuel the burro.
It seemed one way of making amends for the
sad accident of the year before that had been
caused partly by his own recklessness.
When Kirke returned to the house the
family were sitting down to an early luncheon.
Molly made room for him beside herself,
saying cheerily, -
"Manuel drove by the window just now,
smiling all over his face. How much he does
think of you, Kirke!"
"I don't know about that, Molly, but he
thinks a good deal of Hoppity. He'll have





SANTA LUZIA


a splendid time with the little trotter while
we're away."
"Kirke has made many friends at Silver
Gate City," remarked his mother. "Harry
Hobbs for one." Then, turning to Mr. Rowe,
she added, in a sprightly tone, "Kirke pro-
poses doing a little missionary work during
vacation, papa. Haye you any objection to
his taking care of a 'fresh-air child' for a
fortnight ?"
"A 'fresh-air -child,' my dear? I don't
quite understand."
"Well, Harry Hobbs, for instance. Harry
is in need of a change of scene. Do you
approve his coming to Santa Luzia by and
by?"
"0 papa! I was only in fun," exclaimed
Kirke in hot haste. "I don't want Harry
to come; really and truly I don't. Paul and
I have planned no end of good times there
on the beach by ourselves."





THE MERRY FIVE


"And you think Harry wouldn't enjoy those
good times? Is that it, my son ? "
"No, papa; Harry would enjoy them fast
enough," Kirke laughed and blushed; "the
bother is that Paul and I wouldn't enjoy
him. The little kid would be frightfully in
the way with his mud-pies, and his tagging,
and his chattering. Don't you see, papa?"
"Then, Miss Hobbs dresses Harry so oddly,
papa," added Molly, as her father did not
reply. "She makes him look for all the
world like one of Mr. Palmer Cox's brownies;
and people at Santa Luzia wouldn't know
but Harry was one of our family."
"What a shocking thought, Molly!" cried
Mr. Rowe, vastly entertained by her expression
of deep distress. "In the face of a danger like
this it never will do for us to, take Harry."
"You're laughing at me, papa; but you
don't understand how girls feel about such
things. Kirke doesn't understand, either."





SANTA LUZIA


"Girls have too many feelings, I think,"
said Kirke, not very politely. "They're al-
ways afraid of doing something queer."
"I wish boys were a little more like them,
then," Molly pushed back her plate with a
saucy air, "boys never care a fig what is said
of them."
"That's because they're independent, Molly."
"It's because they don't know what is
proper, I say," retorted Molly between fun
and earnest. "Why, I've seen boys that
would walk into church with monkeys on
their backs and never blush."
"I'm afraid Kirke will consider you
rude, Molly," interposed her mother gently.
"Aren't we wandering very far from Harry ?"
"The farther the better," was Molly's se-
cret comment, as Mrs. Rowe continued, -
"I hoped you children would want to do
something nice for Harry. His aunt is not
able to give him many pleasures."




THE MERRY FIVE


She gave him a Caroline cooky yesterday,
mamma," put in Weezy; "full of seeds, it
was. Harry let me bite."
"But, mamma, we can't take Harry with
us," exclaimed Molly, elated by the sudden
thought; "Miss Hobbs can't possibly get
him ready in time for the train."
"As to that, Molly, she can send him next
month by Captain Bradstreet."
"May be Mrs. Kitto won't have room for
Harry," suggested Molly faintly.
Kirke dashed this hope to the ground.
Harry, he affirmed, could be rolled into any
corner like a foot-ball.
"The question is simply this, children,"
said Mrs. Rowe, buttering a biscuit for Don-
ald to eat on the car; "will you devote a
part of your vacation to your little neighbor,
or will you spend the whole of it in amusing
yourselves ? You shall decide."
0 mamma! please don't leave it that way.





SANTA LUZIA


Don't put us on our honor," entreated Molly,
with a shrug.
"Because, when you put us on our honor,
we have to do a thing, even if we hate it
like poison," added Kirke, groping under the
sideboard for the yellow kitten.
Kitty's basket was ready, with a slice of
roast beef at the bottom, and a smart blue
bow on top; and now at the last moment
Ginger had refused to be put in.
"Head her off, Molly. Shut the door,
Weezy. Look out, Don, or I shall run over
you!"
Kirke shouted his orders like a general in
battle. Everybody jostled against everybody
else, and Ginger was no sooner captured than
the carriage came to take them all to the
station. Then followed the excitement of the
journey and of the arrival at Santa Luzia;
and for several days nothing further was said
about Harry Hobbs.




THE MERR Y FIVE


CHAPTER IV

LEARNING TO SWIM

THE children were delighted with the lovely
little city of Santa Luzia, which lay upon the
coast, snuggling in its arms a placid, sunny
bay. For the first week after their arrival
Weezy never tired of watching the sails on
the water, and of counting how many she
could see from her window at The Old and
New."
"The Old and* New" was Mrs. Kitto's
boarding-house, overlooking Santa Luzia
Beach. The Old was the back part, built
of brown adobe, with walls two feet thick;
the New was the modern wooden front, with a
breezy veranda stepping down toward the sea.
"The house puts its best foot forward,"





LEARNING TO SWIM


prattled Molly, as she and Kirke and Weezy
set off one morning for a lesson in swimming.
"That's all right," replied Kirke, "if it
keeps steady on its pins."
"I don't know what you're talking about,"
'sniffed Weezy with disapproval. "Houses
don't have feet; and they don't have pins."
"No, nor soles either, you precious snip
of a goosie."
Kirke held his little sister's hand, swinging
it to and fro as they walked together across
the beach.
"Are you going to squeal to-day when you
go into the water ? The last time you scared
the swimming-master half out of his wits."
0 Kirke, what a story! "
"I'll leave it to Molly if the man didn't
duck."
"You silly, silly boy I You know he
ducked on purpose."
Weezy flirted her sunny head in high dis-




THE MERRY FIVE


dain, while Kirke and Molly exchanged amused
glances.
"Do you think so, Weezy ? Well, may be
he did duck on purpose. I mean to try that
ducking business myself this morning. What-
ever you do, little sister, don't grab me around
the neck; you might pull me under."
Kirke spoke in jest. He could already swim
quite well, for he had learned the art a year
or two before in the East. Molly and Weezy,
on the contrary, had only taken three lessons.
"Hoh, Kirke! I couldn't pull you under.
Of course not, 'cause you're biggerer'n I am,"
said Weezy, stopping to watch a small urchin
scooping ovens in the sand.
He was a plump little boy in "brownie"
overalls, which Molly insisted made him look
like a fat, twisted doughnut.
"He looks like Harry Hobbs," responded
Kirke, hurrying Weezy on towards the bath-
house.





LEARNING TO.SWIM


Molly felt a sudden twinge of conscience.
"That makes me think, Kirke, what shall
we do about Harry? If he comes, he'll have
to come next week with the Bradstreets.
Mamma has left it to us, you know, to ask
him or not, as we please."
Kirke whistled, and kicked aside a tangle
of seaweed.
"Oh! we might as well invite the young
Britisher, I suppose."
"But if Harry comes, Kirke, you and I'll
each have to keep an eye on him to"-
"Yes, that'll be an eye apiece, Molly."
"To see that he doesn't get drowned or
anything."
"Pooh, Miss Fidgetibus, who's going to
drown him ? You couldn't sink that dumpy
boy any more'n you could sink the buoy on
the rock yonder."
"I thought you didn't want Harry any
more than I did, Kirke."





THE MERRY FIVE


"Who says I do want him? Only I was
thinking he could burrow here in all out-
doors like a gopher; and it seems sort of
mean, doesn't it, Molly, to shut down on
the poor little kid?"
"I don't-know."
Molly's glance had wandered from the
sturdy young oven-builder to a group of well-
dressed tourists climbing the long flight of
steps to the bluff overhead. How mortify-
ing it would be to take Harry about among
people like those, and pose as his sister.
Where did Miss Hobbs get the patterns of
his clothes ?
"The beach will make Harry weller,
mamma says," observed Weezy, always ready
to fill the pauses.
"Better, you mean, don't you, Weezy?"
corrected Molly. "Mamma is always wanting
to make somebody better."
"You're right, ma'am," Kirke nodded em-





LEARNING TO SWIM


phatically. "Mamma is kind, way through.
She isn't much like you and me, Molly.
Sometimes we're kind, and then again some-
times we're kind of not."
"Thank you, sir; you can speak for your-
self, if you please," retorted Molly, bridling.
She had secretly prided herself on being
unselfish and warm-hearted, and this frank
remark was wounding to her self-love.
"For my part, I'm willing to send for
Harry," she added virtuously.
"So am I, Molly, on a pinch," said Kirke.
"And I suppose Pauline will bring him,--on
a pinch!"
"Then, as soon as we get home to The
Old and New, Kirke, we'll ask mamma to
write to Miss Hobbs, and have it over with."
"Agreed. The Bradstreets will be here
by next Thursday, won't they? Will they
stay at The Old and New a week?"
"They'll stay till the captain and Hop





THE MERRY FIVE


Kee get Camp Hilarious in running order,"
answered Molly, as they mounted the steps
of the bath-house.
While Kirke presented their tickets at the
office, she and Weezy waited in the main
room. This had a large oblong bathing-tank
in the centre, surrounded on its four sides
by a broad walk. The dressing-rooms opened
upon this walk, and the door of each one
had painted on it near the top either a num-
ber or a letter of the alphabet.
"Which room would you like, Molly?"
asked Kirke, quickly returning with the keys
and their bathing-suits. "You can take 'H '
or 'No. 7.'"
"No. 7; it is the larger," said Molly, draw-
ing Weezy into that room, and locking the
door.
Kirke vanished into H," to reappear be-
fore No. 7 in precisely two minutes, clad in
blue flannel, and calling, -





LEARNING TO SWIM


"What! Aren't you ready yet, girls?"
That was the fun of being a boy, and
having no strings and no hooks and eyes
to hinder him!
On emerging into the main room the chil-
dren found their father seated there awaiting
them. He had formed the habit of being
present at their swimming-lessons.
"I feel safer to watch my ducklings,"
Molly heard him say to Mr. Tullis, the swim-
ming-master, as she and Weezey drew near.
"Your daughters are learning fast, espe-
cially this little one," answered Mr. Tullis,
looking at Weezy. "She'll soon swim like
a fish."
Mr. Rowe patted Weezy's head, shining
beneath her oiled-silk cap.
"She's a venturesome little lassie," he said.
"She never seems to know what fear is."
"She'll make all the better swimmer for
that, Mr. Rowe."





STHE MERRY FIVE


"Provided she doesn't take too great risks,
Mr. Tullis. I've sometimes feared we ought
not to let her go into the water."
"Anybody's liable to get into water, Mr.
Rowe; the point is to know how to get
out," replied the swimming-master lightly.
Molly and Kirke hardly heeded the remark
at the time, but it rang in their ears after-
ward.
Mr. Tullis was already leading Weezy down
the steps into the tank, which was divided
across the middle by a low wall of stone.
On one side of this wall the water was cold,
but on the side they were entering it was
agreeably warm; and Weezy was soon pad-
dling about with great glee, supported under
the chin by the strong hand of the swimming-
master.
"Look, papa, see how well I can do it!"
she cried, splashing and puffing like a young
seal, till she was out of breath.





LEARNING TO SWIM


You'd better rest a few minutes now,
little girl," said Mr. Tullis.
And leaving Weezy clinging to a plank, he
went to instruct Molly in swimming.
Meantime Kirke had been making ludi-
crous attempts to mount a hobby-horse, which,
being mostly barrel, would rear and plunge
as often as he tried to get astride its back.
Finally, tired of these fruitless- efforts, he
climbed the staircase near by to coast down
the toboggan slide with some other boys.
Mr. Rowe looked on as his son dashed
down the slippery board again and again,
and dived into the tank. Then he glanced
at his more timid Molly, flushed with trying
to strike out for herself, and at little Miss
Weezy, floating gayly on her plank; and he
mused,-
"What a blessing it is to be young and
strong! I wish my children could appreciate
this, and could know how happy they are."





52 THE MERRY FIVE

And at that very moment Kirke and Molly
were thinking, -
"Won't we have good times by and by,
after Paul and Pauline have come?"
And little Miss Weezy was thinking; but
she herself could hardly have told what she
was thinking.














































" Pauline and Molly were swinging in a hammock."
Page 53





AT THE BEACH


CHAPTER V

AT THE BEACH

"I WONDER what you'll think of our camp,
Molly."
Pauline and Molly were swinging in a ham-
mock on the front veranda of The Old and
New, chattering like spring chickadees.
The Bradstreets had arrived from Silver
Gate City the previous evening, bringing
Harry Hobbs with them; and Captain Brad-
street had gone on to the canyon that morn-
ing with Hop Kee.
"Papa has a wooden building up there, -
sort of a shanty, where he stores the furni-
ture every winter," went on Pauline. "It is
near to Mr. Arnesten's cottage, and Mr.
Arnesten sees to things when papa is away."




THE MERRY FIVE


"Are the Arnestens all the neighbors you
have, Pauline ?"
"Yes, unless you count the Wassons. But
the Wassons are three miles away, on papa's
bee-ranch. We'll go to see them, Molly, when
you're at the camp."
"Oh, that'll be delightful!" Molly pushed
her heavy auburn hair away from her face,
a habit of hers when things pleased her.
"Right after breakfast every morning,
Molly, we'll put on our sunbonnets, you
can borrow auntie's, and we'll march over
to Mr. Arnesten's for the eggs, and see him
feed the chickens. He has turkeys besides,
and one proud old gobbler that struts about
as if he owned all the gold mines of Cali-
fornia."
"Didn't you say the Arnestens had a little
girl, Pauline?"
"Yes, Olga, the old-fashionedest little soul !
She has eyes just the color of a grindstone,





AT THE BEACH


but her lashes are yellow, and her skin is
yellow too. She used to trudge over with
buttermilk last summer."
"Then the Arnestens have a cow ? "
"I should say they do! It's always break-
ing into the garden and eating up the pease.
We mind that, because Mr. Arnesten supplies
us with vegetables."
"And with chickens too, I suppose, Polly ?"
Yes; Hop Kee cooks chickens beautifully."
Doesn't he ? It seems odd enough, Pau-
line, to think of your having our Chinaman."
"He came to our house in just the right
time, Molly. Mrs. Cannon was so sick she
couldn't have worked for us another .day."
"Hop Kee is a diamond, Polly."
"A topaz, you mean, dear, a yellow topaz.
How we shall hate to give him back to
you!"
Molly snuggled her dimpled chin into her
friend's neck.





THE MERRY FIVE


"I wouldn't worry about that, Pauline. We
sha'n't go home these two months."
"Neither shall we, I hope. Papa told me
yesterday that we should stay in the canyon
all during vacation. Then, if Uncle John isn't
back from the East, auntie will go home
with us to Silver Gate City."
"I'm just longing to see your Auntie David.
Are you sure she'll come to-day, Pauline?"
"She wrote that she should come to-day,
and spend a week here at The Old and New
with Paul and me. Papa can take us all out
to the camp together."
"Oh, dear, Polly! you won't be here but
just seven days. And I haven't entertained
you at all. What shall we do this afternoon ?
Shall we go to the bath-house?"
I'd rather fish," answered Pauline promptly.
"If there's anything I dote on, it's fishing."
"I want to fish," cried Harry Hobbs, from
the corner of the veranda. "Can't I fish?"


S56




AT THE BEACH


The little newcomer was tired of stringing
sea-shells with Weezy. Sewing was girls'
work.
"Don't you and Weezy want to dig in the
sand?" asked Molly, in her sweetest tones.
"I'll find you the dearest little pails and
shovels."
"I can dig at 'ome," responded Harry, with
a grieved look. But he did not tease Molly.
He had promised his Aunt Ruth that he
wouldn't be troublesome.
"Oh! let him go fishing, Molly," said Pau-
line, stepping out of the hammock. "And
let's ask the boys too. They'll take care of
him."
"If they can leave their stilts, Pauline.
They're stalking round the back yard like -
like"-
"Like storks, of course," concluded Pauline,
leaning over the veranda rail to see the lads
better. Come, boys, won't you go fishing ?"




THE MERRY FIVE


"Do you want to, Paul?" asked Kirke
aside; for was not Paul his especial chum?
Paul nodded, and strode to the back porch
in order to dismount on its high platform.
Paul and I'll meet the rest of you at the
wharf, Molly," called Kirke, already upon the
ground. "You'll take the fishing-tackle, won't
you? We'll bring the bait."
The bait was little crawfishes. The boys
had to buy these of an old fisherman on the
flats, who kept a supply of live ones in, a pail
covered with wet seaweed.
"It's fun to see Mr. Tarbox catch the craw-
fish," said Paul, when they were near the
fish-house. "I saw him do it last summer."
-"How does he go to work?"
"Oh! he treads a circle about six feet
across in the mud. Pretty soon the water
soaks into. this ring, and the little crawfish '11
crawl in. All Mr. Tarbox has to do is to
scoop them up."




AT THE BEACH


"That's why he can afford to sell them
cheap," said Kirke.
"But he asks more in the winter," said
Paul.
Kirke' bought two dozen crawfish for a
nickel; and he and Paul carried them back to
the beach, where the girls and Harry were
waiting.
After the hooks had been baited, the three
boys and the three girls walked out upon the
wharf, Molly holding Harry by the hand.
He was a clumsy little fellow, and she was
afraid he might fall over the edge. She had
no such fear for nimble-footed Weezy. Then
they threw in their lines, and waited and
waited, while the sun grew hotter and hotter.
They waited in vain. Nobody had a nibble.
At last Pauline reeled in her line with a
petulant motion.
"Supposing we give up fishing, and go
around Bird Rocks to hunt for abalones."




THE MERRY FIVE


"A good idea," said Paul. "The tide is'
low, and maybe we can find abalones enough
for a soup to-morrow."
"A soup, indeed Will you hear the boy ? "
cried lively Pauline. "Paul thinks only of
soup, and not at all of the beauty of the
shells."
"I'd rather have one large abalone shell
than forty herrings," said Molly, escorting
Harry to the mainland.
"Especially than forty herrings that won't
be caught," added Kirke, dropping his tackle
into the basket. "Perhaps we shall have bet-
ter luck after the tide begins to come in."
"I shouldn't wonder. We'll try again later,"
said Pauline, lingering at the end of the wharf
while Kirke concealed the basket beneath it.
Then the two hastened forward to overtake
Paul and Molly, who had set out for the rocky
cave beyond Bird Rocks. Weezy and Harry
lagged behind the others, Harry's short fat




AT THE BEACH


legs being already weary of ploughing through
the sand.
Weezy was very polite to her little guest,
and very proud to show him the wonders of
Santa Luzia, which she seemed to regard as
the especial property of herself and her
family.
"This is one of our owl shells," said she
presently, bringing Harry a limpet shell
about as large as the palm of her hand.
Harry eyed it sharply.
"Where's the howl.?"
"On the inside. Don't you see, Harry ?"
"That? That isn't a howl. It hasn't any
'ead, Weezy."
"Why, yes, it has, Harry. I think it has
a good head, a very good head indeed."
What did Harry mean by finding fault
with her lovely shell? For a moment Weezy
was too vexed to remember that he was her
company.




THE MERRY FIVE


By this time the others had passed beyond
the ledge which shut off the beach from the
rocky cove, and Harry and Weezy were
alone on the sandy shore. Before them was
the ocean, behind them the high bluff,
climbed by a wooden stairway. Near the
foot of this stairway stood the wharf where
the children had just been fishing.
Weezy looked back at the wharf regret-
fully. She wished that she had stayed there,
instead of walking on the tiresome beach
with a little boy only six years old,- a tiny
boy that didn't like her owl shells!
Why shouldn't she go back now to the
wharf? Nobody had said she mustn't; and
if she should go that minute nobody could
say it, because there was nobody to see
her. She would catch a big herring all her
own self, that she would, and make every-
body stare.
Weezy's eyes sparkled like the waves in





AT THE BEACH


the sunlight, her cheeks glowed like the
beach pea-blossoms at her feet.
"I'm going to fish, Harry. You can come
if you want to," said she, turning briskly on
her heel.
She wore that day a cap and dress of
navy blue trimmed with bands of gilt braid.
Harry was dressed in brown, and as he
bobbed along behind her he resembled a
dorbug chasing a butterfly.
"Here's a hook with a baby crawfish on
it, Harry. You may have that," she said,
with an excited air.
Then, having selected a second baited hook
for herself, she skipped along the wharf,
swinging her line. This was something
worth while, to fish on her own account,
without Molly or Kirke at her elbow to cry
out, -
"Take care, Weezy, don't stick the hook
into you. Take care, Weezy, don't fall over-





THE MERR Y FIVE


board." She hated don'tts" She was vexed
now to hear Harry calling out, yards behind
her, -
"Don't go so fast, Weezy, I'm hawful
scared !"
He had reached a broad crack that
yawned between the planks, and there he
stood trembling till Weezy danced back to
him.
"0 Harry, before I'd be such a baby!
Come along, I'll lead you."
But once having seen the waves tossing
beneath that dreadful crack, Harry could not
be persuaded to cross it; and much against
her will Weezy staid beside him, and fished
near the shore.
"You can hold on to the post, Harry,"
she said generously. "I don't want it, I'm
not afraid."
Harry held on like a barnacle while Weezy
sat on the edge of the wharf, dangling her





AT THE BEACH


feet, and moving her line slowly up and down
in the way she had seen fishermen do.
The beach was unusually deserted that
afternoon, because of a railway excursion
which had attracted many people to the
neighboring city. Weezy, sitting and gazing
down into the restless green water, while
she waited in vain for a nibble, began to
grow sleepy. Suddenly Harry shouted bois-
terously, -
"I've caught a fish, Weezy! Oh, oh! I've
caught a fish !"
Weezy was at once broad awake.
"Have you, Harry? Oh, have you? Let
me pull him in."
She spoke a second too late. Harry had
given the line a quick jerk toward her, and
the next thing she knew a wriggling scul-
pin was flapping its slimy scales right in her
face.
"Ugh Ugh! Take it away, Harry!"





66 THE MERRY FIVE

she cried, dropping her own line, and beat-
ing the fish back with both hands. "Oh,
take the horrid"--
She never finished the sentence. At the
last word she lost her balance, and toppled
headlong into the ocean.




FISHING FOR WEEZY 67






CHAPTER VI

FISHING FOR WEEZY

WEEZY's fall had been to Harry like the
rushing of a meteor across the sky. He had
seen a swiftly moving mass of gilt and blue
dart past him and vanish, and the next thing
he knew he was standing alone upon the
wharf.
For a moment he was too dazed to move;
then he scampered madly to the shore,- trail-
ing the sculpin after him.
"Weezy's tumbled! Weezy's tumbled into
the water," he shrieked, running toward The
Old and New as fast as he could run.
The more direct way was by the one hun-
dred steps which led to the bluff; but Harry
never thought of the steps, he toiled around




THE MERRY FIVE


by the carriage-road. Twice he tripped, and
measured his short length in the sand; but
fortunately his screams went on ahead of him,
and reached Mrs. Rowe up-stairs in her room.
"Are you hurt, Harry? What is it ?" she
cried, hastening to the brow of the hill.
"Come, oh, please come!" sobbed the ter-
rified little fellow. "She's in it. Oh, she's
in it !"
"Who's in it? In what, Harry?"
"Weezy, Weezy's in it--in the ocean! I
didn't push her in !"
"Where, Harry? Show me."
"She tumbled in, she tumbled in her own
self."
Mrs. Rowe had seized the child's hand,
and was dragging him back to the beach.
Behind him still trailed the forgotten scul-
pin, now dead as a door-nail.
"Help! help!" shrieked Mrs. Rowe, as she
pressed on.




FISHING FOR WEEZY


She was trembling all over. She dared not
ask another question. A man hauling sea-
weed from the shore left his horses stand-
ing in the middle of the highway, and turned
back with her.
Ah, the long, long hill Should they never,
never reach the foot of it? Midway Harry
tripped again and fell.
Mrs. Rowe rushed forward alone. She had
caught a glimpse of a small object floating
near the beach. It was Weezy's cap riding
the waves like a little skiff. Yes, certainly
it was Weezy's cap, -the blue cap with gilt
bands ; but, alas! alas! where was the little
girl who so lately had worn it? Where, oh,
where was Weezy herself ?
Not to pain you needlessly, my little read-
ers, I will tell you in confidence that Weezy
was out of the water, safe and well. But
how could poor Mrs. Rowe know this? She
only knew that her darling was not with




THE MERRY FIVE


the four other children now returning from
Rocky Cove, and she called distractedly to
Harry, -
"Show me just where Weezy fell in."
"Hoff there," he pointed at random
along the pier, -"hoff there, by the post."
"Which post, my boy?" cried the ranch-
man. "There are forty or fifty posts."
Harry grew confused; he could not answer.
"I'll row out a piece," said the man,
hurriedly untying a punt moored to the
beach.
"Why didn't I call Edward! Oh, if Ed-
ward were here!" moaned Mrs. Rowe, rush-
ing upon the wharf, and peering over the
side.
"There isn't any kelp to hinder my seeing
to the bottom, ma'am," cried the ranchman
from the boat below.
Mrs. Rowe wrung her hands. "0 Weezy,
Weezy, my dear little- daughter "





FISHING FOR WEEZY


"'If I only knew just where she slipped
in, I'd dive for her," called the pitying'voice
from beneath. "I'd get her for you if I
could, ma'am."
Meanwhile little Miss Weezy, the uncon-
scious cause of all this anguish and commo-
tion, lay half asleep upon the neighboring
bluff behind some tall tufts of alfalfa.
She had scrambled out of the ocean almost
as quickly as she had fallen in. Then she
had started to run home, but, at the top of
the one hundred steps, had become giddy
and sunk down to rest. Oh, she was so
tired, so very, very tired! And it was so
nice and warm on the bluff. To go on to
The Old and New seemed too great an
effort; it was easier to lie still in the sun-
shine. Besides, didn't she want to dry her
wet clothes ? What would mamma say to
her because she had spoiled her pretty
dress? By and by she opened her eyes




THE MERRY FIVE


and blinked at the wharf below. She saw
her mother rushing up and down the planks,
she saw the teamster pushing off from shore.
"Wonder what makes mamma act so
funny? Wonder what that man's doing
with the boat?" she thought drowsily. But
she was too languid really to care; and in
the act of wondering again closed her eyes.
She did not see Kirke race to the pier to
learn what was the matter; she did not hear
her mamma cry,-
"Oh, Kirke, Kirke, your little sister's in
the ocean!"
But when Kirke took in the full meaning
of his mother's words and shouted, half be-
side himself,-
"0 Molly, 0 Paul, Weezy's drowning!
Weezy's drowning in the ocean! then
Weezy sprang to her feet wide awake,-
"0 Kirke Rowe, that's a fib, that's a
dreadful fib !" she cried, whirling about, and




FISHING FOR WEEZY


waving her arms like an excited windmill.
"I'm not drowned one bit! Why, see me,
here I am, right here !"
I wish you could have heard the shout
that answered her from the shore. I wish
you could have seen the sudden rush from the
wharf, and the dash up those wooden steps !
Regardless of salt and sand, Mrs. Rowe
clasped her dripping child to her breast, and
then passed her about like some choice relic
to be kissed and adored.
"You did fall in the ocean though,
Weezy; I saw you!" cried Harry, evidently
bent on clearing himself from any suspicion
of having lied.
Weezy turned to her mother with a most
contrite air, -
"I didn't mean to, mamma, truly I didn't!
That wiggly old fish jumped at me and
knocked me off!"
"Bless my sweet little girlie!" exclaimed




THE MERRY FIVE


Mrs. Rowe, taking the child again in her arms,
"did you think mamma was going to scold
you?"
Weezy looked very happy. In place of the
chiding she had expected for losing her cap
and soiling her gown, she had received hugs
and kisses. The reason for this strange state
of things she did not in the least understand;
but she knew that she liked it. That she
had been in danger of drowning never once
occurred to her.
"Walk as fast as you can, darling" cried
her mamma, leading her on toward the board-
ing-house. "You must have a hot bath and
a good rubbing at once, or you'll take cold."
"My shoes go quish, quish, every step I
take," complained Weezy, pressing forward
with lagging feet.
Wait, we'll carry you, Weezy. Kirke and
I will make a queen's chair and carry you,"
exclaimed Paul.













































"The boys bore the child onward."


Page 75




FISHING FOR WEEZY


"To be sure we will, little water-soaked
girl; why didn't I think of it?" returned
Kirke, wheeling about to clasp hands with
his comrade.
Mrs. Rowe lifted Weezy into the seat thus
formed, and the boys bore the child onward.
The others followed.
"This doesn't look much like Weezy's hair,
does it, Pauline?" said Molly, wringing the
moist locks that straggled down her little
sister's back. "It looks more like seaweed
than hair."
"Or more like wet sewing-silk, Molly. Not
a speck of curl in it."
You must have gone to the very bottom,
Weezy," said Kirke tremulously, as they neared
The Old and New. "How on earth did you
manage to paddle out?"
"Oh, when I came up, you know, I just
climbed into the punt."
"The punt! Why, the punt was ever so




THE MERRY FIVE


far from the shore; Weezy," interrupted Molly.
"I remember 'twas tied by a long rope."
"Yes, pretty long," said Weezy.
"Then how did you get from the boat to
the beach, Weezy, so far off ?" persisted Kirke.
Oh, that was as easy as pie," said Weezy,
highly flattered at finding herself the object
of so much interest. "I just took hold of
the rope, you see."
"Do you mean to say, Weezy, that you
slid from the bow of the boat into the water,
and then worked yourself ashore by that
rope ?"
Yes; why not, Kirke ? The rope was right
there."
"She has no idea she did anything remark-
able," exclaimed Molly in Kirke's ear. "Just
think what might have happened! We ought
to have kept those children in sight every
minute."
Kirke nodded penitently.




FISHING FOR WEEZY


"That's so; but Weezy would have done
well enough if Harry hadn't been there. Why
did we bring him ?" he whispered. Then
aloud, "I can't imagine now how the little
witch got to land. It isn't as if she had
actually learned to swim."
Oh, I pinched the rope, and kind of jiggled
along," explained Weezy coolly; "that wasn't
anything."
"No, of course it wasn't anything," said
Paul and Pauline in chorus, clapping their
hands and laughing.
But the drenched little girl who had per-
formed so grandly on the tight rope was'
growing more exhausted now with every step
she took; and the moment she entered the
house was glad to be undressed, and put to
bed like a baby.
When it was the hour for the train the
other children left her sleeping, and stole off to
the station together to meet "Auntie David."




78 T.HE MERRY FIVE

Harry trudged behind, hugging Weez
damp cap, which had been rescued from the
billows.
"Little John Bull has nothing to say," re-
marked Kirke to Pauline, who walked beside
him. "I think he misses Weezy."
"We all miss her," responded Pauline, with
a glance over her shoulder. "Harry makes
up the number five; but he doesn't take
Weezy's place in the least. Without Weezy
we can't be 'The Merry Five.'"




GOING INTO CAMP


CHAPTER VII

GOING INTO CAMP

THE children met Mrs. Davidson at the
station as they had expected.
She was a cheery little woman, with a
delicate pink skin and soft light brown hair,
so full of waves that Pauline sportively de-
clared that it made her seasick to look at it.
Paul and Pauline were very fond of this
aunt, and found it one of the greatest attrac-
tions of their camp-life that she usually spent
her summers with them.
"And the best of it is, Molly, that Auntie
David loves us just as well as we love her,"
chatted Pauline, the last morning of her stay
at Santa Luzia.
The two girls were pacing arm-in-arm up




THE MERRY FIVE


and down the veranda, waiting for Captain
Bradstreet to drive around with the buck-
board in which he was to take his family
to the canyon.
"I think your Auntie David is perfectly
lovely, Polly."
"Do you, really? Oh, I'm so glad! She
likes you too, Molly. She hopes you'll come
out often to the camp."
"Does she ? The dear, how nice of her !"
Yes ; she says you're a reliable girl,
Molly. She never said as much of her own
niece and, ahem she believes you have
a good influence over me "
Pauline drawled out the last sentence with
a droll pucker of the lips which threw Molly
into spasms of laughter.
"The blessed woman! She didn't say
that, Pauline? You don't mean to tell me
that your Auntie David said that!"
"Yes, those very words, Molly, to papa.


80o





GOING INTO CAMP


And papa, the old darling, whipped out his
pocket-handkerchief, wiped his eyes, and mut-
tered, I've noticed that myself.'"
"Now, Pauline! "
"Oh papa is forever holding you up to
me for an example, Molly. I wonder I don't
hate you."
"The idea of setting me up for an ex-
ample for anybody, Polly,- me, a girl with
a red-haired temper."
"Oh, hush, Molly! Your hair isn't red "
"It used to be when I was a little midget,
-a real cayenne-pepper color, and I had a
peppery temper to match."
"What has become of it, then, Molly ?"
Of my hair, do you mean ? That has
cooled off, but my temper "-
"The stage is ready," shouted Captain Brad-
street, reining his prancing horses around
the corner of The Old and New. "Call
your aunt, Pauline."





THE MERRY FIVE


Weezy, still a trifle pale, ran out upon the
veranda with Harry to witness the departure.
Paul and Kirke raced up from the beach.
Mrs. Davidson came down from her room,
and mounted with Pauline to the back seat
of the buckboard; Paul jumped in at the
front beside his father, quick good-bys were
exchanged, and away dashed the lively horses
on the road to the canyon.
"Thursday, remember we shall expect you
next Thursday, all three of you," cried the
twins, looking backward.
"All three of you, of course," echoed their
father, in tones loud enough to have been
heard at sea. "We want all of you, espe-
cially little Miss Weezy."
Weezy darted into the house, about the
happiest little girl in California, shouting, -
"He did 'vite me, mamma! Captain Brad-
street did 'vite me. He 'vited me officially!
Oh! please may I go?"




GOING INTO CAMP


"We'll see, dear," answered her mother,
with a smile that meant "yes "; "we'll see
how kind and polite you are to Harry for
the rest of his stay."
Mrs. Rowe had suspected all along that the
good captain had intended to include Weezy
in the invitation, but had forgotten to men-
tion the child by name. Grown people are
careless sometimes, and forget that little chil-
dren have been slighted. The children them-
selves do not forget ah, no!
Harry remained at Santa Luzia one week
longer, and the members of the family vied
with one another in making him happy. Mr.
Rowe bought him a new suit, which de-
lighted Molly as much as it did Harry;
Kirke caught horned toads, and dug up trap-
door spiders' nests for the lad's amusement;
while little Miss Weezy loaded him with
shells and sand-dollars till his new pockets
were in danger of bursting. By the end of


83




THE MERRY FIVE


his fortnight at The Old and New they had
all grown fond of the frank little fellow, as
we are apt to grow fond of those whom we
try to make happy. When he was put on
the train in care of the conductor, Weezy
cried, and even Molly looked tearful.
"We shall miss the little scamp, Molly,"
said Kirke, as they walked home from the
station; "but I must confess I'm tired of
playing watch-dog for him."
"Yes, so am I, Kirke," Molly drew a
long breath; "I'm glad we asked him to
come, though. Mamma thinks the visit has
helped him ever so much."
"Does she ? Well, I'm glad. But do
you know, Molly, this morning I was afraid
it would rain, and the kid would have to
stay over? If he had stayed, it would have
bothered us to-morrow about going to the
camp."
Kirke blew off some of his surplus energy




GOING INTO CAMP


in a prolonged whistle, the near prospect of
this much desired outing being very exciting.
But, sad to relate, when the children went
down to breakfast the next morning, yester-
day's light mist was woven into a thick
curtain of fog, which shut out the sun, the
ocean, and even the hedge that bordered the
lawn. Molly opened the front door, and imme-
diately closed it with a shiver.
0 Kirke! out-of-doors it's like a vapor
bath. Do you suppose papa can take us to
the canyon?"
"Papa must take us; papa promised!"
exclaimed Weezy, her eyes watering as if the
fog had condensed in them.
"But you know it never will do for papa
-to get cold, Weezy," returned Molly, herself
ready to cry. "If it isn't pleasant to-day, we
can go when it clears off. Wasn't it nice in
Captain Bradstreet to ask us to stay a long
while ?"




THE MERRY FIVE


"Oh! the fog will lift by and by, Molly.
Here in California mist doesn't mean rain,"
said hopeful Kirke.
For once he was a true prophet. By ten
o'clock the sun had pierced the clouds; and
by eleven the little party set forth in a beach
wagon, attended by Zip, Donald's hairless
Mexican dog. Turning their backs upon the
blue ocean, they drove across the parched
mesa, descended a steep hill, and found them-
selves at the lower end of Sylvan Canyon.
Here the grass was still tender and juicy,
watered by a lazy brook flowing between dwarf
forests of fern. Molly clapped her hands.
"How pretty it is, papa! so green and so
tree-y !"
"The trees are mostly live-oaks and syca-
mores," replied her father, who had driven
over the road the week before with Captain
Bradstreet. "Look out for the branches,
or you'll lose your caps."





GOING INTO CAMP


"I'd like to lose mine," responded Weezy
rather fretfully. "It pinches, and it's all
crumpled up."
Oh never mind, little sister," Molly
brushed some grains of sand from the visor;
"the cap is plenty good enough for the
woods."
Here Zip began to bark and whine around
the wagon; and before anybody could tell
what he wanted he had jumped in, trembling
like a leaf.
"He's afraid of those dogs," said Molly,
the next moment, as a pack of hounds came
running toward them, followed by a man in
a rough hunting-suit.
"No wonder he's afraid," exclaimed Kirke,
rapidly counting. One, two, three, eight
big creatures! And the smallest of them
could eat Zip at a mouthful."
"Their master is Kit Carson's son," ob-
served Mr. Rowe, when they had passed the





88 THE MERRY FIVE

strange procession. "He lives in that hut
behind the willows."
"Does Cat Carson live with him, papa?"
asked Weezy.
No, little daughter; Kit Carson died years
ago, but he was a famous scout in his day."
"What is a court, papa?"
"A scout, Weezy, is a. man sent before an
army to spy out danger."
Oh is that all ? yawned Weezy, tired of
the subject.
"Kit Carson led General Fr6mont through
to the Pacific Ocean, didn't he, papa?" asked
Kirke.
"Yes, my son, when the country was an
unexplored wilderness."
While they talked, the road had been run-
ning about among the trees in an inquisitive
way, as if it were hunting for birds' nests;
and now it crossed a small clearing where
there was a brown cottage.




GOING INTO CAMP


" This is Mr. Arnesten's ranch," said Mr.
Rowe, drawing the reins.
"I see the camp, I see it!" cried Kirke,
standing up in the wagon. "There are three
-yes, four--tents, and a shed besides."
"Hop Kee sleeps in the shed," said Mr.
Rowe. "Ah, here comes Mr. Arnesten from
the spring. Good-morning, Mr. Arnesten.
Can you bring back my horses from the
camp and feed them ?"
The Swede nodded respectfully, and having
set down his two pails of water, plodded
along in his clumsy shoes behind the party.
"Look, Weezy, they've carried the table
out-of-doors under the live-oaks," exclainied
Molly, holding Zip by the collar. "We shall
have a regular gypsy dinner."
"I hope dinner is ready," said Weezy, in
a flutter of expectancy. "I'm 'most starved."
Molly was gazing about her with an air of
keen disappointment.




THE MERRY FIVE


"Where can Paul and Pauline be, Kirke?
I thought they'd be looking out for us."
"And aren't we looking? and haven't we
been looking for an hour?" cried two gay
voices on the right, as the' twins sprang
from behind the tall sycamore that had con-
cealed them.
Then they started three cheers for "The
Merry Five," in which their young visitors
most lustily joined.
"Ship ahoy Cast your anchor !" called
genial Captain Bradstreet, drawn from his
tent by the joyful tumult.
Auntie David hurried after to shake hands
with the newcomers, and bid them welcome
to the camp. All were talking and laughing
together, and making so pleasant a din that
the sleepy old owl at the top of the syca-
more actually winked at them, and cocked
his head on one side to listen.




































/ //" lI ,



"The twins sprang from behind the tall sycamore."
Page 90




THE LITTLE MINERS


CHAPTER VIII

THE LITTLE MINERS

PAULINE raised the green mosquito-netting
that screened the door of the largest tent,
and courtesied demurely to her visitors.
"'Will you walk into my parlor?'"
"Thank you, Mrs. Fly," said Molly, "'Tis
the prettiest little parlor that ever I did
spy.'
The canvas room was indeed very attrac-
tive, as well as comfortable. It had a board
floor carpeted with rugs, and it boasted a
lounge and a table and several rocking-
chairs.
"You and, Weezy are going to sleep with
Auntie David and me in the little room
behind those, Molly," said Pauline hospi-




THE MERRY FIVE


tably, pointing to a pair of gaudy blankets
curtaining off the farther end of the tent.
"Papa bought those blankets of the Navajo
Indians. Aren't they gay?"
"Who, Pauline? The Indians?" asked
Kirke slyly.
"I don't think Indians are gay. I think
they are sober as a-as a cow!" said out-
spoken Weezy, who had not understood
Kirke's joke in the least.
"Pauline was talking about the blankets,
Ducksie," said Molly, smoothing her little
sister's hair. "But what makes you think
that Indians are sober? You've never known
any Indians."
"Oh, Molly Rowe, that isn't a so story.
I've seen half a hundred Indians, well, six,
anyway."
"Where, Weezy?"
"Oh, in the streets and 'round; and in the
curious store." (Weezy meant curio store.)




THE LITTLE MINERS


"Don't you remember that curious store
where mamma bought the funny jugs ?"
"Oh, yes, I do remember now. There
were some Indians there with baskets to
sell; and the storekeeper wouldn't buy them.
Perhaps that made the Indians sober."
"Maybe they were sober because they
weren't drunk," suggested Paul. "Hark! Hop
Kee is blowing the conch-shell. Dinner is
ready."
The dinner was a charming woodland meal,
served in the open air, on a long table
decked with ferns and fragrant bay-leaves.
Captain Bradstreet sat on a bench on one
side of the table between Molly and Pauline,
and Weezy sat on the other side between
Paul and Kirke. Mr. Rowe and Mrs. David-
son occupied chairs at opposite ends of the
table.
Brother insists on giving me a seat with
a back, Mr. Rowe," remarked Mrs. Davidson




THE MERRY FIVE


with a smile as sunny as the California
weather. "He pets me, but I have known
how to 'rough it' as well as anybody."
"I suppose it was a wild country when
you settled on this coast, Mrs. Davidson."
"Indeed it was, Mr. Rowe,"-Mrs. David-
son laughed softly, "you can't conceive
what a contrast it seemed to Philadelphia, our
native city."
"Father moved out here not long after
gold was first discovered in the State," said
Captain Bradstreet, as Hop Kee carried around
the plates of soup. My sister was a little girl
in pinafores, and I was only two years older."
"Our father was a doctor," continued Mrs.
Davidson, passing the crackers; "his health
had failed, and .he came out here to Tuo-
lumne county, and built an adobe house for
us to live in. Do you recollect those heavy
shutters, Alec, that papa used to bar every
night ?"




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