• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Low water
 A lonely boy
 A lonely boy
 Tim
 The whale
 Quiet play
 The parrot and the crows
 Work first
 Forfeits
 The caravan
 Tot's roses
 The donkey
 Whose fault?
 The swing
 Dora and kitty
 Hush-a-bye
 Busy pussies
 The self-willed sheep
 Just the game
 Our friends
 The goldfish
 A lost child
 The roe and the hind
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Smiles and no frowns
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084098/00001
 Material Information
Title: Smiles and no frowns
Physical Description: 48 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stoneman, George ( Publisher )
Fitchew, Edward H ( Illustrator )
Weeks, Charlotte J ( Illustrator )
Wain, Louis, 1860-1939 ( Illustrator )
Publisher: George Stoneman
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1895?
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Advertisements -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Netherlands
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: "Printed in Holland." -- cover.
General Note: Contains verse and prose.
General Note: Advertisements for various patient medicines precede and follow text, on endpapers and back cover.
General Note: Some illustrations by E. H. Fitchew, Charlotte J. Weeks and L. Wain.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084098
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224891
notis - ALG5163
oclc - 231833460

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Low water
        Page 5
    A lonely boy
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A lonely boy
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Tim
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The whale
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Quiet play
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The parrot and the crows
        Page 17
    Work first
        Page 18
    Forfeits
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The caravan
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Tot's roses
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The donkey
        Page 26
    Whose fault?
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The swing
        Page 29
    Dora and kitty
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Hush-a-bye
        Page 33
    Busy pussies
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The self-willed sheep
        Page 37
    Just the game
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Our friends
        Page 41
    The goldfish
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    A lost child
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The roe and the hind
        Page 48
    Advertising
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text







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SMILES
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FROWNS.


LONDON: GEORGE STONEMAN,


21, WARWICK LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW.


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A PLUCKY BROTHER.


"The boy aimed blow after blow."


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LOW WATER.

^OW N(ATEF.

FISHER-BOYS see, one, two, three!
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A LONELY BOY.


A OELY POY.
REMEMBER, you are a young gentle-
man, Master Alan! You must not
play with dirty children. Only look
at your nice tunic! I am ashamed
-= of you!" And Nurse drew Alan
within the gates of his father's park, with a
slight shake.
But it is so dull, Nurse," said Alan, look-
ing back longingly at the merry group of
village children with whom he had been play-
ing in the road, just outside the gates. "It is
so dull. I am so tired of being alone. I
do want somebody to play with."
"You are a naughty, ungrateful, discon-
tented child." said Nurse reproachfully. I
am sure you have all and everything that
heart can wish." And, taking Alan back to
the house, she gave him a thorough wash,
put him on a clean suit, and made him what
she called "fit to be seen" again. It was a
long time since Nurse had been a little girl,
and she seemed to forget how dull it is to
have no one to share your toys with you, and









A LONELY BOY.


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A LONELY BOY.


to have nothing to do when your short lessons
are over but to keep yourself tidy. Alan's
mamma felt for him, and played with him
herself as much as she could. But mamma
was not strong, and the plays in which she
could join were very quiet ones, hardly the
kind for which Alan wished. There was one
quiet play of which Alan seldom tired. Sitting
in the park with his wooden horse for com-
pany, he would amuse himself for hours,
drawing pictures of cows, sheep, and every-
thing he saw.
What are you drawing now, Master Alan?"
Nurse asked him one day. Alan had been in
the park a long time. Nurse had sent him
out early.
"Fairies," said Alan, holding up his sketch-
book. "Look, Nurse! These are fairies curl-
ing and brushing the wool of the little lambs,
to make it white and soft."
Nurse stooped and kissed him. She doesn't
often do that.
"Come with me," she said, "I will show
you something prettier than any little lamb,
or fairy, of the lot! And she is your very own,
too-bless her."




THE KINGFISHER.


A tiny bundle of soft muslin and lace. A
tiny pinky baby in it
Alan's very own little sister. Nurse laid the
bundle carefully in his arms, and let him hold
it all himself.
Oh, Nurse!" cried Alan, "isn't she lovely!
I shall always have somebody to play with
now!"
And, if you were to see the loving way in
which Alan's little sister follows him, as far as
she can; here, there and everywhere, now that
she has grown from a tiny baby into a tiny
trot, you would not call Alan a lonely little
boy any longer.

THEW JIjQFIPHER.
THE kingfisher is an
,e English bird. He is
covered with vivid, flash-
ing blue, and green, and
P- orange, and white. In
splendour, he far excels
... all other English birds.
He chooses to live
NGFoIHER DIVING. near a stream because




THE KINGFISHER.


fishes, on which
he lives, and
insects, after
which he loves
to glance about,
are found there.
He likes bushes is
all along the
banks; for when KINGFISHERS FEEDING.
he fishes he has to sit on some twig overhang-
ing the stream till a fish appears below.
His nest is made in a hole on the stream-
bank. Sometimes he d.igs the hole for
himself, but more frequently he takes one
which has been made by a water-rat.
He lives in a hole that is quite to his mind,
With the green mossy hazel roots firmly
entwined;
Where the dark alder bough waves grace-
fully o'er,
And the. sword-flag and arrow-head grow at
his door.
Then the brown water rat from his burrow
looks out,
To see what his neighbour kingfisher's about;





TIM.


And the green dragon-fly, flitting slowly away,
Just pauses one moment to bid him good-day.

TIM.
"Yo T wait here and take care of
the basket," said Cousin James
to little Tim. James was a
thoughtless young man. He
had brought Tim in his cart
from the quiet village at one end of Cliffe Bay
to the big town at the other. He meant to give
Tim a treat, and never thought that the little
boy might be afraid to be left by himself in a
crowded market. Tim was afraid, though he
tried to be brave. At last he began to cry.
"Came with James Styles ? Did you ?" said
a kind woman who saw his tears. He must
have forgot all about you. He Idrove away
along home more than half-an-hour ago. Don't
you cry no more! Here's a nice bun to put in
your basket, and my man will soon row you
home across the bay."
How nice it was in the boat. Tim felt quite
happy.
"See what a nice buni I've brought you,
mother," he cried, when he ran home, "I've
been to market! Don't you think I am a man I"







TIM.










S-

-. _
.... ...
._ ^ ~ _.






IdHK


" HOW NICE IT WAS IN THE BOAT."




THE WHALE.


THE HALE.
IN the picture is a whale which is out of the
sea. Those figures by the side of the whale
are men on the dry shore. You may imagine,
therefore, the size of the whale by comparing it
with them. It is about sixty or seventy feet in


length.
The whale lives


in the cold


and dangerous


.1-''~


seas near the Pole. It is of great value. Men
go to these cold and dangerous seas to capture
it. A whale-fisher must be a brave, daring, and
thoughtful man. Through want of courage
and sound judgment, many whale-fishers have
lost their lives.
The whale has lungs and requires air, as you




THE WHALE.


and I do. He can remain under water a long
time, but must come now and then to the
surface to breathe and inflate his lungs afresh.
Then, as Job says. out of his nostrils goeth
smoke as out of a seething pot or caldron," for
he shoots up great fountains of water.
It is when he is up at the surface for breath-
ing that fishers catch the whale. The boat
waits till his great round back comes up above
the water. Then they row the boat to him,
and plunge into his side a harpoon. The
harpooner can throw this instrument with great
force, and seldom misses his mark.
The harpoon is arrow-shaped. It is made
of iron. At one end is the sharp point, and at
the other is a ring to which is fastened one end
of a rope, the other being fastened to the boat.
Once there was a whale which had been
harpooned, and was therefore fixed by a rope
to the fishermen's boat. With -the rope
fastened to it, it dashed off towards a part of the
sea that was covered over with very thick ice,
plunged under the ice, and dragged after it the
boat and all the poor men in it. The boat
and men were never seen again. Such is
the strength of the whale.




QUIET PLA Y.


QUIET PLAY.
MOTHER, asked Eva, "may
my dolls have a tea-party ?"
"Yes," said mother, know-
ing very well that this
meant Eva would like some
real tea to pour into her tiny
;i.. tea-set. Mother gave her the
tea, and a nice little cake.
Grannie was not well, and
mother bade Eva play very quietly so as not
to disturb her. "I am going out, Eva, to get
some medicine for dear Grannie, she said, "I
trust you to be a good girl and make no noise
while I am gone. Nurse must stay with
Grannie,, so you will be quite by yourself. "
We won't make a bit of noise,". said Eva to
her dolls, when she was, left alone in the.
nursery. "I'll put on your bonnet, Dora, and.
your hat, Mary. You must play you are
visitors come to tea with me. You need not
wear yours, Lucy. You shall be my little girl
at home. Oh, we will go into the drawing-
room, and I'll be mother! Then it will be just
like a real party."
"Where is Eva ?" asked mother, when she
,came home. But no one had seen her. "I have.







QUIET PLA Y.



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EVA S AFTERNOON TEA


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THE PARROT AND THE CROWS. 1
not heard a sound, ma'am," said Nurse, "Miss
Eva has been as quiet as a mouse."
Mother found Eva at last, in front of the
drawing-room fire, with Dora in her chair, and
Mary and Lucy leaning against the fender.
I'm you, mother!" cried Eva. "And I
haven't 'sturbed Grannie a bit! Perhaps this
was why Eva was taken back to the nursery
with a kiss, for though she had made no noise,
she certainly had made a mess with her
drawing-room party.


THE PARPOT AND THE 9ROWS.
A PARROT, red and blue and green,
Was at a farm-house often seen;
He flew about from tree to tree,
As blithe and happy as could be.
One day the crows pulled up the wheat,
And Poll, too, helped to pull and eat;
He chattered to the farmer's foes,
And did more damage than the crows.
The farmer brought his gun and shot-
Alas for Poll's unhappy lot!
No more on high the parrot rose,
But wounded lay among the crows.
"Bad Company," the farmer said





WORK FIRST.
As Poll was carried off to bed;
"Had you.not with the crows been found;
You still had been all safe and sound."
The farmer's children went to see
How Poll had happened hurt to be;
"Bad Company," the parrot said,
And sadly shook his wounded head.
Poll soon grew well and hopped about;.
But often when the children shout,
He'll perch upon the nearest tree,
And sadly say, Bad Company."
-4---


WORK


F FIRST


You mustn't interrupt me, Puss I
You don't know what I'm at;
Of course you cannot understand,
You darling little
cat!
"I'll play with you .
when work is done,
Dear Kit, keep still
till then;
Just purr and watch,
and patient sit,
Don't pounce upon
my pen."





FORFEITS.


rORFEITP.
"WHAT shall we play now ?"
S asked Lucy, after the trots had
/ / played at Blind Man's Buff,
Ring a ring of Roses, Oranges
and Lemons, Kiss in the Ring,
and Here we go round- the
Mulberry-Bush.
"Clara must choose," said
Kitty, because it is her birthday. What,
shall it be, Clara ?"
"Forfeits," said Clara, "`would you like
that ?"
Some of the trots, who had played before,
thought they would. Others, who had not, did
not know much about it. Baby said "Goo-goo!"
which might mean anything you like. Baby
was the tiniest trot at Clara's party, and ready
for anything in the way of fun that might
come along.
"I'll show you," said Clara. Mother's fan,
and this pretty cracker shall be the forfeits.
Which shall be yours, Nellie Pretend you
know."
"The cracker," said Nellie. Nellie loves to
pull crackers and hear the bang.





FORFEITS.


She likes the nice sweeties inside as well.
Kneel on the hassock, and shut your eyes,"
said Clara. "Now here's a pretty thing, and a
very pretty thing, and what shall be done to
the owner of this pretty thing ? The trots stood
and stared.


SGoo-goo I" said Baby, and held up his face
to be kissed,
"She shall kneel to the prettiest, bow to the
wittiest, and kiss the one she loves best," said
Lucy. "That is what you. have to do, Nellie."





FORFEITS. 21
"Mother is the prettiest, only she isn't here,
and I don't know what wittiest means, but
everybody loves dear Baby best of all," said
Nellie, as she kissed him.
And though Clara laughed, and said Nellie
had not done her forfeit properly- at all, she
helped her pull the cracker, with a splendid
bang, and told her she had earned the sweetie.
Now me! It's my turn now! cried Lucy.














THE 1RAVAN.
HERE in England, when we want to travel we
simply pack up our boxes and drive with
them to the railway station, and in a few





22 THE CARA VAN.
hours we are carried quite to the end of our
journey, but in eastern countries, where there
are no railways and few roads, and where
bands of robbers are always on the look-out
for plunder, and where wild beasts prowl
around, travelling is full of dangers and hard-
ships, and journeys take up weeks and some-
times months.
When Eastern people want to travel, they
sometimes have to wait many days for a pass-
ing caravan, which they ask permission to
join. A caravan is a large travelling party, as
shown in the picture.





TOT'S ROSES.


TOT'jP kO3EpS.
TOT has a rose-tree. Her very own.
2 Nobody may pick my roses,
because they all are to stay for
mother's birthday," she said.
Mother loves rose-buds, but Tot
likes large roses best. "What
makes the rose-buds open ?" she
S asked father the day before the
birthday.
"Sunshine and rain," he said; "but never
mind if your buds are not all open, Tot. Mother
will like them just as well."
Sunshine and rain," thought Tot. My tree
has had sunshine all day. I 'spect it wants
some rain."
Tot brought a watering-pot. It was very
heavy, but she managed to carry it. "Oh,
dear! cried Tot, my roses are so high! I can't
nearly reach them."
Another trot to the house, and Tot came
back with an old chair. Up she climbed and
held the pot over her tree. It was so heavy
Father was digging not far off.
"Take care, Tot!" he cried, and ran to her.
Too late! The chair tilted and over went Tot,







-4 TOT'S ROSES.


~If


S-


UP SHE CLIMBED AND HELD THE POT OVER HER TREE.


S'" '" ,I ,

l1',.i .' .


,"'I ii





TOT'S ROSES.


crash upon her rose-tree, watering-pot and all.
Poor Tot! She had thorns in her face and
hands, and the best bough of her tree was
broken right off. Father took out the thorns,.
and held Tot close in his arms till she felt
better. Then he picked up the broken bough.
"We will gather the flowers, and put them
in water to keep fresh for mother," he said,
" and next time you water your tree, Tot,
water the root like I do. Don't sprinkle the
blooms to make them come out quick. Why,
Tot, when we give you nice bread and milk, to
make you grow a big girl, you take it in your
mouth-we don't put it on the top of your
head."
And in spite of her trouble, Tot began to
laugh.





THE DONKEY,


THE DONKEY.
IN England, even boys think it clever to do
cruel things to a donkey, and too often the
donkey's master does more cruel things still.
His master gives him hard work, little to
eat, and many blows; and when the poor beast
has been dragging his cart about all day, and
goes home hungry, and tired, he gives him no
corn for his supper.
There are some countries where the people
treat donkeys much better than we do in
England. In those countries the poor donkeys
grow bigger and stronger than they do here,
and are even more useful than horses because
they can bear great hardships.







.*"^' ^..-^ ~




BRIGHT EYES," OUR FAVOURITE ANNUAL. Have you read "BRIGHT EYEs"? It is one'
,of the most attractive books ever published-absolutely full &f most charming pictures, and,
the stories are simply delightful. "BRIGaH EYES" in daintily coloured boards at 3s. is sold:
iby all booksellers. It is issued every October .





WHOSE FAULT?


CA


\cl~c~ -Vs
^*^-* *^^gr^ ***- ^C
Jw^^ \


' FINE FUN BRUCE HAD BEEN HAVING."





WHOSE FAULT?

VWHOE FAULT?
"OH! oh! oh !" cried Belle. "See
what Bruce has done! Only
look at my dear Lilla! I shall go
and get father's stick, to beat
you, Bruce."
S Fine fun Bruce had been
having, when he found Belle's
-. doll, Lilla; lying on the stones
--- .. in the yard.
Belle 'felt better when she had had a good
cry, and told dear mother all her trouble.
Yes, you may take it," said mother. "But
be quite-sure whose is the fault of poor Lilla's.
sad state, before you use the stick. "
"Bruce," said Belle, ".I was going to whip
you, but now I am not. You are only a big
puppy, and did not know any better when
you spoilt my dear Lilla. It was my fault. I
ought not to have left her on the ground in
your way. "
Bruce wagged his tail.
F' orgive me, dear Belle. Let us be friends.
again," he seemed to say.
Belle put away the stick and gave Bruce a hug.
We love each other, Bruce I forgive you."'





THE SWING.


jHE WIJ Q.
FOR a summer holiday
Who.would wish a better thing,
Better play for sultry hours
Than a leafy, sheltered swing ?
_'




". '.'
,>1









Happy hours the children pass,
Pussy is more hard to please,
Swinging's not so bad, she thinks,
But poor fun to climbing trees,
Darting where the leafy boughs
Rustle in the summer breeze!




DORA AND KITTY.


ORA AND jITTY,

BE still, Pussy Oh, how-
naughty you are You have
torn the nice lace!"
"Me-ew !" said poor puss. She
did not like being dressed in the.
doll's long clothes at all. She stretched out
the sharp little claws that had already made:
a sad hole in the pretty lace cuff
"Be quiet, Kitty "' said Dora, giving her
a shake. "Now I am going to put on your-
sash."
Dora tied it tightly, making poor puss still
more uncomfortable. Puss tried to get away.
"Oh, you mustn't slip down on the floor I
You'll make the dress all dirty! Now the
hood. Dear little Baby! Baby!"
The strings were short, and the hood was
too small for Pussy's head. But, forcing it on,
Dora tied it tightly under the kitten's chin.
This was too much. With a frantic Mi-auow!"
a wild wriggle of the hind legs that tore a
large place in the skirt of the frock, and a
stroke from the fore-paws that left long red
scratches on Dora's arm, Puss broke away.
Nurse nurse 1" screamed Dora, "see what







DORA AND KITTY. 3'































o!\







15.


"qw


THE DEAREST FRIENDS.




DORA AND KITTY.


that naughty kitten has done. Nurse!
Nurse!"
Nurse was not far off. She soon came. But
instead of pitying Dora, she said, Look at the
poor kitten! See what the naughty girl has
done. How you do tease and torture that poor
puss, Miss Dora! I wonder she puts up with
you as she does."
Nurse picked up the kitten, undressed it, and
Dora ran crying to Grannie. Grannie did pity
the poor arm. She put some nice cold
cream to make it well, and kissed Dora ever
so many times.
"I don't love Kitty any more!" sobbed
Dora. I won't play with her again "
Grannie gave Dora another kiss. "Kitty
doesn't like to play dolls," she said. What
does Kitty like ?"
"Kitty likes to run after a ball, and things
tied to a string," said Dora.
"Well," said Grannie, "suppose you were
to play at what she likes. Puss is only a cat,
you know, and cannot understand what .you
want her to do. But you are a little girl,
with a head that can think, and a 1leart that
~can love and be kind."
Grannie tied a nice cork to a long piece of





HUSH-A-BYE.
string. And if you were to see the fun Dora
and Kitty have with it, you would say they
were the dearest, merriest, friends in the whole
wide world!


N


M P, 4
.... .'.


J1 UH-A-PYE

HUSH-A-BYE, Baby!
On the. tree-top,
When the wind blows
The cradle will rock !-
Runs the old rhyme, but here you may see
A bonnie shawl hammock for baby and me I





BUSY PUSSIES.


PELiE."


"Is she not a
craft,
Sailing on th
sea ?
See her hull,
mast!
'Belle' we
after me."


splendid- -

e true salt

her tiny

call her
-----4----


EVERY place was full except
SMiss Minette's, and Mr. Tom
Pussy-cat, the teacher, was
surprised. Minette was the
very last he would have ex-
.l ," pected to play truant... Tib is
an idle cat, but even Tib was
busy, and sat, holding the book close to his
little black nose, studying How to catch mice
and eat them properly," as quiet and indus-
trious a kitten as you could wish to find. Not
that Tib cares very much about the first part
of the lesson. Anyone may catch the mice


" HE


PUPY


TIUPPIF-P








BUSY PUSSIES.


"PLEASE, SIR, I'VE CAUGHT THEM ALL."


V,7- -;-,i~;





BUSY PUSSIES.


while Tib sleeps in the sunshine, or runs after
his tail. Tib will eat them fast enough. School
was nearly over, when Mr. Tom saw Minette
come in. "Minette," he began sternly. Mew!"
said Minette. "Please, sir, I found a mouse-hole,
and please, sir, I watched till the mice came
out; and please, sir, I've caught them all, and
brought them for you."
Oh, what excitement! over went Snowball's
inkstand. Down went Tabby's book. Greedy
Tittums even slipped from his seat and came
slyly creeping under the desk, in hopes that
one at least of the mice might come to his
share. Mr. Tom's face cleared.
Ahem! he said, "I think I will forgive you
for playing truant, Minette, as -you have not
been wasting your time in idle play. And-
yes-I will give you all a holiday this after-
noon. Try, my dears, to be as clever and
generous as Minette."
"All very fine !" dried Tib, as he chased some
dry leaves, when school was over, I'm not
going to bother myself catching mice for old
Tom! Why didn't he hand some of those over
to us ? He might have given us a lesson how to
eat them properly." "Oh, Tib cried Minette.
But Tib only laughed and ran away.





THE SELF-WILLED SHEEP.

THE ELF-WILLED jHEEP.


THERE was
under the (
One foolish
that it was a


Once a flock of s
:are of one of the t
little sheep got
very hard thing


heep which was
)est of shepherds.
it into its head
to be following


L \V


all day at the shepherd's heels, whilst there
was such a wide and beautiful world to see and
to enjoy. So one day it slipped away from the
flock. The good shepherd soon missed the
sheep, and at once he left the rest of his flock
and set off to find it. He called again andi
again as he hunted about everywhere for the
missing sheep. At length he heard something





7UST THE GAME.


like a bleat;' it was very faint. He followed
the direction of the sound and called again,
and there was another feeble bleat. There,
fast in a thicket, stood the foolish sheep,
panting and exhausted, his dry tongue hanging
far out of his parched and open mouth, and
quivering in every limb.
"Dear, foolish sheep!" said the pitying
shepherd, and, weary though he was, he carried
it back to its home.

JUPT THE -qAME!


rope with a
" What do
anything like
No more


IT is the most splendid game
you ever saw -in your life,
S mother," cried Hoppy.
"It is a game that must
have been made on purpose
for us !" cried Jumpy.
But what is it ? "-asked
Mrs. Kangaroo, looking at a
wooden handle at each end.
you do with it ? I never saw
it before."
did we!" said HoDpp, but this


morning we crept along to the place where all




JUST THE GAME. 39
much of them. I believe they were afraid of
us at first."
"Not a bit! Don't you believe it," said Mrs.
Kangaroo. "Now look here. Show us what
that wonderful new game is."

..- .-.~ "' /-,' i.- ..........


Just the very game for kangaroos, they all
agreed, when it was learned. Even baby
wanted to leave the safe shelter of mother's
pouch and share the fuin If the farmer's
children could have seen how many times Hoppy
and Jumpy 'kept up' they would have been
astonished. Don't you think so ?




JUST THE GAME.


those trees have been cut down, and the bush
cleared. You know where I mean, mother ? "
Mrs. Kangaroo sighed. "Only too well!
Your father says we must move. He is afraid
people are coming to settle here, and they are
too dangerous neighbours for us. "
"Well, mother," Hoppy went on, "there
were two of the queerest little creatures with no
nice fur and no tails, jumping over this, while
two big creatures, very much like them, turned
it round and round under their feet. Oh, it
was splendid! Jumpy and I went up close to
look, but as soon as they saw us they ran away.
We picked it up, but in a minute they came
back. The biggest one had a stick that he
pointed at us. Such a strange stick. Fire
came out of it; and we ran home as fast as we
could."
"Oh my children!" cried Mrs. Kangaroo,
" That was a gun. What an escape you have
had! Your father is quite right. We must
move away from here this very night. "
So those funny creatures were people," said
Hoppy, when he found himse f in the new
home father had chosen at some distance from
the farm in the bush. "Well, I don't think





OUR FRIENDS.


QUR FlIENDS.

THE farmer was angry because the crows&
came into his cornfields and ate some of


CROWS IN THE FIELD.


the corn, so he told his men to shoot them
all dead.




THE GOLDFISH.


Next year the farmer's crops were eaten up
by caterpillars and slugs. Oh, how sorry he
now was that the crows were all dead.
The farmer had forgotten that all through
the winter crows eat up his enemies the
insects, and so prevent them from multiplying.



THE GOLDFISHH.
LYDDIE loved the goldfish, and
--.i longed to take the pretty things
out of the big glass globe to
play with them. A thing that
Aunt Lydia would not allow
on any account. Lyddie has
often begged, coaxed, and pouted in. vain.
"lNo! no, Lyddie pet!" auntie has said.
"You mu st not touch my pretty fish. If I
were to take them out of the water, and give
them to you, they would die."
Auntie dressed Lyddie in her best frock one
day. "It is not time to put on your hat yet,".
she said. "But I am going to take you to the
Crystal Palace. You will see a beautiful glass
fountain, and ever so many gold fish there."






THE GOLDFISH[ 43


A STURDY PULL.




THE GOLDFISH.


Auntie went to look out a train, and Lyddie
was left alone. She went to the goldfish.
" Wouldn't you like to go to the Crystal Palace
and swim in the glass fountain?" she asked.
"I will take you in my pocket. Aunt Lydia
would not say you would die in the fountain."
Lyddie climbed on a hassock to reach the top
of the globe. A sturdy pull.
Oh! oh! It has rolle dover ,wetting her from
head to foot, and smashing itself upon the
carpet. What a sight for Aunt Lydia to see
when she came back!
Lyddie was put to bed.
"It deserved me right not to go to the Crystal
Palace," she sobbed to nurse. It deserved me
quite right, for Auntie always says. don't
touch the fishes. Only I didn't mean to be a
naughty girl. I meant to give the fish a treat."
Auntie has quite forgiven Lyddie, but the
little girl is still sorry and ashamed when she
looks at the empty table in the window, where
the pretty fish-globe used to stand.







A LCST CHILD.


P L~. z,


SOMEBODY FOUND HIM THERE.


I 'i:;


i~:/ -~
:~~.-~
~.u





A LOST CHILD.


A. FOsT -CHILD,
I DiI OWN- the street, and into a shop
went Trot, holding a penny
tightly in his hand. He
'pointed to a large sugar-frosted
i/ cake. "Wants that for Muvver,
Pleasee" he said, laying his
S penny on the counter. The
shopwoman laughed.
'" That isn't enough to buy
such a cake," she said. Here
child, you can have one of these buns if you
like."
For Muvver," said Trot gravely, rolling it
carefully in his pinafore.
Some rough boys stood at a corner. Hullo,
young un!" cried one of them. "What's in your
pinny ? Let's look!" In a moment the
pinafore was unrolled, the bun snatched out,
and away ran the boys. Poor Trot! His bun
was gone, and what was worse, he had lost his
way as well. Crying bitterly, his little feet
wandered till he could go no further, and
sitting down under a railway arch he sobbed
himself to sleep. Somebody, who had little





A LOST CHILD.


ones of his own at home, found him there,
and gently lifted him from the hard cold
ground.
Mother had been frantic when she missed
her Trot. She had searched the streets in
vain, and was just going to the station to ask
if the police had found a lost child when what
should she see, in a gentleman's arms, but Trot
himself.
Trot with a big bun in each hand, and look-
ing as gay and happy as if there were no rough
bad boys in the world, and you couldn't get lost
even if you tried.
-How Trot's mother thanked the kind
gentleman she never knew. But he seemed to
understand it all just as well as if she had been
able to say what she would have wished, instead
of only
S "Thank you, sir! Thank you for all your
goodness to the child My little Trot 1 My
little Trot" *





THE ROE AND THE HIND.


THE O AND THE -IfND.

LOOK at that love-
ly creature with
horns. What is it I .
called ? It is a roe;
a kind of deer.
Look there are
two more, but they
have no horns.
WVhat a're they
,called ?.
They are hinds. The roe is the father deer,
the hind is the mother deer, and the little
hind is the baby deer.
Where the deer
_-__ lives lions and
tigers live; but the
deer can. run so
fast that he is not
often caught and
eaten by those
terrible lions and
tigers.









MELLIN'S FOOD
SFor INFANTS
and INVALIDS.
4C, Lorsc RoI L
AR SIr LANE, SIRATORD, E.
February 1.
SI DEa& SrR,-1 enclose you a photo of our
baby girl, Dorothy Gentle she haring been fed
on your Food for the last twelve months.
Be; g obliged to reeort to the feeding-bottle, I
was recommended your food by a friend of
mind. The photo was taken when she was six
Months old, and I think you will see by the
Condition of the chdd it will speak well for its
excellence. I have always persuaded my
friends to use it, as I am sure it cannot be too
highly recommended for infants.
S" Yours faithfully,
'AUGUSTUS GENTLE."

:: MELLIN'S
FOOD BISCUITS.
(Manufanctured bv' Carr & Co., Carlish, specially
t.r G AIELLIN)
For Children after Weaning. the Aged, Dyspeptic,
and for all who require a simple, nutritious and
sustaining Food.
DIGESTIVE, NOORISHINO, SUSTAINING.
-- Pnice 2s. and 3s. 6d. per Tin.


MELLIN'S EMULSION
COD LIVER OIL
CURES COUGHS, COLDS, BRONCHITIS, -ETC.
FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS.
Price 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. per Bottle. Sample Size, Is.
OF ALL CHEMISTS ANIJD STORES.
AN ILLUSTRATED PAMPHLET ON THE FEEDING AND REARING OF INFANTS.
A PRanirca.L AND SIMPLE TRrarisz FRo MorTERs.
Containing a large number of Portraits of Healthy antd Beautiful Children, together with Facsimiles of
Original Testimonials which are of the greatest interest to all mothers, to be had with samples, free by post,
on application to
MELLIN'S -FOOD WORKS, Stafford St., PECKHAM, 8.E.






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