• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 The lobster
 Dot's help
 "All alone"
 A jolly tar
 Drill
 Playmates
 Bad news
 A funny little customer
 A mammy-boy
 Snap-dragon
 Queen of the day
 Marie's newspaper
 Under control
 May Day
 Our new playroom
 Pick-a-back
 An awkward customer
 "A soldier laddie"
 Katie's doll
 Blindman's buff
 The wounded bird
 Duty first, pleasure afterward...
 Not a coward
 Next door
 Dobbin and Johnny
 A firm foundation
 A hard sum
 Ups and downs
 Pets
 See-saw
 Jack's purchase
 "Little Miss Vanity"
 Ned's jackdaws
 The chaffinch
 A generous cat
 He would be a soldier
 Strong and weak
 Wait a little
 Ripe pears
 Flossy's lost hat
 Tired out
 Cat's cradle
 Ivor's journey
 Puss and the milk-jug
 The wolf and the goat
 Fancy dress
 The picture book
 On the cliff
 My playmate
 Sweet music
 The lost penny
 The first prize
 Jealous Fan
 Use and beauty
 Home from the beach
 Our holiday
 Clara's trust
 What he could
 Ronald's entertainment
 In the dark
 A good turn
 Our happy home
 The flowers' message
 A visit to Brighton
 Kind Bertie
 "Do let me!"
 Ethel's visit
 Naughty temper
 Netta's task
 A chase
 Jasper and Snowflake
 The accident
 Summer holidays
 For the asking
 Queer cricket
 Just to show
 Catching the thief
 Freeing of birds
 Anxious puss
 The little pebbles
 Partings
 Tom's opinion
 Hare and hounds
 Christmas morning
 Dick's lesson
 Lydia's dream
 A narrow escape
 Ungrateful Billy
 Playing horses
 Lost Sally
 The crib
 Too strong
 Never
 "Sunshine"
 Back Cover






Group Title: Tiny trots : an annual for little people.
Title: Tiny trots
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084093/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tiny trots an annual for little people
Physical Description: 204 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stoneman, George ( Publisher )
Rainey, W ( William ), 1852-1936 ( Illustrator )
Browne, Gordon, 1858-1932 ( Illustrator )
Publisher: George Stoneman
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1895
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors ; some other illustrations by Gordon Browne and W. Rainey.
General Note: "Printed in Holland." -- cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084093
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225040
notis - ALG5312
oclc - 23171417

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    The lobster
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Dot's help
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    "All alone"
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A jolly tar
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Drill
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Playmates
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Bad news
        Page 21
    A funny little customer
        Page 22
        Page 23
    A mammy-boy
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Snap-dragon
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Queen of the day
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Marie's newspaper
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Under control
        Page 33
        Page 34
    May Day
        Page 35
    Our new playroom
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Pick-a-back
        Page 40
        Page 41
    An awkward customer
        Page 42
        Page 43
    "A soldier laddie"
        Page 44
    Katie's doll
        Page 45
    Blindman's buff
        Page 46
    The wounded bird
        Page 47
    Duty first, pleasure afterwards
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Not a coward
        Page 50
    Next door
        Page 51
    Dobbin and Johnny
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A firm foundation
        Page 54
    A hard sum
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Ups and downs
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Pets
        Page 64
        Page 65
    See-saw
        Page 66
    Jack's purchase
        Page 67
        Page 68
    "Little Miss Vanity"
        Page 69
    Ned's jackdaws
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The chaffinch
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    A generous cat
        Page 75
    He would be a soldier
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Strong and weak
        Page 78
    Wait a little
        Page 79
    Ripe pears
        Page 80
    Flossy's lost hat
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Tired out
        Page 83
    Cat's cradle
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Ivor's journey
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Puss and the milk-jug
        Page 90
    The wolf and the goat
        Page 91
    Fancy dress
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The picture book
        Page 94
        Page 95
    On the cliff
        Page 96
        Page 97
    My playmate
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Sweet music
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The lost penny
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The first prize
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Jealous Fan
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Use and beauty
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Home from the beach
        Page 111
    Our holiday
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Clara's trust
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    What he could
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Ronald's entertainment
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    In the dark
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    A good turn
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Our happy home
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    The flowers' message
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    A visit to Brighton
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Kind Bertie
        Page 146
        Page 147
    "Do let me!"
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Ethel's visit
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Naughty temper
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Netta's task
        Page 154
        Page 155
    A chase
        Page 156
    Jasper and Snowflake
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
    The accident
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Summer holidays
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    For the asking
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Queer cricket
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Just to show
        Page 172
        Page 173
    Catching the thief
        Page 174
        Page 175
    Freeing of birds
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Anxious puss
        Page 178
    The little pebbles
        Page 179
        Page 180
    Partings
        Page 181
    Tom's opinion
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Hare and hounds
        Page 184
        Page 185
    Christmas morning
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Dick's lesson
        Page 188
        Page 189
    Lydia's dream
        Page 190
        Page 191
    A narrow escape
        Page 192
        Page 193
    Ungrateful Billy
        Page 194
    Playing horses
        Page 195
        Page 196
    Lost Sally
        Page 197
        Page 198
    The crib
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Too strong
        Page 201
        Page 202
    Never
        Page 203
    "Sunshine"
        Page 204
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

























EV v-1 N,I,,E


PRINTrED IN HOLLAND.
4.


NY








TINY


TROTS


AN ANNUAL FOR LITTLE







~l: n


PEOPLE


LONDON: GEORGE STONEMAN, 21, WARWICK LANE,
PATERNOSTER ROW.
1895.


1-7-1- --
























CONTENTS.


All Alone. .
Awkward Customer, An
Accident, The .
Anxious Puss .


PAGE
9
S 42
. 16
. 178


First Prize, The .
Flower's Message, The .
For the Asking .
Freeing of Birds .


Bid News. .
Blindman's Buff.


. . 22 Generous Cat, A .
46 Good Turn, A .


Chaffinch, The . .
Cat's Cradle . .
Clara's Trust . .
Chase, A . .
Catching the Thief. . .
Christmas Morning ..
Crib, The . .


Dot's Help . .. .
D ril . . .
Duty First, Pleasure Afterwards .
Dobbin and Johnny . .
"Do let me!" .. ....

Ethel's Visit . .

Funny little Customer, A .
Firm Foundation, A . .
Flossy's lost Hat .
Fancy Dress . .


S72
S84
.I 121
.156
S174
86
200


S3
S 17
48
S53
149

. I50

. 22
S54
S 81
S93


Hard Sum, A .
Home From the Beach .
Hare and Hounds .


Ivor's Journey .
In the Dark .

Jolly Tar, A. .
Jack's Purchase.
Jealous Fan .
Jasper and Snowflake.
Just to Show .

Katie's Doll .
Kind Bertie .

Lobster, The .
"Little Miss Vanity"
Lost Penny, The .
Little Pebbles, The
Lost Sally ...


S55
SII
. 184


. 86
. 130

. 15
. 67
. o6
. 57
. 173

. . 45
. . 146


2
S69
S102
179
* 197


PAGE
. 104
. 140
. I68
. 176


* 75
* 134







CONTENTS.


Mammy-Boy, A. .
Marie's Newspaper.
May-Day ..
My Playmate .

Not a Coward .
Next Door .
Ned's Jackdaws .
Naughty Temper. .
Netta's Task .
Narrow Escape, A.
Never . .

Our New Playroom
On the Cliff .
Our Holiday .
Our Happy Home.

Playmates. ....
Pick-a-Back .
Pets. .
Puss and the Milk-jug
Picture Book, The.
Partings .. .
Playing Horses .

Queen of the Day. .
Queer Cricket .


. 19
. 40
. 64
. 90


Ripe Pears . .
Ronald's Entertainment .


PAGE
* 25
S30
* 35
* 98

* 50
* 51
* 70
* 152
* 54
. 192
* 203


* 37
. 96
SI112
* 136


I . 94
. 18 Wounded Bird, The
195 Would be a Soldier, He
Wait a Little .
.. .. 29 Wolf and the Goat, The
. .. 170 What he Could .


PAGE
. 81
. 127


. 26
. 45
. 66
. 78
101
. 164
. 204


Snap-Dragon .
Soldier Laddie, A .
See Saw! .
Strong and Weak. .
Sweet Music .
Summer Holidays
"Sunshine" .


Tired Out .
Tom's Opinion .
Too Strong .


Under Control .
Ups and Downs
Use and Beauty. .
Ungrateful Billy. .


Visit to. Brighton, A .


. 34
. 58

. 109
. 194


. 144


47
. 76
; 79
. 91
. 125


83
S182
S201






oirois.


"K.


IIcId


-pa
;2p



if


"I KNOW HOW TO HANDLE THEM CHAPS."


A 677





THE LOJ5ATEA


THE LOBSTER.
("HI! Hi! Get away from
S there! Don't you touch that!
You'll get your fingers nipped!"
cried Jack, running as hard as
he could. "I'm bigger'n you,
and I know how to handle
them chaps."
Mattie dearly loves to poke her fat
fingers where they have no business to
be; she often gets into trouble on that
account. But,' when Jack took out a
lobster, picked up a stick of wood, and
showed her how tightly the creature
gripped it, and how the wood was broken
before he would let it go, Mattie was
glad that Jack had come just when he
did. She had been playing round the
lobster trap, and most likely, in another
minute, those claws would have had a
pinch at her.





bopY.S' AELP.


OTS ELP.

NURSE was nearly at her
Sm wits' end! Nurse gets there
so often that perhaps it is
not so very far to go after
all.
"If you don't stand still,
,Miss Dot, it is ipossz13le
that I can get your hair
tidy."
But Dot wriggled away, crying "Do
let me, Nurse! Only just a minute! I
must see!" and leaned forward right out
of the nursery window. It had been
raining, and two barefooted children were
watching a ragged boy while he eagerly
and carefully groped in the mud.
"What are you doing?" rang out Dot's
clear little voice.
"Dick had a penny, and he's bin and
lost it!" came the mournful answer.
Nurse lifted Dot from the window. "If
you don't stand still, and let me finish





DO&T'N IYJEL}


dressing you, Miss -Dorothy, I shall
undress you straight off and put you
into bed. So there!"
This was desperate! So Dot stood to
be finished as patiently as might be,
darting off to join Lena and Frankie as
soon as she could.
Frankie is only a mite of a boy, but
he has an ear for music, and already plays
two or three simple tunes
on his violin. Lena was
Accompanying him now.
SShe and Frank joined Dot
S/ on the drawing-room bal-
cony, and stood watching
l| the search for the lost coin.
Dick gave it up at last,
and went
-sor row-
,-I fully-
K=_ away,just
before
mamma
came to
the draw-








DOT'S HELP.


.1,1
I iI II


LENA AND FRANKIE AT PLAY,


-~~- --


I I
/, 11L I 1i





DOT'S HELP.


ing-room. Three bright faces, three voi-
ces eager to tell of the poor children's
misfortune.
"You'll give them lots and lots of
pennies, won't you, darling mamma?"
concluded Dot.
Mamma smiled. "I would like to, pet!
But you forget, my Dot, I have three
children of my own, who cost me lots and
lots of pennies, and who have made me
promise to buy the very best magic lan-
tern in AUXBURY for a certain little girl's
birthday. That will mean a great many
pennies, Dot."
Dot looked serious. "How many pen-
nies would it cost, mamma?"
"Two hundred and fifty-two," was the
answer, "A guinea, Dot. I asked the
price yesterday."
Oh, what a lot of pennies! Dot drew
a long breath. Just one recollection of
the ragged, hungry, drooping figures, and
the choice was made.
"Mamma, I would rather have the pen-
nies to spend on those poor children,"




DOT'S HELP.


And mamma promised to make inquiries,
and see whether she thought it wise for
Dot to have her own way. She did think
so. And Dot had it.
Who shall describe the delight of Dick
and his sisters! Nice strong clothes, plenty
to eat, for once. Dick set up in business
as a newspaper boy, and Mary provided
with matches to sell. Baby, of course,
was too young to be set up in trade,
which perhaps was just as well, for Baby
was so absorbed in looking at the new
shoes Dot gave him that he was quite
unable to turn his attention to anything else.
Dot had no lantern when her birthday
came. But, as she stood on the balcony
with mamma, while Frankie played a
pretty tune to Lena's accompaniment, Dick
and Mary smiled and waved their thanks
from the pavement below, even Baby's little
voice trying to join in the "Many happy
returns of the day, Miss Dorothy." Dot felt
she neither regretted the lantern not her
help, and that it was the happiest birthday
of all the six that she had ever known,






ALL ALONE.


N -CiIW~~~rllllllllll


-t -


" WITH A WILD SCREAM SHE TURNS AND FLIES, FRANTICALLY GRASPING SETH'S HAND."


~--1_


~t~- -`
P,


J
e r
7





ALL ALONE.


S"L ALONE,"

R I c .- "WE will go, all alone, to
see the shops," said Weff,
decidedly. Perhaps Nursey
won't be able to take us to-
morrow-day, and then Christ-
I mas day will come and we
won't have nothing. Nothing
at all to hide in the brolly-stand for Cousin Jack to- find."
This dire prospect-nothing at all to hide in the
umbrella-stand for dear Cousin Jack,. proved too much
for a hazy notion in her little twin brother Seth's mind
that, having been sent into the garden by nurse, they
ought to stay where they were till she fetched them in.
Perhaps, too, he was not proof against the delights of
a secret shopping expedition. Anyhow, when Weff
opened the little door in the fence, close by the big
carriage gates, and stepped out into the road, he followed
her. What fun it was! How the light crisp snow crackled
under foot, and how ruddy and large the setting sun looked.
On trotted the children, quite unconscious of the many
curious glances directed at their happy, rosy little faces-
surprised glances that two such children should be out alone.





ALL ALONE.


How beautiful the shops are! What dolls and toys!
What books, and lovely flowers and dresses!
But what is this? Oh, how dreadful!
Weff stops and shrieks, for, standing on its hind legs,
on the kerb immediately opposite the provision shop, is
a large brown bear. Weff has never seen a bear before,
but she recognizes it at once. There is a bear in her
favourite picture book that she so often studies with
Cousin Jack, and this is just like it.
Like the pictured bear, this one holds a stout staff
in its "arms." With clumsy rolling gait, the bear makes
an awkward step or two in the direction of the children.
Weff stands in silent horror for a moment, then, with
another wild scream, and frantic grasp of Seth's hand,
she turns and flies. Not back home again along the
road they have come, but anywhere, anywhere away
from that dreadful sight! In her blind fear, Weff darts
down a side street. Seth runs with her, though, truth
to tell, he is not nearly so frightened. Running till
quite exhausted the children stop to get breath but they
have now quite lost their way.
"Mamma! mamma!" sobbed Weff, "I want mamma!
I want to go home!"
"It was a big bear!" panted Seth, "I am glad it did
not eat us all up."
Yet another scream from Weff who fancied she heard





ALL ALONE. I

the distant growling of the bear, and, clasping each
other's hands, more frightened than ever, the children
again fled away. On, on, sobbing and panting till the
end of the street was reached.
A lofty, vehicle, drawn by a high-stepping horse,
turned sharply round the corner just as the children,
blinded by tears, ran into the road. Lucky for them
that the driver had a firm hand, and perfect control
over his horse. As it was Weff fell down, dragging
Seth with her. Her hat fell off into the snow-choked
gutter, and the elephant she had bought for Cousin
Jack, jerked from her hands, was crushed to atoms
beneath the carriage-wheel. Reining up the horse sharply,
its hoofs just escaped the children, and looking down
on them in alarm the driver, who was no other than
Dr. Abbott, cried out "Good gracious! the little
Gunsleys." Quick as thought his man, who had been
sitting with folded arms on the seat beside him, jumped
down and lifted first Weff and then Seth into the
vehicle.
Weff's hat was next recovered, but the poor elephant
was so hopelessly crushed that, after one glance, the
man left it where it was. The doctor wisely asked no
questions. That the children had no business in Queen
Street, that they were lost and in sad trouble, was
evident enough, and the first thing o be done was to








ALL ALONE.


t- a
-gt~


s ..~vu r ~,~s%~,--

~"~" ,~





ALL ALONE.


take them home again before their mother should be
alarmed and distressed by their absence.
Though Dr.'Abbott had so very little time to spare,
and though- he had already paid his usual visit to
Stanmore Lodge that day, he made time to take the
children right home, to the very gates, and made time
to tell them. they must not say a \word about where
they had been, or. what they had done before mamma.
They might tell Cousin Jack, and they must be sure
to, tell papa and nurse all about it, but not mamnma
just now, because she was not well and it might worry
her. Also they must promise never to run away by
themselves to go shopping again, a promise given readily
enough, They found nurse just inside the little door,
in a distracted state of mind. It was getting quite dark
now, and nurse had her bonnet on, and was coming
out to look for them. Though where in the world she
would have looked, she declared afterwards, she knew
no more than the man in the moon.







14 A JOLLY TAR.


" I'LL FOOT IT ON THE DECK."





A JOLLY fTAR.


OLLY


TAR.


SUCH a jolly Jack Tar sure
did see,


you never


Such a jolly Jack Tar as me, as me!
When I blithely cross my arms, and foot


it on the


deck,


Sure you'd think old ocean calm-that it
never bore a wreck.


But I know that storms must come!


D'ye


see! d'ye see!
So I'll brace myself 'together with a will!
That's me!


I am told that life has
a dismal wreck,
But I'll up and do my
it on the deck.


storms, and many

duty, and I'll foot






i6 DRILL.






fit









a .__
_i i ._ _

---B


" MINNIE IS GOOD NOW LET US PLAY AT SOMETHING SHE LIKES."





PDRILL.


PRILL,
"SHOULDER arms! Present arms! March!
wheel! Left wheel! Attention!" cried Cyril,


-,. .- -:
-" =a y: .r ..
J-ae
AW1


imitating the soldiers he had seen on the
parade ground. "Minnie, how stupid you
are! You are doing it all wrong!"





DRILL.


"But I haven't any wheel at all!" said
Minnie, "I have only a drum."
Minnie does not like playing soldiers,
but it is a favourite game of Cyril's.
"Duffer!" he said, "'right wheel' means
turn to the right, and 'left wheel' means
turn to the left. Even little George knows
that! But girls are such muffs! They are
never any good! You can't do anything
properly!"
Could she not? Cyril did not know it,
but, on that breezy afternoon on the com-
mon, Minnie was succeeding in doing what
many a brave, real soldier has failed in.
For playing thus with Cyril, she was
controlling her own inclinations and her
temper! She turned right, or left, as the
order came, without a word.
Ted is fond of Minnie. So is Cyril,
though he likes his own way better.
"We've played this long enough," said
Ted, "Minnie is good! Now let us play at
something that she likes."





PLA YMATES.


LAYMATES.

SI CAN swing myself," said
f i- Harold, in a sulky tone. "I
don't want you."
Dick and Bertie live next
door, and Harold is gener-
ally glad if they will play
V with him. The boys come over
the wall nearly every day when
school is over, and had been promising
themselves fine times when they saw
Harold's new swing put up. It was dis-
appointing, but, finding him in such a
disagreeable mood, they went away.
Harold, tired of swinging by himself,
had strolled after them. He found them
fishing in a little stream, and longed to
try a cast himself, but after his selfish
behaviour, was ashamed to ask for the
loan of a rod.
Bertie never bears malice. "Hullo,





PLA YMA TES


Harold!"


he cr


"Have a try?
some beauties,
fresh bait."


Harold
thought th


ied, holding
Dick and I
and I've


out his rod.
have caught


just put


on


didn't say much. Perhaps he
e more. Anyhow, when therods


were put away and tea was over, he
shouted over the wall, "Dick! Bertie!
Where are you? Won't you come and
have a swing?"








BAD NEWS.


ri'! i


MOTHER HAS STILL TWO CHILDREN TO LOVE DEARLY.


I "t *
*AA,


< A .,


~ '-'Ci
:. ::i

"I;,:
:~:~: :~





BAD NEWS,


J AD NEWS.

MADGE and May can't read writing. They
do not know a word that is in the letter
lying on mother's lap. But they can read
her face, and what they see there has
brought them from their play to comfort
her-to nestle up close, and remind her
that, whatever the trouble of which the
letter tells, she has still two children to
love her dearly. Earthly love is a sweet
gift, only excelled by the Divine Love.
And of him who dwells in tzzs we know,
"He shall not be afraid of any evil tidings,
for his heart standeth fast in Thy word."

A YUNNY LITTLE CUSTOMER.
"A PENNYWORTH of what, my dear?"
exclaimed old Seabright.
"A penn'orth of delightfulness, if you
please," repeated the child.
"Delightfulness!" and the old man's
face assumed a puzzled expression.




A FUNNY LITTLE CUSTOMER.


The little girl stood gravely at the coun-
ter wondering at the old man's peculiar
behaviour.
"Delightfulness! delightfulness! I have
never been asked for that before. Do
you mean these?" said the old man,
showing his little customer a bottle of
honeydrops.
"No, sir," replied the little girl, shaking
her curly head energetically.

S j.,. enquired he,
showing a tab-
let of Turkish
np delight.
"Oh, yes,
that is delight-
fulness" ex-
-.. claimed the
little girl, and
putting down
her penny, she
departed with
her little pur-
chase.







24 A MAMMY-BOY.


LITTLE SISTER.





A 21LJ1Y: -7iy)Y


A /AlAM AI Y- OY.

"I GILLES NORRIS meant to be
S1 very insulting when he shouted
I- "Mammy-boy!" outside the cot-
-tage, and it would have been
far more fun to go black-berrvying,
than to spend all the half-holiday
watching by a little sick sister, while
mother was out chasing. The taunt
seemed to ring in Ben's ears at first,
but presently he began to think it was
not such a bad title after all. Mother's
boy! of course he was mother's boy, and
he meant to be mother's right hand man
when he grew up, and to work for her as
hard as she worked for her children now.
"Thank you, my boy," said mother, when,
coming home, tired from her work, she
gladly saw everything was right. "You
are such a comfort to me, Ben!"
And Ben laughed to himself to think
that he had for a moment, minded being
called "A Mammy-boy."





SNAP-DRAGON.


NAP- RAGON.

"RUPERT," whispered May, while the
children were waiting for some little visit-
ors who were coming to Grannie's Christ-
mas party, "cook is making us a snap-
dragon; Grannie said so. Let's run into
the kitchen and see her do it."
S"Me too!'" cried
Ella, and away
I they ran.
"Is that all?"
askedRupert,in
a disappointed
tone, when cook
showed him
a large dish
of raisins,
steeped in spirit,
warming before the kitchen fire. "Only
a dish of raisins! It isn't like a dragon
a bit."
Cook laughed. "Wait till you see it
alight. You'll say different then. Don't





SNAP-DRAGON.


none of you touch it," and away went
cook to get out some cakes for tea.
May picked up the dish. "Come along,"
she said. "Let's take it to the drawing-
room, and play with it a little while. I
can light it, and it is for us.'" May put
the dish on Grannie's favourite gipsy-table,
struck a match and lit the snap-dragon.
"Isn't it pretty!" she cried, as the blue
flames flickered around. "And snap-
dragon flames don't burn. You can put
your hand right into them, and take out
the raisins."
Ella looked doubtful. Those flames were
real. But May plunged in her hand. Ah!
she was not quick enough! A start, a cry of
pain, and over went the table, snap-dragon
and all.
"Grannie meant us to have a snap-
dragon, only I spoilt it, and burnt myself
and the drawing-room carpet," May owned
to the little visitors, later in the evening.
"It was very naughty of me, and the next
time Grannie is going to give us a treat,
I will wait till the right time for it comes."







QUEEN OF THE DAY.


k,


I.114
;**


-1 ,


" IN CAME FOUR LITTLE CATS DRAWING A GAY CARRIAGE."


~`~9
r.
---.~-





QUEEN OF THE DAY.


QUEEN OF THE PAY.
LISA sat on a dais under a
Garland offlowers. Roses strew-
ed the steps of the dais, and
made the floor sweet with their
perfume. It was Lisa's birthday, and her
grandparents, with whom she was staying,
had invited a large party, and planned
a grand surprise. Born in England, Lisa
had never seen anything of the kind be-
fore, and felt rather strange when Grand-
mother draped her in a cloudy white
veil, with a shining star, and Grandfather
seated her on the dais, while he stood
behind her. The children ranged them-
selves at one side of the room, as soon
as Lisa was seated. Then Cousin Carl
blew a long blast on his trumpet, and
in rode little Rudolph on a white pony.
"For you, Lisa!" he said. "From
Grandfather. Only you will have a differ-
ent saddle when you ride him."
Another blast! And in came four
little cats drawing a gay carriage, filled





QUEEN OF THE DAY.


with new dolls, presents from Grand-
mother and the cousins.
How delighted Lisa was! She could
not find words in which to express her
pleasure, but the old folks kissed Lisa, and
told her there was no need for her to say
anything at all.
ARIES TEWSPAPEIR

SL. IT was harvest-time at Oakleigh
Farm, and everybody who knows
the farm at all knows well what
a busy time that is. The farm-
er's married daughter Mary
Casey, had come to help,: as she said, or
to enjoy the bustle and fun, as her father
laughed and told her. Anyhow, there she
was, and her little bright-eyed Mary with
her, both quite willing to have a finger
in every pie, and ready to enjoy anything
pleasant that might happen to come along.
Little Mary especially was here, there,
and.everywhere. Trotting with mother to
carry out buns and cakes for the supper




MARY'S NEWSPAPER.


in the big barn; following Grannie into
kitchen and dairy; or after Grandfather
till' her small feet grew weary, and the
farmer was fain to pick her up and carry
her. Mary fell fast asleep at last, and he
took her indoors and laid her on Gran-
nie's bed.
"Little maid be quite tired out," he said,
and mother and Grannie thought he had
put her in the best place possible.
Mary slept so soundly that the supper
in the barn began without her. Mother
slipped away, and went to Grannie's'
room to see how the child was getting
on. The bed was empty.
Mother searched till she found Mary
all alone in the kitchen with her little
toes on the fender.
"I'm Grannie," she said, as the door
opened. "Grannie yeading the newspaper!"
Mother laughed. "What is the news,
Mary?"
"It is all about little Mary,'' said the
child, gravely. "It says she had a had-
dock, 'cause she was so tired."





MARY'S NEWSPAPER.


"A what?" said mother.
"Here," said Mary, pointing with a fat
finger. "It says she was so tired that
she had a haddock in her head."
"Oh! headache !" cried mother. "What
else.?"
"Then it says Grandpa carried her, and
she woked up in Grannie's bed, and she
is to have a bun with lots of sugar on the
top, 'cause she
is such a very
good girl."
How Grand-
I father laughed
when mother
told him! He
told Mary he
dI4 .did not believe
:I Grannie herself
-had ever read
a more true
and interesting
newspaper in
all her life.








UNDER CONTROL.


"I WON'T LET HIMl HURT ANYTHING."


iL.9


-I?


-~
tr~F~; ~-"


--~-~I





34, ,- -.* NER OA T'T Ol l'

UNDER CONTROL,

OGS s not allowed ti
here, Missy!" said the tall
policeman.
'Not unless they are led,"
corrected Mabel. "Miss
Knott says so. Don't you
see I have a string to
iM Beowulf's collar? I'll hold
h iim very tight. I won't
let him hurt anything."
The policeman put his hand. up to his
mouth to hide a laugh.
S"Seeing as your dog is under control,
pass on, Missy!" he said.
And Mabel walked away to join her
sister and: the governess, Beowulf march-
ing sedately at her side.; Under control,
indeed, but" under the control of his
faithful love for his little mistress, rather
than of that of the restraining string in
:her tiny hands.,.






MAY DAY.


M AY


AY*


ONE,two, three, four, five, bonny children,
blithe and gay,,
Peep from out a casement small, on
this sunny first of May.


In the
songbirds


meadows,


woods


and fields,


chirp on .every spray


Soon these merry little ones, blithe will
chant a joyful lay,
While their tiny,, busy hands, .twine'
flower garlands for the day.


R^








OUR NEW PLAYS,90M


It


,I,,' ,/
1'PI


jWeaN
"^


N


WErFF HtOL'ItNC TiTHrL-y O WC[STE-R'S HAND


i ^


t* I




OUR NEEW PLAYROOM.


PUR NEW PLAYROOM.

THIS visit to Aunt Abigail's a
rambling old house near Upton
Woods, bade fair to prove a
4 great success. What would
the playroom be like! Weff
-., could scarcely touch her
Jij i6- tea for the excitement of
the thought.
"Ron!" she said, when the others were
gone with Miss Dunn to Aunt Abigail's
room. "Wouldn't you like to see the
playroom?"
"Yes," said Ronald, "I think I should.
I hope it is a jolly big one."
"Let's go and look at it."
"But we can't," objected Ronald. "We
don't know where it is. Besides it is all
dark, and we haven't any candle."
Weff walked across the room and rang
the bell.
"A candle, and will you show me and
Ronald the way to the playroom, please?"





38 OqlR, NEW.PLA-YRQQM
she said, when Webster the: -housemaid
appeared.
In vain the servant objected' that it was
dark and cold and. the little girl' had
much better wait till daylight to-morrow.
"I want to go! Will you.take me, please?"
was all she could get.from her.
"Very well, then," said Webster, "It
won't take long, only you must have a shawl
right over your head, Miss; for it, is cold
in these passages, and no mistake,"
It was some distance to the playroom,
and seemed a queer roundabout way to
get there. Up steps and down steps, and
through draughty passages, where, more
than once, the candle was nearly blown
out. Ronald was glad Websterhad brought
him his cap, as well as a shawl for Weff.
SArrived in the room, Weff, holding
tightly to Webster's hand, made straight
for the. fireplace.. Oh, what a big chimney!
Almost like a little room, and as there was
no grate, as Brooke had said, she could
walk right into where the fireplace should
have been, and look right up it..




OUR XEW PLAYROOM.


Weff seemed perfectly satisfied. WVebster
took the children back to Miss Dunn's
room, and, then made her way to the
kitchen, where she informed cook and
Ralph that that little girl was "a one-er,
and no mistake," "Ringing the bell as
grown-up-like as you please! and saying
what she wanted as cool as if she was
the mistress of the house."
"That seemed a jolly playroom!" said
Ronald when they were together again.
Weff agreed. "And the chimney was
splendid," she said, "I never saw such a
chimney in all my life."
If Santa Claus could manage to get
down the chimney at home, why this
one would be fifty times more convenient.
Nothing could be better.
Weff cried, and so did Seth, they could
not help it, when the time came for
mamma's good-night kiss and mamma
was not there to give it. Edie made
them each give her one instead, and said
she would put the kisses in a letter and
,send them to mamma, which was the




PICK-A-BACK.


next best thing; so after a few more sobs,
the twins were comforted. Webster had
unpacked some of the boxes, so Edith
Amy was able to sit, in a chair beside
Weff's bed. Miss Dunn thought that
would be the best place for her. Grace
had been unpacked as- well, so she went
into Weff's bed as usual. Weff did-miss
mamma and papa, and baby, and nurse
and Morris very much, but somehow her
last waking thought was of her friend
the major. Her dreams were of him, and
Uncle Jack, and perhaps this was how
Miss Dunn came to find her lying asleep,
with wet eyelashes, it is true, but with
Grace cuddled in her arms, with the
sugar elephant (minus his howdah, his
trunk, and two of his legs) close by, and
with a smile on her face.

ICK-A- ACK.
ALL along the cliffs, right to Bolton Hole-"Boat-in-
the-hole," the children call it-went Lucy and little Nan.
The cliffs take a sharp turn when you come. to Bolton







PICK-A-BACK.


'4t,


* 44


\ '\tt


?Ad


I




AN AWKWARD, CUSTOMER.


Hole, and you get a splendid view, in two directions,
over the sea. The fishing smacks had been gone nearly
a week over their time, and mother was getting very
anxious about father and Ned. There had been some
rough weather, but it was bright and fair this holiday
afternoon. Turning the corner, Lucy stood at the top
of Bolton Hole, and gazed away, away, far over the
sea.- Something seemed to be creeping up from the
horizon. Could it be the sails of the smacks? Lucy
sat down, found some tiny snail shells for Nan to play
with, and waited. One hour, two hours passed by.
Nan began to want her tea. She was tired, even of
the pretty shells. No need to keep her waiting any
longer. Lucy could see the smacks were coming back.
She had counted them, and knew they were all there.
Not one missing! Up she sprang, eager to tell mother
the good news. But how slow seemed Nan's short,
lagging steps!
"You must give me a piggy-back," said Nan, "'cause
I is so hungry!"
Lucy's arms are strong, and she could get over the
ground quicker that way, so Nan had a merry ride
nearly all the way home.


AN AWKWARD CUSTOMElf.

OSTRICH feathers are in such .demand that rearing and
keeping ostriches in captivity for the sake of their
beautiful plumage, is a profitable and not a difficult





AN AWKWARD CUSTOMER. 43

undei-taking', wlilethe birds are small. But just try to
fancy having chickens .to t. tend that can run as fast as,
a horse .can gallop and d ko.p over their, attendants' like


pinepins! Some of these, supposed to be tame birds,
are so dangerous when full grown that the ostrich farmer
only ventures to approach them on horseback, and
that warily!







"A SOLDIER


"DO YOU HEAR MY DRUM?"


_ ... .._


LA~D~F."





"A SOLDIER LADDIE!"


SOLDIER


tt/


_LADDIE."


"THR-R-RUM! Tur-Tum! Do you hear my drum?
.Do you see my hat and my feather!
Thr-r-rum! Tum-Tum! Should an enemy come,
He'd quail, don't you think, altogether?


"Thr-r-rum!
I fancy I
Thr-r-rum!
From my


Tum-Tum! When I beat my drum,
see foes hieing!-
Tum-Tum! When I beat my drum,
home, and my fatherland flying!"


KATIE S POLL.

OH, Pincher! what have
been at?
You wicked little dog!
Poor Katie's dolly mangled
As still as any log!


you


lies,


SHer hat and feather torn to bits,
While one wee armyou hold;
Just wait till Katie's out of school,
And won't you hear her scold!





-BLINDMAN' S BFF.


pLINDMAN S


jUFP.


"How many horses?" Hear the children
say,


round


three times,


and catch


whomni you may!"
Oh, the three horses, black, white and grey!


Four little merry maids, run
Johnnie Brown must 'needs
catch them to-day,


See how


he gropes around


swiftly away,
be quick to

, ';mid. peals


of laughter gayJ


"Turn





THE WOUNDED BIRD.::


7HE WOUNDED PIRD.

ROSE was strolling about the fields
one afternoon with her brother George,
when she saw a little bird lying on
the ground. She thought at first that
he was dead; but when she came
close to him she found that his bright
little eyes were wide open. She took
Shim up in her hands and stroked him
very gently, but birdie did not seem
to like that at all. He twittered and fluttered in great
distress. "Do look, George, at this darling little bird,"
Rose said, running to her brother. "But I am afraid
it is ill. What can be the matter with it?" "It must
be injured, or it would not have been lying there," said.
George. "Let me see?" He examined it and soon
found that one of its legs was broken.' "It must have
fallen out of,the nest," he said. "We will take it home,
and see what we can do for it." George. was very
clever in such matters. He bound up poor little Dickie's
leg in the neatest way, and Rose put him in a cage,
and watched him getting well again with great interest.
It was a little linnet, and soon became very tame. In
a very short time he would perch upon Rose's finger
and sing quite fearlessly.^





DUTY FIRST, PLEASURE AFTERWARDS.


PUTY fIRST, jLEASUIPE -FTERWARDS.

IT is sweet in the woods!
But they are not a good
place in which to study.
There is too much to hear,
I and to see. Lena had
brought out her books. It
was a very warm day, and
1: _I. she thought a shady nook,
under some spreading tree, would be far
more pleasant than the schoolroom. So
it was. She was right so far. But she
sauntered on, and on, letting Spot guide
her by the string tied to his collar,
laughing to see his attempts to catch
the birds, and dive among the bushes,
till there was very little time left for study.
Oh, the poor lessons! They were so
badly learned that Lena heartily wished
next day that she had taken the advice
of her governess, and worked at them
with a will, before going to the woods.





DUTY FIRST, PLEASURE AFTERWARDS.


1 -r
II ".'
c4.L1 I~


She sauntered on and on.




50 NOT A. COWARD.

OT A POWAED.

TOM and other boys were passing across
the fields. As they went, Tom saw that
the pool was covered with ice. "Come,
boys," said he, "who will go on the
pool for a slide?"
Off Tom started to the gate which led
to the water. All were following him.
"Boys," shouted a man carrying milk,
"where are you going? That ice won't
bear you. Come back."
Tom would not heed the man, but
would go. He sneered at the cautious
boys, and cried out, "I'm not a coward!"
And on to the pool he went alone. The
rest of the boys went off to roll a big
snowball on the village green.
He had not gone half a dozen steps
when the ice broke and down he went.
He struggled for awhile and then sank
overhead in the water.
Knowing that the foolish boy must get
into trouble the old milkman had kept near.






NEXT DOOR.


When he saw what had happened he
rushed into the pool, and with some dif-
ficulty seized the boy's arm, and dragged
him out just in time to savehis life.
When he was got out of the water,
Tom was white as the snowy ground,
and so alarmed that he could not speak.
He was carried home, but he soon be-
came very ill, and was ill for many weeks.

EXT OOR.

JENNIE, sitting in, her chair,
Spyed wee Rupert's curly
head,
IT _"That's the little boy next
door,
Come to live, there," mother
said.
S"Little new boy, what's your
name?
SI live here, and so, d'ye see,
/ If you think we might be
friends,
Climb the fence and play
with me!"






52 DOBBIN AND ,JOHNNY.




DOBBIN AND JOHNNY.


OBBIN AND JOHNNY

THE small boy and the big
horse stood still as mice, look-
ing at each other. What were
They thinking about? Did
"ii Dobbin remember the days
1i, when he was' a frolicsome
6 jj young colt, racing and chas-
ing around the meadow very
much like Johnny does now! Did Johnny
think of the time coming when he must
take up his. lifework; must put forth all
his power and energy on the side of
usefulness and right?
Dobbin can't tell us what he thought,
and, whatever Johnnie's thoughts were,
they finished like this:- "Dobbin is the
very bs/est -old horse that ever lived!
And I'll ask Giles to give me a ride when
he takes him down to the pond to drink!"





A FIRM FO UNDATION.


/. AIRM FOUNDATION.

THEY wanted to imitate some street
acrobats they had seen.
"On me!" said Bob, making a back
for the others to climb. But he did not
stand steady. He slipped and fell.
Tom took his place,
Sbut he-was not strong
enough, and quickly
let the other boys
down.
S"Let me come first,
thin!" cried Mike.
"Sure I'm stronger
than both of ye to-
gether, and I'll stand
as stiddy as would
Time himself!"
The trick was soon
done then, for, what
Sis built upon a good,
firm foundation is
y 1 likely to stand.





A HA'RD 5i _l.


ShARD UMA

S IT was a hard sum! a regular
S.i,*& poser! Even Ned Jones, who, the
boys say, can tackle anything,
Looked thoughtfully serious over
this, while Nat Brown didn't even
attempt it. Nat sits next to Ned,
and he waited, watching Ned's
slate as the figures were slowly
:, and carefully set down, and copy-
VV ,ing them on to his. Wrong!"
said the master, when the slates
were sent up. "I was asked to
give you this sum as a test, and it has
proved far beyond all you lads, except
Jones and Brown. I find on each of their
slates the same error. A very slight one.
The rest of you shall work an easier
example, while these two boys find out
their mistake. Jones, return to your place.
Brown, stay here at my table..'
Here was a pretty state of things! Nat
stared in black despair at Ned's retreating





A HARD SUM.


figure. Without a peep at Ned's slate
how should he ever work the horrid thing?
Ned well knew there would be many
more mistakes than one if he attempted
to tackle that sum alone. Could the
master have guessed? The boy's face
flushed red. Ned soon found out the
mistake, and handed up the finished sum.
But Nat toiled hopelessly on and on, long
after school was dismissed, till his master,
who knew all about it, thought he had
been sufficiently punished for the at-
tempted cheat.


~ -. ~'~i~E4~,~8~a, ~Bb~B~i~,~i~5~:
.d .
~ ;
crir.
-








A HARD SUM 57



ii Ij III Iii iII
till






jil








III


All }11,


4-L \



1 I: lilllllili '1!








kA-




UTrS -AND DOWNS.


*JPS AND OWNS..

\VEFF found it dull in the
schoolroom without Edith
and Miss Dunn, and no
-, Ronald either. She did not
care to stay there without them. Seth
would have stayed contentedly enough,
but Weff would not.
"I want to go to the playroom," she
said.
Webster had told her she was not to
ring the bell. Only Miss Dunn was to
do that. And Weff was sure she could
not find her way to the playroom unless
somebody. came to show it to her. What
was she to do?
What she did was to stand and look
out of the window, with her finger in
her mouth, till big tears gathered in her
eyes and rolled down her cheeks. Seth
left his omnibus and came to her.
"What are you crying for, Weff?'
he asked.





*KUPIS ,ij\L) DV1\


"I want mamma!" sobbed Weff, "and
papa, and the major, and baby, and
Morris, and everybody. And I want to
go to the playroom, and I d-d-d-don't
like this place. I don't want to stop
here-I want to go home to mamma."
"So do I!" agreed Seth, and cried for
company.
Two sad little tear-stained faces for
Brooke to see when she opened the door.
A great deal of the trouble was beyond
Brooke's power to put right, she could
only kiss and cosset them. But so far
as the playroom was concerned, that was
an. easy matter.
"Sure, you shall go there this very
minute, once you have on your hats and
wraps," she said, "and it's myself will
take you there that same. And just look
at Floss, now! The creature. With his
little black nose sticking up in the air
and ready to start crying himself if ye
don't lave off at onc't. Floss can't bear
to see ye in trouble, at all, at all."
And Floss quivered and gave a piteous








60 UPS AND DOWNS.














,,.






Ikl' ii"l "



I'I, a~(//~//f.~~ v~~I I IIHIIUlll ~ ~ i//i::


'N


. > .' ..


-TWO 5AO *tITTL. TEA R-STAs. IN E


FACFS,





UPS AND DO WNS.


little whine, that seemed to say Brooke
was quite right.
Brooke could not stay in the playroom.
Miss Gunsley wanted her, but she gave
Ethel a pretty bell, and told her to carry
it with her and ring it if she could not
find her way back to the schoolroom.
Someone would be sure to hear it, and
come to her.
Oh, the playroom was a fine place!
Never a doubt of it!
In the midst of the frolic, during a
pause in the fun, a slight sound was heard
in the chimney.
The children were both startled. Floss
ran to the hearth, and stood under. the
chimney looking up.
"What was it?" cried Weff and Seth,
together.
They were both more than half fright-
ened, and held each other tight. The
noise again, and now Floss barks.
Hand-in-hand the twins creep across the
floor. The: playroom door stands wide
open. Shall they run away or shall they




UPS AND DOWNS.


venture to the chimney and peep? Only a
moment and they turn towards the door.
"Weff!" cries a voice. "Weff! Weff!"
Where can it come from? Why, it
comes from the chimney!
"Weff! Weff!" is repeated more sharply,
and Weff cries in astonishment, "Oh! Oh
Seth! Why-why it's Santy-Claus!"
"Santa Duffer! says the voice. "Don't
be a little silly, Weff! Come here! I want
to get down."
"Why don't you come down then?'"
asks Seth, plucking up courage. If this
is Santa Claus, Seth thinks he is rude,
and he won't have anyone rude to Weff
if he can help it.
"Because of the dog, stupid!" replies
the muffled voice again. Come and take
him away. I don't know him as well as
you do. He growled at me when I went
to see Aunt Abigail this morning, and
I don't want to stay up here any longer.
I want to come down."
Hand-in-hand the twins slowly approach
the chimney. Hand-in-hand they step




UPS AND DOWNS.


upon the hearth, peer up the wide chimney,
and see-Ronald. The chimney is large
and straight, and wide, and enough light
finds its way down to show Ronald sitting
in a kind of recess, leaning against the
wall. Yes, it is Ronald, and no mistake.
"Oh, Ron! Is it really, truly you? I
thought it was Santa Claus!"
"Santa Rubbish!" says Ronald, irre-
verently. "Would you like to come up,
Weff? It is jolly up here."
Weff thinks she would, but it is too high
for her to climb. Ronald had managed
it easily. She looks disappointed.
"Get a chair, Seth. It will stand firm
enough on the hearth, and then you can
both get up," says Ronald, and this is
how it is done. "Isn't it jolly? Now
don't you call this a nice place?" he asks,
as Weff and Seth scramble up beside
him. And they both agree.
It is a dark place and a very dusty
one, but no one seems to mind that.
Ron seems to think it great fun to be
up there, so he must be right.




PETS.


PETS,

DID you ever see such
pets as Fan and her pups?
.... And they are just as
knowing as can be. You
wouldn't believe the fun
S.we have! They begin to
want to eat from Fan's
dish, but I don't let them. They put
their paws right into the food, and make
themselves in a dreadful mess, so I make
them feed from my wooden porridge
spoon. It is all over marks from their
sharp little teeth. 'They play and bite
it so; but I don't mind. Father can't
afford to keep more than one dog, so he,
is going to sell the pups as soon as they
are old enough. I don't like to think
about it, but at least- we will.be as happy
as we can while we are together!






PEITS.





SEE SAW!


kAW!


SEE-SAW!


Up and down


In sweet summer weather!


See-saw!
Jack


Up and down!
and Lil together,


... -' ,,- -"
Sr ..,- .
^^>'. z:^T'{'^ r
" ^Y 1 "<
- 1/ <.i^ '.^J


~~~--e- ;~-~: K,,


Tanting in the meadow green
On a see-saw bonnie,
Whom d'ye think the happiest?
Lil? Or is it Johnnie?


)S EE


--





JACK S PUR CH-AS.


JACK S PURCHASE.

S" CAN you sell mefour-penny-
worth of snuff? I don't know
how much it will be, because
I have never purchased any,"
said Jack Courtney, to the
S-- woman who keeps the general
shop in the little seaside village of Hartness,
as he laid four pennies on her counter.
"Do you want so much? I could sell
you'a screw for a ha'penny. Be you up
to larks, young gentleman?" she asked,
suspiciously.
"No," laughed Jack. "Look here! My
toy yacht got adrift this morning, the
string broke, and as the tide was running
out, I should have lost it, only the one-
armed old boatman went after it and
brought it back. It was awfully good of
him, and I should like to give him
something. He takes snuff, I know."
.The woman weighed out two-penny-
orth. "That was old Vine," she said.







JACK'S 'PURCHASE.


/

II::.


"~~ -. f
t ': i:
h :i. -h
'
a ~i


;'t1
~ >7' '


I!J p.


I





"LITTLE MISS VANITY."


"This is his mixture, and this is his
quantity. A right good fellow is old Vine,
and does a deal more kindness with his
one hand than most folks do with two."
"Thank you!" cried Jack, and picking
up the parcel of snuff and his twopence,
he ran gaily down the beach to give his
present.


LITTLE ISS ANITY,"

CAP and apron all complete!
Buckled shoes upon my feet!
Sunny gleams my golden hair,
Few with me, you'll own, com-
pare!"
: ^ ". Yes,.yousare a pretty child!
Very pretty, Jane!
But, alas! you spoil it all,
Dear, you are so vain!"





VED S JACKDAWS.


ED S JACKDAWS.


THEY wanted a deal of attention, those
S. jackdaws! but Ned patiently nurtured
them from unfledged ugliness to mature
S.. perfection. Mrs. Brown often grumbled
at the boy's keeping them at all, and
keeping them in his bedroom, as she
--- said, "of all places in the world! But,
Sas this'was the only place in the world
at Ned's own disposal, perhaps he had
,: ,.- ot much choice in the matter. Ned
had the offer of a day at the seaside,
S 'and his eyes glistened at the prospect.
"I'd love to go," he said "only--"
"Oh, if it's them daws! I'll look after them for once,"
said Mrs. Brown. So Ned went. How it happened,
Mrs. Brown always declared she never knew. Anyhow,
she gave not a thought to the open window. Till they
had eaten enough, the young daws perched most con-
tentedly on the edge of the tray where Ned always
fed them, and then, instead of fluttering into their wicker
cages, with one accord they made straight for the window,





NED' S JACKDA VS.


and were gone in an instant. Mrs. Brown cried out in
dismay, but that did not bring them back. Poor Ned!
She hardly knew how to tell him when he came home.
"I meant to let them fly," he sighed, "when they
were ready."


As Mrs. Brown said, "he took it like a Briton and
made not a bit of fuss!" But, all the same, Ned would
have liked to have freed his pets himself.




THE CHAFFINCH.


T HE jHAFFINCH.
"WHILE I was peggng out my
doll's clothes, a little bird came
and perched on the line, quite
close to me, and I saw it was
SMay Rogers' little pet chaffinch.
/ May Rogers lives next door to
me, so we have often played
together, and she has let me catch small
spiders and flies, to give to her bird.
'Tim' she calls him, and when he chirps,
it sounds just as if he says. 'Tim, TIM!
Tim, Tim, TIM!' May and I had not been
friends for a whole .fortnight, but Tim
remembered me, and let me take him
into my hand. I always was fond of Tim,
and when I held him, you wouldn't believe
what a wicked thought came into my head.
'Put Tim into the old cage in the garret,'
it said, 'and keep him for your own. You









THE CHAFFINCH. 73


- 1I-!-.11
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5--


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a


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b4





I~


~" t:





THE CH-AFFINCH.


will punish May that way, and nobody
will know!' I acdur-all/ nearly did it! I
had so often wished that Tim was mine.
But I ran in next door to May with him
as fast as I could. Oh, May had been
crying! When we quarrelled we had said
we would never speak to each other again;
but I had to. Of course, I had to tell May
all about how I caught Tim. And we
kissed each other, and I cried too, a little,
and we are better friends than ever, and-
That is just the sort of blue bottle Tim
likes! Yes, I've caught it! I am going
to run in next door and give it to him!"
-


MISS MISCHIEF.





A GENEROUS CAT.


A, -GENEROUS PAT;
HERE is a cat story, from
"f1". *I Meriden, Mississippi!-"I
have a cat that will occupy
Smy seat at the table until
S I come, and will not will-
S ingly give it up. I was ill
.t a short time ago and
unable to occupy it, and
the cat would come from the table to the
bed frequently. She finally caught a mouse
and brought it to the bed, laying it down'
by me. I threw it off, but as often as I did
so the cat would bring it back, until I
thought she wanted me to eat it; so I
made believe I ate it, and the cat went
away apparently satisfied. And before
night the same day she brought me striped
squirrel, and each day for the three days I
was in bed she brought me game with the
same result-she would never leave until
I had pretended to eat it."





HE WOULD BE A SOLDIER.


NE WOULD BE A OLDIES,

"I WILL he a soldier, with a
smart uniform and bright
buttons when I am a man,"
said Henry Masters, and he
marched about the nursery
beating his toy drum and
waving a wooden sword.
df Just then his brother Ernest
ran into the room.
"Let us fight with swords, like real
soldiers," said Henry.
It was fine fun for a few minutes, but
at last Ernest's sword came down rather
heavily on Henry's knuckles.-
The noise of Henry's lamentations was
truly alarming, and nurse said afterwards
a real battle-field must be a very dreadful
place.







.HE WOULD BE A SOLDIER


SEVERELY WOUNDED.





STRONG AND WEAK


STRONG AND


WEAK.


BABY has a coloured whip,
Waves it high with merry shout.
Good old Nep keeps faithful guard
O'er him as he trots about.


Silly baby strikes the dog,
Nep would say, if he could speak,
"Nep is strong, he loves you well,
Nep will never harm the weak."


-=~- --
----- --;-----=- -- --;-


..





" WAIT A LITTLE.


WAIT A LITTLE,

A IFRIEND of mine had a brood of six:
S .'- chickens of a valuable kind, which he-
nrized highly. One day he noticed that
'.^.j three of, them were missing. Pretty
thorough search was made, but they
S* were not to be found.
Suspicion at length fixed on the cat; and as soon as-
suspected there was proof enough at hand to convict
her. She had been seen several times looking wistfully
at them. She had, even that day, been observed to-
spring towards one of the chickens. She must have
killed them, for in what other way could their absence
be accounted for? Poor puss (at once received the-
sentence of death.
"But wait a little," said one; "it may yet be proved'
that she is innocent. They may be alive, or if dead,.
possibly from some other cause."
Most fortunately for poor puss, this advice was,
heeded. Just at night the lost chickens made their
appearance, and all suspicion of foul play was removed.
The old house cat has a good character again.
How important 'the advice sometimes-watt a little;
be not too certain! Your. evil surmisings may all be
groundless, or if injury has been received, it may have
been unintentional, or if mischief has really been done,,
the guilt may have been attributed to the wrong person..
Wait a little. The evil may be in appearance only.









RIPE PEARS. I


II; ''"': ': I,''' !''' I


ii
I'*; i/


a,,

Ii,


iy,
' *, ';ff".,i(


/-7


~:-~u, ir





FLOSSY'S LOST HAT.


RIPE FEARS,
SUCH a bonny, baby boy,
Fastened in his chair!
See his dimpled, eager hands,
How he'd like a pear!

Will he get it, do you think?
Or will Sissie tease?
P'r'aps she will, perhaps she won't!
Call it which you please!


LOSS' LOST IAT.

S"WHAT is the matter? what
are you crying about?'' asked
S..~Mrs. Hancock, the kind far-
mer's wife, with whom Flossy
and her brother Richard were
staying, while their parents
were in Germany. "And what have you
done with your hat?"





FLOSSY'S LOST HAT.


"Richard threw it into a tree, and I
can't get it," sobbed Flossy.
"What made him do that, my dear?"
"I broke his rose-tree."
"Did you do it on purpose?"
"Yes," said Flossy, stoutly.
"Oh! but that was very wrong indeed.
Tell me, how was it?"
"He wouldn't let me help him rake his
garden; and-so-I broke-the rose-tree;"
said Flossy, jerking her words out between
sobs.
"And then Richard threw your hat into
the tree by way of revenge! Eh! Well,
that would not mend his plant, I am
afraid," said Mrs. Hancock.
Flossy sobbed still more. "IfRichardwill
get my hat, I will mend his tree," she said.
Mrs. Hancock smiled. "Ah, my little girl.
Itis much easier to do mischief than to mend
it. All your regrets will notmend the broken
rose-tree. But let us go and tell Richard
you are sorry for having spoilt his pet plant,
andhe will, lam sure,soongetyou your hat."






PiRED OUT.


TIRED UT.

OUT of the wood, and over the hill,
Wearily tramped the little ones' feet:
Teddie and George, Baby and Will,
Come from gathering blackberries sweet.







////
z




See in the west, the sun sinks low,
Shadows grow long by the greenwood
side,
When would the children have reached
their home,
If kind Farmer Bates had not given
them .a ride?





CAT'S CRADLE.


9AT S


{RADLE.


M | "PUT her in!"


said Monty.


had been playing cat's cradle with
Rose, and had run away, bidding


her wait a minute.
back with the kit


"Put her in!


Now he came


ten.
lind her


She'll scratch you!" ,
"Oh, Monty," laughed Rose, "don't
do that! Kitty doesn't like it."
"What is the use of making a cat's
cradle if you don't put the cat in it?"
"Well, try if you like," said Rose; "only
don't hurt poor Kit!"
But puss kicked, and bit, and wriggled,
till the string.was soon too wildly entangled
to form a cat's cradle, or anything else.


He


claws!


84


A/


'~-'~S~a~fi"Pl~e~,


,4






CAT'S CRADLE.


.( ...

#iylil I
' I----~1 N


L

K'


4I' .
t -- ,,
,- ,T ,, ',


"KITTY DOESN'T LIKE IT.


/


h '1~




IVOR'S JOUR.NE Y.


JVORS JOURNEY.
IT was so stupid always to be
obliged to go out with nurse! At
least, Ivor thought so. It made him
seem such a baby! Besides, look at
the nuts and blackberries, the hips
and haws, and all the delightful
things with which the village chil-
dren came home laden from the
woods. Nurse never went to the woods. It
was always too far, or too damp, or too
dusty, or too something or other, for him
to go where he liked, Ivor declared, petu-
lantly. Ivor gave nurse the slip one day,
when he was running with his hoop, and ran
so fast, and so far, that when nurse looked
round for him he was nowhere visible.
"Which is the way to the woods?" he
asked two village children. But they were
shy. Instead of answering, they stared at
him. Fingers in mouth.
"Little stupids!" said Ivor, "I'll find out
for myself." And on he went. The woods
at last! And, oh, the blackberries! Ivor





IVOR'S JOURNEY.


picked and picked the ripe fruit, staining his
mouth, till no lost "Babe in the Wood was
ever more besmearedd and dyed." A
bramble caught his cap, and twitched it
off. It fell half-way down a steep little
bank, close to a grip.
Ivor descended. He was getting tired.
Some scratches were painful. He thought




AIX




THEY STARED AT HIM.
he would get his cap and go home. The
bank was green and mossy. Treacherous,
too! Ivor's feet slipped, and, in a moment,
he found himself in some inches of mud
and water at the bottom of the grip.
What a dirty, wearied, tattered, scratched,










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_____ I* 'l
"'M ; 11 11116



1101+








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MI.,. M k 11& ow
'wrnluuill 1111111 11211,1


THE BEAR PIT ZOOLCCICAL GARDENS.




IVOR'S JOURNEY.


muddy little object when nurse found
him! So utterly dejected that, without a
word of reproof, she picked him up, and
carried him the rest of the way home, "like
a baby," without a word of remonstrance
from him.
"We will keep together this time, if you
please, Master Ivor," said nurse, when
next she took him out.
Nurse has never failed to keep a sharp
eye on him since that day. Though there
is no need, if she only knew it.


/ '/ i \




PUSS AND THE MILK-JUG.


USS AND THE MILK-JUG.
Puss could hardly believe her own green
eyes! cook had finished breakfast, had left
table, and had gone right away out of the
kitchen, without filling Pussy's saucer ot
milk. The milk-jugstood on the table. Puss
blinked at it, winked at the fire, stared at
the jug, looked at her empty saucer, and
S6-. made up her mind
7, ----: '~' such a state of things
i.i! was not to be borne.
'. With a spring she
jumpe u d on the table
--,-, -and put her little
-l ~black nose into the
jug. Not much milk, butjust about enough.
It was low down in the jug and puss was
thirsty. In went her head- till she found
she could reach the milk. A step on the
floor, cook has come back. "Oh the
tiresome cat!" she cries.
Vainly Puss tried to draw her head from
thejug. In her fright she fell from the table,
with the jug still on her head, breaking off




THE WOLF AA'D THE GOAT.


the handle and spilling the rest of the milk.
Cook got a towel and whipped her.
"Naughty, greedy thing!" she said, "why
didn't you wait till I came to feed you?"
Then she pulled away the jug, and Puss
was free. "That cat will leave my jugs alone
after this," said cook, and she was right. If
you show our puss a jug now, she runs
away, anywhere, to hide herself.

7HE 'WOLF AND THE prOAT.
A WOLF saw a Goat feeding at the summit
of a steep precipice, where he had no
chance of reaching her. He called to
her and earnestly besought her to come
down lower, lest she should by some
mishap get a fall; and he added that
the meadows lay where he was standing,
and that the herbage was most tender.
She replied, "No, my friend, it is not me
that you invite to the pasture, but you
yourself are in want of food."


- ,oi-e YLa







92 FANCY DRESS.


" DID YOU ASK WHERE I AM GOING?"





FANCY DRESS.


TANCY


RESS.


'JusT like


Grandma?


Fan and mittens,


And my bonnet, all complete!
Sandal shoes, and clocked my stockings,


Only. you


can't see my feet!


"Did you ask where I am going?


Can't you


really, truly guess?


Why, it is my birthday party,


And this is my fancy


dress'! ii




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