• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 God made the world
 Eve and her sin
 The first death
 The good man Enoch and the sad...
 Noah comes out of the ark
 Man still proud and bad
 A-bra-ham, the man of faith
 The two towns that were burnt
 A-bra-ham sends for a wife for...
 Old I-saac
 Leah and Ra-chel
 Ja-cob and his sons
 The King's dreams
 Le-ah's sons go to buy corn
 The ten men go once more to...
 Ja-cob goes to E-gypt
 The hard tasks
 More of Mo-ses
 Mo-ses sent by God
 The plagues of E-gypt
 The Red Sea
 Manna
 God gave the law
 Moses once more in the Mount
 The spies
 The snakes
 Ba-la-am's ass
 The death of Moses
 Josh-u-a took Mo-ses' place
 The men who came to cheat the men...
 The jud-ges
 Gi-de-on
 Gi-de-on's fleece
 God is with Gideon
 The strong man Sam-son
 Ruth
 The birth of Sam-u-el
 The Ark in the camp
 The Ark sent back
 Saul the king
 Go-li-ath
 Saul's death
 David made king
 The wise king
 E-li-jah
 E-li-sha
 Jo-nah
 The Jews in a strange land
 Da-ni-el
 The Jews come back to their own...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Bible stories in words of one syllable
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084089/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bible stories in words of one syllable
Uniform Title: Bible
Physical Description: x, 160 p., 4 leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: M.A.B
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Unwin Brothers (Firm) ( Printer )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) -- Tract Committee
Publisher: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
E. & J.B. Young & Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: Unwin Brothers
Publication Date: [1895?]
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bible stories, English -- O.T -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Jews -- History -- Juvenile literature -- 586 B.C.-70 A.D   ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- Jerusalem   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Chilworth
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by M.A.B.
General Note: 'Published under the direction of the Tract Committee'.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084089
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222193
notis - ALG2430
oclc - 231833480

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Dedication
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Preface
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
        Page 10
    God made the world
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Eve and her sin
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The first death
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The good man Enoch and the sad fruits of sin
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Noah comes out of the ark
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Man still proud and bad
        Page 26
    A-bra-ham, the man of faith
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    The two towns that were burnt
        Page 31
    A-bra-ham sends for a wife for his son
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Old I-saac
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Leah and Ra-chel
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Ja-cob and his sons
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The King's dreams
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Le-ah's sons go to buy corn
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The ten men go once more to E-gypt
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Ja-cob goes to E-gypt
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    The hard tasks
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    More of Mo-ses
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Mo-ses sent by God
        Page 65
        Page 66
    The plagues of E-gypt
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    The Red Sea
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Manna
        Page 75
        Page 76
    God gave the law
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Moses once more in the Mount
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The spies
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The snakes
        Page 86
    Ba-la-am's ass
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The death of Moses
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Josh-u-a took Mo-ses' place
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    The men who came to cheat the men of Is-ra-el
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The jud-ges
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Gi-de-on
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Gi-de-on's fleece
        Page 106
    God is with Gideon
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The strong man Sam-son
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Ruth
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    The birth of Sam-u-el
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    The Ark in the camp
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    The Ark sent back
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Saul the king
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Go-li-ath
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Saul's death
        Page 138
        Page 139
    David made king
        Page 140
        Page 141
    The wise king
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    E-li-jah
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    E-li-sha
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Jo-nah
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
    The Jews in a strange land
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Da-ni-el
        Page 156
        Page 157
    The Jews come back to their own land
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Advertising
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



'8''


"Ft )cil
/at'~/QT

































,,



vi ~di~P~OI~RB~' I'
-,

~~
-








TC-~-.' ~df~ i Is---:_
::~--~-~----

r-- J B






auaar ~ND EvE BENT ovl os EuEN.







BIBLE STORIES

IN


WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.




SB

M. A. B.


PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE TRACT COMMITTEE.







LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,
NORTHUMBERLAND AVENUE, CARING CROSS;
43, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, AND 48, PICCADILLY,
NEW YORK; POTT, YOUNG & (".












































UNWIN BROTHERS, LITTLE BRIDGE STREET, 71A, LUDGATE HILL, E.C.


; ,


















TO


MY OWN DEAR TWINS,


WHO, THOUGH THEY CAN NOW READ WELL,

AND FAST,

ARE NOT TOO OLD TO REMEMBER

WHEN THEY WISHED THERE WAS SOME BOOK

THEY COULD READ ALL ALONE

ON SUNDAY;

AND WHO WILL LIKE THEIR AUNTIE

TO DEDICATE

THIS LITTLE BOOK TO THEM.


M. A. B.











PREFACE.


So many pens have already been busy in
writing "Bible Stories" in simple forms
for very young children, I should be almost
tempted to doubt the necessity of the little
work I have now completed, did I not find
many parents and children desiring some-
thing more consecutive than the detached
fragments and mere stories from Scripture
which have yet appeared. I trust this
little book may afford much pleasure and
interest to many children, and occupy those





PREFACE.
Sunday hours often difficult to while away,
when Mamma has not time," or "is too
tired to read to us."
I cannot, of course, reduce every word to
a monosyllable, but I hope by dividing, as
I have done, proper names, and the few
words of more than one syllable which I
have been obliged to introduce, to make
them easily read. If the reading of this
little book affords the little ones as much
pleasure as the writing of it has given me,
I shall be well repaid.


M. A. B.












CONTENTS.


CHAPTER PAGE
I. God made the World ... ... .. 11
II. Eve and her Sin ... ... ... 14
III. The First Death ... ... ... ... 16
IV. The Good Man Enoch ... ... 18
V. Noah comes out of the Ark ... ... 22
VI. Man still Proud and Bad ... ... 26
VII. Abraham, the Man of Faith ... ... 27
VIII. The Two Towns that were Burnt ... 81
IX. Abraham sends for a Wife for his Son ... 82
X. Old Isaac ... ... .. .. 85
XI. Leah and Rachel ... ... ... ... 88
XII. Jacob and his Sons ... ... ... 42
XIII. The King's Dreams ... ... ... 46
XIV. Leah's Sons go to buy Corn ... ... 49
XV. The Ten Men 'go once more to Egypt ... 52
XVI. Jacob goes to Egypt ... ... ... 56
XVII. The Hard Tasks ...... ... ... 59
XVIII. More of Moses ... ... ... ... 63
XIX. Moses sent by God ... ... ... 65
XX. The Plagues of Egypt... ... .. 67
XXI. The Red Sea ... ... ... ... 73






COI TENTS.
CHAPTER PAGE
XXII. Manna ... ... .. ... ... 75
XXIII. God gave the Law... ... ... .. 77
XXIV. Moses once more in the Mount ... 80
XXV. The Spies ... ... ... ... ... 82
XXVI. The Snakes ... ... ... ... 86
.XXVII. Balaam's Ass .. ... ... ... 87
XXVIII. The Death of Moses ... ... ... 90
XXIX. Joshua took Moses' Place... ... ... 92
XXX. The Men who came to cheat Israel ... 97


XXXI. The Judges......
XXXII. Gideon ... ......
XXXIII. Gideon's Fleece ...
XXXIV. God is with Gideon ... .
XXXV. The Strong Man Samson...
XXXVI. Ruth ... ......
XXXVII. The Birth of Samuel ...
XXXVIII. The Ark in the Camp...
XXXIX. The Ark sent back ...
XL. Saul the King ......
XLI. Goliath ... ...
XLII. Saul's Death ... ...
XLIII. David made King ... .
XLIV. The Wise King ...
XLV. Elijah ... ...
XLVI. Elisha ... ...
XLVII. Jonah ......


XLVIII. The Jews in a Strange Land ... .
XLIX. Daniel ... ... ... ... .
L. The Jews come back to their own Land


... ... 102
... 104
... ... 106
... 107
... ... 110
... 114
... ... 120
... 124
... ... 127
... 129
... ... 132
... 182
138
... ... 140
... 142
... ... 145
... 148
... 160










BIBLE STORIES.


CHAPTER I.
GOD MADE THE WORLD.
OU have heard, my dear child-ren,
of the great and good God, and
how much love He shows us, and
all you have heard will make you
glad to hear more, and 'glad to
read for your-self some of the great things
He has done; so I will write some of these
great things in such short words that you
can sit down and read them to your-self.
Will not that be nice ?
First of all, I ust tell you of the time
when there was no earth as it now is; but




BIBLE STORIES


when it had no form or shape, when there
was no one on it, and it was all dark. Then
God spake, and it was light; and He put
the bright sun in the sky to give light by
day, and the sweet pale moon and stars to
shine in the night.
And God told the seas how far they were
to come, and that they were not to come on
the part of the land where He would have it
dry. He made the green grass and the
tall trees, and all the plants; and then He
made all the beasts, both small and great,
and the birds, and the fish to- swim in the
sea. Then, last of all, God made man.
He made him after His own like-ness, good,
and free from all sin.
God put man to live in a sweet place
where gay plants and rich fruits grew,
where there was no need for the man to
work hard, and grow hot, and worn, as men
must do now. Then God told the man he
was to be lord of all this, and He made




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


all the beasts and birds, and all that had
life, to come to the man that he might give
them all their names. Now when God had
done all this He saw that the man had no
one to live with him, no one to speak to,
and God knew he would be sad and lone-ly,
so He gave him a wife to love him, and to
live with him and be a help to him. -_
The name of this first man was Adam,"'
and the name of his wife was Eve.'" So
these two were to live in this sweet place I
told you of, the name of which was E-den;
and they were to have all the fruits of the
earth to eat, all but the fruit of one tree.
There were in E-den two trees, one of which
was the Tree of Life "; the other, which
God said they should not eat of, would, if
they ate of it, make them to know what was
good and what was wrong as God knows it.
I dare say it seems to you when God gave
them so much they should not have sought
to eat of that tree, or break that one rule ?





BIBLE STORIES


I grieve to say they did not feel this, and so
I have to tell you at once of their sin and
grief.

CHAPTER II.
EVE AND HER SIN.
ONE day Eve was near the tree which God
said would, if they ate its fruit, make them
wise as God, and she saw a snake, which
spoke to her and bade her eat the fruit, and
said it would be well for her and for the
man if she would do so. Eve ought to have
known that what God had told her must
be true, and should have paid no heed to
what this snake said, for he was in truth
the Devil, who took the shape of the snake;
but no, she heard the false words, and she
took of the fruit and did eat, and gave some
to the man and he ate it; and o they broke
the rule of the good, kind God, who had
done so much for them.




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


And now you must hear what came of this
first sin. God, who sees all things, saw at
once what A-dam and Eve had done, and
He came and spoke to them, and-said they
should live no more in this nice, sweet place
where He had first put them, lest they might
eat of the Tree of Life," and so live on and
on in sin. So He sent a watch to watch by
the tree with a sword of flame, to keep them
from the fruit.
Nor was this all. God put a curse on
the earth that He had made so fair, and
for man's sin it brought forth thorns and
weeds, and man had to work hard to get
food; and pain arid grief came where all
had been so fair, and good, and glad.
Oh, poor Eve! must she not have been
sad to think of all she had brought on the
earth? Yes; but while I tell you of the
grief, I must tell you as well how God, in
His great love, gave poor A-dam and Eve
a hope, a bright hope. What was that, do





BIBLE STORIES


you think ? No less a hope than that in
time His own dear Son should come as one
of her seed, and should save the world from
sin and shame, and set man once more at
peace with God. Think how good and kind
He was to give this glad hope at bnce

CHAPTER III.
THE FIRST DEATH.
THE next thing I have to tell you is so sad,
it will grieve me to tell it and you to hear.
Adam and Eve had two sons, whose names
were Cain and A-bel. Cain's work was to
dig the ground and grow corn and fruit;
and Abel took care of the sheep and flocks.
One day Cain brought some of the fruit of
the ground to God that He might see it, and
take it and bless him. For the same end
A-bel brought a lamb out of his flock to God.
And when God saw these two gifts, that
which A-bel brought did please Him, but




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


I--fz


1/3




BIBLE STORIES


it was not so with what Cain brought, and
this made Cain wroth with A-bel, so wroth,
that he rose up and slew him: yes, he slew
him whom he was bound to love so much!
When God saw it, He told Cain He
knew what he had done, and he would
let him live no more with those whom he
loved, but he should go forth by him-self,
and no one should be kind to him or care
for "him, but all should hate him for the bad
deed that he had done. This death of
A-bel was, yot gsee, the first death there had
been in the worldh;aud this once more
must make us think of poor Eve, and her
deep grief. Vk
CHAPTER IV,
THE GOOD MAN ENOCH AND THE SAD FRUITS
OF SIN.
THE man I shall next tell you of was
E-noch; he was a grand-son of A-dam,
and of him I must tell you that he was so




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE. 19
good and true in all his ways that God took
him to live with Him, and did not let
him die. Oh, is not that a glad thought,,
that with no pain or grief he should pass
from his good life here to a glad life with
God.
Now you must try and think that more
and more men were born in the world day
by day, but I will not try and tell you
their names, you could not read them if I
did. But I grieve to say they did not get
bet-ter, or, like E-noch, walk near to God;
no, they were so bad, so full of sin, that God,
who saw it all, said, "I will sweep men whom
I have made from off the face of the earth."
And in all the whole world there was but
one man who found grace in God's sight.-;
This man's name was Noah; and God told
this man that He meant to send a flood; a
great rain on the earth, which would drown
all the world. God told Noah to build an
ark, or ship, that he might be safe in it




BIBLE STORIES


when the flood should come. God told him
how he was to build it. Now all this was
strange news to Noah, but he did not doubt
that that which God said was true, and he
set to work to build this ark at once, and as
he built it, he told all the men he spoke to
what God had said, and of the flood which
was to come, but they did not care, all they
did was to laugh and mock at Noah; so
year by year, year by year did Noah work
on, and all that time things went. on
just as they had done; but still Noah was
quite sure that God was true, and did not
stop his work.
When the ark was quite made, God told
Noah to take his wife, and his three sons
and their three wives with him, and go
into the ark; and then God sent two beasts
and two birds of each kind to Noah' to the
ark; and when all were in, God Him-self
shut the door. Then came down the great
rain; yes, night and day, day and night,





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


THE FLOOD.




BIBLE STORIES


for more than six long weeks the hard,
hard rain beat down on the earth. Down
it came till all men and beasts, all
that dwelt on the earth were dead;
yes, all the world which God so short
a time past had said was good," was now
one vast waste place. Once more we see
in this the grief which comes through sin.

CHAPTER V.
NOAH COMES OUT OF THE ARK.
BUT Noah-how did Noah get on in his
strange, large ship ? He was quite safe,
The hard rain beat, but did not come near
him; and though his heart must have been
sad for all those he had known on the
earth, yet for him there was peace, and rest
in God. His ark rode oin the sea and was
safe. He had heard God's voice, and he
knew what He said must be true. .Noah had
faith; he could not see the flood before




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


it came; but God's word was all true to him;
and so it should be to all of us; we should
trust in what God tells us, as Noah did.
It was a long time that Noah had to stay
in the ark after the six weeks of rain were
past, for of course the earth was all hid by the
flood, and there was no dry land to be seen.
But now God sent a high wind to blow,
and dry up the water; and when Noah
thought it might be dry, he sent out a bird
from the ark, and this bird flew up and down,
up and down, but found no place to rest on,
so it came back to Noah. Then in a short
time Noah sent out a dove, and the poor
dove found no place to rest on, so she, like
the dove, came back to the safe ark. In a
week more Noah sent out the dove to try in
what state the earth was, and this time the
dove came back with a leaf in her beak, to
show Noah that the trees were to be seen
on the earth. Still Noah thought he would
wait, and to make quite sure that he would




BIBLE STORIES


be wise to leave his safe ark, he sent the dove
out once more : then she found the earth
so dry, and fit to live on, she came back to
the ark no more. Still Noah did not come
forth of his own choice; God had told him
when to go and live in the ark, and now
God told him when it was fit he should
leave it. He said to Noah, "Go forth
from the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy
sons, and their wives, and take forth from
it all the live things with thee." So they
all came forth; and the first thing Noah
did when he found him-self on the dry
land was to build an al-tar where he and
his sons might make offerings and pray to
God, and thank Him for His care of them.
And when God saw what Noah did, He
said that He would drown the world no
more with a flood; and He set the bright
rain-bow in the sky, and bade Noah look at
it and know it was a sign that He would
no more send such a flood on the earth. /

















AA


bWAH'e SACRIFIOL.





BIBLE STORIES


CHAPTER VI.
MAN STILL PROUD AND BAD.
I DARE say you will think all pride after this
must have gone from the hearts of men, and
that they must have felt how great God was,
and how weak they were, when they had seen
what He could do in the flood. But no,
they soon grew proud once more; and then
they thought they would build a large town,
which all men would see, and think how
great they had been, and in the town they
would build a high, high place, which should
reach up to the sky. But God saw their
pride, and He would not have it; so He
put a stop to their work. How, do you
think ? He made all their speech strange,
so that no man knew what his friend
meant.
This, as you may think, soon put a stop
to their work. Nor was this all; for God





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


sent them to live in all parts of the earth,
to dwell no more in one place as they
had done. So their high place which they
thought so much of, the name of which was
Ba-bel, was not built.V/


CHAPTER VII.
A-BRA-HAM, THE MAN OF FAITH.
TIME went on, and more and more men
were born, and the world was much more
full. Oh, that they had been good and
true men, with the love of God in their
hearts But you will see as you go on how
sin grew as men grew. Still, I have to tell
you of good men and glad things, as well
as of what is bad and sad. So let me tell
you now of A-bra-ham, a man of faith, as
Noah was.
When first we hear of him he dwelt in a
land with all his friends, but God bade him





BIBLE STORIES'


leave this land, and go far from all he knew
to a land strange to him then, but which
God said He would give to his seed to dwell
in, and where He would bless them and
make them rich and great. So at once
A-bra-ham left his own land, and with his
wife, and his brother's son, whose name was
Lot, he went forth to the new strange land.
First, God led him from place to place,
and he grew rich in flocks and herds, and
so did Lot, till they had more than could
be well fed in one place, and they went
each one his own way that their men might
not strive for the grass on which to feed the
herds. The place where A-bra-ham went -'
was rich and fine, and there God bade him
stay, and said it should be his own land, and
that it was there he should grow rich.
But great and rich as he was, there was
one thing he had not, and which it was his
great, great wish to have, and that was a
child. So he told his wish to God, who





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


said this too he should have; yes, a son
and son's sons. Then God gave him a son
who was most dear to him, and whose name
was I-saac; and when I-saac was grown up
to be a boy, one day God told A-bra-ham to
take this dear son up to a hill, and there
lay a pile of wood, and bind his son and
kill him upon it, and give him up to Him.
Poor A-bra-ham, quite strong in his trust
in God, but with a most sad heart, did as
God bade him, and went up to the hill with
his dear boy, and as they went Isaac said,
"Here is wood, but where is a lamb for us
to of-fer ? and A-bra-ham said, God will
send a lamb," and so He did; for just as
A-bra-ham had bound his son, and was
rea-dy to kill him, he saw a ram caught in
the hedge by its horns, and heard a voice
which told him to stop; for God saw his
faith, and trust in Him, and would try him
no more.
Think of A-bra-ham's joy as he went





BIBLE STORIES


ABRAHAH AND ISAAO.


.- -
_ .1- .- -- f\
(---- -- _--, \





17

4 'AL





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


home with his dear boy still by his side,
and how his trust and faith in his God
must have grown still more and more. i

CHAPTER VIII.
THE TWO TOWNS THAT WERE BURNT.
Now you must hear some more of Lot, who,
when he and Abraham found they must
part, went to live in a large town.
The men who were in this town were
bad, bad men, and God told Abraham he
meant to send fire down and kill them all.
Then did Abraham pray and ask God that
He would not do so if there were some few
good men found there. But in all that
large town, and a town close by, there was.
no good man save Lot. So God sent two
an-gels to warn Lot of what was to come
to pass, and bade him take his wife and his
sons and their wives out of the town; and
the an-gels led them out. But as they




BIBLE STORIES


went Lot's wife did look back at the town,
though they were told they must not do
this, and at once God smote her, and she
was made in-to a pil-lar of salt. See
how sad it was that sheqvould not do what
God bade her! And as soon as Lot and
those with him were safe out of the place,
God sent down fire, and burnt both towns
quite up.
This is all I need tell you of Lot;
and we will now hear more of A-bra-ham
and his son. /
CHAPTER IX.
A-BRA-HAM SENDS FOR A WIFE FOR HIS SON.
A-BRA-HAM did not wish his son to take a
wife of the land where he was, and he made
up his mind to send his head man to fetch
a wife for I-saac from the land whence God
had brought him. When the head man
came to this land, the beasts he had with
him were in want of drink, and he took




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


them to the side of a well, and soon there
came to the well a young girl, who drew
from the well and gave drink to his poor
beasts. She was a kind, nice girl, with a
sweet face, and he gave her gifts, and bade
her tell him her name. This she did, and
led him to her home, where he was bade to
stay and rest, and where her friends gave
him all he had need of. So he told them
who he was and what he had come to this
place for, and said he should like' to take
this nice kind girl back with him to be wife
to I-saac, and she was glad to go with him,
for he spoke well of I-saac and of A-bra-
ham. This girl's name was Re-be-kah.
I must give you these long names to spell
out; but some one, I am sure, will tell you
how to call them. (
So Re-be-kah went with this man to
I-saac's house. He was out in the fields;
and he. saw them come, and he spoke to the
girl and saw her face, and his heart was




BIBLE STORIES


made glad that God had sent him so good
a wife.
By and by I-saac and Re-be-kah had two
sons born, to whom they gave the names of
E-sau and Ja-cob, and of them there is
much you must hear. They were twihs, but
E-sau was born just a short time before
Jacob.
When they grew up it was E-sau's work
to go into the fields and hunt, and he was
wise as to how to catch game'; but Ja-cob,
who did not care for such wild sports, dwelt
at home in his tent.
One day E-sau came home from a long
hunt, quite faint for want of food, and he
found that Ja-cob had just made some good
soup which he meant to eat. Then Esau said,
" Feed me, I pray thee, with thy soup, for
I am faint." And Jacob said, "I will give it
thee if for it thou wilt sell to me all that
which thou wilt have as first-born son when
our fa-ther dies. Thou wilt have it all





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


thou art the first-born." And so much did
E-sau want the soup, he sold his rights as
first-born for the sake of it..

CHAPTER X.
OLD I-SAAC.
NEXT we hear how Ja-cob got his fa-ther
to bless him more than E-sau. This is
how that came to pass. I-saac, by the time
I tell you of, was quite old and blind, and
one day he told E-sau to go and hunt some
game and cook it, and bring it to him, and
he would bless him.
Re-be-kah heard him say this, and her love
for Ja-cob was great, and she did not want
him to lackwhat E-sau had; so she badehim
kill a kid, and she made a good dish of meat,
then she told Ja-cob to put the skins of the
kid on his hands and neck, for Ja-cob was
a man with a smooth skin, but E-sau's skin
was rough and had much hair on it.
02




BIBLE STORIES


When Ja-cob had done this, he took the
dish of kid to I-saac, and said, "Rise, I
pray thee, and eat."
And the old fa-ther said, How hast thou
been so quick, my son ?"
And Ja-cob said, The Lord God brought
it to me." Still the poor blind old man
had doubts as to which son it was, for he
thought the voice was the voice of Ja-cob,
Then he felt his hands, which had the
skins of the kid on them, and he thought
it must be E-sau with his rough skin. And
so at last he did bless him with the first
and best bless-ing, as though it was his
first-born son.
No doubt God let all this be; still, the
act of sin was no less on the part of Ja-cob.
By and by poor E-sau came in from his
hunt, and when he had made his game fit
to eat, he took it to his fa-ther and said,
"Rise, eat, and bless me, my fa-ther."'
Then I-saac said, "Who art thou ?" and he





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


ISAAO AND ESAU.




BIBLE STORIES


said, "I am thy son, thy first-born son
E-sau."
I-saac saw the false act of Ja-cob, and
was sad, but he told E-sau that he "had
blest Ja-cob, and he must be blest." Then
E-sau wept, and said, "Canst thou not
bless me as well, 0 my fa-ther?" Then
I-saac blest him, but could not change what
he had said which made Ja-cob head and
lord of all the sons of I-saac.,

CHAPTER XI.
LEAH AND RA-CHEL.
You will not think it strange that E-sau
was wroth with Ja-cob, and said he would
slay him; so their mo-ther bade him leave
her, and go to a far-off land, the land
where she was born, that he might be safe.
Then he went far from his home, and as he
went on his way night came on, and he laid
down on the ground to sleep, with a stone




IN WORD OF ONE SYLLABLE.


upon which to rest his head.! While he slept
he saw a glad sight; he saw in a dream high
steps that went up from the earth to the sky,
and on them an-gels of God, who went up
and down; and at the top he saw the Lord
God, who spoke to him and told him He
would give that land where he lay to him and
to his seed, and that He would bless him and
make him great and rich. When Ja-cob
woke up his heart was glad, and he swore
that he would seek to do henceforth that
whichwas right, and to walknear to God, who
was so good to him in of spite all his sins.
Then Ja-cob went on his way, and came
to the land to which his mo-ther had sent
him, and he went in-to a field, where there
was a well, by the side of which were three
flocks of sheep which had laid down to rest,
and the men who had the care of them were
with them.
Ja-cob spoke to the men, and said, "Do
you know La-ban?,'




BIBLE STORIES


Now La-ban was the man his mo-ther
had bade him seek, and the men said, Yes,
we know him, and soon will his young girl
Ra-chel come here with his sheep, which
she takes care of." When she came Ja-cob
went'to help her put the stone off the
well, and he gave drink to her sheep; and
he told her who he was and whence he
came, and she, quite glad to hear it, took
him to her home.
There, year by year, did he stay, for his
love'for Rachel was great, and he would
have her for his wife; but Laban made
him first take to wife her sis-ter Leah,
whom he did not love so much; and then
he had to wait on some years more ere he
could get Ra-chel for his wife.
You know, in the land I tell you of, men
might have two or more wives.
Well, at last, when Ja-cob had got his
two wives, and had grown quite rich in
sheep and goats and cows, he thought it




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


best to go to his old home; and as he
went, who should he meet but E-sau; and
you may think he felt some fear when he
saw him, for he knew how bad and false he
had been to him.
He sent some of his men to E-sau with
gifts of cows and sheep, but he did not
dare to come him-self till he heard that
his heart was kind, and his wrath had
passed by; and to his joy, when they came
near E-sau ran to meet him, and kiss
him, and spoke kind words to his wives
and sons, and would not take the gifts
till Ja-cob told him it would make him
more glad he should do so.
Yet one thing more took place while
Ja-cob was on his way home.
It was just at the time when he had sent
his men on with the gifts to E-sau.
While he stood by him-self God met
him face to face, and told him He should
change his name from Ja-cob to Is-ra-el.,




BIBLE STORIES


You will now find that I speak of him
from time to time by his new name, and
that his sons and grand-sons, bore the
name of Is-ra-el-ites, or the men of
Is-ra-el.

CHAPTER XII.
JA-COB AND HIS SONS.
AND now I have a good deal to tell you of
Ja-cob or Is-ra-eL, JFirst, you must hear,
that his wife Le-al had ten sons;I but his
dear wife Ra-chel for a long time had none,
and he thought God did not mean to bless
her with them. Then at last, to his and
her great joy, she had two boys, whose
names were Jo-seph and Ben-ja-min.
And for the great love he bare to his wife
Ra-chel, his love for these two sons was
deep and strong.
Now the ten sons of Le-ah did not like
to see this great love of their fa-ther for




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


Jo-seph, and they made up their minds
they would get rid of him.
So one day when they were out in the
fields with their sheep, they saw him come
in-to the field, and they said, "Let us put
him down in-to this pit, and kill a goat,
and dip his gay coat which his fa-ther gave
him, in the blood of the goat, and take it
home to his fa-ther and tell him a wild
beast has put him to death."
But it seems one of these bad men had
not quite so hard a heart as the rest, and
he said, Not so, let us not kill him, but
\let us sell him to these men whom you
may see come this way."
Then they took him up out of the pit
where they had put him, and sold him to
some strange men from the land of Egypt,
whom just then they saw pass by.
Poor boy! how sad he must have felt;
and how sad must his poor fa-ther have
been, whose love for him was so great, when






BIBLE STORIES


JOSEPH SOLD BY HIS BRETHREN.




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


he saw the gay coat all red with blood, and
heard the false tale of his death.
So Jo-seph went far off, to Egypt, a
strange land, and there, in a short time,
and for no fault of his, he was cast in-to a
jail. You know what that is, do you not ?
It is a strong place built round with high
walls, from whence no man can get out, and
where are put the thieves and bad men who
are not fit to live free lives.
But Jo-seph, as I told you, had done no
harm or wrong, and was put in there for no
cause. So good was he while he was there
that the head man of the jail was kind to
him, and made him help him to take care
of the men in the jail.
By and by, two of these men dreamt
strange dreams, and thought these dreams
must mean to show them what was to come
to pass. Then God made Jo-seph wise to
see what they meant, and this he told to
the men, who, in time, found his words




-BIBLE STORIES


come true; and you will see how in this
way God's help came to Jo-seph. /


CHAPTER XIII.
THE KING S DREAMS.
IN a short time the king of this land of
Egypt had some strange dreams, and he
sent for all his wise men and bade them
tell him what his dreams meant. But no
one could do so; then one of the men who
had been in jail with Jo-seph, told the
King that there was a wise young man
there whose words had come true in the
case of his dream.
The King then sent for Jo-seph and
told him his dreams, and bade him tell
him what they meant.
You would like, I am sure, to hear what
these dreams were.
One was, that the King saw seven full






IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


JOSEPH INTERPRETS PHARAOH'S DIRNAX.




BIBLE STORIES


ears of corn and seven thin ears, and the
seven thin ears ate up the seven full ears.
And then he dreamt he saw seven fat cows
come up out of a stream, and seven thin
cows come up from the same stream and
eat up the seven fat cows.
Then God gave Jo-seph to know what
these dreams meant; and he said, These
two dreams mean the same thing. God
will send seven years when the corn and
fruits of the earth shall grow well and give
much food; and then He will .send seven
years when all shall fail, and there will be
no food to eat. So now let the King be
wise and set a man to rule the land, and
store the corn, that there may be no want
when the bad time comes."
All this the King felt to be true, and he
thought, what man can I find more wise
than this one ? And he put a ring on
Jo-seph's hand, and made him to rule the
land next to the King him-self And wise




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE. 49
and well it was the King did this, for all
the seven good years did Jo-seph make the
men of the land save up the corn and put
it safe in barns; and when at last the
seven bad years came, and no seed came
up, and no corn was to be had, while all
the lands round were in sad want of bread
this land was well fed, for the corn they
had was like the sand of the sea, so much
was there.j

CHAPTER XIV.
LE-AH'S SONS GO TO BUY CORN.
IN the land where Ja-cob and his sons
dwelt there was no corn, nor bread, and
their want was great; so when Ja-cob
heard how much corn there was in E-gypt
he said to his sons, Go to E-gypt, where
I hear there is much corn, and buy, that
we may live and not die."
So the ten sons of Le-ah went; but
D





BIBLE STORIES


Ja-cob would not let Ben-ja-min go; for
he said, "Lest some harm come to him."
Anhd whei. these ten men came to buy
corn, Jo-seph it was who sold it to them;
but they did not know him, though he
knew them; and they made low bows to
him, as to a great and strange man.
Then Jo-seph spoke with a rough voice,
and in a way not his own to them, and
said, Whence come ye ?"
'Then they said, "We come from the
land of Ca-na-an to buy food."
And Jo-seph made as though he did not
know them, and said, "Ye are spies, come
to spy out our laid, and see how poor we
are."
And they said, "Nay, my lord; but to
buy food are we come. We are all the
sons of one man, and are true men and no
spies.. We are twelve sons of one man:
ten are here, one is at home, and one is
not."




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


SThen Jo-seph said, I will prove you, if
you be true men or spies, Ye shall not go
forth from hence till the young one comes
from home; send one of you to fetch him,
and the rest shall stay here in jail till he
is come.j'
Then he kept them in jail for three days,
but his heart was sad, to think of his
old fa-ther and Ben-ja-min at home and in
want, so he kept one of them bound in
jail, and the rest he let go with corn to
their home; but he bade them come back
soon, and bring the young one with them.
Then Jo-seph had corn put in all their
sacks, and when they paid for it, he bade
his men put the money they had paid, as
well as the corn, in all their sacks.
This the men did not know of till'they
had gone some way, and then, when one of
them topk some food out of his sack to
give to his ass, lo! he found his money
there.




BIBLE STORIES


When they got home to Ja-cob they told
him all that had come to pass, and they
un-did their sacks, and each one found his
money in his sack. They could not think
what all this meant; but as they had guilt
and grief in their hearts for the bad deed they
had done some years past to Jo-seph, this
strange thing gave them more grief than joy.
And what did their poor fa-ther feel when
he heard them ask him to let them take his
dear young son to E-gypt ? He felt he could
not part with him, and he said, My two
sons Jo-seph and. Si-me-on are gone, and
now you would take this one as well. My
son shall not go down with you."


CHAPTER XV.
THE TEN MEN GO ONCE MORE TO E-GYPT.
So for some time they went no more to
E-gypt; but when all the corn they had





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


brought with them was gone, and they
were in sad need of food, they once more
said to Ja-cob, Let us go to E-gypt, and
take the boy with us; for if we take him
not we shall get no corn."
So at last, but with a sad heart, the poor
old man bade them go; but he said they
were to take gifts with them, and money, and
the money they had found in their sacks,
and try to win Jo-seph to be kind to them.
When they came to Jo-seph, and he saw
the lad for whom he had so true a love, his
heart was full of love and joy, and he had
a feast made in his house, and these men
brought to eat with him.
Still they did not know him. They gave
him their gifts, and spoke to him as to a
'strange man.
And Jo-seph was kind to them, and bade
them eat and drink and not fear; and to
Ben-ja-min he sent the best and most of
all there was to eat.





BIBLE STORIES


But still he did not tell them who he
was; and once more he let them go with
'their sacks full of corn; and once more he
made his men put the money in the sacks'
mouths; and yet more, he bade them put
his own cup that he drank out of in Ben-
ja-min's sack; and then he let them go.
And when they were not long gone, he
sent his head-man to stop them, and tell
them he knew they had got his cup.
They were full of grief and pain that
this should be said of them, and said,
" Search and see, for we have not done
this bad thing."
And lo! it was found in Ben-ja-min's sack.
Then they rent their clothes, and went
back to the town.
And when they came to Jo-seph's house
they fell on the ground at his feet. And
he said, "Go back, all of you,' to your
fa-ther; I will but keep him in whose sack
the cup was found."




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


Now this one was just the one, the loss
of whom they knew would break their poor
old fa-ther's heart; so they told Jo-seph of
their fa-ther's fond love for Ben-ja-min,
and all he had said to them ere he would
trust his dear son with them. f
And their grief was great. So Jo-seph
could hide what he felt no more. He sent
all who stood by from the room, and he
wept, and said, "I am Jo-seph: doth my
fa-ther yet Nve ? "
They could not speak for fear; but he
said, Come near, and fear not; you sold
me to this land, but it was God who sent
me, that I might save your lives. Go and
tell your fa-ther that I am lord of all
E-gypt, and bring him here to me; and
you shall dwell in this land, and have all
you need."
And he fell on Ben-ja-min's neck and
wept; nor did he fail to kiss those who had
once been so hard to him.




BIBLE STORIES


CHAPTER XVI.
JA-COB GOES TO E-GYPT.
WHEN the King of E-gypt heard of Jo-
seph's wish to have his fa-ther with him,
he bade him send and bring Ja-cob and his
sons, and their wives, and all they had, and
to come up to live in E-gypt. And, old as
Ja-cob was, when he heard this glad news
he said, I will go and see my son ere I
die."
God did not leave Ja-cob in doubt if it
were right that he should go to E-gypt;
but as he went on his way God spoke to
him, and said, I am God; fear not to go
down to Egypt, for I will there make thee
great. I will go down there with thee, and
I will bring thee forth thence once more."
So Ja-cob went on his way with no fear.
And when they came to the land, Jo-
seph drove forth to meet them; and when





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


he saw his fa-ther he fell on his neck and
wept long.
Ah! can you not think of the joy they
felt; they who had not met for so long, and
whose love was so great.
And poor old Ja-cob said, Now let me
die, for I have seen thy face once more."
Then Jo-seph went to the King, and
took 'ive of the sons of Ja-cob with him,
and told the King who they were, and that
they had cows and sheep, which they had
brought with them, for there was no grass
in their own land.
And the King bade Jo-seph give them
the best part of E-gypt to dwell in, and
there they were in peace for long, till the
time of old Ja-cob's death drew nigh, and
he sent for Jo-seph, and told him when he
was dead he would not be laid in the grave
in E-gypt, but in his own land.
And Ja-cob put his hands on the heads
of Jo-seph's two sons to bless them; and




BIBLE STORIES


when he did so he laid his hand first not
on the first-born son, but on the young one;
and so he did bless him first and best.
Then Ja-cob sent for all his sons, and
spoke much to them of what should come
to pass, and spoke the words God gave him
to speak to them. Strange words they were
to them, then; but much must they have
thought of them in the years that came,
when he who spoke to them was dead.
And when he had made an end of all his
wise, God-sent words, he went to his last
sleep.
God took him from them.
Poor Jo-seph! it was sad to him to see
his fa-ther die, and he fell on his fa-ther's
face-his dead, cold face-and wept.
Then he bade wise men, who knew how
to do such things, to wrap the dead corpse
up with sweet spice; and by and by he got
the King's leave to take the corpse, and lay
it, as Ja-cob had bade him, not in the strange





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


land of E-gypt, but in a grave in Ca-na-an,
where A-bra-ham had laid his wife.
And the King, who was kind in all his
thoughts for Jo-seph, sent men to help him.
So Jo-seph and the house of Ja-cob"
grew rich and great in Egypt; and when
Jo-seph grew old, he bade them, when he
was dead and they left E-gypt, not leave his
bones there; for, you see, none of these
men could cease to think of their own land
of Ca-na-an, to which God had brought
them long since.

CHAPTER XVII.
THE HARD TASKS.
ALL you have yet heard of the life of the
sons of Ja-cob in E-gypt has been good,
but this peace did not last.
When the King, who I told you was so
kind to them, was dead, and Jo-seph was
dead, there was a new king, who had not





BIBLE STORIES


known Jo-seph, and who did not like to
see the men of Is-ra-el (that is, the sons
and sons' sons of Ja-cob, whose name, I
have told you, God said was to be Is-ra-el)
grow so great and rich in his land. So he
sought to put them down, and keep them
poor and low; and he made them work
hard to make bricks, and build, and work
hard in the fields.
And far worse than this-he said when a
boy was born to the Is-ra-el-ites he was to
be put to death, that no more should grow
up to be men in his land; and he said that
when a boy was born the nurse should take
it and put it to death. But no, they had
not the heart to do this, and they were sure
it would not please God; so they would
not do it.
But this did not save the poor boys; for
the hard, bad king bade the men of E-gypt
take the poor boys and throw them into the
river: the girls he let live.





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


But God, who sees all that goes on at all
times, and has His own wise ways, let one
man child be kept safe to do a great work for
Him, and of this child you shall now hear.
There was a man and his wife who had
a son born to them-a fine, fair child it
was, and the wife hid him, while he was
quite young, in his own home.
But when he was three months old she
found it hard to hide him more, and great
was her fear and dread lest some one shordd
find him out, and take him from her, and
cast him in-to the river.
So what did she do ? She made an ark
-a kind of small boat-of flags that grew
by the side of the stream, and she laid her
babe in it, and put it on the edge of the
stream in the flags which grew there.
Poor thing! with what a sad heart she
left her dear child there in all that risk!
By the stream she left a girl of hers to
watch, and see what would come to pass.







































MOSES IN THE BULRUSHES.




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


By and by a daugh-ter of the King came
to bathe in this stream, and, as she stood
at the side, she saw the small ark.
Then she sent one of her maids to fetch
it; and, hark! she heard the poor wee
babe cry. Then she felt much grief for it,
and said, This is one of the poor babes
the King would slay."
She made up her mind she would save
this child, and take it to her home. Then
the girl whom I told you stood by the stream
came up, and said, Shall I go and call a
nurse to nurse this child for thee ? And
the la-dy said, "Go !" So the girl ran and
brought the child's own mo-ther.

CHAPTER XVIII.
MORE OF MO-SES.
MOSES' mo-ther took him home to nurse
and care for him; and when he grew so old
that he did not need a nurse she took him




BIBLE STORIES


back to the lady at the King's court. With
her he was brought up, as if he had been
her own son; and it was she who gave him
the name of Mo-ses.
Now when Mo-ses grew to be a man he
saw how hard was the life led by the Is-ra-
el-ites in E-gypt, and he sought how to
help them.
Some of the things he did for them came
to the ears of the King; and he, in his
wrath, sought to slay Moses.
This God would not let be, for He had
much work for Mo-ses to do.
Mo-ses fled to the land of Mid-i-an, to
be safe from the King.
There he sat down by a well; and as he
sat there, some girls came to give their
sheep drink; then Mo-ses drew for them
from the well, and drove off some rude men
who would have kept them back from the
well.
, And the girls took Moses to their home,




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


and gave him bread to eat, and he dwelt
,vith them in their home, and took one of
them to be his wife.
At the death of this King of E-gypt, you
will grieve to hear a worse one came to the
throne, who put more hard work and toil
on the poor Is-ra-el-ites.
But though man was hard on them, God
saw them, and heard their cry for help; and
the help He sent them was by the same
Mo-ses I have told you of, one of them-
selves, kept safe, no doubt, by God for this
work.

CHAPTER XIX.
MO-SES SENT BY GOD.
MO-SES was out one day, in a lone, wild
place, with a flock of sheep, and there he
saw a strange sight; he saw a bright flame
come forth from a bush as if the whole
bush were on fire, yet it was not burnt I




BIBLE STORIES


Then God spoke to him from this bush,
and said, Mo-ses, Mo-ses;" and Mo-ses
said, "Here am I."
Then God said, Draw not near, but put
your shoes from off your feet, for I am here.
I am the God of thy fa-thers."
Then Mo-ses hid his face in fear.
God then told him how He had seen the
hard fate of the poor Is-ra-el-ites, and
heard their cry of grief, and was come down
to help them, and to lead them out of that
land to a rich land, which they should have
for their own.
And God said He would send Mo-ses to
lead them out.
Then said Mo-ses, "Who am I, that I
should do this ?"
And God said that He would go with
him; and though the task would be a hard
one, yet, by His strong arm, it should be
done at last.
God gave Mo-ses proofs or signs of His





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


strength, and of the help that should be
his.
Mo-ses did not like the task at all,
and he said to the Lord, that he could not
speak well, and was not a good man to
plead the Lord's cause.
Then the Lord said that A-ar-on, the
bro-ther of Mo-ses, should go with him;
and that He would give them both words
to speak, and would make them wise.
And God bade them take with them a
rod, through which He said they should
work great acts and deeds.

CHAPTER XX.
THE PLAGUES OF E-GYPT.
AT last, though it would seem with much
dread at his heart, Mo-ses went back to
E-gypt, to do the work which God had set
him; and as he went he met A-ar-on.
So they both went in to the King, and
a2




BIBLE STORIES


said, they had come to beg him to let them
lead the Is-ra-el-ites out of the land.
How wroth was the King; and how far
more hard he made the tasks of the poor
men!
He bade them who had charge of them,
press them more and more at their hard work.
They had, as I told you, bricks to make.
Now to make these bricks they had to
use straw, which was brought to them; but
now the King said they must go and find
the straw where they could; and yet they
must make the same bricks as if they had
straw to their hand; and if they did not,
men should beat them.
Poor men! this was hard work for them,
and it was hard for them to think that
Mo-ses and A-ar-on, who had come to help
them, should make their lot worse than it
had yet been.
Once more, the Lord spoke to Mo-ses, to
cheer im on; and now He sent him and




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


A-ar-on to work strange signs in the eyes
of the King.
But no, these strange signs would not
make him see the men were sent of God;
and he would not let the Is-ra-el-ites go.
So at last God, in His wrath, sent what
we call plagues on the land of E-gypt.
First He bade Mo-ses stretch his rod over
the water, and it and all the water in the
land was made blood, so that no one could
drink it, and all the fish in it died.
Then He sent frogs into all the land,
frogs into' the roads and fields, frogs into
the rooms and into the beds. A bad plague
this was, and the King said if the plague
of frogs was taken away, then would he let
the Is-ra-el-ites go.
So God took them off the land; and as
soon as they were gone, the heart of the
King grew hard once more; and he would
not let the men go.
Then God sent plague on plague.




BIBLE STORIES


He made all the dust turn into lice.
He made flies come thick over all things.
He sent a bad plague on all the beasts
in the land, which caused them to die.
He made bad boils to come on man and
beast.
He sent hard hail which beat down the
crops. And all that was not spoilt by the
hail, locusts came and eat up.
Then He made it so daik in the day, for
three whole days, that they could not move,
or see at all.
And when these plagues came, the King
said, if Mo-ses would pray God to take them
off the land, he would let the men of Is-ra-el
go; but it was just the same, each time;
as soon as the plague was gone the King's
heart grew hard.
But at last God sent a plague that did
quite touch the King's hard heart.
One day, God told Mo-ses to tell the
Is-ra-el-ites to kill in each house a lamb,





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


and put some of the blood of the lamb on
the posts of the doors; for He said that
night should He send one to pass through
the land, to kill the first-born of each house,
but the blood should show when a house
was that of an Is-ra-el-ite, for there would
he not slay; for none of these plagues came
on them.
And so it was done. And when morn
came, and the men of E-gypt woke up, lo !
in each house the first-born was dead.
Oh, what a land of grief it was that day,
and with what haste the King sent to Mo-ses
and A-ar-on, and bade them go, and take
all the Is-ra-el-ites with them ; fast, fast he
bid them go, lest more grief should yet come.
And so it was God set them free, and led
them out from the land where grief a\nd
toil had been their lot; and would have
led them at once to the good land He had
told Mo-ses of, had they been good and
true.







____ -:












=-0




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


CHAPTER XXI.
THE RED SEA.
You will think, when the king of E-gypt
had gone through so. much woe at the
Lord's hand, he would have let the Is-ra-
el-ites go in peace.
But no; when he heard they were gone,
he said, Why have we let them go ? Who
shall now serve us?" So he got his men
and his cars, and he drove with speed on
the way they had gone, and he found them
close to the Red Sea, which they had to
cross to get from his reach.
Then God, the same good God who had
led them forth, bade Mo-ses lift his rod up
and stretch out his hands to the sea; and
when he had done so, the sea rose up like
a wall on this side and on that, so that
the Is-ra-el-ites could pass through on dry
land.
Then the King and his men thought to




BIBLE STORIES


go in like way, on dry land; but God made
the wheels of their war cars fall off, so that
they could not drive fast, and when they
were but half way through the sea, the
men of Is-ra-el were safe on the far side.
When God, that good God, whose help is
so sure to come to those who trust Him,
saw they were safe, He made the walls of
the sea to close in and drown the King and
all his hosts!
Oh, the joy that Moses and all those he
had led out felt, that they were safe!
They sang at once a glad song of praise
to God.
They said, The Lord is my strength
and my song. He is my God; we will praise
Him. He is a man of war; the Lord is
His name. The king and his hosts has He
cast into the sea." And much more which
you will like to read when you can make
out the long words which are too much for
you now.




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


CHAPTER XXII.
MANNA.
AND now you say to yourself, These men
must have gone on their way in full joy and
trust in the God who had done such great
things for them."
No: after they had passed through the
Red Sea safe, they came to a place where
there was no stream for them to drink from ;
and though they went on till they found
one, it was not good. And did they then
trust God ?
No ; at once they said it was hard, and
made a grief of it to Mo-ses.
But God came to Mo-ses' help, and told
him to take a branch of a tree which He
would show him, and cast it in the stream,
and as soon as Mo-ses did so, the stream
was good for them to drink.
Then as they went on, they felt sad they
had left E-gypt; for they said they had




BIBLE STORIES


had good food there, and here they did not
know what to eat. So God sent them a
kind of bread. He made it come down
like frost on the ground each day, and they
were to go and get in all they would want
for each day, no more; if they took more,
God said it would turn bad, and would not
keep, but on the sixth day they were to get
what would last that day and the next; for
they were to do no work on the last day of
the week, which was God's day. And on that
day God did not send down this bread.
The name of this food was Man-na; it
was, to look at, like a small white seed;
and to taste, it was sweet.
I told you it would not keep, nor would
it, save that Mo-ses, by God's word, made
them pick up some and put it by in a pot,
that they and their sons, and sons' sons,
year by year might look at it, and know the
help God had sent them in the strange land.
And this kept, and did not turn bad.




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


CHAPTER XXIII.
GOD GAVE THE LAW.
As the men of Is-ra-el went through this
land, they came to a large, high hill, the
name of which was Mount Si-na-i. There
they set their tents up round the Mount.
God bade Mo-ses come up to speak to
Him in this Mount, and the men round in
their tents heard thun-der, and saw fire
come forth from the Mount.
Then God spake to Mo-ses, and gave
him laws by which he should rule the men
of Is-ra-el; and He gave him plans by
which he and the men of Is-ra-el should
know how to build a large tent for the Lord,
where He would meet with Him.
There was no part which God did not
show to him and tell him of; for God will
have men serve Him in His own way, and
none else.
And God told Mo-ses how he was to set




BIBLE STORIES


apart priests, and the dress they were to
wear, and the work they were to do im His
house. And He told him of the lights and
the oil they were to bless and use, and the
sweet scent they were to burn, and what
they were to offer.
And God told him how they were to
spend their weeks; six days for their own
work, and one to be kept for the Lord's use.
When He had said all this, He gave
Mo-ses two large slabs of stone, on which
with His own hand He wrote the laws.
Ah, how glad must Mo-ses have felt
when he "had heard all this, and knew he
might go down and tell it to the men he
thought stood at the foot of the Mount to
watch and wait for him. How he must
have thought, "Now I will make them
glad with all God's words to me."
Ah, no! ah, no! They did not wait;
they did not watch. In a short time they
said to A-a-ron, "Why has Mo-ses left





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


us ? We know not where he is gone. Up,
make us gods which shall lead us."
So A-a-ron bade them break off their
rings which were in their ears and in their
wives' ears, and bring them to him; and out
of these gold rings he made a calf of gold,
And he said, These be thy gods which
brought thee up out of the land of E-gypt."
The next day they made a great feast,
and sat down to eat and to drink, and rose
up to play. And while they did all this,
God bade Mo-ses go down to them, and He
told him what he should find. And God
was wroth with them. So Mo-ses went
down from the Mount, and in his hands he
took the two slabs of stone with the laws
which God wrote on them.
And when Mo-ses got down and saw the
calf, and the men dance and shout in its
praise, his grief and wrath were such, that
he cast the stones on the ground, so that
they broke.




BIBLE STORIES


Mo-ses then took the calf and burnt it
in the fire, and told the men how great their
sin had been in this want of trust in God,
and in that they had made gods to lead
them, when there was but one true God.

CHAPTER XXIV.
MOSES ONCE MORE IN THE MOUNT.
You will be glad to hear God let Mo-ses
hew out two more stones, like the first,
and take them up to the top of the Mount.
And there God spoke to Mo-ses once more,
and stood with him in the Mount. And
Mo-ses knelt there, and hid his face, and
heard with awe the words of the Lord.
And as the Lord bade him, he wrote the
words of the Law on the new stones.
And he was long up in the Mount with
God; and when he came down his face
shone, so that he had to put a veil on it
while he spoke to the men of Is-ra-el.









































THE TABERNAOLE.




BIBLE STORIES


Next we are told how Mo-ses and the
men of Is-ra-el made the house, or tent,
of God, just as God had told Mo-ses it was
to be made. And when it was done, a cloud
came down on it from God-a cloud by day,
and a cloud of fire by night-to show that
God was there.
The next part we read in God's Book
tells us all the laws which God gave to
these Is-ra-el-ites by Mo-ses. He told all
they were to do, and all they were not to do.
But I will not tell you all this; it is more
than you could think of while you are so
young.
CHAPTER XXV.
THE SPIES.
Now I will pass on to a time when these
men had so strong a wish for some new kind
of food, and not the same man-na I told you
God fed them with, that they wept, and
said, Who shall give us flesh to eat ?"





IN WORDS OF OE SYLLABLE.


And God's wrath was great with them;
and in His wrath He gave them their wish.
He sent them birds which we call quails,
and they were glad.
But while they yet ate of them God's
wrath sent on them a great plague; that is,
He made them quite ill and sick, so that
many died.
The men were worn and sad that they
went on and on so long, and yet did not
come to the good land which God had said
He would bring them to, and to which He
would have brought them much sooner had
they been good and true.
Some of them said the land where they
were to go was not a good land. Then
Mo-ses chose some men out from them, and
sent them on to see the land, and to spy
out what it was like.
And it was then the time when the
grapes were ripe; so these spies cut down
a bunch of grapes so large, that two men
S2




BIBLE STORIES


had to bear it on a pole. This was to
show how rich a land it was.
And they said, It is a good land and a
rich, but the men of the land are big and
strong, and we can-not fight them."
But two of the spies, Ca-leb and
Josh-u-a, said, "Let us go up and take
the land; we can do so well." But no;
the men of Is-ra-el would not hear these
two. They would but say they could not
go up to the land to take it, and that some
one must lead them back to E-gypt. They
were wrong and bad in all they said.
Then God spoke and said, for this their
sin not one of them, but Ca-leb and
Josh-u-a, should go in to the land to have
it. Their sons and young ones should go,
but not one 'of these men who had come up
out of E-gypt.
From time to time they broke forth in
wrath and bad words and deeds, and God
had to bring grief and death on them.




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


Once some of them were so bad, that
God made the earth open, and fire come up
and kill them.
They came to a place where there was
no drink for them, and at once they were
wroth, and did not think how God had
brought a stream from "the bare rock for
them some time back.
Then God bade Mo-ses take the rod he
had had in E-gypt, and speak to the rock,
and a stream would come forth.
And Mo-ses said, "Hear now, ye men.
Must we fetch you drink ouyt of this
rock?" And he smote the rock twice
with his rod, and the stream came' forth at
once for them.
Ah, but this time God's wrath was upon
Mo-ses, for he had made it out as if he
had brought the stream out of the rock,
without God's help, for he said, Must we
fetch drink out of this rock ?" and he struck
the rock, which God had not told him to do.




BIBLE STORIES


God thus warns us against pride, and
shows that He wills that we do what He
says, and nought else; for He told Mo-ses
that for this sin he should not lead the men
in to the land, but should die on the way.
It seems a small thing to you that
Mo-ses did. Yes, but we must have no
way or choice of our own, must not be proud
of anything which God gives us.
God's way is the right one; that must
we do.

CHAPTER XXVI.
THE SNAKES.
Now you shall hear of a plague of fierce
snakes which God sent in wrath for the sins
of these men; and these snakes bit, and their
bite was so bad, it brought death with it.
The men said to Mo-ses, This is
for our sins; pray the Lord that He may
help us."




WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


When Mo-ses did so, the Lord bade him
make a large snake of brass and set it up
on a high pole, and tell the men to look up
at it; and when the men who had bites
from the fierce snakes would look up at this
brass snake, they got well once more.


CHAPTER XXVII.
BA-LA-AM S ASS.
Now we come to a story which I dare say
you have heard; the story of the ass which
spoke.
As the men of Is-ra-el went on their way
they passed through a land where the King
(Ba-lak) felt much fear of them.
He knew their strength came from God;
so he sent to fetch a man whose name was
Ba-la-am, and who, he seems to have known,
could bless or curse from God.
And Ba-lak bade him come to curse these





BIBLE STORIES


men, and then he thought he could drive
them out from -the land.
But God said to Ba-la-am, Thou shalt
not go. Thou shalt not curse these men
for they are blest."
So Ba-la-am rose up and said to the men
whom the King had sent, Get you to your
land, for the Lord will not give me leave to
go with you."
So they went and told the King, and he
sent more men to Ba-la-am, and said, if he
would come he would make him rich.
But no, he would not go, till at last God
gave him leave to do so; but he was to
speak no word but that which God gave
him.
Next day Ba-la-am got up, and took
his ass, and rode with the men of the
King.
As he went on the road, the An-gel of
the Lord stood in the way with a drawn
sword. Ba-la-am did not see this, though




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


the ass did. And the ass would not go on
in the road, but would try and turn in-to a
field. And Ba-la-am smote the ass to
make it go on its way.
Still there stood the An-gel, and on each
side of the road there was a wall. And as
the ass could not pass she thrust her-self
close up to the wall, so as to crush Ba-
la-am's foot, and he smote her once more.
Still the ass saw the An-gel, and she fell
down. Then the Lord gave her the gift
of speech; and she said-
"What have I done that thou shouldst
smite me ?"
And Ba-la-am said, "If I had a sword
in my hand, now would I slay thee."
Then God let Ba-la-am see the An-gel.
And the Angel told him to go on his way
with the men, but to speak none but the
word of God.
Ba-lak came out to meet Ba-la-am, and
took him to a high place, whence he would




BIBLE STORIES


see all the men of Is-ra-el, and bade him
curse them.
But no, God would have him bless; and
bless he must.
In vain did Ba-lak plead that it was a
curse he sought for. God's will in this, as
in all else, must be done.

CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE DEATH OF MOSES.
I SHALL now pass on, and not speak of the
laws and rules laid down by God through
the lips of Mo-ses, but tell you of the time
when he was near to death, and when he
bade all the men-the twelve tribes they
were, who came from and kept the names
of the twelve sons of Ja-cob-come round
him.
These twelve tribes did Mo-ses bless,
bless with words from God; and he sang a
song, a grand song which you will love to




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


read by and by, in which he tells the name
of the Lord, that He is great, and all His
ways are good; that He is a Rock of
strength to all who trust Him; that He it
was who had led them out from the strange
land; that He had fed them on the way;
and much more, which it would be in vain for
me to try and write so that you could read it.
When he had said all this, he went up to
the top of a high mount.
Thence God let him see the land which
the tribes were to have for their own, but
where Mo-ses must not go, for that once
when he spake not wisely with his lips.
Thence he saw it all; and then in peace
he laid down to die.
An old man he was, twice as old as most
men are now when they die, but his eye
was not dim; nor was' he weak, nor his
strength gone.
He did God's work to the last, and he did
it well.




BIBLE STORIES


CHAPTER XXIX.
JOSH-U-A TOOK MO-SES' PLACE.
WHO was to lead the men on now? Who
was to take the place of Mo-ses? God gave
them now in-to the hands of Josh-u-a-one
of the two good spies I told you of-and he,
we are told, was wise, and on him Mo-ses
had laid his hands, to bless him and to
make him fit for the work he was to do.
The men of Is-ra-el were glad to have him
to lead them.
And God spake to him, and bade him lead
them on, and said He would give them all
the land; and that He would not leave him
to himself, nor fail him, but that he and
they must be strong and bold, and do all
that Mo-ses had taught them, and keep
God's laws in all things, and then He, the
Lord, would go with them, and be their
guide and their guard. So Jo-shua spoke




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


to the men, and said he would lead them if
they would let him; and the men said they
would go where he bade them, and do what
he told them.
And now God said He would lead them
at once into the land where they were to
dwell, but to get there they must cross a
deep stream, the name of which was Jordan;
but God bade them not fear, He would take
them through it. So He bade some of the
priests take the Ark, which was a kind of
chest kept in God's house, and in which were
kept all the things of most worth in that
House (as the pot with the man-na; Aaron's
rod, which he took with him into Egypt).
Well, as I said, God bade some priests
take this Ark, and all the men of Israel go
with them, and go to the stream; and as
soon as the priests' feet came to the edge
of the stream, back it went, as the Red
Sea had done, and left a safe dry path to
cross by I





BIBLE STORIES


Then Josh-u-a bade the men take twelve
stones-one stone for each of the tribes-
out of Jor-dan, and pile them up in
a heap at the place where they came
to, and where they spent the night.
This was done that when their sons and
sons' sons should say, What are these
stones, and what does this heap mean ? '
they should hear of the great deed done
for them on the day when the Lord
brought them safe through Jor-dan, and,
when they heard this, should praise the
Lord.
Now the men of Is-ra-el were no more in
a waste land, but were where they could
get corn and such things to eat; so their
need of the man-na was past, and God sent
it down no more.
When they came past the stream of Jor-
dan, they found there a large and strong
town, which was in the hands of their foes.
And, though they had full trust in the




IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


Lord, they did not see how they could take
so large a town. /
But it came to pass, as Joshua stood by
Je-ri-cho- hat was the name of the place
-he saw a man who stood by him with a
drawn sword in his hand; then Josh-u-a
said, "Art thou for us or not?" And
the man said, "As prince of the Lord's
host am I come to you."
See here, help came once more, straight
from the Lord, to these men, for whom He
had such care!
And the Lord told Joshua, by the angel
whom He sent, that, for six days, all the
men of war were to go round the town once
each day, and that some of the priests were
to bear the Ark, while seven priests should
go with them and it, and each take in his
hand a ram's horn. And on the last day
they should all go seven times round the
town, and then the seven priests should
blow a loud blast on the rams' horns, and











































THE FALL or *JE1QO,





IN WORDS OF ONE SYLLABLE.


they should all shout with a loud shout.
And all this they did, and when they did so,
the walls of the strong town fell down flat!
Yes, no strong men of war took it, no
strength got the day. But the Lord gave
it into their hands. The Lord was their
strength and their might.
Then they burnt the town with fire; but
they first took out of it the brass and the
gold, and all the things of real worth, that
they might use them in the House of God;
and on all else Josh-ua put a curse, as God
bade him.

CHAPTER XXX.
THE MEN WHO CAME TO CHEAT THE MEN
OF IS-RA-EL.
NEXT we read, in God's Word, of the way
in which God made a large town, the name
of which was Ai, to fall in-to the hands of
Josh-u-a, and how Josh-u-a burnt Ai, and
G




BIBLE STORIES


took its king, and hung him on a tree till
he was dead.
Now, as you can well think, all the kings
in these lands were in sore straits what to
do, and how to save their lands from these
strong men of Is-ra-el.
And they made a bond to fight as one
man to save their lands.
The men of one of the lands (the land
of Gib-e-on) thought they would be quite
wise, and go to work in such a way that
they should cheat Josh-u-a; and think
what they did!
They took old sacks for their corn, and
put wine in old skins (for, you may have
heard, in these lands of the East they put
wine and such things in skins of beasts),
and they put on old clothes, and old shoes
on their feet, and" took old dry bread, and
went up to the camp of the men of Is-ra-el,
and said, "We be come from far; make a
league with us, and we will serve you."




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs