• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Dedication
 See-saw
 A despatch to Fairyland
 The stately giraffe
 A dear little girl of Nantucke...
 In the tower
 The donkey and his company
 Johnny Peter
 The first tooth
 Handel (the boy-musician)
 Will-o'-the-wisp
 The three wise women
 Fire-light fancies
 The three wise men
 A chapter of butts
 The Christmas tree
 The dead doll
 The miller of Dee
 Little Sambo
 Mild Farmer Jones
 The toll
 Billy Boy
 Tandem
 The carnivoristicous ounce
 Ten little gentlemen
 Four years old
 There was a good boy
 The sad story of the three...
 My Uncle Jehoshaphat
 Coming
 Lullaby
 Five fives
 The three fiddlers
 Back Cover






Group Title: See-saw : a book of songs and pictures from "St. Nicholas"
Title: See-saw
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084088/00001
 Material Information
Title: See-saw a book of songs and pictures from "St. Nicholas"
Uniform Title: St. Nicholas (New York, N.Y.)
Physical Description: score (93, 1 p.) : ill., music ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hutchison, W. M ( William Marshall ), b. 1854
Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Printer )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Dalziel Brothers ; Camden Press
Publication Date: [1895?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with original music by William M. Hutchison.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Some illustrations by Palmer Cox.
General Note: For voice and piano.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084088
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224629
notis - ALG4895
oclc - 231833458

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
    Dedication
        Page 7
        Page 8
    See-saw
        Page 9
    A despatch to Fairyland
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The stately giraffe
        Page 12
    A dear little girl of Nantucket
        Page 13
    In the tower
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The donkey and his company
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Johnny Peter
        Page 22
    The first tooth
        Page 23
    Handel (the boy-musician)
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Will-o'-the-wisp
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The three wise women
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Fire-light fancies
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The three wise men
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    A chapter of butts
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The Christmas tree
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The dead doll
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The miller of Dee
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Little Sambo
        Page 62
    Mild Farmer Jones
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    The toll
        Page 67
    Billy Boy
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Tandem
        Page 70
    The carnivoristicous ounce
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Ten little gentlemen
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Four years old
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    There was a good boy
        Page 81
    The sad story of the three beetles
        Page 82
        Page 83
    My Uncle Jehoshaphat
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Coming
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Lullaby
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Five fives
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    The three fiddlers
        Page 94
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


















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The Baldwin Library
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TIE LEISURE HOUR.


Frontisfiece.


i i






SE


E


-SA


W


A BOOK OF SONGS AND PICTURES FROM "ST. NICHOLAS."


WITH ORIGINAL MU81S.
BY
WILLIAM M. HUTCHISON,
Composer of The Lighthouse Light," Ehren on the Rhine." The Road to the Fair," "I'll Conquer or Die,"
Apperley Mill," etc., etc.


,LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.


BEDFORD STREET, STRAND.










CONTENTS.


THE LEISURE HOUR (Frontispiece)
DEDICATION .
SEE-SAW .
A DESPATCH TO FAIRYLAND
THE STATELY GIRAFFE .
A DEAR LITTLE GIRL OF NANTUCKET
IN THE TOWER .
THE DONKEY AND HIS COMPANY
JOHNNY PETER .
THE FIRST TOOTH .
HANDEL (THE BOY-MUSICIAN)
WILL-O'-THE-WISP .
THE THREE WISE WOMEN .
FIRE-LIGHT FANCIES
THE THREE WISE MEN .
A CHAPTER OF BUTTS
THE CHRISTMAS TREE .
THE DEAD DOLL
THE MILLER OF DEE .
LITTLE SAMBO .
MILD FARMER JONES .
THE TOLL .
BILLY BOY .
TANDEM .
THE CARNIVORISTICOUS OUNCE
TEN LITTLE GENTLEMEN. .
FOUR YEARS OLD .
THERE WAS A GOOD BOY.
THE SAD STORY OF THE THREE BEETLES.
MY UNCLE JEHOSHAPHAT
COMING .
LULLABY .
FIVE FIVES .
THE THREE FIDDLERS


PAGE.
4
. 4

7
9
.
S. 12
13
S14
IS
22
23
S 24
27
30
S. 34
S 36
40
.42
46
S50
62

* 68
63
67



71

74
76
74


8I
S 82
S 84
S86
88
S 90
S. 94








DEDICATION.




NCE upon a time,
(And that was long ago!)
These little songs were written
For four small things I know.


Alice, with her blue eye
Opened very wide,
Would ask to have the music,
And nestle to my side.

Arthur clamours loudly,
"Sing the songs again!
Yes, sing about the Miller,
And people in the rain !"

That long story ended,
Harry, four years old,
Wants the Will-o'-the-wisp,"
That led the search for gold.

Baby claps her handles,
Crows her childish laugh;
She always likes the story
About the tall Giraffe.

Well, the little ditties
That pleased those children four,
Are printed now, and offered .,-r
To many children more. 'C"

And if they take the jingles,
As kindly as they're meant,
The writer can assure them
That he is quite content.
W. M. IH.






SEE-SAW.


See- saw, Mar-ge -ry Daw; Jack-y has got a new mas ter: And he shall have but a






-n--n --. ___B c /k- --- t -l_ -- -
4-0
pen-ny a day, Be-cause he canwork no fas ter.

I--


See-saw, Margery Daw;
Here we go higher and higher!
Now soon we'll be at the top of the tree,
Perhaps we may reach the spire!

( )

















cv


DESPATCH


TO


FAIRYLAND.


(io)







A DESPATCH TO FAIRYLAND.


pa lace of pearl,..................... And ask if her high- ness will



_ __--- -


O Queen, I'm so grieved 'cause my dolly wont
play,
And so tired of pretending it all!
I must walk for her, talk for her, be her all day,
While she sits still and stares at the wall.



I thought I would ask you if, in your bright
train,
You had not one fairy to spare;
A naughty one, even-I should not complain,
But would love it with tenderest care.


Or a poor little one who had lost its bright
wings-
I should cherish it not a bit less-
And, beside, they'd get crushed with the sofas
and things,
And be so inconvenient to dress.



0 Queen of the Fairies, so happy I'll be,
If you'll only just send one to try;
I'll be back again soon after dinner to see
If you've left one here for me. Good-bye


(II )







THE STATELY GIRAFFE.

-o-*-B---


+ + "+" t_+ _-"k -- .-- --++--,-- --------+.+. + +.+. + +.

old'friend the Ta-pir, Said, "Cut me a ca-per, It's a year since I've had a good laugh!"


1 -_-_-- --- _A A


-i -
A A
|^=.-^^ 4N^=a4-


So, to please him, the gracious Giraffe,
Jumped over a Cow and her Calf;
But when the old Tapir
Told folks of this caper,
They said, "That's just some of your chaff:-


"He's a dignified chap, that Giraffe,
And we know he does nothing by half;
We can understand how
He might jump o'er a Cow,
But he'd never jump over a Calf!"


( 12)







A DEAR LITTLE GIRL OF NANTUCKET.


wind was quite strong, And she sail'd right a long, Did this dear lit tle girl of Nan-tuck-et.

or-


She sail'd right along o'er the ocean,
Which became in a dreadful commotion;
But where she's got to,
I must fain tell you true,
That I haven't the least sort of notion.


( 3)









/i


IN THE TOWER.


(14)








IN THE TOWER (A.D. 1554).


By the ri ver deep and black, Where the count-less masts a rise, Lon don's tow -er
-- -- -- -r- -se-
-, -,1
.- F zi zr ___^^ = ^gi E^


I N I


S -W= --,I---- .. ... ---- -- --

If for life, or if for death, Led a pris- ner thro' its gate, Came E li za beth !



o va _a -






Not as yet the haugh ty Queen, But a prin-cess, young and fair, With no crown up -







--- -,_ _


on her head, Save of gol den hair. Trem bling, passed she thro' the door,

a 15)a


_ "







IN THE TOWER-Continued.





Door of dread, and door of doubt, Where so ma ny had gone in, Ne-ver to come out.










In the tow'r liv'd chil-dren four, Ba by chil-dren full of glee, And they no-thing
------ -r -.o -










knew nor car'd What the law might be. It was vain to tell them nay;









..- --- ---

It was vain to shut the door; Un der, o ver, a ny way, Went the chil -dren four.










Much they long'd to ease her pain, And they found a lit tie key; Brought it to her





(16)





IN THE TOWER-Conined.


) there, and said, "Mis-tress, you are free! Now you can un lock the gate,

.




And can go a broad at will, On ly, please come back sometimes To us chil-dren still !"


i :J
(l^ i -----i------------- -(- -i -t---- i-[, ,- ---





r Did she ev er seek them out In the hap-pier af ter day, When she reign'd great






Eng-land's Queen ? His t'ry does not say. But the ten der child ish tale,






Like a fra -grant, long dead flow'r, Lin- gers yet, and ma keth sweet London's great old Tow'r.


( 17)























/ A Don-key, go-ing to Bre-men once, O'er-
\I .. s s- -^- -- f --S


- day," repliedthe Donkey then,"Good friend,whereare youbound?" "To Bremen" bark'd the lit tle Dog,"To
.~~- ~,---- --- IN I-


see my friend the Hound!"....






So on they journeyed, side by side,
Or loitered by the way,
Until they met a Pussy Cat,
Who mewed a sweet "good-day !"
"Good-day, Dame Puss," they both replied;
"Pray, where may you be bound?"
"To Bremen," mewed the little Cat,
"To sing and look around."
( 18)


/--
_- -




.~- --


-+-I-- ---


.--I h .-~T-~--~i--l--R1


I







THE DONKEY AND HIS COMPANY-Continued.


Thereat they begg'd her com-pany, To cheer the lonesome

-S _*- r- S-I g --:- :. i-g -S- -


crowd a shrill "Good day."... "Good day, good-day," the three re-plied, "Pray, where, Sir, are you







bound?" "To Bre- men," crowd the lit tie Cock, To see some Fish es drown'd."


F- -


They found a house all hushed and dark,
Save for one window high,
Whence stray'd the beam of golden light
That they were guided by!
The Donkey, as the tallest, tried
To stand and peep within;
But nay! the window proved too high,
And great was his chagrin!

Then, mounting on the Donkey's back.
The Dog essayed to see;
But still the window was too high,
And quite dismay'd was he!
The Pussy Cat next volunteered
Upon the Dog to stand;
Yet even she, upon his back,
The distance had not spanned!


(19)






THE DONKEY AND HIS COMPANY--Contnuea.



Sir Chan ti deer then flap'd his wings, And lit on Pus sy's head. And stand-ing thus,-he
-- --- --r--CS f I P S- f-'r=---' --, -l -


7I~fl


(20 )


F


I


7;sfeFI- P---n


I


! I'







THE DONKEY AND HIS COMPANY--onoued,


-I. -1i


Oh, what alarm the thieves were in,
They scattered to a man!
As soon as, at a signal given,
The concert first began.
They hither ran, they thither ran,
As never men before,
While Donkey and his company
Walked in and shut the door.


And so they feasted well, and slept
Until the following day,
When being all thereby refreshed,
They went upon their way.
To Bremen, strolling slowly on,
At last the travellers came,
And there, by giving concerts, all
Attained to lasting fame!


(21)





JOHNNY PETER.
---$E-0-4)--


S found a pen ny,











He .is go ing


(22)


with his ma ny Friends who hap pen'd by so han dy,

Fr fp


t,- ~e~-a st\e~t~ op







THE FIRST TOOTH.


f% 1 kL


I. Oh! ba by's got her first new tooth, I real ly do de dare; Now
2. Her fa their's gone a way for food, But he'll be back by noon; And
I -- -- -- -


.(23 )


L






HANDEL

(THE BOY.MUSICIAN),


Bare and cold the




- --- -=^



JI gar ret cham ber,
-a- 9


f(,V 1


sha dows dim,


-, V I 1 '


Hung with dus ty, droop ing cob webs, Drap' ry weird and grim:
*=


(24)







HANDEL-Continued.





Rat tl'd loud the loos en'd case -ment, Bleak the night -wind rose and fell;......








--- ---- -

In the pau ses of its wail ing, Toll'd the mid- night bell.









Sud den- ly, from out the sha dows Of the old de sert ed room,










Came a strain of faint -est mu sic Thro' the ghost ly gloom.










Fier cer howl'd the wind, and strong er Swell'd the strain ex ult ing ly,......





(25)






HANDEL-connued.





Till there roll'd a among the raft ers, Waves of me lo dy.










3. While the night grew still to lis ten, Soft and slow the mu sic sigh'd,
4. Boy, in af ter years, the mas ter Of all migh ty har mo- nies;



*- S 1





And, in melt ing mi nor mea sures, In to si lence died.
With a more than child ish rap ture In thy lift -ed eyes:


"- An [ iI r f i l I I I | I I ,







Say, what skil ful rapt, mu si cian, In the lone ly room a part,
Sure ly in the gar- ret cham-ber, Dim with sha-dowy mys te ry;..,
O- .


(26)






WILL-O'-THE-WISP.
060 --


\ "Will o' -the-Wisp! Will the-Wisphe-Wisp! Show me your lan -tern true!...






0 ver the mea-dow, and o ver the hill, Glad ly I'll fol low you !"


(27)






WILL-O'-THE-WISP-Cotinuea.


"Nev er I'll stop, nev er I'll rest! Ev er I'll be your friend,... If

i' "" J / ] i [I P- --[






on ly you'll give me the pot of bright gold That lies at your jour- ney's end !"



f---- ----*I-*.----9--9-9.--9- -- --------hr-,7 ----------




Af- ter the light went the brave boy, Trudg-ing a long so bold;








Think-ing of all the fine things he would buy, With the won-der-ful pot of gold... A



_" :- I- ,1--: -i




house, and a horse, and a full rigg'd ship, And a ton of the sweet est drops,... And



(28)







WILL-0'-THE-WISP-contiued.





all of the marbles there are in the world, And all the new kinds of tops...

S- : -: ____-: -- ___








Will- o' the-Wisp! Will- o' the-Wisp! Flew to a dis mal swamp; He










out out his lan-tern and van-ish'd a- way, In the ev'n -ing, chill and damp... The










poor lit tle boy went shi ver ing home, Wea ry, and wet, and cold;... e'd










come, a- las! to his jour'-ney's end- But where was the pot of gold?






THE THREE WISE WOMEN.


Three wise old women were they, were they, Who went to walk on a win ter day; One





_-- w__ r-- -.-
-00=-
car-ried a bas-ket to hold some plums, One car-ried a lad-der to climb for gums; The

____---- -_--__ H----+--i---- ~- _---r--z ---_ -__-_- ___ L-






third (and she was the wis est one), She car-ried a fan to keep off the sun. "Dear

[ ^^ ^^g^^=^^ ^=g=g=Sg^^Js^


(30)







THE THREE WISE WOMEN-ontinue .






dear!" said one, "a bear I see; I think we'd bet-ter all climb a tree!" Butthere


-- --.=a AP AV ',-o -- -- =-. -- oS -r -f --S--S- _- '-


_jv





was-n't a tree for miles a- round, So, far too fright-en'd to stay on the ground, They













clim'd their lad-der up to the top, And sat there a-screaming, "We'll drop, we'll drop!" But the


t : \I--- _'_%.- =i


--'C
--


,-
('


,(3 )
1(3 3)


V.


- -.








THE THREE WISE WOMEN--ontiued.




















~----









wind was strong as the wind could be, And blew their lad der right out to sea; So




I **








soon the wise wo-men were all a float, In a lea-ky old lad-der in stead of a boat; And









-~ -w


ev' ry time that the waves rolled in, Of course the poor things were wet to the skin. They





(32)





THE THREE WISE WOMEN-contined.


took their basket and tried to bale, They put their fan up to make a sail: But

= 60 7


if they saw a ny bears or no, Why you must find out, for I... don't know.
IS
g~t^ E^E E^ ^Eg=====gS==EEJ=: :i |


Words and Illustrations by kind permission of Mrs. CORBETT.
(33)


I









FIRE-LIGHT FANCIES.


"Tell me chil- dren! tell me chil- dren! as you see the flames a -


Op O1
V/ V_






FIRE-LIGHT FANCIES-Contined.


Look so wise? Sure, the New Year bells a ring ing Have such

"1 --- -- ------







hap pi ness been bring ing, That the Christ mas stars, still shin ing,









seem re flect ed in your eyes, In your glad and joy ful eyes !

-- 1 4


2, Then the younger answered quickly, glancing
sideways to the right,
"We've been telling dreadful stories about ghosts
who dress in white;
Till at last a sleepy feeling
Over both of us came stealing,
For we thought we almost saw them, looking
at us through the light,
Disappearing in the light!"


3. Then I said, "My little laddie, and my golden-
hair'd Louise,
Every heart may have its phantoms, have its
ghosts and lovely elves;
But the ones who bring a blessing,
And the ones most worth possessing,
Only come and live with people who are lovely
like themselves,
Good and lovely like themselves."


( 35)








THE THREE WISE MEN.


ST-re 'e c&d irien ue'e h %.ere they, Who

-~i ___ _
I V -





encr day; One




4,4




- '
I *-n..v.

--
-- i-""--- i
A ~ ~ ~ ~ -- r--- -* .-
--- '


(36)







THE THREE WISE MEN--ontiued.


carried a club to dig for gold, One wore a big uls-ter to keep off the cold; The








third, and he was the wi sest one, To kill the mos-qui toes carried a gun. "Oh









dear!" cried one, "three wo-men I see, The on ly chance for our lives is to flee!" Sothey







-- d -' I L

ran till they got to the great North Pole, And up in the steal-thi-est way they stole; But





F EI aIVtops t---an

high a top sat a Po ar bear, Which fll'd the wise men with woe and des-air. One

R __ '--


(3'7)








THE THREE WISE MEN-ontinued.






used his club for a para a chute, And one from the stock of his gun did shoot; The





-ir ---- i-s ft------ I--





third,,-in the ul-ster, he faint-ed a- way, And there he'd have lain to this very day, If the





I N


three old wo-men had not appeared: The very old wo-menthey all of them fear'd. One











fanned the ul- ster in to life, For which most glad- ly he made her his wife The

0-y m----- -\-S----------P -a---1------'* -- =. -f-----dP --..


I V I Y I i







next with her lad-der caught him of the club, Andstraight-waybe-gan all his bruis-es to rub; The


.1 I e 1 v I


(38)


v~ v







THE, THREE WISE MEN-Continued.


t h i rd T be fo l:.'e i o 'O a i, rm. Had___
w-






-4 -~-r- xm
car i,-. zphir tman off u n d r her arm.
__ Iv





I ~ -~ : ___


-1 .- i-r i4


4r -
I'1


( 39)


'-7






_-cN-


i i







A CHAPTER OF BUTTS.


"I'LL BUTT IT!" SAID THE GOAT.


"WHAT! IT BUTTS AGAIN !


"I'LL GIVE IT A GOOD ONE THIS TIME !


4r


"PERHAPS I'D BETTER GET OUT OF ITS WAY! '


BUT HE DIDN'T.


S40)







A CHAPTER OF BUTTS-Continued.




J A fool ish Goat once saw a swing, And said, "At that I'll have a fling; I'll








S butt it, butt it, butt it!" (He then began to mutter) I'll butt it, butt it, butt it, And butt it in-to butter !"
)- g S f- -- -- -
-\ 1 -- -- El


He butted well, but said with pain,
"Good gracious What! it butts again!
I'll butt it, butt it, butt it !"
(He then began to mutter)
"I'll butt it, butt it, butt it,
And butt it into butter!"

I'll give a good one this time!:" so
He rushed again with head down low;
"I'11 butt it, butt it, butt it !I
(He then began to mutter)
"I'll butt it, butt it, butt it,
And butt it into butter!"

"I really can't stop here all day,
r., Perhaps I'd better clear away;
i^!' ~I do not care to butt it!"
(He then began to mutter)
"But if I cared to butt it,
I'd butt it into butter!"

But lo the swing came down behind,
And made the goat his level find;
So, as he tumbled over
And rolled into the gutter,
He said, "I'd better drop it,
This is an awful butter!"
(41 )







THE CHRISTMAS TREE.


---<***: *----

RECITATIVE.

]-- .. ..--....=--- ------ -I -- ,-9--.
One Christ -mas Eve, on a frost y night, When nurse was gone and had left no light, Lit- tie


S-a- l





E va's face with glad ness beam'd, For thiS is what the dar ling dream'd.







4-2-
Old Saint Ni cho las came so speed i ly o ver the fro zen snow:-








"Lots of eat -a bles, lots of drink a bles, Comr ing for me I know."

Tn.- C= = ; -- |g 4 : = ^*g : ~ f= : ^ ~ = ~ f


S42)






THE CHRISTMAS TREE-continued.


Dolls in sa tin and


C43)








THE CHRISTMAS TREE-Continued.


--------;------ i ------*--:,b'< -"-f^-- -J-, J_--,


Shak ing snowflakes and bits of i ci cles Out ot his win ter gown.

--- 7 -_ _r--_ -_ -_ | _---__ --


-P_




Then the dol -lies got on a chair, and they climb'd to the Christmas tree...





(44)
< 44 )


_.___






THE CHRISTMAS TREE-coohued.


Hung up ap ples and bags of cho co late, Laughing a loud in glee....

m=^ =i :--1=84== |- ===---=g-~-- ^


l~s-__

E va. found them all hang -. ing stea -di- ly Up on her Christ-mas Tree!



(45)


-----------'--- r ---" "---- -r-- --"



.1 I I I t I t

9-0
Ducks and Rab-bits, a Dog and Squir-rel, came bound-ing a-long the floor:


- -_- _~* = i g =








Then a Sol-dier, a Horse and Wag-gon, and doz ens of oth ers more.








4 4/ -d- -- -

So they played till the morn ing came, And they stopped all their pranks and glee, When







| !--, 1--Il I -r1 H













- H


THE DEAD DOLL.

---Yued-bti------





' 'You needn't be try-ing to corn-fort me, I
.i \ -- -- -s -o--~ -


Stell you my Dol -ly is dead! ........ There's









S no use in say ing she is- n't ...... With a crack like that in her head........ It's






I --r- -- --

S just -like you said, it would-n't hurt much, To have my tooth out that day ;....... And









then, when the man 'most pulled my head off, You had n't a word to say......... When


I (46I)

(46)






THE DEAD DOLL-Coninued.


-- .---r- 0 -- d ----- P----- e -----------, ----,
/I '- ..-- -U- --- -a- -a-
S said to me, most ex press ly,... "Heres a rib-bon for Hil de garde!"..... And I
--- -W- --- -- --
I I ---^-----^--m---- -T*-^--"-----~-----------,-, y_~ --~)E-.--T------,-- ____-----







went and I put it on Tab- by...... And Hil- de-garde saw me do it!..... But I





., ---


S said to my-self, "Oh! nev- er mind, I don't be lieve she knew it !" But I
V ._.-- --_- ', ---_-- -
I I---- ---i -Ua_-a






know that she knew it now; ......... And I just be lieve, I do,.......... That her

I k--- -- -






S poor lit tie heart was bro ken..... And so her head broke too.......... Oh! my



(47)






THE DEAD DOLL--Continued.


is -- -s--=--- -
hit it o ver and o ver ...... And it has n't cracked a bit.......... But







since the dar ling is dead ........ She'll want to be bu ried, of course ..... We'll
I -__ _._- --__ :_ ,:,-- --_ __ -.-----




-t -a- -a-
[7



J-i1 = -^^ = = -J ~ -^ .^ ~st


take my lit tie wa gon, Nurse, And you shall be the Horse :... And I'll


l______________=_____-._7---.


ii\ -- --_- -a- -* -a- --
walk be hind and cry .......... And we'll put her in this, you see,.......... This
._______ ___------ _----o= -- --- __--_-----.----- _-





dear lit tie box, and bu ry her then Be neath the big ma pie tree......... And


(48)


NI








THE DEAD DOLL-Continued.


~-U -U-
Pa, he will make me a tomb stone, Like the one he made for my Bird....... And he'll
I -a- -- a- ,- -a-- w -0-


H -,.




ii .: V


- _____-----, -- -- --- --_--. ---*-I--- .
I say, "Here lies poor Hil de -garde, A beau ti ful Doll, who's dead i...... She







i o- Io in h r h
died of a bro ken heart, she did, And a dread ful crack in her head !''

I1. F I I ^-==,=,-


(49)


r k


v^- Y -









THE MILLER OF DEE.


Moderato.


J The moon was a-float, like a gol den boat, In the

I S I


sea blue depths of the sky,......,.. When the Mil ler of Dee, with his chil dren three, On his










S fat red horse rode by............... "Whi- their a way, 0 Mil ler of Dee?


(5o)







THE MILLER OF DEE-Continued.

Presto.
IU --i-- I 4 *-

S pass'd the big toll gate......... But the Mil- ler answered him ne-ver a word,











-WI






Ne -ver a word spake he; He paid his toll, and he spurr'd his horse, And rode


---- --- --- -

4--. 4




on with his chil -dren three, "He's a fraid to tell! "quoth the old Tollman, "He's a -









sham'd to tell!" quoth he. "But I'll










fol- low you up, and I'11 find out where You are


.(.. 5----- -..- .

(.s )







THE MILLER OF DEE-Contiued.

A

----- .1 sI a

go-ing, O Mil-ler of Dee!" The







Moderato.




moon was a -float, like a gol- den boat, Nearing the shore of the sky;... When, with












cough and with sneeze, and his hands on his knees, The old Toll-man passed by.........





-e--


ae yl n- a-wa so
"--- ^ i 1 i 1 7 ;, i "








S "Whither a-way, 0 Toll man old? Whither a-way so


_" _


(52)







THE MILLER OF DEE--ontinued.


fast?"... Cried the Milkmaid who stood at the farm yard bars, As the Toll- man old crept





Presto.


past........ The Toll-man answered her nev-er a word, Nev-er a word spake
S-- | -


-e- -e;: v -A -
he; Scant breath had he at the best to chase Af- ter- the Miller of Dee. "He
-- ___ __


0ssR- r-
-sr


(53)







THE MILLER OF DEE-cotinued.


i -


(54)


hur ried on with her brim ming pail, And nev er a word spake she........... "She

m^ ^*-* : ^ ^^^E^ mF"^^^ ^^4-


-a- -a-
she, And a way from the farm, with her pail on her arm, She fol-low'd the Mil-ler of








--
Dee. r The









Par son stood in his cap and gown, Un der the old oak -










tree; "And whither a-way, with your pail of milk, My pret-ty milkmaid?" said he.... But she
-^ip '^ ^ -r --- g ; ~' \ ,,' ^r"-'-,,
-' r = Z .^ \[ : lb S^


L I






THE MILLER OF DEE-Continued.


du ty to know!' said he. And he fol-low'd the Maid, who followed the Man, Who
--- 4- A -- f i



_, '- "- v '-= ---


fol-low'd the Mil-ler of Dee.








Af ter the Par- son, came his Wife; The Sex- ton, he came next;......
--- = _F -i -- -
U -J 0 *.' ---- I --- l a -J --


(55)


r
r






THE MILLER OF DEE--ontinued.


Af ter the Sex ton, the Con- sta ble came, Trou-bl'd and sore per plext.....







Af-ter the Con stable, two rag ged Boys, To see what the fun would be ........ And a
.' : ---*.-f- --*- --^-Ss-S--- (S --- --v. ,t f -- i

_"__ 7" =,_ -^ ^j, .-- __ -.




lit -tie black Dog, with on- ly one eye, Was the last of the Nine, who with groan and with sigh,







S Fol-low'd the Mil-ler of Dee...... Night had
I-,,='- :-,-I-, -_ .- ,- : -: -: __
l --


Moderato.


anchor'dthe moon not a mo-ment too soon, Un-derthe lee of the sky;...... For the
s N I i I I__ I I ,1 .
/I .' -p-g -*- ----,e -g -g-4--- -,.,-a-i--.4- -_-,---- --_------






wind it blew, and the rain fell too, Andthe Ri ver of Dee ran high......... He



--56--
(56






THE MILLER OF DEE-continuea.





ford-ed the riv-er, he climbed the hill, He and his child-ren three; But where-

--- _- -----_- --- a-*-- --- __-
'I _-- '= = = ^ 81 ^ _8 _^ ^-= ==


ev er he went, they fol-low'd him still, That wick ed Mil ler of Dee.........






Presto.



Just as the clock struck the hour of twelve, The Mil-ler reached home a gain, And
/I, ,, F-A=-


when he dismount-ed and turn'd, behold! All those who had followed him









o-ver the wold, Came up in the pour-ing rain.





(57)






THE MILLER OF DEE-contnuea.


Splash'd and spat-ter'd from head to foot, Mud dy and wet and drag gl'd,



.( ss)
58ss







THE MILLER OF DEE-continued.


0 ver the hill and up to the mill, That wretch ed com-pa-ny strag-gled. They
1 e .


Moderato.


Par -son, and thus spake
a "


( 59 )








THE MILLER OF DEE-Coinued.ea




I I
he :...... "Now, what do you mean by your con-duct to-night, You wretch ed Mil ler of

6p-




Presto.



S Dee?". ..... "I went for a ride, a nice cool ride, I and my chil-dren









te A. I tk tm l .a I -wdo i t c k--- r-
three; And I took them a long, as I al- ways do," Said the wick ed Mil-ler of
[1---


(6o)







THE MILLER OF DEE-Continued.

Moderato.



Dee. "But you,... my friends, I would like... to know Why you

_ _________- __ ______ __ -____-
i 9. i --,g-=E---- -i_---- a-^








fol low'd me all the way?"... They looked at each o their; "We were







j,.1 -. -- -p- --"



out for a walk, A nice cool walk !" said they,
-- ---


























A FULL STOP.


(61)







LITTLE SAMBO.


I.UT L '--- -


II


Lit tie Sam- bo he was stand ing Close be -
-a- e .- s .'


K I I I


side the milk-ing pail; And thought to get a
I_-- _- -----_ _- --- -g
L-__ -iS---- ----- s^ i=- I^ ^ i^^ p I


tumbled on his head; He nev- er got that

.. S L t-LI


drop of milk, But got the pail in stead!
-.- -E --


I ~


7--


-____________ J-I


(62)


I-


I I7


-- BI


; i I I


I ---






MILD FARMER JONES.


I Cried Far-mer Jones, "What's this I see ? Come down from out my
ho t.ee-C--m---o-wmb----I--0ti-,k--omi-- t;-T






S hick-ory tree! Come down, my boy, I think you might; To
%1 _--
V _I


S ste is neith-er wise nor right.You won't, you naugh-t boy? oh fie You
S steel is neith er wise nor right. You won't, you naugh- ty boy? oh fie! You

tl _, -__ --l :-- : _


that you say? Takes two to make a bar gain, eh ?" The



(63)
(.63)







MILD FARMER JONES-conti ued.




I Far-mer's dog has mount-ed guard; There is an axe in



/ Lil O O i--'--




I yon- der yard; "Now tho' the skies should quake and fall, My


.,-4 ,__ --, -




strokes shall bring down tree and all Fast came the blows, but








vain the plot, The tree may yield, the boy will not; His








pelt ing nuts the Far-mer blind, But still the axe its
S- --__








S cleft doth find. Ah! who is this doth cry, "Hold up! I



(64)







MILD FARMER JONES-Continued.


.^ ^^ --------- --

me, and see If I don't leave your hick -'ry tree!" Tis








done, the faith- ful dog is tied, The shin ing axe is








turn'd a- side. "No hoax- ing now! the youth doth cry, And




1 v- f -gP --t- ---



S Far mer Jones re plies "Not I." Said Jones, "You're sor ry








now, I see, For knock-ing nuts from off my tree!" "Well,



(65)







MILD FARMER JONES-Conuinued.


yes, if you'll just take the pup, And let a fel low pick 'em up!' "All

__ ____ __-49 __ z









right, my boy!"cried Far mer Jones, Who felt de light ed in his bones; For











ne ver since the world be gan, Was seen so ve ry mild a man !
























S(66)







































^_- _,-_----_ _--- --- = *- ---- -- --^L g^- __---

They did n't have a pen-ny, And could- n't bor-row a ny, And they ow'd ex act ly






A A A



half a cent* for coal, cent for coal; So they said, "We'll run a way," When a goose came out to






=AF



say: You must pay two cents a piece all round for toll, round for toll!"
A A



A cent is an Amtrican coin of the va!u3 of a halfpenny.
(67)








BILLY BOY.

---fOe->-:-





Poor Bil ly Boy was ma sic mad, Oh!








mu- sic mad was he:....... And yet be was as


S blithe a lad As a ny lad could be......... "With a hi de did-dle, a
a -- f *



IF-~



bow and fid-dle, A rig -a me ho," sang he......... For Bil ly was as
/ -ft- -ft- -p- A L -P- A -L _p. -

I I-- --i 'i "- ^- r "-





blithe a lad as a ny lad could be: "Oh! no one knows the joy I know, Or


-" a- -




sees the sights I see;...... So play me high or play me low, my fid-dle's e- enough for



(68)







BILLY BOY-Continued.


S me...... With a hi -de- did-die, a bow and fid-dle, A rig a -me- ho," sang he...... For
\ l---o- .-- | /- __ -- .- -l*. --
L : *A OE



Ef=-



Bil ly was as blithe a lad as a ny lad could be! "It
1 j. ___-- -- --* '-f- -__ _



_____ **


I r takes me here, it takes me there, So play me low or


high ......... It


O __AL


S finds me, binds me, a ny-where, and lifts me to the sky I............ With a
} ^- -^ .,___= ==C= == ====^ -f4Bl ~ ~^ f ~


(69)










TANDEM.



-.-
T- ---_
-I~----_
-'`--i ----- ---- C=__r_~_~
-----"I;~--~-~ ~-------

-h-f -I -~il=j------- -~--~-_-~1


"Oh, dear pa pa !" three chil dren cried, "You pro -mis'd, don't you know ...... That
-a _--a ~ a-a--.--


next when you shall take a ride, All three of us shall go."......... I



,3A =-^- -^-- l l ------ 3^-__ .-.----- _- ----


did," the fath er said, "You know I nev er speak at ran dom,... So






get your rol ler skates, we'll go Off in a tear ing tan dem."


(70)


IK








THE CARNIVORISTICOUS OUNCE.


There once was a beast called an ounce,...... Who went with a
"-B --- B- _O


quad ru ped an ti- cal
s --


I ,o I
ounce............
-A- I


You'd think, from his name, he was
S -5-


weigh'd, I'll be bound, three or four hun-dred pound, And he looked most un cor mon-ly


( 7 )


I I -








THE CARNIVORISTICOUS OUNCE-c inued.


tall, mon ly tall, -He looked
tall, mon ly tall, -H e look'd


most un corn mon ly tall..................
S-s- --


He sprang on his prey with a
S-5-


pounce ---........
pounce,.........
-.- -
zs~~-=-- --~


And gave it a jerk and a
_ _^ ^ ^ _s-


- ris ti-cous ounce, ti-cous ounce, This car ni -vo ris
"-


- -ti-cous ounce............
-5-


rMa
roar ;...... His claws he'd un sheath, And he'd show all his teeth, And the man would be




(72 )


F HS- -a


__e







THE CARNIVORISTICOUS OUNCE-ontinued.


-4-


/ seen nev-er more, nev cr more! And the man would be seen nev-er more! .........






te-
---= ___-3- -- --T-i--_--_ __-- --- --_-.--1






. I'd ra their (I'm tell ing you true) ......... Meet with three hun-dred-weight of a
: __ -_- -


S kind, wouldn't you? wouldn't you? Than an ounce of this kind, wouldn't you?............
kind, wouldn't you? wouldn't you? Than an ounce of this kind, wouldn't you?.


---- -(73)
(73)


























" TEN LITTLE GENTLEMEN,.


I-
'`. ,, .,.-:


(74












TEN LITTLE GENTLEMEN.



--%----------- "--


Ten lit tie gen-trle-men, bold and straight, Up comes a big fel low, who

- r^..-1 ----- -*---*-i ---&-P-------- -1 -a--t--- f-








says he won't wait. Ten lit tie gen tie men all in a heap, Now











should n't you think they would feel rath er cheap?










(75)


~_







FOUR YEARS OLD.
---<*-c-e>--



Bright in the ear ly- morn ing, His






brown eyes o pen wide........ And there's
---i--y-\~-r-/ -----


nev- er a wink more slum ber, When one is at his side. A -







S wake with his hair a tum ble, He springs up on his toes;......... And
M------------------.--i,--,, : ,---cF--S--:- y--j -.-!--- ---,-------
., I 1 *


In to his clothes he dan ces, Then








down to break fast goes. Then



(76)







FOUR YEARS OLD-Continued.


out with his lit tie bar row, And


----- ^ I ^ r s


ho! you're a brave young far mer!" "Oh no, I'm build ing now : ......... I:ll


---"--------- -- ^--------0-[-"--- _.-- --
"- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ,'( .L -


build mon-ster barns and house es, Come

oe-


(77)


rl~WJ=-3~1 -,- --l;i-----~_1__~__=;pl_







FOUR YEARS OLD-Continued.


K start ing, he hears the ox en, That

S-i.- _._


whip on his should er march es, With all a sol dier's pride. Why






S there is my fast, wild Rol la, Whoa', who will ride with me? ............ This


78)
(78)






FOUR YEARS OLD--ontnued.


all thro' the long, long day time, He works and plays with a will;........ The






lit tl hands al ways bu sy, The quick feet ne ver still. Un -

l b~ ~ -- -- -- t--


( 79)






FOUR YEARS OLD-Coninued.




two lit tie arms ca res sing Come round, and sweet low words...... I


-4r
1 _- ,_ 4l---_ --__ -__





hear, that are sweet and ten -der As the coo ing good night of birds. And

l..-





1 he, with the bright eyes close ing, With kiss on cheek and brow ......... Says
-j ----=-----l==-*'-*p==yf--,--, -,-- --'----~-=F--^-==^==






S soft-ly, "Good-night, I love you, I'm on- ly your lit- tie boy now."
I --- ---...- "- "- "i-- -' -.- 3- ^ j


















(So)







THERE WAS A GOOD BOY.


---




















i There was a good boy who fell ill, And
-a- -9-









begg'd them to give him a pill; "For my kind pa-rents sake, The










dose I will take!" Said this dear lit- tle boy who fell ill.




( 81 ) 6






THE SAD STORY OF THE THREE BEETLES.


1


? i' I ^^^I Pr= IJ 4 -L


The day was fair, the sky was bright, And daisies starr'd the meadow land,When fine Miss Beetle,
4- 2 -! -1 .- - -0- -. -V--


l o~g- 1 vI


S gold bedight,Walk'd forth, a basket in her hand. That morn, besidethe roadway, met Her lovers,-for, oh,
i .. -I- -t -t -.- -t -t -- -t -t- -S-- --


!er r -000 o---I-- 2 __ -


f ic-kle one! She smil'd on two from eyes of jet, As many a fair coquette has done. Ah, blows fall hard when
)1- -.--.. -, --M -,- 1, .-l- ----_-_l- ---


v I- --


beetles meet! Now thrust and parry quick weremade; And when the battle reached itsheat, Each in the other


-t
-- --^- -I -I- '-"-'-^-F,"^ E,
_I_ -


J sheathed his blade. Miss Beetle, from a mossy stone, Look'd down upon the battle-ground, Then gave a faint, heart-

(82 )


I


i/


1
1


1


!

I


(







THE SAD STORY OF THE THREE BEETLES-Cotinuea.


-broken groan, And this is what the peo-ple found: Three victims lying still and cold, Where two broad roads to-
1~~.~-~, a- ,, f -- -






-ge-ther meet; One glo ri ous with specks of gold,-An emp-ty bas-ket at her feet. They made a sad and







si lent grave, Where but ter-flies float' in the air, And fra-grant blooms of clo ver wave, And
'1i -t- t r -- ,____ S -,-, -__,- .-






mul-lein-stalks grow tall and fair. And there these three do sweet-ly rest, Though tru ly this had





neer been so, Had fair Miss Bee te thought it best To smile on oe brave lee te beau.

S ne'er been so, Had fair Miss Bee- tie thought it best To smile on one brave lee-tie beau.
R I --F-- -I- / I -' I-F I-/ F-d-' *


(83)


fc






MY UNCLE JEHOSHAPHAT.









--- -^-- r B---


(84 )







UNCLE JEHOSHAPHAT-Contiued.


Un cle Je hosh a- phat lov'd that pig, And pig gy, he lov'd him:.........
a -I-I-
= te ll rfr I______ 5 ______ 2 __ 7:Z________ R ____ ^ -- i __ --


-Lz


both jump'd in to the lake one day To see which the best could swim.


They


My
Ik


Un- cle Je hosh a-phat he swam up, And pig gy he swam down,......... And
-10401 -d--& --.0


L~z~r~ ~r~~zz~ ~c~~zffizzJ


both rode home on the brin dl'd calf, To car ry it to its mother.
/ -- __ 1 --.- ... ., ..


~:=t


(85)


(IF~9L~i


I ~


---t-i-- --


-II


=d--&


~I-V--~~--F-- ----k-i--








COMING.


Two fair ships are sail
--_ -EE


sea,..................


Wil lie's ship and my


Full as full can be :.................... Side by side, my
_AL -OF- _0L







SWil lie says, Like as pin to pin.....................

I I __ ---_-------------I1 ___--\





S Oh, the hap py, hap py days, When our ships come


( 86 )
(86)


P






COMLNG-Contin'ued.


(87)







LULLABY.


Rock -a -by, lul la- by, bees in the clo ver, Croon -ing so drow si ly,



-002



cry ing so low, Rock a by, lul la -by, dear lit- tie ro ver,







-dI
Down in to won- der-land, Down to the un -.der-land, Go, oh, go!








Go, oh, go! Down in to won- der- land, go ............



ido
-9-





Rock- a by, lul -la by, rain on the o, ver, Tears on the eye lids that
_ ----------r--------f- ,-r------ ------_-----------.---------







wa ver and weep; Rock a by, lul la- by, bend -ing it o ver,



(88)






LULLABY-Continued'


Down on the mo ther-world, Down on the
Down on the mo ther-world, Down on the


o their world, Sleep, oh, sleep !


I.6. g "' .- v





S Sleep, oh, sleep Down on the mo ther-world, sleep .........



'P*



Rock a by, lul la by, dew- on the do ver, Dew on the eyes that will






77-
( -_-- "_-_. ___d--

spar kle at dawn; Rock a- by, lul la by, dear lit- tie ro ver,







In to the still ly-world, in to the lil y- world, Gone, oh, gone!
_. __-----__-=______----__-__-_-__-_--_--






Gone, oh, gone! In to the lil y-world, gone .........

(-U-
S)----
( 89)


,l tu


WEEE--7"s;i"~'


f







FIVE FIVES.

e--.--- -o---


Five lit tie pus sy -cats sit ting in a row, Blue rib-bon round each neck
! ,T -i i ^-==-- --







fas-ten'd in a bow: "Hey, kit-tens ho, kit tens are your fa ces clean?








S Don't you know you're sit ting there, so as to be seen?"

d


I 90)






FIVE FIVES-Continued.


do-
i Five pret ty lit tle birds sing- ing all to- geth er, Flit -ting round so joy ful ly,

1------- --



a-
in the plea-sant wea-ther, "Hey, bir-dies! ho, bir-dies! why not fret and cry?"







S "Oh! be -cause we're good and glad; that's the rea- son why!"


















S Five lit tie fluf fy dogs, stand-ing on their toes, Each with a su gar plum


( 9T )







FIVE FIVES-Continued.


19I


Five lit tie boys with pipes, what are they at here? Smo-kifig? not a bit of it,
). -: -=F ----- -' l L


-1--- -I---- -I--3-i----a-


l ~ --
that is ve ry clear! "Hey, lad-dies ho, lad-dies if I do not trou-ble,








Will you kind ly blow me out a fa-mous big soap bub-ble?"


S ~ -(--92)--
(92)


M = -- --, 7 i I= __- ..=_ i I


~~__~__o--L j I----1_IL_----------l


:72







FIVE FIVES-Contiued.





















Five ro sy lit tie girls, with their dol lies small: Oh! don't you think the girls are




egg-




pret ti est of .all? Hey, las sies! ho, las -sies Just an o their look!" Then










smile and kiss your hand to them, be fore you close the book.




(93)






?~iP l77d(


Our songs are done, the voices hushed

That a rose so fresh and free;

To sleep now go, and dream in peace

Of these merry fiddlers three.


A. *
"*/


PRINTED BY DALZIEL BROTHERS, CAMDEN PRESS, LONDON, N.W.


_~__ __
_~ ___~__ _________



~


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