• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Rymes and jingles
 Curly locks
 Little Bo-peep
 Jack Sprat
 Simple Simon
 A ship a-sailing
 Babes in the woods
 The house that Jack built
 A frog he would a-wooing go
 Fire! fire! burn stick!
 Poor Cock Robin
 The cat and the mouse
 Cinderella; or the little glass...
 Jack and the bean-stalk
 Little Red Riding Hood
 The history of Tom Thumb
 Jack the giant-killer
 Beauty and the beast
 Blue Beard
 Puss in boots
 The sleeping beauty
 Whittington and his cat
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Altemus' young people's library
Title: Mother Goose rhymes, jingles and fairy tales
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084076/00001
 Material Information
Title: Mother Goose rhymes, jingles and fairy tales compiled from authoritative sources
Series Title: Altemus' young people's library
Uniform Title: Mother Goose
Children in the wood (Ballad)
Cinderella
Jack and the beanstalk
Little Red Riding Hood
Tom Thumb
Jack the Giant-Killer
Beauty and the beast
Puss in Boots
Sleeping Beauty
Whittington and his cat
Alternate Title: Mother Goose's rhymes, jingles and fairy tales
Physical Description: 254, 4 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Altemus, Henry ( Publisher )
Publisher: Henry Altemus
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Nursery rhymes   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with two hundred and thirty-four illustrations.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084076
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002234632
notis - ALH5067
oclc - 08910042

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Advertising
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Rymes and jingles
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Curly locks
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Little Bo-peep
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Jack Sprat
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Simple Simon
        Page 34
        Page 35
    A ship a-sailing
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Babes in the woods
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The house that Jack built
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    A frog he would a-wooing go
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Fire! fire! burn stick!
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Poor Cock Robin
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The cat and the mouse
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Cinderella; or the little glass slipper
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Jack and the bean-stalk
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Little Red Riding Hood
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    The history of Tom Thumb
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Jack the giant-killer
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
    Beauty and the beast
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Blue Beard
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
    Puss in boots
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
    The sleeping beauty
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
    Whittington and his cat
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
    Advertising
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
    Back Cover
        Page 259
        Page 260
    Spine
        Page 261
Full Text
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The Baldwin Ubr..ry )
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ALTEMUS' YOUNG PEOPLE'S LIIBDRRV


MOTHER

GOOSE
RHYMES
JINGLES
AND PAIDY TALES
COMPILED FROM AUTHORITATIVE SOURCES

With Two Hundred and Thirty-Four Illustrations

PHILADEPLPHIH
HIENDY ALTEMUS









IN UNIFORM STYLE


Copiously Illustrated

THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS
ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND
THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS & WHAT ALICE FOUND THERE
ROBINSON CRUSOE
THE CHILD'S STORY OF THE BIBLE
THE CHILD'S LIFE OF CHRIST
LIVES OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON
THE FABLES OF IESOP
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA
MOTHER GOOSE'S RHYMES, JINGLES AND TALES
EXPLORATION AND ADVENTURE IN THE FROZEN SEAS
THE STORY OF DISCOVERY AND EXPLORATION IN AFRICA
GULLIVER'S TRAVELS
ARABIAN NIGHTS' ENTERTAINMENTS
WOOD'S NATURAL HISTORY
A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, by CHARLES DICKENS
BLACK BEAUTY, by ANNA SEWELL


Price 50 Cents Each


HENRY ALTEMUS, PHILADELPHIA


Copyright z896 by Henry Altemus

















CONTENTS.


RHYMES AND JINGLES

CURLY LOCKS .

LITTLE BO-PEEP .

JACK SPRAT .

SIMPLE SIMON .

A SHIP A-SAILING

BABES IN THE WOOD

HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

A FROG HE WOULD A-WOOING GO

FIRE! FIRE! BURN STICK!

COCK ROBIN .


PAGE
7

24

S 27

29

S 33

36

S 38

42

S 49

53

S 59





Contents.


CAT AND THE MOUSE

CINDERELLA

JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD

TOM THUMB

JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

BLUE BEARD

Puss IN BOOTS

SLEEPING BEAUTY

WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT


PAGE
62

65

86

o109

116

S42

67

SI193

207

221

235





Rhymes and Jingles.


DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY has come up to town,
In a yellow petticoat and a green gown.





Rhymes and Jingles.


6523






Rhymes and Jingles.


RIDE a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady ride on a white horse !
Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,
And so she makes music wherever she goes.


__ ____





Rhymes and Jingles.


M ISTRESS MARY, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With cockle shells, and silver bells,
And columbines all in a row.





Rhymes and Jingles. IT





Rhymes and Jingles.






Rhymes and Jingles.


HEY diddle, dinkety, poppety, pet,
The merchants of London they wear scarlet;
Silk in the collar, and gold in the hem,
So merrily march the merchant men.





Rhymes and Jingles.






Rhymes and Jingles.


L TTLE Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the
corn;
But where is the boy that looks after the sheep ?
He's under a haycock, fast asleep.
Will you awake him? No, not I;
For if I do, he'll be sure to cry.


.1, -ai





Rhymes and Jingles.


HARK, hark,
The dogs do bark,
Beggars are coming to town;
Some in rags,
Some in jags,
And some in velvet gown.





Rhymes and Jingles. 17





Rhymes and Jingles.


W EE Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs in his nightgown,
Rapping at the window, crying through the lock,
"Are the children in their beds, for now it's eight
o'clock?"





Rhymes and Jingles.





Rhymes and Jingles.


'A-


T HREE wise men of Gotham
Went to sea in a bowl;
If the bowl had been stronger,
My song would have been longer.





Rhymes and Jingles. 21





Rhymes and Jingles.


X MAS is coming, the geese are getting fat,
Please to put a penny in the old man's hat;
If you haven't got a penny, a ha'penny will do,
If you haven't got a ha'penny, God bless you.





Rhymes and Jingles. 3





Rhymes and Jingles.


CURLY locks, curly locks,
Wilt thou be mine?
Thou shalt not wash dishes,
Nor yet feed the swine,

But sit on a cushion
And sew a fine seam,
And feed upon strawberries,
Sugar and cream.


We
Mi-A







Rhymes and Jingles. 25


_ _





Rhymes and Jingles.





Rhymes and Jingles.


L TTLE Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Leave them alone and they'll come home,
And carry their tails behind them.
Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they still all were fleeting.
Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.





Rhymes and Jingles.


It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Under a meadow hard by :
There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.






Rhymes and Jingles.


ACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean,
So it came to pass between them both
They licked the platter clean.

Jack ate all the lean,
Joan ate all the fat,
The bone they picked it clean,
Then gave it to the cat.





Rhymes and Jingles.


Jack Sprat was wheeling.
His wife by the ditch,
The barrow turned over,
And in she did pitch;

Says Jack, she'll be drowned,
But Joan did reply,
I don't think I shall,
For the ditch is quite dry.





Rhymes and Jingles. 31





Rhymes and Jingles.






Rhymes and Jingles.


Joan Sprat went to brewing
A barrel of ale,
She put in some hops,
That it might not turn stale;

But as for the malt,
She forgot to put that;
This is brave sober liquor,
Said little Jack Sprat.





Rhymes and Jingles.


SIMPLE SIMON met a pieman,
Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the piemain,
"Let me taste your ware."


Says the pierman to Simple Simon,
"Show me first your penny ;"
Says Siriple Simon to the pieman,
"Ind red, I have not any."


Simple Simon went a-fishing,
For to catch a whale;
All the water he had got
Was in his mother's pail.


SSimple Simon went to look
) *-r- '---- I T -- *--
If plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made oor Simon whistle.1





Rhymes and Jingles.






Rhymes and Jingles.


I SAW a ship a-sailing,
A-sailing on the sea;
And, oh it was all laden
With pretty things for thee.


There were comfits in the cabin,
And apples in the hold:
The sails were made of silk,
And the masts were made of gold.


The four-and-twenty sailors
That stood between the decks
Were four-and twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.


The captain was a duck,
With a jacket on his back;
When the ship began to move,
The captain said, "Quack quack I"




Rhymes and Jingles. 37


8=5~





Babes in the Woods.




M Y dear, do you know
How, a long time ago,
Two poor little children,
Whose names I don't know,
Were stolen away.
On a fine summer's day,
And left in a wood,
As I've heard people say?



And when it was night,
So sad was their plight,
The sun. it went down,
And the moon gave no light!
They sobbed and they sigh'd,
And they bitterly cried,
And the poor little thiings- --
Tt ey laid down and died.





Rhymes and Jingles.




Rhymes and Jingles.


11


And when they were dead,
The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves
And over them spread ;
And all the day long
They sang them this song,
Poor babes in the wood !
Poor babes in the wood !
And don't you remember
The babes in the wood?





Rhymes and Jingles. 41





42 The House that Jack Built.





The House that Jack Built.


HIS is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.





44 The House that Jack Built.


This is the rat
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.


This is the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house


This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house


that Jack built.


that Jack built.






The House that Jack Built.


This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog; that worried the cat;
That killed the rat; that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.






The House that Jack Built.


This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.





The House that Jack Built. 4





The House that Jack Built.


This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the farmer sowing his corn,
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.





A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.


A FROG he would a-wooing go,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho, says Rowley,
And on the road he met with a rat.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

"Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see ?"
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

When they came to the door of Mousey's hall,
Heigho, says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock and they gave a loud call;
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

"Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within ?"
Heigho, says Rowley,





50 A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.

"Oh, yes, kind sirs, I'm sitting to spin."
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinacn,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

"Pray, Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some beer?
Heigho, says Rowley,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer."
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

"Pray, Mr Frog, will you give us a song?
Heigho, says Rowley, .
But let it be something that's not very long."
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

"Indeed, Mrs. Mouse," replied the frog,
Heigho, says Rowley,
"A cold has made me as hoarse as a dog."
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

"Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog," Mousey
said,
Heigho, says Rowley,.
"I'll sing you a song that I have just made."
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !





A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go. 5






52 A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go.

But while they were all a merry-making,
Heigho, says Rowley,
A cat and her kittens came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !
The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
Heigho, says Rowley,
The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !
This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright,
Heigho, says Rowley,
He took up his hat, and he wished them good-night.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley 1
But as Froggy was crossing over a brook,
Heigho, says Rowley,
A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !
So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho, says Rowley.
The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee !
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !





Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!


AN old woman was sweeping her house, and she
found a little crooked sixpence. "What," said
she, "shall I do with this little sixpence? I will go
to market and buy a little pig." As she was coming
home she came to a stile; the piggy would not go
over the stile.
She went a little farther, and she met a dog. So
she said to the -
dog, Dog! bite l...
pig; piggy
won't go over
the stile, and I
shan'tgethome -
to-night." But
the dog would
not.
She went a
little farther,
and she met a stick. So she said, "Stick stick!
beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't get over
the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But the
stick would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a fire. So
she said, "Fire fire burn stick ; stick won't beat
dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't get over the
stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But the fire
would not.





Fire! Fire! Burn Stick!


She went a little farther, and she met some water.
So she said, Water water quench fire ; fire won't
burn stick ; stick won't beat dog ; dog won't bite pig;
piggy won't get over the stile, and I shan't get home
to-night." But the water would not.
She went a little farther, and she met an ox. So she
said, "Ox! ox!
Drink water;
water won't
S j quench fire;
Fire won't burn
( 5 stick; stick
won't beat dog;
I dog won't bite
pig; piggy
won't get over
the stile, and I
,d shan'tgethome
SN to-night." But
the ox would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a butcher.
So she said, "Butcher butcher kill ox; ox won't
drink water; water won't quench fire; fire won't
burn stick ; stick won't beat dog; dog won't bite pig;
piggy won't get over the stile, and I shan't get home
to-night." But the butcher would not.
She went a little farther, and she met a rope. So





Fire! Fire! Burn Stick I 55





Fire! Fire I Burn Stick I


she said, Rope! rope! hang butcher; butcher won't
kill ox; ox won't drink water; water won't quench
fire; fire won't burn stick; stick won't beat dog;
dog won't bite pig; piggy won't get over the stile,
and I shan't get home to-night." But the rope would
not.
So she went a little farther, and she met a rat. So
Sshe said, "Rat!
rat gnaw rope;
.o rope won't hang
butcher; butcher
won't kill ox;
ox won't drink
water; water
: won' t quench
fire; fire won't
burn stick; stick
won't beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't get
over the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But
the rat would not.
So she went a little farther, and she met a cat. So
she said, Cat cat kill rat ; rat won't gnaw rope ;
rope won't hang butcher; butcher won't kill ox; ox
won't drink water; water won't quench fire; fire
won't burn stick; stick won't beat dog; dog won't
bite pig; piggy won't get over the stile, and I shan't
get home to-night." But the cat said to her, "If





Fire I Fire I Burn Stick I 57






Fire Fire I Burn Stick


you will go to yonder cow and fetch me a saucer of
milk, I will kill the rat." So away went the old
woman to the cow.
But the cow said to her, "If you will go to yonder
haystack and fetch me a handful of hay, I'll give
you the milk." So away went the old woman to the
haystack ; and she brought the hay to the cow.
As soon as the
.. .. cow had eaten
e r.. bthe hay she
1 gave the old
woman the
milk, and away
she went with
it in a saucer to
:- the cat.
As soon as the
cat had lapped
up the milk,
the cat began to kill the rat; the rat began to gnaw
the rope; the rope began to hang the butcher;. the
butcher began to kill the ox; the ox began to drink
the water ; the water began to quench the fire; the
fire began to burn the stick ; the stick began to beat
the dog; the dog began to bite the pig; the little
pig in a fright jumped over the stile; and so the old
woman got home that night.






Poor Cock Robin.


W HO killed Cock Robin? I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow, I killed Cock Robin.

Who saw him die? I, said the Magpie,
With my little eye, I saw him die.

Who caught his blood? I, said the Fish,
With my little dish, I caught his blood.

Who made his shroud? I, said the Eagle,
With my thread and needle, I made his shroud.

Who'll dig his grave? The Owl, with aid,
But mattock and spade, will dig Robin's grave.






Poor Cock Robin.


Who'll be the parson? I, said the Rook,
With my little book, I'll be the parson.

Who'll be the clerk? I, said the Lark,
If not in the dark, I'll be the clerk.

Who'll carry him to the grave? I, said the Kite,
If not in the -night, I'll carry him to the grave.

Who'll be chief mourner ? I, said the Swan,
I'm sorry he's gone, I'll be chief mourner.

Who'll bear his pall ? We, said the Wren,
Both the cock and the hen, we'll bear the pall.






Poor Cock Robin. 61
Who'll toll the bell? I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull, and I'll pull the bell.

Who'll lead the way? I, said the Martin,
When ready for starting, and I'll lead the way.



All the birds in the air began sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll for poor Cock Robin.

To all it concerns, this notice apprises,
The Sparrow's for trial at next bird assizes.






The Cat and the Mouse.


THE cat and the mouse
Played in the malt-house:
The cat bit the mouse's tail off. "Pray, puss, give
me my tail." "No," says the cat, "I'll not give you
your tail, till you go to the cow and fetch me some
milk."
First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the cow, and thus began,-
"Pray, cow, give me milk, that I may give cat
milk, that cat may give me my own tail again."
"No," said the cow, "I will give you no milk, till
you go to the farmer and get me some hay."
First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the farmer, and thus began,-






The Cat and the Mouse.


Pray, farmer, give me hay, that I may give cow
hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat
milk, that cat may give me my own tail again."
"No," says the farmer, "I'll give you no hay, till
you go to the butcher and fetch me some meat."

First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the butcher, and thus began,-

"Pray, butcher, give me meat, that I may give
farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may
give cow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may
give cat milk, that cat may give me my own tail again."
"No," says the butcher, "I'll give you no meat till
you go to the baker and fetch me some bread."


AI -
I 'I;






64 The Cat and the Mouse.











First she leapt, and then she ran,
Till she came to the baker, and thus began,-
"Pray, baker, give me bread, that I may give
butcher bread, that butcher may give me meat, that I
may give farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay,
that I may give cow.hay, that cow may give me milk,
that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my
own tail again."
"Yes," says the baker, "I'll give you some bread,
But if you eat my meal, I'11 cut off your head."
Then the baker gave mouse bread, and mouse gave
butcher bread, and butcher gave mouse meat, and
mouse gave farmer meat, and farmer gave mouse hay,
and mouse gave cow hay, and cow gave mouse milk,
and mouse gave cat milk, and cat gave mouse her
own tail again !















THE HISTORY OF CINDERELLA;
OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.


HE-


r~(erF~T



u
u






Cinderella; or the


THF PROUDI$T WOMAN RVAR $AUN.






Little Glass Slipper.


THERE lived once a gentleman who married for
his second wife the proudest woman ever seen.
She had two daughters of the same spirit, who were
indeed like her in all things. On his side, her hus-
band had a young daughter, who was of great good-
ness and sweetness of temper; in this she was like
her mother, who was the best woman in the world.
No sooner was the wedding over than the step-
mother began to show her ill-humor; she could not
bear her young step-daughter's gentle ways, because
they made those of her own daughters appear a thou-
sand times more odious and disagreeable. So she
employed her in the meanest work of the house; she
it was who must wash the dishes and rub the tables
and chairs, and it was her place to clean madam's






Cinderella; or the


chamber and that of the misses, her daughters. She
herself slept up in a sorry garret, upon a wretched
straw bed, while her sisters' rooms had shining floors
and curtained beds, and looking-glasses so long and
broad that they could see themselves from head to
foot in them.
The poor girl bore everything with patience, not
daring to complain to her father. When she had
finished her work she used to sit down in the chimney
corner among the cinders; so that in the house she
went by the name of Cinderwench. The youngest of
the two sisters, however, being rather more civil than
the eldest, called her Cinderella. But Cinderella,
ragged as she was, looked a hundred times more
charming than her sisters, decked out in all their
splendor.?





Little Glass Slipper. 69

IIWlHffIllli i l II -- t


C3NDBRIELA DRESSES THEIR HAIR.





Cinderella; or the


It happened that the king's son gave a ball, to which
he invited all the persons of fashion for miles around;
our two misses were among the number, for they made
a great figure in the country. They were delighted
with this invitation, and were wonderfully busy choos-
ing such dresses 'as might become them. This was a
new trouble for Cinderella, for it was she who ironed
her sisters' linen, and plaited their ruffles. There
was little then talked of but what dresses should be
worn at the ball. "I," said the eldest, "will wear
my crimson velvet gown." "I," said the youngest,
"will wear a dress all flowered with gold and a brooch
of diamonds in my hair." Yet they sent for Cinder-
ella to ask her advice, for she had excellent taste.
She helped them as much as she could, and even
offered to dress their hair, which was exactly what
they wanted.





Little GlaSs Slipper.


While she was busy over this, her sisters said to
her, Cinderella, should not you be glad to go to the
ball?" "Ah," said she, "you but mock me; it is
not for such as I am to go thither." You are in the
right of it," replied they, "it would make the folk
laugh to see a Cinderwench at the ball." Any other
than Cinderella would have dressed their hair awry,
but she was good and did nothing but her best.
At last the happy moment arrived: they all set off,
and Cinderella looked after them till they passed from
her sight, when she sat down and began to cry.


i-) '16C.A.





Cinderella; or the

S-nnr


Her godmother came in, and seeing her in tears,
asked what ailed her. "I want-oh, I want-"
sobbed poor Cinderella, without being able to say
another word.
Her godmother, who indeed was a fairy, said to
her, "You want to go to the ball, isn't it so ?" "Oh,
yes!" said Cinderella, sighing. "Well then," said
her godmother, "be but a good girl, and I will -con-
trive that you shall go."
Then taking her kindly by the hand, she said,
"Run now into the garden, and bring me a pumpkin."
Cinderella flew at her bidding, and brought back the
finest she could get. Her godmother scooped out the
inside, leaving nothing but the rind; this done, she






Little Glass Slipper.


PgCRJZD OUT VQR T14 BA4I,,





Cinderella; or the


struck it with her wand, and the pumpkin was in-
stantly changed into a fine coach, gilded all over with
gold. She then went to look into the mouse-trap,
where she found six mice, all alive; she told Cinder-
ella to raise the door of the mouse-trap, and as each
mouse came out, at one tap of her wand they changed
into splendid horses; so that now Cinderella had a
coach and six horses of a fine dappled mouse-color.
' Here, my child, are your coach and horses," said
the godmother; "but what shall we do for a coach-
man ? run and see if there be not a rat in the trap;"
Cinderella brought the trap, and in it were three
huge rats. The fairy made choice of the biggest of
the three, and having touched him, he was turned
into a fat jolly coachman, who mounted the hammer-
cloth in a trice.
She next said to Cinderella-" Go again into the
garden, and you will find six lizards behind the water-
ing-pot; bring them hither." She had no sooner done
so, than her godmother turned them into smart foot-
men; who at once skipped up behind the coach.
Then said the fairy, "'Now, then, here is something
that will take you to the ball; are you pleased with
it ?" Oh, yes," cried she, "but must I go in these
dirty clothes ?"
Her godmother only touched her with her wand,
and her clothes were turned into cloth of gold and






Little Glass Slipper.


TH4 PRINCE GAZING ON CINDIRCLA.






Cinderella; or the


silver, all beset with jewels. This done she gave her
a pair of glass slippers, the prettiest in the world.
Being thus decked out, she got into her coach; but
her godmother bade her, above all things, not to stay
past midnight, telling her that if she stayed a single
moment longer, all her fine things would return to
what they had been before.
She promised her godmother she would not fail to
leave the ball before midnight, and then away she
drove.
The king's son, being told that a great princess
had come, ran out to receive her; he gave her his
hand as she stepped from her coach, and led her
among all the company.
Cinderella no sooner appeared than everyone was
silent; both the dancing and the music stopped, and
then all the guests might be heard whispering, "Ah,
how handsome she is." All the ladies were busied in
gazing at her clothes and head-dress, that they might
have some made after the same pattern. The king's
son took her to dance with him: she danced so grace-
fully that they all more and more admired her.
A fine supper was served up, whereof the young
prince ate not a morsel, so intently was he busied in
gazing on her. She sat down by her sisters, giving
them part of the fruit which the prince had presented
her with; which very much surprised them. While






Little Glass Slipper.


DROPPING HER GI.ASS S4IPPFB.






Cinderella; or the


Cinderella was thus talking with her sisters, she heard
the clock strike eleven and three-quarters, whereupon
she immediately made a curtsey to the company and
then hastened away. Being got home, she thanked
her godmother, and said she could not.but wish she
might go next day to the ball, because the king's son
had desired her.
While she was telling her godmother all that had
passed, her two sisters knocked at the door, and Cin-
derella opened. How long you have stayed !" cried
she, pretending to yawn. "If you had been at the
ball," said one of them, "let me tell you, sleepiness
would not have fallen on you. There came thither
the very handsomest princess ever seen with eyes;
she showed us a thousand kindnesses, and gave us
oranges and citrons." Cinderella asked the name of
the princess, but they told her they did not know it,
and that the king's son was uneasy, and would give
all the world to know who she was.
At this, Cinderella, smiling, replied, She must be
very beautiful : could I not see her? Ah dear Miss
Charlotte, do lend me your yellow suit of clothes that
you wear every day? "-" Oh, indeed I" cried Miss
Charlotte, "lend my clothes to such a dirty Cinder-
wench as thou art !"
The next day the two sisters went to the ball and
so did Cinderella, dressed still more magnificently
than she had been on the first night.






Little Glass Slipper.


The king's son was always with her, and said the
kindest things to her imaginable. She was so far
from feeling wearied by this, that she forgot the
charge her godmother had given her; so she at last
counted the clock striking twelve when she took it
to be no more than eleven : she then fled as nimble as
a deer. The prince followed, but could not overtake
her; she dropped one of her glass slippers, which the
prince carefully took up. She got home all out of
breath, without coach or footmen, and in her old
clothes, having nothing left of all her finery but one
of the little slippers. The guards of the gate were
asked if they had seen a princess go out, but they
said they had seen nobody except a young girl very.
meanly dressed.
When the two sisters returned, Cinderella asked
them if they had been as much amused as the night






Cinderella; or- the


before, and if the beautiful princess had been there?
They told her, yes, but that she hurried away at twelve
o'clock, so fast that she dropped one of her glass slip-
pers, which the king's son had taken up; and that
he was surely in love with the person to whom the
slipper belonged.
What they said was perfectly true, for the king's
son caused it to be given out that he would marry
her whose foot this slipper would exactly fit. So
they began by trying it on the princesses, then on
the duchesses, and all the court, but in vain; they
then brought it to the two sisters, who both tried all
they could to force their feet into the slipper, but
without success.
Cinderella, who was looking at them all the while,
could not help smiling, and said, Let me see what I






Little Glass Slipper.


IT FITS CINDEREUIAA.






Cinderella; or the


can do with the slipper," which made her sisters
laugh heartily. "Very likely," said they, "that it
would fit your clumsy foot The gentleman who
was sent to try the slipper saw that she was very
handsome, and said he had been ordered to try it on
everyone that pleased. Then, putting the slipper to
her foot, he found that it went on very easily, and
fitted her as though it had been made of wax.
The astonishment of the two sisters was great, but
still greater when Cinderella drew out of her pocket
the other slipper, and put it on At that very mo-
ment in came her godmother, and with one touch of
her wand, made Cinderella appear more magnificent
than ever.
The sisters knew her again at once, and throwing
themselves at her feet, begged pardon for the ill-
treatment they had made her undergo. Cinderella






Little Glass Slipper.


AWIONISHMUNT O THU $I$T]4RS.





84 Cinderella; or the

forgave them with all her heart, and begged that
they would always love her.
She was then led to the palace where the young
prince received her with great joy and in a few days
they were married. Cinderella, who was as good as
she was beautiful, took her sisters to live in the palace,
and shortly afterwards matched them to two great
lords of the Court, and they all lived happily ever
afterwards.





Little Glass Slipper. 85





Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


THERE once lived a poor widow, in a cottage
which stood in a country village, a long distance
from London, for many years.
The widow had only a child named Jack, whom
she gratified in everything; the end of her foolish
kindness was, that Jack paid little attention to any-
thing she said; and he was heedless and naughty.
His follies were not owing to bad nature, but to his
mother never having chided him. As she was not
rich, and he would not work, she was obliged to sup-
port herself and him by selling everything she had.
At last nothing remained, only a cow.
The widow, with tears in her eyes, could not help






Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


scolding Jack. "Oh! you wicked boy," said she,
"by your naughty course of life you have now brought
us both to fall! Heedless, heedless boy I have not
money enough to buy a bit of bread for another day :
nothing remains but my poor cow, and that must be
sold, or we must starve "


Jack was in a degree of tenderness for a few min-
utes, but it soon passed over; and then becoming very
hungry for want of food, he teased his poor mother to
let him sell the cow ; which at last she sadly allowed
him to do.
As he went on his journey he met a butcher, who
asked why he was driving the cow from home?





Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


Jack replied he was going to sell it. The butcher
had some wonderful beans, of different colors,, in his
bag, which caught Jack's fancy. This the butcher
saw, who, knowing Jack's easy temper, made up his
mind to take advantage of it, and offered all the beans
for the cow. The foolish boy thought it a great offer.
The bargain was momently struck, and. the cow ex-
changed for a few paltry beans. When Jack hastened
home with the beans and told his mother, and showed
them to her, she kicked the beans away in a great
passion. They flew in all directions, and fell as far as
the garden.
Early in the morning Jack arose from his bed, and
seeing something strange from the window, he hast-
ened down-stairs into the garden, where he soon
found that some of the beans had taken root, and
sprung up wonderfully: the stalks grew of an im-
mense thickness, and had so entwined, that they
formed a ladder like a chain in view.
Looking upwards, he could not descry the top, it
seemed to be lost in the clouds. He tried it, found it
firm, and not to be shaken. A new idea immediately
struck him : he would climb the bean stalk, and see
whither it would lead. Pull of this plan, which made
him forget even his hunger, Jack hastened to tell it
to his mother.
He at once set out, and after climbing for some






Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 89


-A 'fI --v~ w~ inn)F'j J)


STALKS oF IMMINSU THICKNI$S.





Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


hours, reached the top of the bean-stalk, tired and
almost exhausted. Looking round, he was surprised
to find himself in a strange country; it seemed to be
quite a barren desert; not a tree, shrub, house, or
living creature was to be seen.
Jack sat himself pensively upon a block of stone,
and thought of his mother; his hunger attacked him,
and nowhe felt sorrowful for his disobedience in climb-
ing the bean-stalk against her will; and made up his
mind that he must now die for want of food.
However, he walked on, hoping to see a house
where he might beg something to eat. Suddenly he
saw a beautiful young woman at some distance. She
was dressed in an elegant manner, and had a small
white wand in her hand, on the top of which was a pea-
cock of pure gold. She came near and said : I will
tell to you a story your mother dare not. But before I
begin, I require a solemn promise on your part to do
what I command. I am a fairy, and unless you per-
form exactly what I direct you to do, you will take
from me the power to assist you; and there is little
doubt but that you will die in the attempt." Jack
was rather frightened at this caution, but promised to
follow her directions.
"Your father was a rich man, with a greatly gen-
erous nature. It was his practice never to refuse help
to the poor people about him; but, on the contrary,






Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


to seek out the helpless and distressed. Not many
miles from your father's house lived a huge giant,
who was the dread of the country around for cruelty
and wickedness. This creature was moreover of a


very envious spirit, and disliked to hear others talked
of for their goodness and humanity, and he vowed to
do him a mischief, so that he might no longer hear
his good actions made the subject of every one's talk.






92 Jack and the Bean-Stalk.

Your father was too good a man to fear evil from
others; so that it was not long before the cruel giant
found a chance to put his wicked threats into prac-
tice ; for hearing that your parents were about passing
a few days with a friend at some distance from home,
he caused your father to be waylaid and murdered,
and your mother to be seized on their way homeward.
"At the time this happened, you were but a few
months old. Your poor mother, almost dead with
affright and horror, was borne away by the cruel
giant's servants, to a dungeon under his house, in
which she and her poor babe were both long kept
prisoners. Distracted at the absence of your parents,
the servants went in Isearch of them; but no tidings
of either could be got. Meantime he caused a will to
be found making over all your father's property to
him as your guardian, and as such he took open pos-
session.
"After your mother had been some months in
prison, the giant offered to restore her to liberty, on
condition that she would solemnly swear that she
would never tell the story of her wrongs to any one.
To put it out of her power to do him any harm, should
4 she break her oath, the giant had her put on ship-
board, and taken to a distant country; where she
was left with no more money for her support than
what she got by selling a few jewels she had hidden
in her dress.






Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 93


WAYLAID BY THI GIANT.






Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


"I was appointed your father's guardian at his
birth; but fairies have laws to which they are subject
as well as mortals. A short time before the giant
killed your father, I transgressed; my punishment
was the loss of my power for a certain time, which,
alas, entirely prevented my helping your father, even
when I most wished to do so. The day on which you
met the butcher, as you went to sell your mother's
cow, my power was restored. It was I who secretly
prompted you to take the beans in exchange for the
cow. By my power the bean-stalk grew to so great
a height, and formed a ladder. The giant lives in
this country; you are the person who must punish
him for all his wickedness. You will meet with
dangers and difficulties, but you must persevere in
avenging the death of your father, or you will not
prosper in any of your doings.
"As to the giant's goods, everything he has is yours,
though you are deprived of it; you may take, there-
fore, what part of it you can. You must, however,
be careful, for such is his love for gold, that the first
loss he discovers will make him outrageous and very
watchful for the future. But you must still pursue
him; for it is only by cunning that you can ever hope
to get the better of him, and become possessed of your
rightful property, and the means of justice overtaking
him for his barbarous murder. One thing I desire is,






Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 95


I- gSPIUD A IARG1U MANSION.






Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


do not let your mother know you are aware of your
father's history till you see me again.
"Go along the direct road; you will soon see the
house where your cruel enemy lives. While you do
as I order you, I will protect and guard you ; but
remember, if you disobey my commands, a dreadful
punishment awaits you."
As soon as she had made an end she disappeared,
leaving Jack to follow his journey. He walked on
till after sunset, when, to his great joy, he espied a
large mansion. This pleasant sight revived his droop-
ing spirits; he redoubled his speed, and reached it
shortly. A good-looking woman stood at the door;
he spoke to her, begging she would give him a morsel.
of bread and a night's lodging. She expressed the
greatest surprise at seeing him; and said it was quite
uncommon to see any strange creature near their-'
house, for it was mostly known that her husband was
a very cruel and powerful giant, and one that would
eat human flesh, if he could possibly get it.
This account terrified Jack greatly, but still, not
forgetting the fairy's protection, he hoped to elude
the giant, and therefore he begged the woman to take
him in for one night only, and hide him where she
thought proper. The good woman at last suffered"
herself to be persuaded, for she had a kind heart, and:
at last led him into the house.






Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


,. First they passed an elegant hall, finely furnished;
.-ey, then went through several spacious rooms, all in
.the same style of grandeur, but they seemed to be
qpite forsaken and desolate. A long gallery came
f.; ext; it was very dark, just large enough to show
that, instead of a wall each side, there was a grating
.of iron, which parted off a dismal' dungeon, from
Swhence issued the groans of several poor victims whom
the cruel giant kept shut up in readiness for his very
large appetite. Poor Jack was in a dreadful fright at
: witnessing such a horrible scene, which caused him
'to fear that he would never see his mother, but be
captured lastly for the giant's meal; but still he
recollected the fairy, and a gleam of hope forced itself
-'-nto his heart.





98 Jack and the Bean-Stalk. -

The good woman then tookJack to a large kitchen,
where a great fire was kept; she bade him sit down,
and gave him plenty to eat and drink. When he had
done his meal and enjoyed himself, he was disturbed
by a hard knocking at the gate, so loud as to cause

















the house to shake. Jack was hidden in the oven,:
and the giant's wife ran to let in her husband.
Jack heard him accost her in a voice like thunder,
saying: "Wife! wife! I smell fresh meat Oh,
my dear," replied she, "it is nothing but the people
in the dungeon." The giant seemed to believe lier,,






Jack and the Bean-Stalk. 99













and at last seated himself by the fireside, whilst the
: wife prepared supper.
By degrees Jack managed to look at the monster
through a small crevice. He was much surprised to see
..what an amazing quantity he devoured, and supposed

' his supper was ended, a very curious hen was brought
and placed on the table before him." Jack's curiosity
was great to see what would happen. He saw that it
Stood quiet before him, and every time the giant said:
S" Lay!" the hen laid an egg of solid gold. The giant
amused himself a long time with his hen; meanwhile
: his wife went to bed. At length he fell asleep, and
Ssnored like the roaring of a cannon. Jack, finding
him stU~asleep at daybreak, crept softly from his




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