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What Transformation MeansFaye Harrison reflects on her semester at the University of Cape Town, South Africa This spring Faye Harrison, Joint Professor of Anthropology and African American Studies, was an Andrew W. Mellon Visiting Fellow at the University of Cape Town (UCT). The purpose of the fellowship program is to stimulate and internationalize dia logue on research. Hosted by the Department of Social Anthropology, Harrison became familiar with the research and scholarship of a cross-section of scholars and students in the Faculty of Humanities. She presented a paper, Jesus Died for Us, We Die fi We Don*: A Retrospective Reflection on Jamaicas 2010 State of Emergency in the Tuesday Seminar series that faculty and students attend weekly. The discussion illuminated the strikingly similar conditions of urban poverty, gang violence, drug fiefdoms, and predatory politics in Cape Flats, Cape Towns sprawling zone of slums and informal settlements. The synergetic exchange provided thought-provoking perspectives on postcolonies in two different parts of the world. The Mellon Fellowship allowed Harrison to explore the meanings and practices associated with post-apartheid era transformation at the university, whose Office of Transformation Services addresses equity in the university and wider society. She was especially interested in the role social anthropology, gender studies, and African studies are envisioned to play in this process. March was UCTs newly initiated Transformation Month. The special programming and daily media coverage offered useful information and opportune moments to elicit views on the continuities and discontinuities since apartheid ended and nonracial democracy was launched in1994. Although small, UCTs Department of Social Anthropology has abundant intellectual vitality. Deeply appreciated are Harrisons conversations and exchanges of published and unpublished writings with Frances Nyamnjoh, Andrew Mugsy Spiegel, Fiona Ross, Helen McDonald, Susan Levine, Mantoa Rose Smouse (African Languages, UF Ph.D.), Mohamed Adhikari (History), and Lungisile Ntsebeza (Sociology). Patti Hen dersons graduate seminar on gender and sexuality, in which Harrison taught two sessions on the ethnography of stratified sexualities in the African diaspora, was also an important source of stimulation. Finally, Harrison acknowledges the generous collegiality of Kwesi Prah, who exposed her to the research and publications of the Centre for Advanced Studies of African Society (CASAS), the independent institution he founded to facilitate cooperation and collaboration among conti nental and diaspora scholars.* Well Die For Our Don in Jamaican Creole summer 2011University of Florida, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Embarking on a Study of Urban Life In the Port City of Tema, GhanaDr. Brenda Chalfin Associate Professor of AnthropologyI will be in Ghana from June through December 2011 to embark on a new research project on urban plan ning and public life in the port city of Tema funded by a Fulbright Hays Award. Countering prevailing accounts of African urban life, which emphasize the organic logics of informality, migration and uncontained sprawl, the project seeks new insight into the dynamics of African urbanism by taking seriously the ongoing legacy of urban planning. On par with other high modernist urban schemes of the post-war era, from Brasilia and British New towns to American suburbs and Soviet industrial cities, Tema was established shortly after Ghana gained independence in 1957. The city was the brainchild of Ghanas first president, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, and world-renowned urbanist, Constantin Doxiadis, who sought to launch Ghana into a fully modern future unhampered by its pre-industrial past or cultural distinctions separating citizens from each other and an emerging global economic ecumene. My research in Tema combines ethnography, biogra phy, and institutional and architectural history to investigate the governing bodies involved in formulating and implementing strategies of urban management and devel opment over the citys half century of existence. I am equally concerned with tracing the experiences of Temas residents as they negotiate the citys tightly conceived, and nearly entirely preformatted, built environment. Given my underlying concern as a political anthropologist with the spectrum of political possibilities allying the governed and the ungoverned, of particular interest to me are the forms of public life that flourish in the interstices between Temas highly scripted master plan and residents own aspirations for success and upward mobility amidst the contingencies of contemporary urban existence. Faye Harrison with UCT Department of Social Anthropology chair, Francis Nyamnjoh.

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page 2 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 Amherst, and is now the Anthropology Department Chair. I had the chance to visit them at Georgia State and both of them talked about the inspiring UF under graduate experience and what it meant to their careers. We welcome two new faculty members this fall, Dr. Sharon Abramowitz, who was featured in last years newsletter, and Dr. Jack Martin, featured in this issue. Dr. Abramowitz has spent this past year as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Her interests in Africa, womens health, social justice, and medical anthropology are a welcome addition to the Depart ment. Dr. Martins spectacular career as a linguist of Native American languages of the Southeast adds much needed expertise in the field of language and culture in the Department. Their classes, research, and participa tion in the department next year are highly anticipated by all of us. I think they will be important participants in the fall Potlatch picnic as well! I step down as chair of the department on August 15, and Susan deFrance will be interim chair this com ing year. Although the budget situation for higher education in Florida is very difficult, the department is in good shape, and Susan will bring her usual organiza tional skills, enthusiasm, and commitment to the success of anthropology with her into the chairs office. As a zooarchaeologist, she will make no bones about doing a great job.Id like to start by thanking all of you who have contributed your time, interest, support, and enthusiasm to the Department this past year. I have always felt that anthropology makes a difference in the world, and all of the alumni, present and past students, staff, faculty, and other friends have made a world of difference to Anthro pology at Florida. When we ask students in our classes why they take them, many say that the topics of anthropology are important and based on worldwide knowledge, but also because the classes we teach attract diverse and interesting students as well. One of Mike Heckenbergers students said that taking an anthropology class is like being at the United Nations: students, graduate students, and professors come from different places and have unique perspectives on the science and art that is anthropol ogy.Allan F. Burns reflects on leading the department as chair for the past two years. Allan has led the department just swimmingly... It is inspiring to see what has been accomplished in the department this past year, and much of this newsletter high lights some of these important advances that students and faculty have accom plished. But it is even more inspiring to hear about what past students, under graduate and graduate, are doing. There are undergraduate anthropology majors working at PBS as documentary producers, others are contributing to internation al health through their careers in medicine and related fields; still others are in the arts and creative fields. All undergraduate majors Ive heard from who have graduat ed are quick to point to the thoroughness of our program, the inspiration found in classes, and the extra experiences offered through field schools, labs, study abroad, and mentorship that are the hallmarks of our department. Two of our undergraduate majors are now professors at Geor gia State Univer sity. Dr. Cassandra White graduated from UF in 1991, completed her MA here in 1993, and went on to get her Ph.D. at Tulane University in 2001. She now teaches cultural anthropology and leads a summer abroad program in Brazil. As fate would have it, Dr. Frank Wil liams (UF Anthro pology, 1989) also joined Georgia State after receiv ing his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Dr. White Dr. Williams

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 3 Estonko? / Ch e hantaamo? Thats how you say How are you? in Creek and Miccosukee, two languages spoken within the Seminole Tribe of Florida. My research focuses on documenting the Native languages of the southeastern U.S. So far Ive concentrated on Creek in Oklahoma and Florida, Miccosukee in Florida, Koasati in western Louisiana, Alabama in eastern Texas, and Choctaw in Oklahoma. All of these languages are part of the same family: like the Germanic languages or the Romance languages they share many similarities to each other.We Welcome New Faculty MemberDr. Jack Martin, Elling Eide ProfessorJack Martin looks forward to joining UF My work typically involves collabora tive projects established between tribes and universities. Typically we try to produce multimedia dictionaries, grammars, text collections, and language teaching materials. I like to take students with me into the field, and we work together to determine our research goals and financing. A donor, Dr. Elling Eide, has generously established an endowment at the University of Florida to support professional expenses related to this research. For the past eighteen years Ive been teaching in an English department at the College of William and Mary in Virginia. Moving to Gainesville will be a big change for me, but Im looking forward to devel oping a suite of language-related courses in the Anthropology department (Linguistic Field Methods, Language Typology, Historical Linguistics, the Native Languages of the South, etc.). Stop by and say hello when you get a chance! Faculty Achievements & HonorsAbdoulaye Kane received a Faculty Enhancement Opportunity award to embark on a new study: I propose to study a Sufi Muslim group in Senegal, the Tijani Sufi order of Medina Gounass, and its transnational connections. These connections lead to Morocco where the founder of the order, Cheikh Ahmed Tijani, a saint of Algerian origin, is buried, and to France, where the disciples of the Medina Gounass order have emigrated and settled since the 1960s. Through fieldwork in France, Morocco and Senegal, I plan to explore the ways in which transnational religious circuits are being built among the Muslim follow ers of Tijaniyya. I want to examine how transnational religious circuits like that established by the revered Baro Family of Mbour, along with the help of their follow ers, bring together holy sites of pilgrimage in North Africa, Sufi religious centers in Senegal, and Senegalese diasporic commu nities in Europe. In May, I hope to participate in one of these organized pilgrimages to Fez, and accompany the entourage of the Tijani spiritual leader Cheikh Baro from there to the Daha in Mantes-la-Jolie (France). The Daha will be sponsored by members of the Senegalese Diaspora in France, and feature groups of religious scholars from the Medina Gounass branch of Tijaniyya. For the purpose of this study, I will follow as a participant observer the itinerary of Cheikh Baro from Morocco to France and then to Senegal, over a period of two months. Augusto Oyuela-Caycedos research regarding the terra preta (black earth) managed landscapes of the Amazon and ancient agriculture in NE Peru were featured in Discovery magazine, on NPR, the Washington Post, and other popular venues. O-Cs work continues to challenge perceptions that the Amazon was unsuitable for largescale civilization. Ken Sassaman will take over in January as editor of American Antiquity, the flagship journal of the Society for American Archaeology. Mike Warren was elected Vice-President of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. Susan deFrance was honored with a Colonel Allan R. and Margaret G. Crow Term Professor for 2011. CONGRATULATIONS!We would like to congratulate the following members of the department who have achieved tenure and/or promotion:Dr. Peter CollingsPromotion with Tenure to Associate Professor Dr. James DavidsonPromotion with Tenure to Associate Professor Dr. Abdoulaye KanePromotion with Tenure to Associate Professor Dr. Augusto Oyuela-CaycedoPromotion with Tenure to Associate Professor Dr. David DaeglingPromotion to Full Professor Dr. Ken SassamanPromotion to Full Professor

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page 4 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 St. Johns Archaeological Field School and Lower Suwannee River projectThe Laboratory of Southeastern Archaeology, under the direction of Ken Sassaman, continues field operations in two Florida venues. This past summer marked the ninth year of the St. Johns Archaeological Field School, located since 2007 at the mouth of Silver Glen Run in Lake County. Fifteen undergraduate students joined UF graduate students in efforts to document five millennia of ritualized living at what Harvards Jefferies Wyman described in 1875 as the most gigantic deposits of shells met with on the waters of the St. Johns. Jason ODonoughue is investigating the changing ecological and cultural value of freshwater springs like Silver Glen. Integral to his dissertation research, Zack Gilmore is detailing the community formations attending mound construction at 8LA1-West Locus B that contains a well-preserved midden and feature assemblage span ning the late Mt. Taylor and Orange periods. Another project of the 2010 field school was made possible by plans of the U.S. For est Service (USFS) to improve the public use facilities of Silver Glen Spring. The amphitheater of shell surrounding the spring was mined long before the site was incorporated into the Ocala National Forest. Still, portions of this deposit and associated sites remain in place and required assessment before improvements are made to the parking lot, bath facilities, and access trail to the spring. In partnership with USFS, Asa Randall, Jason ODonoughue, and field school students conducted shovel testing in areas targeted for renovation. This aspect of research is led by recent UF Ph.D. Asa Randall, who is head ing off to the University of Oklahoma this summer to begin his new life as an Assistant Professor. The St. Johns Archaeological Field School will return to the shores of Silver Glen Run in 2011 to continue testing of the U-shaped monument and Locus B, and to initiate testing of a St. Johns II period village on a ridge nose overlooking the spring boil. The other major venue of research by the Laboratory of Southeastern Archaeol ogy is the upper Gulf coast of Levy and Dixie counties, home to the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. Ph.D. students Paulette McFadden, Micah Mones, and Elyse Anderson have been conducting survey and test excavation at several sites with occupa tions spanning the past 4000 years. The guiding objective of understanding impacts of sea level rise on ancient coastal communities has expanded into investigations of landscape modification, ritual practice, and regional alliances, as well as marine ecology and geoar chaeology. A report of the first phase of fieldwork is available on the labs website (http:// www.anthro.ufl.edu/LSA/). Elyse Anderson (left) and Paulette McFadden record profiles at a 2000-year-old village on the Florida gulf coast. Archaeological Field School Updates Archaeological Field Schools Provide Undergraduate TrainingFor the last several years, James Davidson and Ken Sassaman have each offered a 6-week summer archaeological field school. These programs are extremely popular with our undergraduates and provide many of them with their first field experience.Kingsley Plantation Archaeological Field SchoolThis is our sixth annual field school at King sley Plantation, on Fort George Island, and administered by the National Park Service as but one part of the greater Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve National Park (Jacksonville, Florida) Occupied by circa 1792, this plantation derives its name from Zephaniah Kingsley, who occupied the site between 1814 and 1839. Defy ing convention, he took as a wife Anna Madgigine Jai, an enslaved girl from Senegal. Objecting to the harsh laws regarding interracial marriage and biracial children when Florida became American territory, Kingsley moved his family to Haiti in 1839. Our goals this summer are to complete exca vations within Cabin E-10, excavate the water well discovered in 2010 behind cabin E-11, better explore the floor features in the center of the sugar mill, and finally, delineate the extent and function of a previously unknown tabby floored structure found in 2010 just north of the sugar mill. Cabin E-10 is the first cabin in the east arc to be extensively documented archaeologically. After excavating cabins W-12, W-13, and W-15 in the west arc during the 2006 through 2009 field schools, it was believed necessary to determine if the patterns of chronology and material cul ture seen in these cabins adjacent to the marsh would also be present in the interior of the island. The west arc cabins date from 1814 to circa 1839, and were abandoned when the Kingsleys moved to Haiti. From the combined evidence thus far examined, Cabin E-10 was occupied some 20 years after the departure of the Kingsleys in 1839, or up to the beginning of the Civil War. In the east arc interior yard area, we are also searching for the pre-Kingsley slave cabins that were burned by the Seminole Indians in 1812, while behind Cabin E-11, we are completely exca vating the water well discovered in 2010.

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 5 During the Spring 2010 and 2011 semesters, thirteen UF Anthropology undergrad uate majors and two graduate students participated in an ongoing archaeological field project at Moche Borago, a large ~70m wide rock shelter situated on the slopes of a dormant volcanic mountain in S.W. Ethiopia. Currently co-directed by Dr. Steven A. Brandt of UFs Anthropology Department and Dr. Ralf Vogelsang of the University of Colognes Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, the Southwestern Ethiopia Archaeological Project (or SWEAP) is focused upon testing the hypothesis that the S.W. Ethiopian Highlands were a major environmental and cultural refugium for anatomically modern hunter-gatherers dealing with the cold, arid climates of the Last Glacial prior to human migrations across and out of Africa by ca. 50,000 years ago. Moche Borago Field project participants, Spring 2011The Southwestern Ethiopia Archaeological Project and 2010 Study Abroad ProgramsSteven A. Brandt SWEAP first began in 2006 with funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, but since 2010 has been fund ed by the Sonderforschungsbereich or SFB (German Science Foundation) as part of a four year multidisciplinary collaborative research initiative centered at the Univer sity of Cologne and entitled Our Way to Europe: Culture-Enironment Interaction and Human Mobility in the Late uaternary (for more information, visit http:// www.sfb806.uni-koeln.de). SFB funds cover all field and international travel expenses for UF and German faculty and graduate students, as well as all projectrelated field and travel expenses of the UF undergraduates. In Spring 2011, the 7 UF undergrad uates received 14 credit hours in African archaeological field methods through the UF International Centers Study Abroad program, by attending course lectures at UF in January and April, and 8 weeks of fieldwork and travel in Ethiopia during February and March. Living in a tented camp at an elevation of 2200 m and five minutes walk from Moche Borago rock shelter, the students spent the majority of their field time learning how to excavate the rock shelters very complex natural and human-made deposits dating to ca. 60,000 years ago, and to record all stone artifacts and animal remains using Total Stations. They also learned how to conduct systematic archaeo logical and environmental surveys of the surrounding mountain terrain and neighboring Southern Rift Valley, and discovered Ethiopias tremendous natural and cultural diversity by visiting national parks and interacting with many of the countrys 80 + ethnic groups. Those interested in hearing more about the day to day field activities of the 2011 UF students can read their blog at www.nonnobissolum.blogspot.com. Further research information on the 2011 field season and plans for the 2012 field season, including student applications, will be posted in the near future at web.me.com/archorn.

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page 6 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 Applied Research in War-torn Afghanistan: Notes from the field Kandahar Air Force Base Afghanistanby Dr. Rod Stubina (Ph.D. UF 2002, USAID), Region Representative for the Office of Transition Initiatives, Kandahar, Regional Command South and Southwest, United States Agency for Inter national DevelopmentAlarms started to go off just as I was jumping into bed. Rocket Attack, Rocket Attack over and over again. Soldiers are assigned to protect us; this is a key ele ment about what is going on. Why do I want to be in a place where I have to rely on our soldiers to protect me 24/7? Last year I capped three tours in West Africa working for the Peace Corps as Deputy Country Director. But after 6 years, I wanted to get back to my original interests for getting into anthropology at UF, how people in vulnerable areas make decisions in times of disruption, and what kind of resources can we offer to assist in smoothing their instability.Alumni ResearchUF graduates continue a great tradition of research. In this newsletter we highlight some of the ongoing work being conducted by UF-trained anthropologists. I had studied these phenomena in Cameroon and in Niger. But those areas were either post-disaster, or the work was with internally displaced peoples and vul nerable populations. Here in Afghanistan, we have it all, post disaster, post-conflict, internally displaced, returning refugees, kinetic environments, presently and persistently unstable areas. This is the first time I have seen experienced, applied, social scientists and development practitioners, working hand-in-hand with the military to assist vulnerable populations, in the middle of a war. As a field officer for USAID, I man aged USAID projects that were imple mented through our partners for the com munities that were identified as cleared and stabilized, without strong government presence, and without GIRoA (Govern ment Islamic Republic of Afghanistan). Once clearing operations ended, and an area is now held by either coalition forces or Afghan forces, there is a vacuum of infrastructure, government, and resources in the region. If activities arent imple mented immediately, insurgents, corrupt entities, or criminal elements could move in fast. Most of USAIDs programming tra ditionally, and presently, in Afghanistan have a long-term development focus that takes their projects years to realize impact. I work with USAIDs Office of Transition Initiatives, which is a smaller unit within USAID, a USAIDs expeditionary field program. Some call it Peace Corps on steroids. OTI is able to move resources or projects into a transition area quickly and fluidly. The role I play in South and South western Afghanistan is to seize critical windows of opportunity to provide fast, flexible, short-term assistance targeted at key political transition and stabilization needs. I work closely with the military during the shape, clear, and hold phases of COIN strategy (Counter Insurgency). We work with various specialized elements of the military that can integrate into unstable areas and live in communities with locals. They help us identify areas where we can develop effective and innovative programming that is flexible, and adapted to unique situations. Some examples of this are quickimpact projects highlighting peace dividends and building confidence in support of new government elements or stabilization efforts. The projects we design bring people from feuding ethnic or religious groups together to work productively. We try to develop the methods to disseminate fair and unbiased information widely through open media outlets that we fund or identify. We work with the community to foster linkages between emerging civil society and national and local government bodies. We also look to re-integrate ex-combatants and displaced persons and protect vulnerable populations. We do this under the wire. When I design a program or an activity, I do it with local government or local elders. Local government, formal or informal, takes full credit. The communities have no idea that the projects that we are supporting for their reconstruction are actually USAID funded. We dont even report to the U.S. mission where our activities are. We are trying to increase GIRoAs capacity and credibility quietly. For us, it is about the process, not the output. This approach is different from national USAID programming. We arent a charity, and we arent looking for branding. We are looking to stabilize a region or community and build a support base for the community to their local government. Then we disen gage. Some of the criteria I look for when I disengage; are other actors capable of sustaining and improving upon our work, or if functional Afghan institutions have begun legitimately representing GIRoA and other development actors. Can these institutions manage and fulfill local expectations? Sometimes the places we target are not ready for our engagement. Communities are responsive when they are included in their own development. This is the value that social scientists bring to the table when working with our military colleagues. Many in the military do not see the benefits of anthropologists living and working alongside soldiers, advising, or controlling how development funds are most effectively allocated in kinetic environments. And this has been made very clear to me on several occasions. The relationship is an ongoing struggle of development

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 7 priorities, target areas, and space. My feeling is, with this much at stake, I have no choice but to try and be a part of the process, and represent, from a development perspective, alternatives and current methods, with which I have anthropological experience. Its over 106 degrees today, with zero humidity. Despite being strapped in tightly to my seat, I am bouncing around in the back of a heavily armored MATV, being escorted on a routine patrol by a Special Forces FET Team (Female Engagement Team, 4 highly trained female soldiers) to a village that was recently cleared of Taliban. The Special Forces want me to meet the district governor (DG). They have been working with him to clear the area of insurgents who had been menacing the local popula tion of a village just south of Kandahar. This is a strategic point both geographically and historically. The village is at a crossroads of Taliban trafficking to Kandahar City, and other villages buffering the city. This town is also host to a historical Islamic shrine. The District Governor is risking his life daily to try and get out into the community and meet the needs of the population. This is rare in an area where the Taliban routinely targets government officials for assassination. Together with Special Forces, the District Governor wants some projects, any project, to show that the Afghan gov ernment is supporting the villages and his position. Work ing through the local government, the FET team had been engaging a girls school that had also been targeted by the Taliban. The school needs a security wall, and a total refurbishment: windows, doors, blackboards, everything. It sat empty until the district governor ral lied the village to clean the school up and invite the Special Forces to assist them. The FET teams, and Special Forces, are extremely committed to showing the progress of this area. With little or no development funding, they were able to clear all the insurgents, with the support of the community. However, they have no funding to help the District Governor pro vide basic services to his population. This is exactly where OTI can assist as capacity gets built. Already the local police have made significant security gains, but the population needs to see progress and gov ernment services for their risk of driving insurgents away. If projects arent brought in now, it could severely affect village sta bility operations that keep the Taliban away. This is the crucial coordination and conversation social scientists need to have when advising on stability and project development. Because our resources are limited and USG funding has been tempered, our footprint now needs to be larger and more meaningful, but with less money. Our strategies have to shift to be more flexible with each engagement into communities in transition. It is the process of commu nity engagement that is most important. Measuring that process is a challenge. It is easy to put up structures or do cash for work programs. But how does that achieve stability? What are the criteria we need to see before we engage in an unstable area? What projects or support foster stabilization in vulnerable communities? And when do we know we can then disen gage, and allow traditional development to occur? These are unique and difficult situations to assess in this environment. Working with the Special Forces has been an unexpected pleasure. They are out in rural areas, living with communities, speaking the language, occasionally dressed as host nationals, and gaining a unique perspective of how communities in conflict areas tick. This is not unlike what I did as a volunteer when I was in Africa. However, I had no resources then. This collaboration is needed to best support the drive to have communities forge their own future from conflict, and stand up to insurgents, reclaiming stability. If these communities can achieve this, then we can mitigate their resilience to self-sufficiency and security, and then we can leave. US Aid Director Dr. Raj Shah and UF Anthropology Alumnus Rod Stubina

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page 8 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 More Alumni ResearchAfrican ArchaeologyDrs. Kathryn Weedman Arthur (Ph.D., Univ. of Florida 2000), John W. Arthur (Ph.D., Univ. of Florida 2000), and Matthew C. Curtis (M.A. 1995 and Ph.D. 2005 Univ. of Florida) recently received National Science Foundation funding (20112013) to continue their studies with the Borada-Gamo of southern Ethio pia documenting their indigenous history and culture. The Arthurs have been working with the Gamo for the last 15 years, since their dissertation ethnoarchaeological work among potters (Arthur) and hideworkers (Weed man Arthur). Curtis joined the Arthurs in 2005, when they began to work with the Borada-Gamo to conduct ethnoarchaeological, historical, archaeological, and environmental research in the region. Between 20052008, they funded their research through the University of South Florida, the National Science Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The oral histo ries and traditions collected during this research resulted in the identification of nine historic open-air settlements and many sacred ritual spaces dating between cal AD 1270 to 1950, as well as three cave sites dating between 1920 to 6400 cal BP. Their ethnoarchaeological study of the use of space and material culture of Borada-Gamo present-day households indicates that there is great potential for the archaeological visibility of the different caste households at these historic sites. The project continues to engage the Borada-Gamo community in historical studies, by incorporating local oral traditions and histories of the region in archaeo logical and environmental studies. The project includes a regional archaeological survey and broad scale excavations at Ochollo Mulato, the oldest open-air historic site in the region (A.D. 12701950 cal), and at Gulo cave (62801920 cal B.P.) to explore conquest, internal development, environ mental change, and conflict as explanations for the origin and development of caste. To enhance the understanding of past and present environments of the region, the project has assembled an international team of spe cialists. The project includes investigations of subsistence and environmental change, geomorphology, and regional settlement to document land clearance and deforestation and identify the different diets and land scapes occupied by the caste groups today and in the past. The project continues to engage the Borada-Gamo combining stud ies of material culture, use of space, and life histories to assess how transformations in status, economy, and religion have affected public and household spaces, material cul ture, and caste identity. An important component of the project is to work in concert with Bora da-Gamo elders to provide written and film documentation of the Borada-Gamo indigenous culture and historic places in the effort to preserve it for future genera tions. Thus, importantly, the project inte grates the interpretations and participation of elders, secondary school teachers and students, research assistants, and Ethiopian university students to produce books and films to be distributed to the Borada-Gamo schools and community. Dr. Matthew C. Curtis mapping Gamo site Dr. John Arthur and Ato Bizuayehu Lakew conducting oral history interviews with Gamo elders Dr. Kathryn Arthur conducting an ethnographic interview

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 9 Joe Neil Henderson, Ph.D. 1979, Medical Anthropologist Three current state archaeologists/ preservation officers are UF Ph.D.s (Dr. Ryan Wheeler, Florida, Dr. Jonathan Leader, South Carolina, and Dr. Ruth Trocolli, District of Columbia). Dr. Trocolli reflects on preserving the historical resources in our nations capital: I have served as the State Archaeologist* for Washington, D.C. (the District) since 2007. The District is different from most states in that one archaeologist performs all of the archaeological review and compliance functions as well as maintaining the archaeological site and report files, conducting outreach, and curating the collections. Much of the development in the District occurs using federal funding so many proj ects go through archaeological review (under Section 106). A self-taught Geographic Information System (GIS) user, I have established a GIS that includes dozens of historic maps and aerial photos, and has created custom data layers with archaeological sites and surveys, locations of original streams and shorelines, former cemeteries, and Civil War resources. GIS is a powerful tool for analyzing land use through time and predicting the presence of intact archaeological resources hiding beneath highly developed urban landscapes. A companion tool to GIS is geoarchaeological coring, used to determine if areas of archaeological potential have intact soil profiles. The landscape of the District is far from natural in many areas, with estuaries and streams filled over and miles of made-land along the rivers. Under the fill, and even under the footprints of modern buildings, intact prehistoric and historic sites remain, waiting to be found by someone wielding the right tools.Dr. Henderson is Professor of Medical Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and Director of the American Indian Diabetes Prevention Center in the College of Public Health, in Oklahoma City. He is a mem ber of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. Dr. Henderson was honored by the award of the Leadership in Prevention for Native Americans, 2006, by the Loma Linda University School of Public Health and the Award of Achievement by the University of Oklahoma, College of Public Health. Dr. Henderson is the for mer Editor-in-Chief of the Jour nal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology and past-President of the Association for Anthropology and Ger ontology. He has authored many articles in the scientific press and is co-author of the texts, Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health (2001) and, with Maria Vesperi, is co-editor of The Culture of Long Term Care (1995). Dr. Hendersons research areas focus on aging, health, and long-term care issues of American Indian people. As a doctoral student of Otto Von Mering, Joe-Neil merges gerontology and other medical health issues in his research: Over the past five years, I have been conducting research with funds from the Alzheimers Association on perceptions of etiology, treatment, and disease course of Alzheimers and related dementias among 10 American Indian Nations in Oklahoma. Concurrently, I was Co-PI of a Robert Wood Johnson Founda tion grant to study health belief model change regarding diabe tes self-care. I was awarded a National Institutes of Health grant from the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop a multidisciplinary center to study the prevention of diabetes among American Indian populations. Specifically, my work is on dementia caregiving, biological and cultural influences regard ing recognition and treatment of dementia and diabetes, cultural constructions of disease, and community health interventions and education in the context of cultural diversity. I have con ducted bio-cultural research on Alzheimers disease in American Indian tribes, developed Alzheimers support groups in African-American and Spanishspeaking populations, and con ducted geriatric health care edu cation for American Indian pro viders across the United States. Currently, I am conducting research into health beliefs and behaviors of gestational diabetes among Oklahoma Choctaw and Chickasaw women. The themes of this research are the preven tion of disease, reduction of health disparities, and the build ing of healthier lives among the youth, adults, and elders in cul turally diverse populations. Dr. Ruth Trocolli

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page 10 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 My Semester in Gainesville as an Eddy Visiting ProfessorTed (Edward C) GreenI was offered a one-semester visiting professorship at UF a year before my schedule allowed me enough free time to accept the position. By last Janu ary, I was available and looking forward to missing another bitterly cold winter in New England. I had spent the previous nine years at the Harvard School of Public Health. My wife and I took the auto-train down from Washington, D.C. which is more or less my permanent home, one cold day on the 1 st of January. We almost ended up living in a high-rise (not at all our style), but fortunately through gradu ate student connections, we were able to sublet an old house in the Duck Pond from an anthropologist who was heading for Washington. (As it turned out, when we left Gainesville on May 1, yet another anthropologist moved in to start a new lease.) We enjoyed this house quite a bit and became friends with the landlord and his wife. The landlord owns a black, 1918 Gibson A-model mandolin, and so do I. What are the odds...? He and his wife took us snorkeling in some of the many springs and rivers that are accessible from Gainesville, and that maintain a 72 degree temperature year-round, warm enough for humans but a little too cold for alligators or water moccasins (I was assured). The Duck Pond and indeed Gainesville is very flat and so very good for bicycling, which I did a lot of. We also lived right next to a park and so I got into the habit of rolling out of bed in the mornings and jogging in the park before breakfast. My wife befriended a professor emeritus of engineering and physics who lived across the street. He is in his nineties and was one of the great pioneers of solar and alternative energy, bringing enormous government grants to UF in the 1950s and '60s, at a time when grants were much smaller. He liked to come over to visit and tell us fantastic stories about his long and distinguished career that got its start when he deserted Hitlers infantry in his native Austria and found his way to America. I knew Russ Bernard from the early 1970s. Ever since that time, Russ seems to come back into my life every few years, always resulting in something careerenhancing. It was great to have some time to properly catch up with Russ and his wife, and before I left Gainesville, I asked Russ to join the board of directors of my non-profit, the New Paradigm Fund .The Elizabeth Eddy Endowment recognizes the career of applied anthropologist Elizabeth Marie Liz Eddy. Established by Professor Eddys estate, the endowment provides funding of a visiting professorship for an applied anthropologist to spend a semester at UF teaching a course and interacting with applied anthropology students. The endowment also supports graduate students through both dissertation writing fellowships and research assistantships. Eddy Fellowships and AssistantshipEddy Fellowships to help support dissertation preparation this year went to Ed GonzalezTennant, Timothy Podkul, and Brian Tyler. Dawit Woldu was awarded the 2011 Elizabeth Eddy Applied Anthropology Research Assistantship. Dawit assisted Dr. Ted Green with his research and teaching on the topic of AIDS, Behavior, and Culture during the spring semester.Elizabeth Eddy Endowment: Visiting Professor, Fellowships, and Assistantship Dawit Woldu

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 11 My academic load during this past spring semesterif it can even be called a loadwas a seminar I called AIDS, Behavior and Culture. I chose the name from the title of one of my two books that came out in January. It is quite an experience to find oneself back in a classroom after being in the field, applying anthropology for a quarter of a century or more. True, I came to UF from the Harvard School of Public Health, but I conducted and/or directed research there and did no regular teaching. One startling encounter was with the new technology available. One day early in the semester, I was trying to recall the name of the co-author of an article Id written in about 1982...I couldnt quite remember. Within seconds, a student had the article on her iPad. Not just the citation; the entire article. (Note to self: watch what you say! Everything now is on the Internet and your students can access it all in nanoseconds!) The seminar provided opportunities for some intense discussions about the politics, ideology and financial selfinterest associated with the multi-bil lion dollar per-year industry that Global AIDS has become. Of course I learned a lot from my students. I mentioned in my seminar that if anyone was interested in either dissertation study or volunteer work with an exciting new non-profit in South Africa, I could help make the connections. It turned out that none of my immediate students needed an entree to southern Africa, but through them, two student volunteers emerged. One is an anthropology major who plans to go to med school, and the other just gradu ated in Womens Studies and would like to spend at least a year in South Africa. Both will work with and through the Ubuntu Institute in South Africa, and both will be involved in research related to some training in drug and alcohol addiction that the New Paradigm Fund in partnership with World Vision/Swa ziland is implementing in July, in Swa ziland. I will be the supervisor of the research of one of the students, who will be getting course credit for her research. I forget at this moment how many cred its she is getting but even a couple of months of field research in Africa is hard to put a value on. It will look great Elizabeth Eddy Endowment: Visiting Professor, Fellowships, and Assistantshipon a resume or medical school application, and such experiences often lead to long and rewarding careers working in Africa, or wherever a student volunteer happens to go. I had also worked with UF grad student Nicki DEricco before coming to Gainesville, and she coauthored a paper with myself, the director of the Ubuntu Institute, and three others, which was pub lished in the African Journal of AIDS Research. Dr. Lance Gravlee trained Nicki in the MAXQDA qualitative data analysis software, which proved most use ful in analyzing our many hours of taped focus group discussions in four southern African countries. Based on that first collaboration, I asked Nicki to analyze qualitative findings from a recent study in Uganda, which my colleagues and I are currently publishing. Nicki will again be a co-author of the qualitative paper from that research. I have a feeling that through my links with Russ Bernard, Paul Allen, and Lance Gravlee that other UF anthropology students will find their way to Africa through my contacts, and possibly my own non-profit or that of my South African godson, who runs the Ubuntu Institute."The seminar provided opportunities for some intense discussions about the politics, ideology and financial self-interest associated with the multi-billion dollar per-year industry that Global AIDS has become." Dr. Ted Green

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page 12 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 Faculty Member & AffiliateAlaska, Peter Collings, Cultural Anthropology Florida, James Davidson, Historical Archaeology Florida, Ken Sassaman, SE Prehistoric Archaeology Florida, Lance Gravlee, Medical Anthropology Florida, William Marquardt, Archaeology Florida, Kathy Deagan, Archaeology Florida, Neill Wallis, Archaeology Florida, Jack Martin, Linguistics Florida, Mike Warren, Forensic Anthropology Bulgaria, Maria Stoilkova, Cultural Anthropology China, C. K. Shih, Cultural Anthropology China, John Krigbaum, Biological Anthropology China, Rick Stepp, Cultural Anthropology Democratic Republic of Congo, Connie Mulligan, Genetics Research Democratic Republic of Congo, Sharon Abramowitz, Medical Anthropology Eastern Europe, Jack Kugelmass, Cultural Anthropology El Salvador, Allan Burns, Cultural Anthropology Ethiopia, Steve Brandt, Archaeology Ghana, Brenda Chalfin, Cultural Anthropology Guatemala, Kitty Emery, Archaeology Guyana, Mike Heckenberger, Archaeology Haiti, Jerry Murray, Cultural Anthropology Ivory Coast, Dave Daegling, Biological Anthropology Liberia, Sharon Abramowitz, Medical Anthropology Mexico, Susan Gillespie, Archaeology Mexico, Susan Milbrath, Archaeology Morocco, Abdoulaye Kane, Cultural Anthropology Collings Davidson Oyuela-Caycedo Kernaghan Daegling Martin

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 13 North America, John Moore, Cultural Anthropology Nova Scotia, Marilyn Thomas-Houston, Cultural Anthropology Peru, Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo, Archaeology Peru, Florence Babb, Cultural Anthropology Peru, Michael Moseley, Archaeology Peru, Richard Kernaghan, Cultural Anthropology Peru, Susan deFrance, Archaeology Peru, Tony Oliver-Smith, Cultural Anthropology Senegal, Abdoulaye Kane, Cultural Anthropology South Africa, Faye Harrison, Cultural Anthropology St. Lucia, William Keegan, Archaeology Tanzania, Alyson Young, Medical Anthropology Tanzania, Peter Schmidt, Archaeology Yucatan, Allan Burns, Cultural AnthropologyResearch Spans the GlobeBrandt Young Harrison Shih

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page 14 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 Faculty ResearchOur faculty members and anthropology affiliates continue to conduct diverse research across the globe. Tai Monkey Project Field Assistant Richard Paacho and a forest friend (photo by Scott McGraw).David Daegling: Ta Monkey ProjectDespite the political turmoil in Cte dIvoire, it has been a productive year for the NSF-supported Ta Monkey Project. This research, which investigates the relationship between diet, feeding behavior and bone structure in the jaws of West African monkeys, was featured in six presentations at the spring meetings of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. The project supports undergraduate and graduate student research here at UF, but importantly also helps support the field assistants in Cte dIvoire through our collaborative effort with Ohio State University to step up conservation efforts in the last patch of undisturbed rainforest in West Africa. Several of the monkey species under study are listed as critically endangered by the IUCN.Connie Mulligan: Epigenetic alterations and stress among new mothers and infants in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A biocultural look at the intergenerational effects of warOur ability to successfully adapt to a constantly changing environ ment and increasingly complex stressors is one of the ways in which we are distinctively human. There is growing evidence that there may be an intermediate mechanism that mediates between the rapidly changing environment and our slowly evolving genome, i.e. epigenetic alterations. A new project based in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) will investigate epigenetic alterations (chemical modifications to the genome that do not change the underlying DNA sequence, but do affect gene expression) as a possible pathway to developmental plasticity and adap tation. Professors Connie Mulligan, Lance Gravlee and Alyson Young and Department of Anthropology graduate student Nikki DErrico will examine epigenetics and socio-cultural measures of stress in one of the most stressful environments today, the eastern DRC where war has waged for 14 years. This war and the related political-economic instability have far reaching consequences as a result of widespread maternal deprivation, increased exposure to psychosocial stressors and direct physical violence. Last summer, with support from the Center for African Studies, Mulligan spent one week and DErrico spent six weeks at HEAL Africa in Goma, DRC collecting blood and placental samples from 25 new mothers and their infants as well as semi-structured interview and trauma survey data from the mothers. This study is the first to investigate epigenetic alterations in humans as a means of modifying gene expression in offspring as a result of trauma to the mother. Our research has the potential to dramatically transform the ways in which we think of adaptation and evolution as well as inform policies to address societal problems. UFs Office of Research recently awarded us a two year $84,000 Research Opportunity Fund grant to begin this project.

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 15 Peter Schmidt Peter Schmidt with UF students (Justin Dunnavant, left; Ayana Flewellen, right) at Kanazi Palace during a UF field school in May, 2011.Rick Stepp: Biocultural Diversity Conservation in ChinaRick Stepp has begun a research collaboration focused on biocultural diversity conservation in the Greater Mekong Region of Southeast Asia. The Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Academy of Sciences fund this program through their 111 Program, an innovative partnership to build capacity and train students in a number of areas deemed crucial by the Chinese government. The academic partner is Minzu University in Beijing, China. Minzu University is unique among Chinese universities due to its focus on education (graduate and undergraduate) of the more than 56 indigenous groups in the country. The university also houses a significant biodiversity policy institute that is charged with representing China in the Convention on Biological Diversity. During the summer of 2010, Stepp traveled with UF President Bernard Machen, UF International Center Dean David Sammons and other administrators to sign a cooperative agreement with Minzu University. Since that time, 2 graduate students from Minzu have worked in Stepps lab as research scholars and a delegation from Minzu traveled to UF to meet with Provost Joe Glover in March of this year. In June 2011, a delegation from the UF Provosts Office will go to Beijing to explore further col laboration with Minzu and participate in the 60th anniversary celebration of the founding of the university. Students and faculty interested in collabo rating in the project should email stepp@ufl.edu The Department of Anthropology is forging new ties with colleagues in Computer Science and Engineering and the Emerging Pathogens Institute at UF. Rick Stepp is co-investigator on a new National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study the social factors and social networks involved in the transmission of tuberculosis. The disease is of major significance worldwide, and the World Health Organization estimates that 1/3 of the entire worlds population is currently infected with TB bacillus. Of these, 5% will become sick or infected. The team will be working closely with public health officials in developing more effective protocols and a software application to understand how tuberculosis is spread. continued on page 16Peter Schmidt has been conducting ethnographic research in NW Tan zania since October 2009 (returning for the fall semester 2010) on social mem ory and the HIV/AIDS trauma. His research focuses on the impact of AIDS on the transmission of oral testimonies, both oral traditions and oral histories. Once a region where elders related ency clopedic histories and where epic poetry flourished, HIV/AIDS has been devastating to males in generation above age 65. A proportionately higher number of men in their 40s and 50sthose who should be elders todaypassed from AIDS in the 1980s and 1990s. These keepers of oral tradition have suffered a disproportionate loss of life vis--vis women in the same age group. Inter ruption of the chains of oral transmission means that young people have no knowledge about their histories nor do people in their middle years retain more than cursory knowledge about clan and kingdom histories. Interviews inevitably turn into con versations about how the recent past and experiences with HIV/AIDS color present life and views of the past. This is a grievously difficult struggle. House holds headed by single females make up a huge proportion of village life, up to 29%, often on the smallest and least productive plots. AIDS has taken from every familyup to 1.5 family mem bers per household in one neighboring village. People still want to talk about the scourge, a kind of therapeutic discourse. How can something as sweet as love making come to be so monstrous? asked one wise man of 80, who mourns his loss of many children. With the passing of elderly males keepers of oral traditions, elderly women have become the most riveting storytellers. Now ele vated to history keepers, their newly recognized expertise reflects their deep knowledge of people and events they have witnessed in their lifetimes. More recently, Peter has focused on the restoration of an early 20thcentury palace built by the German colonial government for a local king and collaborator. A marvelous mix of colonial architecture and local political court life, this suite of three buildings has been rescued from partial ruin to become a vital, living memorial to a history of local interaction with both German and British colonial power.

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page 16 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 Alyson Young: Livestock Climate Change CRSP Research in northern TanzaniaAlyson Young is spending June in northern Tanza nia working on research associated with a recently funded seed grant from the USAID Livestock Climate Change collaborative research support program (LCCCRSP) through Colorado State University. The project entitled, Risk, Perception, Resilience, and Adaptation to Climate Change in Niger and Tanzania is focused on understanding and describing the longer-term health and economic consequences of pastoral/agropastoral respons es to local climate change in East and West Africa. This research is being carried out by a multidisciplinary team from UF and includes Dr. Sandra Russo (PI, International Center), Dr. Brian Mayer (co-PI, Sociol ogy), Dr. Alyson Young (co-PI, Anthropology), and Sarah McKune (co-PI, Sociology/School of Natural Resources). The project builds on food security, health, and livelihood research from 2005 in both Niger and Tanzania. Dr. Young will spend the time in Tanzania this summer collecting child nutritional data and testing whether a vulnerability scale developed among pastoralists in Niger can also be used to understand how climate change con tributes to resilience and vulnerability in East African pastoral communities. The UF team is working closely with institutional partners in both Niger and Tanzania on all aspects of the project. A workshop is also being held in collabora tion with the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi to discuss findings from the project as well as methodologies for risk assessment and vulnerability analysis in pastoral populations. Susan deFrance: Inca Expansion into Southern PeruSusan deFrance, along with a team of Peruvian colleagues and American students, investigated the economic and social consequences of Inca conquest of far south ern coastal Peru. With funding from the National Geographic Society, a CLAS Humanities Enhancement Award, and a NSF DIG (Sofia Chacaltana, U. Illinois-Chicago), they completed excavations at the southern Peruvian sites of Tacahuay Tambo and Punta Picata in June and July 2010 to examine changes that accompanied Inca expansion and the incorporation of local indigenous populations into the Inca state. Ongoing analyses (Cayetano University-Lima and at Museo Contisuyo-Moquegua) are addressing the intensification of agricultural production under Inca control, partic ularly increased production of cotton, and changes in fishing and shellfishing behavior for state needs. Bioarchaeological and isotopic analyses of human remains from tombs at Tacahuay Tambo are addressing health, population origins, and biological distance of interred populations associated with the Inca conquest.Faculty Research, continued from page 15

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 17 Graduate Student Accomplishments and AwardsWe saw a record number of graduate students complete their degrees this past year. Nine students obtained their masters degrees while twenty-eight students earned their doctorates!Zack Gilmore has been awarded a Hyatt and Cici Brown Endowment Fellowship for the upcoming year. Kathy Liu received a CLAS disser tation fellowship for Spring 2011. The Center for Latin American Studies provided generous support to several of our graduate students, particularly for Masters research, through its grants and fellow ships. Summer Research Grants were awarded to Corey Souza and Camee Maddox. LAS also awarded a William Carter Field Research Grant to Jamie Lee Marks. The Center awarded Alissa Jordan the A. Curtis Wilgus Fellowship for her preliminary dissertation work this summer. Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships for the 2011 aca demic year went to Maia Bass, Anna Brodrecht, Nikki C. DErrico, Joe Feldman Jason Hartz, Camee Maddox, Erik Timmons and Dawit Woldu. Dawit Woldu also received an Auzenne Dissertation Fellowship. Paul Morse was awarded the Miss Lucy Dickinson Fellowship by the Florida Museum of Natural History. This fellowship is granted to a first-year Ph.D. candidate pursuing a course of study in Vertebrate Pale ontology. Nicole Cannarozzi received the Ripley P. Bullen Award from the Florida Museum. Hannah Mayne received the Ger son Fellowship from the UF Center for Jewish Studies and the Cooper Award. Erik Timmons received a pre-dissertation grant from the Center for African Studies. Maranda Kles was a NAGPRA intern for the Southeastern Archaeol ogy Center, a division of the Nation al Park Service. Maranda earned a STAR Award, which is a Special Thanks for Achieving Results. Danny Pinedo was awarded the Inter-American Foundation Grassroots Development Fellowship. Allysha Winburn was awarded the Kosciuszko Foundation Tuition Scholarship for graduate studies. Sarah E. Page-Chan received a 2011 Society for Applied Anthro pology Student Endowed Award and an Innovation through Institu tional Integration (I-Cubed) Teach ing Award (funded by NSF) for new course development and implemen tation at UF. Alan F. Schultz received a Gradu ate Student Council Travel Award to attend the Society for Applied Anthropology Annual Meeting, Spring 2011, in Seattle, Washing ton. Joe Feldman received support to participate in the NSF Summer Institute for Research Design in Cultural Anthropology (SIRD). Anna Brodrecht received a Ful bright Public Policy Initiative Grant to conduct fieldwork in Mexico. Meredith Marten was awarded a Fulbright-Hays DDRA grant for fieldwork in Tanzania on health care sustainability and resiliency. Tim Podkul and Forest R. Stevens (Geography) were awarded a grant through the NSF Innovation through Institutional Integration Program for their project Linking Social and Land Change Networks: A Mixed Methods Approach in a Water Limited Landscape. Lucas Martindale Johnson was awarded a two-year membership and recognition in the bulletin of the International Association of Obsidian Studies for his outstand ing poster at the 2010 Society for American Archaeology meetings. Jeff Hoelle won the Robert M. Netting Student Paper Award from the American Anthropological Association, Culture and Agriculture section, 2010 for his paper Convergence on Cattle: Political Economy, Social Group Perceptions, and Socioeconomic Relationships in Acre, Brazil. Becky Blanchard received the NOAA Sea Grant Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship with the Office of Marine Conser vation at the U.S. Department of State. The Pound Lab forensic crew recent ly received a coin of excellence from the Alachua County Sheriffs Department for their participation in an excavation of a possible burial site. The award was presented at the Sheriffs Office annual awards banquet. Receiving the awards were graduate students Traci Van Deest, Katie Skorpinski, Nicolette Parr, Carlos Zambrano, Kristina Ballard Caroline Dimmer and Pound Lab Director, Dr. Mike Warren. Ellen Lofaro received a Center for Latin American Studies Field Research Grant (2010) and the UF Graduate Student Council 1st place poster award in February 2011.UF and External Awards, Grants, and InternshipsPolly and Paul Doughty Research Awards support graduate student anthropological research in the area of international peace, conflict reso lution, and/or development, with preference given to a focus on Latin America. This year five worthy recipients will embark on fieldwork: Justin uinn Joe Feldman Dawit Woldu John Hames and Jamie Lee Marks The Department of Anthropol ogy, through a gift of Drs. Alba Amaya Burns and Allan Burns, offers awards for summer research in Latin America for projects in Medical Anthropology, Human Rights, and Applied Anthropol ogy. The award honors the memory and goals of social justice of Miguel Angel Amaya, a medical student who perished during the Civil War in El Salvador. Miguel Angel Amaya was the brother of Professor Alba Amaya Burns. This years recipient is Marlon Carranza-Zelaya. John M. Goggin Awards are made to doctoral candidates specializing in sociocultural and biological anthro pology who will use the stipend for expenses related to preparation of the dissertation. This years recipient is Zhongzhou Cui Charles H. Fairbanks awards go to doctoral candidates specializing in archaeology who will use the stipend for expenses related to prepa ration of the dissertation. This years recipients are Edward GonzalezTennant and Clete Rooney. The James C. Waggoner Grant in Aid honors the memory of Dr. James C. Waggoner, Jr. who had an appreciation for the graduate pro gram and for the value of graduate research. This award is open to stu dents in any subfield of anthropolo gy. Camee Maddox is the recipient of the inaugural award. Nicolette Parr won the inaugu ral William Goza Fellowship, a $5000 award presented by the Wil liam R. Maples Center for Forensic Medicine. Dr. Goza was a key bene factor of the Pound Laboratory and the University of Florida. This will be an annual award presented to a top Pathology Resident or Forensic Anthropology Graduate student.Departmental Awards

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page 18 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 Undergraduate Student Achievements and HonorsThis past year 251 anthropology majors received their bachelors degrees!Undergraduate Honors Theses: Several undergraduates worked with faculty mentors to produce impressive Senior Honors Theses over the past year.Arian Albear: Changes in Meaning of Maya Cruciform Shapes through Time (Mil brath). Casey Cottrill: Medical and healthcare issues in 19th and early 20th century America: Bottle Analysis (Davidson). Sarah Geggus: Taking root: A case study of immigrants and their gardens in Gainesville, Florida (Stepp). Moriah Goldfarb: An Analysis of Conus Shell Tinklers Recovered from 8NA142 (Sassaman). Heather Lear: Islam and European Identity: Turkish Accession to the European Union as seen by University Students in Holland and Turkey (Stoilkova and Wald, Political Science). He Li : Sex assessment of the distal femur: an anthropological and medical perspective (Warren). Keilani Jacquot: American womens psychology and the influence of Protestantism (Collings). Meredith Moukawsher: Designing a conservation policy with bite: The value of an ethno-archaeological perspective to ongoing shark debates in the South Pacific (deFrance). Dustin Reuther: A cross-cultural comparison of common themes and derived functions of insects exploited for entomophagy (Oyuela-Caycedo). David Roebuck : Do Suriname Cebus apella obtain foraging benefits from mixed species associations with Saimiri sciureus? (Burns/Boinski). Katlyn Scholl: Variable microsatellite loci for population genetics studies of a sucking louce (Pedicinus badii) found on Old World Monkeys (Reed, FLMNH). Christina Tedman : Child Labor Discourse and the NgabeBugle: An Evaluation of the After Effects of Child Labor Regulations in the Indigenous Group of Panama (Krigbaum and Serra, African Studies). Andrea Warren: Preliminary Characterization and Provenance of Obsidian Artifacts from Ethiopian Archaeological Sites using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (Brandt). Outstanding undergraduate Kelley Williams honored with the Brendan OSullivan Award for Academic Excellence.Kelley is graduating with a perfect 4.0 GPA. She reflects on what drew her to anthropology and her future: I was born in Okinawa, Japan, because my dad was in the military. Shortly afterward, we moved to Kansas, and then to Florida where my family has lived ever since. Even though I was too young to remember living in any of these places, I think that growing up knowing that part of my past and hearing of my parents experiences overseas put a desire in me to know about other people and places in the world. This interest also grew because of my church, which hosts an annual missions conference. When I was in middle school, my family welcomed a missionary from Nigeria into our home for the week. This woman made a lasting impression on me, and inspired my interest Africa. After going to Brazil a few times in high school, I was able to go to Uganda for the first time, just before enrolling at the University of Florida. I had originally planned on studying engineering at UF, but after thinking about my real interests and passions, I realized that anthropology was a much better fit. I declared my major in anthropology before beginning classes, and I never even considered changing it. My classes in anthropology, along with African Studies and Swahili, have allowed me to learn more about the world, and have opened up opportunities for me to serve in Uganda and study in Tanzania. This upcoming year after graduation, I will be going to China to teach English, most likely to secondary school or university students. I am very excited to be able to expe rience another part of the world, and to see where this next step will lead me in the future.Patricia S. Essenpreis Scholarship The 2011 Patricia S. Essenpreis Scholarship for female undergradu ates to attend an archaeological field school was awarded to Anna Binder and Rachel Fernandez. Anna will be attending the St. Johns Archaeological Field School directed by Dr. Ken Sassa man. Rachel will be attending the Pog gio Civitate Archaeology Field School in Murlo, Italy.Five talented undergraduates granted University Scholars Awards to conduct research in collaboration with a faculty mentorJason Breslin: Chiribaya subsistence based on analysis of invertebrate remains from the coastal site of Punta Picata, Peru (Susan deFrance, mentor). Erin Harris-Parks: Petro graphic analysis of Weeden Island pottery to determine provenance of sacred and secular wares (Ken Sassaman, mentor). John Moran : Chinese-African relationships in Botswana (Abdoulaye Kane, mentor). Amelia Schaub: From the faunas mouth: seasonality using CO2-laser ablation on prehistoric tooth enamel from island Southeast Asia (John Krig baum, mentor). Tamra Joy Rich: Biocultural aspects of substance abuse and medications in Swaziland (through Interdisciplinary Studies, Ted Green, mentor). Rachel Fernandez and Anna Binder

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011 page 19 Marcus Hepburn Marcus Hepburn 63, died June 8, 2010, in Tallahassee, Florida. Hepburn (BS/MS, Florida State U, Ph.D. UF) was a pioneer in fisheries anthropology. In the 1970s and 80s he held research positions at Florida State University, UNC Wilmington, and East Carolina University. An extraordinarily gifted ethnographer, Hepburn was fieldwork er, interviewer and research supervisor on numerous projects in Florida and North Caro lina. He authored or co-authored many applied studies of coastal communities, fisheries management technical reports, and presentations at scholarly meetings. By 1985 Hepburn had nearly completed his doctoral dissertation comparing three Southern fishing commu nities, but his progress was derailed by family tragedy. Afterward he rededicated himself to his religious faith, eventually completing studies to become a deacon of the Roman Catholic Church. From 1985 to 2004 Hepburn was employed by the Florida Department of Community Affairs where he worked on numerous community projects. He also completed numerous applied stud ies of fisherfolk and served as a consultant and fellow for several state and national agencies. In 2005 Hepburn went to work for Catholic Charities of Florida as an emergency management specialist. At the time of his death, he was chair of Florida Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters. Hepburn brought anthropological know-how to all his work. Hoping to finish at last his dissertation, Hepburn was readmitted to the University of Florida doctoral program in 2007. At the time of his passing Marcus was completing his dissertation comparing maritime cultures on Cedar Key, Harkers Island, North Carolina, and the Florida Panhandle community where he began his maritime career. Marcus was awarded his Ph.D. posthumously from the University of Florida in Spring 2011 (from J. Anthony Paredes and James C. Sabella) In MemoriamOtto O. von MeringOtto Oswald von Mering (19222010), Ph.D., Professor Emeritus in Anthropology and Gerontology in the Colleges of Medicine and Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, passed away on December 31, 2010, in Gainesville, Florida. Otto was born in Berlin, Germany, October 21, 1922, and moved to the U.S. in 1939. His Bachelors was in history from Williams College (1944), and his Ph.D. was from Harvard University in Social Anthropology, mentored by Dr. Clyde Kluckhohn. and developed connections with the State of Floridas International Exchange Center on Gerontology, thereby extending the geographic, cultural, and intellectual reach of aging studies. He was energetic in working in com munities on questions of health education, aging, and bridging research and everyday life. His multidisciplinary relevance was reflected in his publication venues beyond anthropology, such as psychiatry, medicine, social work, nursing, and psychology. His last text was an edited volume, The Future of Long-Term Care: Social and Policy Issues, with R. H. Binstock and L. E. Cluff, Johns Hopkins Press, 1996. In 1999, Dr. von Mering was honored in a paper session at the meetings of the Society for Applied Anthropology, Tucson, Arizona. Everyone appreciated Ottos sardonic humor, sharp critiques of events, and his penchant for penetrating com munication via displays of wonderful linguistic choreog raphy. His interests were boundless, his insights acute, and he often presaged what would come to be considered new frontiers of anthropology. As I heard him say to someone in a conference hallway, Well, of course, we must some times explore the hinterlands. Otto was a real explorer and emissary for anthropology. The field will miss him greatly. (Source: Joe Neil Henderson) Dr. von Mering was an advocate and practitioner of multi-disciplinary think ing, research, and publishing on human health and disease. However, he told his students to consider Rudolph Vir chows axiom that, Disease is but life under altered conditions. That is, beware of pigeonholes like health and disease because they are cultural constructs that can surreptitiously mire problem solving. He enjoyed mentoring, and his many stu dents in anthropology and other fields are a legacy to his commitment to future scholars and researchers. As a doctoral student of Clyde Kluck hohns, von Merings academic research included participation in Harvards Labo ratory of Social Relations originating the Comparative Study of Values in Five Cultures project. One outcome was his authorship of A Grammar of Human Values (Pittsburgh, University SAGE Publica tions, Inc., 1961). His first professional position began in 1955 at Western Psy chiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, when utilizing medical anthropologists in medical settings was a novel idea. There, he applied anthropology to the psychiatric hospital as an organization and to its cur riculum, practices, patients, and practitio ners viewing them as cultural systems tied more to prevailing cultural contexts than to the empiricism of positivist medicine. Dr. von Mering moved to the University of Florida, Department of Anthro pology in 1971. He became the Director of the Center for Gerontological Studies

PAGE 20

Department of Anthropology1112 Turlington Hall PO Box 117305 Gainesville FL 32611-7305 Phone: 352-392-2253 Fax: 352-392-6929 Website: www.anthro.ufl.edu NON PROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID GAINESVILLE FL PERMIT NO 94 Friends of Anthropology (provides for a wide variety of department initiatives and needs) Custom Copies Graduate Travel (defrays costs for graduate students to travel to professional meetings) Patricia S. Essenpreis Award for Undergraduate Archaeology Research (assists female undergraduates to attend field school) Brendan OSullivan Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Majors (honors the highest-ranking major at spring graduation) Polly and Paul Doughty Graduate Research Award (funds graduate student research in Latin America) Burns Amaya Graduate Research Awards (funds graduate student research in Latin America) Charles H. Fairbanks Scholarship (defrays research costs for archae ology Ph.D. students in their final year) John M. Goggin Memorial Scholarship (defrays research costs for Ph.D. students in cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology in their final year) William R. Maples Scholarship (defrays research costs for forensic anthropology graduate students) Marvin Harris Lecture Fund (lecture series honors the late Professor Marvin Harris, one of the nations leading anthropological theorists) Zora Neale Hurston Fellowship (celebrates diversity, in honor of Zora Neale Hurston) James C. Waggoner, Jr. Grants-in-Aid Endowment (supports gradu ate student research) Zoe Martin del Campo-Hermosillo Award (supports travel to con ferences for graduate students who are single custodial parents) Gift Amount: $25 $50 $100 $250 $________ Please fill out and return this page, along with your check made payable to the UF Foundation, to Anthropology, PO Box 117305, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7305. Please make any corrections needed to the address on the aboe label.Become a Friend of AnthropologyYou Can Make a Difference! We need your help, whether you can spare only a few dollars or many more. The Anthropology Department depends on gifts to fund student travel to meetings, undergraduate and graduate scholarships, dissertation and field school awards, lecture series, laboratory enhancements, and other initia tives. Its easy to make your tax-deductible gift through the University of Florida Foundation. Online giving to the Friends of Anthropology Fund with a credit card is now available at www.uff.ufl.edu/OnlineGiving/CLAS.asp Anthropology Friends Fund (000393). UF employees can donate to any Anthropology fund through payroll deduction. Or use this convenient form to designate your gift to a specific purpose:


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UniversiT M olorida College of Liberal O Frts and Scienes

University of Florida, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences summer 201 1


Embarking on a
Study of Urban Life
In the Port City of
Tema, Ghana
Dr. Brenda Chalfin
Associate Professor of Anthropology
Will be in Ghana from June through December 2011
to embark on a new research project on urban plan-
ning and public life in the port city of Tema funded by a
Fulbright Hays Award. Countering prevailing accounts of
African urban life, which emphasize the organic logics of
informality, migration and uncontained sprawl, the project
seeks new insight into the dynamics of African urbanism
by taking seriously the ongoing legacy of urban planning.
On par with other high modernist urban schemes of
the post-war era, from Brasilia and British New towns to
American suburbs and Soviet industrial cities, Tema was
established shortly after Ghana gained independence in
1957. The city was the brainchild of Ghana's first presi-
dent, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, and world-renowned urbanist,
Constantin Doxiadis, who sought to launch Ghana into a
fully modern future unhampered by its pre-industrial past
or cultural distinctions separating citizens from each other
and an emerging global economic ecumene.
My research in Tema combines ethnography, biogra-
phy, and institutional and architectural history to inves-
tigate the governing bodies involved in formulating and
implementing strategies of urban management and devel-
opment over the city's half century of existence. I am
equally concerned with tracing the experiences of Tema's
residents as they negotiate the city's tightly conceived, and
nearly entirely preformatted, built environment. Given my
underlying concern as a political anthropologist with the
spectrum of political possibilities allying the governed and
the ungoverned, of particular interest to me are the forms
of public life that flourish in the interstices between Tema's
highly scripted master plan and residents own aspirations
for success and upward mobility amidst the contingencies
of contemporary urban existence.


What Transformation Means
Faye Harrison reflects on her semester at
the University of Cape Town, South Africa
his spring Faye Harrison, Joint Professor of Anthropology and African American
Studies, was an Andrew W. Mellon Visiting Fellow at the University of Cape Town
(UCT). The purpose of the fellowship program is to stimulate and internationalize dia-
logue on research. Hosted by the Department of Social Anthropology, Harrison became
familiar with the research and scholarship of a cross-section of scholars and students
in the Faculty of Humanities. She presented a paper, "Jesus Died for Us, We Die fi We
Don*: A Retrospective Reflection on Jamaica's 2010 State of Emergency" in the "Tues-
day Seminar" series that faculty and students attend weekly. The discussion illuminated
the strikingly similar conditions of urban poverty, gang violence, drug fiefdoms, and
predatory politics in Cape Flats, Cape Town's sprawling zone of slums and informal
settlements. The synergetic exchange provided thought-provoking perspectives on post-
colonies in two different parts of the world.
The Mellon Fellowship allowed Harrison to explore the meanings and prac-
tices associated with post-apartheid era transformation at the university, whose Office
of Transformation Services addresses equity in the university and wider society. She was
especially interested in the role social anthropology, gender studies, and African studies
are envisioned to play in this process. March was UCT's newly initiated Transformation
Month. The special programming and daily media coverage offered useful information
and opportune moments to elicit views on the continuities and discontinuities since
apartheid ended and "nonracial" democracy was launched in 1994.
Although small, UCT's Department ofS social Anthropology has abundant intellec-
tual vitality. Deeply appreciated are Harrison's conversations and exchanges of published
and unpublished writings with Frances Nyamnjoh, Andrew "Mugsy" Spiegel, Fiona
Ross, Helen McDonald, Susan Levine, Mantoa Rose Smouse (African Languages, UF
Ph.D.), Mohamed Adhikari (History), and Lungisile Ntsebeza (Sociology). Patti Hen-
derson's graduate seminar on gender and sexuality, in which Harrison taught two sessions
on the ethnography of stratified sexualities in the African diaspora, was also an important
source of stimulation. Finally, Harrison acknowledges the generous collegiality of Kwesi


Prah, who exposed her to
the research and publications
of the Centre for Advanced
Studies of African Society
(CASAS), the independent
institution he founded to
facilitate cooperation and
collaboration among conti-
nental and diaspora scholars.
*"We'llDieFor OurDon"inJaaican Creole


r


Faye Harrison with UCT
Department of Social
Anthropology chair
Francis Nyamnjol


7y 1


II q

















Allan F Burns reflects
on leading the department as
chair for the past two years.




Allan has led

the department

just swimmingly...


'd like to start by thanking all of you who have contributed your time, interest,
support, and enthusiasm to the Department this past year. I have always felt that
anthropology makes a difference in the world, and all of the alumni, present and past
students, staff, faculty, and other friends have made a world of difference to Anthro-
pology at Florida. When we ask students in our classes why they take them, many say
that the topics of anthropology are important and based on worldwide knowledge,
but also because the classes we teach attract diverse and interesting students as well.
One of Mike Heckenberger's students said that taking an anthropology class is like
being at the United Nations: students, graduate students, and professors come from
different places and have unique perspectives on the science and art that is anthropol-


It is inspiring to see what has been
accomplished in the department this past
year, and much of this newsletter high-
lights some of these important advances
that students and faculty have accom-
plished. But it is even more inspiring to
hear about what past students, under-
graduate and graduate, are doing. There
are undergraduate anthropology majors
working at PBS as documentary produc-
ers, others are contributing to internation-
al health through their careers in medicine
and related fields; still others are in the
arts and creative fields. All undergraduate
majors I've heard from who have graduat-
ed are quick to point to the thoroughness
of our program, the inspiration found in
classes, and the extra experiences offered
through field schools, labs, study abroad,
and mentorship that are the hallmarks of
our department.


Two of our
undergraduate
majors are now
professors at Geor-
gia State Univer-
sity. Dr. Cassandra
White graduated
from UF in 1991,
completed her MA here in 1993, and
went on to get her Ph.D. at Tulane Uni-
versity in 2001. She now teaches cultural
anthropology and leads a summer abroad
program in Brazil. As fate would have
it, Dr. Frank Wil-
liams (UF Anthro-
pology, 1989) also
joined Georgia
State after receiv-
ing his Ph.D. from
the University
of Massachusetts,


Amherst, and is now the Anthropology Department
Chair. I had the chance to visit them at Georgia State
and both of them talked about the inspiring UF under-
graduate experience and what it meant to their careers.
We welcome two new faculty members this fall,
Dr. Sharon Abramowitz, who was featured in last year's
newsletter, and Dr. Jack Martin, featured in this issue.
Dr. Abramowitz has spent this past year as a Post-Doc-
toral Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Her interests
in Africa, women's health, social justice, and medical
anthropology are a welcome addition to the Depart-
ment. Dr. Martin's spectacular career as a linguist of
Native American languages of the Southeast adds much
needed expertise in the field of language and culture in
the Department. Their classes, research, and participa-
tion in the department next year are highly anticipated
by all of us. I think they will be important participants
in the fall "Potlatch" picnic as well!
I step down as chair of the department on August
15, and Susan deFrance will be interim chair this com-
ing year. Although the budget situation for higher
education in Florida is very difficult, the department is
in good shape, and Susan will bring her usual organiza-
tional skills, enthusiasm, and commitment to the suc-
cess of anthropology with her into the chair's office. As
a zooarchaeologist, she will make no bones about doing
a great job.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 2







We Welcome New Faculty Member

Dr. Jack Martin, Elling Eide Professor
Jack Martin looks forward to joining UF
Estonko? / Chehantaamo? That's how you say 'How are you?' in Creek and Miccosukee,
two languages spoken within the Seminole Tribe of Florida. My research focuses on
documenting the Native languages of the southeastern U.S. So far I've concentrated on
Creek in Oklahoma and Florida, Miccosukee in Florida, Koasati in western Louisiana,
Alabama in eastern Texas, and Choctaw in Oklahoma. All of these languages are part of
the same family: like the Germanic languages or the Romance languages they share many


similarities to each other.
My work typically involves collabora-
tive projects established between tribes and
universities. Typically we try to produce
multimedia dictionaries, grammars, text
collections, and language teaching materi-
als. I like to take students with me into the
field, and we work together to determine
our research goals and financing. A donor,
Dr. Elling Eide, has generously established
an endowment at the University of Florida
to support professional expenses related to
this research.


For the past eighteen years I've been
teaching in an English department at the
College of William and Mary in Virginia.
Moving to Gainesville will be a big change
for me, but I'm looking forward to devel-
oping a suite of language-related courses in
the Anthropology department (Linguistic
Field Methods, Language Typology, His-
torical Linguistics, the Native Languages
of the South, etc.). Stop by and say hello
when you get a chance!


Faculty Achievements & Honors


Abdoulaye Kane received a Faculty
Enhancement Opportunity award to
embark on a new study: I propose to study
a Sufi Muslim group in Senegal, the Tijani
Sufi order of Medina Gounass, and its
transnational connections. These connec-
tions lead to Morocco where the founder
of the order, Cheikh Ahmed Tijani, a saint
of Algerian origin, is buried, and to France,
where the disciples of the Medina Gounass
order have emigrated and settled since the
1960s.
Through fieldwork in France, Moroc-
co and Senegal, I plan to explore the ways
in which transnational religious circuits
are being built among the Muslim follow-
ers of Tijaniyya. I want to examine how
transnational religious circuits like that
established by the revered Baro Family of


Mbour, along with the help oftheir follow-
ers, bring together holy sites of pilgrimage
in North Africa, Sufi religious centers in
Senegal, and Senegalese diasporic commu-
nities in Europe.
In May, I hope to participate in one
of these organized pilgrimages to Fez, and
accompany the entourage of the Tijani
spiritual leader Cheikh Baro from there
to the Daha in Mantes-la-Jolie (France).
The Daha will be sponsored by members
of the Senegalese Diaspora in France, and
feature groups of religious scholars from
the Medina Gounass branch of Tijaniyya.
For the purpose of this study, I will follow
as a participant observer the itinerary of
Cheikh Baro from Morocco to France
and then to Senegal, over a period of two
months.


Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo's research regarding the terra
preta (black earth) managed landscapes of the Amazon
and ancient agriculture in NE Peru were featured in
Discovery magazine, on NPR, the Washington Post, and
other popular venues. O-C's work continues to challenge
perceptions that the Amazon was unsuitable for large-
scale civilization.

Ken Sassaman will take over in January as editor of
American Antiquity, the flagship journal of the Society for
American Archaeology.

Mike Warren was elected Vice-President of the American
Board of Forensic Anthropology.

Susan deFrance was honored with a Colonel Allan R.
and Margaret G. Crow Term Professor for 2011-2012.


CONGRATULATIONS!
We would like to congratulate the following
members of the department who have achieved
tenure and/or promotion:


Dr. Peter Collings-Promotion with Tenure to Associate Professor
Dr. James Davidson-Promotion with Tenure to Associate Professor
Dr. Abdoulaye Kane-Promotion with Tenure to Associate Professor
Dr. Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo-Promotion with Tenure to Associate Professor
Dr. David Daegling-Promotion to Full Professor
Dr. Ken Sassaman-Promotion to Full Professor


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 3







Archaeological Field School Updates
Archaeological Field Schools Provide Undergraduate Training
For the last several years, James Davidson and Ken Sassaman have each offered a 6-week summer archaeological field school.
These programs are extremely popular with our undergraduates and provide many of them with their first field experience.


St. Johns Archaeological Field School and
Lower Suwannee River project
The Laboratory of Southeastern Archaeology, under the direction of Ken Sassaman,
continues field operations in two Florida venues. This past summer marked the
ninth year of the St. Johns Archaeological Field School, located since 2007 at the mouth
of Silver Glen Run in Lake County. Fifteen undergraduate students joined UF graduate
students in efforts to document five millennia of ritualized living at what Harvard's Jef
feries Wyman described in 1875 as "the most gigantic deposits of shells met with on the
waters of the St. Johns." Jason O'Donoughue is investigating the changing ecological and
cultural value of freshwater springs like Silver Glen. Integral to his dissertation research,
Zack Gilmore is detailing the community formations attending mound construction at
8LAl-West Locus B that contains a well-preserved midden and feature assemblage span-
ning the late Mt. Taylor and Orange periods.
Another project of the 2010 field school was made possible by plans of the U.S. For-
est Service (USFS) to improve the public use facilities of Silver Glen Spring. The "amphi-
theater" of shell surrounding the spring was mined long before the site was incorporated
into the Ocala National Forest. Still, portions of this deposit and associated sites remain
in place and required assessment before improvements are made to the parking lot, bath
facilities, and access trail to the spring. In partnership with USFS, Asa Randall, Jason
O'Donoughue, and field school students conducted shovel testing in areas targeted for
renovation. This aspect of research is led by recent UF Ph.D. Asa Randall, who is head-
ing off to the University of Oklahoma this summer to begin his new life as an Assistant
Professor.
The St. Johns Archaeological Field School will return to the shores of Silver Glen
Run in 2011 to continue testing of the U-shaped monument and Locus B, and to initiate
testing of a St. Johns II period village on a ridge nose overlooking the spring boil.
The other major venue of research by the Laboratory of Southeastern Archaeol-
ogy is the upper Gulf coast of Levy and Dixie counties, home to the Lower Suwannee
National Wildlife Refuge. Ph.D. students Paulette McFadden, Micah Mones, and Elyse
Anderson have been conducting survey and test excavation at several sites with occupa-
tions spanning the past 4000 years. The guiding objective of understanding impacts of sea
level rise on ancient coastal communities has expanded into investigations of landscape
modification, ritual practice, and regional alliances, as well as marine ecology and geoar-
chaeology. A report of the first phase offieldwork is available on the lab's website (http://
www.anthro.ufl.edu/LSA/).


Kingsley Plantation
Archaeological Field
School
T his is our sixth annual field school at King-
sley Plantation, on Fort George Island, and
administered by the National Park Service as but
one part of the greater Timucuan Ecological and
Historic Preserve National Park (Jacksonville,
Florida)
Occupied by circa 1792, this plantation
derives its name from Zephaniah Kingsley, who
occupied the site between 1814 and 1839. Defy-
ing convention, he took as a wife Anna Madgigine
Jai, an enslaved girl from Senegal. Objecting to
the harsh laws regarding interracial marriage and
biracial children when Florida became American
territory, Kingsley moved his family to Haiti in
1839.
Our goals this summer are to complete exca-
vations within Cabin E-10, excavate the water
well discovered in 2010 behind cabin E-11, better
explore the floor features in the center of the sugar
mill, and finally, delineate the extent and function
of a previously unknown tabby floored structure
found in 2010 just north of the sugar mill.
Cabin E-10 is the first cabin in the east arc
to be extensively documented archaeologically.
After excavating cabins W-12, W-13, and W-15 in
the west arc during the 2006 through 2009 field
schools, it was believed necessary to determine
if the patterns of chronology and material cul-
ture seen in these cabins adjacent to the marsh
would also be present in the interior of the island.
The west arc cabins date from 1814 to circa 1839,
and were abandoned when the Kingsley's moved

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 4









































The Southwestern Ethiopia Archaeological Project
and 2010-2011 Study Abroad Programs
Steven A. Brandt


During the Spring 2010 and 2011 semesters, thirteen UF Anthropology undergrad-
uate majors and two graduate students participated in an ongoing archaeological
field project at Moche Borago, a large ~70m wide rock shelter situated on the slopes of
a dormant volcanic mountain in S.W. Ethiopia. Currently co-directed by Dr. Steven A.
Brandt of UF's Anthropology Department and Dr. RalfVogelsang of the University of
Cologne's Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, the Southwestern Ethiopia Archaeologi-
cal Project (or SWEAP) is focused upon testing the hypothesis that the S.W. Ethiopian
Highlands were a major environmental and cultural refugium for anatomically modern
hunter-gatherers dealing with the cold, arid climates of the Last Glacial prior to human
migrations across and out of Africa by ca. 50,000 years ago.


SWEAP first began in 2006 with
funding from the U.S. National Science
Foundation, but since 2010 has been fund-
ed by theS ..... ..'. .... or SFB
(German Science Foundation) as part of
a four year multidisciplinary collaborative
research initiative centered at the Univer-
sity of Cologne and entitled Our Way to
Europe: Culture-Environment Interaction
and Human Mobility in the Late -Quater-
nary (for more information, visit http://

Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


www.sfb806.uni-koeln.de). SFB funds
cover all field and international travel
expenses for UF and German faculty and
graduate students, as well as all project-
related field and travel expenses of the UF
undergraduates.
In Spring 2011, the 7 UF undergrad-
uates received 14 credit hours in African
archaeological field methods through the
UF International Center's Study Abroad
program, by attending course lectures at


UF in January and April, and 8 weeks of fieldwork and
travel in Ethiopia during February and March. Living in
a tented camp at an elevation of 2200 m and five minutes
walk from Moche Borago rock shelter, the students spent
the majority of their field time learning how to excavate
the rock shelter's very complex natural and human-made
deposits dating to ca. 60-40,000 years ago, and to record
all stone artifacts and animal remains using Total Stations.
They also learned how to conduct systematic archaeo-
logical and environmental surveys of the surrounding
mountain terrain and neighboring Southern Rift Valley,
and discovered Ethiopia's tremendous natural and cultural
diversity by visiting national parks and interacting with
many of the country's 80 + ethnic groups.
Those interested in hearing more about the day
to day field activities of the 2011 UF students can read
their blog at www.nonnobissolum.blogspot.com. Further
research information on the 2011 field season and plans
for the 2012 field season, including student applications,
will be posted in the near future at web.me.com/archorn.


page 5












Alumni Research

UF graduates continue a great tradition of research. In this newsletter we highlight some of the
ongoing work being conducted by UF-trained anthropologists.


Applied Research in War-torn Afghanistan:
Notes from the field Kandahar Air Force
Base Afghanistan
by Dr. Rod Stubina (Ph.D. UF 2002, USAID), Region Representa-
tive for the Office of Transition Initiatives, Kandahar, Regional
Command South and Southwest, United States Agency for Inter-
national Development
A larms started to go off just as I was jumping into bed. "Rocket Attack, Rocket
attack" over and over again. Soldiers are assigned to protect us; this is a key ele-
ment about what is going on. Why do I want to be in a place where I have to rely on our
soldiers to protect me 24/7? Last year I capped three tours in West Africa working for
the Peace Corps as Deputy Country Director. But after 6 years, I wanted to get back to
my original interests for getting into anthropology at UF, how people in vulnerable areas
make decisions in times of disruption, and what kind of resources can we offer to assist
in smoothing their instability.


I had studied these phenomena in
Cameroon and in Niger. But those areas
were either post-disaster, or the work was
with internally displaced peoples and vul-
nerable populations. Here in Afghanistan,
we have it all, post disaster, post-conflict,
internally displaced, returning refugees,
kinetic environments, presently and persis-
tently unstable areas. This is the first time
I have seen experienced, applied, social
scientists and development practitioners,
working hand-in-hand with the military
to assist vulnerable populations, in the
middle of a war.
As a field officer for USAID, I man-
aged USAID projects that were imple-
mented through our partners for the com-
munities that were identified as cleared
and stabilized, without strong government
presence, and without GIRoA (Govern-
ment Islamic Republic of Afghanistan).
Once clearing operations ended, and an
area is now held by either coalition forces
or Afghan forces, there is a vacuum of
infrastructure, government, and resources


in the region. If activities aren't imple-
mented immediately, insurgents, corrupt
entities, or criminal elements could move
in fast.
Most of USAID's programming tra-
ditionally, and presently, in Afghanistan
have a long-term development focus that
takes their projects years to realize impact.
I work with USAID's Office of Transition
Initiatives, which is a smaller unit within
USAID, a USAID's expeditionary field
program. Some call it Peace Corps on
steroids. OTI is able to move resources or
projects into a transition area quickly and
fluidly.
The role I play in South and South-
western Afghanistan is to seize critical
windows of opportunity to provide fast,
flexible, short-term assistance targeted at
key political transition and stabilization
needs. I work closely with the military
during the 'shape, 'clear,' and 'hold' phases
of COIN strategy (Counter Insurgency).
We work with various specialized elements
of the military that can integrate into


unstable areas and live in communities with locals. They
help us identify areas where we can develop effective and
innovative programming that is flexible, and adapted
to unique situations. Some examples of this are quick-
impact projects highlighting peace dividends and building
confidence in support of new government elements or
stabilization efforts. The projects we design bring people
from feuding ethnic or religious groups together to work
productively. We try to develop the methods to dissemi-
nate fair and unbiased information widely through open
media outlets that we fund or identify. We work with
the community to foster linkages between emerging civil
society and national and local government bodies. We also
look to re-integrate ex-combatants and displaced persons
and protect vulnerable populations.
We do this under the wire. When I design a program
or an activity, I do it with local government or local elders.
Local government, formal or informal, takes full credit.
The communities have no idea that the projects that
we are supporting for their reconstruction are actually
USAID funded. We don't even report to the U.S. mission
where our activities are. We are trying to increase GIRoA's
capacity and credibility quietly. For us, it is about the
process, not the output. This approach is different from
national USAID programming. We aren't a charity, and
we aren't looking for branding. We are looking to stabilize
a region or community and build a support base for the
community to their local government. Then we disen-
gage. Some of the criteria I look for when I disengage; are
other actors capable of sustaining and improving upon
our work, or if functional Afghan institutions have begun
legitimately representing GIRoA and other development
actors. Can these institutions manage and fulfill local
expectations? Sometimes the places we target are not
ready for our engagement. Communities are responsive
when they are included in their own development. This
is the value that social scientists bring to the table when
working with our military colleagues.
Many in the military do not see the benefits of
anthropologists living and working alongside soldiers,
advising, or controlling how development funds are most
effectively allocated in kinetic environments. And this
has been made very clear to me on several occasions.
The relationship is an ongoing struggle of development


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 6






































priorities, target areas, and space. My feeling is, with this
much at stake, I have no choice but to try and be a part of
the process, and represent, from a development perspec-
tive, alternatives and current methods, with which I have
anthropological experience.
It's over 106 degrees today, with zero humidity.
Despite being strapped in tightly to my seat, I am bounc-
ing around in the back of a heavily armored MATV, being
escorted on a routine patrol by a Special Forces FET
Team (Female Engagement Team, 4 highly trained female
soldiers) to a village that was recently cleared of Taliban.
The Special Forces want me to meet the district governor
(DG). They have been working with him to clear the area
of insurgents who had been menacing the local popula-
tion of a village just south of Kandahar. This is a strategic
point both geographically and historically. The village is at
a crossroads of Taliban trafficking to Kandahar City, and
other villages buffering the city. This town is also host to a
historical Islamic shrine.
The District Governor is risking his life daily to try
and get out into the community and meet the needs of
the population. This is rare in an area where the Taliban
routinely targets government officials for assassination.
Together with Special Forces, the District Governor wants
some projects, any project, to show that the Afghan gov-
ernment is supporting the village's and his position. Work-
ing through the local government, the FET team had been
engaging a girl's school that had also been targeted by the
Taliban. The school needs a security wall, and a total
refurbishment: windows, doors, blackboards, everything.


It sat empty until the district governor ral-
lied the village to clean the school up and
invite the Special Forces to assist them.
The FET teams, and Special Forces,
are extremely committed to showing the
progress of this area. With little or no
development funding, they were able to
clear all the insurgents, with the support
of the community. However, they have no
funding to help the District Governor pro-
vide basic services to his population. This
is exactly where OTI can assist as capacity
gets built. Already the local police have
made significant security gains, but the
population needs to see progress and gov-
ernment services for their risk of driving
insurgents away. If projects aren't brought
in now, it could severely affect village sta-
bility operations that keep the Taliban
away. This is the crucial coordination and
conversation social scientists need to have
when advising on stability and project
development.
Because our resources are limited
and USG funding has been tempered, our
footprint now needs to be larger and more
meaningful, but with less money. Our
strategies have to shift to be more flexible
with each engagement into communities
in transition. It is the process of commu-


nity engagement that is most important.
Measuring that process is a challenge. It
is easy to put up structures or do cash for
work programs. But how does that achieve
stability? What are the criteria we need to
see before we engage in an unstable area?
What projects or support foster stabili-
zation in vulnerable communities? And
when do we know we can then disen-
gage, and allow traditional development
to occur? These are unique and difficult
situations to assess in this environment.
Working with the Special Forces has
been an unexpected pleasure. They are
out in rural areas, living with communi-
ties, speaking the language, occasionally
dressed as host nationals, and gaining a
unique perspective of how communities in
conflict areas tick. This is not unlike what
I did as a volunteer when I was in Africa.
However, I had no resources then. This
collaboration is needed to best support
the drive to have communities forge their
own future from conflict, and stand up
to insurgents, reclaiming stability. If these
communities can achieve this, then we can
mitigate their resilience to self-sufficiency
and security, and then we can leave.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 7









More Alumni Research


African Archaeology
Drs. Kathryn Weedman Arthur (Ph.D., Univ. of
Florida 2000), John W. Arthur (Ph.D., Univ. of
Florida 2000), and Matthew C. Curtis (M.A. 1995 and
Ph.D. 2005 Univ. of Florida) recently received National
Science Foundation funding (2011-2013) to continue
their studies with the Borada-Gamo of southern Ethio-
pia documenting their indigenous history and culture.
The Arthurs have been working with the Gamo for the
last 15 years, since their dissertation ethnoarchaeological
work among potters (Arthur) and hideworkers (Weed-
man Arthur). Curtis joined the Arthurs in 2005, when
they began to work with the Borada-Gamo to conduct
ethnoarchaeological, historical, archaeological, and envi-
ronmental research in the region. Between 2005-2008,
they funded their research through the University of
South Florida, the National Science Foundation, and the
National Endowment for the Humanities. The oral histo-
ries and traditions collected during this research resulted
in the identification of nine historic open-air settlements
and many sacred ritual spaces dating between cal AD 1270
to 1950, as well as three cave sites dating between 1920 to
6400 cal BP. Their ethnoarchaeological study of the use of
space and material culture of Borada-Gamo present-day
households indicates that there is great potential for the
archaeological visibility of the different caste households
at these historic sites.
The project continues to engage the Borada-Gamo
community in historical studies, by incorporating local
oral traditions and histories of the region in archaeo-
logical and environmental studies. The project includes a
regional archaeological survey and broad scale excavations
at Ochollo Mulato, the oldest open-air historic site in


the region (A.D. 1270-1950 cal), and at
Gulo cave (6280-1920 cal B.P.) to explore
conquest, internal development, environ-
mental change, and conflict as explanations
for the origin and development of caste. To
enhance the understanding ofpast and pres-
ent environments of the region, the project
has assembled an international team of spe-
cialists. The project includes investigations
of subsistence and environmental change,
geomorphology, and regional settlement to
document land clearance and deforestation
and identify the different diets and land-
scapes occupied by the caste groups today
and in the past. The project continues to
engage the Borada-Gamo combining stud-
ies of material culture, use of space, and life


histories to assess how transformations in
status, economy, and religion have affected
public and household spaces, material cul-
ture, and caste identity.
An important component of the
project is to work in concert with Bora-
da-Gamo elders to provide written and
film documentation of the Borada-Gamo
indigenous culture and historic places in
the effort to preserve it for future genera-
tions. Thus, importantly, the project inte-
grates the interpretations and participation
of elders, secondary school teachers and
students, research assistants, and Ethiopian
university students to produce books and
films to be distributed to the Borada-Gamo
schools and community.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 8












Joe Neil Henderson, Ph.D. 1979, Medical Anthropologist


Dr. Henderson is Professor
of Medical Anthropology
at the University of Oklahoma
Health Sciences Center, and
Director of the American Indian
Diabetes Prevention Center in
the College of Public Health, in
Oklahoma City. He is a mem-
ber of the Choctaw Nation of
Oklahoma. Dr. Henderson was
honored by the award of the
Leadership in Prevention for
Native Americans, 2006, by the
Loma Linda University School
of Public Health and the Award
ofAchievement by the University
of Oklahoma, College of Public
Health. Dr. Henderson is the for-
mer Editor-in-Chief of the Jour-
nal ofCross-CulturalG. ,' .
and past-President of the Associ-
ation for Anthropology and Ger-


ontology. He has authored many
articles in the scientific press and
is co-author of the texts, Social
and Behavioral Foundations of
Public Health (2001) and, with
Maria Vesperi, is co-editor of
The Culture of Long Term Care
(1995). Dr. Henderson's research
areas focus on aging, health, and
long-term care issues of Ameri-
can Indian people. As a doctoral
student of Otto Von Mering,
Joe-Neil merges gerontology and
other medical health issues in his
research:
Over the past five years, I
have been conducting research
with funds from the Alzheimer's
Association on perceptions of
etiology, treatment, and disease
course ofAlzheimer's and related
dementias among 10 American


Indian Nations in Oklahoma.
Concurrently, I was Co-PI of a
Robert Wood Johnson Founda-
tion grant to study health belief
model change regarding diabe-
tes self-care. I was awarded a
National Institutes of Health
grant from the National Institute
of Minority Health and Health
Disparities to develop a multi-
disciplinary center to study the
prevention of diabetes among
American Indian populations.
Specifically, my work is on
dementia caregiving, biological
and cultural influences regard-
ing recognition and treatment of
dementia and diabetes, cultural
constructions of disease, and
community health interventions
and education in the context of
cultural diversity. I have con-


ducted bio-cultural research on
Alzheimer's disease in Ameri-
can Indian tribes, developed
Alzheimer's support groups in
African-American and Spanish-
speaking populations, and con-
ducted geriatric health care edu-
cation for American Indian pro-
viders across the United States.
Currently, I am conducting
research into health beliefs and
behaviors of gestational diabetes
among Oklahoma Choctaw and
Chickasaw women. The themes
of this research are the preven-
tion of disease, reduction of
health disparities, and the build-
ing of healthier lives among the
youth, adults, and elders in cul-
turally diverse populations.


Three current state archaeologists/

preservation officers are UF Ph.D.'s
(Dr. Ryan Wheeler, Florida, Dr. Jonathan Leader, South Carolina, and Dr.
Ruth Trocolli, District of Columbia). Dr. Trocolli reflects on preserving
the historical resources in our nation's capital:
have served as the State Archaeologist* for Washington, D.C. (the District) since
2007. The District is different from most states in that one archaeologist performs
all of the archaeological review and compliance functions as well as maintaining the
archaeological site and report files, conducting outreach, and curating the collections.
Much of the development in the District occurs using federal funding so many proj-
ects go through archaeological review (under Section 106). A self-taught Geographic
Information System (GIS) user, I have established a GIS that includes dozens of
historic maps and aerial photos, and has created custom data layers with archaeologi-
cal sites and surveys, locations of original streams and shorelines, former cemeteries,
and Civil War resources. GIS is a powerful tool for analyzing land use through time
and predicting the presence of intact archaeological resources hiding beneath highly
developed urban landscapes. A companion tool to GIS is geoarchaeological coring,
used to determine if areas of archaeological potential have intact soil profiles. The
landscape of the District is far from natural in many areas, with estuaries and streams
filled over and miles of made-land along the rivers. Under the fill, and even under the
footprints of modern buildings, intact prehistoric and historic sites remain, waiting to
be found by someone wielding the right tools.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 9











Elizabeth Eddy Endowment:

Visiting Professor, Fellowships, and Assistantship


The Elizabeth Eddy Endowment recognizes
the career of applied anthropologist Elizabeth
Marie "Liz" Eddy. Established by Professor
Eddy's estate, the endowment provides funding
of a visiting professorship for an applied anthro-
pologist to spend a semester at UF teaching a
course and interacting with applied anthropol-
ogy students. The endowment also supports
graduate students through both dissertation
writing fellowships and research assistantships.


Eddy Fellowships

and Assistantship
Eddy Fellowships to help support dissertation
preparation this year went to Ed Gonzalez-
Tennant, Timothy Podkul, and Brian Tyler.
Dawit Woldu was awarded the 2011 Eliz-
abeth Eddy Applied Anthropology Research
Assistantship. Dawit assisted Dr. Ted Green
with his research and teaching on the topic
of AIDS, Behavior, and Culture during the
spring semester.


My Semester in Gainesville as an
Eddy Visiting Professor
Ted (Edward C) Qreen
was offered a one-semester visiting professorship at UF a year before my
schedule allowed me enough free time to accept the position. By last Janu-
ary, I was available and looking forward to missing another bitterly cold winter
in New England. I had spent the previous nine years at the Harvard School of
Public Health.
My wife and I took the auto-train down from Washington, D.C., which is
more or less my permanent home, one cold day on the 1st of January. We almost
ended up living in a high-rise (not at all our style), but fortunately through gradu-
ate student connections, we were able to sublet an old house in the Duck Pond
from an anthropologist who was heading for Washington. (As it turned out,
when we left Gainesville on May 1, yet another anthropologist moved in to start
a new lease.)
We enjoyed this house quite a bit and became friends with the landlord and
his wife. The landlord owns a black, 1918 Gibson A-model mandolin, and so do
I. What are the odds...?
He and his wife took us snorkeling in some of the many springs and rivers
that are accessible from Gainesville, and that maintain a 72 degree temperature
year-round, warm enough for humans but a little too cold for alligators or water
moccasins (I was assured).
The Duck Pond and indeed Gainesville is very flat and so very good for
bicycling, which I did a lot of. We also lived right next to a park and so I got into
the habit of rolling out of bed in the mornings and jogging in the park before
breakfast.
My wife befriended a professor emeritus of engineering and physics who
lived across the street. He is in his nineties and was one of the great pioneers of
solar and alternative energy, bringing enormous government grants to UF in the
1950s and '60s, at a time when grants were much smaller. He liked to come over
to visit and tell us fantastic stories about his long and distinguished career that
got its start when he deserted Hitler's infantry in his native Austria and found his
way to America.
I knew Russ Bernard from the early 1970s. Ever since that time, Russ seems
to come back into my life every few years, always resulting in something career-
enhancing. It was great to have some time to properly catch up with Russ and his
wife, and before I left Gainesville, I asked Russ to join the board of directors of
my non-profit, the New Paradigm Fund .


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 10





















My academic load during this past
spring semester-if it can even be called
a load-was a seminar I called AIDS,
Behavior and Culture. I chose the name
from the title of one of my two books
that came out in January. It is quite an
experience to find oneself back in a class-
room after being in the field, applying
anthropology for a quarter of a century
or more. True, I came to UF from the
Harvard School of Public Health, but
I conducted and/or directed research
there and did no regular teaching. One
startling encounter was with the new
technology available. One day early in
the semester, I was trying to recall the
name of the co-author of an article I'd
written in about 1982...I couldn't quite
remember. Within seconds, a student
had the article on her iPad. Not just the
citation; the entire article. (Note to self:
watch what you say! Everything now is
on the Internet and your students can
access it all in nanoseconds!)
The seminar provided opportuni-
ties for some intense discussions about
the politics, ideology and financial self-
interest associated with the multi-bil-
lion dollar per-year industry that Global


AIDS has become. Of course I learned a
lot from my students.
I mentioned in my seminar that
if anyone was interested in either dis-
sertation study or volunteer work with
an exciting new non-profit in South
Africa, I could help make the connec-
tions. It turned out that none of my
immediate students needed an entree
to southern Africa, but through them,
two student volunteers emerged. One is
an anthropology major who plans to go
to med school, and the other just gradu-
ated in Women's Studies and would like
to spend at least a year in South Africa.
Both will work with and through the
Ubuntu Institute in South Africa, and
both will be involved in research related
to some training in drug and alcohol
addiction that the New Paradigm Fund
in partnership with World Vision/Swa-
ziland is implementing in July, in Swa-
ziland. I will be the supervisor of the
research of one of the students, who will
be getting course credit for her research.
I forget at this moment how many cred-
its she is getting but even a couple of
months of field research in Africa is
hard to put a value on. It will look great


"The seminar provided opportunities for some intense discus-

sions about the politics, ideology and financial self-interest asso-

ciated with the multi-billion dollar per-year industry that Global

AIDS has become."


on a resume or medical school application, and such
experiences often lead to long and rewarding careers
working in Africa, or wherever a student volunteer
happens to go.
I had also worked with UF grad student Nicki
D'Ericco before coming to Gainesville, and she co-
authored a paper with myself, the director of the
Ubuntu Institute, and three others, which was pub-
lished in the African Journal of AIDS Research. Dr.
Lance Gravlee trained Nicki in the MAXQDA quali-
tative data analysis software, which proved most use-
ful in analyzing our many hours of taped focus group
discussions in four southern African countries. Based
on that first collaboration, I asked Nicki to analyze
qualitative findings from a recent study in Uganda,
which my colleagues and I are currently publishing.
Nicki will again be a co-author of the qualitative paper
from that research.
I have a feeling that through my links with Russ
Bernard, Paul Allen, and Lance Gravlee that other UF
anthropology students will find their way to Africa
through my contacts, and possibly my own non-profit
or that of my South African godson, who runs the
Ubuntu Institute.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page I I





















































Alaska, Peter Collings, Cultural Anthropology
Florida, James Davidson, Historical Archaeology
Florida, Ken Sassaman, SE Prehistoric Archaeology
Florida, Lance Gravlee, Medical Anthropology
Florida, William Marquardt, Archaeology
Florida, Kathy Deagan, Archaeology
Florida, Neill Wallis, Archaeology
Florida, Jack Martin, Linguistics
Florida, Mike Warren, Forensic Anthropology
Bulgaria, Maria Stoilkova, Cultural Anthropology
China, C. K. Shih, Cultural Anthropology
China, John Krigbaum, Biological Anthropology
China, Rick Stepp, Cultural Anthropology
Democratic Republic of Congo, Connie Mulligan, Genetics Research
Democratic Republic of Congo, Sharon Abramowitz, Medical Anthropology
Eastern Europe, Jack Kugelmass, Cultural Anthropology


page 12


El Salvador, Allan Burns, Cultural Anthropology
Ethiopia, Steve Brandt, Archaeology
Ghana, Brenda Chalfin, Cultural Anthropology
Guatemala, Kitty Emery, Archaeology
Guyana, Mike Heckenberger, Archaeology
Haiti, Jerry Murray, Cultural Anthropology
Ivory Coast, Dave Daegling, Biological Anthropology
Liberia, Sharon Abramowitz, Medical Anthropology
Mexico, Susan Gillespie, Archaeology
Mexico, Susan Milbrath, Archaeology
Morocco, Abdoulaye Kane, Cultural Anthropology
Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


-dP-




























































North America, John Moore, Cultural Anthropology
Nova Scotia, Marilyn Thomas-Houston, Cultural Anthropology
Peru, Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo, Archaeology
Peru, Florence Babb, Cultural Anthropology
Peru, Michael Moseley, Archaeology
Peru, Richard Kernaghan, Cultural Anthropology
Peru, Susan deFrance, Archaeology St. Lucia, William Keegan, Archaeology
Peru, Tony Oliver-Smith, Cultural Anthropology Tanzania, Alyson Young, Medical Anthropology
Senegal, Abdoulaye Kane, Cultural Anthropology Tanzania, Peter Schmidt, Archaeology
South Africa, Faye Harrison, Cultural Anthropology Yucatan, Allan Burns, Cultural Anthropology


"I Z


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 13









Faculty Research
Our faculty members and anthropology
affiliates continue to conduct diverse
research across the globe.


Connie Mulligan: Epigenetic alterations and stress
among new mothers and infants in the Democratic
Republic of Congo: A biocultural look at the inter-
generational effects of war
Our ability to successfully adapt to a constantly changing environ-
ment and increasingly complex stressors is one ofthe ways in which
we are distinctively human. There is growing evidence that there may be
an intermediate mechanism that mediates between the rapidly changing
environment and our slowly evolving genome, i.e. epigenetic alterations.
A new project based in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) will
investigate epigenetic alterations (chemical modifications to the genome
that do not change the underlying DNA sequence, but do affect gene
expression) as a possible pathway to developmental plasticity and adap-
tation. Professors Connie Mulligan, Lance Gravlee and Alyson Young
and Department of Anthropology graduate student Nikki D'Errico will
examine epigenetics and socio-cultural measures of stress in one of the
most stressful environments today, the eastern DRC where war has waged
for 14 years. This war and the related political-economic instability have
far reaching consequences as a result of widespread maternal deprivation,
increased exposure to psychosocial stressors and direct physical violence.
Last summer, with support from the Center for African Studies,
Mulligan spent one week and D'Errico spent six weeks at HEAL Africa
in Goma, DRC collecting blood and placental samples from 25 new
mothers and their infants as well as semi-structured interview and trauma
survey data from the mothers.
This study is the first to investigate epigenetic alterations in humans
as a means of modifying gene expression in offspring as a result of trauma
to the mother. Our research has the potential to dramatically transform
the ways in which we think of adaptation and evolution as well as inform
policies to address societal problems. UF's Office of Research recently
awarded us a two year $84,000 Research Opportunity Fund grant to
begin this project.


David Daegling: Tai Monkey Project
Despite the political turmoil in C6te d'Ivoire, it has been a produc-
tive year for the NSF-supported Tai Monkey Project. This research,
which investigates the relationship between diet, feeding behavior and
bone structure in the jaws of West African monkeys, was featured in
six presentations at the spring meetings of the American Association
of Physical Anthropologists. The project supports undergraduate and
graduate student research here at UF, but importantly also helps support
the field assistants in C6te d'Ivoire through our collaborative effort with
Ohio State University to step up conservation efforts in the last patch
of undisturbed rainforest in West Africa. Several of the monkey species
under study are listed as critically endangered by the IUCN.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 14












Rick Stepp: Biocultural Diversity
Conservation in China
Rick Stepp has begun a research collaboration
focused on biocultural diversity conservation
in the Greater Mekong Region of Southeast Asia.
The Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese
Academy of Sciences fund this program through
their 111 Program, an innovative partnership to
build capacity and train students in a number of
areas deemed crucial by the Chinese government.
The academic partner is Minzu University in Bei-
jing, China. Minzu University is unique among
Chinese universities due to its focus on education
(graduate and undergraduate) of the more than 56
indigenous groups in the country. The university
also houses a significant biodiversity policy insti-
tute that is charged with representing China in the
Convention on Biological Diversity. During the
summer of 2010, Stepp traveled with UF President
Bernard Machen, UF International Center Dean
David Sammons and other administrators to sign
a cooperative agreement with Minzu University.
Since that time, 2 graduate students from Minzu
have worked in Stepp's lab as research scholars and
a delegation from Minzu traveled to UF to meet
with Provost Joe Glover in March of this year. In
June 2011, a delegation from the UF Provost's
Office will go to Beijing to explore further col-
laboration with Minzu and participate in the 60th
anniversary celebration of the founding of the uni-
versity. Students and faculty interested in collabo-
rating in the project should email stepp@ufl.edu.
The Department of Anthropology is forging
new ties with colleagues in Computer Science and
Engineering and the Emerging Pathogens Insti-
tute at UF. Rick Stepp is co-investigator on a new
National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study
the social factors and social networks involved in
the transmission of tuberculosis. The disease is
of major significance worldwide, and the World
Health Organization estimates that 1/3 of the
entire world's population is currently infected with
TB bacillus. Of these, 5-10% will become sick or
infected. The team will be working closely with
public health officials in developing more effective
protocols and a software application to understand
how tuberculosis is spread.


Peter Schmidt
P eter Schmidt has been conducting
ethnographic research in NW Tan-
zania since October 2009 (returning for
the fall semester 2010) on social mem-
ory and the HIV/AIDS trauma. His
research focuses on the impact of AIDS
on the transmission of oral testimonies,
both oral traditions and oral histories.
Once a region where elders related ency-
clopedic histories and where epic poetry
flourished, HIV/AIDS has been devas-
tating to males in generation above age
65. A proportionately higher number of
men in their 40s and 50s-those who
should be elders today-passed from
AIDS in the 1980s and 1990s. These
keepers of oral tradition have suffered
a disproportionate loss of life vis-a-vis
women in the same age group. Inter-
ruption of the chains of oral transmis-
sion means that young people have no
knowledge about their histories nor do
people in their middle years retain more
than cursory knowledge about clan and
kingdom histories.
Interviews inevitably turn into con-
versations about how the recent past
and experiences with HIV/AIDS color
present life and views of the past. This
is a grievously difficult struggle. House-


holds headed by single females make
up a huge proportion of village life, up
to 29%, often on the smallest and least
productive plots. AIDS has taken from
every family-up to 1.5 family mem-
bers per household in one neighboring
village. People still want to talk about
the scourge, a kind of therapeutic dis-
course. "How can something as sweet as
love making come to be so monstrous?"
asked one wise man of 80, who mourns
his loss of many children. With the
passing of elderly males keepers of oral
traditions, elderly women have become
the most riveting storytellers. Now ele-
vated to history keepers, their newly
recognized expertise reflects their deep
knowledge of people and events they
have witnessed in their lifetimes.
More recently, Peter has focused
on the restoration of an early 20th-
century palace built by the German
colonial government for a local king
and collaborator. A marvelous mix of
colonial architecture and local political
court life, this suite of three buildings
has been rescued from partial ruin to
become a vital, living memorial to a
history of local interaction with both
German and British colonial power.
continued on page 16


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 15










Faculty Research, continued from page 15


Susan deFrance: Inca Expansion into Southern Peru
Susan deFrance, along with a team of Peruvian colleagues and American students,
investigated the economic and social consequences of Inca conquest of far south-
ern coastal Peru. With funding from the National Geographic Society, a CLAS
Humanities Enhancement Award, and a NSF DIG (Sofia Chacaltana, U. Illinois-Chi-
cago), they completed excavations at the southern Peruvian sites ofTacahuay Tambo
and Punta Picata in June and July 2010 to examine changes that accompanied Inca
expansion and the incorporation of local indigenous populations into the Inca state.
Ongoing analyses (Cayetano University-Lima and at Museo Contisuyo-Moquegua)
are addressing the intensification of agricultural production under Inca control, partic-
ularly increased production of cotton, and changes in fishing and shellfishing behavior
for state needs. Bioarchaeological and isotopic analyses of human remains from tombs
at Tacahuay Tambo are addressing health, population origins, and biological distance
of interred populations associated with the Inca conquest.


page 16


Alyson Young: Livestock Climate Change
CRSP Research in northern Tanzania
A lyson Young is spending June in northern Tanza-
nia working on research associated with a recently
funded seed grant from the USAID Livestock Climate
Change collaborative research support program (LCC-
CRSP) through Colorado State University. The project
entitled, "Risk, Perception, Resilience, and Adaptation
to Climate Change in Niger and Tanzania" is focused on
understanding and describing the longer-term health and
economic consequences ofpastoral/agropastoral respons-
es to local climate change in East and West Africa.
This research is being carried out by a multidisci-
plinary team from UF and includes Dr. Sandra Russo (PI,
International Center), Dr. Brian Mayer (co-PI, Sociol-
ogy), Dr. Alyson Young (co-PI, Anthropology), and Sarah
McKune (co-PI, Sociology/School of Natural Resources).
The project builds on food security, health, and liveli-
hood research from 2005 in both Niger and Tanzania.
Dr. Young will spend the time in Tanzania this summer
collecting child nutritional data and testing whether a
vulnerability scale developed among pastoralists in Niger
can also be used to understand how climate change con-
tributes to resilience and vulnerability in East African
pastoral communities.
The UF team is working closely with institutional
partners in both Niger and Tanzania on all aspects of
the project. A workshop is also being held in collabora-
tion with the International Livestock Research Institute
in Nairobi to discuss findings from the project as well
as methodologies for risk assessment and vulnerability
analysis in pastoral populations.
Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011








Graduate Student Accomplishments and Awards

We saw a record number of graduate students complete their degrees this past year.
Nine students obtained their masters degrees while twenty-eight students earned their doctorates!


Departmental Award
Polly and Paul Doughty Research
Awards support graduate student
anthropological research in the area
of international peace, conflict reso-
lution, and/or development, with
preference given to a focus on Latin
America. This year five worthy
recipients will embark on fieldwork:
Justin Quinn, Joe Feldman, Dawit
Woldu, John Hames, and Jamie
Lee Marks.
The Department of Anthropol-
ogy, through a gift of Drs. Alba
Amaya Burns and Allan Burns,
offers awards for summer research


in Latin America for projects in
Medical Anthropology, Human
Rights, and Applied Anthropol-
ogy. The award honors the memory
and goals of social justice of Miguel
Angel Amaya, a medical student
who perished during the Civil War
in El Salvador. Miguel Angel Amaya
was the brother of Professor Alba
Amaya Burns. This year's recipient
is Marlon Carranza-Zelaya.
John M. Goggin Awards are made to
doctoral candidates specializing in
sociocultural and biological anthro-
pology who will use the stipend for


expenses related to preparation of
the dissertation. This year's recipi-
ent is Zhongzhou Cui.
Charles H. Fairbanks awards go to
doctoral candidates specializing in
archaeology who will use the sti-
pend for expenses related to prepa-
ration of the dissertation. This year's
recipients are Edward Gonzalez-
Tennant and Clete Rooney.
The James C. Waggoner Grant
in Aid honors the memory of Dr.
James C. Waggoner, Jr. who had an
appreciation for the graduate pro-


UF and External Awards, Grants, and Internships


Zack Gilmore has been awarded a
Hyatt and Cici Brown Endowment
Fellowship for the upcoming year.
Kathy Liu received a CLAS disser-
tation fellowship for Spring 2011.
The Center for Latin American
Studies provided generous support
to several of our graduate students,
particularly for Master's research,
through its grants and fellow-
ships. Summer Research Grants
were awarded to Corey Souza and
Camee Maddox LAS also awarded
a William Carter Field Research
Grant to Jamie Lee Marks. The
Center awarded Alissa Jordan the
A. Curtis Wilgus Fellowship for her
preliminary dissertation work this
summer.
Foreign Language and Area Studies
Fellowships for the 2011-2012 aca-
demic year went to Maia Bass, Anna
Brodrecht, Nikki C. D'Errico, Joe
Feldman, Jason Hartz, Camee
Maddox, Erik Timmons, and
DawitWoldu.
Dawit Woldu also received an
Auzenne Dissertation Fellowship.
Paul Morse was awarded the Miss
Lucy Dickinson Fellowship by the
Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory. This fellowship is granted to a
first-year Ph.D. candidate pursuing


a course of study in Vertebrate Pale-
ontology.
Nicole Cannarozzi received the
Ripley P. Bullen Award from the
Florida Museum.
Hannah Mayne received the Ger-
son Fellowship from the UF Center
for Jewish Studies and the Cooper
Award.
Erik Timmons received a pre-dis-
sertation grant from the Center for
African Studies.
Maranda Kles was a NAGPRA
intern for the Southeastern Archaeol-
ogy Center, a division of the Nation-
al Park Service. Maranda earned a
STAR Award, which is a Special
Thanks for Achieving Results.
Danny Pinedo was awarded the
Inter-American Foundation Grass-
roots Development Fellowship.
Allysha Winburn was awarded the
Kosciuszko Foundation Tuition
Scholarship for graduate studies.
Sarah E. Page-Chan received a
2011 Society for Applied Anthro-
pology Student Endowed Award
and an Innovation through Institu-
tional Integration (I-Cubed) Teach-
ing Award (funded by NSF) for new
course development and implemen-
tation at UF


Alan F. Schultz received a Gradu-
ate Student Council Travel Award
to attend the Society for Applied
Anthropology Annual Meeting,
Spring 2011, in Seattle, Washing-
ton.
Joe Feldman received support to
participate in the NSF Summer
Institute for Research Design in
Cultural Anthropology (SIRD).
Anna Brodrecht received a Ful-
bright Public Policy Initiative Grant
to conduct fieldwork in Mexico.
Meredith Marten was awarded a
Fulbright-Hays DDRA grant for
fieldwork in Tanzania on health care
sustainability and resiliency.
Tim Podkul and Forest R. Ste-
vens (Geography) were awarded a
grant through the NSF Innovation
through Institutional Integration
Program for their project Linking
Social and Land Change Networks:
A Mixed Methods Approach in a
Water Limited Landscape.
Lucas Martindale Johnson was
awarded a two-year membership
and recognition in the bulletin of
the International Association of
Obsidian Studies for his outstand-
ing poster at the 2010 Society for
American Archaeology meetings.


gram and for the value of graduate
research. This award is open to stu-
dents in any subfield of anthropolo-
gy. Camee Maddox is the recipient
of the inaugural award.
Nicolette Parr won the inaugu-
ral "William Goza Fellowship", a
$5000 award presented by the Wil-
liam R. Maples Center for Forensic
Medicine. Dr. Goza was a key bene-
factor of the Pound Laboratory and
the University of Florida. This will
be an annual award presented to a
top Pathology Resident or Forensic
Anthropology Graduate student.



Jeff Hoelle won the Robert M.
Netting Student Paper Award
from the American Anthropologi-
cal Association, Culture and Agri-
culture section, 2010 for his paper
"Convergence on Cattle: Political
Economy, Social Group Perceptions,
and Socioeconomic Relationships in
Acre, Brazil".
Becky Blanchard received the
NOAA Sea Grant Dean John A.
Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship
with the Office of Marine Conser-
vation at the U.S. Department of
State.
The Pound Lab forensic crew recent-
ly received a "coin of excellence"
from the Alachua County Sheriff's
Department for their participation
in an excavation of a possible burial
site. The award was presented at
the Sheriff's Office annual awards
banquet. Receiving the awards were
graduate students Traci Van Deest,
Katie Skorpinski, Nicolette Parr,
Carlos Zambrano, Kristina Bal-
lard, Caroline Dimmer and Pound
Lab Director, Dr. Mike Warren.
Ellen Lofaro received a Center
for Latin American Studies Field
Research Grant (2010) and the UF
Graduate Student Council 1st place
poster award in February 2011.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 17









Undergraduate Student Achievements and Honors
This past year 251 anthropology majors received their bachelor's degrees!


Outstanding undergraduate Kelley Wil-
liams honored with the Brendan O'Sullivan
Award for Academic Excellence.
Kelley is graduating with a perfect 4.0 GPA. She reflects on
what drew her to .,.. and herfuture: I was born
in Okinawa, Japan, because my dad was in the military.
Shortly afterward, we moved to Kansas, and then to
Florida where my family has lived ever since. Even though
I was too young to remember living in any of these places,
I think that growing up knowing that part of my past and
hearing of my parents' experiences overseas put a desire in
me to know about other people and places in the world.
This interest also grew because of my church, which hosts
an annual missions conference. When I was in middle
school, my family welcomed a missionary from Nigeria
into our home for the week. This woman made a lasting
impression on me, and inspired my interest Africa. After
going to Brazil a few times in high school, I was able to
go to Uganda for the first time, just before enrolling at the
University of Florida.
I had originally planned on studying engineering at
UF, but after thinking about my real interests and pas-
sions, I realized that anthropology was a much better fit.
I declared my major in anthropology before beginning
classes, and I never even considered changing it. My classes
in anthropology, along with African Studies and Swahili,
have allowed me to learn more about the world, and have
opened up opportunities for me to serve in Uganda and
study in Tanzania.
This upcoming year after graduation, I will be going
to China to teach English, most likely to secondary school
or university students. I am very excited to be able to expe-
rience another part of the world, and to see where this next
step will lead me in the future.
page 18


Undergraduate Honors Theses: Several undergraduates worked
with faculty mentors to produce impressive Senior Honors The-
ses over the past year.
Arian Albear: Changes in Meaning of Maya Cruciform Shapes through Time (Mil-
brath). Casey Cottrill: Medical and healthcare issues in 19th and early 20th century
America: Bottle Analysis (Davidson). Sarah Geggus: Taking root: A case study of immi-
grants and their gardens in Gainesville, Florida (Stepp). Moriah Goldfarb: An Analysis
of Conus Shell Tinklers Recovered from 8NA142 (Sassaman). Heather Lear: Islam
and European Identity: Turkish Accession to the European Union as seen by University
Students in Holland and Turkey (Stoilkova and Wald, Political Science). He Li: Sex
assessment of the distal femur: an anthropological and medical perspective (Warren).
Keilani Jacquot: American women's psychology and the influence of Protestantism
(Collings). Meredith Moukawsher: Designing a conservation policy with 'bite': The
value of an ethno-archaeological perspective to ongoing shark debates in the South
Pacific (deFrance). Dustin Reuther: A cross-cultural comparison of common themes
and derived functions of insects exploited for entomophagy (Oyuela-Caycedo). David
Roebuck: Do Suriname Cebus apella obtain foraging benefits from mixed species associ-
ations with Saimiri sciureus? (Burns/Boinski). Katyn Scholl: Variable microsatellite loci
for population genetics studies of a sucking louce (Pedicinus badii) found on Old World
Monkeys (Reed, FLMNH). Christina Tedman: Child Labor Discourse and the Ngabe-
Bugle: An Evaluation of the After Effects of Child Labor Regulations in the Indigenous
Group of Panama (Krigbaum and Serra, African Studies). Andrea Warren: Preliminary
Characterization and Provenance of Obsidian Artifacts from Ethiopian Archaeological
Sites using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (Brandt).


Five talented undergraduates granted University Scholars Awards
to conduct research in collaboration with a faculty mentor
Jason Breslin: Chiribaya subsistence based on analysis of invertebrate remains from the
coastal site of Punta Picata, Peru (Susan deFrance, mentor). Erin Harris-Parks: Petro-
graphic analysis ofWeeden Island pottery to determine provenance of sacred and secular
wares (Ken Sassaman, mentor). John Moran: Chinese-African relationships in Botswana
(Abdoulaye Kane, mentor). Amelia Schaub: From the fauna's mouth: seasonality using
CO2-laser ablation on prehistoric tooth enamel from island Southeast Asia (John Krig-
baum, mentor). TamraJoy Rich: Biocultural aspects of substance abuse and medications
in Swaziland (through Interdisciplinary Studies, Ted Green, mentor).


Patricia S. Essenpreis
Scholarship
The 2011 Patricia S. Essenpreis
Scholarship for female undergradu-
ates to attend an archaeological field
school was awarded to Anna Binder
and Rachel Fernandez. Anna will be
attending the St. John's Archaeological .
Field School directed by Dr. Ken Sassa- ..
man. Rachel will be attending the Pog-
gio Civitate Archaeology Field School
in Murlo, Italy.
Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011











In Memoriam


Otto 0. von Mering
Otto Oswald von Mering (1922-2010), Ph.D., Professor Emeritus in Anthropology
and Gerontology in the Colleges of Medicine and Arts and Sciences, University
of Florida, passed away on December 31, 2010, in Gainesville, Florida. Otto was born in
Berlin, Germany, October 21, 1922, and moved to the U.S. in 1939. His Bachelor's was
in history from Williams College (1944), and his Ph.D. was from Harvard University in
Social Anthropology, mentored by Dr. Clyde Kluckhohn.


Dr. von Mering was an advocate and
practitioner of multi-disciplinary think-
ing, research, and publishing on human
"health and disease." However, he told
his students to consider Rudolph Vir-
chow's axiom that, "Disease is but life
under altered conditions." That is, beware
of pigeonholes like "health" and "disease"
because they are cultural constructs that
can surreptitiously mire problem solving.
He enjoyed mentoring, and his many stu-
dents in anthropology and other fields
are a legacy to his commitment to future
scholars and researchers.
As a doctoral student of Clyde Kluck-
hohn's, von Mering's academic research
included participation in Harvard's Labo-
ratory of Social Relations originating the
"Comparative Study of Values in Five


Cultures" project. One outcome was his
authorship of A Grammar of Human Val-
ues (Pittsburgh, University SAGE Publica-
tions, Inc., 1961). His first professional
position began in 1955 at Western Psy-
chiatric Institute and Clinic, University
of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
when utilizing medical anthropologists in
medical settings was a novel idea. There,
he applied anthropology to the psychiatric
hospital as an organization and to its cur-
riculum, practices, patients, and practitio-
ners viewing them as cultural systems tied
more to prevailing cultural contexts than
to the empiricism of positivist medicine.
Dr. von Mering moved to the Uni-
versity of Florida, Department of Anthro-
pology in 1971. He became the Director
of the Center for Gerontological Studies


and developed connections with the State of Florida's
International Exchange Center on Gerontology, thereby
extending the geographic, cultural, and intellectual reach
of aging studies. He was energetic in working in com-
munities on questions of health education, aging, and
bridging research and everyday life. His multidisciplinary
relevance was reflected in his publication venues beyond
anthropology, such as psychiatry, medicine, social work,
nursing, and psychology.
His last text was an edited volume, The Future of
Long-Term Care: Social and Policy Issues, with R. H.
Binstock and L. E. Cluff, Johns Hopkins Press, 1996. In
1999, Dr. von Mering was honored in a paper session at
the meetings of the Society for Applied Anthropology,
Tucson, Arizona.
Everyone appreciated Otto's sardonic humor, sharp
critiques of events, and his penchant for penetrating com-
munication via displays of wonderful linguistic choreog-
raphy. His interests were boundless, his insights acute, and
he often presaged what would come to be considered new
frontiers of anthropology. As I heard him say to someone
in a conference hallway, "Well, of course, we must some-
times explore the hinterlands.' Otto was a real explorer
and emissary for anthropology. The field will miss him
greatly. (Source: Joe Neil Henderson)


Marcus Hepburn
M arcus Hepburn 63, died June 8, 2010, in Tallahassee, Florida. Hepburn (BS/MS,
Florida State U, Ph.D. UF) was a pioneer in fisheries anthropology. In the 1970s
and '80s he held research positions at Florida State University, UNC Wilmington, and
East Carolina University. An extraordinarily gifted ethnographer, Hepburn was fieldwork-
er, interviewer and research supervisor on numerous projects in Florida and North Caro-
lina. He authored or co-authored many applied studies of coastal communities, fisheries :.
management technical reports, and presentations at scholarly meetings. By 1985 Hepburn
had nearly completed his doctoral dissertation comparing three Southern fishing commu-
nities, but his progress was derailed by family tragedy. Afterward he rededicated himself
to his religious faith, eventually completing studies to become a deacon of the Roman
Catholic Church. From 1985 to 2004 Hepburn was employed by the Florida Department
of Community Affairs where he worked on numerous community projects. He also completed numerous applied stud-
ies of fisherfolk and served as a consultant and fellow for several state and national agencies. In 2005 Hepburn went to
work for Catholic Charities of Florida as an emergency management specialist. At the time of his death, he was chair
of Florida Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters. Hepburn brought anthropological know-how to all his work.
Hoping to finish at last his dissertation, Hepburn was readmitted to the University of Florida doctoral program in 2007.
At the time of his passing Marcus was completing his dissertation comparing maritime cultures on Cedar Key, Harkers
Island, North Carolina, and the Florida Panhandle community where he began his maritime career. Marcus was awarded
his Ph.D. posthumously from the University of Florida in Spring 2011 (fromJ. Anthony Paredes and James C. Sabella)


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2011


page 19








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We need your help, whether you can spare only a few dollars or many more. The Anthropology Department depends on gifts to fund student travel
to meetings, undergraduate and graduate scholarships, dissertation and field school awards, lecture series, laboratory enhancements, and other initia-
tives. It's easy to make your tax-deductible gift through the University of Florida Foundation. Online giving to the Friends of Anthropology Fund
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to any Anthropology fund through payroll deduction. Or use this convenient form to designate your gift to a specific purpose:


O Friends of Anthropology (provides for a wide variety of department
initiatives and needs)
O Custom Copies Graduate Travel (defrays costs for graduate students
to travel to professional meetings)
O Patricia S. Essenpreis Award for Undergraduate Archaeology
Research (assists female undergraduates to attend field school)
O Brendan O'SullivanAward for Outstanding Undergraduate Majors
(honors the highest-ranking major at spring graduation)
O Polly and Paul Doughty Graduate Research Award (funds graduate
student research in Latin America)
O Burns Amaya Graduate Research Awards (funds graduate student
research in Latin America)
O Charles H. Fairbanks Scholarship (defrays research costs for archae-
ology Ph.D. students in their final year)
O John M. Goggin Memorial Scholarship (defrays research costs for
Ph.D. students in cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and
linguistic anthropology in their final year)


o William R. Maples Scholarship (defrays research costs for forensic
anthropology graduate students)
O Marvin Harris Lecture Fund (lecture series honors the late Professor
Marvin Harris, one of the nation's leading anthropological theorists)
O Zora Neale Hurston Fellowship (celebrates diversity, in honor of
Zora Neale Hurston)
O James C. Waggoner, Jr. Grants-in-Aid Endowment (supports gradu-
ate student research)
O Zoe Martin del Campo-Hermosillo Award (supports travel to con-
ferences for graduate students who are single custodial parents)


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