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summer 2010University of Florida, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences On sabbatical, I had just finished (late 2009) six weeks of interviewing Haitians and Dominicans along the border about Haitian / Dominican tensions. As I sat in Gainesville on January 14 writing up my findings, the dev astating earthquake struck. By January 15 all my anthropo logical insights about Haiti and the D.R. seemed suddenly ancient history. After cell phone service was restored I was able to talk with my village, La Hattethe community in the Cul-de-Sac floodplain not far from the Dominican border where Maria and I spent our first two years of marriage in the 1970s. There are still few latrines in the village. But cell phones are everywhere. If youre confused about some detail of land tenure or folk healing, you can now carry out an emergency ethnographic interview via cell phone. You can even do it during a seminar to settle an argument. Roll over, Malinowski. Conversely the villagers can now ask for financial or visa help. Anthropologists can no longer so easily dump land-tenure informants once university-tenure is secure. No one got killed in the village itself and the earth quake demolished only a few houses. But most houses had splits. People were terrified, sleeping outside at night fear ful of aftershocks. Food was available in the market, but food prices had soared. The daily three-meal ideal had long ago been reduced to two. After the earthquake it dropped to one meal a dayor less. To add insult to injury all of the outside aid was being monopolized, as always, in the Republic of Port-au-Prince. La Hatte had gotten nothing. Could I speak to the blan ? When was I coming down? A major international NGO gave me the chance. They asked for a rapid needs assessment outside of Portau-Prince. Their potential target area included La Hatte. I asked: Could La Hatte be one of the assessment sites? Of course. Great idea! Could they promise theyd do something there beside research? Ummmm... errrr... hope fully... maybe. I got the picture. But what other long shot does an anthropologist have to practice nepotism for his friends? Some anthropologists make careers debunking An Assignment in Post-Earthquake Haitiby Gerald F. Murrayhumanitarian aid. One of them rushed with his notepad to Haiti the day after the earthquake. Unable himself to do anything for the homeless with crushed limbs, he could at least skewer the phony imperial ist do-gooders pretending to help. Great contribution. This cranky genre of spitball anthropology however, would be of little use to La Hatte. I signed on with the NGO for a brief contract, treating it not as a bloodsucker but as a bona-fide service organization wishing to improve its perfor mance via anthropological input. I arrived on a Sunday and on Monday was whisked out, with Haitian companions, a vehicle, and a driver, for two weeks of field immersion. The NGO requested information on four domains in which they could potentially provide assistance: livelihoods/food security, education, health/nutrition, and child safety. They first tried helping my team and me with an elaborate three-hour-long French language questionnaire designed for post-disaster assessment in Franco phone Africa. I politely refused their help. For the use of my team I designed a Creole language qualitative questionand-observation guide that elicited anthropologically strategic information via free-floating interviews on each of the four domains. We did key informant interviews with local officials and with lay and religious service providers, but above all focus group interviews with groups of farmers and market women about life after the earthquake. I also designed a one-page Creole language household survey questionnaire to assess house dam ages and to quantify and identify the age, gender, and kinship status of the refugees who had flooded in from Port-au-Prince. I rapidly trained four teams of interview ers to apply the instrument to some 2,000 see Haiti, page 15 Haitian woman outside her partially destroyed home

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page 2 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Chairs NotesThe Department of Anthropology is a lively place. This year flew by with all kinds of interesting teaching, news, and activities. As is tradition, our students and faculty had some fun between teaching, publishing, doing outreach, and talking about humans, their history, and their world. Last falls Potlatch Picnic raised thousands of dollars for student travel, and all of us on the faculty were relieved that the student skit only scratched the surface of some of our foibles and unique personality traits! The end of the fall term included a covered dish holiday event where we all paused to celebrate the holidays. The spring Armadillo Roast included the usual mystery meat com petition, and I had the enjoyable task of helping judge the pie contest. I had some trepidation when I came to the mud pie with plants sticking out of it, but it was chocolate, so all was well. The spring term came to an end with the first graduation reception in the newly remodeled seminar/conference room and Anthropology Suite on the first floor of Turlington. About 60 students and their parents came by after graduation to see the labs and rooms and to talk about being an anthro pology major or Ph.D. student in the program. James Davidson was in his lab, working away on the African American archaeology collection; many of the par ents commented on how great it was to see and talk to a working archaeologist! Anthropology was in the news quite a bit this year. James Davidson appeared on the Ken Burns documentary on National Parks; Connie Mulligan and her students work on the long habitation of the Bering Strait received extensive attention in the media, and Jerry Murray became a key scholar, interviewee, and consultant in understanding the social and cultural responses to Haitis earthquake in January. Emeritus Professor Russ Bernard was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, joining other NAS members Mike Moseley and Curator Emerita Elizabeth Wing, affiliate in the Depart ment with the Florida Museum of Natural History. Of the eleven NAS members at the University of Florida, three are anthropologists. Students and faculty in the department published articles, gave papers, carried out research, and made real impacts through their work in many, many ways, and this newsletter highlights Welcome to Anthropology 2010!by Allan F. Burnssome of them. As this newsletter is written, the Gulf of Mexico is filling with oil from the BP spill; graduate stu dent Becky Blanchard is among others who are working with the State of Florida to address the impacts of that spill on our coastline. This was the first year of the Elizabeth Eddy Endowed Visiting Professorship in Applied Anthropol ogy. Thanks to the very generous endowment that Dr. Eddy created through the gift of her estate to the Depart ment, graduate students Amy Non, Sarah Cervone, Ava Lasseter, and Jennifer Hale-Gallardo were supported in their dissertation work this spring. The Department also hosted Dr. Mary Allegretti as the first Eddy Endowment visiting applied anthropologist. Mary gave several public lectures and taught a fascinating seminar on anthropol ogys role in environmental and development issues in the tropics. Her perspective on her time at UF appears on page six of this newsletter. Two professors are retiring this year, Dr. Jerry Mur ray and Dr. John Moore. We will miss their insights, their teaching, and their contributions, but as emeritus faculty, we know that they will be around for counsel and help in the coming years. At the same time, we had two very successful searches for new faculty this year. Dr. Sharon Abramowitz, a medical anthropologist who works in Africa will be here after she finishes her post-doc at Johns Hopkins next year, and Dr. Richard Kernaghan, a special ist in legal anthropology, violence and terrorism, and war who has done extensive work in Peru will join us this fall. Welcome to both of these new faculty members! I hope you enjoy this edition of the Newsletter. Be sure to contact us whenever you would like, and come by and visit the department this year. Were waiting to wel come you! Students visiting Open House in new seminar room

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 3 Sharon Abramowitz looks forward to coming to UFThank you all kindly for your warm wishes and welcomes to the University of Florida Department of Anthropology and the UF Center for African Studies. I look forward to joining your remarkable collaborative four-field faculty in 2011, and as a medical anthropolo gist and an Africanist, I am eager to bring to the department my expertise and field experience in mental health, humanitarian inter vention, violence, and post-war reconstruction in West Africa (spe cifically Liberia, Guinea, and Cote dIvoire). I write to you at present from a post-doctoral teaching position at Harvard Universitys Departments of Anthropology and Women and Gender Studies. As a new member of the UF faculty, I bring a strong political commitment to health and human rights, support for mixed methods research, an orientation to critical ethnographic praxis, and deep and abiding love of anthropological history and theory. My background is in social work, gender-based violence advocacy, and international development, and I have teaching experience in these areas, as well as experience in West Africa working in relief and development projects related to health, gender, and development issues. I look forward to teaching classes in these areas and in the new graduate program in Development Practice. I will also be bringing to Gainesville my husband Greig Arendt (a happy devotee of professional worlds beyond academia), and our extremely cute, toddling daughter Leah. In the coming year, I will be away from Gainesville in an NIMHsponsored postdoctoral fellowship in Psychiatric Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Universitys Bloomberg School of Public Health. My previous research at Harvard, funded by the National Science Foun dation, explored mental health, state-building, and humanitarian intervention in Liberias post-conflict reconstruction. New projects on the horizon include an ethnohistory of gender violence and a study of humanitarian interventions in gender-based violence in Libe ria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, researches into sub stance abuse and post-conflict recovery, ethnographically informed epidemiologies of mental illness, and a continued examination of government health sectors in resource-poor settings. Although I am far away in Baltimore, UF is very much on my mind this year. I look forward to meeting UF graduate students and faculty colleagues at the AAA meeting in New Orleans in November, and working collaboratively with the faculty on new research and teaching initiatives in the months and year to come. I am delighted and honored to join the UF faculty, and I eagerly anticipate joining you in Gainesville soon. I wish you all happy and easy travel this sum mer. Sharon AbramowitzRichard Kernaghan is ready to join usHello, I am Richard Kernaghan. As the newest member of the UF anthropology faculty, it is a pleasure to have this opportu nity to express how thrilled I am to join the department. I thought I might take this occasion to share with you a few words about my thematic areas of study and teaching. Though primarily a political and legal anthropologist I have a deep appreciation and love for storytelling and find myself continu ally captivated by the question of how narratives link up with actual events. In this, I take inspiration from philosophies of history and language, which I also draw upon to reflect on how law and violence can become inextricably bound. This path has led me increasingly to issues of legal spaces and terrains and to the kinds of itineraries they make possible. In broad terms my research has explored the everyday experience of law at the margins of the nation-state. What interests me specifically are the lived histories of places and times where armed conflict and illegal economies converge. How are such time-spaces perceived? What are the politics that shape the ways they come to be repre sented? And furthermore, what challenges do those perceptions and representational politics create for ethnographic modes of inquiry? While I have an enduring fascination with the histories and cul tural worlds of Latin America, Peru is where I have posed these questions directly by looking at the intersection of (counter)insurgency and the illicit cocaine trade in a region just east of the central Andes known as the Upper Huallaga Valley. Currently I am working on my second manuscript about this frontier zone, which is an ethnographic history of the encounter between a twenty-year cocaine boom and the Maoist Shining Path. This project takes the anthropological study of law in a decidedly topographical direction. I explore, on the one hand, the social processes by which landscapes at the margins of the state become converted (and sometimes re-converted) into legal ter ritories and, on the other, how those same land-inscribing practices have influenced the circulation of (il)licit persons and things. Dual emphasis on territoriality and circulation in turn provides a frame for me to reconsider the regional impact of frontier roads as well as the relation of their construction to riversan interest I intend to carry forward in a separate project on contraband networks along the northern Peruvian border with Colombia and Brazil. It is exciting and an honor to become a part of the Department of Anthropology and the broader anthropology community of the University of Florida. The rich possibilities I see for conversations and collaborations across the disciplines sub-fields are truly amazing. As a researcher, educator and colleague I very much look forward to contributing in every way I can to the tradition and legacy of this fine program.Richard KernaghanWe Welcome Two New Faculty Members: Drs. Sharon Abramowitz & Richard Kernaghan

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page 4 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Field school students excavate test units at 4000-year-old village site along Silver Glen RunSt. Johns Archaeological Field SchoolThe St. Johns Archaeological Field School, under the direction of Ken Sassaman, launches its fourth season of fieldwork in 2010 at sites along Silver Glen Run in northeast Florida. Like many other places along the St. Johns River, Silver Glen Run was a locus of sustained human occupation starting 6000 years ago, when the inedible remains of freshwater shellfish began to accumulate at places of dwelling and rit ual. In the 1870s, Harvards Jeffries Wyman described the shell mound at the mouth of the Run as the largest in the region: a 300-meter-long, U-shaped deposit some 8 meters tall. Unfortunately, shell from this mound was mined in the 1920s, although other sites in the areaincluding several smaller shell middens and campsites escaped destruction. Field school efforts are thus divided between investigating the less conspicuous aspects of life along Silver Glen Run, as well as documenting what remains from mounds long since destroyed. Field school provides technical training for aspiring young archaeologists, but they are structured by the research questions of participating professionals and graduate students. UF Ph.D. Asa Randall wrote his dissertation on the origins of Archaic monuments from the results of field school. Following in his footsteps are Zack Gilmore, who is investigating the social circumstances leading to the construction of the mound Wyman observed, and Jason ODonoughue, who is delving into the ecology and archaeology of Floridas springs. Two other UF Ph.D. students, Meggan Blessing and Paulette McFadden, add expertise in zooarchaeology and geoarchaeology to ensure that undergraduate participants are exposed to a variety of research questions and methods.Field School Updates: Archaeological Field Schools Provide Undergraduate TrainingFor the last several years, James Davidson and Ken Sassaman have each offered a 6-week summer archaeological field school. These programs are extremely popular with our undergraduates and provide many of them with their first field experience. Kingsley Plantation Archaeological Field SchoolKingsley Plantation, on Fort George Island, Florida, is the birthplace of Plantation Archaeology, in as much as in 1968 it was the first site where archaeology was directed specifically at answering questions related to slave life. In 2006 James Davidson taught an archaeo logical field school there, the first step of a multi-year reassessment of plantation archaeology. Several uncov ered features suggest African spiritual belief, most nota bly a chicken burial in the floor of a slave cabin, a form of animal sacrifice reminiscent of West African cultures. The opportunity to link elements of African-American spirituality with their African analogues and precursors is an exciting prospect, and one that has been actively pursued. Davidson is now conducting the fifth year of summer excavations at the Kingsley Plantation site. Cumulatively they have excavated the interior spaces of four slave cabins, most dating to between 1814 and 1839 and occupied by African-born men and women. Arguably as important as ongoing or active excava tions is the reassessment of the Florida Museum of Nat ural Historys archaeological collections from Kingsley. All of the artifacts collected by Dr. Charles Fairbanks in his pioneering excavations of Kingsley Plantation in 1968, as well as at other plantation sites in Florida and Georgia, are curated there, none of which have been examined since the preliminary reports were written in the early 1970s. A reappraisal of these collections from the sites that help begin the field of African-American Archaeology would be of great value, especially in light of recent theories and paradigm shifts beyond the sim plistic pattern recognition studies of the 1970s. David son and his students are making significant progress on the reanalysis of these materials in new theoretical light. This past January Davidson along with graduate students Karen McIlvoy and Rebecca Douberly Gor man hosted two tours at the Kingsley site for attendees of the 2010 Society for Historical Archaeology Meet ings that took place on Amelia Island. Despite record low temperatures and a bitter wind, over 150 people visited the site.

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 5 A Cultural Festival in the Senegal River Valley: Reinventing Local Traditions for Returning Migrantsby Abdoulaye KaneThe organization of cultural festivals in the villages of the Senegal River Valley has become a major priority of Haalpulaar hometown associations based in Europe and the United States. This is an apparently surprising turn for associations that have traditionally occupied themselves with development initiatives aimed at bringing con crete improvements of living conditions experienced in the Haalpulaar immigrants home villages. Yet conversations I had with leaders of such associations in France and the United States indicate their conviction that cultural festivals can in fact play an integral role in strategies aimed at development of their home villages. In 2008, with the help of the Humanities Enhancement Grant, I participated in one such cultural festival, conducted in the village of Thilogne, Senegal. In the process, I acquired an interesting perspective on the nature of the stakes, players, discourses, cultural performances, and artisanal exhibitions that bring these events to life as development initiatives. For our generation and those preceding it, participation in the Thiayde was a rite of passage for young women who had yet to be married. We would spend all year creating songs, and throughout the months leading up to Taske carefully consider the types of clothes and jewelry we planned to wear for the competition, she added. Now, to Aminatas dismay, women of the younger generation put on their finest clothes and jewelry to watch their men compete on the soccer field. For these women Thiayde is a relic reserved for the cultural festivals that take place every two years. In their new incarnation as part of a reinvented tradition, Thiayde songs have been adapted to the new circumstances, often in the form of praise songs honoring successful migrants, the hometown associations, and the village as a whole. It is striking to observe that the cultural practices being performed during the festivals tend to be of little relevance to con temporary village life. Rather, they constitute a recreation of particular traditions, customs, and performances that their cre ators perceive will be admired by returning migrants, visiting urbanites and tourists as an exotic reflection of a lost cultural past. One fascinating example of such reinven tion of tradition is the cultural practice of Thiayde, a carefully choreographed event whereby processions of young women engage in ritual competition for husbands. According to one informant, Aminata, aged 54, and a resident of Thilogne, Thiayde competitions were held between groups of women from neighborhoods between which there existed friendly rivalries. Such friendly inter-neighborhood rivalries were sustained by the frequency with which men from each of the neighborhoods took wives from the other. The men of the Diabe Salla neighbor hood, for example, often take wives from among the women of the Ndioufnaabe neighborhood, and vice versa. The Thiayde were peaceful, yet lively, confrontations between young women on both sides, each with the objective of getting their own men to marry within their own neighborhoods, while luring as many men as possible from other neighborhoods to marry there as well. The women of each neighborhood spend countless hours preparing, crafting praise songs they use to promote themselves, and lyrical diatribes used to target women of the opposite camp. Thiayde were often organized around the Taske a Muslim feast celebrating Abrahams sacrifice. To begin the Thiayde competition during Taske the groups of women would leave their neigh borhoods around 5:00 pm and walk slowly toward the center of the village, each with a lead vocal carefully selected for her excel lent voice. While walking, they begin sing ing their praise songs, following with the lyrical diatribes upon their encounter with their rival groups. The rival groups meet at around 7:00 pm at the center of the vil lage, surrounded by spectators who listen carefully to the raucous proceedings. The Thiayde conclude with each side inevitably claiming victory, as their members disperse and straggle back to their respective neigh borhoods. The Thiayde is not practiced any more by the younger generation, lamented Aminata, who is charged with organizing the Thiayde during the cultural festival. Abdoulaye Kane with one of the local artists Rival teams of the Thiayde during the festival: one team wears lighter clothes while the other wears darker clothes

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page 6 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Happy Trails to Jerry & JohnDrs. Gerald F. Murray and Dr. John H. Moore are retiring this term. We wish them the best in their new and continued pursuits.Dr. Jerry F. Murray came to UF in 1985. As a specialist in applied anthropology, Jerry has done applied contract assignments in 15 countries for 27 public and private agencies. A major part of Jerrys career con cerned the anthropology of agroforestry systems and reforestation efforts in Haiti. The earthquake there brought his work to the forefront of understanding the complex ity of vulnerability and survival in Haiti. Jerry also wrote several insightful and innovative ethnographies about the Dominican Republic including issues of urban microenterprise, and changes in the educational system of the Dominican Republic. Jerry also worked extensively in the Middle East, including research on the Jewish Diaspora. Jerry is a teacher who challenged, enlightened, and inspired students in all of his classes, from the Anthropology of Religion and Language and Culture to graduate seminars on the Caribbean. Several of Jerrys students are carrying on his legacy of work on Hispaniola and in other areas. As our lead article indicates, Jerry has been involved with the consequences of and response to the Haitian earth quake. He will continue to work on this topic as he enters a new phase of life. We look forward to seeing Jerry in the next years of his career. Dr. John H. Moore came to UF as Chair of the Department in 1993 after having served previously as Chair at the University of Oklahoma. John took advantage of the chang ing university and helped the department to grow in stature. We were recognized as one of the top departments, including both private and public universities in the U.S. Johns insistence that the department should be diverse, scholarly, and dedicated to teaching is a legacy that remains with us today. Johns research is among the broadest in the department including demography, race and racism, kinship, Marxism, and Native Americans. His consulting work and research in Native American communities brought the department back to one of the roots of anthropology in North America. Johns long-standing interest in the intersection of biological and cultural aspects of race culminated in the publication of the 2007 Macmillan Encyclopedia of Race and Racism for which he served as Editor-in-Chief. He has trained numer ous graduate students, including mentoring several Native American doctoral students. His op-ed pieces in the Gainesville Sun and other venues brought anthropology to public discourse. John has been a friend and mentor to many of us. We will miss the annual tipi construction on the UF campus! The Elizabeth Eddy Endowment recognizes the career of applied anthropologist Elizabeth Marie Liz Eddy. Established by Professor Eddys estate, the endowment provides funding for a visiting professorship for an applied anthropologist to spend a semester at UF teach ing a course and interacting with applied anthropology students. The Eddy endowment supporting applied anthropology was inaugurated in the Spring semester with the appointment of Dr. Mary Allegretti as visiting professor in the Department of Anthropology. The endowment also supported three graduate students in completing their dissertations and one research assistantship. Eddy Visiting Professorship: This Spring in Gainesville by Mary AllegrettiFor the second time in five years I had the opportunity to teach a course at the University of Florida. The first was in fall 2005 and the second in spring, this year. In the Fall 2005 semester I came to UF as a Bacardi Eminent Scholar invited by the Center for Latin American Studies. In 2010 I was invited by the Department of Anthropology to be the first recipient of the Elizabeth Eddy Professorship of Applied Anthropology. With this experience at UF, Ive completed five interesting experiences as an itinerant visiting professor at North-American universities. During Fall 2004 I received the McCluskey Fellowship at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies (Yale University); from March to July 2005, I was the Tinker Visiting Professor at the Department of Anthropology (University of Chicago); from January to May 2007, I was again a Tinker Visiting Professor at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies (University of Wisconsin-Madison). The course I teach is always the same: Social Movements and Public Policies: The Experience of the Rubber Tappers in the Amazon Region. The difference among the courses is the result of the interaction and the interests of the students. The difference between one course and the other is determined by the interaction that occurs with the students, i. e. by the confluence of interests around the theoretical debate and the exchange of practical experiences. The course is based on my professional experience working as an anthropologist with social movements in the Brazilian Amazon and in different capacities: as a researcher, as an activist, as a policy maker in governmental institutions at local and federal levels, and today as an inde pendent consultant. I tell students about the incredible change created by social movements in the Amazon in the last two decades based on a model that combines clear proposals in defense of the forest, strategic alliances at national and international levels, and political capacity to articulate ideas that have local and global relevance. It is one of the most successful movements in the world, responsible for the protection of more than 5% of the Amazonia for local communities. The message of my courses is clear: as an anthropologist I concen trate my hopes for a better world through a transformation made by the hands of the poor, the exploited, and the workers of the world. As a student I dreamed and fought for an opportunity to study and research those groups that were marginalized. And I fought for justice. I had the Elizabeth Eddy Endowment: Visiting Professorship,

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 7 opportunity not only to do my research with a social group involved in deep social change, but also to collaborate with them based on the knowl edge I accumulated about their reality. So, I realized that there is a strategic role played by us social scientists when we decide to do something that goes beyond Academia and accomplishes something that is based on what we do as social scientists. This debate is particularly interesting at UF for two main reasons: the tradition of research in social and environmental topics in Latin America, and especially in the Amazon Region, and the identity of the students. Because of this combination its possible to teach students that not only know your work and like to be in your class, but also bring to the class real questions that they are facing in their fieldwork in different countries. The Spring semester in Gainesville was one of the best that I have had since I started this itinerancy, for different reasons: the warm recep tion made by my colleagues at the Department of Anthropology and the feeling of being at home (I was professor of the Department of Anthropol ogy at the Federal University of Paran, in the south of Brazil for more than 10 years); the mix of cultures, traditions and interests of the students (4 North Americans, 4 Brazilians, one Peruvian, one Belizean, and one French); the topics of their research (medical anthropology, extractive reserves, and social movements in different countries from Latin America and Africa); and a smart and participative teacher assistant (Jennifer HaleGallardo) who helped me offer a good course. For all of these reasons, Im sad that my time in Gainesville has ended. Maybe I will come again sometime in the future. Eddy Fellowships and AssistantshipAva Lasseter (Tony Oliver-Smith, Chair) used an Eddy Fellowship to work on completing her dissertation examining how a group of smallscale fishermen in the Yucatan, Mexico adapt to resource scarcity. Using strategies observed during 13 months of fieldwork, she develops a model of adaptation to marine resource scarcity centered on strategies of inten sification and diversification with which to analyze against a model of adaptation. She then explores how social relationships within the fishing cooperative relate to the adaptive behavior of individual fishermen within the community. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the develop ment of a model of adaptation to marine resource scarcity that can be used comparatively in other settings and argues that a better understanding of human responses to scarcity through the development of such a model will contribute to more successful resource management. Amy Non (Connie Mulligan, Chair) is using an Eddy Fellowship to com plete the final analyses and writing of her dissertation, entitled, Analyses of genetic data within an interdisciplinary framework to investigate recent human evolutionary history and complex disease. This disserta tion research draws on diverse interdisciplinary data with two aims: 1) to explore both evolutionary history in Eastern Africa and Yemen, and 2) to investigate health disparities in the complex disease of hypertension. The two evolutionary history projects specifically integrate genetic, historical, linguistic, and geographic data to explore evolutionary history in both small regional ethnic populations (Ethiopian and Yemenite Jewish groups) and across wider geographic space in Yemen. The two health disparities projects integrate genetic and sociocultural data to examine contributors to racial disparities in health in a Puerto Rican population, as well as in the African American participants of the Familial Blood Pressure Program (FBBP). Sarah Cervone (Anita Spring and Tony Oliver-Smith, co-Chairs) is using an Eddy Fellowship to complete her dissertation Beneath the Peak: Moun tain Tourism and the Global Economy in a Moroccan Village. Sarah com pleted seventeen months of research in the Amazighe (Berber) village of Aremd in the High Atlas Mountains during 2007-2008. The Kingdom of Morocco, under the auspice of the World Bank and the United Nations, has implemented a series of tourism development policies in remote areas like Aremd with the expectation that increased cash and capital will alle viate poverty and reduce pressure on natural resources. Sarahs research illuminates how the global tourism economy articulates with pre-existing socio-economic arrangements in Aremd. These findings will demonstrate that tourism development has done more than simply increase cash and capital in the village; it has exacerbated pre-existing social hierarchies and introduced a new system of inequality based on money-wealth. As a result, the benefits and consequences of tourism development were distributed unequally among residents. Uneven tourism development has not only restructured the community, it has reformulated fundamental aspects of the way of life in Aremd. Jennifer Hale-Gallardo was awarded the 2010 Elizabeth Eddy Applied Anthropology Research Assistantship. Jennifer was responsible for assist ing Dr. Mary Allegretti with her research and teaching on the topic of anthropology and development during the past spring semester. Dr. Mary Allegretti holds a painting of Chico Mendes by anthropologist and artist Ana Maria Vasquez of the Womens Earth Alliance. It was gifted to her by UF graduate students in honor of her groundbreaking contributions to applied anthropology and her courageous collaboration with rubber tapper Chico Mendes in the struggle for innovative land reform. This collaboration culminated in a social movement that led to the creation of Brazils unique policy of extractive reserves which protects peoples rights to use and harvest products from the forest while preserv ing environmental values.Fellowships, & Assistantship Mary Allegretti and her spring semester seminar students

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page 8 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Mamitas in Peru...Florence E. Babb has finished a book on the refashioning of nations for tourism that had her traveling to Peru, Nica ragua, Mexico, and Cuba. Now shes heading back to Peru to start a new project, a reexamination of the notion that Andean women are more Indian than their male coun terparts. With changes due to indigenous mobilization, urbanization, and tourism development, shes finding that there is newly minted cultural capital in being indigenous and female, though gender inequalities do persist. Shell have the assistance of UF anthropology graduate students Joe Feldman and Jamie Lee Marks in Peru this summer.Bring back some textiles for Potlatch...Willie Baber, member of the Board of the Neo Synthesis Research Center (NSRC), will attend a Board meeting in Sri Lanka and a landcare workshop sponsored by NSRC in June. NSRC, an environmental NGO initiated in 1980, is transitioning to a renewed mission focusing on Land care Sri Lanka, an international movement that will help secure funding of the Centers activities and programs.Originally escaping hurricanes, now oil inundation, our affiliates from Tulane University...Harvey and Victoria Bricker, who will be returning to Gainesville for the summer, anticipate spending the sum mer months checking installments of edited copy for their co-authored book on astronomy in the Maya codices. Now that the research for that project is finished, each of them has returned to ongoing research in other fields. As a necessary foundation for her planned book on the his-Faculty ResearchFaculty Members & Affiliates Conduct Diverse Research Across the Globetory of grammatical features in Yucatecan Maya, Victoria is transforming the 16thcentury Motul Dictionary into a root-andstem dictionary. Other grammatical infor mation will come from ca. 1000 Mayalanguage documents (wills, land titles, bills of sale, letters, and formal complaints) that are provenienced in space and time. Har vey is preparing materials on the French Palaeolithic site of Les Tambourets for the on-line publication of an attribute analysis of the lithic industry combined with a database of the artifact catalogue, artifact illustrations, excavation photographs, and all previous published and unpublished reports. The on-line format will permit completing the publication of the site in ways that were not possible when he fin ished his excavations in the 1980s.Get out of jail free cards dont really work...Joel Cohen and collaborators are carrying out research to examine the impact of debt consolidation loan marketing on consum ers finances. These loans keep the wolf from the door (and reduce creditor harassment) in the short run, but often serve to put people in even worse financial shape over time. In several studies they dem onstrate potential harmful consequences of such loans, and then they attempt to undo these consequences via warning messages and financial literacy interven tions. Previously, research demonstrated that products sold as remedies are treated psychologically as if they were get out of jail free cards. Such remedies can have the ironic effect of leading people to take more rather than less risk (because the remedy is available to save the day).Do you have a license for your monkey?Dave Daegling heads an NSF-funded project that explores the relationship of skull anatomy to feeding behavior among seven species of monkeys from the Ivory Coasts Tai Forestthe largest remaining patch of undisturbed rainforest in West Africa. In collaboration with colleagues from Ohio State University and Union College (NY), Daegling is engaged in a multi-scale analysis of bone structure in these monkeys to determine the ways in which the primates have adapted to a variety of demanding diets. One of the initial findings of this project is that some monkeys appear to soften some of the bone in the jaw in places where there is a danger of fracturing, and redirecting chewing stresses to regions where fracture is less likely and the bone can safely stiffen. The latest finding from the field is that the sooty mangabeys regularly consume nuts that are among the hardest foods eaten by primates anywhere in the world, and even the larger local chimpanzees wont eat the nuts unless theyve broken the shells first with hammerstones. Ongoing work in Daeglings lab is exploring how the bone of mangabey jaws has adapted to this extreme stress environment.Animals didnt seem to mind the drought...Kitty Emery along with graduate student Erin Thornton continued research on zooarchaeological and isotopic signatures of Maya animal remains corroborated paleoclimatic models for the Maya region but revealed variable local impact linked to site-specific environmental conditions. This study also suggests that most Maya landscapes and animals were not severely impacted even during peak drought periods. Elsewhere in the Maya region com bined environmental and archaeological studies in the Classic Maya polity of Motul de San Jos highlight complex economic and political relationships. The rulers were supplied with stone tools, meat, and agricultural products by lower-ranked farmer/ hunters from outlying settlements, but they also crafted woven, brocaded, and shell-decorated, textiles. Elite non-nobles produced narrative polychrome ceramics for exchange and crafted fine marine-shell Mangabeys from the Tai Forest Photo by Scott McGraw

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 9 adornments for the ruling family. Lowerstatus residents and the middle-class and elite non-nobles probably also participated in a market exchange system that included an inland exchange port and community market places in the two largest settle ments.Where can you get a good feijoada?Maxine Margolis, Professor Emerita, is hard at work on a book, Bye Bye Brazil: Emigrs from the Land of Soccer & Samba, about the Brazilian diaspora worldwide.Thats Mayapan not marzipan...Susan Milbrath reports that in her role as Curator of Latin American Art and Archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, she negotiated the permanent transfer of a major collection from the Maya site of Cerros in Belize this year. Anthropology graduate students here at UF are already working on this large, well-documented collection, exca vated by David Freidel in the 1970s. Her research on Mayapan, the last Maya capital in Mexico, continues with a number of co-authored publications out recently with Carlos Peraza, the director of the INAH project. She also completed a book manuscript, entitled Heavenly History: Decoding Ancient Mexican Astronomy in the Codex Borgia. This comprehensive study of astronomical images in the codex reveals a pattern of seasonal imagery that can be directly linked with Aztec festival calendars.Collaborative projects in medical anthropology...Connie Mulligan and Lance Gravlee are continuing their work on health disparities and genetic and sociocultural risk factors for hypertension. Their work has also been publicized through major news media across the country as well as major anthro pological and biological journals. This research is integrated into the teaching mission of the department.Our colleague at the Law School...Winston Nagan is a member of the Com mittee on Peace and Development of the World Academy of Art and Science. The committee works on the issues of disarma ment and, in particular, its connection to nuclear weapons policy. Winston has writ ten a piece on the question of the ratifica tion of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, as well as a presentation on the approach to nuclear weapons disarmament of the Obama administration. Winston has also been working on the question of whether it is possible to make the case for the human right to full employment. This is a part of the World Academys investiga tion into the issue of employment and pov erty. Winston also continues to do work on indigenous human rights issues relating to the Shuar of Ecuador. These issues include environmental and climate change concerns as well as issues of land titles and the protection of traditional knowledge.High elevation pastoralists suffer in Peru...Tony Oliver-Smith, Professor Emeritus, spent time in Espinar, Peru, high in the Department of Cusco as a consultant for Oxfam examining the impacts of climate change on alpaca herders. Espinar is a highland province mostly between 40005000 meters above sea level. People and their herds have been experiencing problems with unpredictable climate varia tion consisting of intense nighttime cold and searing daytime heat. The cold makes the alpacas abort and the young get sick and die, reducing the herds, which are the only source of income for the high altitude pastoralists. And the heat is drying up the pasturage so the alpaca, sheep and the few cattle have less to eat. Unpredictable climate is making their precarious highelevation lives even tougher.Too bad Ripley is not alive not Bullen, but Robert...Professor Emerita Barbara Purdy for quite some time has been obsessed with the desire to re-excavate the Old Vero Site, 8IR9, Indian River County, Florida, first investigated from 19131916. The site remains controversial after almost 100 years because of the questionable contem poraneity of human and extinct Late Pleistocene bones. Vero is still the only site in the Americas where such associations have been reported. Since March 2009, Purdy has been researching a fragmented fossil bone from Vero Beach containing a small, but unmistakable, image of a mammoth engraved on the surface. Having assumed that the bone and carving were probably a fake, Purdy had the object tested by paleontologists, forensic specialists, and materials science engineers. Thus far, these tests have verified that it is genuine and, based on rare earth element analysis, originated at or near the Old Vero Site. Further testing is planned. Using 21st-century technology and an interdisciplinary team of scientists, Purdy hopes to solve the mystery of Vero within the next year or so.Getting Cozy with Ticks, Mosquitoes, and Water Moccasins...Ken Sassaman, Hyatt and Cici Brown Professor of Florida Archaeology, launched a new research program in 2009 on the northern Gulf Coast of Florida. The Lower Suwannee Archaeological Survey is a partnership with U.S. Fish and Wildlife to investigate coastal sites being destroyed by tidal erosion, as well as sites on hammocks and relict dunes that are currently above the high-water mark. Ph.D. students Paulette McFadden, Micah Mones, and Elyse Anderson are developing their own research projects in the context of this long-term study, which is centered on the relation ship between environmental and cultural dimensions of sea-level change. The team has already discovered two 75-m diameter shell rings dating to ca. 2000 years ago, the presumed remains of circular villages of the Deptford era. In other news, Kens longstanding interest in Archaic societies of the American Southeast culminated this year in the publication of The Eastern Archaic, Historicized ( Altamira, 2010), a synthesis of 8000 years of Amerindian experience in historiographic perspective.Woman of many passport stamps...Anita Spring, Professor Emerita, studied small and medium entrepreneurs and businesses in the formal sector in Mozambique during summer 2009. She also studied Chinese economic actors in Mozambique who owned businesses from large (telecommunications and construction) to small (restaurants), as well as workers in the service sector. She presented papers at the International Academy of African Business and Development (IAABD) meet ings in Uganda and did invited presentations at Indiana, Yale, Kansas, and James Madison Universities, as well as at the United Nations. She serves as Executive Secretary of IAABD and President of Culture and Agriculture.If you build it, they will come...Mark Thurner completed a book on the history of Peruvian historiography and anthropology, and from doing that was inspired to begin a project on museums. His current research traces the colonial and national genesis of muse ums of anthropology and history in the Hispanic world (Peru, Mexico, Spain, and Argentina). This summer Mark will be teaching an in situ course on the history of such museums in Paris, after which he will be expanding his study to Madrid, Mexico City, Lima, and Buenos Aires.

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page 10 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Two Faculty Members Elected to National AcademiesH. Russell Bernard, Professor Emeritus of anthropology, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Russ is among 72 new members and 18 foreign associates from 14 countries chosen in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Russs election to the acad emy recognizes his influence not only on the field of anthro pology, but also sociology, political science, public health, and epidemiology. Russ served as chair of the department from 1979 to 1990. During his time with the department, he was a guest or visiting professor at the University of Cologne in Germany, University of Michigan, University of Kent in Canterbury, and the National Museum of Ethnology in Osaka, Japan. Before coming to UF, Russ was a professor at the University of Illinois, Washington State University, and West Virginia University. Russ has held the editorship of the American Anthropologist and the journal of the Society for Applied Anthropology, Human Organization. He was a founder of Cultural Anthropology Methods Journal, which became the journal Field Methods. His methods text, Research Methods in Anthropology has gone through three editions, and his gen eral research methods text Social Research Methods, has been used by tens of thousands of students. Russs research is a blend of the sciences and humanities. His contributions to net work analysis, especially his N-SUM project which provides network and statistical ways of counting the uncountable events such as victims of earthquakes, stigmatized diseases such as HIV in countries around the world, wars, and social conditions such as homelessness, have been used by the World Health Organization and other organizations to solve humanitarian crises. Russ has been a mentor to countless graduate students, who honored him through the Dissertation Mentor Award. And Russ and his wife, Carole, have been mainstays of the department, making the department a welcoming place for students and faculty alike. The National Academy of Sciences, established in 1863, is a private organization of sciences and engineers dedicated to the furtherance of science and its use for the general welfare. Russ joins 11 other UF faculty as members of the academy including two anthro pologists, Elizabeth Wing (Florida Museum of Natural History, Curator Emerita) and Michael Moseley. Jerald T. Milanich, Curator Emeritus of anthropology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, has been named a fellow in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Jerry is among 229 new fellows who join one of the nations most prestigious honorary societies and a center for independent policy research. The scholars, scientists, jurists, writers, artists, civic, corporate and phil anthropic leaders represent universities, museums, national laboratories, private research institutes, businesses and foun dations. Jerry received his bachelors, masters, and doctorate in anthropology at the University of Florida. He formerly served as chair of the anthropology department at the Florida Museum of Natural History. Jerry is the author or editor of fourteen books and monographs and over 100 scientific publications. As a contributing editor at Archaeology magazine Jerry brings archaeological research to the public. In 2005, Jerry was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Florida Archaeological Council. He is a previous recipient of grants and scholarships from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and others. Jerry was the mentor of numerous masters and doctoral students. Jerrys areas of research interest include the archaeology of pre-Columbian peoples in the southeastern United States, the De Soto entrada, and the impact of Spanish colonization on the Native Americans. Recent research has focused on the use of journalism as Faculty Achievements & Honorshistorical record during the last three decades of the 19th century (in Florida and the American West) and on the Seminole Indians of Florida in the early 20th century. Since its founding by John Adams, John Hancock, and other scholar-patriots, the Academy has elected lead ing thinkers and doers from each generation, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin in the 18th century, Daniel Webster and Ralph Waldo Emerson in the 19th, and Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill in the 20th. The current membership includes more than 250 Nobel laureates and more than 60 Pulitzer Prize winners. Jerry joins his wife Maxine Margolis, Professor Emerita, who was inducted into the AAAS in 2009. Maxine and Jerry are one of the rare married couples who are both Fel lows of the AAAS.Honorary DegreesDr. Lourdes Arzipe (Pro fessor-researcher at Centro Regional de Investigaciones Multidisciplinarias, National University of Mexico) anthro pologist, policy maker, and international social scientist, was awarded an honorary doctorate by UF at spring semester graduation. Dr. Arizpes work with UNESCO, the Mexican Government, and migration has made her one of the most important anthropologists of the century. Her collaborations with Helen Safa, Car men Diana-Deere, Anita Spring, Marianne Schmink, and Florence Babb were highlighted at a luncheon on the Friday before the commencement ceremony. The Depart ment of Anthropology and the Center for Latin American Studies helped to sponsor this honorary degree.Grant GettersPeter Collings received a Program Initiation Fund grant from the UF Water Institute to study water manage ment in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) watershed spanning Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. Colings and Ph.D. candidate Becky Blanchard were part of a multidisciplinary teamwhich included faculty and graduate students from engineering, ecology, and political sciencethat developed a research plan for analyzing the seemingly intractable 30-year "tri-state water war" in the ACF basin. Susan deFrance received grants from the National Geo graphic Society and the CLAS Humanities Scholarship fund to conduct archaeological research in coastal south ern Peru on Inca economic specialization. Lance Gravlee received a Leon County Health Depart ment grant: Community and Household Food Environ ments. Lance Gravlee and Connie Mulligan were awarded an NIH Clinical and Translational Science Institute grant: Pilot Investigation of The Role of Epigenetic Methylation in Mediating risk of Hypertension in a Study Population of African Americans in Tallahassee.

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 11 Alumni GiftsOur alumni are continuing to help the department through their generosity.Anne Stokes (Ph.D. 1998) President of Southeastern Archaeological Research, Inc. has pledged to underwrite the Patricia S. Essenpreis Archaeological Field School Scholar ship that is awarded each spring to a female undergraduate who will be attending a field school. Thanks Anne! Luz Martin del Campo (Ph.D. 2010) has started a fund in the UF Foundation to help defray the costs of attending professional meetings for those graduate students who are single parents. Thanks Luz!In MemoriamJames C. Waggoner, Jr.Although James C. Waggoner, Jr. (Ph.D. 2009) was born on Staten Island, New York, he spent most of his life and archaeological career in Georgia. While an undergraduate at Middle Georgia College (now Georgia College and State University), Jamie received credit for taking anthropology and archaeology classes at the University of Georgia, where he participated in his first archaeological field school in 1996. After a couple of years doing Cultural Resource Management archaeology for Southern Research, Inc., Jamie enrolled in graduate stud ies at Florida State University, where he earned an M.A. in anthropol ogy in 2002. That same year Jamie matriculated in the Ph.D. program in Anthropology at the University of Florida. He graduate with a Ph.D. in August 2009, a little more than a month before his body succumbed to the cancer he fought with great courage since the summer of 2008. In addition to dissertation fieldwork along the Chickasawhatchee and Ichawaynochaway Creeks of south western Georgia, Jamie participated in field projects in central Georgia, northeastern Georgia, Florida, and Mexico. Jamies passion for and commitment to archaeology will never be forgotten. Ken Sassaman To honor Jamie and his legacy, his family has established an endowment to help support graduate student research in all subfields of anthropology. We are very grateful to the Waggoner family.Marcus Hepburn Marcus Hepburn passed away in June after suffering an accidental fall. Marcus started the graduate program in the 70s and then returned about 3 years ago to finish his doctorate on the changing adaptations of outer-banks fisherfolk in N.C. He was on track to complete his dissertation this fall. Guest Lectures Enlighten CampusIn October, Dr. Charles R. Cobb presented the Inaugural Brown Lecture in Archaeology, spon sored by the Hyatt and Cici Brown Endowment for Florida Archaeology and the Department of Anthropology. Dr. Cobb is Director of South Caro lina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, and Professor of Anthropology, University of South Carolina. Enlightenment Ideals, Sexual Politics, and Economic Realities on the Carolina Frontier provided a new perspective on colonialism and the creation of hybrid societies. Dr. Anthony Aveni (Russell B. Colgate Professor of Astronomy and Anthropology, serving appointments in both Departments of Physics and Astronomy and Sociology and Anthropology at Colgate University) presented The End of Time: The Maya Mystery of 2012 in January with support from Department of Anthropology, the Center for Latin American Studies, and the Florida Museum of Natural History. Dr. Tianlong Jiao (Bishop Museum & University of Hawaii) presented Toward a New Understanding of the Prehistory of Southeast China in April with sponsorship by the Asian Studies Program, Interna tional Center, Center for the Humanities, and the Public Sphere (Rothman Fund), Department of Anthropology.Achievements and RecognitionBrenda Chalfin was selected for a Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere at the Univer sity of Florida Library Enhancement Grant in the Humanities during 20102011. Brenda proposed to develop library materials related to urban Africa. Dave Daeglings grantsmanship caught the eye of the Deans office. Dave was named the Colonel Allan R. and Margaret G. Crow Term Professor for 2010. Mike Moseley was honored by former students and colleagues with a volume entitled Andean Archaeology: A Tribute to Michael E. Moseley published by UCLAs Cotsen Institute of Archaeology. Mike Warren was recognized with a National Institute of Justice Paul Coverdell Award for Improve ments to the Forensic Sciences. Alyson Young was named a 20092010 CLAS Teacher of the Year. Congratulations to Connie Mulligan who was pro moted to full professor and to Lance Gravlee and C.K. Shih who were awarded tenure and promoted to associate professor.

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page 12 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Graduate Student Accomplishments and AwardsWe saw a record number of graduate students complete their degrees this past year. Nineteen students obtained their masters degrees while twenty-three students earned their doctorates! Polly and Paul Doughty Research Awards support graduate student anthropological research in the area of inter national peace, conflict resolution, and/or development, with preference given to a focus on Latin America. This years three worthy recipients will embark on fieldwork. Stephanie Borios (Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo, Chair) will study womens changing roles and home gardens in the Peruvian Andes. Tatiana Gumucio (Faye Harrison, Chair) will study the Yuqui indigenous peoples of lowland Bolivia and how their production of artisan crafts for the tourist market is a force of incremental social change. Anqi Liu (Faye Harrison, Chair) will travel to Tibet to examine Llasas urban landscape since the 1950s and the cultural political process of change in the urban setting.The Department of Anthropology, through a gift of Drs. Alba Amaya Burns and Allan Burns, offers awards for summer research in Latin America for projects in medical anthropology, human rights, and applied anthropology. The award honors the memory and goals of social justice of Miguel Angel Amaya, a medical student who perished during the Civil War in El Salvador. Miguel Angel Amaya was the brother of Professor Alba Amaya Burns. This years recipient June Carrington will conduct a multi-scalar study of the dissemination of health information and resources within Mexicos healthcare system, specifically in Yucatan. Allan Burns with Dr. Luz Martin del Campo and Dr. Ryan Theis receiving their Ph.D.s at Spring 2010 GraduationGraduate student NSF and Fulbright Awards Andrew Tarter (Jerry Murray, Chair) was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Andrews dissertation will explore Haitian farmers cultural, socioeconomic and/or ecological reasons for retaining parcels of forested land. Andrew hopes to elucidate key variables that may influence the success of future tree-planting or reforestation projects in Haiti. Meredith Marten (Alyson Young, Chair) received a Fulbright-Hays grant for her research in northern Tanzania. Meredith will work with HIV+ women and infants who are enrolled, and then after 2 years disenrolled, from a prevention program at a mission hospital to understand how par ticipants cope with a loss of program support after disenrollment. Alison Ketter (Brenda Chalfin, Chair) received a Fulbright IIE and an NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant to conduct dissertation research on fairtrade practices and political anthropology in South Africa. Joost Morsink (Bill Keegan, Chair) is working at the archaeological site of MC-6, Middle Caicos, Turks & Caicos Islands, investigating the eco nomic role of salt and salt control by the Pre-Columbian inhabitants of this unique site. Tess Kulstad (Jerry Murray, Chair) was awarded an NSF REG (Research Experience for Graduates) grant to research the effects of the January 12th earthquake in Haiti on child fosterage and informal adoptions in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, particularly the transnational movement of children along the Haitian-Dominican border. Alan Schultz (Lance Gravlee, Chair) also received an NSF REG grant for a project examining social network analysis among Tsimane Villagers in Amazonia. Alan was also chosen to participate in a five-week cultural anthropology field school funded by NSF and coordinated by the Tsimane Amazonian Panel Study (TAPS). Tamar Carter (Lance Gravlee and Connie Mulligan, co-Chairs) will use funding from an NSF REG to research the factors influencing the preva lence of hypertension in populations of the African Diaspora. Tamars research examines genetic and sociocultural factors that impact stress and blood pressure. Fulbright U.S. Student Scholarships were also awarded to Jeff Hoelle (Marianne Schmink, Chair) and Timothy Podkul (Chris McCarty, Chair).

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 13 John M. Goggin Awards are made to doctoral candidates specializing in sociocultural and biological anthropology who will use the stipend for expenses related to preparation of the dissertation. This years recipients are Khadidja Arfi (Peter Schmidt, Chair) and Hilary Zarin (Susan Gillespie, Chair). Khadidja will be studying Algerians moments of memory under colonialism using oral history and written archives with field research in Algeria and France. Hilary will be using Gog gin funds to complete her disserta tion regarding place making among historically displaced peasants in the Brazilian Amazon.Charles H. Fairbanks Awards go to doctoral candidates specializing in archaeology who will use the stipend for expenses related to prep aration of the dissertation. This year Geoff DuCh emin (Susan deFrance, Chair) will use scholarship funds to complete his dissertation on community use of animals at archaeological sites located in southern Puerto Rico.William R. Maples Awardsare available for anthropology graduate students conducting pre-dissertation or dissertation research in forensic anthropology. 2010 Awardee Nicolette Parr (Mike Warren, Chair) will be producing a diachronic study of the dentition of Micronesian Chamorros peoples to understand biological diversity and the colonization of the Pacific Islands.The Center for Latin American Studies provided generous support to several of our graduate students, particularly for masters research, through grants and fellowships. Summer Research Grants were award ed to Jessica Jean Casler, Lizzy Hare, Angelina Howell, Tess Kulstad, Ann Laffey, Carmen Laguer-Diaz, Ellen Lofaro, Timothy Mesh, and Jeffrey Vadala. A TCD field grant was awarded to Stephanie Borios.Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships went to Lauren Cheek, Nicole DErrico, Joseph Feldman, Rachel Iannelli, Camee Maddox, Meredith Marten, Caitlin Peterson, Noah Sims, Erik Timmons, and Dawit Woldu. Congratulations to you all and good luck with learning a new language.The Hyatt and Cici Brown Endowment provided two graduate students with funding. Jon Endonino used a Brown Grant-inAid to fund a one-month sabbatical from his day job at SEARCH to finish writing his dissertation on the Thornhill Lake Mound complex in Volusia County, Florida. Isaac Shearn is using a Brown Grant-in-Aid to conduct preliminary fieldwork on the Caribbean nation of Dominica for his dissertation research on social distance and pottery traditions of the Windward Islands.UF Dissertation Fellowships and Other Awards Auzenne Fellowships went to Camille Feanny, Maria Morera, Philip Surles, and Dawit Woldu. A McGinty/CLAS Dissertation Fellowship went to Noelle Sullivan. Meredith Marten was awarded a Madelyn M. Lockhart Pre-Dissertation Grant. A Graduate Student Teaching Award was given to Khadidja Arfi. UF International Center Outstanding Achievement Awards went to Yang Jiam and Haiyan Xing. A TCD Practitioner Experience Award as well as a Valene Smith Tourism Award was given to Tatiana Gumucio. Angelina Howell was awarded a Charles Wagley Research Fellowship. Aida Miro received a SPICE Fellowship.Non-UF AwardsA Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship was awarded to Amy Non. Amy also received an Exemplary Public Health Student of the Year and a How ard Hughes Graduate Student Mentoring Award. Ashley Sharpe received a Dienje Kenyon Memorial Fellowship. An American Institute of Indian Studies Junior Fel lowship went to Ben Valentine. Ryan Morini received a Phillips Fund Grant for Native American Research and a Sven and Astrid Liljeblad Endowment Fund Grant.Eleanor Roosevelt Global Citizenship Award Edward Gonzalez-Tennant has become the first winner of the new Eleanor Roosevelt Global Citizenship Award presented by the Center for a Public Anthropology. The award recognizes introductory anthropology teachers who go beyond talking about global citizenship to helping students develop the objectivity, critical thinking skills, and communication skills to be effective global citizens in todays world. Way to go Gomez! Hilary Zarin Khadidja Arfi 2010 William R. Maples Awardee Nicolette Parr conducting recovery of POW/MIA remains in Lao People's Democratic Republic

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page 14 Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 Brendan OSullivan Award This year two stellar undergraduates were hon ored with the Brendan OSullivan Award for Academic Excellence. Both Kristina Marie Hook and Alexander Lee Riehm graduated with perfect 4.0 GPAs. Kristina, from Pensacola, Florida, is an anthropology major with minors in interna tional development and humanitarian assistance, and teaching English as a second lan guage. She is an Anderson Scholar of Highest Distinction, recipient of UF Student-Alumni Association Scholarship, Presidents Honor Roll, Deans List, and completed the UF Hon ors Program. Kristina is member of National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Golden Key Honor Society, and Lambda Alpha Anthro pology Honor Society. She was active in Recurso, Campus Crusade for Christ, Camp Boggy Creek, St. Francis House, the English Language Institute, and tutored at Harvest Baptist Church. Kristina has been on mission trips to Russia, Nicaragua, and Uganda. She plans to attend graduate school and work for an international non-governmental organiza tion. This fall, Kristina will begin a Master's program in International Development at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Kristina was awarded the university's Founders' Scholarship, the highest scholarship offered by this school. Alex, from Law renceville, Georgia, is an anthropology and religion double major with a history minor. He won Dial Center Best ualitative Paper Award for Separate Lives, Separate Visions: Geopolitics and Community Relations in Post-Accord Belfast. He presented this paper at the International Conference for Peace and Reconciliation and the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting. He studied abroad in Belfast, Ireland and Mrida, Mexico. He is an Ander son Scholar, National Merit Scholar, UF Hon ors Ambassador, Sledd Hall resident assistant, and a member of Student Honors Organiza tion and Society of Academic Religious Stud ies. Alex will be attending graduate school at George Washington University where he will be studying International Affairs and concen trating on conflict resolution and economic relations. Five talented undergraduates were granted University Scholars Awards to conduct research in collaboration with a faculty mentor. Joseph Gallagher (Allan Burns) will work on a select group of medicinally important plants in Maya communities of Belize. Joseph is combining ethnobotany, local community knowledge and science, and conservation in order to understand seasonal uses of plants used to treat skin ailments and how their collection relates to preserving biodiversity in a Mopan Maya village. Joseph is working with Belizian UF graduate student Pio Saqui on this project. Michael Granatosky (Dave Daegling) will be investigating changes in mandibular bone quality during growth in macaque monkeys. Heather Lear (Maria Stoilkova) will be traveling to Turkey and conducting research among Turkish students on issues of identity and alliance with EU values. David Roebuck (Connie Mulligan) will be using GIS and genetic data on Yemeni samples to empirically estimate migration rates over three generations. Joshua A. Villanueva (Abdoulaye Kane) will be doing research in France on citizen ship and social exclusion of second-gen eration North African immigrants in the Parisian suburbs. Undergraduate Student Achievements and HonorsThis past year 238 anthropology majors received their bachelors degrees!Alexander Lee Riehm and Kristina Marie HookPatricia S. Essenpreis Scholarship The 2010 Patricia S. Essenpreis Scholarship awarded to a female undergraduate to attend an archaeological field school was awarded to Brittany Leigh Brown. Brittany will be attend ing the Kingsley Plantation Archaeological Field School directed by Dr. James Davidson. After volunteering for two semesters in the archaeology lab working on material recovered from previous field seasons, Brittany is ready to get her hands (and face and clothes) dirty! Congratulations Brittany. University Scholars Awards

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Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010 page 15 Worlds Best Office Staff!Where would we be without our fantastic office staff? Many of the accomplishments highlighted in this newsletter are the result of the tremendous efforts of our staff. Our current team of Karen Jones, Patricia Gaither-King, Juanita Bagnall, and Pam Freeman are the best cohort that the anthropology department has seen. In addition to their official duties for such things as getting our courses scheduled, registering our students, processing proposals and travel, they also fix our mistakes and help solve little problems. They are occasional psy chological counselors to faculty and students. Despite being overworked and underpaid, they are professional, cheerful, and helpful. Karen and Pat have been with the department since 1992 and 1988, respectively. Com bined, Karen and Pat have more institutional memory that most of the current faculty. Juanitas efficiency as graduate assistant keeps our students on track and may households in two towns and two villages. To make a long story short, the earthquake had affected the lives even of people far from the epicenter. The world knows about the Port-au-Prince homeless. But even where houses were standing, there is a crisis of hunger because of soaring food prices and an influx of refugees. People were actually flocking back to the camps of Port-auPrince to get access to the foreign aid. The destruction and closing of schools was, surprisingly, felt as one of the worst blows. Income is crucial, but parents (particularly moth ers) use it to send their children to one of the myriad tiny local private schools that dot Haiti in the absence of all but a few State run schools. In my lengthy recommendation section I designed a step-by-step program, supported by school budgets and market figures, that would permit an organization with funding and with focused programming to have major impacts on livelihoods (principally credit for female market women) and on education. I saw the Haitian government at its worst. One U.N. organization had finally come to La Hatte and passed out 500 vouchers, one for each family, to prepare for a relief shipment. They did their duty and respectfully went through the mayor of the nearby town. Brilliant. They filmed themselves entrusting to him the 500 vouchers to be passed out. When the cameras stopped rolling and the advance team departed, he passed out 40 and pocketed 460 for himself: 92% overhead for his services. This is a petty microcosmic replay of a much greater impend ing tragedy, as expatriate managers of public sector relief money from the U.S., Canada, and Europe affirm their respect for the sovereign Haitian government and vow to channel the $12.5 billion dollars of promised aid through Haiti, continued from page 1 the proper authorities. In capitulating to French-speaking, coat-and-tie Haitian authorities, these irresponsible wasters of other peoples money reject the unanimous pleas heard all over Haiti to keep the money away from the goernment. Actually thats not fair. Theyve never heard ordinary Haitians. For them the flag-waving franco phone elite are the Voice of Haiti. La Hatte continues to suffer. The NGO has yet to act there. Has anyone read the report? Im not sure; it exceeded five pages (actually, about 85). But I was able personally to channel several thousand dollars of money from Gainesville to local schools, the future of Haiti, and to begin discussion of a privately funded scholar ship program for the children of La Hatte. No villager believes the blah-blah-blah development rhetoric about Haitis future. Parents who school their children will do everything possible to get them out of agriculture and out of Haiti. Outsiders can support the education. What Haitians do with it is their own business. Two Haitian women selling used clothing in a town on the Dominican side of the border. be an indirect cause of this past years exceptional graduation success. And our most recent addition, Pam, learned the ropes very quickly; you wouldnt know that Pam was the newbie. To keep their jobs challenging for themand give them headachesUF likes to implement new software, programs, and accounting systems. People Soft was just the beginning. So, the next time you are in the office, thank them for all they do. Otherwise, faculty might find themselves teaching those popular 7:30 am classes and student paperwork just might not make it to the graduate school or the registrar. Pam, Nita, Pat, and Karen.

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Department of Anthropology1112 Turlington Hall PO Box 117305 Gainesville FL 32611-7305 Phone: 352-392-2253 Fax: 352-392-6929 Website: www.anthro.ufl.edu NON PROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID GAINESVILLE FL PERMIT NO 94 Friends of Anthropology (provides for a wide variety of department initiatives and needs) Custom Copies Graduate Travel (defrays costs for graduate students to travel to professional meetings) Patricia S. Essenpreis Award for Undergraduate Archaeology Research (assists female undergraduates to attend field school) Brendan OSullivan Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Majors (honors the highest-ranking major at spring graduation) Polly and Paul Doughty Graduate Research Award (funds graduate student research in Latin America) Burns Amaya Graduate Research Awards (funds graduate student research in Latin America) Charles H. Fairbanks Scholarship (defrays research costs for archae ology Ph.D. students in their final year) John M. Goggin Memorial Scholarship (defrays research costs for Ph.D. students in cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology in their final year) William R. Maples Scholarship (defrays research costs for forensic anthropology graduate students) Marvin Harris Lecture Fund (lecture series honors the late Professor Marvin Harris, one of the nations leading anthropological theorists) Zora Neale Hurston Fellowship (celebrates diversity, in honor of Zora Neale Hurston) James C. Waggoner, Jr. Grants-in-Aid Endowment (supports grad uate student research) Zoe Martin del Campo-Hermosillo Award (supports travel to con ferences for graduate students who are single custodial parents) Gift Amount: $25 $50 $100 $250 $________ Please fill out and return this page, along with your check made payable to the UF Foundation, to Anthropology, PO Box 117305, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7305. Please make any corrections needed to the address on the aboe label.Become a Friend of AnthropologyYou Can Make a Difference! We need your help, whether you can spare only a few dollars or many more. The Anthropology Department depends on gifts to fund student travel to meetings, undergraduate and graduate scholarships, dissertation and field school awards, lecture series, laboratory enhancements, and other initia tives. Its easy to make your tax-deductible gift through the University of Florida Foundation. Online giving to the Friends of Anthropology Fund with a credit card is now available at www.uff.ufl.edu/OnlineGiving/CLAS.asp Anthropology Friends Fund (000393). UF employees can donate to any Anthropology fund through payroll deduction. Or use this convenient form to designate your gift to a specific purpose:


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University of Florida, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences SU m er 20 10


An Assignment in Post-Earthquake Haiti


by Qerald F Murray
On sabbatical, I had just finished (late 2009) six weeks
of interviewing Haitians and Dominicans along the
border about Haitian / Dominican tensions. As I sat in
Gainesville on January 14 writing up my findings, the dev-
astating earthquake struck. ByJanuary 15 all my anthropo-
logical insights about Haiti and the D.R. seemed suddenly
ancient history.
After cell phone service was restored I was able to
talk with "my" village, La Hatte-the community in the
Cul-de-Sac floodplain not far from the Dominican border
where Maria and I spent our first two years of marriage
in the 1970s. There are still few latrines in the village. But
cell phones are everywhere. If you're confused about some
detail of land tenure or folk healing, you can now carry out
an emergency ethnographic interview via cell phone. You
can even do it during a seminar to settle an argument. Roll
over, Malinowski. Conversely the villagers can now ask for
financial or visa help. Anthropologists can no longer so
easily dump land-tenure informants once university-tenure
is secure.
No one got killed in the village itself and the earth-
quake demolished only a few houses. But most houses had
splits. People were terrified, sleeping outside at night fear-
ful of aftershocks. Food was available in the market, but
food prices had soared. The daily three-meal ideal had long
ago been reduced to two. After the earthquake it dropped
to one meal a day-or less. To add insult to injury all of
the outside aid was being monopolized, as always, in the
Republic of Port-au-Prince. La Hatte had gotten nothing.
Could I speak to the blan? When was I coming down?
A major international NGO gave me the chance.
They asked for a rapid needs assessment outside of Port-
au-Prince. Their potential target area included La Hatte.
I asked: Could La Hatte be one of the assessment sites?
"Of course. Great idea!" Could they promise they'd do
something there beside research? "Ummmm... errrr... hope-
fully... maybe"' I got the picture. But what other long shot
does an anthropologist have to practice nepotism for his
friends? Some anthropologists make careers debunking


humanitarian aid. One of them rushed
with his notepad to Haiti the day after the
earthquake. Unable himself to do anything
for the homeless with crushed limbs, he
could at least skewer the phony imperial-
ist do-gooders pretending to help. Great
contribution. This cranky genre of spitball
anthropology however, would be of little
use to La Hatte. I signed on with the
NGO for a brief contract, treating it not
as a bloodsucker but as a bona-fide service
organization wishing to improve its perfor-
mance via anthropological input.
I arrived on a Sunday and on
Monday was whisked out, with Haitian
companions, a vehicle, and a driver, for
two weeks of field immersion. The NGO
requested information on four domains
in which they could potentially provide
assistance: livelihoods/food security,
education, health/nutrition, and child
safety. They first tried "helping" my team


and me with an elaborate three-hour-long
French language questionnaire designed
for post-disaster assessment in Franco-
phone Africa. I politely refused their
help. For the use of my team I designed
a Creole language qualitative question-
and-observation guide that elicited
anthropologically strategic information
via free-floating interviews on each of
the four domains. We did key informant
interviews with local officials and with lay
and religious service providers, but above
all focus group interviews with groups
of farmers and market women about
life after the earthquake. I also designed
a one-page Creole language household
survey questionnaire to assess house dam-
ages and to quantify and identify the age,
gender, and kinship status of the refugees
who had flooded in from Port-au-Prince.
I rapidly trained four teams of interview-
ers to apply the instrument to some 2,000
see Haiti, page 15











Chair's Notes


Welcome to Anthropology 2010!


by Allan F Burns

She Department of Anthropology is
a lively place. This year flew by with
all kinds of interesting teaching, news, and
activities. As is tradition, our students and
faculty had some fun between teaching,
publishing, doing outreach, and talking
about humans, their history, and their
world. Last fall's Potlatch Picnic raised
thousands of dollars for student travel,
and all of us on the faculty were relieved
that the student skit only scratched the
surface of some of our foibles and unique
personality traits! The end of the fall
term included a "covered dish" holiday
event where we all paused to celebrate
the holidays. The spring Armadillo Roast
included the usual "mystery meat com-
petition:' and I had the enjoyable task of
helping judge the pie contest. I had some
trepidation when I came to the "mud" pie
with plants sticking out of it, but it was
chocolate, so all was well. The spring term
came to an end with the first graduation
reception in the newly remodeled semi-
nar/conference room and "Anthropology
Suite" on the first floor of Turlington.
About 60 students and their parents came
by after graduation to see the labs and
rooms and to talk about being an anthro-


pology major or Ph.D. student in the
program. James Davidson was in his lab,
working away on the African American
archaeology collection; many of the par-
ents commented on how great it was to
see and talk to a "working archaeologist!"
Anthropology was in the news quite
a bit this year. James Davidson appeared
on the Ken Burns' documentary on
National Parks; Connie Mulligan and
her students' work on the long habitation
of the Bering Strait received extensive
attention in the media, and Jerry Murray
became a key scholar, interviewee, and
consultant in understanding the social and
cultural responses to Haiti's earthquake in
January. Emeritus Professor Russ Bernard
was elected to the National Academy of
Sciences, joining other NAS members
Mike Moseley and Curator Emerita
Elizabeth Wing, affiliate in the Depart-
ment with the Florida Museum of Natural
History. Of the eleven NAS members
at the University of Florida, three are
anthropologists. Students and faculty in
the department published articles, gave
papers, carried out research, and made
real impacts through their work in many,
many ways, and this newsletter highlights


page 2


some of them. As this newsletter is written, the Gulf of
Mexico is filling with oil from the BP spill; graduate stu-
dent Becky Blanchard is among others who are working
with the State of Florida to address the impacts of that
spill on our coastline.
This was the first year of the Elizabeth Eddy
Endowed Visiting Professorship in Applied Anthropol-
ogy. Thanks to the very generous endowment that Dr.
Eddy created through the gift of her estate to the Depart-
ment, graduate students Amy Non, Sarah Cervone, Ava
Lasseter, and Jennifer Hale-Gallardo were supported in
their dissertation work this spring. The Department also
hosted Dr. Mary Allegretti as the first Eddy Endowment
visiting applied anthropologist. Mary gave several public
lectures and taught a fascinating seminar on anthropol-
ogy's role in environmental and development issues in the
tropics. Her perspective on her time at UF appears on
page six of this newsletter.
Two professors are retiring this year, Dr. Jerry Mur-
ray and Dr. John Moore. We will miss their insights, their
teaching, and their contributions, but as emeritus faculty,
we know that they will be around for counsel and help
in the coming years. At the same time, we had two very
successful searches for new faculty this year. Dr. Sharon
Abramowitz, a medical anthropologist who works in
Africa will be here after she finishes her post-doc at Johns
Hopkins next year, and Dr. Richard Kernaghan, a special-
ist in legal anthropology, violence and terrorism, and war
who has done extensive work in Peru will join us this fall.
Welcome to both of these new faculty members!
I hope you enjoy this edition of the Newsletter. Be
sure to contact us whenever you would like, and come by
and visit the department this year. We're waiting to wel-
come you!
Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010









We Welcome Two New Faculty Members:

Drs. Sharon Abramowitz & Richard Kernaghan


Sharon Abramowitz
looks forward to coming to UF

Thank you all kindly for your warm wishes and welcomes to the
University of Florida Department of Anthropology and the UF
Center for African Studies. I look forward to joining your remarkable
collaborative four-field faculty in 2011, and as a medical anthropolo-
gist and an Africanist, I am eager to bring to the department my
expertise and field experience in mental health, humanitarian inter-
vention, violence, and post-war reconstruction in West Africa (spe-
cifically Liberia, Guinea, and Cote d'Ivoire). I write to you at pres-
ent from a post-doctoral teaching position at Harvard University's
Departments of Anthropology and Women and Gender Studies.
As a new member of the UF faculty, I bring a strong political
commitment to health and human rights, support for mixed methods
research, an orientation to critical ethnographic praxis, and deep and
abiding love of anthropological history and theory. My background
is in social work, gender-based violence advocacy, and international
development, and I have teaching experience in these areas, as well as
experience in West Africa working in relief and development projects
related to health, gender, and development issues. I look forward to
teaching classes in these areas and in the new graduate program in
Development Practice. I will also be bringing to Gainesville my hus-
band Greig Arendt (a happy devotee of professional worlds beyond
academia), and our extremely cute, toddling daughter Leah.
In the coming year, I will be away from Gainesville in an NIMH-
sponsored postdoctoral fellowship in Psychiatric Epidemiology at
Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. My
previous research at Harvard, funded by the National Science Foun-
dation, explored mental health, state-building, and humanitarian
intervention in Liberia's post-conflict reconstruction. New projects
on the horizon include an ethnohistory of gender violence and a
study of humanitarian interventions in gender-based violence in Libe-
ria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, researches into sub-
stance abuse and post-conflict recovery, ethnographically informed
epidemiologies of mental illness, and a continued examination of
government health sectors in resource-poor settings.
Although I am far away in Baltimore, UF is very much on my
mind this year. I look forward to meeting UF graduate students and
faculty colleagues at the AAA meeting in New Orleans in November,
and working collaboratively with the faculty on new research and
teaching initiatives in the months and year to come. I am delighted
and honored to join the UF faculty, and I eagerly anticipate joining
you in Gainesville soon. I wish you all happy and easy travel this sum-
mer.
-Sharon Abramowitz


Richard Kernaghan
is ready to join us

Hello, I am Richard Kernaghan. As the newest member of the
UF anthropology faculty, it is a pleasure to have this opportu-
nity to express how thrilled I am to join the department. I thought
I might take this occasion to share with you a few words about my
thematic areas of study and teaching.
Though primarily a political and legal anthropologist I have a
deep appreciation and love for storytelling and find myself continu-
ally captivated by the question of how narratives link up with actual
events. In this, I take inspiration from philosophies of history and
language, which I also draw upon to reflect on how law and violence
can become inextricably bound. This path has led me increasingly to
issues of legal spaces and terrains and to the kinds of itineraries they
make possible.
In broad terms my research has explored the everyday experience
of law at the margins of the nation-state. What interests me specifi-
cally are the lived histories of places and times where armed conflict
and illegal economies converge. How are such time-spaces perceived?
What are the politics that shape the ways they come to be repre-
sented? And furthermore, what challenges do those perceptions and
representational politics create for ethnographic modes of inquiry?
While I have an enduring fascination with the histories and cul-
tural worlds of Latin America, Peru is where I have posed these ques-
tions directly by looking at the intersection of (counter)insurgency
and the illicit cocaine trade in a region just east of the central Andes
known as the Upper Huallaga Valley. Currently I am working on my
second manuscript about this frontier zone, which is an ethnographic
history of the encounter between a twenty-year cocaine boom and
the Maoist Shining Path. This project takes the anthropological study
of law in a decidedly topographical direction. I explore, on the one
hand, the social processes by which landscapes at the margins of the
state become converted (and sometimes re-converted) into legal ter-
ritories and, on the other, how those same land-inscribing practices
have influenced the circulation of (il)licit persons and things. Dual
emphasis on territoriality and circulation in turn provides a frame
for me to reconsider the regional impact of frontier roads as well as
the relation of their construction to rivers-an interest I intend to
carry forward in a separate project on contraband networks along the
northern Peruvian border with Colombia and Brazil.
It is exciting and an honor to become a part of the Department
of Anthropology and the broader anthropology community of the
University of Florida. The rich possibilities I see for conversations
and collaborations across the discipline's sub-fields are truly amazing.
As a researcher, educator and colleague I very much look forward to
contributing in every way I can to the tradition and legacy of this fine
program.
-Richard Kernaghan


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 3










Field School Updates: Archaeological Field

Schools Provide Undergraduate Training

For the last several years, James Davidson and Ken Sassaman have each offered a 6-week
summer archaeological field school. These programs are extremely popular with our
undergraduates and provide many of them with their first field experience.


Kingsley Plantation
Archaeological Field School
Kingsley Plantation, on Fort George Island, Florida, is
the birthplace of Plantation Archaeology, in as much
as in 1968 it was the first site where archaeology was
directed specifically at answering questions related to
slave life. In 2006 James Davidson taught an archaeo-
logical field school there, the first step of a multi-year
reassessment of plantation archaeology. Several uncov-
ered features suggest African spiritual belief, most nota-
bly a chicken burial in the floor of a slave cabin, a form
of animal sacrifice reminiscent of West African cultures.
The opportunity to link elements of African-American
spirituality with their African analogues and precursors
is an exciting prospect, and one that has been actively
pursued. Davidson is now conducting the fifth year
of summer excavations at the Kingsley Plantation site.
Cumulatively they have excavated the interior spaces
of four slave cabins, most dating to between 1814 and
1839 and occupied by African-born men and women.
Arguably as important as ongoing or active excava-
tions is the reassessment of the Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History's archaeological collections from Kingsley.
All of the artifacts collected by Dr. Charles Fairbanks
in his pioneering excavations of Kingsley Plantation in
1968, as well as at other plantation sites in Florida and
Georgia, are curated there, none of which have been
examined since the preliminary reports were written in
the early 1970s. A reappraisal of these collections from
the sites that help begin the field of African-American
Archaeology would be of great value, especially in light
of recent theories and paradigm shifts beyond the sim-
plistic pattern recognition studies of the 1970s. David-
son and his students are making significant progress on
the reanalysis of these materials in new theoretical light.
This past January Davidson along with graduate
students Karen McIlvoy and Rebecca Douberly Gor-
man hosted two tours at the Kingsley site for attendees
of the 2010 Society for Historical Archaeology Meet-
ings that took place on Amelia Island. Despite record
low temperatures and a bitter wind, over 150 people
visited the site.


St. Johns Archaeological Field School
The St. Johns Archaeological Field School, under the direction of Ken Sassaman,
launches its fourth season of fieldwork in 2010 at sites along Silver Glen Run in
northeast Florida. Like many other places along the St. Johns River, Silver Glen Run
was a locus of sustained human occupation starting 6000 years ago, when the inedi-
ble remains of freshwater shellfish began to accumulate at places of dwelling and rit-
ual. In the 1870s, Harvard's Jeffries Wyman described the shell mound at the mouth
of the Run as the largest in the region: a 300-meter-long, U-shaped deposit some 8
meters tall. Unfortunately, shell from this mound was mined in the 1920s, although
other sites in the area-including several smaller shell middens and campsites-
escaped destruction. Field school efforts are thus divided between investigating the
less conspicuous aspects of life along Silver Glen Run, as well as documenting what
remains from mounds long since destroyed.
Field school provides technical training for aspiring young archaeologists, but
they are structured by the research questions of participating professionals and
graduate students. UF Ph.D. Asa Randall wrote his dissertation on the origins of
Archaic monuments from the results of field school. Following in his footsteps are
Zack Gilmore, who is investigating the social circumstances leading to the construc-
tion of the mound Wyman observed, and Jason O'Donoughue, who is delving into
the ecology and archaeology of Florida's springs. Two other UF Ph.D. students,
Meggan Blessing and Paulette McFadden, add expertise in zooarchaeology and
geoarchaeology to ensure that undergraduate participants are exposed to a variety of
research questions and methods.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 4










A Cultural Festival in the

Senegal River Valley:

Reinventing Local Traditions

for Returning Migrants

by Abdoulaye Kane

The organization of cultural festivals in the villages of the Senegal River Valley has
become a major priority of Haalpulaar hometown associations based in Europe
and the United States. This is an apparently surprising turn for associations that have
traditionally occupied themselves with development initiatives aimed at bringing con-
crete improvements of living conditions experienced in the Haalpulaar immigrants'
home villages. Yet conversations I had with leaders of such associations in France and the
United States indicate their conviction that cultural festivals can in fact play an integral
role in strategies aimed at development of their home villages. In 2008, with the help
of the Humanities Enhancement Grant, I participated in one such cultural festival,
conducted in the village of Thilogne, Senegal. In the process, I acquired an interesting
perspective on the nature of the stakes, players, discourses, cultural performances, and
artisanal exhibitions that bring these events to life as development initiatives.


It is striking to observe that the cultural
practices being performed during the fes-
tivals tend to be of little relevance to con-
temporary village life. Rather, they consti-
tute a recreation of particular traditions,
customs, and performances that their cre-
ators perceive will be admired by returning
migrants, visiting urbanites and tourists as
an exotic reflection of a lost cultural past.
One fascinating example of such reinven-
tion of tradition is the cultural practice of
Thiayde, a carefully choreographed event
whereby processions of young women
engage in ritual competition for husbands.
Accordingto one informant, Aminata, aged
54, and a resident of Thilogne, Thiayde
competitions were held between groups
of women from neighborhoods between
which there existed friendly rivalries. Such
friendly inter-neighborhood rivalries were
sustained by the frequency with which
men from each of the neighborhoods took
wives from the other.
The men of the Diabe Salla neighbor-
hood, for example, often take wives from
among the women of the Ndioufnaabe
neighborhood, and vice versa. The Thiayde
were peaceful, yet lively, confrontations
between young women on both sides, each
with the objective of getting their own men

Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


to marry within their own neighborhoods,
while luring as many men as possible from
other neighborhoods to marrythere as well.
The women of each neighborhood spend
countless hours preparing, crafting praise
songs they use to promote themselves, and
lyrical diatribes used to target women of
the opposite camp. Thiayde were often
organized around the Taske, a Muslim feast
celebrating Abraham's sacrifice. To begin
the Thiayde competition during Taske, the
groups of women would leave their neigh-
borhoods around 5:00 pm and walk slowly
toward the center of the village, each with
a lead vocal carefully selected for her excel-
lent voice. While walking, they begin sing-
ing their praise songs, following with the
lyrical diatribes upon their encounter with
their rival groups. The rival groups meet
at around 7:00 pm at the center of the vil-
lage, surrounded by spectators who listen
carefully to the raucous proceedings. The
Thiayde conclude with each side inevitably
claiming victory, as their members disperse
and straggle back to their respective neigh-
borhoods.
"The Thiayde is not practiced any-
more by the younger generation:' lamented
Aminata, who is charged with organizing
the Thiayde during the cultural festival.


"For our generation and those preceding it, participation
in the Thiayde was a rite of passage for young women who
had yet to be married. We would spend all year creating
songs, and throughout the months leading up to Taske,
carefully consider the types of clothes and jewelry we
planned to wear for the competition:' she added. Now,
to Aminata's dismay, women of the younger generation
put on their finest clothes and jewelry to watch their men
compete on the soccer field. For these women Thiayde is a
relic reserved for the cultural festivals that take place every
two years. In their new incarnation as part of a reinvented
tradition, Thiayde songs have been adapted to the new
circumstances, often in the form of praise songs honoring
successful migrants, the hometown associations, and the
village as a whole.


page 5









Happy Trails to Jerry &John Elizabeth Eddy Endowment:

Drs. Gerald F. Murray and Dr. John Visiting Professorship,
H. Moore are retiring this term. We
wish them the best in their new the Elizabeth Eddy Endowment recognizes the career of applied
and continued pursuits. anthropologist Elizabeth Marie "Liz" Eddy. Established by Profes-
and continued pursu sor Eddy's estate, the endowment provides funding for a visiting profes-


Dr. Jerry F. Murray came to UF in I
1985. As a specialist in applied anthropology,
Jerry has done applied contract assignments
in 15 countries for 27 public and private
agencies. A major part ofJerry's career con-
cerned the anthropology of agroforestry
systems and reforestation efforts in Haiti.
The earthquake there brought his work to
the forefront of understanding the complex-
ity of vulnerability and survival in Haiti. Jerry
also wrote several insightful and innovative ethnographies about the
Dominican Republic including issues of urban microenterprise, and
changes in the educational system of the Dominican Republic. Jerry
also worked extensively in the Middle East, including research on the
Jewish Diaspora. Jerry is a teacher who challenged, enlightened, and
inspired students in all of his classes, from the Anthropology of Reli-
gion and Language and Culture to graduate seminars on the Caribbean.
Several ofJerry's students are carrying on his legacy of work on His-
paniola and in other areas. As our lead article indicates, Jerry has been
involved with the consequences of and response to the Haitian earth-
quake. He will continue to work on this topic as he enters a new phase
of life. We look forward to seeing Jerry in the next years of his career.

Dr. John H. Moorecameto UFas
Chair of the Department in 1993 after having
served previously as Chair at the University of
Oklahoma. John took advantage of the chang-
ing university and helped the department to
grow in stature. We were recognized as one of
the top departments, including both private
and public universities in the U.S. John's insis-
tence that the department should be diverse,
scholarly, and dedicated to teaching is a legacy
that remains with us today. John's research is among the broadest in the
department including demography, race and racism, kinship, Marxism,
and Native Americans. His consulting work and research in Native
American communities brought the department back to one of the
roots of anthropology in North America. John's long-standing interest
in the intersection of biological and cultural aspects of race culminated
in the publication of the 2007 Macmillan Encyclopedia of Race and
Racism for which he served as Editor-in-Chief. He has trained numer-
ous graduate students, including mentoring several Native American
doctoral students. His op-ed pieces in the Gainesville Sun and other
venues brought anthropology to public discourse. John has been a
friend and mentor to many of us. We will miss the annual tipi construc-
tion on the UF campus!


sorship for an applied anthropologist to spend a semester at UF teach-
ing a course and interacting with applied anthropology students. The
Eddy endowment supporting applied anthropology was inaugurated
in the Spring semester with the appointment of Dr. Mary Allegretti as
visiting professor in the Department of Anthropology. The endowment
also supported three graduate students in completing their dissertations
and one research assistantship.

Eddy Visiting Professorship:
This Spring in Gainesville
by Mary Allegretti
For the second time in five years I had the opportunity to teach a course
at the University of Florida. The first was in fall 2005 and the second in
spring, this year.
In the Fall 2005 semester I came to UF as a "Bacardi Eminent
Scholar" invited by the Center for Latin American Studies. In 2010 I
was invited by the Department of Anthropology to be the first recipient
of the "Elizabeth Eddy Professorship of Applied Anthropology."
With this experience at UF, I've completed five interesting experi-
ences as an itinerant visiting professor at North-American universities.
During Fall 2004 I received the McCluskey Fellowship at the School
of Forestry and Environmental Studies (Yale University); from March
to July 2005, I was the Tinker Visiting Professor at the Department of
Anthropology (University of Chicago); from January to May 2007, I
was again a Tinker Visiting Professor at the Nelson Institute for Envi-
ronmental Studies (University ofWisconsin-Madison).
The course I teach is always the same: Social Movements and
Public Policies: The Experience of the Rubber Tappers in the Amazon
Region. The difference among the courses is the result of the interaction
and the interests of the students. The difference between one course and
the other is determined by the interaction that occurs with the students,
i. e. by the confluence of interests around the theoretical debate and the
exchange of practical experiences.
The course is based on my professional experience working as an
anthropologist with social movements in the Brazilian Amazon and in
different capacities: as a researcher, as an activist, as a policy maker in
governmental institutions at local and federal levels, and today as an inde-
pendent consultant. I tell students about the incredible change created
by social movements in the Amazon in the last two decades based on a
model that combines clear proposals in defense of the forest, strategic
alliances at national and international levels, and political capacity to
articulate ideas that have local and global relevance. It is one of the most
successful movements in the world, responsible for the protection of
more than 5% of the Amazonia for local communities.
The message of my courses is clear: as an anthropologist I concen-
trate my hopes for a better world through a transformation made by
the hands of the poor, the exploited, and the workers of the world. As a
student I dreamed and fought for an opportunity to study and research
those groups that were marginalized. And I fought for justice. I had the


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 6











Fellowships, & Assistantship


opportunity not only to do my research with a social group involved in
deep social change, but also to collaborate with them based on the knowl-
edge I accumulated about their reality. So, I realized that there is a strategic
role played by us social scientists when we decide to do something that
goes beyond Academia and accomplishes something that is based on what
we do as social scientists.
This debate is particularly interesting at UF for two main reasons: the
tradition of research in social and environmental topics in Latin America,
and especially in the Amazon Region, and the identity of the students.
Because of this combination it's possible to teach students that not only
know your work and like to be in your class, but also bring to the class real
questions that they are facing in their fieldwork in different countries.
The Spring semester in Gainesville was one of the best that I have
had since I started this itinerancy, for different reasons: the warm recep-
tion made by my colleagues at the Department of Anthropology and the
feeling of being at home (I was professor of the Department of Anthropol-
ogy at the Federal University of Parani, in the south of Brazil for more
than 10 years); the mix of cultures, traditions and interests of the students
(4 North Americans, 4 Brazilians, one Peruvian, one Belizean, and one
French); the topics of their research (medical anthropology, extractive
reserves, and social movements in different countries from Latin America
and Africa); and a smart and participative teacher assistant (Jennifer Hale-
Gallardo) who helped me offer a good course.
For all of these reasons, I'm sad that my time in Gainesville has
ended. Maybe I will come again sometime in the future.



Eddy Fellowships and Assistantship
Ava Lasseter (Tony Oliver-Smith, Chair) used an Eddy Fellowship to
work on completing her dissertation examining how a group of small-
scale fishermen in the Yucatan, Mexico adapt to resource scarcity. Using
strategies observed during 13 months of fieldwork, she develops a model
of adaptation to marine resource scarcity centered on strategies of inten-
sification and diversification with which to analyze against a model of
adaptation. She then explores how social relationships within the fishing
cooperative relate to the adaptive behavior of individual fishermen within
the community. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the develop-
ment of a model of adaptation to marine resource scarcity that can be used
comparatively in other settings and argues that a better understanding of
human responses to scarcity through the development of such a model will
contribute to more successful resource management.

Amy Non (Connie Mulligan, Chair) is using an Eddy Fellowship to com-
plete the final analyses and writing of her dissertation, entitled, "Analyses
of genetic data within an interdisciplinary framework to investigate
recent human evolutionary history and complex disease. This disserta-
tion research draws on diverse interdisciplinary data with two aims: 1) to
explore both evolutionary history in Eastern Africa and Yemen, and 2) to
investigate health disparities in the complex disease ofhypertension. The
two evolutionary history projects specifically integrate genetic, historical,
linguistic, and geographic data to explore evolutionary history in both
small regional ethnic populations (Ethiopian and Yemenite Jewish groups)
and across wider geographic space in Yemen. The two health disparities


projects integrate genetic and sociocultural data to examine contributors
to racial disparities in health in a Puerto Rican population, as well as in
the African American participants of the Familial Blood Pressure Program
(FBBP).

Sarah Cervone (Anita Spring and Tony Oliver-Smith, co-Chairs) is using
an Eddy Fellowship to complete her dissertation Beneath the Peak: Moun-
tain Tourism and the Global Economy in a Moroccan Village. Sarah com-
pleted seventeen months of research in the Amazighe (Berber) village of
Aremd in the High Atlas Mountains during 2007-2008. The Kingdom of
Morocco, under the auspice of the World Bank and the United Nations,
has implemented a series of tourism development policies in remote areas
like Aremd with the expectation that increased cash and capital will alle-
viate poverty and reduce pressure on natural resources. Sarah's research
illuminates how the global tourism economy articulates with pre-existing
socio-economic arrangements in Aremd. These findings will demonstrate
that tourism development has done more than simply increase cash and
capital in the village; it has exacerbated pre-existing social hierarchies and
introduced a new system of inequality based on money-wealth. As a result,
the benefits and consequences of tourism development were distributed
unequally among residents. Uneven tourism development has not only
restructured the community, it has reformulated fundamental aspects of
the way of life in Aremd.

Jennifer Hale-Gallardo was awarded the 2010 Elizabeth Eddy Applied
Anthropology Research Assistantship. Jennifer was responsible for assist-
ing Dr. Mary Allegretti with her research and teaching on the topic of
anthropology and development during the past spring semester.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 7











Faculty Research

Faculty Members & Affiliates Conduct Diverse Research Across the Globe


Mamitas in Peru...
Florence E. Babb has finished a book on the refashioning
of nations for tourism that had her traveling to Peru, Nica-
ragua, Mexico, and Cuba. Now she's heading back to Peru
to start a new project, a reexamination of the notion that
Andean women are "more Indian" than their male coun-
terparts. With changes due to indigenous mobilization,
urbanization, and tourism development, she's finding that
there is newly minted cultural capital in being indigenous
and female, though gender inequalities do persist. She'll
have the assistance of UF anthropology graduate students
Joe Feldman and Jamie Lee Marks in Peru this summer.

Bring back some textiles for Potlatch...
Willie Baber, member of the Board of the Neo Synthesis
Research Center (NSRC), will attend a Board meeting in
Sri Lanka and a landcare workshop sponsored by NSRC
in June. NSRC, an environmental NGO initiated in 1980,
is transitioning to a renewed mission focusing on "Land-
care Sri Lanka:' an international movement that will help
secure funding of the Center's activities and programs.

Originally escaping hurricanes, now oil inunda-
tion, our affiliates from Tulane University...
Harvey and Victoria Bricker, who will be returning to
Gainesville for the summer, anticipate spending the sum-
mer months checking installments of edited copy for their
co-authored book on astronomy in the Maya codices.
Now that the research for that project is finished, each of
them has returned to ongoing research in other fields. As
a necessary foundation for her planned book on the his-


tory of grammatical features in Yucatecan
Maya, Victoria is transforming the 16th-
century Motul Dictionary into a root-and-
stem dictionary. Other grammatical infor-
mation will come from ca. 1000 Maya-
language documents (wills, land titles, bills
of sale, letters, and formal complaints) that
are provenienced in space and time. Har-
vey is preparing materials on the French
Palaeolithic site ofLes Tambourets for the
on-line publication of an attribute analysis
of the lithic industry combined with a
database of the artifact catalogue, artifact
illustrations, excavation photographs, and
all previous published and unpublished
reports. The on-line format will permit
completing the publication of the site in
ways that were not possible when he fin-
ished his excavations in the 1980s.

Get out of jail free
cards don't really work...
Joel Cohen and collaborators are carrying
out research to examine the impact of debt
consolidation loan marketing on consum-
ers' finances. These loans keep the wolf
from the door (and reduce creditor harass-
ment) in the short run, but often serve to
put people in even worse financial shape
over time. In several studies they dem-
onstrate potential harmful consequences
of such loans, and then they attempt to
"undo" these consequences via warning
messages and financial literacy interven-
tions. Previously, research demonstrated
that products sold as remedies are treated
psychologically as if they were "get out of
jail free cards." Such remedies can have the
ironic effect of leading people to take more
rather than less risk (because the remedy is
available to save the day).

Do you have a license
for your monkey?
Dave Daegling heads an NSF-funded
project that explores the relationship of
skull anatomy to feeding behavior among
seven species of monkeys from the Ivory
Coast's Tai Forest-the largest remaining


page 8


patch of undisturbed rainforest in West
Africa. In collaboration with colleagues
from Ohio State University and Union
College (NY), Daegling is engaged in
a multi-scale analysis of bone structure
in these monkeys to determine the ways
in which the primates have adapted to a
variety of demanding diets. One of the
initial findings of this project is that some
monkeys appear to soften some of the
bone in the jaw in places where there is
a danger of fracturing, and redirecting
chewing stresses to regions where fracture
is less likely and the bone can safely stiffen.
The latest finding from the field is that the
sooty mangabeys regularly consume nuts
that are among the hardest foods eaten by
primates anywhere in the world, and even
the larger local chimpanzees won't eat the
nuts unless they've broken the shells first
with hammerstones. Ongoing work in
Daegling's lab is exploring how the bone of
mangabey jaws has adapted to this extreme
stress environment.

Animals didn't seem
to mind the drought...
Kitty Emery along with graduate student
Erin Thornton continued research on
zooarchaeological and isotopic signatures
of Maya animal remains corroborated
paleoclimatic models for the Maya region
but revealed variable local impact linked
to site-specific environmental conditions.
This study also suggests that most Maya
landscapes and animals were not severely
impacted even during peak drought peri-
ods. Elsewhere in the Maya region com-
bined environmental and archaeological
studies in the Classic Maya polity of Motul
de San Jos6 highlight complex economic
and political relationships. The rulers were
supplied with stone tools, meat, and agri-
cultural products by lower-ranked farmer/
hunters from outlying settlements, but
they also crafted woven, brocaded, and
shell-decorated, textiles. Elite non-nobles
produced narrative polychrome ceramics
for exchange and crafted fine marine-shell

Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010







adornments for the ruling family. Lower-
status residents and the middle-class and
elite non-nobles probably also participated
in a market exchange system that included
an inland exchange port and community
market places in the two largest settle-
ments.

Where can you get a good feijoada?
Maxine Margolis, Professor Emerita, is
hard at work on a book, Bye Bye Brazil:
Emigres from the Land of Soccer & Samba,
about the Brazilian diaspora worldwide.

That's Mayapan not marzipan...
Susan Milbrath reports that in her role
as Curator of Latin American Art and
Archaeology at the Florida Museum
of Natural History, she negotiated the
permanent transfer of a major collection
from the Maya site of Cerros in Belize
this year. Anthropology graduate students
here at UF are already working on this
large, well-documented collection, exca-
vated by David Freidel in the 1970s. Her
research on Mayapan, the last Maya capital
in Mexico, continues with a number of
co-authored publications out recently
with Carlos Peraza, the director of the
INAH project. She also completed a book
manuscript, entitled Heavenly History:
I .. .. Ancient Mexican Astronomy in
the Codex Borgia. This comprehensive
study of astronomical images in the codex
reveals a pattern of seasonal imagery that
can be directly linked with Aztec festival
calendars.

Collaborative projects
in medical anthropology..
Connie Mulligan and Lance Gravlee are
continuing their work on health disparities
and genetic and sociocultural risk factors
for hypertension. Their work has also been
publicized through major news media
across the country as well as major anthro-
pological and biological journals. This
research is integrated into the teaching
mission of the department.

Our colleague at the Law School...
Winston Nagan is a member of the Com-
mittee on Peace and Development of the
World Academy of Art and Science. The
committee works on the issues of disarma-
ment and, in particular, its connection to
nuclear weapons policy. Winston has writ-

Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


ten a piece on the question of the ratifica-
tion of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test
Ban Treaty, as well as a presentation on the
approach to nuclear weapons disarmament
of the Obama administration. Winston
has also been working on the question of
whether it is possible to make the case for
the human right to full employment. This
is a part of the World Academy's investiga-
tion into the issue of employment and pov-
erty. Winston also continues to do work
on indigenous human rights issues relating
to the Shuar of Ecuador. These issues
include environmental and climate change
concerns as well as issues of land titles and
the protection of traditional knowledge.

High elevation
pastoralists suffer in Peru...
Tony Oliver-Smith, Professor Emeritus,
spent time in Espinar, Peru, high in the
Department of Cusco as a consultant
for Oxfam examining the impacts of cli-
mate change on alpaca herders. Espinar
is a highland province mostly between
4000-5000 meters above sea level. People
and their herds have been experiencing
problems with unpredictable climate varia-
tion consisting of intense nighttime cold
and searing daytime heat. The cold makes
the alpacas abort and the young get sick
and die, reducing the herds, which are the
only source of income for the high altitude
pastoralists. And the heat is drying up
the pasturage so the alpaca, sheep and the
few cattle have less to eat. Unpredictable
climate is making their precarious high-
elevation lives even tougher.

Too bad Ripley is not alive-
not Bullen, but Robert...
Professor Emerita Barbara Purdy for quite
some time has been obsessed with the
desire to re-excavate the Old Vero Site,
8IR9, Indian River County, Florida, first
investigated from 1913-1916. The site
remains controversial after almost 100
years because of the questionable contem-
poraneity of human and extinct Late Pleis-
tocene bones. Vero is still the only site in
the Americas where such associations have
been reported. Since March 2009, Purdy
has been researching a fragmented fossil
bone from Vero Beach containing a small,
but unmistakable, image of a mammoth
engraved on the surface. Having assumed


that the bone and carving were probably a fake, Purdy had
the object tested by paleontologists, forensic specialists,
and materials science engineers. Thus far, these tests have
verified that it is genuine and, based on rare earth element
analysis, originated at or near the Old Vero Site. Further
testing is planned. Using 21st-century technology and an
interdisciplinary team of scientists, Purdy hopes to solve
the mystery of Vero within the next year or so.

Getting Cozy with Ticks,
Mosquitoes, and Water Moccasins...
Ken Sassaman, Hyatt and Cici Brown Professor of Florida
Archaeology, launched a new research program in 2009 on
the northern Gulf Coast of Florida. The Lower Suwannee
Archaeological Survey is a partnership with US. Fish and
Wildlife to investigate coastal sites being destroyed by tidal
erosion, as well as sites on hammocks and relict dunes that
are currently above the high-water mark. Ph.D. students
Paulette McFadden, Micah Mones, and Elyse Anderson
are developing their own research projects in the context
of this long-term study, which is centered on the relation-
ship between environmental and cultural dimensions of
sea-level change. The team has already discovered two
75-m diameter "shell rings" dating to ca. 2000 years ago,
the presumed remains of circular villages of the Deptford
era. In other news, Ken's longstanding interest in Archaic
societies of the American Southeast culminated this year
in the publication of The Eastern Archaic, Historicized
(Altamira, 2010), a synthesis of 8000 years of Amerindian
experience in historiographic perspective.

Woman of many passport stamps...
Anita Spring, Professor Emerita, studied small and
medium entrepreneurs and businesses in the formal sector
in Mozambique during summer 2009. She also studied
Chinese economic actors in Mozambique who owned
businesses from large (telecommunications and construc-
tion) to small (restaurants), as well as workers in the service
sector. She presented papers at the International Academy
ofAfrican Business and Development (IAABD) meet-
ings in Uganda and did invited presentations at Indiana,
Yale, Kansas, and James Madison Universities, as well as at
the United Nations. She serves as Executive Secretary of
IAABD and President of Culture and Agriculture.

If you build it, they will come...
Mark Thurner completed a book on the history of Peruvi-
an historiography and anthropology, and from doing that
was inspired to begin a project on museums. His current
research traces the colonial and national genesis of muse-
ums of anthropology and history in the Hispanic world
(Peru, Mexico, Spain, and Argentina). This summer Mark
will be teaching an in situ course on the history of such
museums in Paris, after which he will be expanding his
study to Madrid, Mexico City, Lima, and Buenos Aires.


page 9











Faculty Achievements & Honors


Two Faculty Members
Elected to National Academies
H. Russell Bernard, Professor Emeritus of anthropology, was
elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Russ is among
72 new members and 18 foreign associates from 14 countries
chosen in recognition of their distinguished and continuing
achievements in original research. Russ's election to the acad-
emy recognizes his influence not only on the field of anthro
pology, but also sociology, political science, public health, and
epidemiology.
Russ served as chair of the department from 1979 to
1990. During his time with the department, he was a guest or
visiting professor at the University of Cologne in Germany, University of Michigan, Uni-
versity of Kent in Canterbury, and the National Museum of Ethnology in Osaka, Japan.
Before coming to UF, Russ was a professor at the University of Illinois, Washington State
University, and West Virginia University.
Russ has held the editorship of the American Anthropologist and the journal of the
Society for Applied Anthropology, Human Organization. He was a founder of Cultural
Anthropology Methods Journal, which became the journal Field Methods. His methods
text, "Research Methods in Anthropology" has gone through three editions, and his gen-
eral research methods text "Social Research Methods:' has been used by tens of thousands
of students.
Russ's research is a blend of the sciences and humanities. His contributions to net-
work analysis, especially his "N-SUM project" which provides network and statistical
ways of "counting the uncountable" events such as victims of earthquakes, stigmatized
diseases such as HIV in countries around the world, wars, and social conditions such as
homelessness, have been used by the World Health Organization and other organizations
to solve humanitarian crises.
Russ has been a mentor to countless graduate students, who honored him through
the Dissertation Mentor Award. And Russ and his wife, Carole, have been mainstays of
the department, making the department a welcoming place for students and faculty alike.
The National Academy of Sciences, established in 1863, is a private organization of
sciences and engineers dedicated to the furtherance of science and its use for the general
welfare. Russ joins 11 other UF faculty as members of the academy including two anthro-
pologists, Elizabeth Wing (Florida Museum of Natural History, Curator Emerita) and
Michael Moseley.

Jerald T. Milanich, Curator Emeritus of anthropology at the Florida Museum of Natural
History, has been named a fellow in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Jerry is
among 229 new fellows who join one of the nation's most prestigious honorary societies
and a center for independent policy research. The scholars,
scientists, jurists, writers, artists, civic, corporate and phil-
anthropic leaders represent universities, museums, national
laboratories, private research institutes, businesses and foun-
dations.
Jerry received his bachelor's, master's, and doctorate
in anthropology at the University of Florida. He formerly
served as chair of the anthropology department at the Florida
Museum of Natural History. Jerry is the author or editor
of fourteen books and monographs and over 100 scientific
publications. As a contributing editor ar I. ..- magazine Jerry brings archaeological
research to the public. In 2005, Jerry was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from
the Florida Archaeological Council. He is a previous recipient of grants and scholarships
from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities,
and others. Jerry was the mentor of numerous master's and doctoral students.
Jerry's areas of research interest include the archaeology ofpre-Columbian peoples
in the southeastern United States, the De Soto entrada, and the impact of Spanish coloni-
zation on the Native Americans. Recent research has focused on the use of journalism as


historical record during the last three decades of the 19th
century (in Florida and the American West) and on the
Seminole Indians of Florida in the early 20th century.
Since its founding by John Adams, John Hancock,
and other scholar-patriots, the Academy has elected lead-
ing "thinkers and doers" from each generation, including
George Washington and Benjamin Franklin in the 18th
century, Daniel Webster and Ralph Waldo Emerson in the
19th, and Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill in the
20th. The current membership includes more than 250
Nobel laureates and more than 60 Pulitzer Prize winners.
Jerry joins his wife Maxine Margolis, Professor Emerita,
who was inducted into the AAAS in 2009. Maxine and
Jerry are one of the rare married couples who are both Fel-
lows of the AAAS.

Honorary Degrees
Dr. Lourdes Arzipe (Pro-
fessor-researcher at Centro
Regional de Investigaciones
Multidisciplinarias, National
University of Mexico) anthro-
pologist, policy maker, and
international social scientist,
was awarded an honorary doc-
torate by UF at spring semester
graduation. Dr. Arizpe's work
with UNESCO, the Mexican Government, and migration
has made her one of the most important anthropologists
of the century. Her collaborations with Helen Safa, Car-
men Diana-Deere, Anita Spring, Marianne Schmink,
and Florence Babb were highlighted at a luncheon on the
Friday before the commencement ceremony. The Depart-
ment of Anthropology and the Center for Latin American
Studies helped to sponsor this honorary degree.

Grant Getters
Peter Collings received a Program Initiation Fund grant
from the UF Water Institute to study water manage-
ment in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF)
watershed spanning Georgia, Alabama, and Florida.
Colings and Ph.D. candidate Becky Blanchard were part
of a multidisciplinary team-which included faculty and
graduate students from engineering, ecology, and political
science-that developed a research plan for analyzing the
seemingly intractable 30-year "tri-state water war" in the
ACF basin.

Susan deFrance received grants from the National Geo-
graphic Society and the CLAS Humanities Scholarship
fund to conduct archaeological research in coastal south-
em Peru on Inca economic specialization.

Lance Gravlee received a Leon County Health Depart-
ment grant: Community and Household Food Environ-
ments.

Lance Gravlee and Connie Mulligan were awarded an
NIH Clinical and Translational Science Institute grant:
Pilot Investigation of The Role of Epigenetic Methylation
in Mediating risk of Hypertension in a Study Population
of African Americans in Tallahassee.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 10








Guest Lectures
Enlighten Campus
In October, Dr. Charles R. Cobb presented the
Inaugural Brown Lecture in Archaeology, spon-
sored by the Hyatt and Cici Brown Endowment
for Florida Archaeology and the Department of
Anthropology. Dr. Cobb is Director of South Caro-
lina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology,
and Professor of Anthropology, University of South
C n..li.i FT '.. .. Ideals, SexualPolitics, and
Economic Realities on the Carolina Frontier provided
a new perspective on colonialism and the creation of
hybrid societies.

Dr. Anthony Aveni (Russell B. Colgate Profes-
sor of Astronomy and Anthropology, serving
appointments in both Departments of Physics and
Astronomy and Sociology and Anthropology at
Colgate University) presented 7i, i / i. '.,
The Maya Mystery of2012 in January with support
from Department of Anthropology, the Center for
Latin American Studies, and the Florida Museum of
Natural History.

Dr. TianlongJiao (Bishop Museum & University
of Hawaii) presented TowardaNew ...
ofthe Prehistory ofSoutheast China in April with
sponsorship by the Asian Studies Program, Interna-
tional Center, Center for the Humanities, and the
Public Sphere (Rothman Fund), Department of
Anthropology.

Achievements
and Recognition
Brenda Chalfin was selected for a Center for the
Humanities and the Public Sphere at the Univer-
sity of Florida Library Enhancement Grant in the
Humanities during 2010-2011. Brenda proposed to
develop library materials related to urban Africa.

Dave Daegling's grantsmanship caught the eye
of the Dean's office. Dave was named the Colonel
Allan R. and Margaret G. Crow Term Professor for
2010-2011.

Mike Moseley was honored by former students and
colleagues with a volume entitled Andean Archaeol-
ogy: A Tribute to MichaelE. Moseley published by
UCLA's Cotsen Institute ofArchaeology.

Mike Warren was recognized with a National Insti-
tute of Justice Paul Coverdell Award for Improve-
ments to the Forensic Sciences.

Alyson Young was named a 2009-2010 CLAS
Teacher of the Year.

Congratulations to Connie Mulligan who was pro-
moted to full professor and to Lance Gravlee and
C.K. Shih who were awarded tenure and promoted
to associate professor.

Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


Alumni Gifts

Our alumni are continuing to help the
department through their generosity.

Anne Stokes (Ph.D. 1998) President of Southeastern Archaeological Research, Inc. has
pledged to underwrite the Patricia S. Essenpreis Archaeological Field School Scholar-
ship that is awarded each spring to a female undergraduate who will be attending a field
school. Thanks Anne!

Luz Martin del Campo (Ph.D. 2010) has started a fund in the UF Foundation to help
defray the costs of attending professional meetings for those graduate students who are
single parents. Thanks Luz!


In Memoriam

James C. Waggoner, Jr.
Although James C. Waggoner, Jr. (Ph.D. 2009) was born on Staten Island, New York,
he spent most of his life and archaeological career in Georgia. While an undergraduate
at Middle Georgia College (now Georgia College and State University), Jamie received
credit for taking anthropology and
archaeology classes at the University
of Georgia, where he participated in
his first archaeological field school in
1996. After a couple of years doing
Cultural Resource Management
archaeology for Southern Research,
Inc., Jamie enrolled in graduate stud-
ies at Florida State University, where
he earned an M.A. in anthropol-
ogy in 2002. That same year Jamie
matriculated in the Ph.D. program
in Anthropology at the University
of Florida. He graduate with a Ph.D.
in August 2009, a little more than a
month before his body succumbed to
the cancer he fought with great courage since the summer of 2008. In addition to dis-
sertation fieldwork along the Chickasawhatchee and Ichawaynochaway Creeks of south-
western Georgia, Jamie participated in field projects in central Georgia, northeastern
Georgia, Florida, and Mexico. Jamie's passion for and commitment to archaeology will
never be forgotten.
Ken Sassaman

To honor Jamie and his legacy, his family has established an endowment to help support
graduate student research in all subfields of anthropology. We are very grateful to the
Waggoner family.

Marcus Hepburn
Marcus Hepburn passed away in June after suffering an accidental fall. Marcus started
the graduate program in the 70s and then returned about 3 years ago to finish his doc-
torate on the changing adaptations of outer-banks fisherfolk in N.C. He was on track to
complete his dissertation this fall.


page II











Graduate Student Accomplishments and Awards

We saw a record number of graduate students complete their degrees this past year. Nineteen
students obtained their masters degrees while twenty-three students earned their doctorates!


Graduate student NSF and Fulbright Awards
Andrew Tarter (Jerry Murray, Chair) was awarded an NSF Graduate
Research Fellowship. Andrew's dissertation will explore Haitian farmers'
cultural, socioeconomic and/or ecological reasons for retaining parcels of
forested land. Andrew hopes to elucidate key variables that may influence
the success of future tree-planting or reforestation projects in Haiti.

Meredith Marten (Alyson Young, Chair) received a Fulbright-Hays grant
for her research in northern Tanzania. Meredith will work with HIV+
women and infants who are enrolled, and then after 2 years disenrolled,
from a prevention program at a mission hospital to understand how par-
ticipants cope with a loss of program support after disenrollment.

Alison Ketter (Brenda Chalfin, Chair) received a Fulbright IIE and an
NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant to conduct dissertation research on
fairtrade practices and political anthropology in South Africa.

Joost Morsink (Bill Keegan, Chair) is working at the archaeological site
of MC-6, Middle Caicos, Turks & Caicos Islands, investigating the eco-
nomic role of salt and salt control by the Pre-Columbian inhabitants of
this unique site.

Tess Kulstad (Jerry Murray, Chair) was awarded an NSF REG (Research
Experience for Graduates) grant to research the effects of the January 12th
earthquake in Haiti on child fosterage and informal adoptions in Haiti
and the Dominican Republic, particularly the transnational movement of
children along the Haitian-Dominican border.

Alan Schultz (Lance Gravlee, Chair) also received an NSF REG grant
for a project examining social network analysis among Tsimane' Villagers
in Amazonia. Alan was also chosen to participate in a five-week cultural
anthropology field school funded by NSF and coordinated by the Tsi-
mane' Amazonian Panel Study (TAPS).

Tamar Carter (Lance Gravlee and Connie Mulligan, co-Chairs) will use
funding from an NSF REG to research the factors influencing the preva-
lence of hypertension in populations of the African Diaspora. Tamar's
research examines genetic and sociocultural factors that impact stress and
blood pressure.

Fulbright U.S. Student Scholarships were also awarded to JeffHoelle
(Marianne Schmink, Chair) and Timothy Podkul (Chris McCarty,
Chair).


Polly and Paul Doughty Research Awards
support graduate student anthropological research in the area of inter-
national peace, conflict resolution, and/or development, with preference
given to a focus on Latin America. This year's three worthy recipients
will embark on fieldwork. Stephanie Borios (Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo,
Chair) will study women's changing roles and home gardens in the
Peruvian Andes. Tatiana Gumucio (Faye Harrison, Chair) will study the
Yuqui indigenous peoples of lowland Bolivia and how their production of
artisan crafts for the tourist market is a force of incremental social change.
Anqi Liu (Faye Harrison, Chair) will travel to Tibet to examine Llasa's
urban landscape since the 1950s and the cultural political process of
change in the urban setting.


The Department of Anthropology,
through a gift of Drs. Alba Amaya Burns and Allan Burns, offers
awards for summer research in Latin America for projects in medi-
cal anthropology, human rights, and applied anthropology. The
award honors the memory and goals of social justice of Miguel Angel
Amaya, a medical student who perished during the Civil War in El
Salvador. Miguel Angel Amaya was the brother of Professor Alba
Amaya Burns. This year's recipient June Carrington will conduct a
multi-scalar study of the dissemination of health information and
resources within Mexico's healthcare system, specifically in Yucatan.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 12








John M. Goggin Awards
are made to doctoral candidates
specializing in sociocultural and
biological anthropology who
will use the stipend for expenses
related to preparation of the dis-
sertation. This year's recipients
are Khadidja Arfi (Peter Schmidt,
Chair) and Hilary Zarin (Susan
Gillespie, Chair). Khadidja will be
studying Algerian's moments of
memory under colonialism using
oral history and written archives
with field research in Algeria and
France. Hilary will be using Gog-
gin funds to complete her disserta-
tion regarding place making among
historically displaced peasants in
the Brazilian Amazon.


Charles H. Fairbanks Awards
go to doctoral candidates specializing in archaeology
who will use the stipend for expenses related to prep-
aration of the dissertation. This year Geoff DuCh-
emin (Susan deFrance, Chair) will use scholarship
funds to complete his dissertation on community use
of animals at archaeological sites located in southern
Puerto Rico.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


7 AOW
1 ^ 1W

Khadidja Arfil
Li







Hilary Zarin


I


page 13


William R. Maples Awards
are available for anthropology graduate students conducting pre-dissertation or dis-
sertation research in forensic anthropology. 2010 Awardee Nicolette Parr (Mike
Warren, Chair) will be producing a diachronic study of the dentition of Micronesian
Chamorros peoples to understand biological diversity and the colonization of the
Pacific Islands.

The Center for Latin American Studies
provided generous support to several of our graduate students, particularly for mas-
ter's research, through grants and fellowships. Summer Research Grants were award-
ed to Jessica Jean Casler, Lizzy Hare, Angelina Howell, Tess Kulstad, Ann Laffey,
Carmen Laguer-Diaz, Ellen Lofaro, Timothy Mesh, and Jeffrey Vadala. A TCD field
grant was awarded to Stephanie Borios.

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships
went to Lauren Cheek, Nicole D'Errico, Joseph Feldman, Rachel lannelli, Camee
Maddox, Meredith Marten, Caitlin Peterson, Noah Sims, Erik Timmons, and Dawit
Woldu. Congratulations to you all and good luck with learning a new language.

The Hyatt and Cici Brown Endowment
provided two graduate students with funding. Jon Endonino used a Brown Grant-in-
Aid to fund a one-month sabbatical from his day job at SEARCH to finish writing
his dissertation on the Thornhill Lake Mound complex in Volusia County, Florida.
Isaac Shearn is using a Brown Grant-in-Aid to conduct preliminary fieldwork on the
Caribbean nation of Dominica for his dissertation research on social distance and
pottery traditions of the Windward Islands.

UF Dissertation Fellowships and Other Awards
Auzenne Fellowships went to Camille Feanny, Maria Morera, Philip Surles, and
Dawit Woldu. A McGinty/CLAS Dissertation Fellowship went to Noelle Sullivan.
Meredith Marten was awarded a Madelyn M. Lockhart Pre-Dissertation Grant. A
Graduate Student Teaching Award was given to Khadidja Arfi. UF International
Center Outstanding Achievement Awards went to Yang Jiam and Haiyan Xing. A
TCD Practitioner Experience Award as well as a Valene Smith Tourism Award was
given to Tatiana Gumucio. Angelina Howell was awarded a Charles Wagley Research
Fellowship. Aida Miro received a SPICE Fellowship.

Non-UF Awards
A Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship was awarded to Amy
Non. Amy also received an Exemplary Public Health Student of the Year and a How-
ard Hughes Graduate Student Mentoring Award. Ashley Sharpe received a Dienje
Kenyon Memorial Fellowship. An American Institute of Indian Studies Junior Fel-
lowship went to Ben Valentine. Ryan Morini received a Phillips Fund Grant for
Native American Research and a Sven and Astrid Liljeblad Endowment Fund Grant.

Eleanor Roosevelt Global Citizenship Award
Edward Gonzalez-Tennant has become the first winner of the new Eleanor Roosevelt
Global Citizenship Award presented by the Center for a Public Anthropology. The
award recognizes introductory anthropology teachers who go beyond talking about
global citizenship to helping students develop the objectivity, critical thinking skills,
and communication skills to be effective global citizens in today's world. Way to go
Gomez!







Undergraduate Student Achievements and Honors

This past year 238 anthropology majors received their bachelor's degrees!


Brendan O'Sullivan Award
This year two stellar undergraduates were hon-
ored with the Brendan O'Sullivan Award for
Academic Excellence. Both Kristina Marie
Hook and Alexander Lee Riehm graduated
with perfect 4.0 GPAs.
Kristina, from Pensacola, Florida, is an
anthropology major with minors in interna-
tional development and humanitarian assis-
tance, and teaching English as a second lan-
guage. She is an Anderson Scholar of Highest
Distinction, recipient of UF Student-Alumni
Association Scholarship, President's Honor
Roll, Dean's List, and completed the UF Hon-
ors Program. Kristina is member of National
Society of Collegiate Scholars, Golden Key
Honor Society, and Lambda Alpha Anthro-
pology Honor Society. She was active in
Recurso, Campus Crusade for Christ, Camp
Boggy Creek, St. Francis House, the English
Language Institute, and tutored at Harvest
Baptist Church. Kristina has been on mission
trips to Russia, Nicaragua, and Uganda. She
plans to attend graduate school and work for
an international non-governmental organiza-
tion. This fall, Kristina will begin a Master's
program in International Development at




University Scholars Awards
Five talented undergraduates were granted Uni-
versity Scholars Awards to conduct research in
collaboration with a faculty mentor.
SJoseph Gallagher (Allan Burns) will
work on a select group of medicinally
important plants in Maya communities of
Belize. Joseph is combining ethnobotany,
local community knowledge and science,
and conservation in order to understand
seasonal uses of plants used to treat skin
ailments and how their collection relates to
preserving biodiversity in a Mopan Maya
village. Joseph is working with Belizian UF
graduate student Pio Saqui on this project.


the Josef Korbel School
of International Stud-
ies at the University of
Denver. Kristina was
awarded the university's
Founders' Scholarship,
the highest scholarship
offered by this school.
Alex, from Law-
renceville, Georgia, is an
anthropology and reli-
gion double major with
a history minor. He won
Dial Center Best Quali-
tative Paper Award for
"Separate Lives, Separate
Visions: Geopolitics and
Community Relations
in Post-Accord Belfast."
He presented this paper at the International
Conference for Peace and Reconciliation and
the American Anthropological Association
Annual Meeting. He studied abroad in Belfast,
Ireland and Merida, Mexico. He is an Ander-
son Scholar, National Merit Scholar, UF Hon-
ors Ambassador, Sledd Hall resident assistant,





* Michael Granatosky (Dave Daegling) will
be investigating changes in mandibular bone
quality during growth in macaque monkeys.
* Heather Lear (Maria Stoilkova) will be
traveling to Turkey and conducting research
among Turkish students on issues of identity
and alliance with EU values.
* David Roebuck (Connie Mulligan) will
be using GIS and genetic data on Yemeni
samples to empirically estimate migration
rates over three generations.
* Joshua A. Villanueva (Abdoulaye Kane)
will be doing research in France on citizen-
ship and social exclusion of second-gen-
eration North African immigrants in the
Parisian suburbs.


page 14


and a member of Student Honors Organiza-
tion and Society of Academic Religious Stud-
ies. Alex will be attending graduate school at
George Washington University where he will
be studying International Affairs and concen-
trating on conflict resolution and economic
relations.




Patricia S. Essenpreis
Scholarship
The 2010 Patricia S.
Essenpreis Scholarship
awarded to a female
undergraduate to attend
an archaeological field
school was awarded to
Brittany Leigh Brown.
Brittany will be attend-
ing the Kingsley Plantation Archaeological
Field School directed by Dr. James Davidson.
After volunteering for two semesters in the
archaeology lab working on material recovered
from previous field seasons, Brittany is ready
to get her hands (and face and clothes) dirty!
Congratulations Brittany.



Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010







World's Best

Office Staff!
W T ere would we be without our fantastic office
S staff? Many of the accomplishments highlighted
in this newsletter are the result of the tremendous efforts
of our staff. Our current team of Karen Jones, Patricia
Gaither-King, Juanita Bagnall, and Pam Freeman are the
best cohort that the anthropology department has seen.
In addition to their "official duties" for such things as
getting our courses scheduled, registering our students,
processing proposals and travel, they also fix our mistakes
and help solve little problems. They are occasional psy-
chological counselors to faculty and students. Despite
being overworked and underpaid, they are professional,
cheerful, and helpful. Karen and Pat have been with the
department since 1992 and 1988, respectively. Com-
bined, Karen and Pat have more institutional memory
that most of the current faculty. Juanita's efficiency as
graduate assistant keeps our students on track and may


Haiti, continued from page I
households in two towns and two villages.
To make a long story short, the earthquake had
affected the lives even of people far from the epicenter.
The world knows about the Port-au-Prince homeless. But
even where houses were standing, there is a crisis of hunger
because of soaring food prices and an influx of refugees.
People were actually flocking back to the camps of Port-au-
Prince to get access to the foreign aid. The destruction and
closing of schools was, surprisingly, felt as one of the worst
blows. Income is crucial, but parents (particularly moth-
ers) use it to send their children to one of the myriad tiny
local private schools that dot Haiti in the absence of all but
a few State run schools. In my lengthy recommendation
section I designed a step-by-step program, supported by
school budgets and market figures, that would permit an
organization with funding and with focused programming
to have major impacts on livelihoods (principally credit for
female market women) and on education.
I saw the Haitian government at its worst. One U.N.
organization had finally come to La Hatte and passed
out 500 vouchers, one for each family, to prepare for a
relief shipment. They did their duty and respectfully went
through the mayor of the nearby town. Brilliant. They
filmed themselves entrusting to him the 500 vouchers to
be passed out. When the cameras stopped rolling and the
advance team departed, he passed out 40 and pocketed
460 for himself: 92% overhead for his services. This is
a petty microcosmic replay of a much greater impend-
ing tragedy, as expatriate managers of public sector relief
money from the U.S., Canada, and Europe affirm their
respect for the sovereign Haitian government and vow to
channel the $12.5 billion dollars of promised aid through


be an indirect cause of this past year's teams. People Soft was just the beginning.
exceptional graduation success. And our So, the next time you are in the office,
most recent addition, Pam, learned the thank them for all they do. Otherwise,
ropes very quickly; you wouldn't know faculty might find themselves teaching
that Pam was the newbie. To keep their those popular 7:30 am classes and student
jobs challenging for them-and give them paperwork just might not make it to the
headaches-UF likes to implement new graduate school or the registrar.
software, programs, and accounting sys-


the "proper authorities." In capitulating
to French-speaking, coat-and-tie Haitian
authorities, these irresponsible wasters of
other people's money reject the unanimous
pleas heard all over Haiti to keep the money
away from the government. Actually that's
not fair. They've never heard ordinary
Haitians. For them the flag-waving franco-
phone elite are the Voice of Haiti.
La Hatte continues to suffer. The
NGO has yet to act there. Has anyone
read the report? I'm not sure; it exceeded
five pages (actually, about 85). But I was


able personally to channel several thousand
dollars of money from Gainesville to local
schools, the future of Haiti, and to begin
discussion of a privately funded scholar-
ship program for the children of La Hatte.
No villager believes the blah-blah-blah
development rhetoric about Haiti's future.
Parents who school their children will do
everything possible to get them out of
agriculture and out of Haiti. Outsiders can
support the education. What Haitians do
with it is their own business.


Department of Anthropology News, Summer 2010


page 15








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We need your help, whether you can spare only a few dollars or many more. The Anthropology Department depends on gifts to fund student travel
to meetings, undergraduate and graduate scholarships, dissertation and field school awards, lecture series, laboratory enhancements, and other initia-
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O Friends ofAnthropology (provides for a wide variety of department
initiatives and needs)
O Custom Copies Graduate Travel (defrays costs for graduate students
to travel to professional meetings)
O Patricia S. Essenpreis Award for Undergraduate Archaeology
Research (assists female undergraduates to attend field school)
O Brendan O'Sullivan Award for Outstanding Undergraduate
Majors (honors the highest-ranking major at spring graduation)
O Polly and Paul Doughty Graduate Research Award (funds graduate
student research in Latin America)
O Burns Amaya Graduate Research Awards (funds graduate student
research in Latin America)
O Charles H. Fairbanks Scholarship (defrays research costs for archae-
ology Ph.D. students in their final year)
O John M. Goggin Memorial Scholarship (defrays research costs for
Ph.D. students in cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and
linguistic anthropology in their final year)


o William R. Maples Scholarship (defrays research costs for forensic
anthropology graduate students)
O Marvin Harris Lecture Fund (lecture series honors the late Professor
Marvin Harris, one of the nation's leading anthropological theorists)
O Zora Neale Hurston Fellowship (celebrates diversity, in honor of
Zora Neale Hurston)
O James C. Waggoner, Jr. Grants-in-Aid Endowment (supports grad-
uate student research)
O Zoe Martin del Campo-Hermosillo Award (supports travel to con-
ferences for graduate students who are single custodial parents)


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