• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Development of regional impact...
 Index
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Sections 1-18
 Impact on the environment and natural...
 Impact on the economy of the...
 Impact on the public facilities...
 Impact on public transportation...
 Impact on housing in the regio...
 Other impacts
 Appendix 1: References for questions...
 Appendix 2: North and South New...
 Appendix 3: Broward County noise...
 Appendix 4: References for question...
 Appendix 5: Native plant speci...
 Appendix 6: Percolation tests
 Appendix 7: Letter concerning historical...
 Appendix 8: Plates 27 E-1/E-6....
 Appendix 9: Letter from Broward...
 Appendix 10: Transportation maps...
 Appendix 11: Letter from Broward...
 Appendix 12: Native animal...














Group Title: new community for Broward County
Title: A New community for Broward County
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083811/00002
 Material Information
Title: A New community for Broward County
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Arvida Corporation
Publisher: Arvida Corporation
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083811
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Development of regional impact team, Arvida Corporation
        Page 3
    Index
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
        Page 5
    List of Tables
        Page 8
    List of Figures
        Page 9
    Sections 1-18
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Impact on the environment and natural resources of the region
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Impact on the economy of the region
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Impact on the public facilities of the region
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Impact on public transportation facilities of the region
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Impact on housing in the region
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Other impacts
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Appendix 1: References for questions 19.A.2 and 19.A.3
        Page 138
    Appendix 2: North and South New River Canal parameters
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Appendix 3: Broward County noise abatement ordinance
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    Appendix 4: References for question 19.C.1, on noise
        Page 168
    Appendix 5: Native plant species
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Appendix 6: Percolation tests
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Appendix 7: Letter concerning historical sides
        Page 184
    Appendix 8: Plates 27 E-1/E-6. Analysis of raw water quality
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Appendix 9: Letter from Broward County School Board
        Page 191
    Appendix 10: Transportation maps 1-6
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
    Appendix 11: Letter from Broward County Transportation authority
        Page 198
    Appendix 12: Native animal species
        Page 199
Full Text




















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RPA ID
Project I D
Project Code
Planning Region
Date of Receipt

Office Use Only


NEW COMMUNITY FOR BROWARD COUNTY


BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA

DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL IMPACT





Submitted by:

Arvida Corporation
1501 First National Bank Building
Miami, Florida 33131


DRI Public Hearing(s) Place
Notice of Public Hearing Rec


Date
Section 380.06
(7) F.S.)


Office
Use
Only

















DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL IMPACT TEAM
ARVIDA CORPORATION/BROWARD


DESIGN TEAM


Owner/Develope r




Land Planners





Civil Engineers




Legal Counsel


Arvida Corporation
Norman Cortese Vice-President
1501 First National Bank Building
Miami, Florida 33131

Environmental Planning and Design
John 0. Simonds & Paul D. Wolfe (Partners)
Jack Scholl & Jim Voss (Members)
13965 N.W. 67 Avenue
Miami Lakes, Florida 33014

Gee & Jenson Engineers
Fred A. Greene, Exec. Vice President
2019 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

Ferrero, Middlebrooks, & Houston
Edward Houston
707 S.E. 3 Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316


CONSULTANTS


Traffic Engineer
Economi st




Ecologist


Wilbur Smith & Associates
Joe F. Rice
Joe Watterson
8420 N.W. 52 Street
Miami, Florida 33166

J. A. Lasater, Ph.D.
Florida Institute of Technology
Country Club Road
Melbourne, Florida 32901













INDEX


Air Quality . . . . . . .
Animal Life . . . . . .
Aquatic Life. . . . . . .
Archeological Sites . . . . .

Capital Equipment Costs . . . .
Climatology . . . . . . .
Communications. . . . . . .
Construction Costs. . . . . .
Cultural Facilities . . . . .


Demand (Project) . . .
Density (Residential) . .
Dwelling Units (Numbers and


Type)


Education . . . . .
Elevations (Street and Floor)
Emergency Services . . .
Emissions (Types of). . .
Employment Characteristics. .


Endangered Species.


Energy. . . . .
Environmental Impacts .
Expenditures (Estimated


Annual)


Fire Protection . . . . .
Flood Insurance . . . . .

Geology . . . . . . .


.30.A.2
.26.D
.20.A.3
.19.A.2
.22
.20.B.5
.29.A.,B. ,C.
.19., 33.E
.21.A


. . . . . . . .30.A.4
. . . . . . . .26.E

. . . . . . . .20.B.10


Health Care . . . . . . . . . . .
Historical Sites . . . . . . . . .
Housing Market Analysis . . . . . . . .

Land Use Allocations. . . . . . . . .

Natural Resources . . . . . . . . .
Noise . . . . . . . . . . . .

Parks and Recreation . . . . . . . .
Phasing (Developmental) . . . . . . . .
Population. . . . . . . . . . .

Radiation . . . . . . . . . . .
Raw Materials . . . . . . . . . .

Sanitary Sewage . . . . . . . . . .
Security. . . . . . . . . . . .


.30.A.5
.20.B.8
.21.1, 33.C, 33.G


. . .23.A.I, 26.C.1-5

. . .20.A
. . .19.C.1

. . .20.B.9, 30.A.7
. . .31
. . .23.C, 34.E

. . .19.C.2
. . .24.B

. . .25.A
. . .30.A.8


.19.A
.20.B.3
.20.B.4
.20.B.8

.24.B
.19.A.l
.30.A.1
.21 .H
.30.A.6

.21.1.1
.33.D
.23.A.I


. .


*

*
.
.
.































Soils . . . . . .
Solid Waste . . . .
Storm Water System . .
Suppliers (Private) . .
Support Industries . .

Taxes . . . . . .
Topography . . . .
Transportation. . . .

Vegetation (Natural). . .

Water
Discharges . . .
r Potable and non-potable.
Water Bodies
Boundaries . . . .
Creation . . . .
Water Quality . . . .


.20.B.6
.28.A. B., C., D
.26.A
.24.A
.24.A


. . . . . . . . .21 .C. E.
. . . . . . . . .20.B. 1
. . . . . . . . .32.

. . . . . . . . .20.B.2


. . . . . . . . . 19.B.2
. . . . . . . . .27.

. . . . . . . . .20.B.7. (a)
. . . . . . . . .19.B.4
. . . . . . . . . 19.B










DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL IMPACT

APPLICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT APPROVAL
UNDER SECTION 380.06(6) FLORIDA STATUTES

CONTENT


Section (s)
I, 2, 3, 4 . . . . . . .
5. . . . . . . . . .
6 . . . . . . . . .
7, 8, 9, 10. . . . . . .
II, 12, 13, 14, 15 . . . . .
16, 17 . . . . . . . .
18 . . . . . . . . .


Subject
* . Information for Office Use Only
. . State of Intent
* . Permit Information
. . Applicant Information
. . Development Information
. . Public Hearing Information
. . Application Information


Impact on the Environment and Natural Resources of the Region
19 . . . . . . . . . . Environmental Impact
20 . . . . . . . . . . Impact on Natural Resources

Impact on the Economy of the Region
21 . . . . . . . . . . Fiscal Characteristics
22 . . . . . . . . . . Employment Characteristics
23 . . . . . . . . . . User Characteristics
24 . . . . . . . . . . Subsidiary Development

Impact on the Public Facilities of the Region
25 . . . . . . . . . . Sanitary Sewers
26 . . . . . . . . . . Storm Water Disposal
27 . . . . . . . . . . Water Supply
28 . . . . . . . . . . Solid Waste
29 . . . . . . . . . . Energy
30 . . . . . . . . . . Other Public Facilities
31 . . . . . . . . . . Other Considerations

Impact on Public Transportation Facilities of the Region
32 . . . . . . . . . . Public Transporation Considerations

Impact on Housing in the Region
33 . . . . . . . . . . Housing Characteristics

Other Impacts
34 . . . . . . . . . ... General Considerations



Appendices

1. References for Questions 19.A.2. and 19.A.3.
2. North and South New River Canal Parameters
3. Broward County Noise Abatement Ordinance
4. References for Question (C-1), on Noise
5. Native Plant Species

































Appendices Cont.

6. Percolation Tests
7. Letter Conserning Historical Sides
8. Plates 27 E-1/E-6. Analysis of Raw Water Quality
9. Letter From Broward County School Board
10. Transportation Maps 1-6
11. Letter from Broward County Transportation Authority
12. Native Animal Species





















TABLES


Titles


Location


1. Climatological Data . . . . . . . .19.A.
2. Increases in Pollution by Phase . . . . 19.A.3
3. Chemical Parameters of Water. . . . . .19.B.2
4. Soils Discription . . . . . . . .20.B.6
5. Total Estimated Annual Expenditures . . . .21.A
6. Total Estimated Annual Expenditures Within
The Region . . . . . . . . .21.B
7. Total Estimated Annual Expenditures Outside
Region, Inside Florida . . . . . .21.B
8. Total Estimated Annual Expenditures Outside
Florida . . . . . . . . .21.B
9. Estimated County Tax. . . . . . . .21.E
10. Housing Market Analysis . . . . . . .21.1
11. Number of Employees by Type . . . . . .22.A
12. Employment by Occupational Type Permanent
and Temporary. . . . . . . .22.E
13. Estimated Average Annual Employment and Wages
by Type During Development. . . . . .22.E
14. Estimated Average Annual Employment and Wages
by Type Post-Development. . . . . . .22.E
15. Costs of Capital Equipment and Raw Materials. .24.B
16. Soild Waste Generation. . . . . . . .28.A
17. Land Allocation . . . . . . . . .32.B
18. Residential Allocation . .. . . . . .32.B
19. Daily Vehicle Trip Generation Rates . . . .32.C
20. Daily Vehicle Trips (Graph) . . . . . .32.C
21. Programmed Road Improvements. . . . . .32.F
22. Stages and Target Dates . . . . . . .34.B




























MAPS


Title

Location . . . .

Broward County Trafficways

Aerial . . . . .

Topography and Vegetation.

Soils Series . . . .

Master Plan. . . .

Drainage . . . . .

Water Distribution . .

Waste Water Collection .

Transportation Maps 1-6. .


Location

. . . . . . .Question

Plan . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Question

. . . . . . .Appendix





















1. PROJECT I.D.

2. PROJECT CODE NO.

3. PLANNING REGION

4. DATE OF RECEIPT





5. STATEMENT OF INTENT

The undersigned owner or authorized representative of Arvida

Corporation hereby proposed to undertake a Development of

Regional Impact as defined in Section 380.06 Florida

Statutes, and in support thereof does herewith submit the

following information which is correct to the best of his

knowledge.



March, 1974
Date Norman A. Cortese
Vice President












6. PERMIT INFORMATION


Attached hereto and made a part thereof is an application for
a development permit to Broward County.

a. Application for Building Permit
Xb. Application for Zoning Change
c. Application for Variance
_d. Application for Other (Specify)


7. APPLICANT INFORMATION

Applicant (Name, Address, phone)

Norman A. Cortese
Arvida Corporation
1501 First National Bank Building
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone 358-3300


8. -AUTHORIZED AGENT (NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE)

Norman A. Cortese
Arvida Corporation
1501 First National Bank Building
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone 358-3300


9. LOCATION OF PROJECT (ATTACH METES & BOUNDS
DESCRIPTION, IF NECESSARY)

Property bounded on the North by S.R. 84; on the East by
Dike Road; and the South by the South New River Canal
(C-ll) ; on the West by U.S. #27 in
Sections: 31-49-40
Sections: 34, 35, 36-49-39
Sections: 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 24, 25-50-39
Sections: 6, 7, 8, 17, 18, 19, 20, 29, 30-50-40


10. IF AREA IS PLATTED, FILL IN, OTHER OMIT:

Dade County Plat Book 2 Page 17
Sections Platted: 35-49-39
Sections Platted: 1, 3, 11, 13, 25-50-39
Sections Platted: 7, 17, 19, 29-50-40














11. LIST ALL LOCAL GOVERNMENTS HAVING JURISDICTION OVER THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT AND LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
WHICH THEY HAVE ADOPTED.
a. Broward County
b. Broward County Zoning Ordinance


12. LIST AGENCIES FROM WHICH APPROVAL AND/OR A PERMIT MUST BE
OBTAINED PRIOR TO INITIATION OF PROJECT. MAKE ATTACHMENT
FOR ADDITIONAL ENTIRE IF NECESSARY.

Central & Southern Florida Flood Control District
Broward County
Board of County Commissioners
Engineering Department
Air and Water Pollution Control Department
Utilities Department
Area Planning Board (re Trafficways Plan)
Health Department
State of Florida
Air and Water Pollution Control Board
Department of Health and Rehabilitation Services
Department of Transportation


13. HAVE YOU REQUESTED A BINDING LETTER OF INTERPRETATION FROM
THE DIVISION OF STATE PLANNING PURSUANT TO SECTION 380.06(4)
F.S.?

No


14. TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT?

Residential, shopping center and office park

15. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF DEVELOPMENT (INCLUDING SITE)

This development, covering approximately 10,000 acres is to
be a spacious rural to semi-rural low-key community, within
an extensive open space framework, and with a Florida atmos-
phere. Emphasis will be on residential uses, with inclusion
of a wide range of housing types for families of varying
income levels and cultural backgrounds. There will be a
series of villages of various types, with the full range of
community services, which will be grouped around shopping,
employment, institutional and recreational centers.














The development will maintain a harmonious relationship with
the conservation areas to the north and west, and with the
urbanizing areas to the east and south. A comprehensive
water management program is planned to eliminate stress on
the area water resources. Large areas of land will remain
in its natural state, with development clustered around a
series of large lakes and interconnecting waterways.

The PUD approach will be utilized as, this will be a long
range development, and will apply the clustered concept in
all uses, including institutional, industrial, business
office and commercial. A broad employment base is also
planned, to strengthen the community concept, and to reduce
internal traffic movement.

The goal is to create a self-contained and unified community
of low density (four (4) dwelling units per gross acre).

(Refer to the following maps).

Arvida has prepared and submits to the South Florida Regional
Planning Council this application for development approval
for the Master Plan described. The company is working to
accomplish the objective of committing a strategic parcel
of Broward County Land to the best planning processes avail-
able. The preparation of this application pursuant to law
is an important first step in doing so, for it reduces to
writing the prospective impact of implementation of the
proposed plan.

"Good planning maybe the most important element of good land
use. That is why Arvida has chosen to plan for a community
which encompasses 10,000 acres. Obivously, a project of that
scope will take years to complete, and will undoubtedly be
accomplished by firms in addition to Arvida. The important
contribution Arvida can make is to commit the area to a
good plan. If approved by the appropriate authorities all
those who participate in the development process will be
committed to the basic concepts of the plan. Technological,
economic or environmental factors not presently known or
foreseeable may later require material alterations in the
Master Plan an inevitable possibility in a 40 year program.
Any such changes will be possible only by review and approval
of the appropriate authorities. For now, Arivda seeks ap-
proval of the present plan as the optimum blend of uses re-
quired by the region and dictated by social, environmental
and economic realities."


















CONSERVATION A;FA i


CONSERVATION AREA 2A


AREA 2B


".i.:t^


CONSERVATION AREA 3A


AREA 3B


BOCA
RATON


FT LAUDERDALE


ATLANTIC


OCEAN


MIAMI BEACH
k-Z-


N




0 4
SCALE IN MILES


LOCATION


~~1








BROWARD COUNTY AREA PLANNING BOARD
BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADOPTED
Broword County Area Planning Board
ADOPTION DATES (ADOPTED IN FOUR PARTS)
North-- Oct 9,1962 Southeoast Nov, 7,1963
Central-- Septil.1962 SoutheRS Apr 17,1969


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BOTANICAL NAME COMMON NAME '/
TEREBINTHIFOLIUS BRAZILIAN PEPPER
KL MELALEUCA /CAE
SLEUCADENDRON CAJEPUT 6
CASUARINA
EQUISETIFOLIA AUSTRALIAN PINE
SCLADIUM SAWGRASS &
JAMAICENSIS SEEDLING MELALEUCA SOUTH NEW RIVER ( NAL
S QUERCUS SCRUB OAK &
MINIMA RANGE GRASSES GRIFFIN RD.





1000 0 2000 4000
SCALE IN FEET
TOPOGRAPHY &
VEGETATION























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RANGE SERIES







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l.u'J n [ r '- ,'


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1000 0 2000

SCALE IN FEET



SOIL SERIES


4000


rwp ma 4







TOURIST CENTER /
INDUSTRIAL PARK /
BUSINESS OFFICE /
REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION
CENTER


PRIMARY PARKWAY


GOLF COURSE


SECONDARY PARKWAY


RESIDENTIAL
MID-RISE
GARDEN A-'T
PATIO / T.:. hM.:.UIE
PATIO / T,tVfI .j E
SINGLE f A .IL .
RANCHETTE ESTATE


COMMERCIAL N
CONVENIENCE COMMERCIAL
NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER W/ DRUG /
HARDWARE OR SUPERMARKET
NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER W/ DRUGSTORE /
HARDWARE / AND SUPERMARKET


SCHOOL /PARKS


ELEMENTARY


MIDDLE

SENIOR


GRIFFIN ROAD


1000 0 2000 4000
SCALE IN FEET


MASTER PLAN


S 84


ENTER


III

D


0


S




0

































DISTRICT WATER SURFACE EL.
4.0 NORMAL OPERATION OF
CANALS AND LAKES

5.0 MAXIMUM W.S. EL. AT
SUCTION SIDE OF PUMPS


TYPICAL CANAL SECTION


AQUATIC AQUATIC
GROWTH AR A GROWTH AREA




EL. 7
II" WATER SURFACE T 7.5

7\'. DEPTH N
VARIES
I BOTTOM
WIDTH VARIES


GRIFFIN ROAD


1 1/4" DAY : 118,000 GPM


1000 0 2000 4000

SCALE IN FEET


DRAINAGE











, ..










", I I



-. I|I


I I /





MI 4STRI, B O I I.
or %
"" I
---_---- UTILITIES PLANT



I

1 IER ,C U P I\ I "
























N










SCALE IN FEET
SERVICE PUMPS % ..


- -- MAJOR WATER DISTRIBUTION r ir]:I





































UTILITIES PLANT


b
I'-j
c~ %..~. I
~1




I-


0-- LIFT STATION & FORCE MAIN


N




1000 0 2000 4000

SCALE IN FEET

WASTEWATER
COLLECTION


I~


4r


I
I
I
I


I.-
I
I
I
I
I----
I
I
I
*.ri

I
:1
~,- '






























16. DATE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS)


PLACE


DATE


17. DATE OF NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS)
PURSUANT TO SECTION 380.06(7)F.S.













QUESTION 19: PROVIDE QUANTIFIED DATA ON THE FOLLOWING PRIOR TO,
DURING AND AFTER CONSTRUCTION OF THE PROJECT AND DISCUSS IN DETAIL
THE CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT AS A RESULT OF THE PROJECT

A. AIR QUALITY

1. PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA: AVERAGE
VELOCITY AND PREDOMINANT WIND DIRECTION BY MONTH; AVER-
AGE, HIGHEST, AND LOWEST MONTHLY AND ANNUAL RAINFALL IN
INCHES; AND NORMAL MONTHLY AVERAGE AND HIGHEST AND LOW-
EST RECORDED TEMPERATURES.

(See Table 1 on the following page)

Neither the proposed land uses, nor the physiographic
conditions of wind, precipitation, or topography will
contribute appreciably in a negative way to the quality
of the ambient air.

2. PEAK EMISSIONS

LIST AVERAGE AND PEAK EMISSIONS BY TYPE (I.E. CO PARTI-
CULATES, ETC.) AMOUNT, SOURCE AND SPECIFIC LOCATION.

At present the sources of air emissions from the appli-
cants property are limited primarily to automotive emis-
sions generated along the peripheral highways, State
Road 84 on the north, U. S. 27 on the west, and Griffin
Road on the south. The emissions produced within the
interior of the project area are extremely minimal,
generated by an occasional air boat or swamp buggy
present during hunting seasons. These sources are
producing minimal effects on the regions' air quality.

During all phases of construction, large numbers of
heavy-duty construction vehicles will be present at the
development site. Approximately 95 percent of this
equipment will be diesel power with exhaust emissions
having the same general characteristics as automobile
emissions. Particulate matter from diesel exhaust will
be in the form of black and white smoke; however, a
diesel engine when properly adjusted and operated under
design loads should emit no visible smoke. Anticipated
types of equipment to be used during construction are
as follows: dredges, pans, draglines, trucks, bull-
dozers and end loaders. Small amounts of exhaust emis-
sions produced by the construction equipment will have
little or no effect on the surrounding area.








TABLE 1


PRECIPITATION
(Inches)


January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December


Avg.

2.03

1 .87

2.27

3.88

6.44

7.37

6.75

6.97

9.47

8.21

2.83

1.67


Max.

6.66

6.56

7.22

10.21

18.54

22.36

13.51

16.88

24.40

21.08

13.15

6.39



24.40


Year

1969

1966

1949

1960

1968

1968

1947

1943

1960

1952

1959

1958


Sept.
1960


Min.

0.04

0.01

0.02

0.07

0.44

1 .81

1 .77

1.65

2.63

1.50

0.09

0.13



0.01


WIND
(Miles Per Hour)


Year

1951

1944

1956

1971

1965

1945

1963

1954

1951

1962

1970

1968


Feb.
1944


TEMPERATURE
(F)

Avg.

66.9

67.9

70.5

74.2

77.6

80.8

81.8

82.3

81.3

77.8

72.4

68.1


Period of Record 1931-1960

Source: U. S. Dept. of Commerce
NOAA NO. 60-8


Maximum Temperature Recorded

Minimum Temperature Recorded


100.0

28.0


(July, 1942)

(January, 1940)


Avg. Vel.

9.4

10.1

10.3

10.4

9.4

8.1

7.8

7.6

8.2

9.1

9.2

8.8


Annual


Di rect ion

N. N. W.

E. S. E.

S. E.

E. S. E.

E. S. E.

S. E.

S. E.

S. E.

E. S. E.

E. N. E.

N

N


59.76












Upon completion of the development at full occupancy,
the source of atmospheric type emissions will be limited
primarily to those of automotive origin (assuming that
the gasoline fueled internal combustion engine is still
the primary people mover 38 years from now.) Traffic in
or around the development will increase as will ambient
concentration of specific pollutants, (carbon monoxide,
hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and parti-
culate matter). Approximately 452,308 vehicle trips of
7.32 miles are expected to be generated by the populace
of the development daily. This will generate approxi-
mately 83,989 pounds of atmospheric emissions daily.
Twenty-five percent, or 119,290, of the trips are expected
to be generated outside the project area, emitting ap-
proximately 54,915 pounds to the regional atmosphere.
The remaining seventy-five percent, or 333,018 vehicle
trips, will be generated within the boundaries of the
development and produce approximately 29,074 pounds of
specific pollutants. The greatest concentrations of ex-
ternal trip emissions will be felt south and east of the
development, based on projected geographic distributions.
Table 2 tabulates the increase in pollutants by phase.

The most pronounced effects will be in areas of frequent
use such as parking lots and major arterial highways.
The greatest impact of the expected external trip gen-
eration will be felt by the peripheral highways bound-
ing the development; Griffin Road, SR 84, US 27 and
the proposed 1-75 to be constructed immediately east of
the proposed development site. A detailed traffic
analysis was conducted to determine the traffic flow
estimates during construction and upon completion of the
development, the results of which are indicated in
Question 32.

The results of the projection were applied to the line
source of "corridor" mathematical model to obtain pre-
dictions of carbon monoxide concentrations in the area.
Computations were conducted in accordance with the
"worst possible condition" parameters as set forth in
the Revision of the State of Florida Air Implementation
Plan Review of Complex Sources. The parameters used
are as follows:

1. Class D, Stability.
2. Vehicle speed, 30 miles per hour
3. Receptor located at 50 feet from road edge.
4. Wind angle, 22.50.
5. Background concentration, 0.
6. Road width, 30.5 meters.
7. Road placed at grade level.












8. Wind speed, one meter per second.
9. Projected average emission factors as pub-
lished in Environmental Protection Agency's
Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors-
Year 1985.

All roads in the study were Found to produce carbon mon-
oxide concentrations below 10 percent of the national
standard as prescribed by the Florida Department of
Pollution Control. Emissions of this magnitude pose no
threat to the environment, in the immediate area or
regionally.

Point concentration sources within and surrounding the
proposed project area will be limited to larger parking
facilities, industrial sites, commercial facilities,
and a nearby county incinerator. The large parking lots
associated with commercial and industrial developments
will cause higher concentrations of specific pollutants.
Stationary sources, such as emergency diesel generators
and small incinerators will add to the concentrations
of specific pollutants but are not expected to be of
s i gn i f i chance.

Based on traffic projections throughout the phases of
the project development, no parking facilities are ex-
pected to produce concentrations of specific pollutants
in excess of the standards set forth in the Florida Air
Implementation Plan.

Industrial centers and regional distribution centers may
cause some elevated concentration points. Emissions
from diesel-powered traffic associated with these de-
velopments, will cause a reduction in local air quality
but are not expected to be a major source in reducing
regional air quality.

3. AIR QUALITY CONTROL MEASURES

SPECIFY MEASURES THAT WILL BE TAKEN TO AVOID AIR QUALITY
CONDITIONS THAT EXCEED FEDERAL OR STATE STANDARDS

Emissions generated by automotive traffic during and
after construction are not expected to exceed Federal
or State standards. Regulations of the Environmental
Protection Agency and additional Federal requirements
for common emission controls on newer automobiles are
expected to reduce emissions to levels below those
presented in Table 2. Calculations made in that section
were based on 1990 emission level factors.







TABLE 2


Internal
Speci fi c
Pollutants*


External
Trips


External
Mileaqe


External
Pollutants*


Total
Total Specific
Trips Pollutants


1976-77

1978-79

1980-81

1982-83

1984-85

1986-87

1988-89

1990-91

1992-93

1994-95

1996-2000

2001-2005

2006-2010

2011-2013


2,600

14,300

35,600

61,600

88,600

114,200

136,500

154,500

171,200

187,500

228,100

268,700

309,400

333,018


8,060

44,330

110,360

190,960

274,660

354,020

423,150

478,950

530,720

581,250

707,110

832,970

959,140

1,032,356


621

2,951

6,369

9,455

11 ,761

15,160

18,120

13,700

14,947

16,625

20,225

23,826

27,434

29,074


1 ,900

9,100

16,500

33,200

48,400

63,200

71,300

92,400

106,100

115,700

116,900

118,200

119,290

119,290


*Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and
particulate matter


Year


Internal
Trips


Internal
Mi I league


3,800

18,200

330,000

664,000

968,000

1 ,264,000

1 ,426,000

1,848,000

2,122,000

2,314,000

2,338,000

2,364,000

2,385,800

2,395,800


225

920

14,774

25,778

32,803

42,834

48,324

47,828

48,843

53,263

53,815

54,414

54,915

54,915


4,500

23,400

52,100

94,800

137,000

177,400

207,800

246,900

277,300

303,200

345,000

386,900

428,690

452,308


846

3,871

21 ,143

35,233

44,564

57,994

66,444

61,528

63,790

69,888

74,040

78,240

82,349

83,989













Although not presently available, 1995 emission factors
are expected to be substantially less than 1990 stan-
dards. Planned road improvements such as 1-75 will
further reduce line concentrations.

During the initial construction phase, dust will be gen-
erated from normal construction activity. This dust
generation will be kept to a minimum through the use of
grassing and mulching once the area has reached final
elevation and by maintaining other dust generation
areas in a damp condition so as to inhibit dust produc-
tion.

A list of references for the proceeding sections 19 A.2
and A.3, appears as Appendix 1.

QUESTION B.I.(a)

RECHARGE AND RETENTION AREAS

(a) The 10,000 acres encompassed by the proposed pro-
ject is a portion of the recharge area for the
Biscayne aquifer. The primary source of water to
recharge the aquifer comes from rainfall of which
there is approximately 59.8 inches per year. A
significant portion of this rainfall is lost by
evaporation from ponds of shallow standing water
created by poor drainage and evapotranspiration
from vegetation. Development of this land will
change the drainage patterns from what is presently
a poorly drained area with canals on the southern
portion of the property discharging directly into
the South New River Canal, to a system of lakes
and canals. The proposed system will reduce the
amount of evaporation because of the elimination
of shallow ponds of standing water and by concen-
trating the runoff in the network of lakes and
canals. Additionally, the excavation of the lake
and canal system will penetrate the upper layer
of limestone allowing increased amounts of re-
charge water to reach the aquifer. The present
system of drainage allows unlimited discharge to
flow into the South New River Canal through open
canals on the southern portion of the property.

The proposed drainage system has been designed with
a storage capacity of 79 percent of a 10 year fre-
quency storm without requirements for discharge












into the South New River Canal. This increased on-
site retention will increase the water available
for recharge of the aquifer.

The majority of groundcover is presently in the
form of sawgrass, Brazilian pepper, Melaleuca and
other forms of native vegetation as described in
Question 20.B.2. Many of the indigenous plants of
the area are classified as phrealophytes and are
found to have large transpiration rates. The modi-
fication of this vegetation with plants of lower
transpiration rates can effect water conservation
thus making available greater amounts of water for
recharge into the aquifer.

Since the principal source of recharge for the
Biscayne aquifer is rainfall, all methods which
are utilized to reduce losses from evaporation,
evapotranspiration and discharge into drainage
canals, will increase the amount of water avail-
able for recharge of the aquifer. Based on the
projected population of the proposed project, it
is calculated that a rainfall recharge of approx-
imately 20.2 inches per year will be required to
assure that no depletion of the aquifer occurs
because of withdrawals for domestic consumption.
As indicated in Question 19.A.l. the annual rain-
fall in this area is approximately 59.8 inches,
therefore, approximately 39.6 inches of the total
year's rainfall could be evaporated or lost by
evapotranspiration. Evapotranspiration for the
area is calculated at approximately 23.2 inches per
year. This value was obtained through use of an
evapotranspiration rate for 100 percent sod cover
over 55 percent of the project with a 36" deep
water table. This rate was experimentally obtained
by Stewart & Mills in their 1967 studies of the ef-
fect of water table depth and plant density on eva-
potranspiration rates in Southern Florida. Using
additional data from the same study of Stewart &
Mills and data for pan evaporation by the U. S.
Weather Bureau, an evaporation rate of 13.4 inches
per year is calculated for the 20 percent of the
project covered by water. Summation indicates a
net surplus of approximately 3.0 inches of water per
year in excess of losses. A breakdown of the monthly
water budget figures is included in Question 26.

The only significant withdrawals to be made from
the shallow groundwater aquifer will be for
domestic potable water uses. The bulk of irriga-













tion water is to be supplied from surface water
pumping systems. Large users of water for indus-
trial and commercial uses, which is not required to
be of potable water quality, may obtain their water
from deep wells beyond the shallow aquifer zone,
thus reducing demands on shallow groundwater sup-
pl ies.

It is felt through adequate management of the water
resources in the area by techniques such as proper
drainage control, reduced open water surface area,
limited discharge of water into the South New River
Canal and reduction in the evapotranspiration rates
over the natural conditions, that the project will
be self-sufficient for water recharge and the ef-
fect on the region's water supply will be minimal.

19.B.l(b)

WATER WITHDRAWALS

(b) Potable water to serve the area will be obtained
from the Biscayne aquifer. It is planned that the
water requirements for the project will be supplied
by one water treatment plant constructed in four-
teen phases and supplied by wells located through-
out the project area. Ultimate water withdrawal
requirements for the project are estimated to be
15.0 million gallons of water per day or an equiv-
alent of 20.2 inches of rainfall per year.

As indicated in the previous section the recharge
capability of the 10,000 acre project will exceed
the withdrawal requirements that are planned for
this area. There are no additional withdrawals
contemplated from outside the proposed development.

It is possible that withdrawals of nonpotable water
from the Floridan aquifer may be utilized for cool-
ing and other industrial uses. The use of this
water will relieve the demand on the fresh water
supply.

It is planned that a majority of the irrigation
water required will be supplied from surface sources
The utilization of surface water for irrigation
will further relieve the demand upon fresh water
supplies from the Biscayne aquifer without seriously
impairing the effectiveness of the recharge areas.













Using an area of 500 acres that would be heavily
irrigated and a quantity of 50 inches of water a
year over this area, the average daily irrigation
water usage would be 1.9 million gallons per day
or a total of 2.5 inches per year over the entire
development. This water withdrawal also repre-
sents a reduction of the lakes by .04 inches per
day. Although a portion of this water will be lost
due to evapotranspiration a significant quantity
will return to the groundwater via percolation.

19.B.2

WATER QUALITY

DISCHARGES INTO SURFACE WATERS (STATE THE INITIAL AND
FINAL RECEIVING BODY OF WATER AND PROVIDE CURRENT DRY
SEASON (JANUARY MAY) AND WET SEASON (AUGUST-NOVEMBER)
NUTRIENT ANALYSIS OF RECEIVING WATERS USING TOTAL P,
TOTAL KJELDAHL N, N03, NH4, ORTHO-P04, TOTAL DISSOLVED
SOLIDS, AND BOD

(a) DETERGENTS AND SOLVENTS
(b) FUEL AND OIL

Samples of the water in the vicinity of the pro-
ject were acquired on the afternoon of 11 November
1973, stored in ice, and processed in the Florida
Institute of Technology Water Quality Laboratory
on the morning of 12 November 1973. Three sample
sites were located in the South New River Canal
(SNRC) and two sites were near the mouth of exist-
ing canals draining the property. The initial
receiving waterbody is the South New River Canal
but the final receiving body of water depends upon
the fresh water demand. During dry (or low water)
periods, water from the SNRC is pumped into Con-
servation Area 3A to maintain the water level in
this region. During wet (or high water) periods,
water flows eastward and excess water enters the
Intracoastal Waterway. Consequently, there is an
appreciable amount of water recycling. All of
the water in the vicinity of the project is subject
to extensive pollution due to: a) all portions of
the property which are accessible to the public
but remote from either well-traveled roads or oc-
cupied houses have been subjected to extensive
dumping of cast off items of almost every descrip-
tion, and b) the accessible but isolated portions












of the project are widely used as "target practice"
areas by rifle and shotgun owners. Almost every
solid object in the area is riddled with bullet
holes and the ground is littered with empty rifle
and shotgun shell casings; therefore, it is readily
apparent that many persons frequent the area where
there are no sanitary facilities.

The observed chemical parameters of the water in
the vicinity of the project are tabulated in Table
3 (Appendix 2 indicates water quality in adjacent
surface water bodies. Source: Broward County
Pollution Control). It is evident that general
water quality is comparatively poor with large
amounts of suspended material and high BOD's. Due
to the extensive recycling, there is relatively
little variation in the water quality throughout
the year especially for the water in the SNRC.
Since the preponderance of the water in the SNRC
is intimately associated with the water in the con-
servation area, it is unlikely the project will
cause degradation of the water quality during its
construction. It is apparent that following de-
velopment, the water entering the SNRC will have
an improved quality due to the removal of the
discarded items and the cessation of non-sanitary
disposal of human waste.

(c) SEDIMENT AND SILT FROM 1) DREDGE AND FILL 2) EROSION

Since all canals and artificial ponds for runoff
will be interior to the project area, no release
of these waters is anticipated until each con-
struction activity is completed. Sediment and silt
from these activities will be essentially zero.
The relatively low variation in the terrain is
conducive to minimal erosional problems. Thus,
suitable plantings along all potential erosion
surfaces will effectively eliminate sediment and
silt from erosion.

(d) SURFACE RUNOFF

Surface runoff water will be impounded in a complex
series of ponds and connecting canals. Suitable
aquatic plants will be introduced to act as filters
and nutrient absorbers. This approach will yield
water, at the time of discharge into the SNRC, hav-
ing a higher quality than that which is presently
in the canal.








SURFACE WATER QUALITY
River Canal & Contributory


Station
2


Stati on
3


Drainage Canals


Station
4


Tubiit


Turbi dity
(Jackson Units)

pH

Nitrite mg/l

Nitrate mg/l

P04-Ortho mg/1

Detergents

Oil & Grease

Dissolved Solids
mg/l

Dissolved 02 mg/l

BOD5 mg/l

Total P mg/l

K jeldahl N mg/l

NH4


43


7.10

0.005

0.065

0.14

Trace

None


600

2.30

>10

0.57

0.123

None


Station
Station
Station
*Station
*Station


54


7.15

0.003

0.047

0.16

Trace

None


500

10.20

6.6

0.19

0.105

None


7.20

0.001

0.049

0.15

Trace

None


530

5.70

>10

0.22

0.161

None


Located South New River Canal West End of Project
Located South New River Canal Center of Project
Located South New River Canal East End of Project
Located Mouth of Drainage Canal and Between Stations 1 & 3
Located Mouth of Drainage Canal and Between Stations 3 & 5
*Discharging into South New River Canal


Sample taken on November 11, 1973 and tested at Florida Institute of Technology on November 12, 1973.


TABLE 3


Parameter


South New


Station
I


Station
S


7.20

0.010

0.150

0.14

Trace

None


530

13.95

9.3

0.28

0.189

None


61


7.20

0.005

0.045

0.11

Trace

None


430

5.50

>10


0.123

None












(e) THERMAL DISCHARGES


No sources of heated effluents are anticipated within
the confines of the project area.

(f) CENTRAL SEWER SYSTEM EFFLUENT

There are no planned direct discharges into either
the surface waters or the shallow groundwater of the
project area, of central sewer system effluent.
Effluent from the wastewater treatment plant will
be disposed of by means of deep well injection into
the boulder zone. A thorough discussion of the
wastewater treatment system and effluent disposal
is discussed in Question 25. Deep well injection
of sewerage effluent is governed by the Florida De-
partment of Pollution Control, Broward County Pol-
lution Control, Central & Southern Florida Flood
Control District and other regulatory agencies
whose approval will be gained prior to construction
or operation of the injection system.

During the initial stages of the development per-
colation/evaporation ponds may be used until com-
pletion of the injection facilities. Operation of
these ponds will be in accordance with standards
set forth by the various regulatory agencies.

19.B.3. DISCHARGE OR SEEPAGE INTO GROUNDWATER

(a) LIQUID WASTE

Nutrients presently enter the groundwater of the
project area via two primary means:

1. Natural processes of decayed organic material
from animals and plants and introduction by
meteorological conditions in the area.

2. Waste generated by humans utilizing the area
for recreational purposes.

There are planned to be no direct discharges into
the shallow groundwater system of liquid wastes.
It can be expected that herbicides, pesticides,
nutrients from fertilization of the landscaped
areas and nutrients generated by horses and other
animals will reach the groundwater by percolation
of both irrigation water and storm runoff. To
minimize the effect of nutrients upon the area's













groundwater, extensive use of swales and nutrient
removal vegetation on the perimeter of the lake and
canal system is planned. Thus, as the water flows
overland it will be filtered and a portion of the
nutrient load removed.

As discussed in Questions 19.B.2.(f) and 25., the
discharge of central sewer system effluent will be
made into the boulder zone. This water is highly
saline in quality and is not a source of potable
water. During initial stages of the development
percolation/evaporation ponds may be used to treat
wastewater effluent. Monitoring of these ponds
will be conducted to insure containment of pollu-
tants.

(b) SOLID WASTE

No direct effect of solid waste disposal on the
quality of groundwater is anticipated within the
proposed development. Solid wastes from the pro-
posed development in the form of refuse and garbage
will be removed from the site by truck and dis-
posed of in the approved county disposal sites.
Monitoring and regulation of these sites is ac-
complished by the Broward County Pollution Control
Board and the Florida Department of Pollution Con-
trol.

19.B.4. CREATION OF WATER BODIES

(a) WASTEWATER TREATMENT OR POLISHING LAGOONS

There will be no permanent treatment or polishing
lagoons created within the project. Effluent from
the wastewater treatment plant will be disposed via
deep well injection to the boulder zone. During
the initial stages of construction and before the
injection facilities are completed, temporary po-
lishing ponds may be used to treat wastewater.
These ponds will be operated in accordance with
Florida Department of pollution control and Broward
County Pollution Control Regulations.

(b) BORROW PITS

No borrow pits for the singular purpose of obtain-
ing fill will be created within the development.
The lake and canal system to be excavated will













serve the dual purpose of providing fill to bring
the remaining site to grade. This, lake and canal
system will also serve as the storm water retention
area for ground water recharge and other uses re-
quiring non-potable water.

(c) LAKES

Approximately one thousand eight hundred acres of
the project area will consist of lakes, lagoons,
dry swales and other water storage areas. An addi-
tional 1200 acres will be available for water
storage within the residential areas. This system
of lakes will provide the primary recharge areas
for water to re-enter the Biscayne Aquifer. All
of the site drainage will be discharged into this
system of lakes with its level being maintained
by two pump stations located on the south side of
the project and discharging into the South New
River Canal. Maximum discharge as limited by the
Central & Southern Florida Flood Control District
will be 1-1/4 inch per 24 hour period.

The average depth of excavation for the lakes will
be approximately 25 feet with side slopes of one
on four to a depth of one foot mean sea level, then
a slope of approximately one on one to the bottom
elevation of the lake. Because of the depth of the
lake system, it is expected that there will be some
stratification of water within the system. The
upper level of the lakes will most likely be of
higher oxygen content being mixed by wind action
across the surface of the lake. The deeper por-
tions of the lake can be expected to be somewhat
lower in oxygen content but may be mixed by the
movement of water through the lake and canal drain-
age system. The use of plant material on the fringe
of the system and shallow shorelines will aid in
the maintenance of water quality by nutrient removal
from drainage runoff. The fringe areas will also
provide propagation areas for aquatic life.

The lake and canal system will provide a dual pur-
pose of providing fill to raise ground elevations
above flood elevations and to provide water storage
for surface drainage. In addition to these uses the
larger water bodies will be available for recrea-
tional uses.













(d) CANALS


Only canals associated with the lake drainage system
are planned to be constructed. These canals will
be an integral part of the drainage system and will
act to conduct water between lakes and to the two
discharge points where excess water will be dis-
charged into the South New River Canal. The canals
will be constructed with the same design parameters
as the lake system and will be maintained by the
West Broward Improvement District as will the lake
system. The existing system of canals will be
closed and filled as progress is made in construct-
ing the new system.

(e) STORM WATER IMPOUNDMENT

As previously discussed, the on-site lake system
will act as a storm water impoundment area with a
storage volume of 6000 acre feet or 6.6 inches of
rainfall. For rainfalls of greater than 6.6 in-
ches discharge would be at the rate of 1-1/4" per
day. This area will also act as the major source
of water recharge to the Biscayne Aquifer in addi-
tion to providing storage and routing for the pro-
ject's surface water runoff. A thorough discussion
of the storm water drainage system is included in
Question 26.

19.C OTHER EFFECTS

1. NOISE

No major noise problems are anticipated by the proposed
development. The development is to be a residential com-
munity with a much lower density than other developments
in the area. There will be an increase in noise levels
during the construction phases, but this will be tempo-
rary. After development is completed, noise levels will
be greater than the ambient noise levels that presently
exist in the undeveloped areas. However, this increase
will be comparable to the increase in other developed
communities and should not adversely affect the region.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development is con-
cerned with noise as a major source of environmental
pollution. In its efforts to provide decent housing and
a suitable living environment the Department has issued
a booklet "Noise Assessment Guidelines" to provide for












the assessment of the exposure of a housing site to
present and future noise conditions. The overall noise
level of the applicant's development site, under these
guidelines, is expected to be classified "normally ac-
ceptable" to "clearly acceptable" during and after de-
velopment.(1) Development is to be phased over 37 years,
therefore, some housing can be expected to be near
areas of construction which will have higher noise level
concentrations than others.


(a) STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

SPECIFY APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL NOISE
CONTROL STANDARDS OR REGULATIONS THAT MUST BE MET
BY THE DEVELOPMENT AND STATE HOW THEY WILL BE MET
BOTH DURING AND AFTER CONSTRUCTION.

There are no applicable state noise control stan-
dards or regulations to be met.

Federal Standards and Regulations which may apply
are:

1. Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA)-42 CFR.(2)

a. Noise Regulations General 1910.95
b. Noise Regulations Construction 1926.52

2. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Noise
Standards and Procedures 23 CFR 772. (2)

During construction all possible precautions will
be taken to insure protection against exceeding
permissible noise exposure levels set forth in OSHA
Regulations 1910.95 and 1926.52. Road noise levels
generated by vehicular traffic will be compatible
with FHWA Standards during and after construction. (2)

Locally, the Broward County Board of Commissioners
has adopted "The Broward County Noise Abatement
Ordinance" (August, 1973). The purpose of the or-
dinance is to "eliminate, regulate and restrict
sources and occurrences of noise at decibel levels
which would be contrary to the public welfare and
constitute a nuisance to the public at large".
Section 6 lists the presumed ambient noise levels
for the purpose of the ordinance and Section 8 de-
fines the restrictions on Construction of Buildings
and Projects (see Appendix 3). It is the intent of
the developer to comply with this ordinance.












(b) AFFECTS UPON AMBIENT NOISE LEVEL


PROVIDE DATA ON THE INCREASE IN NOISE OVER THE
AMBIENT NOISE BACKGROUND BOTH DURING CONSTRUCTION
AND AFTER COMPLETION. INCLUDE SPECIFIC LOCATION
INFORMATION ON NOISE SOURCES IN RELATION TO PEOPLE
BOTH ON AND OFF THE SITE.

The estimated ambient noise level existing at the
development site, prior to construction, is approx-
imately 40 50 dBA. This sound level range is
based on the Broward County ambient noise levels
and typical residential areas.(3,4) During the
construction phase, and based on construction of
similar magnitude, it is estimated that the noise
level will increase approximately 10-20 dBA over
the ambient noise level. This increase will be due
to the construction equipment that will be in
operation at the development site. The highest
noise levels will be in the immediate area of any
one particular piece of equipment, hence, the
overall increase will be greatest during the work-
ing day when all the equipment is operating. This
expected increase does exceed the standards. How-
ever, as the distance from any noise source in-
creases, the noise level is reduced. Therefore,
the expected increase in the overall noise level
at the development site will have only a slight im-
pact on the surrounding area.

The roadway noise levels will be increased during
and after construction. Refer to Question 32 for
the amount of traffic generated and the roads that
will be affected both during and after development.
Using the FHWA Reference Standards, 23 CFR 722 set
forth in the Environmental Regulation Handbook, of
LlO (that level which exceeds the standard 10 per-
cent of the time) the expected range of noise
levels at 100 feet from those roads affected during
construction will be 50-60 dBA. At completion of
construction and full occupancy of the development,
the expected range of LlO noise levels at 100 feet,
on the roads indicated in Question 32, will be
60-70 dBA.

The roadway noise levels for the expected construc-
tion traffic and traffic generated by the develop-
ment were arrived at by procedures set forth in
Report 117, Highway Noise/A Design Guide for High-
way Engineers. (5) These noise levels are compatible













with FHWA Standards for a designed noise level/land
use relationship of 70 dBA set forth in 23 Code of
Federal Regulations 722.(2)

(c) NOISE LIMITING METHODS FOR CONSTRUCTION

SPECIFY METHODS TO BE USED TO MINIMIZE NOISE DURING
CONSTRUCTION

The construction of the development is planned to
proceed in phases. Methods used to limit noise
during construction will include the dispersal of
equipment over a large portion of the site area.
This will minimize the concentration of noise
sources thus allowing a greater air space to at-
tenuate the noise generated by each piece of con-
struction equipment. Also Section 8 of the
Broward County Noise Abatement Ordinance limits
construction noise over the ambient noise levels
listed in Section 6 of the ordinance between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. of the same day.
This should result in minimizing the effects of
noise on the people in and around the development
site.

(d) NOISE REDUCTION TECHNIQUES

SPECIFY THE CONSTRUCTION AND LANDSCAPING MATERIALS
AND DESIGN TECHNIQUES USED TO REDUCE NOISE SOURCES
OR BUFFER THEM. SPECIFY METHODS USED TO REDUCE
SOUND TRANSMISSION BETWEEN HOUSING UNITS.

The design of all buildings, trafficways and other
facilities will utilize advanced techniques of noise
control abatement. Plans for the proposed Community
will be directed toward such sound abatement devices
as earth mounding and acoustical walls along the
major roadways as required to achieve the accept-
able sound levels of 60-70 dBA or lower.

As part of the development, landscape planting will
be placed along roadways and between houses to pro-
vide buffer strips that will provide absorptive
vegetative cover. These landscape materials will
consist of broad leaf indigenous plants and other
types of native vegetation.

The potential reduction of noise by buffer landscape
planting is variable and depends upon many factors,


















including proper placement, sufficient density and
heights of plants, as well as others. Studies in-
dicate that a sound level reduction of 5 to 12 dBA
may be expected, and occasionally 6 reduction as
high as 15 dBA may be experienced.

(See Appendix 4, for references to footnotes 1-6
in Section C.1).

19.C.2. RADIATION

(a) SPECIFY THE LOCATION AND TYPE OF ANY RADIOACTIVE
MATERIAL THAT WILL BE USED DURING OR AFTER DE-
VELOPMENT.

(b) SPECIFY ANY RADIOACTIVE BY-PRODUCT OR WASTE THAT
WILL RESULT FROM ACTIVITY IN THE DEVELOPMENT AREA,
INCLUDING THEIR DEGREE OF RADIOACTIVITY AND THE
METHOD AND LOCATION OF DISPOSAL.

All equipment with radioactive sources that may be
used during the various construction phases of the
project will be subject to regulation of the Atomic
Energy Commission and/or the Broward County Health
Department.

After the construction phases are complete the pri-
mary radiation sources are expected to be from
medical treatment and diagnostic facilities as well
as industrial inspection and gaging equipment.
Procedures for safety are covered by applicable
laws and regulations as previously stated. In addi-
tion the operation of medical radiation facilities
is governed locally by the Broward County Health
Department.

The types of radiation sources contemplated are
highly localized and normally result in no harmful
effects to the region.













Question 20.A.


A. WHICH OF THE EXISTING NATURAL RESOURCES IN THE AREA INFLUENCED
THE DECISION TO DEVELOP ON THE SITE AND HOW WILL THE DEVELOP-
MENT AID IN INSURING THE CONTINUED EXISTENCE OF THOSE RESOURCES?

The existing natural resources in the area were not a decid-
ing factor in arriving at the decision to develop the site.
The ecosystem present in the applicant's property is extremely
limited in both character and quality. Imported plants, such
as Melaleuca leucadendra (Cajeput), Schinus terebinthifolius
(Brazilian Pepper), and to a lesser extent, Casuarina equiseti-
folia (Australian Pine) are overgrowing the area and causing
a significant degradation of the already poor ecosystem. It
is likely the land is capable of supporting a substantially
improved ecosystem.

20.B. DISCUSS THE IMPACT OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT ON THE
FOLLOWING:

1. TOPOGRAPHY AS SHOWN ON THE TOPOGRAPHIC MAP AND FINAL
GRADE PLAN.

The existing topography as shown in the Topography and
Vegetation map in Question 15, shows very little topo-
graphic relief. The average elevation is between 5
and 6 feet mean sea level with a gradual rise in ele-
vation to 9 feet in the northwestern corner of the pro-
ject. This lack of topographic relief provides poor
drainage with resultant ponding over a major portion of
the project. The drainage has been somewhat improved,
over the southern portion of the property, by draining
through a series of canals into the South New River
Canal.

The lake and canal system to be excavated will provide
fill to bring the site to required grade. This excava-
tion and fill operation will extensively modify the
existing topography. Upon completion of the modifica-
tions the overall topography will be contoured to pro-
vide adequate drainage for all areas and to provide
sufficient elevations in residential areas to protect
these areas from a one in one-hundred year flood. In
general, swale drainage will be utilized to conduct
water into the lake and canal system. The lake system
has been designed with sufficient capacity to provide
maximum retention time of storm water and thus reduce
the amount of discharge by pumping that will be required.













2. NATURAL VEGETATION (USE THE EXISTING TERRESTRIAL AND
AQUATIC VEGETATION MAP, SITE PLAN SHOWING AREAS TO BE
MAINTAINED IN NATURAL CONDITION, AND THE LANDSCAPING
PLAN).

It is evident the natural vegetation of the proposed
development area is rapidly being displaced by two im-
ported species, Brazilian Pepper (Schinus terebinthi-
folius) and Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendra). A third
imported species, Australian Pine (Casuarina equiseti-
folia) has established colonies in the area (see Topo-
graphy and Vegetation map, Question 15). There is
little doubt that if corrective measures are not in-
stituted, there will essentially be no native vegeta-
tion remaining in the area in due time. Based on the
growth of the Melaleuca in Palm Beach County, it is
estimated that total displacement will be accomplished
in about ten years.

If the overrun of the project property occurs, massive
invasion of the Everglades by the Melaleuca will ensue,
and irreparable environmental harm, with a drastic al-
teration of the ecology of the Everglades, could not be
prevented.

The preparation of a landscape plan is not feasible at
this early stage, but all planting will be done in
accordance with the landscape ordinance of Broward
County. The overall approach will be to provide simple,
informal mass plantings of indigenous shade trees,
palms, and shrubs. Spots of color will be added by
irregular locations of flowering trees. The total plant-
ing will provide a park-like setting for living, work-
ing, and community recreation.

The plants of the basic habitats on the applicant's
property are listed in Appendix 5.

(a) WHAT EFFECT WILL CHANGES IN HYDROLOGY DUE TO THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT, INCLUDING ALTERATION OF
NATURAL DRAINAGE PATTERNS AND CHANGES IN GROUND
WATER LEVELS, HAVE ON NATURAL VEGETATION AND ON
MAINTENANCE NEEDS FOR LANDSCAPING?

With development, drainage patterns will change
from sheet flow with temporary pond retention to
an engineered runoff design that will convey excess
rainfall or runoff to a chain of waterways and golf
course lakes. Changes in the presently almost non-














existent drainage to one which is effective will
adversely effect the principal native plant, which
is sawgrass (Cladium jamaicensis); but this plant
is losing out to the Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendra)
infestation. Alteration in the drainage system
will also tend to limit the Melaleuca.

There is at present no landscape planting on the
applicant's property. The future landscape plan
for the property will take into account drainage
patterns and maintenance needs.

(b) WHAT QUANTITY OF EROSION IS LIKELY DUE TO THE RE-
MOVAL OF NATURAL VEGETATION?

As natural vegetation is removed during the phased
development, new and more desirable plants will be
used for revegetation to provide a positive control
of erosion. The variation in topography averages
only 2-3 feet over the entire tract, therefore,
erosion will be minimal. Cut areas, banks and
areas of spoil placement will be graded, seeded,
and mulched to reduce erosion caused by wind action.

(c) WHAT TYPE AND EXTENT OF BUFFER AREAS ARE PROVIDED
BETWEEN NATURAL AND DEVELOPED AREAS?

A major portion of the site is designated for land-
scape improvement with indigenous planting. The
buffer areas will contain lawn and native plant
material. The total site is lacking in unique or
natural areas, therefore, a negative impact on the
site due to development will not accrue.

(d) WHAT EFFECT WILL ALTERATION OF AQUATIC VEGETATION
HAVE ON WATER QUALITY AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE?

Aquatic plants, except for sawgrass (Cladium
jamaicensis), are virtually absent on the project
property. Since water retention is planned for the
runoff water and the lakes are being designed to
support numerous species of desirable aquatic plants,
the resultant water quality is expected to be super-
ior to that present in the adjacent canals. Nu-
trient uptake is expected to be improved over
existing utilization, and to yield water with a
very low nutrient content.














3. ANIMAL LIFE


Since the areas already overgrown by the melaleuca and
Schinus are essentially devoid of ground cover, virtu-
ally all native animal life has been displaced as a
consequence of these imports.

(a) INCLUDE INFORMATION ON MAMMALS, REPTILES AND BIRDS

Only small mammals and reptiles presently reside
in the area since the existing vegetation is not
conducive to larger species. The bird population
is restricted and the population density is low
due to generally poor food conditions. A listing
of the observed species that inhabit or frequent
the area is given in Appendix 12.

(b) FOR EACH OF THE THREE TYPES OF ANIMALS IDENTIFY
ANY FEEDING, BREEDING OR NESTING SITES.

Small mammals and reptiles inhabit those portions
not already overgrown by imports. From the survey
made by the applicant's ecologist, nesting areas
appeared to be absent.

(c) WHAT MEASURES WILL BE TAKEN TO INSURE OR ENHANCE
SURVIVAL AND REPRODUCTION OF INDIGENOUS SPECIES?

Since the proposed development will be carried out
over an extended period of time, created natural
areas will be progressively prepared along with
other aspects of the project. Accordingly, the
indigenous species will migrate into these areas
as rapidly as they are prepared. It is believed
the recreated areas, with development, may limit
the incoming population and diversity of native
animal species, but the habitat will be superior
to the one which would result from a no-development
approach.

4. AQUATIC LIFE (INCLUDES FISH, AMPHIBIANS, AND AQUATIC
INVERTEBRATES AND INSECTS).

(a) WHAT SPECIES CURRENTLY EXIST IN THE AREA UNDER CON-
SIDERATION? USE ACCEPTABLE SCIENTIFIC TAXONOMY
AND TREAT THE BENTHIC, LITTORAL, LIMNETIC AND TIDAL
ZONE POPULATIONS SEPARATELY.













(b) IDENTIFY AND SHOW THE LOCATIONS OF THOSE WETLANDS
AND WATER AREAS ON OR NEAR THE SITE THAT WILL BE
MODIFIED IN ANY WAY BY THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT.
(SEE MASTER PLAN IN QUESTION 15)

There are no natural waterbodies present in the
project site. Several manmade canals are present
along the southern edge of the property. Areas
of standing water occur during the rainy period
but these are ephemeral. During the dry periods,
the canals are often devoid of water. Therefore,
no stable aquatic community exists in the area.
Undoubtedly, various aquatic species are introduced
from time to time, but they are lost during any ex-
tended dry period.

(c) WHAT NEW OR ADDITIONAL CHEMICAL OR BIOLOGICAL ELE-
MENTS WILL BE INTRODUCED TO AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS
AS A RESULT OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT AND WHAT
IS THE EFFECT OF THE RESULTANT NEW CONCENTRATIONS
IN RELATION TO THE TOLERANCE LEVELS OF AQUATIC
LIFE IN THE RECEIVING AREAS.

The construction of lakes and waterways for runoff
water management will permit a stable aquatic com-
munity to develop and flourish. The excess water
from such storage will flow into the South New
River Canal of the Central and South Florida Flood
Control District.

The aquatic environment will be enlarged by the
creation of lakes and waterways. These will pro-
vide habitat for a variety of biological elements:
fish, invertebrates, and aquatic plants. Most of
the "new" species will be introduced by transient
aquatic birds.

Chemical elements might be introduced into the
aquatic environment because of long range develop-
ment. These elements would consist principally
of nutrients, trace metals, hydrocarbons, and
pesticides that are present in urban runoff.

Nutrients, trace elements, hydrocarbons, and
pesticides will be removed through natural pro-
cesses in the course of overland flow and lake
retention on the applicant's property. The ap-
plicant's ecologist states that the quality of
water flowing into the receiving waters will












likely be of better quality than that of the exist-
ing canal. Thus, water discharge from the appli-
cant's property should constitute no problems of
tolerance levels to aquatic life in receiving waters.

5. ENDANGERED SPECIES

(a) ANSWER THE QUESTIONS UNDER ANIMAL LIFE AND AQUATIC
LIFE FOR ANY SPECIES OF THOSE LISTED IN ATTACHMENT
3 THAT FREQUENT, BREED, NEST, FEED, OR ARE RESIDENT
I1N THE AREA.

(b) WHAT ACTIONS WILL BE TAKEN IN THE PROPOSED DEVELOP-
MENT AREA TO MAINTAIN OR ENHANCE THE EXISTENCE OF
THE SPECIES IN (a).

No rare or endangered species presently utilize the
project area in any capacity.

Hopefully, the development of improved environmental
areas will induce some of these creatures to adopt
this area.

6. SOILS

Surface soils at the proposed development site consist
of four main soil series. These series are the Lauder-
hill, Dania, Hallandale and Plantation, all of which are
considered as naturally occurring. Refer to the Soils
Series map in Question 15 for the location of these soil
series.

The Lauderhill Series are moderately thick, poorly drained,
organic soils with layers of well decomposed organic ma-
terial occurring to depths of about 31 inches. Beyond
this depth hard limestone rock can be found. This series
has formed in hydrophytic plant remains in small depres-
sions and large fresh water marshes.

The Dania Series are shallow, very poorly drained, or-
ganic soils that have well decomposed organic materials.
Sandy mineral materials about 2 inches thick over hard
rock are found at depths of less than 70 inches. This
series has formed in depressions, fresh water marshes,
and swamps from the remains of hydrophytic plants.

The Hallandale Series are approximately level, poorly
drained, and rapidly permeable sand soils with a high
water table. This series is found to have a thin black
and grayish horizon, and a thin discontinuous brownish












or yellowish horizon immediately above hard porous lime-
stone at a depth of about 16 inches. The Hallandale
Series has developed in thin beds of sandy marine sedi-
ments.

The Plantation Series, of which very little is found
at the proposed development site, are very poorly drained
and rapidly permeable sand soils. This series is found
to have an organic layer about 10 inches thick on the
surface of a mineral soil. The mineral soil has a dark
gray sandy subsurface layer, and a pale brown horizon
over limestone at depths of 35 inches below the surface.
This series is found occurring in transitional positions
between the mineral and organic soils.

(a) DESCRIBE EACH SOILS SERIES IN TERMS OF:

(1) DUST POTENTIAL
(2) EROSION POTENTIAL
(3) DEPTH TO BEDROCK
(4) CORROSION POTENTIAL
(5) SHRINK-SWELL POTENTIAL
(6) PERMEABILITY AND PERCOLATION RATE
(7) DEPTH OF WET SEASON WATER TABLE
(8) DURATION OF WET SEASON WATER TABLE
(9) PRESUMPTIVE BEARING VALUE
(10) RESERVOIR EMBANKMENT SUITABILITY

Refer to Table 4 for a tabulation of soils descrip-
tion. This table answers Question 20.B.6.(a), (1)
through (10).

(11) SPECIFY THE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR EACH OF
ITEMS I THROUGH 10. PROVIDE DETAILED RESULTS
OF SOILS PERCOLATION TESTS, BY A REGISTERED OR
LICENSED SOILS TESTING FIRM DETERMINING STEADY
PERCOLATION RATE CAPABILITY OF THE SOILS IN
THE PROJECT AREA

SOURCES OF INFORMATION FOR 20.B.6.(a), (1)
THROUGH (10).

Items (1) through (10): the source of information
was the United States Department of Agriculture
Soil Conservation Service.

A copy of the performed percolation tests within
the project is included as Appendix 6, and the
Aerial map in Question 15 shows the location of
each test site.















Corros ion
Potential Shrink
Dust Erosion Depth to for Steel/ Swell
Potential Potential Bedrock Concrete Potential


Permea-
bility
Rate


Wet Season
Water Table
Depth


Wet Season
Water Table
Durat i on


Presumptive
Bearing
Value


Reservoi r
Embank-
ment
Suitability


Low 20-40
inches


Low to
Moderate


Low 14-20
i n ches


High


High


6-20 0-10
inches/ inches


Moderate


Hallen- Moderate
dale to
High


Planta- Low to
tion Moderate


Mod.
to
High


7-20
in ches


28-56
inches


Hi gh


High


Sl i ght
to
Moderate


6-20
inches/
hr.


6-20
inches/
hr.


Low
to
High


6-10
inches


6-10
inches


TABLE 4 SOILS DESCRIPTION


Soil
Series


Lauder
hill


Low to
Moderate


Dania


High


High


Moderate


6-20
inches/


0-10
inches


6-12
months


6-12
months


Low


4-6
months


2-6
months


High


Low













(b) SOILS SUITABILITY FOR DEVELOPMENT


ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS ON THE DEVELOPMENT SUIT-
ABILITY OF THE SOILS (REFERENCE: "AN ASSESSMENT
OF THE DEVELOPMENT SUITABILITY OF LAND IN SOUTH
FLORIDA." SOUTH FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL,
JUNE 1973).

As shown in Table 4 under "Soils Description" and
on the Soils map, 22 percent of the site is covered
with the Hallandale Soil Series. This soil series
is classified by the South Florida Regional Plan-
ning Council staff as Marginal Two because of its
soil composition, vegetation and hydrological
characteristics. According to the "Intrinsic
Suitability Matrix," Page 16 of the above refer-
ence, the Hallandale Series has severe limitations
for development. The major limitations of this
soil series concerns its load bearing character-
istics and flooding potential. To alleviate these
limitations, it is planned to remove the organic
soils underlying significant load areas, such as
roads, parking lots and house pads, and refill
these areas with soils of good load bearing
characteristics from the excavated lakes and canals.
The flood potential will be improved to acceptable
limits by filling the residential areas to an
elevation of 6 to 7 feet mean sea level. Adequate
drainage will be provided and 1800 acres of lakes
canals, lagoons and swales will provide on-site
retention of storm water and an area for direct
recharge of the groundwater aquifer.

The remaining 78 percent of the site is covered
with the Lauderhill, Plantation and Dania Soils
Series which are classified as Marginal Three.
Their limitations encompass poor load bearing
characteristics as a result of between 16 to 20
inches of organic, and flooding caused by low
ground elevations and/or poor drainage. These
soils act as water storage areas for most of the
year and provide recharge to the groundwater.

With development these areas will be replaced by
1800 acres of water storage area in the form of
lakes, canals, lagoons and swales in addition to
1200 acres of residential and recreational open
areas which will be available for water retention













and groundwater recharge during heavy rainfalls.
As indicated by the water budget outlined in
Question 26, this recharge area will provide ade-
quate recharge to offset withdrawals, evaporation
and evapotranspiration as a result of the project.
Only the organic soils underlying areas such as
roads, parking lots and house pads will be removed
and replaced by suitable fill. The remainder of
the site will have fill placed over the surface
organic. The flood hazard will be reduced by im-
plementation of a storm drainage plan as outlined
in Question 26. Basic points of this plan include
minimum residential floor elevations above the 100
year flood elevation of 7.5 feet mean sea level,
providing 6,000 acre-feet of storage for storm run-
off and a pump discharge of a maximum 1-1/4" of
water per twenty-four hour day to maintain designed
water elevations.

The fill required for load bearing areas will be
obtained from the excavation of the 1,800 acre lake
and canal system. The organic soils removed from
road beds, building pads and parking lots will be
placed on the open areas such as parks, golf course
and residential yards. The modifications proposed
for the project will correct deficiencies presently
existing with the soils and provide an area suit-
able for development. An adverse impact is not
expected as a result of the soil series modifications.

7. LAKES, RIVERS, STREAMS, CREEKS, SWAMPS, MARSHES AND
STRANDS

(a) OUTLINE THE BOUNDARIES OF ANY OF THE ABOVE AQUATIC
SYSTEMS AND THEIR FLOODPLAINS THAT OCCUR IN OR ARE
ADJACENT TO THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT.

The Location map in Question 15 shows the location
of Conservation Areas 2B and 3A both of which are
in close proximity to the project area. Immedi-
ately south of the site is the South New River Canal
which carries water from Conservation Area No. 3A
and drainage water from surface runoff in this area.
The project area in itself consists of low, flat
terrain with little natural drainage. During cer-
tain portions of the year much of the lowland area
is inundated by water and its naturally wet condi-
tion is evidenced by the presence of sawgrass and
other water-oriented types of vegetation.













(b) IDENTIFY ANY OF THE ABOVE AREAS THAT WILL BE ALTERED
BY THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT.

The proposed development will modify the existing
topography by construction of a series of lakes
and canals to provide drainage throughout the pro-
ject area. The spoil created by this excavation
will be used to raise the elevation of the remain-
ing portions of the property. Most of the area is
presently vegetated by lowland type vegetation and
will be replaced by vegetation native to higher
elevations. The periphery of the lake and canal
system will remain in lowland and aquatic type
vegetation. These vegetation types are capable of
removing nutrients from the water as the drainage
flow enters the system.

(c). HOW WILL SUCH ALTERATION AFFECT THE ASSOCIATED
ECOSYSTEM.

The modification of the project area will totally
change the ecosystem of the area. As it exists,
the project areas ecosystem is practically devoid
of aquatic or animal life. The existing natural
vegetation is being replaced by Melaleuca and
Schinus which are exotic, not indigenous, species.
(See Questions 20.B.2, 20.B.3, 20.B.4, and 20.B.5).

The adjustment of the existing environment with its
associated elimination of native vegetation would
in most cases have an adverse effect on an area's
ecosystem. However, because of the lack of an
established native ecosystem in the proposed pro-
ject area the resultant adverse effect is expected
to be minimal.

Some aquatic and animal life will be encouraged to
inhabit the area as indigenous vegetation is rein-
troduced to the area.

8. HISTORICAL OR ARCHEOLOGICAL SITES

(a) SHOW THE LOCATION THAT DESCRIBED THE SIGNIFICANCE
OF ANY SUCH SITE ON OR ADJACENT TO THE PROPOSED
DEVELOPMENT.

The National Register of Historic Places has been
consulted with the finding that there are no his-
toric places currently designated in Broward County













outside the City of Fort Lauderdale. In consulting
the National Registry of National Landmarks we find
that there are no designated natural landmarks
within Broward County nor closer than Martin County
to the north, Monroe County to the south, or Collier
County to the southwest. The proposed development
cannot be expected to cause detectable deterioration
of any designated historic place or natural landmark.

Contact has been made with the State of Florida,
Department of State, Bureau of Historic Sites & Prop-
erties, regarding a site evaluation for historical
or archeological significance. A letter from the
State Archeologist and Bureau Chief (see Appendix
7), states that the proposed project area has five
archeological sites recorded by the Broward County
Historical Society. This information indicated
that a professional survey need not be made of this
area and that a county wide survey which will in-
clude this area is planned during the summer of
1974.

It is planned to continue working with the state and
local historical and archeological organizations so
as to protect sites of significance.

9. PARKS AND RECREATION AREAS

(a) IDENTIFY ALL STATE OR NATIONAL PARKS AND RECREATION
AREAS WITHIN 50 MILES OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT,
ALL REGIONAL-SCALE (250 1,000 ACRES) PARKS AND
THEIR FACILITIES WITHIN 20 MILES, AND ALL COMMUNITY-
SCALE PARKS AND THEIR FACILITIES WITHIN 5 MILES.

The impact on these parks caused by this develop-
ment would be insignificant due to the distance of
the parks from the site and the fact that many
amenities similar to National, State, and local
park facilities will be provided at the site.

NATIONAL PARKS

There is one National park located within 50 miles
of the development.

STATE PARK

There are four State parks located within 50 miles
of the development in Dade, Broward, Monroe and











Palm Beach County's. The closest is the 180 acre
Hugh Taylor Birch State Park approximately 18
miles away. The other three range from 30 to 48
miles from the site. There are five regional
scale parks that are approximately within 20 miles
of the proposed site.

LOCAL PARKS

There are three Community Scale Parks within 5
miles of the proposed development and three recrea-
tion areas ranging from 1/2 mile to 12 miles from
the proposed site.


NATIONAL PARKS (within 50 miles)

Everglades National Park (Dade & Monroe
Counties)


Campi ng
Picnicking
Boat i ng
Fishing
Guided Tours
Hiking
Museums


MILES ACRES


50 1,400,533


Cab ins
Motel
Groceries
Restaurant
Post Office
Passive


STATE PARKS: (within 50 miles)

Hugh Taylor Birch (Broward County)


Picnicking
Boat i ng
Fish ing
Swimming


Skin Diving
Nature Trails
Guided Tours
Pass i ve


Cape Florida (Dade County)


Picnicking
Boating
Fishing
Swimming
Camping


Skin Diving
Nature Trails
Guided Tours
Museum Exhibits
Pass ive


(subme rged)


Grossman Hammock (Dade County)

Picnicking
Swimming
Fishing
Camping
Nature Trails
Passive


640











MILES ACRES
Pahokee (Palm Beach County) ~ 30

Picnicking
Swimming
Fishing
Boating
Camping
Pass ive
Groce ries/Suppl ies

REGIONAL SCALE PARKS: (250 1,000 acres) and their
facilities within 20 miles of proposed site.

Markham Park (Broward County) (609 acres)

Existing Activities:

Camping Grounds
Picnic Areas



C. B. Smith Park (Broward County) (320 acres)

Existing Activities:
(Undeveloped)





Greynolds Park (Dade County (228 acres)

Existing Activities:

Group Camping
Picnic Grounds
Fishing
Boating
Nature Trai Is
Golf Course


Thompson (Dade County) (618 acres)

Existing Activities:

Camp Grounds
Fishing
Nature Trails
Airboat Rides
















Gratigny (Dade County (515 acres)


Undeveloped


RECREATION AREAS: (within 50 miles of proposed site)

Everglades Holiday Park (1/2 mile)

Guide Service
Boat Tours
Bait
Fishing
Picnicking
Camping Area
Equipment sales & rentals

Saw Grass Camp (2 miles)

Equipment rentals
Air Boat Rides
Guide Service
Bait
Picnic Facilities
Fishing

Loxahatchee Recreation Area (12 miles)

Equipment sales & rentals
Guide Service
Fishing
Picnic Area


COMMUNITY SCALE PARKS: and their facilities within five miles of
proposed development.

Camp Seminole (120 acres)
South Florida Council of Boy Scouts

Existing Facilities:

Camps i tes
Boating















10. GEOLOGY


(a) PROVIDE A BRIEF STATEMENT ON THE GEOLOGY OF THE
AREA AND AN APPRAISAL OF THE WATER-BEARING
CAPACITY AND WATER QUALITY IN THE GEOLOGIC FORMA-
TIONS UNDERLYING THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT

The State of Florida occupies part of a much larger
geographic unit, the Floridian Plateau. This pla-
teau separates the deep water of the Gulf of Mexico
from the deep water of the Atlantic Ocean and for
millions of years has been alternately dry land or
covered by shallow seas.

The geologic formations that occur under the pro-
posed development site generally exist over much
of Broward County and in most of Southeast Florida.
The surface layer is composed of loosely packed,
usually sorted sand, and is referred to as Pamlico
Sand. This layer covers most of Broward County
except in and around the Conservation Area where
the surface is composed of organic soils. The
Pamlico Sand layer varies in thickness from 40 feet
near the coast, tapering to non-existence west of
Broward County. The permeability of the sand near
the coast is high but is reduced in the west by
the addition of silts and organic material.

Underlying the Pamlico Sand is the Fort Thompson
formation, composed of white sandy limestone,
cavernous sandstone and thin beds of dense fresh-
water limestone. In northeast Broward County this
formation is of non-marine origin and is referred
to as the Anastasia formation. The Fort Thompson -
Anastasia formation is highly permeable, thick and
cavernous near the coast. It thins out and becomes
less permeable to the west and finally tapers to
non-existence in Hendry and Collier Counties.

Below the Fort Thompson Anastasia formation,
underlying most of the Everglades and extending
eastward to the coast is a layer known as
Caloosahatchee Marl. The Caloosahatchee is a gray
to green marl that is of low permeability and con-
sidered a poor water source. Water obtained from
this marl is hard, highly colored, highly miner-
alized and generally unfit for use.














The next lower layer, the Tamiami formation, is
composed principally of limestone, calcareous sand-
stone and pockets of quartz sand. It is considered
a good source of water, except in zones of salt
water intrusion and where intermingling with the
Caloosahatchee Marl has occurred, lowering the
yield and the water quality.

Beneath the Tamiami formation is the Hawthorn for-
mation. This formation is relatively impermeable
and acts as an aquiclude (non-water-bearing bed)
between the underlying highly mineralized artesian
waters and the limestone and freshwater above.

Below the Hawthorn formation approximately 900 feet
below sea level is the Tampa limestone. The waters
of this limestone are mineralized and under artesian
conditions. Beneath the Tampa limestone is the
Suwanee limestone. The Suwanee is a granular,
compact limestone. It is permeable and contains
mineralized water under artesian conditions.

Below the Suwanee is a series of limestones that
are very similar and can be distinguished only with
the aid of fossils. The uppermost limestone of
these is approximately 100 to 350 feet thick and
called the Ocala. This is an excellent water bear-
ing formation except in South Florida where the
water is saline. The middle layer, the Avon Park
limestone, is generally an excellent water bearing
formation. However, the water is highly mineral-
ized and too salty and corrosive for most uses.
The lowest layer is the Lake City limestone. This
is a dark brown dolometic limestone with little
water-bearing value.

The Tampa, Suwannee, Ocala, Avon Park and Lake City
limestones comprise a hydrologic unit known as the
Florida aquifer. The Florida aquifer underlies
nearly all of Florida and is found in part of the
Southeast United States. This aquifer furnishes a
large part of the groundwater supplies for the
state. It is considered a major source of water
for North and central Florida. In Southern Florida,
the waters of the Florida aquifer are highly mineral-
ized, very saline, very corrosive and contain hydro-
gen sulfide. This water can be used only for cer-
tain special uses such as industrial cooling and air
conditioning.













The Pamlico Sands, Fort Thompson-Anastasia forma-
tion and the Tamiami formation, with the addition
of Miami Oolite in Dade County, comprise a hydro-
logic unit known as the Biscayne Aquifer. This
aquifer is an excellent water-bearing source,
supplying most of the potable water for Dade and
Broward Counties.

(b) PROVIDE AN ANALYSIS OF GROUND AND SURFACE WATER
SYSTEM TO ESTABLISH THE EXTENT TO WHICH CHANGES
DUE TO THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WILL AFFECT OTHER
USERS IN THE AREA.

An analysis of the existing surface water system
is included in Question 19.B.2 with a quality
analysis tabulated in Table 3. An analysis of a
sample drawn from an existing well adjacent to the
project in 1969 is included as Appendix 8, Plate
27.E.-I and provides an indication of groundwater
quality.

The existing surface water drainage system allows
for direct discharge into the South New River
Canal or as in the case of the northern portion of
the project allows water to stand during the major-
ity of the wet season. The effect of modifications
on the surface drainage characteristics of the
proposed development property is to retain, on-site,
79 percent of the runoff from a ten year frequency
storm. To maintain water surface elevation below
flood stages during storms, discharges up to 1-1/4
inches per day would be made into the South New
River Canal. The increased on-site retention, with
a storage volume of approximately 6,000 acre feet
and the excavation of the canal and lake system
through the first lens of limestone, will allow
greater recharge of the shallow aquifer. By in-
creasing the retention of site drainage, the
quality of water discharged to the South New River
Canal can be regulated, whereas with the present
system of drainage all water regardless of quality
is discharged into the South New River Canal.

As indicated in Question 27, approximately 15.0
million gallons per day (MGD) of potable water will
be required at the project's completion to service
the project's demand. This water will be drawn
from the Biscayne aquifer located below the pro-
posed development at a depth of approximately 80
feet. A yearly water budget prepared for the pro-













ject indicates that of the 59.8 inches of rainfall
received by the project yearly, approximately 20.2
inches will be required to recharge the aquifer to
compensate for withdrawals by the development. An
additional 23.2 inches will be lost by evapotrans-
piration and an additional 13.4 inches of water per
year will be lost by evaporation from the system of
lakes and canals. This leaves a total of 3.0 inches
of rainfall that is in excess of what would be used
by the project and may be lost by seepage of ground-
water toward the ocean or discharged into the South
New River Canal. By management of the water re-
sources of the proposed development, a minimum im-
pact on other users in the area or on the region's
water supply will result.

(c) WATER LEVELS AND DEPTH OF SALTWATER INTRUSION

PROVIDE DATA ON:

1) EXISTING WET AND DRY SEASONS GROUNDWATER
TABLE ELEVATIONS OR DEPTH BELOW GROUND;
2) THE HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL CONES OF DE-
PRESSION THAT WOULD BE ASSOCIATED WITH
MAXIMUM PUMPING OF ANY PLANNED WELLS;
3) RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXISTING GROUNDWATER
LEVELS AND BOTH EXISTING AND PROPOSED SUR-
FACE WATER LEVELS;
4) WHERE APPLICABLE IN THE COASTAL ZONE, IN-
CLUDE THE DEPTH TO THE ZONE OF SALTWATER
INTRUSION.

1. EXISTING WET AND DRY SEASONS GROUNDWATER
TABLE ELEVATIONS OR DEPTH BELOW GROUND.

The existing water table in the area of the proposed
project has a gradual slope from the northeast to
the southwest. This slope is a result of the pro-
ject's close proximity to Conservation Areas 2B and
3A where water impoundment has created high water
tables. During prolonged dry periods the water
table in the project area is between 2-1/2 to 3 feet
MSL.(1) During extremely wet periods of the year the
water table is between 5 and 7 feet MSL.(l) During
periods of normal rainfall the average water table
within the project is approximately 4 feet MSL.
It is planned that the maintenance of this water

(1) U.S. Department of the Interior,
Geological Survey 'Water in Broward County."
Map series Number 29, November 1968.














level, within the lake and canal system of the de-
velopment, will fluctuate with the water table of
the area during normal rainfall periods, but that
the level will be reduced during storms or heavy
rainfall Is.

2. THE HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL CONES OF DEPRESSION
THAT WOULD BE ASSOCIATED WITH MAXIMUM PUMPING
OF ANY PLANNED WELLS.

Based on well performance data obtained from an
existing well immediately northeast and adjacent
to the applicant's development and coupled with
drilling logs showing limestone, sand and mixtures
thereof to a depth of approximately 75 feet, it is
estimated that the typical cone of depression will
be defined by vertical drawdowns of approximately
2 feet. The radius of the cone of influence ex-
tended outward approximately 200 feet from the
well. As part of the potable water installation
a series of test wells will be sunk to determine
the exact well pumping characteristics.

3. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXISTING GROUNDWATER
LEVELS AND BOTH EXISTING AND PROPOSED SURFACE
WATER LEVELS.

No changes are planned between the relationship
of existing groundwater levels and existing and
proposed surface water levels. It is planned
that the lake and canal system will be maintained
at approximately 4 .feet MSL, which is the approximate
water table elevation at this time.

4. WHERE APPLICABLE IN THE COASTAL ZONE INCLUDE
THE DEPTH TO THE ZONE OF SALT WATER INTRUSION.

The eastern edge of the proposed project is located
approximately 18 miles from the coast of the
Atlantic Ocean, and adjacent to Conservation Areas
2B and 3A which are utilized as water impoundment
areas. The high water head maintained in the Water
Conservation Area in conjunction with the water
retention areas created within the proposed develop-
ment by excavation of a lake and canal system, is
expected to offset the effect of water withdrawals
from the aquifer by the development. The proposed
development is thus not expected to have an effect
on salt water intrusion within the region.




























Question 20.C.


C. SPECIFY THE PLANNING AND DESIGN PROCEDURES THAT WILL BE
USED TO MINIMIZE THE AMOUNT OF CLEAR-CUTTING OR ELIMINATION
OF EXISTING NATURAL AREAS AND TO RESTORE, EITHER BY LAND-
SCAPING OR REINTRODUCTION OF NATIVE VEGETATION, ANY AREAS
THAT ARE NECESSARILY OR INADVERTENTLY CLEARED. SPECIFY
THE METHODS AND PROCEDURES THAT WILL BE USED DURING DE-
VELOPMENT TO MINIMIZE UNPLANNED DAMAGE OR ELIMINATION OF
NATURAL AREAS.

The site contains very little environmentally desirable
vegetation or other natural areas. The reintroduction of
indigenous trees, palms, shrubs, and grass will be the over-
all landscape approach used in establishing an aesthetically
pleasing environment.

To implement construction each phased development area will
be isolated by elevated grading of the perimeter, or earth
dikes to control fill and drainage flow from leaving the
construction area. This procedure will be employed to pro-
tect all adjacent property and the undisturbed drainage area.














Question 21.A.


A. SPECIFY THE ESTIMATED ANNUAL EXPENDITURES, DURING THE DE-
VELOPMENT PERIOD, FOR:

1. LAND
2. CAPITAL
3. RAW MATERIALS
4. CONSTRUCTION LABOR
5. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
6. ADVERTISING AND SALES
7. OTHER


(See Table 5 which follows)


B. SPECIFY THE ESTIMATED AMOUNTS THAT WILL BE SPENT IN THE
ABOVE CATEGORIES:

1. INSIDE THE REGION
2. OUTSIDE THE REGION, BUT WITHIN FLORIDA
-3. OUTSIDE FLORIDA

The estimated annual expenditures for the above categories,
by year of expenditure, during the development period (1976-
2013), are presented in Tables 6, 7 and 8 which follow.
These costs include:

(a) Land clearing and preparation
(b) Two 18-hole golf courses
(c) 40,800 dwelling units
(d) Neighborhood commercial centers
(e) Civic and cultural areas within a community
center complex
(f) Industrial Parks
(g) Roads
(h) Utility systems

The estimated annual expenditures for the above items, by
year of expenditure, are divided into three tables to illus-
trate the portions to be spent in the six county region,
(Broward, Palm Beach, Dade, Martin, Monroe, and St. Lucie
Counties), outside the six county region but in Florida,
and those expenditures to be spent outside the State of
Florida.










TABLE 5
TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUAL EXPENDITURES
($000)


RAW CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONAL ADVERTISING
YEAR LAND CAPITAL MATERIALS LABOR SERVICES AND SALES OTHER TOTAL


420
421
510
510
700
701
611
610
805
805
657
656
324
324
294
295
353
352
337
337


$ -0-
8,235
14,053
17,123
24,283
23,646
33,332
29,675
32,363
28,842
32,345
30,191
25,016
23,004
24,254
26,746
18,392
21,752
19,600
17,887


1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996-
2000
2001-
2005
2006-
2010
2011-
2010


TOTAL -0- 10,022 701,090


$ 7,070
11,908
16,826
18,630
26,033
27,643
26,507
27,689
32,540
30,472
30,029
28,764
20,133
18,951
19,147
20,656
16,724
18,697
17,175
16,169

44,642

41,122

39,595

21,675
578,797


$ 1,110I
2,878
4,411
5,108
7,188
7,327
8,548
8,195
9,272
8,473
8,911
8,422
6,450
5,994
6,314
6,772
5,017
5,779
5,254
4,865

17,236

15,877

15,288

8,369
183,058


$ 370
1 ,055
1,618
1 ,873
2,636
2,687
3,134
3,005
3,400
3,107
3,267
3,088
2,365
2,198
2,315
2,483
1 ,839
2,119
1,926
1 ,784

6,320

5,822

5,606

3,069
67,086


$ 236
671
1 ,029
1 ,192
1 ,677
1 ,710
1 ,995
1,912
2,163
1,977
2,179
1 ,965
1 ,505
1 ,399
1,473
1 ,580
1,171
1,348
1 ,226
1,135

4,022

3,705

3,567

1,953
42,690


$ 9,206
25,168
38,447
44,436
62,517
63,714
74,127
71,086
80,543
73,676
77,288
73,086
55,793
51,870
53,797
58,532
43,496
50,047
45,518
42,177

148,228

136,544

131,475

71,972
1 ,582,743


-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-


-0- 76,008

-0- 70,018

-0- 67,419

-0- 36,906










TABLE 6


TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUAL EXPENDITURES WITHIN THE REGION
($000)


RAW
YEAR LAND CAPITAL MATERIALS


CONSTRUCTION
LABOR


PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES


ADVERTISING
AND SALES


105
105
128
128
175
175
153
153
201
201
164
164
81
81
74
74
88
88
84
84


-0-
7,000
11,945
14,555
20,641
20,099
28,332
25,224
27,509
24,516
27,493
25,662
21 ,264
19,553
20,616
22,734
15,633
18,489
16,660
15,204


1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996-
2000
2001-
2005
2006-
2010
2011-
2013
TOTAL


-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-


31,370
595,927


OTHER


TOTAL


0 64,607

0 59,515

0 57,306


0
2,506


$ 7,070
11,908
16,826
18,630
26,033
27,643
26,507
27,689
32,540
30,472
30,029
28,764
20,133
19,951
19,947
20,656
16,724
18,697
17,175
16,169

44,642

41,122

39,595

21,675
580,597


$ 999
2,590
3,970
4,597
6,469
6,594
7,693
7,376
8,345
7,626
8,020
7,580
5,805
5,395
5,683
6,095
4,515
5,201
4,729
4,379

15,512

14,289

13,759

7,532
164,753


$ 730
1 ,136
1 ,474
1,627
2,085
2,115
2,383
2,306
2,543
2,367
2,463
2,363
1 ,922
1 ,822
1,892
1,993
1,606
1,774
1,659
1,573

4,326

3,996

3,867

2,364
52,386


$ 201
570
875
1,013
1,426
1,454
1,696
1,625
1,839
1,681
1,767
1,670
1 ,279
1,189
1 ,252
1,343
995
1,146
1,042
965

3,419

3,149

3,032

1,660
36,288


$ 9,105
23,309
35,218
40,550
56,829
58,080
66,764
64,373
72,977
66,863
69,936
66,203
50,484
47,991
49,464
52,895
39,561
45,395
41,349
38,374

132,506

122,071

117,559

64,601
1,432,457


OTHER TOTAL





TABLE 7


TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUAL


EXPENDITURES OUTSIDE THE REGION,
($000)


INSIDE FLORIDA


YEAR
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984

1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992

1993
1994

1995-


LAND
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-


1996-
2000 -0- -0- 7,601 -0- 1,379 967 420 10,349
2001-
2001- -0- -0- 7,002 -0- 1,270 917 371 9,560
2005
206- -0- -0- 6,742 -0- 1,223 896 357 9,218
2010
2011- -0- -0- 3,691 -0- 670 642 195 5,198
2017
TOTAL -0- -0- 70,110 -0- 14,646 14,763 4P222 103,791


CAPITAL
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-


RAW
MATERIALS
-0-
824
1,405
1,712
2,428
2,365

3,333
2,968

3,236
2,884

3,235
3,019
2,502
2,300
2,425
2,675
1,839
2,175
1,960

1 ,789


CONSTRUCTION
LABOR
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-


PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
89
230

353
409

575
586
684
656

742
678

713
674

516
480

505
542
401
462
420
389


ADVERTISING
AND SALES

383
441

497
522
599
604
648
636

675
646
662
644

575
555
567
583
519
547
528
51 3


OTHER
24
67
103
119
168

171
200
191
216
198
208

197
151
140
147

158
117
135
123
114


TOTAL
496

1 ,562
2,358
2,762

3,770
3,726
4,865
4,451
4,869
4,406
4,818

4,534
3,741
3,475
3,644
3,958
2,876

3,319
3,031
2 805












YEAR

1976

1977
1978

1979
1980
1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987
1988

1989

1990

1991
1992

19q3

1994

1995
1996-
2000
2001-
2005
2006-
2010
2011-
2013
TOTAL


LAND

-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-


CAPITAL

315
316

382
382

525

525
458

457
6004
6004

493
492

243

243

220
221

265

264

253

253

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

7,515


TABLE 8

TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUAL EXPENDITURES OUTSIDE FLORIDA
($000)

RAW CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONAL ADV

MATERIALS LABOR SERVICES AN

-0- -0- 22
412 -0- 58

703 -0- 88
856 -0- 102

1,214 -0- 144

1,182 -0- 147

1,667 -0- 171
1,484 -0- 164

1,618 -0- 185
1,442 -0- 170

1,617 -0- 178

1,510 -0- 168

1,250 -0- 129

1,150 -0- 120
1,213 -0- 126

1,337 -0- 135
920 -0- 100

1,088 -0- 116

980 -0- 105

894 -0- 97

3,800 -0- 345

3,501 -0- 318

3,371 -0- 306

1.845 -0- 167


3505


-0- 3,661


ERTISING
D SALES

-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-


. wE


~5,O55


OTHER

-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-


-0- 3,661


TOTAL

337
786
1,173

1 ,340
1,883

1 ,854
2,296
2,105

2,407
2,216

2,288

2,170

1,623

1 ,513

1,559

1,693
1 ,285

1 ,468

1 ,338
1,244

4,145

3,819

3,677

2,012

46,231













The land columns show no expenditures because the land was
fully paid for by the applicant before the inception of the
project.

Capital computations are based upon the expenditures by the
applicant for the capital required in the basic land develop-
ment process.

Construction labor includes expenditures for basic land de-
velopment as well as anticipated labor costs.

C. IF ANY OF THE DEVELOPMENT WILL BE EXEMPT FROM PROPERTY OR
OTHER TAXES, SPECIFY ITS NATURE AND FAIR MARKET VALUE.

It is not presently anticipated that any portion of the de-
velopment will be exempt from property or other taxes. Re-
served sites for such uses as schools and churches can be
provided for within the development. These areas will be
removed from the tax rolls as the facilities are constructed
in the future. Their value at the time of construction may
be estimated at $25,000 per acre.

*In addition, there may be several hundred acres removed
from the tax roles when put into use as lakes and canals,
however, title to this land will undoubtedly go to a
homeowners association for maintenance, or to the proposed
improvement district, and it is not certain, at this time
whether this type of ownership will be exempt from property
or other taxes.

D. SPECIFY THE FAIR MARKET VALUE OF ANY LAND OR FACILITIES WHOSE
FEE SIMPLE TITLE IS DONATED TO A GOVERNMENTAL BODY FOR PUBLIC
PURPOSES.

At the present time there are no specific lands scheduled for
donation. In the future any specific needs and/or requests
regarding land donations will be evaluated by the applicant.

E. PROVIDE ESTIMATES OF THE MUNICIPAL, SCHOOL DISTRICT, COUNTY
AND STATE TAX REVENUES FROM THE PROJECT AREA FOR EACH YEAR
DURING THE PERIOD FROM THE CURRENT YEAR THROUGH THE THIRD
YEAR AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THE DEVELOPMENT.

The estimates of tax revenues are based upon the purchase
price of the units occupied in each year of the development
period, in addition to three post development years. Unit
purchase prices are estimated in current dollars, and the
taxes indicated here do not reflect increases that might
occur in this price in any given year or the resultant
changes in assessed value.













The estimated County property taxes to be generated by the
development along with the distribution of these funds within
Broward County for the years 1974-2016, are shown in Table 9.
The assessed property value of properties in any given year,
includes the cumulative amounts of residential, commercial and
industrial development that has been completed, as well as
the value of the undeveloped land remaining. Price ranges
for residential units of various types were used to estimate
the value of these properties. The net taxable value repre-
sents the value of the property after the Homestead Exemption
of $5,000 has been applied (available to the full population),
as well as the Senior Homestead exemption. Twenty-one per-
cent of the population of the community is expected to
qualify for the Senior Homestead Exemption (based on the ex-
pected percentage of the population that will be above 65
years of age; see age distribution table in Question 23 C).
This exemption was applied only to that portion of the total
tax levy that was allocated for schools.

The total tax receipts are based on a levy of 16.7109 mills
and have been distributed according to the portions collected
for General County, Flood Control, Hospital and School pur-
poses in Table 9.

The State tax revenues have been estimated in the following
Table based upon total reported tax receipts from Broward
County in 1972. In order to obtain the estimated annual
collections, per capital expenditures for that year have been
applied to the expected full development population of the
community.


ANNUAL STATE TAX REVENUES

ARVIDA-FULL DEVELOPMENT
ESTIMATED COLLECTIONS
SOURCE PER CAPITAL (ANNUAL)

Sales & Use Tax $ 110.92 $ 11,072,589

Gasoline Tax 36.40 3,633,630

Motor Vehicle Lic. 17.51 1,747,936

Other 74.22 7,409,012


TOTAL


$ 239.05


$ 23,863,167








TABLE 9
ESTIMATED COUNTY TAX


Estimated County Tax Receipts


Assessed
Property
Value


4,000
17,000
30,000
50,214
82,283
127,415
176,709

239.074
311 ,594
389,553
465,378
539,083
610,846
680,689
743,454
800,706
859,562


908,326
955,419
1 ,002,483
1 ,046,663
1,090,396
1,131,546
1,173,036
1,216,339
1,254,901
1,289,413

1,324,749
1,360,170


Net
Taxable
Value


1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980


Estimated Disbursements of Revenues


Total
Tax
Rece i ts


4,000
17,000
30,000
48,218
76,687
116,495
158,227

212,213
275,477
343,302
409,054
472,897
535,010
595,405
649,468
698,885
750,783

793,346
834,389
877,403
913,684
951,669
986,880
1,022,230
1,059,090
1,091,672
1,120,497

1,150,025
1,179,638


General
County
Funds


18.4
78.1
137.5
222.9
356.9
543.4
740.6


67
285
501
808
1,289
1,959
2,665

3,577
4,646
5,791
6,901
7,980
9,030
10,050
10,962
11 ,797
12,673

13,391
14,084
14,778
15,424
16,065
16,661
17,259
17,883
18,433
18,921

19,422
19,924


Flood
Control


1.9
8.2
14.5
23.5
37.6
57.3
77.9

104.8
136.1
169.7
202.4
234.1
264.9
294.9
328.8
346.2
371.9

392.9
413.3
433.7
452.7
471.5
489.0
506.6
524.9
541.2
555.6

570.4
585.2


Hospital


6.5
27.8
49.0
79.6
127.3
193.8
264.1

355.1
461.4
575.3
685.8
793.2
897.9
999.4
1,114.4
1,173.3
1,260.3

1,331.7
1 ,400.5
1 ,469.5
1,534.0
1,597.8
1 ,657.4
1,716.7
1 ,778.9
1 ,834.0
1,882.7

1,932.9
1,983.1


School


40.0
170.0
300.0
482.0
767.2
1,164.5
1,582.4

2,121.7
2,755.0
3,433.4
4,090.3
4,729.0
5,350.3
5,954.3
6,394.7
6,988.4
7,507.9

7,933.3
8,344.3
8,754.0
9,173.0
9,516.7
9,868.6
10,222.9
10,592.3
10,916.6
11 ,205.0

11,500.3
11,796.5


Year


995.4
1,293.5
1,612.6
1,922.5
2,223.7
2,516.9
2,801.4
3,124.0
3,289.1
3,532.9

3,733. 1
3,925.9
4,120.4
4,300.3
4,479.0
4,646.0
4,812.7
4,986.9
5,141.2
5,277.7

5,418.4
5,559.2


1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990

1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000


2001
2002


















Estimated
Assessed
Property
Year Value


2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016


1,397,334
S,434,073
1 ,473,079
1 ,509,668
1,546,807
1 ,584,086
1,618,815
1,653,265
1,686,049
1,718,976
1,749,938
1,765,552
1,765,552
1,765,552


County Tax
Net
Taxable
Value


1,210.692
1,241.381
1,273.974
1,304.453
1,335,391
1,336,318
1,395,088
1,423,519
1,450,555
1,477,734
1,503,239
1,518,239
1,518,239
1,518,239


Receipts
Total
Tax
Receipts


General
County
Funds


20,449
20,969
21,528
22,038
22,561
23,086
23,578
24,055
24,515
24,976
25,409
25,841
25,841
25,841


5,705.9
5,852.2
6,011.3
6,150.7
6,298.2
6,445.3
6,585.3
6,717.3
6,846.5
6,975.8
7,097.5
7,290.8
7,290.8
7,290.8


Estimated Disbursements of Revenues


Flood
Control


600.6
616.0
632.7
647.4
663.0
678.4
693.2
707.1
720.7
734.3
747.1
767.4
767.4
767.4


Hospital


2,035.5
2,087.6
2,144.3
2,194.2
2,246.7
2,299.2
2,349.1
2,396.2
2,442.3
2,488.4
2,531.9
2,600.8
2,600.8
2,600.8


School


12,107.0
12,413.2
12,739.7
13,045.7
13,353.1
13,663.1
13,950.4
14,234.4
14,505.5
14,777.5
15,032.5
15,182.0
15,182.0
15,182.0



















F. IF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WILL-RECEIVE LOCAL, STATE, OR
FEDERAL LOANS, SUBSIDIES, OR GRANTS, SPECIFY THE AMOUNT,
SOURCE, AND IF A LOAN, REPAYMENT TERMS.

It is not presently anticipated that any portions of the
development will receive local, State or Federal loans, sub-
sidies, or grants, with the possible exception of loans or
grants for sewage treatment facilities.

G. SPECIFY THE NUMBER, TYPE AND EXTENT OF ANY EXISTING RESI-
DENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, OR AGRICULTURAL USES THAT
WILL BE DISPLACED BY THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT AND THEIR
FAIR MARKET VALUES.

Uses presently on the land consist of five grazing leases,
comprising approximately 630 acres which are used inter-
mittently for that purpose.

H. PROVIDE ESTIMATED CONSTRUCTION COST PER SQUARE FOOT FOR
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES, AND
APPROPRIATE PER UNIT COSTS FOR OTHER DEVELOPMENTS OF
REGIONAL IMPACT.

Residential construction costs for the development, based on
current (1974) estimates, are expected to average $20 per
square foot for low density (single family detached units),
$18 per square foot for higher density housing units.

Commercial construction costs are expected to average $18
per square foot of gross enclosed area, and industrial con-
struction is estimated to average $17 per square foot of
gross enclosed area.

These costs do not reflect such indirect cost items as land,
interest, overhead, development cost, promotion and sales,
etc., which would represent approximately 37% of the total
unit price.













I. IF A COPY OF THE MARKET STUDY IS NOT SUBMITTED AS A PART OF
THE APPLICATION, OR IF THE MARKET STUDY DOES NOT PROVIDE
THEIR ANSWER, ANSWER THE FOLLOWING: (NOTE: IF ANY OTHER
QUESTION IN THE APPLICATION IS ANSWERED BY A SUBMITTED MAR-
KET STUDY, THE QUESTION MAY BE ACCEPTABLY ANSWERED BY A
SPECIFIC CITATION OF LOCATION IN THE MARKET STUDY.)

1. HOW WAS THE DEMAND FOR THIS PROJECT DETERMINED?
INCLUDE THE ASSUMPTIONS, FORMULAE, DATA SOURCES, AND
PROVIDE PROJECTIONS OF DEMAND BY COST RANGE FOR THE
TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT PROPOSED, BOTH IN THE IMMEDIATE
AREA (COUNTY OR SUB-COUNTY AREA FOR DEVELOPMENTS IN
DADE, BROWARD AND PALM BEACH) AND FOR THE REGION.
NOTE: APPROXIMATE COST RANGES INCLUDE:

RESIDENTIAL (SALES) $15-20,000; $20-35,000; etc.
RESIDENTIAL (RENTAL) $50-$100; $100 150;
$150 200; etc.
COMMERCIAL PER SQUARE FOOT PRICE IN DOLLAR
INCREMENTS FOR BOTH RENTAL AND SALE SPACE.
INDUSTRIAL PER SQUARE FOOT PRICE IN DOLLAR
INCREMENTS FOR BOTH RENTAL AND FOR SALE SPACE.

The applicant initially determined market demands from
sales experience at other developments undertaken in
southern Florida and Broward County. To complement
this experience, the following evaluation of the housing
market in Broward County offers further justification
for the residential development proposed.

A Housing Market Analysis of the Fort Lauderdale -
Hollywood Area (which includes all of Broward County)
provides an insight into the short-term housing demand,
indicating a sales housing demand of 15,200 units an-
nually through 1974. While longer term projections are
not available from this source or the Area Planning
Board of Broward County, housing growth projections from
1960 through the projections for 1974 have been analyzed,
with the resulting Table 10 illustrating annual demand
for sales housing through the year 2013. While projec-
tions this far into the future are not meant to be
exact, they are intended to give an overview of de-
mand changes, considering housing trends over the past
16 years.

Table 10 also compares the proposed 40,800 units in the
development, by price range, to the corresponding demand
for units in each price range for the county. The pro-


























posed development will absorb a maximum of 10.4% of the
annual units in these price ranges in any given year.
On the average, the ARVIDA development will need to
capture only 2.7% of the county market over the 38 year
span. Of course, when considering the proposed units
in terms of total county demand (across all price ranges),
the capture rate is even less.

All available housing data indicates that the price
ranges being developed in this project will remain an
important segment of the increasing demand in the area.
Combined with the demand illustrated in Table 10, the
development will provide for a reasonable share of the
housing demand projections for Palm Beach County, pre-
pared by the Area Planning Board of Palm Beach County.
They substantiate the demand for units in these price
ranges, and indicate similar capture rates. The Anal-
ysis by the Department of Housing and Urban Development
also indicates a firm housing market in the county, with
adjacent Palm Beach County being termed tight. Both
counties have a very low vacancy rate among sales hous-
ing, 1.5% for Broward County and 1.6% for Palm Beach
County.











TABLE 10


HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS


$22,500-$34,999
YEAR COUNTY ARVIDA


AND BY HOUSING UNIT PRICE
$35,000-$44,999 $45,000 and over
COUNTY ARVIDA COUNTY ARVIDA


TOTAL UNITS
$22,500 and Over
COUNTY ARVIDA


ARVIDA SUPPLY
AS % OF COUNTY
DEMAND


10,900 0
11 ,554 330
12,247 545
12,982 880
13,741 1,254
14,565 1,388
15,438 1,535
16,364 1,704
17,346 1 ,701
18,387 1,646
19,490 1,611
20,660 1,576
21 ,900 1,441
23,214 1,295
24,607 1,150
26,083 1,053
27,648 1,032
29,307 1,032
31 ,065 1,006
32,928 981
196,759 4,960
288,886 4,991
352,190 4,890
265,703 2,800


183,341 19,920 417,998 8,680


1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996-2000
2001-2005
2006-2010
2011-2013


6,658
7,057
7,480
7,929
8,385
8,888
9,421
9,986
10,585
11 ,220
11 ,893
12,607
13,363
14,165
15,015
15,916
16,871
17,883
18,956
20,093
120,063
160,670
215,017
162,504


0
0
0
60
264
297
330
374
383
383
383
383
368
334
300
279
263
263
244
225
1 ,447
1 ,873
2,306
1,437


1 ,348
1 ,429
1,515
1 ,606
1 ,702
1,804
1,912
2,027
2,149
2,278
2,415
2,560
2,714
2,877
3,050
3,233
3,427
3,633
3,851
4,082
24,393
32,641
43,682
33,013


0
0
135
360
514
610
710
810
823
823
823
823
718
621
525
496
491
491
484
478
2,479
2,783
2,560
1,363


2,894
3,068
3,252
3,447
3,654
3,873
4,105
4,351
4,612
4,889
5,182
5,493
5,823
6,172
6,542
6,934
7,350
7,791
8,258
8,753
52,303
95,575
93,491
70,186


0
330
410
460
476
481
495
520
495
440
405
370
355
340
325
278
273
278
278
278
1 ,034
335
24
0


0
2.8
4.4
6.7
9.1
9.5
9.9
10.4
9.8
8.9
8.2
7.6
6.5
5.5
4.6
4.0
3.7
3.5
3.2
2.9
2.5
1.7
1.3
1.0


TOTAL 902,625 12,196


1,503,964 40,800 2.7













QUESTION 22 THE FOLLOWING SHOULD BE ANSWERED SEPARATELY FOR THE
DEVELOPMENT AND POST-DEVELOPMENT PERIODS. IF EMPLOYMENT CHARAC-
TERISTICS VARY BY DEVELOPMENT PHASE, PROVIDE SEPARATE DATA BY
PHASE.

A. WHAT ARE THE ANTICIPATED NUMBER OF EMPLOYERS BY TYPE? (USE
BUREAU OF CENSUS OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATIONS.) IF SPECIAL-
IZED SKILLS ARE REQUIRED, STATE THE TYPE AND NUMBER OF EM-
PLOYEES NEEDED.

Table 11 shows the anticipated number of employees, by type,
for each phase of the project.

Much of the labor involved in the development will be rela-
tively specialized, although it is most likely that all types
will be among those normally available in the existing labor
force. The list which follows includes most of those
specialties which will be involved in the development process.
Broad groups which will be required by the various businesses
and industries that choose to locate in the development are
also included.

Accountants
Advertising specialists
Air conditioning mechanics
Arch itects
Attorneys
Auto mechanics
Bookkeepers
Carpenters
Cement finishers
Clerical workers
Dentists
Drivers
Drywall mechanics
Electricians
Executive managers
Floor covering mechanics
Gardeners
Golf course architects
Greenskeepers
Heavy equipment operators
Land planners
Loaders
Maids
Medical doctors
Maintenance personnel
Masons
Pointers










Table 11

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY TYPE


PROFESSIONAL,
TECHNICAL,
MANAGERIAL

147

310

481

597

766

853

737

963

1,021

1,044

1,166

1,148

1,143

992


PHASE

I





IV

V

VI

VI I

VIII

IX

X

XI

XII

XIII

XIV


CLERICAL
AND
KINDRED

296

626

971

1,204

1,544

1,749

1,486

1,975

2,094

2,142

2,392

2,356

2,344

2,035


CRAFTSMEN,
FOREMEN, &
KINDRED

1,569

3,317

5,146

6,380

8,184

9,114

7,874

10,292

10,912

11,160

12,461

12,276

12,214

10,602


YEAR

1976-1977

1978-1979

1980-1981

1982-1983

1984-1985

1986-1987

1988-1989

1990-1991

1992-1993

1994-1995

1996-2000

2001-2005

2005-2010

2010-2013


SALES

142

300

465

576

739

823

711

930

986

1,008

1,126

1,109

1,103

958


LABORERS

376

797

1,237

1,533

1,967

2,161

1,892

2,440

2,587

2,646

2,955

2,91 1

2,896

2,514


TOTAL

2,530

5,350

8,300

10,290

13,200

14,700

12,700

16,600

17,600

18,000

20,100

19,800

19,700

17,100












Plumbers
Public relations specialists
Retail clerks
Roofers
Salesmen
Secretaries
Sheetmetal workers
Surveyors
Tile setters
Truck drivers
Various industrial workers

B. WHAT IS THE ESTIMATED PERCENTAGE OF EMPLOYEES, BY TYPE, THAT
WILL COME FROM:

1. WITHIN 25 MILES OF THE DEVELOPMENT.
2. WITHIN THE REGION
3. WITHIN THE STATE


EMPLOYMENT WITHIN WITHIN WITHIN
TYPE 25 MILES REGION STATE

Professional,
Technical 90 10

Managers,
Administrators 95 -- 5

Sales Workers 100 -- --

Clerical and
Kindred Workers 100 --

Craftsmen,
Foremen, and
Kindred Workers 80 20

Laborers 100 --

Service Workers 100 --


C COULD THE PERCENTAGES IN B BE INCREASED THROUGH TRAINING,
EITHER ON-THE-JOB OR IN AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION? IF SO,
IS SUCH TRAINING PRESENTLY AVAILABLE? WOULD YOU WISH TO BE
ASSISTED IN ESTABLISHING ANY SPECIFIC TRAINING PROGRAMSS?
INDICATE THE PERCENTAGES OF EMPLOYMENT, BY OCCUPATIONAL TYPE,
THAT WILL BE PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY, AND THE AVERAGE ANTI-
CIPATED LENGTH OF EMPLOYMENT FOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES.











Although training in many specialties is available in educa-
tional institutions throughout the region, and although on-
the-job training is equally feasible, no difficulty is fore-
seen in filling the needs of this development from the
existing labor force. Therefore, specific training programs
for this project might be redundant.

Table 12 indicates the percentages of employment by type,
that will be permanent and temporary, and the average anti-
cipated length of employment for temporary employees.


D. SPECIFY THE NUMBER OF WORK SHIFTS PER DAY, THE AVERAGE NUMBER
OF EMPLOYEES PER SHIFT, AND THE START AND FINISH TIMES FOR
EACH SHIFT.


YEA

1976-19

1978-19

1980-19

1982-19

1984-19

1986-19

1988-19

1990-19

1992-19

1994-19

1996-20

2001-20

2006-20

2011-20

DEVELOPMENT


WORK SHIFTS
AND
NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES PER SHIFT

SHIFT
\R 7:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M.

77 1,940

79 4,100

81 6,370

83 7,890

85 10,120

87 11,280

89 9,740

91 12,730

93 13,500

95 13,810

00 15,420

05 15,190

10 15,110

13 13,120

T 13,040


SHIFT
8:30 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

590

1 ,250

1,930

2,400

3,080

3,420

2,960

3,870

4,100

4,190

4,680

4,610

4,590

3,980

3,960


PHASE







IV

V

VI

VI I

VII I
VIll

IX

X

XI

XI I

XII I

XIV

POST










The above table provides the requested information. It should
be noted that the development period in the present case is
sufficiently long that unforeseen changes in shift structures
may take place. Such changes might include, for example,
shortening of shift durations, and changes in the number of
shifts per day.

E. PROVIDE THE ESTIMATED ANNUAL AVERAGE NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY
THE FOLLOWING INCOME GROUPS DURING THE DEVELOPMENT PERIOD
AND THE FIRST YEAR AFTER COMPLETION.

Under $3,999 $10,000 $14,999
$4,000 $5,999 $15,000 $24,999
$6,000 $9,999 $25,000 over

The response to this Question is found in Tables 13 and 14,
for the development and post-development periods, respectively.


F. WHAT IS THE ESTIMATED TOTAL ANNUAL PAYROLL DURING THE DEVELOP-
MENT PERIOD AND THE FIRST SUBSEQUENT YEAR?

PHASE YEAR ANNUAL PAYROLL($000)

I 1976-1977 27,263

II 1978-1979 57,652

III 1980-1981 89,441

IV 1982-1983 110,885

V 1984-1985 142,243

VI 1986-1987 158,407

VII 1988-1989 136,855

VII I 1990-1991 178,882

IX 1992-1993 189,658

X 1994-1995 193,968

XI 1996-2000 216,598

XII 2001-2005 213,365

XIII 2006-2010 212,287

XIV 2011-2013 184,270


POST DEVELOPMENT


183,192



















Table 12


EMPLOYMENT BY OCCUPATIONAL TYPE
PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY


EMPLOYMENT
TYPE
Accountants
Advertising specialists
Air Conditioning
Bookkeepers
Building Architects
Carpenters
Cement Finishers
Commercial Workers
Dry Wall Mechanics
Electricians
Engineers
Executive Managers
Floor Covering Workers
Golf Course Architects
Heavy Equipment Operators
Industrial Workers
Landscape Architects
Maintenance Personnel
Office Workers
Painters
Plumbers
Secretaries
Sheet Metal Workers
Surveyors
Tile Setters
Truck Drivers


PERMANENT
PERCENT
80
10
.10
100
10
25


TEMPORARY
PERCENT/AVERAGE LENGTH
20 1 month/year
90 "Job" basis
90 3 months/year

90 "Job" basis
75 6 months/year
100 3 months/year


100
10
10
10
100
10


5 months/year
4 months/year
"Job" basis


90 2 months/year
100 "Job" basis
100 "Job" basis

90 "Job" basis


4 months/year
4 months/year
3 months/year
4 months/year
"Job" basis
3 months/year
"Job" basis


NOTE: After completion of the project, all employees will be
permanent, although not all will be full-time.
















Table 13

ESTIMATED AVERAGE ANNUAL EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES BY TYPE

DURING DEVELOPMENT


WAGE RANGE

Under $4,000

$4,000-$5,999

$6,000-$9,999

$10,000-$14,999

$15,000-$24,999

$25,000 and over

TOTAL


AVERAGE
WAGE



$ 5,000

8,000

12,500

20,000

35,000

$10,720


NUMBER
OF
WORKERS



1,732

5,337

5,334

1,427

70

13,900


WAGES
(000)



$ 8,660

42,696

66,675

28,540

2,450

$149,021


PROFESSIONAL,
TECHNICAL,
MANAGERIAL







430

327

47
804


SALES





149

103

501

23

776


CLERICAL
AND
KINDRED



495

700

388

49



1,632


CRAFTSMEN,
FOREMEN, &
KINDRED





3,690

4,413

550



8,653


LABORERS



1,237

798







2,035



















TABLE 14

ESTIMATED AVERAGE ANNUAL POST DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES BY TYPE


Wage Range
Under $4000


$ 4,000 $ 5,999
$ 6,000 $ 9,999
$10,000 $14,999
$15,000 $24,999
$25,000 & Over
TOTAL


Average
Wage


$ 5,000
$ 8,000
$12,500
$20,000
$35,000
$10,818


No. of
Workers


1,820
6,547
6,889
1,641
103
17,000


Prof.
Wages Tech.
(000) Mgrl.


9,100
52,272
86,113
32,820
3,605
183,910


118
682
402
68
1,270


Sales


182
314
172
602
35
1,305


10,528 1,357


Craftsmen
Foreman &
Kindred


9,531
5,436
561


Clerical
and
Kindred


772
1,093
599
76


2,540


LABOR


866
491















QUESTION 23

A. IF SOMEONE OTHER THAN THE DEVELOPER WILL OCCUPY THE PROPOSED
DEVELOPMENT, SPECIFY THE EXPECTED:

1. TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT BY LAND AREA, ENCLOSED AREA AND
NUMBER OF UNITS FOR:

(a) RESIDENTIAL


Low Density

Medium Density

COMMUNITY CENTER

COMMERCIAL


15,950 D.U.

24,850 D.U.


5,317 Acres

1 ,042 Acres

180 Acres


Neighborhood Centers
Convenience Centers


TOURIST CENTER

INSTITUTIONAL (SCHOOLS)

10 Elementary @ 10 Acres
3 Middle @ 17 Acres
2 Senior @ 30 Acres


53 Acres
22 Acres






100 Acres
51 Acres
60 Acres


(f) BUSINESS OFFICE/INDUSTRIAL

(g) SERVICES SEWAGE AND WATER
TREATMENT PLANT

(h) RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE


Wate r
Golf
Arterial Right-of-Ways


1,800 Acres
300 Acres
573 Acres


2,673 Acres

10,000 Acres


75 Acres

20 Acres






211 Acres

450 Acres


32 Acres













2. PLACE FROM WHICH THE OCCUPANT WILL BE DRAWN:


(a) WITHIN THE COUNTY 45%
(b) OUTSIDE THE COUNTY,
BUT WITHIN THE REGION 15%
(c) OUTSIDE THE REGION,
BUT WITHIN THE STATE 5%
(d) OUTSIDE FLORIDA 35%


B. WHAT PART OF THE PROPOSED FACILITY WILL BE USED BY A NEW COM-
PANY, OR BY EITHER A NEW BRANCH OR THE RELOCATION OF AN
EXISTING COMPANY FROM ELSEWHERE IN THE COUNTY, THE REGION,
THE STATE AND THE U.S.

Both the neighborhood commercial centers and the Community/
Business and Office Center are expected to be occupied
by new and relocating companies. These companies may be
comprised of tenants who will be starting or moving their
own businesses. Statewide and/or national convenience store
operations are also expected to open new branches in both
the major community center and the individual neighborhood
commercial sites. Most will be service oriented, and it
can be assumed that most are presently located in the region.

The industrial mix expected in the industrial parks is un-
known at the present time, as well as the geographic source
of the tenants. However, the excellent access to regional
and national arterial systems would seem to dictate nationally
oriented industrial opportunities as well as regionally
oriented activities.

C. IF A RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT, INDICATE THE ANTICIPATED POPU-
LATION THAT WILL OCCUPY THE DEVELOPMENT BY AGE GROUP (0-5,
6-18, 19-25, 26-44, 45-64, 65 AND OLDER) AND BY NUMBER
ORIGINATING FROM:

1. WITHIN THE COUNTY
2. ELSEWHERE IN THE REGION
3. ELSEHWERE IN THE STATE
4. ELSEWHERE IN THE U.S.

The age distribution of the population is indicated below.
This table reflects the anticipated age breakdown projected
for Broward County in 1990, the midpoint of the development
period. While this cannot be held as a precise prediction
of the age composition over a 38 year development period,
the development is intended to largely conform to Broward
County as a whole.
















AGE DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION

AGE BRACKET NUMBER PERCENT

0- 5 5,640 5.65
6-18 21,820 21.86
19-25 8,155 8.17
26-44 20,285 20.32
45-64 22,960 23.00
65 and older 20,965 21.00
99,825 100.00

Those portions of the projected population which will migrate
from each geographic area are listed below. These projec-
tions reflect Broward County's migration trends in recent
years.


ORIGINS OF POPULATION

ORIGIN NUMBER PERCENT

Within the County 64,885 45%

Elsewhere in the
Region 4,990 15%

Elsewhere in the
State 4,990 5%

Elsewhere in the U.S. 24,960 35%

99,825 100%



Source: Modified from Migration Patterns 1965 1970 for Broward
County, U. S. Census of Population 1970.

The total population growth will be spread over a period
of 38 years, for an average annual increase of only ap-
proximately 2,630.












QUESTION 24


A. WHAT PRIVATE SUPPLIERS AND/OR SUPPORTING INDUSTRIES AND SER-
VICES ARE REQUIRED, BOTH DURING DEVELOPMENT AND POST-
DEVELOPMENT? WHICH OF THESE DO NOT NOW EXIST IN THE AREA?
IN THE REGION? IN THE STATE?

The following private suppliers and services are expected to
be needed during the development period: building materials,
building material transportation, excavation, hauling, mech-
anical equipment, pipe laying, and road building. It is
anticipated that all of these will be available within the
region. Among the services and suppliers required after de-
velopment are food services, furniture and furnishings, office
equipment, maintenance and service equipment, and a wide range
of general retail goods. All of these are available within
the region.

The requirements of the non-retail industries and businesses
which will locate in the development will also occur after
construction. Although it is impossible at this time to
anticipate the nature of those businesses and industries, it
is likely that only a minor share of their requirements will
be met outside the region, and a still lesser share outside
the state.

B. SPECIFY THE COST OF CAPITAL EQUIPMENT AND RAW MATERIALS NEEDED
DURING DEVELOPMENT AND POST-DEVELOPMENT BY SOURCE:

1. WITHIN THE COUNTY
2. OUTSIDE THE COUNTY, BUT IN THE REGION
3. OUTSIDE THE REGION, BUT INSIDE THE STATE
4. OUTSIDE FLORIDA

For the purposes of this analysis, capital equipment is con-
sidered to include the following equipment:

Appliances Hardware
Plumbing Steel Doors
Electrical Form Equipment
Cabinets Iron Railings
Roofing Shower Doors
Carpeting Patio Screens, etc.
Windows Elevators
Mirrors Light Fixtures

Raw materials are considered to include the following:

Concrete Landscaping Material
Drywall Material Tile

























Mi liwork Flooring
Paint Insulation
Stucco Paving Material
Blocks Form Materials
Reinforcing Bars

Table 15 details the expenditures by Phase for raw materials
and capital equipment.

C. WHAT OTHER TYPES OF DEVELOPMENT ARE LIKELY TO BE ENCOURAGED
TO LOCATE IN THE GENERAL AREA AS A RESULT OF THE PROPOSED
DEVELOPMENT?

The project is being phased over a 38 year period and is
being directed toward self containment. This makes it dif-
ficult to predict what types of development may be encour-
aged to locate in the surrounding area. The applicant, in
planning this project, has allocated, within the boundaries
of the project, sufficient lands to accommodate the majority
of the project's needs. Large, flexible areas in the inter-
ior are available for Community Center, Commercial, Recrea-
tion and Open Space. Residential areas extend to the prop-
erty lines except for the Tourist Center and the Business
Office/Industrial Complex to the Northwest and the Business
Office/Industrial Center to the East.











TABLE 15

COSTS OF CAPITAL EQUIPMENT AND RAW MATERIALS
($000)


CAPITAL EQUIPMENT
Within Outside Outside
County County Region


YEAR


1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996-2000
2001-2005
2006-2010
2011-2013


0
271
462
563
798
777
1,095
975
1,063
948
1,063
948
822
756
797
879
604
679
715
644
588
2,497
2,300
2,215


Outside
State
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


Within
County
0
2,684
4,579
5,579
7,913
7,706
10,861
9,670
10,545
9,398
10,539
9,838
8,151
7,496
7,903
8,715
5,993
7,088
6,387
5,828
24,768
22,815
21,969
12,026


RAW MATERIALS
Outside Outside
County Region
0 0
141 0
241 0
294 0
417 0
406 0
572 0
509 0
555 0
495 0
555 0
518 0
429 0
395 0
416 0
459 0
315 0
373 0
336 0
307 0
1,304 0
1,201 0
1,156 0
633 0


12,027 0 0


Outside
State


0
5,140
8,771
10,688
15,156
14,758
20,804
18,521
20,200
18,002
20,189
18,843
15,614
14,358
15,138
16,693
1I,480
13,577
12,233
11,164
47,440
43,702
42,079
23,035


0 0 288,451


TOTAL 437,585 22,450












SANITARY SEWERS


A. AMOUNT OF SEWAGE

PROVIDE PROJECTIONS OF BOTH THE STRENGTH AND THE PEAK AND
AVERAGE DAILY SANITARY SEWAGE FLOW GENERATED IN MILLIONS
OF GALLONS PER DAY (MGD) BY MAJOR DEVELOPMENT PHASE AND
UPON COMPLETION OF THE PROPOSED PROJECT.

The table below provides the estimated averages and peak
flows by development phases that are expected to be generated
by the proposed development. The anticipated strength of
these flows will be 200 PPM-BOD5 and 300 PPM suspended solids.


Population

981
4,921
11 ,668
19,794
28,067
35,927
42,723
48,225
53,358
58,334
70,514
82,181
93,547
99,825


*Ave rage
Flow (MGD)

0.1
0.5
1.2
2.0
2.8
3.6
4.3
4.8
5.3
5.8
7.1
8.2
9.4
10.0


**Peak Flow
(MGD)

0.2
1.2
2.9
4.9
7.0
9.0
10.7
12.1
13.3
14.6
17.6
20.5
23.4
25.0


* Based on 100 gallons per day per person.
** Based on 250 gallons per day per person.

As part of the utilities plant indicated on the Master Plan
in Question 15, a wastewater treatment plant is planned to
be constructed in the northeast corner of the project on land
covering approximately 12 acres. Design and construction of
the wastewater treatment plant will be in accordance with the
Florida Department of Pollution Control, Central & Southern
Florida Flood Control District, and other regulatory agency
regulations. The facilities will be constructed in phases
as indicated in the preceding table. This will permit in-
corporation within each phase of advancements and improve-
ments in the treatment equipment and processes.


The wastewater treatment area will be designed
sewage flows based upon the average daily flow
The hydraulic characteristics of the treatment


to treat the
into the plant.
plant will be


End of
Year

1977
1979
1981
1983
1985
1987
1989
1991
1993
1995
2000
2005
2010
2013


Question 25.













designed to accommodate peak flows of 250% of the average
daily flow. All lift stations and force mains will be de-
signed for peak flows of 250% of the average daily flow.

B. TYPE OF SEWAGE SYSTEM

PROVIDE THE NAME OF THE AGENCY THAT WILL PROVIDE SEWAGE
TREATMENT FACILITIES, THE TYPE OF FACILITIES, AND TREATMENT
METHOD, CURRENT CAPACITIES (MGD), LOCATION AND PLANS FOR
ANY EXPANSION NEEDED TO ADEQUATELY TREAT SEWAGE FROM THE
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT. INDICATE THE COMPATIBILITY OF DE-
VELOPMENT PHASES WITH THE PLANNED EXPANSION OF TREATMENT
WORKS.

The project area is neither presently served by an existing
utility company nor are there plans to extend the County
utility system to the project area. If at some time in the
future a regional system is extended to the project area a
connection into the regional system may be made at that time.

It is proposed that an improvement district with the powers
to levy taxes and construct, own and operate the utility
facilities be created for the project area. This district
will include only the proposed development and will have a
Board of Commissioners elected by the freeholders of the
project.

The utilities plant containing the wastewater treatment plant
will be located in the northeast corner of the project area
as shown on the Master Plan in Question 15. This site will
encompass an area of 32 acres for potable water and wastewater
treatment facilities, of which approximately 12 acres will
be devoted to the wastewater treatment facilities.

The wastewater treatment process to be used will be the con-
tact stabilization method of activated sludge treatment. A
minimum of 90% removal of BOD5 and suspended solids will be
provided as currently required by the State of Florida De-
partment of Pollution Control.

The wastewater treatment plant will be constructed in phases
to correspond with the projected growth of the development.
This will allow efficient operation of the facilities through-
out the growth of the development, and will permit advantages
to be taken of improvements in the art.

Disposal of the effluent from the treatment plant is planned
to be via deepwell injection into the boulder zone.














Since the Central & Southern Florida Flood Control District
has regulations that prohibit the discharge of any addi-
tional wastewater treatment plant effluent into its drainage
canals there are basically two wastewater effluent disposal
alternatives that were considered for use at this project.
These alternatives are:

1. Total containment on site through the use of
either seepage ponds and/or spray irrigation.

2. Deep well injection of the wastewater into the
boulder zone.

The first of these two alternatives involves the setting aside
of large areas of the project for wastewater disposal. How-
ever, due to the porous limerock immediately below the surface,
the seepage rates which may be expected from ponds of this
nature, would allow seepage of wastewater effluent to move
into the groundwater too rapidly to allow for soil filtration.
Upon completion of the proposed development, the projected
wastewater flow of 10 MGD would constitute a major source of
contamination of the Biscayne aquifer in this area. Conse-
quently, utilization of seepage ponds would require that
nutrient removal facilities be installed for a tertiary treat-
ment of the wastewater prior to entry into the pond system.

Nutrient removal can also be accomplished by the use of spray
irrigation on crop lands. The crops would pick up the nitro-
gen and phosphorus from the effluent prior to effluent con-
tact with the groundwater. This method, however, requires
large land areas, suitable soil for crops and a water table
low enough to provide nutrient removal prior to contact with
groundwater. This method was not considered feasible for a
project of this size.

The alternative to total containment would be the use of efflu-
ent disposal into the boulder zone by deep well injection.
This method is presently being used at two locations in Dade
County and is under consideration at several other locations.
Such disposal can only be utilized according to existing
State regulations when there is, no other practical method of
disposal of waste effluent. This method does remove water
from the reuse cycle but from the standpoint of degradation
of water quality and the severe geological problems of the
area it is considered the most feasible method of wastewater
effluent disposal.
































C. DEVELOPER'S FUNDING OF SEWERAGE PLANT

SPECIFY THE EXTENT TO WHICH A DEVELOPER WILL FUND NECESSARY
ADDITIONAL SEWERAGE WORKS AND/OR ASSURANCES (PERFORMANCE OR
CONSTRUCTION BONDS) THAT THE WORKS WILL BE PROVIDED.

Until such time as an improvement district is established,
assurances that the facilities will be constructed will be
made with bonds posted with the County. At such time as
the West Broward Improvement District is established, the
district will operate, expand, improve and set the rates for
the treatment facilities.












26. STORM WATER DISPOSAL


A. LOCATION AND SIZE OF WATER CONTROL STRUCTURES

AS PART OF THE PLAN FOR THE PROPOSED STORM WATER SYSTEM
INCLUDE THE LOCATION, SIZE AND PROPOSED OPTIMUM STAGE
FOR ALL PROPOSED WATER CONTROLLED STRUCTURES AND INCLUDE
THE PLANS FOR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.

Drainage for the 10,000 acres covered by the proposed project
will be accomplished by an interconnected series of lakes
with two discharges in the south of the project area. A
drainage plan with the location of the pumping installations
has been prepared for the area and is included in the Drain-
age map in Question 15. Surface runoff within the project
will be channeled into the system of lakes and canals by
use of the grassed swales. The water in this network of
lakes and canals will be routed to the two pumping stations
located on the south side of the project area.

The two pumping stations located adjacent to the South New
River Canal will be the only water control devices presently
planned for the project area. The capacity of these pumping
stations will be approximately 118,000 gpm each and will
operate with a designed water elevation of four feet mean
sea level.

Operation and maintenance of the drainage system, which in-
cludes the lakes, canals and pumping stations, will be the
responsibility of the West Broward Improvement District
which will be established to operate and maintain the utili-
ties and improvements within the project. Management of
the District will be by a board of commissioners elected by
the property owners of the District.

The system will be operated so as to maintain a water eleva-
tion below 5.5 feet mean sea level (MSL) for a 10 year fre-
quency storm and less than 7.5 feet MSL for a 100 year
frequency storm. Stages at the pump for each of these storms
will be 4 feet MSL and 5 feet MSL respectively. On the dis-
charge side of the pumping stations, water stages will be
maintained by the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control
District.

An on site storage volume of 6,000 acre-feet will allow re-
tention of most average storms and up to 79 percent of a 10
year frequency storm without discharge into the South New
River Canal. To maintain elevations below flood elevations,
discharges will be made at a rate of up to 1-1/4 inches per
day when required.













B. STORM VOLUME


SPECIFY IN INCHES PER 24 HOURS AND CUBIC FEET PER SECOND THE
AVERAGE 10 and 100 YEAR STORM VOLUMES. THE PERCENT OF THIS
VOLUME THAT CAN BE RETAINED ON SITE, THE AVERAGE RETENTION
TIME AND FLOOD ELEVATION.

The following table lists the storm volumes for a 10 and 100
year frequency storm:
Total*
Peak Storm Maximum
Hydrograph Runoff Pump Time** Flood
Storm 5-Day 5-Day Discharge Volume To Remove Elevation
Frequency Rainfall Runoff CFS In/Day Ac-Ft All Runoff Ft. MSL

10 Year 12.5" 8.4" 455 2.17 7,602 7.3 Days 5.5
100 Year 18.7" 12.4" 670 3.19 11,222 10.8 Days 7.5

* Based on 10,883 acres drainage area.
** Based on a removal rate of 236,000 gallons per minute.

Approximately 6,000 acre-feet of water storage area will per-
mit 79 percent of the storm runoff from a 10 year frequency
storm and 53 percent of the runoff from a 100 year frequency
storm to be retained on the site. The maintenance of these
volumes will encompass a flood elevation of 6.5 feet mean sea
level (MSL) with zero pump discharge. Using a discharge rate
of 1-1/4 inches per day, the maximum flood elevation for a
10 year frequency storm would be 5.5 feet MSL and 7.5 feet
MSL for a 100 year frequency storm.

For a 10 year frequency storm, the retention time for the
volume of water above 6.5 feet MSL is 1.5 days and a reten-
tion time for the total 10 year storm is 7.3 days. The 100
year storm will have a retention time of 5.0 days for the
volume above 6.5 feet MSL and 10.8 days for the total storm.

C. SPECIFY THE AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE OF THE TOTAL SITE THAT WILL
BE:

1. UNDISTURBED NATURAL AREAS

According to the applicant's environmental consultants,
the total site is lacking in unique or natural areas.
Development, will pose no serious impact on the site.
To provide for the installation of large lakes, water-
ways, golf courses, parks, landscaped divided arterial
parkways, and heavy indigenous planting, the regarding
and landscape improvement of the major portion of all















natural areas will be necessary. Undisturbed areas
should approximate 1000 to 1200 acres or 10-12% of the
total site and generally be limited to 2/3 of the
Ranchette areas.

2. REPLANTED AND LANDSCAPED, INCLUDING GOLF COURSES WITH
GRADE ELEVATIONS, IF NOT SHOWN ON THE FINAL GRADING
PLAN.

Approximately 90% of the total site will be developed,
including: 1,800 acres of lakes, canals, lagoons, and
swales, 300 acres of golf courses, and 573 acres of
landscaped arterial parkway rights-of-way. The minimum
golf course grade elevation will approximate 5'-6'.

C. SPECIFY THE AMOUNT AND PERCENTAGE OF THE TOTAL SITE THAT WILL
BE:

3. GRASSED SWALES WITH APPROXIMATE ELEVATIONS AS ABOVE.

Approximately 400 acres or 4 percent of the project will
be grassed swales. The invert elevation of these swales
will vary from 4 to 7 feet mean sea level.

4. LAKES AND PONDS WITH MINIMUM, OPTIMUM AND MAXIMUM STAGES
AND VOLUMES

Approximately 1,800 acres or 18 percent of the project
will consist of lakes, lagoons, canals and swales. An
additional 1,200 acres of residential area, swales and
100 acres of golf course will also be available for
water storage. The total volume available for water
storage between 4 and 6.5 feet mean sea level will be
6,000 acre-feet.

Maximum stage for the lake system will occur with a 100
year frequency storm and will be 7.5 feet mean sea
level (MSL). This maximum stage will occur in the
northern portions of the project with a stage of 5 feet
MSL at the pump stations. During normal operation, a
stage of 4 feet MSL will be maintained throughout the
system which will approximate the normal water table.
During periods of little rainfall, the system will
operate at normal water table elevations.


















5. COVERED WITH IMPERVIOUS SURFACES INCLUDING STRUCTURES,
WALKWAYS, ROADS, PARKING LOTS, ETC.

Site
Acres Percentage

Structures (Buildings) 981 10%

Roads & Sidewalks 479 5%

Parking 957 10%
25%

These numbers are approximations and are to be adjusted
as planning proceeds.

D. ELEVATIONS

PROVIDE STREET AND FLOOR ELEVATIONS

Minimum street elevations will be 5.5 feet mean sea level
which is equal to a 10 year frequency storm. Minimum floor
elevations will be 7.5 feet which is equal to a 100 year
frequency flood elevation.

E. FLOOD INSURANCE

IS THE AREA ELIGIBLE FOR FLOOD INSURANCE?

According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development,
the project is not classified for flood insurance. Upon de-
velopment of this area, all house pads will be above the 100
year flood elevation of 7.5 feet mean sea level and will thus
be eligible for flood insurance.

F. WATER BUDGET

THE FOLLOWING TABLE IS A MONTHLY WATER BUDGET FOR THE PROJECT.















WATER BUDGET


Potable (1)
Average Water Evapo-(2)
Month Rainfall Withdrawals Transpiration Evaporation Net

Jan. 2.03 1.68 1.07 0.70 -1.42

Feb. 1.87 1.68 1.32 0.80 -1.93

Mar. 2.27 1.68 1.72 1.14 -2.27

Apr. 3.88 1.68 2.18 1.40 -1.38

May 6.44 1.68 2.88 1.44 0.44

June 7.37 1.68 2.35 1.30 2.04

July 6.75 1.68 2.65 1.40 1.02

Aug. 6.97 1.68 2.68 1.36 1.25

Sept. 9.47 1.68 2.13 1.20 4.46

Oct. 8.21 1.68 1.82 1.10 3.61

Nov. 2.83 1.68 1.34 0.86 -1.05

Dec. 1.67 1.68 1.01 0.70 -1.72

Total 59.76 20.16 23.15 13.40 +3.05


(1) Assuming 100% occupancy each month.
(2) Effect of depth of water table and plant density on evapotrans-
pi ration rate in Southern Florida, Stewart & Mills, 1967.
(3) U.S.W.B. Pan Evaporation, Stewart & Mills, 1967.

Note: Figures based on 55% open area, 20% water surface and 25%
impervious area.













27. WATER SUPPLY


A. WATER QUANTITIES

PROVIDE THE ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF WATER THAT WILL BE REQUIRED
DURING MAJOR DEVELOPMENT PHASES AND POST DEVELOPMENT ON AN
ANNUAL AND PEAK DAILY BASIS FOR POTABLE AND NONPOTABLE
QUALITY USE. WHAT PERCENTAGE OF THE AVAILABLE SUPPLY IS
THIS?


The following table tabulates the quantities of
that will be required by the development during
development phases.


Population

981
4,921
11 ,668
19,794
28,067
35,927
42,723
48,225
53,358
58,334
70,514
82,181
93,547
99,825


* Based on 150 gallons per
** Based on 300 gallons per


*Ave rage
Flow (MGD)

0.1
0.7
1.8
3.0
4.2
5.4
6.4
7.2
8.0
8.8
10.6
12.3
14.0
15.0

per person.
per person.


potable water
the various


**Peak Flow
(MGD)

0.3
1.5
3.5
5.9
8.4
10.8
12.8
14.5
16.0
17.5
21.2
24.7
28.1
29.9


The majority of nonpotable water used for irrigation will be
drawn from surface water resources. It is expected that a
certain portion of cooling water for industrial and commercial
areas may be drawn from the Floridan aquifer. This water is
too saline to be then discharged into surface water bodies.
Consequently, the discharged cooling water would be placed
back into the Floridan aquifer. The source of potable water
for the proposed development will be the Biscayne aquifer of
which the total available supply is not known. Well data
from adjacent wells indicate excellent transmissibility of
the aquifer, which is an excellent indication that sufficient
water is available for the project.


End of
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