• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Little fingers - Little joys
 Lazy Milly
 Ding dong
 The tale of a monkey
 Come out
 The cottage by the brook
 Bunnies meat
 The careful Dicky
 Flowers to sell
 What shall I catch you!
 Wishes
 Taking a walk
 Private & confidential
 Plenty to say
 Once upon a time
 Happy as a king
 Two little mice
 A sad mishap
 The seagulls
 Mother's nosegay
 The trabelled swan
 The well
 Thinking
 Doggie's lesson
 Christmas morn
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: R T & S artistic series
Title: Flowers I bring and songs I sing
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083807/00001
 Material Information
Title: Flowers I bring and songs I sing
Series Title: R T & S artistic series
Physical Description: 48 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Goodman, Maude ( Illustrator )
Simpson, Bessie ( Illustrator )
Maguire, Helena, 1860-1909 ( Illustrator )
Nesbit, E ( Edith ), 1858-1924 ( Author )
Burnside, Helen Marion ( Author )
Scanes, Arthur ( Author )
Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Fine Art Works ( Printer )
Publisher: Raphael Tuck & Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Paris ;
New York
Manufacturer: Fine Art Works
Publication Date: [1893]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1893   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's poetry
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Paris -- France
United States -- New York -- New York
Germany
 Notes
Citation/Reference: BM
General Note: Probable imprint date from BM cited below.
Funding: Artistic series.
Statement of Responsibility: designs by Maude Goodman, Bessie Simpson, and Helena Maguire ; poems by Edith Bland, Helen Marion Burnside, Arthur Scanes.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083807
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223438
notis - ALG3687
oclc - 14108622

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Little fingers - Little joys
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Lazy Milly
        Page 5
    Ding dong
        Page 6
    The tale of a monkey
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Come out
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The cottage by the brook
        Page 11
    Bunnies meat
        Page 12
    The careful Dicky
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Flowers to sell
        Page 15
        Page 16
    What shall I catch you!
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Wishes
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Taking a walk
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Private & confidential
        Page 23
    Plenty to say
        Page 24
    Once upon a time
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Happy as a king
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Two little mice
        Page 29
    A sad mishap
        Page 30
    The seagulls
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Mother's nosegay
        Page 34
        Page 33
    The trabelled swan
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The well
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Thinking
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Doggie's lesson
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Christmas morn
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Back Matter
        Back Matter 1
        Back Matter 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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and printed at te Fine Ar- Works in Germany.
COPYRIGHT.


'RAPHAELTuCI- & bON5
LONDON, PARIS & NEW YORK,.


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EATH sunny skies of summer
days,
And by the glowing winter's
hearth,
By breezy sea, in woodland ways,

We oft, ere now, have shared your
mirth.

Dear children, whom again we meet-
Before whose eyes again we place
Our little book, which you will greet,
We trust, with glad and smiling face.



We know the things and people well
Of whom we tell you in our rhymes,
And such adventures that befell,
Have really happened scores of times.



And children sweet, we know you too.
Who read our little book to-day,
And think, and plan, and work for you,
And hold you in our hearts always.


Helen Marion Burnside.






























































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LITTLE fingers gently tapping on the window pane,
Little whispers, fondly uttered, soon come home again;
Little brown eyes fondly watching daddy down the street,
Little laughter as she turns their loving glance to meet.


Little sorrow stealing o'er her loving little breast,
Little teardrops glisten, little hands are pressed;
But smiles soon follow tears, as on an April day,
Banishing the clouds, then all again is gay.
Arthur Scanes.







THERE are many little children on this big sunshiny earth,
Little hearts that have their sorrows, and their fancies, and their mirth;
But however many of them, big, or middle-sized, or small,
In the hearts of grown-up people there is room to hold them all.



Though it's years and years ago, dears, since we
lived in children-land,
Once again along its valleys we will wander
hand in hand:
And the sunshine and the showers take
together as they come,
If we find there's April weather in the
way where we shall roam.
Helen Marion Burnside.





































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LITTLE FINGERS.


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YOU'D better make haste home, Milly-you'd better hasten home,
It's late, and mother's wondering why ever you don't come;
There's cake to make, and mother's busy as can be,
There's wood to chop, and tea to set, Granny's come to tea.
So hurry home, run very fast, and help your mother dear,
You may be useful there-and oh, you're far from useful here.
Edith Bland.















SING a song of summer-bees are on the
wing,
Merry birds are singing as they ought
to sing.
Little children playing as they ought to
play,
In among the meadows all the happy day.
Ding-dong, winter, keep away;
Ding-dong, summer, stay.


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Sing a song of winter-bees are gone
to sleep,
Roses all are buried where the snow
lies deep;
Little children dancing round the
Christmas tree,
Laugh to see the snow where roses
used to be.
Ding-dong, summer, melt the snow;
Ding-dong, winter, go.
Edit/ih Bnd.






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A PET FROM OVER THE SEA.


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THESE children had a monkey once,
Who had :, ctu'l t.il,
And when he tried to crack a nut
He'd nearly always fail.

The reason why, I'm sure you'll guess-
If not, well, I will tell:
His teeth were not quite strong enough
To penetrate the shell.
Arthur Scanes.














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DAY DREAMS.


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COME out, come out, to meadows
wide,
Your books and work forsaking;
Along the brimming brooklet's side
The daffodils are waking.


Forth they troop in gowns of green.
And don their caps of yellow,
And blithest dancers ever seen,
Each nods to nodding fellow.


They whisper, whisper, while the
breeze
Their dainty heads is swaying;
And you, and I, ard birds, and
bees,
Can hear that they are saying


"Come out, come out, ye children
sweet,
And chase the gleams and shadows
That fly, on gold and purple feet,
Across the fragrant meadows."
Helen Marion Burnside.














T HERE'S a little cottage by a little brook,
And in that little cottage, if you care to look,
You'll find a little boy, and a little girl,
With their eyes brim-full of fun, and little heads a-curl.


The little brook is shallow, and the little girl and boy
Sail'd a boat on it one day ('twas but a penny toy);
In they tumbled, flop-heels flying high o'erhead-
But that you cannot see, because they've gone to bed.

Helen Marion Burnside.


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SAID Bunny Jack to Bunny Jill,
"Are those things good to eat ?"

Said Bunny Jill-" they'll make us ill,

They're not like Bunnies' meat."


A squirrel, peering from tl- bral.,:.

Behind these Bunnies t .':.
Laughed Ha-ha-ha !--h.bo \v\.- '.,u arc !

I'll taste the meat for \ou "



Said Bunny Jack and Buiunr, il,
"You really are too sweet -
But if you would just be so :;:.:,d
As just to taste the rml-.t.



"Delighted, friends, I'm .u.--
no, thanks "--
Quoth Squg in hone 'd .
tones;
Then closed an eye-that
Squirrel sly- R
And nibbled up y,,
the cones


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I DOGGY said to dickybird
SI" Do come down to me,"
Dickybird to doggy said
I'm safer in the tree."




Dogg. said to dickybird
I Im sure you'll tumble off,"
Dickybird to doggy said
"Don't you try to chaff."



So doggy left the dickybird
Still perched up in the tree,
Because the fun of being killed
He really failed to see.
Arthur Scanes.


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THE WOODS


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FLOWERS to sell! flowers to
sell!
I roamed in the morning
early
By blossoming brake and by
hawthorn dell,
While dews on the grass
hung pearly.

.j;- Flowers to sell flowers to sell!

From Butterfly's bower I reft
them,
-. The brown bees promised they
would not tell,
If honey enough I left them.

i Fl. '-r.- t. sell flowers to sell!
S. e ~ here I pluck'd them yonder
... A fairy peep'd out of her fox-glove cell,
And whispered me here to wander.
Flowers to sell! flowers to sell!
She knew you'd be here to buy them;
The dew is yet bright on each bud and bell,
Come, pay me a kiss, and try them.
Helen Marion Burnside.



















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CTHAT shall I catch you,
Kind Sir, or sweet Madam-

Would you buy sword-fish,

Or pike, if I had 'em ?




What shall I catch you-
A dog-fish, or cat-fish,
A shark, or a mermaid,
A round fish, or flat fish ? "




What shall you catch me ?-
Well, sword-fish might fight me;
Your shark, or your pike, lad,
I'm fearful would bite me.




I'd rather you'd catch me
A sea-urchin bonnie-
As merry and brown as -
Your sweet self, my sonnie --"




















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I WISH that we could paint, Pussy,

Pictures that look true,

And not the horrid smudgy things

I sometimes show to you;

Bad as they are, though, Pussy, dear,

They're more than you can do.




I wish that we could sing,
Pussy,
Could sing a whole song
through,
Not little, funny, purry songs, .
Like those I hear from
you;
But funny as your singing is,
It's more than I could
do.




I wish that we could work, Pussy,

Like Dad and Mammy, too,

Then they might sometimes rest and play

As we do, I and you.

But useful, helpful things, Pussy,

Are more than we can do '

Edith Bland

































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OUT FOR A WALK.


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COME and take a walk with me

With US, I mean, for we are three,

Rover, Rough, and I, you see.



Rough won't touch the birds I know,
But Rover will a-hunting go,
After bunnies in the snow.



There, I'm sure he sees one now,
How it scampers to and fro,
On that little hilluck's brow.



He has never caught one yet
(That's a fact I don't regret),

But some fun you're sure to see,
If you take a walk with me.
Helen Marion Burnside















SAID mother sheep to daughter lamb

"Come over, child, come over."

"No, no, it's nicer where I am,

Amongst the rosy clover."






Come, daughter lamb," said mother sheep,

"Across the silver shallows."

Said daughter lamb, "I think, I'll keep

.\n:i.;t the golden mallows."






"Well, be it so, my lazy lamb;

Just keep your tail behind you;

I'll go to lunch with father ram,

And then come back to find
you."
Helen Marion Burnside.












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"Come, Nannie," she cried- "come, and
share my milk,
And then we can take a %alk,
For you look very wise about hundreds
ol things
Oh, Nannie, why can'l you talk !








"Not talk answered Nan--" % hy, I
chatter all day ,
My Billy will tell you so :
I've got plenty t,:. say in my %own
sort of way,
Which you don't understand,
you know."
Helen Marion Burnside.


1 r,E.\R little girl sat
sipping her milk
At the foot of some step;,
one day,
And there came by a goat and
.peeped over the %\all,
Very smart, in a coat uf grey.










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9NCE upon a time, Jack
I knew a little sailor,

(The story's told in rhyme,
Jack,)
Whose ship was called a
I whaler.


Now listen to my tale, Jack,

This sailor went a-sailing,

He went to catch a whale
Jack,
He really went a-whaling.


A pocket-knife he took, Jack,

My little friend, the sailor,

To stick-so says the book-
Jack,
Into the fish's tail,-er-


Er-yes, it's written here, Jack,

Then home he came a-sailing,

A nd vowed with many a tear,
Jack,
H-e'd go no more a-whaling.
Helen Marion Burnside.

















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As happy as a king is Roy,
When on his mother's .kiee he sits;
Far better than a book or toy;

Or, even than his cat or kits.


He loves that quiet resting place;

He loves to feel her gentle kiss ;
He loves to gaze into her face,

And feel how sweet a mother is.


She sings him songs, or tells him tales

Of "when she was a girl," you know;

And with delight that never fails,

Roy hears her talk of "long ago."


"Some day," says Roy, "when I'm a man,

Dear mother, I'll take care of you ,

And every single thing I can,

To please you, I will always do."
Helen Mar'ion Aar:siL'.












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AS A KING.


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THERE were two little mice, two grey little mice
(Not those of the nursery clock),
Who once on a time, if there's truth in a rhyme,
Did "diccory diccory dock."
These were quite other mice, one foolish, one wise,
Aye, one, dear, was wiser by far
Than the other, who went-on marauding bent-
Round the rim of a blue china jar.
For he sat on a shelf by his own little self,
And squeaked-" Little brother, it's plain-
There-just as I said, gone-heels over head!
He will ne'er go a-hunting again."
Helen Marion Burnside.















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:'IT's very kind to leave behind,



In growing old, I've got a cold,

And 0! the rain does pelt a



Fellow so," croak'd father
frog-
"How sore my throat is
getting,
It must have been that fog,
I ween,
That gave me such a wet-
ting."



Then, just as he slept cosily,

A sad mishap befell, a

Boy came by, and shouted Hi!

Here's mother's lost umbrella !"
Helen Marion Burnside.








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WHAT ARE T HE


SEAGUULLS


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*IHAT do the great seagulls see
When they fly far, far away ?
Other small children like me,
Digging and wading all day?


All sorts of children at play
See their wide wings shining white,
.That's in the sunshiny day,
What do the gulls do at night?

When the sun sinks round and red,
Then colours all disappear,
All the good gulls go to bed,
Just like good children, my dear.
Edith Bland.


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YOU, flov. ers, are mother's nosegay,
She's going to a ball to-night,
And you will hear music, and see the fun
And enjoy yourselves in the light.


And I shall lie in the dark, tucked up,
And see nothing pretty at all; {
Oh! I wish I could be a nosegay,
For then I could go to the ball.
Edith Bland.


75




































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W VHEN I was young," the old swan said,
"I took into my silly head,
The notion that a swan should go
And see the world, and I did so.


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I saw some curious things, no doubt,
As I walked painfully about ;
And oh, believe me, 'tis the case,
The world's a dry and dreadful place.


I passed through woods and fields of grass,
Where not a drop of water was;
And in the parks and lanes beyond
There wasn't even a common pond.


When that eventful day began,
I thought I was a clever swan ;
But long before the day was done
I knew I was a foolish one.


And when I reached a cornfield dry,
With prickly sheaves that stood up high,
I cried The 'world no more I'll roam,'
For 1 was better off at home.

I ran-I stopped not
breath to take,
Until I plunged into
the lake ;.

but learn content- w
You wouldn't like it if
you went."
Edith Bland.

















DOWN goes the bucket, rattles off the chain;
What will there be in it, when it's up again ?
\\ater from the well so deep,
after r bright and clear.

Mind \,: u do nut tumble in;

Do) not go -o near.

NMan f'athiu.nt lfai bclou, -prings are welling deep.

ltoldJ my hand, dear. nuw you're safe! only just a peep.






What can these two dickies be ?

-. Surely they don't think
O plunging in the depths below,

To take a cooling drink.

Better far content themselves

With puddles from the rain;

-Like you or me, if they fall in,

They'd ne'er come up again.
Arthur Scanes.










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THE 'WE/LL.


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I hear the blackbirds singing;

The leaves upon the tree

Stand still awhile to listen,

Then clap their hands in glee.




I think thd birds are
happy

Because the grass is
green,

S. Now all the rain is
over

That's made the leaves
so clean.



They sparkle in the
sunshine,

And all the air is
sweet

With flowers, whose
fresh lips open,

The sun's warm kiss
to meet.
Helen Marion
Burnside.



















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I HEAR THE BLACKBIRDS SINGING









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DOGGIE'S


LESSON.



















You must sit till half-past four,
But not a minute more,
For that's when dogs and children '
have their tea-
There'll be half a bun for you,
And some milk and water too,
And two buns and jam and real milk for me-.



You don't like sitting so ?
But it must be done, you know:
I hate my lessons just as much as you-
But you'll get no milk or bun
Till the lessons are all done-
And sitting still's the lesson you must do


Sit steady as a rock,
And never mind the clock,
That naughty clock is very, very wrong-
I've a comfortable chair,
So I really do not care
If you find your lesson very much too long.
Edith Bland.










































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'4.1"


ON CHARITY


BENT.


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N CHARITY bent, and hand in hand,
Two fairies went, though they'd no wand,
Nor wings had they of a dazzling hue,
But dressed like me, or just like you.



'Tis Christmas morn, the snow lies deep,
And all around seems hush-ed in sleep;
But as they take their \ray along,
A Christmas peal rings out ding-dong I



And every note of the village chime
Appears to sing in merry rhyme :
Good cheer shall enter ever h.omec. -..
Where'er these fairies sweet shall -'.
come !
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TWI LI
TWILIGHT is falling o'er sea and sky,
Under its wing is each birdie's head,


G HT.
Each little daisy has closed its eye-
And here is the candle to light us to bed.
Helen Marion Burnside.

























GOOD NIGHT.




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