• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Chapter VII
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: The book of playmates
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083804/00001
 Material Information
Title: The book of playmates
Alternate Title: Happy hours
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gellie, Mary E
Griffith, Farran and Co ( Publisher )
Turnbull & Spears ( Printer )
Publisher: Griffith Farran & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Turnbull and Spears
Publication Date: [1894?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birthdays -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1894   ( local )
Advertisements -- 1894   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1894   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
Advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by M.E.B. (Mary E. Gellie)
General Note: Date of publication from advertisements for various products on endpapers and following text: 11/94.
General Note: With: The book of Christmas and winter-time / by M.E.B. (Mary E. Gellie) -- The book of pleasant hours / by M.E.B. (Mary E. Gellie)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083804
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223473
notis - ALG3722
oclc - 231756623

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
    Title Page
        Page 6
    Chapter I
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Chapter II
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Chapter III
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Chapter IV
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Chapter V
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Chapter VI
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Chapter VII
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Advertising
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Back Cover
        Page 38
Full Text

'THE SECRET OF HEALTH.'

Written by a Diplom6e of a London Hospital.
A Copy of this Book will be sent to each user of LIFEBUOY SOAP who sends his
or her name and address and 12 LIFEBUOY SOAP Wrappers, postage or carriage paid,
to LEVER BROTHERS, Limited, Port Sunlight, near Birkenhead.
CONTENTS:--THE MISSING BAG: A Complete Story-INTRODUCTION TO THE 'SECRET OF HEALTH'-GUIDE
TO HOME NURSING-GUIDE TO NURSING IN INFECTIOUS ILLNESSES-OUR DUTY TO OUR NEIGHBOUR-CHOLERA:
How to Prevent it-SPECIAL CHAPTER-A WORD OF WARNING-SICK DIET, AND FEEDING THE SICK-USEFUL
HINTS FOR HEADS OF FAMILIES.

Books by LIFEBUOY SOAP is a Carbolic Disinfectant Soap for use in the
Prevention of Sickness and the Preservation of Health, and Is guaran-
Popular Authors teed perfectly pure and free from any injurious chemicals.

Given with All purchasers of this soap can exchange the Wrappers, at the Dealer's from whom
they buy the soap, for BOOKS. A book bound in cardboard covers can be had for
Lifebuoy Soap. 8 LIFEBUOY SOAP Wrappers.


LEVER BROTHERS, Limited, Port Sunlight, near Birkenhead, have received the accompanying Report on
LIFEBUOY ROYAL DISINFECTANT SOAP from Dr. Karl Enoch, Chemisch, Hygienisches Institut, Hamburg.
REPORT. cultivated germs or
The e n microbes (Bacillus),
The examination in each case certain
of the sample of exact time being al-
'Lifebuoy Royal lowed for the op-
Disinfectant Soap' eration; and thus
furnished to me by F the capacity of this
Messrs. Lever Bros., soap for destroying
Limited, of Port the various live and
Sunlight, England, '^ growing germs was
gives the following 4 proved.
results as to its
action as a dis- SI THE RESULTS

were as follows:-
Solutions of i, 2,
and per cent. of .-The obstinate
Lifebuoy Royal Dis-
infectant Soap in Typhoid Microbes,
water were made. VO '
These solutions en with 5 per cent. so.
whee rsolution AN ANTISEPTIC & lution, were dead
were brought to bear TUEo a O. DISINFECTANT w
on a variety of clean L within 2 hours.
2.-The operation of this soap on the Cholera Microbes was very remarkable, and showed this
soap to be in the highest degree a disinfectant. These were taken from persons who had died of
Cholera in Hamburg, and showed a result as follows:-
With the 2 per cent. mixture, Cholera Microbes were dead within 15 minutes. With the 5 per
cent. same were dead within 5 minutes.
3.-The Diphtheria Microbes were killed after 2 hours with the 5 per cent. solution.
4.-The 5 per cent. solution was tried on fresh Carbuncle germs, and the result showed that
the Microbe life was entirely extinct after 4 hours.
From the foregoing experiments it will be seen that the Lifebuoy Royal Disinfectant Soap is
I powerful disinfectant and exterminator of the various germs and microbes of disease.

(Signed) KARL ENOCH, Chem. Hygien. Inst, Hamburg,





Hoven's Hose Holder's Trade Mark.'
is in the
Old Willow Pattern Plate.


For suspending
HnOVEN' 5 CLIP STOCKINGS without GARTERS.
Sole Maker ALFRED BREESE, LONDON.
Sold Everywhere.























MIN




ikf




ASK-





THE .BOOK

OF


PLAYMATE


BY M. E. B. (MIARY E. GELLIE)
AUTHOR OF "A GEM OF AN AUNT," FEARLESS FRANK."
ETC. ETC.


LONDON
GRIFFITH FARRAN & CO.
NEWBERY HOUSE, 39 CHARMING CROSS ROAD


S





Whe Book of Playmates.
-^--

CHAPTER I
LITTLE MAY came running in from the garden with
her arms full of flowers, and a wreath on her head.
"Look, mammal" she cried, "Sister Bella has
made me a crown of flowers, because it is my
birthday."
"Yes, my darling, it is a beautiful crown," said
May's mamma, as she took the child in her arms
and gave her a kiss, "and the weather is so fine
and warm that I am going to take you to see
Uncle and Aunt James. You are to stay a whole,
week to play with your little cousins. Will not
that be a grand birthday treat ?"
"Oh, how lovely I" cried May; and she
danced about, clapping her hands for joy.
May had only her sister Bella at home to
play with, and there was nothing she liked
better than to stay with her little cousins.
Very soon May and her mother set off in
the carriage. May chattered very fast about all
the fine games she would have with her cousins.
"I hope you will be a very good
little girl
while you are
away, and do
all that Aunt
Fanny tells
you," said
her mother.
"Yes, I will be very, very good, I promise," said May.






THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.
.-ifi


'i




THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


C CHAPTER II.

O look, mammal" cried May, "there is Kitty in
the garden gathering a rose, and there is Aunt
Fanny at the window, with Ethel blowing
bubbles. Oh, I wonder whether auntie will
let me blow bubbles too I"
S They had reached Uncle James's house.
It was a large house, with a beautiful garden
all round it, and beyond the garden were
some pleasant sunny meadows, and a shady
wood, where the children loved to play.
When Aunt Fanny saw the carriage
drive up, she ran to the door to receive her
visitors.
"Auntie, dear, I see Harry and Flora in
the meadow, may I go to them?" asked May.
"Yes, my dear, run off," said her aunt, "but don't let
Harry take you into mis- ,, "'
chief."
May soon reached her ,l''12i '
little cousins, who were
having a fine game to-
gether. Flora pretended .
that she had been caught "
in a shower of rain, and
was crouching under an
umbrella, and Harry was
pouring water upon the /_,
umbrella, for rain, out of _- .
a large watering-pot. -





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


SHarry laughed when he
S 7' 1 saw May coming, for he was
i very fond of his cousin.
Y "You must be caught in
S the rain now," he cried, "and
get under the umbrella too.
; Flora, you must make room for
All May; there is plenty of room
for both."
The children played at this
game for some time, then Flora
f a got tired of it, and ran off into
a bank of flowers, and began
to pick big daisies.
Come along into the
i^i m ; house and see the baby," said
Harry to May. So May ran
off with Harry to the nursery, for she dearly loved the baby.
Flora was so busy gathering big daisies that she did not
see that the other two were running away.
When she looked up and saw that they were just going out
at the gate on the other side of the meadow, she began to run
after them, for she did not like to be left alone; but they ran
so fast, that she could not catch them, so the poor little thing
sat plump down in the middle of some long grass, and thrust
her fist into her eyes, and began to cry most piteously.
Kitty, the eldest girl, was busy working in her garden on
the other side of the hedge when she heard the sound of a child
crying. She stopped from her work and listened, and then
peeped through a hole in the hedge, and saw poor little Flora
all alone on the other side of the meadow.
Kitty at once threw down her rake, and ran through the




THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.

garden gate into the field to the help of her sister, for Kitty
was a very kind-hearted child, and if any of her little brothers
or sisters got into trouble, she was always the first to try to
comfort them.
By the time she had reached the other side of the meadow,
poor Flora was crying louder than ever.
"Why, Flora, that is a face I" cried Kitty; "whatever is the
matter ?"
"Harry and May are nasty things," sobbed Flora; "they
have run away, and I can't catch them."
Never mind, Flora; you shall come along with me," said
Kitty, wiping the little girl's eyes, and kissing her.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


CHAPTER III.

DON'T cry; come along with me,
and we will have a swing," said Kitty.
Then she took the little girl by
the hand, and led her into the garden,
Sand round to the back of the house,
where there was a fine swing fastened
Sto the branches of a large tree. The
,' seat of the swing was so wide that
two children could sit on it side by
side.
a Kitty and Flora had a nice long
swing together, and soon Flora's tears
were all dried up, and she was quite
happy again.
While the sisters were having
their ride in the swing, Harry and May
ran into the house. First they went
into the nursery and saw the baby,
who was sitting up in his high chair, wrapped round with a
blanket.
Baby knew that May's was a strange face, and he put
his thumb into his mouth and cried, Boo-boo I" when she
laughed and made funny faces at him.
Harry soon grew tired of playing with the baby.
"I say, May," he said, "would you like to see the new
picture papa is painting? He is gone out now, so if you like
we will go into his room and get a peep at it."
So they ran downstairs and into the studio-that was the
name of the room where Uncle James painted his pictures.
B






THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


A o





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


In the studio they found Tom, who was always up to
mischief, sitting before an easel, painting a picture of the dog
Punch. Tom had on a pair of his father's spectacles, and Punch
was sitting up on his hind legs, with a hat on his head, quite
enjoying the fun.
"I will paint something too I cried May. And she perched
herself up in a high chair, before a big easel, with a new canvas
on it. "Now, Harry, you stand quite still, and I will paint
your portrait."
She was daubing away very happily, and making her clean
pinafore in a fine mess
with the wet paint,
when Aunt Fanny
came in.
Oh, Tom, you
are a naughty boy to
lead your Cousin May
into such mischief I "
she cried. Come
away, all of you, and
let nurse make you
tidy for dinner."
So the three
children were sent to
the nursery, where
their hands and faces
were well scrubbed
to get off the wet
paint, and they went
down to dinner look-
ing very clean and
S, nice.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.
















..... ... ..
1, INV~--~~=-~





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


After dinner,
the children
to th were all sent
out of doors to
amuse them-
selves.
They went
Outside the
garden to play
on the village
green, where
there were
some fine large
trees, with seats
""..."S.- 'all round them.
Here they had a splendid romp; theyplayed at hide and seek
and all sorts of nice games, and came back to the house at tea-
time quite tired out with so much running about.
After tea, May's mamma went home. All the children ran
to the door to see her get into the carriage.
"Good-bye, May, my darling," she said; "be a good little
girl. I shall come to fetch you at the end of the week."
May felt a little sad at saying good-bye to her dear mother,
and stood on the door-step kissing her hand till the carriage was
out of sight; but the boys shouted Hurrah, and threw up their
caps in the air, they were so glad that Cousin May was left behind.
After this they went into the drawing room, where the
children all stood in a circle round the piano, and sang hymns,
while Auntg Fanny, played. the tunes, and their young voices
sounded very sweet.
By this time it was getting late, and very soon the young
folks were sent to bed.





THE BOOK OF PLA YIMATES.


CHAPTER IV.
THE next morning, while Kitty was at her lessons, the little
ones played in the nursery at family coach.
They made a grand coach with chairs and the rocking-horse.
Harry was to be postilion, so he sat on the rocking-horse
in front, and cracked his long whip and cried "Gee-upl"
May and Tom pretended to be husband and wife, and
dressed themselves up and sat inside on a chair, while Cuthbert
was footman, and stood at the back holding up a large umbrella
to keep off sun or rain.
This game kept I
them all quite
happy till
di-nner-7
time. -





THE BOOK OF PLAYMATES.

SAfter dinner, Aunt Fanny
17- said, It is such a lovely day
that I think we will all go into
the fields to gather wild flowers."
So off the children scampered
to get their hats. They were
Very fond of playing in the fields,
Sand tried who could gather the
most wild flowers. The baby
a enjoyed himself as much as any
one, tumbling about in the sweet,
soft grass.
Kitty showed May her two
a v pet lambs. They were very tame,
and came running up as soon as
their mistress called them, for they knew her voice quite well,.
and would eat out of her hand. They were called Lily and
Snow, because their fleeces were So white.
May was very much delighted with the lambs, and would
not leave them. She took some of the bread that Kitty had
brought with her, and held it, out to them, and when they saw
tliat she stood quite still, and was gentle, and did not attempt to
touch them, they came close up and nibbled at the bread.
They let Kitty stroke them and pull their ears softly, but if*
May even put out her hand to give them a pat, they looked
quite frightened, as though they would run away, for they were'."
very timid little creatures.
By and by Flora came up shouting; they were so frightened,
that they scampered off to the other end of the field. Flora ran
after them to try to catch them, but that only made them run
the faster.
"Oh, Flora, how unkind of you to drive the poor lambs




THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.









..
'RAW
PIdi





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


away," cried May; "they let me feed them before you came,
and now they will not come near me."
This offended Miss Flora, who was a funny little girl, and
easily put out, and she ran off too. She went right across the
field, and straight home to the house, holding her hand before
her eyes to hide her tears.
May was going to run after her, but Kitty said she had
better be left to herself, and no one knew so well how to manage
Flora as Kitty.
By and by Kitty followed her little sister, for she did not like
to think that she was unhappy. Kitty cried, "Flora! Flora!"
and hunted all over the garden and half through the house, but
no Flora was to be seen or heard. At last Kitty looked into the
drawing-room, and there was Flora perched on a big chair, with
a slate and book before her, pretending to
l do lessons like Kitty. She was half asleep,
S her little face was skill very tearful, and her
curly hair was tumbled all over her head.
When Kitty came in Flora looked up,
// and was going to run away, but Kitty
stopped the little girl, and said,-
B stopped Would you like me to tell you
a story, Flora?"
SThere was nothing Flora liked
better than a story, so the sisters sat
together in a big arm-chair, and
S Kitty told a beautiful story about
ya foolish little lamb that wandered
away from its mother's side, and got
Lost up on the mountains; and" how
- H the little lamb got tired and cold
and hungry, and its poor fleece was




THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES&


torn by the thorny bushes, and it cried for its mother, but
there was no mother near to hear its cries. And then at last,
when the poor lamb was so tired and miserable that it could
hardly even cry, the kind shepherd came
and lifted it up tenderly in his arms, and
wrapped his plaid round it to keep off the
cold, and carried it back to its own mother's
side;--and the little lamb was
never so foolish as to run away
P again.
Kitty had just finished her
story, when they
heard the laugh-
ing and shouting
of the other chil-
dren, who were
all coming home
quite hungry for
their tea.
They had
brought several
baskets full of
wild flowers home
with them, as
well as some
blackberries
which they asked
the cook to make
into jam, but she
said there were
not enough for
that.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


CHAPTER V.
"THE sun is so hot that nurse shall take you to play in the
wood this afternoon," said Aunt Fanny the next day. "It will
be shady and cool in the wood."
So all the children set off with nurse for the wood. As
they were starting, little Ethel got on to the back of Ponto,
the big dog-for Ethel and Ponto were great friends. She said
he should carry her to the wood. But Ponto was lazy, and
quite refused to carry Ethel; he lay down flat with her on his
back, and would not stir, so little Ethel had to go on her own
feet, holding by Kitty's hand.
It was a beautiful wood, with all sorts of trees in it, and
long grass thick with lovely flowers. The birds sang sweetly
in the branches of the trees, and a little stream danced merrily
over its rocky bed.
Nurse sat down beneath one of the large trees with her
work, and the children amused them-
S*selves gathering flowers. Some of
Stem helped a poor old woman
to pick up sticks to light
S/ her fire with. There were
a great many dry sticks
i lying about, and each
child tried to make the
-~---7- biggest bundle.
They soon collected
more sticks than Widow
Brown could carry, so
they piled them up into
a heap just on the border




THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


of the wood, and she said
she would get her son Bill
to fetch them in a wheel-
barrow when he came home
from school in the evening.
Then Kitty said she
thought they ought to try
to fill a basket with wild
hyacinths to take home to
their mamma, who she knew
was very fond of the pretty
blue flowers.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


Every now and then
/ nurse looked up from
S "her work to see that the
children were all safe.
r^'- q_ There were so many of
.-" them that she had to
,he count them sometimes
S to make sure that not
Sone was missing.
S "Where is Harry?"
she cried by and by
t "I cannot see him any-
where. I am afraid he
is up to some mischief."
__ The rest of the
children began to run
H, in all directions, crying
"Harry I Harry "
Harry heard their
cries well enough, but he was enjoying himself so much that
he took good care not to answer.
He had wandered down to the side of the little stream,
where it ran between some big stones. The water looked so clear
and cool that he thought it would be fine fun to have a paddle.
So he took off his boots and socks, and waded up and down in
the water; and there nurse found him just as she was beginning
to grow really frightened that some mischief had happened to
him. He was as happy as a king, carrying a boot under each
arm, and with his fat little legs nearly up to the knees in
water.
"Oh, you young rascal I cried nurse," what a fright you
have given me, to be sure I"




THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


She soon dried his feet,
Sand made him sit down beside
U hher, and told him not to
SllT venture to go out of her sight

F | To keep him quiet, she
gave him a picture-book to
look at. This amused him for
I ~ some time, but by and by
nurse had to leave her work
to pick up Ethel, who had
tumbled down and hurt her-
self.
The moment nurse had turned her back, up jumped Master
Harry, and ran straight back to the stream. He sat down
on a big stone, and was just beginning to pull off his boots
to have another paddle, when Kitty happened to come up.
Come along, Harry," she cried, nurse says it is time
to go home; it is getting late, and J
mamma will be wondering what has
become of us." ,
So Harry had to take his
sister's hand, and go home
quietly like a good boy,
but he promised himself -
another paddle before
long; for there was
nothing that
Harry enjoyed
more than getting
himself wet, some-
how or other.




THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


CHAPTER VI.
THE weather was so
St fine and pleasant that the
to ,I whole family spent most
L of the day in the garden.
Often Uncle James and
Aunt Fanny sat together
b reading under the shade
of a wide-spreading tree,
While the children played
About.
Harry and May had
always been great friends,
Sand they generally went
S '~, d together. One of theii
Sfavourite amusements was
to water the flowers. Harry was never quite happy unless he
was making himself in a mess. So he particularly enjoyed
watering the flowers, because he was nearly always wet through
before he had finished the job.
"The poor flowers look very hot and dry; let us water
them, May,". said Harry one fine day.
May was quite willing, so the two fetched two watering-
pots, and went to the garden pump to fill them. Harry pumped
while May held the' pots to be filled, and quite as much water
went outside as in.
As they were going round to the flower garden, each
carrying a full watering-pot, they passed the open window of
Uncle James's studio. There were a number of plants stand-
ing about the room, for Uncle James was fond of flowers.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


"I will go and water uncle's flowers
for him," said May; I am sure the
poor things want water."
So she ran in at the window and
watered all the plants. There was one
standing on a chair, and she was just
stretching to water it, and making a
terrible mess on the chair and the floor,
When her aunt came in.
B" "Oh, May, what a mess you are
making she cried. You must not
come into your uncle's room alone. Run away into the garden;
there are plenty of flowers for you to water there."
May ran off as fast as she could, for her aunt looked really
angry, and she emptied all the water she had left upon the first
plant she came to, and then went in search of Harry. She
found him blowing bubbles on the grass.
Just then Kitty came up with a number of the children,
and said they were all going to play at hide-and-seek.
"I will hide with Harry and Ethel," she said, "and the rest
of you must begin to hunt as soon as you hear us cry out."
Off went Kitty with Harry and Ethel, while the others stood
still in front of the house, listening.
In about five minutes they heard a
distant cry of "WhoopI Whoop I "
and then they all ran off in different
directions in search of the hiders.
They went all over the
garden, and through the I V
shrubberies, till they
came round to the back ,S-
of the house.




THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


At the back of the house there was a little yard, where
there were some wooden sheds and the dog's kennel. The yard
S~ was separated from the garden by a
_-f ~low wall.
"I. believe they are somewhere in
the yard," cried Tom. "I am sure I
heard some one move. We must climb
over the wall."
Soon the whole lot of children were
scrambling by the creepers up the side of
the wall, and tumbling over the top.
Punch, the
S' dog, began to bark
with all his might,
and then appeared
the head of Harry,
S. who was getting
.- -l Nquite tired of hid-
ing so long. Soon
they found Kitty
in the wood shed,
and little Ethel
crouching beneath
the wall.
It was the turn
of the others to hide
now, but Kitty said
they must play with-
out her this time, as
-N kv-'-- 7 she had to go an
errand for her mamma
to see a poor woman.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMA TES.


Kitty put on her hat
and cape, and took a bag
full of nice things for a
t poor woman in the village,
Sbwho was very ill.
SKitty was kind-
hearted, like her mother,
and though she enjoyed
fun and play as much as
Sany other child,' she was
always ready to do any-
thing to help those who
were poor or in any
trouble. So she was
quite pleased to leave her
merry games and go to
see poor Mrs. Fry, who
was ill in bed.
Mrs. Fry was very
glad to see her kind little
visitor, who opened the
bag and put out all the
good things it contained on a table beside the bed. There was
some nice cold meat, and some fruit, and a few new-laid eggs.
Kitty sat beside the poor woman and talked for a little;
told her how baby was growing, and what tricks Harry
played, and then she said she must go home, for it was
getting late.
While Kitty was away, the other children romped about till
they were tired, and then they went indoors for tea.
After tea their mamma gathered them all round her, and
told them a story, which kept them quiet till bed-time.





THE BOOK OF PLAYMATES


They went to bed one at a time, beginning at the youngest.
While the babies were being put to bed, the others stood
round the piano, and sang some pretty hymns, and their mamma
played the tunes.
May was very fond of music, and she knelt upon a chair,
and rested her arms on the back of it, and her chin in her
hands, and listened and hummed the tune, for she did not know
the words of all the hymns her cousins sang.
"Now May must say her own evening hymn," said Aunt
Fanny. "Come along to my side, dear May."
So May went to her aunt's side and said her own hymn.
"You know been such a
your mamma good little girl
is coming to that, if you
fetch you to- like, I will ask
morrow, May; your mamma
won't you be to let you
glad to see her come again
again ?" soon, and


Ye s, "
answered May,
"but I shall
be sorry to go
away from
you, auntie,
dear.
I love
y o- u
all so
much."
"You
have


spend another
week with
us," said kind
Aunt Fanny,
as she gave
the child a
kiss.
So
May
went
to bed
quite
happy.





THE BOOK OF PLAYMATES.


CHAPTER VII.












THE very last day of May's happy week had come, so she
wanted to make the very most of it.
She had breakfast in the nursery with her little cousins.
As soon as breakfast was done, nurse wiped their hands and
faces, and sent them all down to the dining-room, baby and all.
There they had a romp with their papa, and were very
merry; he gave each one in turn a ride upon his foot, and
they sang-
Ride a cock horse
To Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady upon a white horse;
Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes,
She shall have music wherever she goes.

But I am sorry to say that Ethel pinched the baby, and
snatched away his whip, because she thought he had a longer
ride than she.
So Ethel had to stand in the corner for five minutes as a
punishment, and she did not like that at all.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


SIn the
midst of the
fun baby grew
1 '.. sleepy, so they
laid him on a
% ^^/---' '" pillow, with
-his whip and his
ball, and there
he slept for an
J hour, while the
other little ones
were sent outside to play, so that their
noise should not disturb him.
Kitty took May round to have a
good-bye look at everything. They went
through the wood, and all over the garden, and gathered a
nosegay of beautiful flowers for May to take home with her.
Harry followed them about wherever they went. He had
dressed himself up in some of Tom's
clothes, and carried a long whip under
his arm, and said he was an Irishman
driving his pigs to market.
Presently Tom came running
up and said, "Here is auntie. I
can see the carriage coming along
the road."
Tom ran to open the big ,*t.
gates to let the carriage in, and
all the others ran after him. ^
May's mamma nodded and : -
smiled when she saw all the ,/s. .si"
little folks running to welcome '-- t -





THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


her, and when she got out of the carriage she
gave each child a kiss.
"And how is my little May, and what
has she been doing all this time? I hope
she has been good," she said.
Aunt Fanny declared that May had been
such a good little girl that she must come
again for a week, before long.
At this good news May began to skip
S^ and jump, and all the other children clapped
their hands and shouted, because they were
so glad to think that May was to come back
some day. Then they ran upstairs with their
HARY aunt's things--little Rose, the youngest girl,
coming last with the sunshade, and they left the two mammas
to talk while they had the last game with Cousin May.
They played at keeping school. Tom put on his papa's
spectacles and was schoolmaster, and all the others sat in a long
row and pretended to do lessons. Tom was a very strict school-
master; he carried a stick under his arm, and if any of the
children misbehaved, he pretended to give them a rap on the
knuckles, but he had such an unruly set of scholars that he
was obliged to scold with a very loud voice,
to try to make them keep order.
This was a capital game, and kept them
all happy till it was time for nurse to make
them clean and neat to go down stairs to
dinner with their mammas.
Soon after dinner May's mamma
said. it was time for her to go home, -
and she would like the carriage to
be ordered.





THE BOOK OF PLA YMATES.


Tom and Harry ran to the stables to see the horses put in-
they were large black horses, with brass harness. When all was
ready, the two little boys mounted on to the coach-box beside
the coachman, who was very good-natured, and said he would
give them a drive for a mile along the road.
By this time May and her mamma were quite ready.
May almost cried when she said good- bye to her kind
aunt and all her dear cousins, she was so sorry that
her happy visit and the bright smiles
had come to an returned to her
en d, and she dear little face,
had to leave and she spent
them all. the rest of
But the day
by the telling
time she B ella
reached the fine
hom e, fun she
and saw had had
her own with her
sister cousins
Bella while
stand- she had
ing at b e e n
the gate away.
watch- So
ing for t h i s
her, she was the
felt end of
qu i t eMay's
happy y birthday
aga i n, treat.




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