• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The old snow man
 Kitty in the cradle
 Paying back
 Jolly Joe
 Lazy Lew
 An April rain - A contented...
 What the grasses said
 Little bird
 A little nut-cracker
 Ben's growl
 Polly's school
 Birds
 Who was she?
 The little chief
 The secret
 A song for summer
 What the fox thought
 Nobody knows
 How the baby was named
 The dough-dog
 Tick tock - A naughty sheep
 Pudding and milk - A request from...
 A little country girl
 Winnie's troubles - Some naughty...
 Pedro - Bunny-Coats Bed
 Miss Pussy's sickness - A wonderful...
 Neddy's pets
 The window-pane tree
 The meeting of the birds
 Pussy and the Martins - Like...
 A catastrophe
 My kitty - Where they grow
 The lost chickens
 Our visitor
 The mower and the bird's nest -...
 Great expectations - Harry's...
 Nine little birdies
 Back Cover






Group Title: Snow bird series
Title: Doll's tea party
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083796/00001
 Material Information
Title: Doll's tea party merry play time
Series Title: Snow bird series
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
S.J. Parkhill & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: S.J. Parkhill & Co.
Publication Date: c1895
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1895   ( local )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's poetry
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated.
General Note: Poems.
General Note: Frontispiece and last page pasted down on verso and recto of cover.
General Note: Contains two black and white illustrations by Kate Greenaway, p. 30 and 46.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083796
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223352
notis - ALG3601
oclc - 14255826

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The old snow man
        Page 5
    Kitty in the cradle
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Paying back
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Jolly Joe
        Page 10
    Lazy Lew
        Page 11
    An April rain - A contented boy
        Page 12
        Page 13
    What the grasses said
        Page 14
    Little bird
        Page 15
    A little nut-cracker
        Page 16
    Ben's growl
        Page 17
    Polly's school
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Birds
        Page 20
    Who was she?
        Page 21
    The little chief
        Page 22
    The secret
        Page 23
    A song for summer
        Page 24
    What the fox thought
        Page 25
    Nobody knows
        Page 26
    How the baby was named
        Page 27
    The dough-dog
        Page 28
    Tick tock - A naughty sheep
        Page 29
    Pudding and milk - A request from the birds
        Page 30
    A little country girl
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Winnie's troubles - Some naughty I's
        Page 33
    Pedro - Bunny-Coats Bed
        Page 34
    Miss Pussy's sickness - A wonderful scholar
        Page 35
    Neddy's pets
        Page 36
    The window-pane tree
        Page 37
    The meeting of the birds
        Page 38
    Pussy and the Martins - Like baby
        Page 39
    A catastrophe
        Page 40
    My kitty - Where they grow
        Page 41
    The lost chickens
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Our visitor
        Page 44
    The mower and the bird's nest - Who is this coming?
        Page 45
    Great expectations - Harry's birthday
        Page 46
    Nine little birdies
        Page 47
    Back Cover
        Page 48
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DOLL'S TEA PARTY



MERRY PLAY TIME


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ILL USTRA TED



BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY


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COPYRIGHT, 1895,
BY

LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.


All rights reserved.


BOS TON
S. J. PARICHrLL & CO." PRIwTERs


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THE OLD SNOW MAN.


Charley, and Arthur, and John,
Three merry young rogues that I
know,
Have been at work in the drifts
And made an old man out of
snow.


His body is clumsy and rough;
His face has queer features to
show;
And nothing but stumps for his
arms
Has this poor old man made of
snow.


But how the boys frolic and shout
And how their chubby cheeks
glow I
For oh! 'tis such wonderful fun
To make an old man out of snow.


They pat him, they smooth him
around
To harden him well; for they
know
That the sun will do all he can
To melt down their old man of
snow.
-M. E. N. H.


"
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KITTY IN THE CRADLE.
" I warn a live baby," said Jenny one I'll fasten a pretty lace cap on your
day; head;
"A baby that knows how to frolic I'll rock you to sleep in my dolly's
and play; soft bed."


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"ROCK-A-BY, BABY, OH! ROCK-A-BY-BY.

My doll can do nothing but just
wink her eyes,
And all the day long in the drawer
S she lies.


Come here, little kitty,
with milk;
I'll wrap you in dolly's
of silk;


I'll feed you

best blanket


Then kitty purred gently, as if she
would say,
"I think wouldd be nice to be treated
that way;"
And she tried very hard to be patient
and good,
And let Jenny do.with her just as she
would.



She lay in the cradle dressed up in
a cap;
She soon went to sleep and had a
long nap;
While Jenny like any small mother
sat nigh,
And sung, Rock-a-by, baby, oh I
rock-a-by-by."
-M A. Af.





























































NOW, WHAT IS THE LETTER'S NAME ?"
"NOW, WHAT IS THE L-ETTriR'S NAME?



























HOW A LITTLE WALK WAS SPOILED.
HOW A LITTLE WALK WAS SPOILED.


PAYING BACK.

Seven happy little chicks walked out one day in June,
Thought they would enjoy the way by starting up a tune;
Seven ugly little ducks, whose names I will not mention,
Made up their minds to follow them, and spoil their good intention;
Now everybody knows that a duckling's voice is deep,
And everybody knows that quack will make more noise than feep.
So when they found their music drowned, these plucky little chicks
Made up tIeir minds to cure these ducks of all such naughty tricks;
So they chased them from the barn-yard, on this pleasant day in June,
Then started on their walk again, and went on with their tune.




*. -..I *


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A LITTLE WOMAN.






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JOLLY JOE.


' I LIKE to go to school I do,"
Says jolly little Joe;
Because I really think it is
The nicest place I know.

" The boys and girls, at nine o'clock,
I always like to see;
I like to see the teacher, too,
I know that she likes me!

*" I like to see the scholars sit

With arms all neatly folded;
And if there should be naughty ones
I like to hear them scolded!

' I like to read of birds and bees
And trees and flowers, too;
Of sailors, soldiers,.and about
The gallant things they do.


" I like to write I always did -
To take my pen in hand
And show how much a boy can do,
I think is very grand.

"Arid then I always like to spell;
I think it is such fun
To pick the little letters out
And join them one by one.

" I like arithmetic, because
'Tis such a pleasant sight
To see the figures on my slate
All coming out just right.


" I like it all.. I'll try to do
The very best I can,
Because I want to grow to be
A wise and honest man.".


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LAZY LEW.


" I NEVER 1ike to go to school,"
Says lazy little Lew;
S'Tis such a very stupid place I
I hate it-so I do.

"I do not like the girls and boys,
They always laugh, to see
That when I am a little late
The teacher frowns at me.

"I do not like to sit so still
With both arms tightly folded;
And if I make a little noise
I'm sure of getting scolded.

"I hate to read. The birds and
flowers
I'd rather go ard see;
And all the men and things in books,
What good are they to me?


"I hate to write I never could -
I hate to hold a pen;
To make a poor boy work so hard,
I think, is very mean.

" I always did dislike to spell,
It is so hard to know
The names of all the letters well.
And how they ought to go.

"Arid then I hate arithmetic,
'Tis such a dismal sight -
The rows of figures on my slate
I never can get right !

" I'll play the truant -yes, I will,
As often as I can;
I'll vote against there being schools,
If ever- I'. a man I "
-S. D.


__


- :;


I- ***








AN APRIL RAIN.


You poor little birds,
It's happened again -
In the midst of your play
Down patters the rain.


You were caught in a shower
Just so last week,
And I thought that morning
I ought to speak;


I hear you all up
A-singing at dawn,
I know you have tried
Each tree on the lawn,


Yet not one of you all
Have picked up a straw-
Such improvident birds
I ne'er before saw.


But I hope you see now
That it would be best
To let your play go
And build you a nest.


SA CONTENTED BOY.


How old am I?
Well, let me see!
Johnnie is four,
Mary is three,
And I am as big
As I want to be;
For both their years
Belong to me:


Six and one,
Three, and four,
I ve, and two,
But not one more.
I am the oldest
Of mother's three,
And just as big
As r want to be.
-K. T. w.


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SA JOLLY -LITTLE PAIB;


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" I LAY ON THE GRASS TO READ."


.WHAT THE GRASSES SAID.


Who can hear the grass talk ?
Very few, I know;
Yet it whispers every day,
Sweet and soft and low.


And one day I heard it;
Shall I tell you when ?
I lay on the grass to read,
And I heard it then.


Everything was pleasant;
Bright the sun did shine;
Dew lay in the flowers' eyes,
Heavy sleep in mine;


So I gently shut them,
Soon they opened wide;
For I heard the grasses talk
Fast on every side I

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This is what they talked about:
Oh, what pleasant weather I
Lift your heads up to the sun,
Nod and wave together 1


" We're so glad that we are grass,
Cool and soft and green;
Oh, how sad the earth would look-
If no grass were seen I


"And we love the summer warm,
But, oh, dear I oh, dear!
What will little grasses do
When winter cold is here?


" How the wind will whistle
Round about our heads I


Oh it's very hard to have
No covers on our beds !"


Then the wise red-rose bush
Tall, and rough and old,
Shook his head, and kindly said,
You will not be cold,


SFor God sends a blanket warm
For every blade of grass,
Soft and light, and white as wool;
Not a blade He'll pass I"


"What's the blanket made of ?
Quick! we want to know!"
" Why, my dears," the rose-bush said,
God's blanket is the snow."


LITTLE BIRD.


Little bird, little bird, where are


you flying?
You have left no track
blue sky,
But you know the way
see it,


in the clear

if I cannot


And you will come back again by
and by.


For you have a nest, with little
ones in it,
I know where it is, on the apple-
tree high,
And you'll not forget, when your
children are hungry,
And you will come back again, by
and by. -M. H.






































A LITTLE NUT-CRACKER.


A LITTLE NUT-CRACKER.

Such a merry little, jolly little fel- Such a bushy little tail, such a
low is he, bright, sparkling eyel
As he dances up aloft in a big "Chir-r-r! here I go! see how I
oak-tree I fly I"






He chatters, and he skips in and
out 'mong the branches;
He leaps down the trunk with
sudden little launches;
He perks his saucy nose, he whisks
his plumy tail;
He veers and tacks and jibes, like
a schooner in a gale.


He picks the chestnuts brown; he
cracks them in a trice;
He eats the farmer's grain; he's
as bad as are the mice;
With apples, nuts and corn -a
dainty store, you see -
Such a jolly little, jaunty little
squirrel is he -F A. H.


BEN'S GROWL.


"0 dear!" growled sleepy .Ben,.
I wish there was no school,
At least no 'tardy' rule I
I'd sleep and sleep and then -

"I'd crawl out slow's a snail,
And put on my best hat
And take my ball and bat,
Some plum cake in my pail,

"And then down town I'd go.
I'd stop at every store,
Buy twenty pounds or more
Of candy; then, you know,


" If I must go to school,
Why I could sit and munch
My candy and my lunch -
0 dear I That tardy' rule 1"









POLLY'S SCHOOL.


Polly is schoolma'am,
Sober and wise;
Very old schoolma'am,
In baby's eyes.

Sweetest of sunshine
Plays through the room,
Making cheeks healthy,
Making them bloom.


POLLY AND HER PUPIL.


Only one scholar
Has Polly now;
When Polly questions
She makes a bow.

Polly says, "Baby,
Now you spell cat."


Baby she giggles;
"If you spell that,

"-Then Polly'll give you
Apple all nice;
Or mamma's plum-cake,
Very big slice!"

Baby likes "merits;"
Nod goes her head;
Crows at the apple
Juicy and red.

Now lessons over,
L Polly says "Sing I"
Baby's eyes twinkle,
Sweet carols ring.

SOut! through the windows,
Gay robins, red,
Join in the chorus
By Polly led.

Then school is over,
Work is all done,
Baby wants mamma,
So off they run.




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BIRDS.


Do you see that little bird ? One has a merry eye
Hush, now- do not say a word Just as blue as any sky,
He's industriously eating at the cher-. With a laughing little rosy face, and
ries in the tree, dimple in his chin,
And there comes another one, And he wears a kilted skirt
He is joining in the fun (Worse for cherry-stains and dirt)
As if he thought "These goodies And a jaunty coat with pockets nice
were expressly made for me." for putting cherries in I


Such a jolly little pair And the other little elf
I am ready to declare Who is covering himself
I have never seen in cherry-tree, or With the juices of the summer, has
apple, pear or peach. the nattiest of suits,
Are they robin, wren or jay, With a sailor hat and collar,
Bobolink or bluebird, pray? And a belt that cost a dollar I
I will tell you of their feathers- He has clocks upon his stockings,
you may give a name to each. too, and buttons on his boots

Well, everybody knows
That birds who wear such clothes,
Will n-ver spread their tiny wings and fly away from you;
They will scramble down, pell-mell,
If you ring a dinner-bell,
And declare they are as hungry as if cherries never grew I
-S. D.


-.1









WHO WAS SHE?


As I was going down the walk
So pleasant, cool and shady,
Right in the middle of the path
I met a little lady.


I made'to her my sweetest bow;
She only walked on faster;
I smiled, and said "Good-morning,
ma'am,"
The moment that I passed her.


She never noticed me at all;
I really felt quite slighted;
I thought, ".I'll follow you, I will,
Altho' I'm not invited."


Perhaps you think me very rude;
But then, she looked so'funny -
From head to feet all -dressed in
fur
This summer day so sunny.


She didn't mind the heat at all,
But wrapped the fur around her,


And hurried on, as if to say,
"I'll tend to my own
sir !"


gown.


I followed her the whole way
home;
Her home was in my garden,


ALL DRESSED IN FUR.


Beneath my choicest vines and
yet
She never asked my pardon.


I never heard her speak a word;
But once I heard the miller,
Coming down the sidewalk, say,
"There goes Miss Caterpillar "
J. A.


Bh~







Five little squirrels up in a tree:
This squirrel cried, "What do you see ?"
This squirrel cried, I smell a gun !"
This squirrel cried, Ho, let us run I"
This squirrel cried, "I'll hide in the shade I"
This squirrel cried, "I'm not afraid "
Bang I went the gun I
But they ran, every one










THE LITTLE CHIEF.


I AM my mother's little man
I am the chief of all the cla


I know there's Ned and Fred and Ted,
But if you please, sir, I'm the Head.

They like their play, and so, you see,
Who's left to be the man but me ?
My mother-knows I am the one
To do that thing which must be done.
sweep, the walks; I tend the door;
I go on errands to the store;
And any day I'd run a mile
To 'see my .pretty mother smile 1

You needn't laugh because Im small
Just being big, sir,isn't all-
; I',inuch a man as any man
n; -^If I do everything I cap I.: :;,:


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THE SECRET.


"Oh, I have been out for a walk,"
said she,
For a walk in the woods alone.;
And the birds have told me a secret,
To keep for 'fy very own.























"I'VE BEEN OUT FOR A -WALK."
The dear old woods were spicy and
sweet,
And the warm wind blew in my
face,



/ .. *


I gathered the
the grass,
And a rabbit and


buttercups out of

I ran a race.


" It was Mr. and Mrs. Thrush," she
-. said,
"They were talking as I went past;
And of course I could hear what
they said, you know,
They chattered so loud and so fast.
But I promised them truly I never
would tell,
So they sang the dear secret to me.
And good Mrs. Thrush flew away
to her nest,
And let me just peep in and see.

"But you all- will know pretty soon,"
she said;
For the days go by so fast!
And I think they will fly out into
the sun,
Before the summer is past.
And I shall watch them every day,
For the old birds know me well,
But you mustn't ask any more,"
said she;
" For I promised I would not tell "
M.L










A SONG FOR SUMMER


Out in the field one summer's day,
Our little Annie, tired with play,
Among the violets dropped her head;
Sleep caught her in her fragrant bed.

The field flowers crowded all around
The sleeping baby on the ground;


The lily, buttercup, sweetbrier,
And cardinal flower, like flame of
fire.

The gold-eyed daisy bowed to
greet
The wild rose nestling at her feet;
The honey-bee, that restless rover,
Hummed in the heart of the scented
clover.

A laughing sprite came out to see
The little maid; so glad was he,
He danced a polka, o'er and o'er,
On the dandelion's golden floor.



































"FOUR SUCH DOGS I NE'ER DID SEE."


WHAT THE FOX THOUGHT.

Four to one! It is not fair. Then comes Nep, so fierce and strong;
Coward dogs! They do not dare Once near me, I'd not live long..
One by one to race with me.
Four such dogs I ne'er did see. A u ,
Almost up is spotted Jim,
At my best I'd distance him.
There is Tige, the foremost one; But they've chased me round and round
I know him by that big, red tongue. Till I start at ev'ry sound.


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Lady Jane I do not fear;
She's a dog I could live near,
If her master did not say,
' You must hunt that fox to-day."


Cruel men I They call us sly -
Call us tricky -quick to fly;
But if once we chased them so,
Wouldn't they just learn to go?


NOBODY KNOWS.


How the wind whistles -and roars 1
How he blows, he blows, and he
blows I
But what does he say at the doors ?
Nobody knows, nobody knows.

The ground is covered with white,
For it snows, it snows, and it snows;
But it falls so silent at night
That nobody knows, nobody knows.

The grass is springing again,
And it grows, it grows, and it grows,
In the sunshine and the rain -
How, nobody knows, nobody knows.

Hear the black cock flap his wings !
And he crows, he crows, and he
crows; .


But whether he laughs or he sings,
Why, nobody knows, nobody knows.

The brook runs sparkling along,
And it flows, it flows, and it flows;
But what is its rippling song,
Why, nobody knows, nobody knows.

The cow comes down 'through the
lane,
And she lows, she lows, and she lows;
But what she says it is plain
That nobody knows, nobody knows.

Over the fields and away
Fly the crows, the crows, the crows;
They caw, they caw, but they say
What nobody knows, nobody knows.
--. B.


.-.-





























DAISIES ALL ABOUT HER.


HOW THE BABY WAS NAMED.


Mother's busy washing;
Jack has gone to school;
Baby's in t*e garden;
Kitty has a spool.

Every one is busy
This bright summer day,
None more so than Baby,
Working hard to play.

Hat stuck full of daisies,
Dolls are daisy-crowned-


Daisies, daisies everywhere
Lying on the ground.

Out comes little pussy
Tossing them about;
Baby calls, "Go way now I "
With a little pout.

Summer sun grows warmer;
Baby tires with play;
Down upon the green grass
Fast asleep she lay;


.A








Daisies all about her,
Sunshine overhead,
Pussy nestled closely
In this summer bed.

Mother from her washing.
Comes, and finds her there


With the wide-eyed daisies
Nestling in her hair.

Then was Baby christened
In the summer sweet;
Now, no longer Baby,"
But sweet Marguerite.


THE DOUGH-DOG.

One day when grandma was making This wonderful dog could stand on
some pies, its feet,
She wished to give Tommy a pleas- Its body was chubby, and cunning,
ant surprise; and neat,
Its little dough-head was spotted
with black,
SAnd. its little dough-tail curled over
its back.

S. .And when Tommy saw it he shouted
with glee,
How good grandma was- to make
--that for me!
BRUNO.
And he played with the puppy-dog
So she made a puppy-dog out of day after day,
some dough, Till its head and its tail were both
And baked it, and marked it, and worn away.
named it Bruno.
r* ,-








TICK TOCK.


Tick tock, tick tock -
I'll count the seconds by grand-
mother's clock.
When sixty have ticked, the min-
ute-hand shows
That one minute comes as another
one goes.
Sixty seconds a minute, and then
it will take
Sixty minutes, I know, an hour to
make.
The length of a day I can easily
mark -
Just twenty-four hours of day-light
and dark.
Seven days make a week; and .then
fifty-two
Of these weeks make a year, if my
counting is true.
A hundred long years, and then
there will be
A century here, for some one to see.



A NAUGHTY SHEEP.

What very soft steps you take, naughty sheep
You wish me to think you're good, naughty sheep I
You've come through a hole in the fence, naughty sheep I
And now you must- go straight back, naughty sheep I








PUDDING AND


Two little bowls
Round and white;
Two little spoons
Silver bright;



A REQUEST FROM

Dear little girls, throw us a crumb;
Dear little boys, please bring us
some!
0, don't you know, when falls the
snow,
That dinnerless the birdies go ?
Yet, dears, we earn, with summer
-song,
Our daily food the winter long.
A ,little bird with hunger wild
Is wretched as a starving child.


p~p ,15
Ic~a~


MILK.


Two little stools
Side by side;
Two little girls,
Mother's pride,

Jolly as kits,
Plump as mice;
Pudding and milk-
Isn't it nice ?

Pudding and milk,
Mothers know,
Is just what makes
Little girls grow



THE BIRDS.








A LITTLE COUNTRY GIRL.


What will Lolly do in spring-time ?
She'll go out to play,
She wih. bring home pussy willows
And May-flowers gay.
She will feed the little chickens,
Watch the lambs at play,
And hunt for nests, of new-laid i
eggs,
Up in the mows of hay.

V.0








What will Lolly do in summer ?
She'll pick berries red,
Trim her hair with dandelions,
Weed her flower-bed,
Tie her curls with yellow corn-silk,
Make long daisy chains,
And play "keep house" with all
her dolls,
n Every time it rains.















FWhat will Lolly do in autumn?
See the yellow grain,
And pick golden-rod and asters,
Up and down the lane.
Saturday she'll go a-nutting,
Wade among the leaves,
And ride upon the loaded cart
High up among the sheaves.












What will Lolly do in winter?
She will skate and slide,
Play at games and look at pictures
By the fireside.
She will sew upon her presents
For the Christmas tree,
And through snowy winter nights
Sleep snug as snug can be.
/ -K.. L.


- *tt=
,8.







WINNIE'S TROUBLES.


"I NEVER shall be big,"
Said little Winnie Winch;
I have tried for a month .
And I haven't grown an inch -
I know, for I measured
'By a mark on the wall.
Little cups, little books, little desks,
little clothes -
For seven long years I've had only
those.

Then the poor small Winnie
Made a great wise plan
How to grow very fast ;
And away she ran.
When she came in again
She was oh, so tall I
Her gown swept the floor
From the door to the wall;
She walked up and down, till she tripped in her train,
And then she was glad to be a small girl again.
-E. F. P.



SOME NAUGHTY I'S.


Some little people cry: Now hear them passing by:
I won't, I can't, I- han't, I be,
I shall, I shan't -" I are, I see -"
Oh, what a naughty I I Oh, what a naughty I I











PEDRO.


HE can sit, he can stand,
He can climb up a tree;
He can hold in his hand
A cup full of tea;
He can eat a hot cake
Without burning his thumb;
He can hoe, he can rake,
He can beat on a drum.


He can run, he can hop,
For Pedro is spry;
He can dance like a top,
He can laugh, he can cry;
But there's one little thing
This monkey can't do,
And that is to sing
And chatter like you I


BUNNY-COAT'S BED.


Little gay Bun-ny-coat
Slipped into bed-


Nothing was seen of him,
But his gray head:


Where was his bed, think you?
Where did he dream?
You will laugh when I tell you,
So droll does it seem!


In little Jean's pocket
In her apron so white,
The little grey Bunny-coat"
Slept'all the night.
-F. P. C







MISS PUSSY'S SICKNESS.


DR. GREY'S PATIENT.


Miss Pussy is ill;
She lies very still


In her snug little bed,
SWith a pain in her head.

" 0 doctor!" cries she,
" Pray what can it be
That gives me such pain
On the top of my brain ?"

Says old Doctor Grey,
" Excuse me, I pray,
For seeming so rude,
But it is for your good;

" I really do think "
(This he says with a wink!)
" You have eaten a slice
Too much of young mice "


A WONDERFUL SCHOLAR.


O, a wonderful, scholar
Is our little Kate


She reads in a primer;
She writes on a-slate;
Her lines are not even;
Her O's are not round;
And her wdrds in the reader
Could not be found.

Her sewing what puckers I
What stitches! what knots I







And along the whole hem,
There are tiny red spots;
Her weekly reports
Tell how oft she has spoken;
And there's not a rule
That she never has broken.

Yet she comes to mamma
For a smile and a kiss,


As if a "bad mark,"
Should be paid for by this.
And she cries in delight,
While she swings round her hat:
"I'm a wonderful scholar,
For I can spell 'cat!'
C-A-T, Call"


NEDDY'S PETS.


"HERE'S A KITTY FOR YOU I"


NEDDY has a pony,
Her name is Jenny Stone;"
He strokes her and he pats her,
And rides her all alone.


He had a little kitten,
Her name was Nellie Gray;"
He gave her to a lady, /
Who lives a mile away.

He has a little chicken,
Her name is Miss "Bright Eyes;"
And when she sees her master
She lifts her wings and flies.

He has a big Newfoundland dog,
His name is Faithful Tray; "
Both-Neddy and his doggie
Were five years old in May.

.He has a baby-sister,
His best and dearest pet-
What do you think her name is ?
She hasn't any yet.
-K. L.































ON THE ICY_WINDOW-PANE


THE WINDOW-PANE TREE.


With her warm little finger,
Gold Locks wrote
On the icy window-pane
A note.


"Make me a Christmas-tree,"
It read;,
It was signed with a flourish,
Yours, Gold Head."


Then out came the sunlight's
Sparkling ray;
It melted the message
All away.


But the very next morning,
Lo behold
On the glass of the window,
White and cold,








Was a tapering fir-tree, Cried out little Gold Locks,
Weighed with snow, "See, oh, se.e
Spire-like at the top, Jack Frost has painted.
And broad below. My Christmas-tree t"




THE MEETING OF THE BIRDS.

Four little merry, talkative birds
Met in a thicket together ore day;
And, "Oh, how pleasant it is," said one,
To build pretty nests in the month of May.

I" I like the world best*in June," said one,
"When the flowers are blossoming bright and -
sweet,
And the cherries are hanging thick on the trees,
Ripe and crimson, all ready to eat.

) The other two said,, we like to sing
_To call the people to rise with the sun; --
S And we like to sing at the evening hour
V To tell the people the day-time is done."

And so these four little frolicsome birds
Talked as they met in the thicket one day,
S Till they thought of their young ones waiting at
SWe 'home,
When they spread their small wings and flut-
tered away.








PUSSY AND THE MARTINS.


One day Pussy said, as she came
from the barn,
"I am very tired of living on mice;
I'll take a walk through the trees, I
think;
A tender young bird would taste very
nice."

Then she climbed, and climbed, with
a careful step,
From branch to branch of a tall green
fir,
Where Mrs. Martin lived with her
mate
In a snug little house that was built
for her.

:But the martins saw her as on she
came,
And they hastened out to drive her
away;


They pecked at her ears, her eyes, her
nose,
And frightened her so she'd no wish
to stay;

And down to the ground they fol-
lowed her close;
They flew about her from side to
side,
Till Pussy was sick with a dizzy
head,
And glad to go in a corner and hide.

She will not climb the fir tree again;
She found the martins too bold and
strong;
She keeps to her diet of rats and
mice,
And stays in the barn where the
cats belong.


LIKE BABY.


I'm going to make a dolly,
Just like the baby there;
I'm going to take some sunshine
And twist it up for hair.


I'm going to take the bluest speck
In all the great blue skies,
And make a bright blue pretty pair
Of little winking eyes.







I'm going to take some roses,
The sweetest, brightest pink,
To make her little darling cheeks,
The very thing, I think I


But, oh dear me! I surely am
Forgetting all the while,
I cannot find a single thing
To make a baby's smile.


A CATASTROPHE.


One little black cat, one little gray-
Two little funny cats having such a play!
Over goes the gray cat sticking out her toes;
Down tumbles Blackie, right upon her nose!
Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor;
There go the kitten-cats scrambling for the door;
Up pops a brown mouse, coming through a crack!
Jump goes the mamma-cat before it can get back I
Funny little black cat, funny little gray--
How they let the brown mouse try to run away I
Off goes the brown mouse, in among the palls I
Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails I


I f








MY KITTY.


And you shall have cake and cream
for dinner,
And a little nap on my bed, my
dear.


But first give your
washing,
And with each little
well;
And I'll tie on your


THE PET KITTY.


Come here, kitty, and sit on my
shoulder,
Give me your paw, and purr in
my ear,


face a good

paw wipe it

neck a blue


ribbon,
To fasten your collar and bell.

For you caught that sly mouse in
the pantry,
Where he had nibbled my crack-
ers away;
What should I have done without
kitty ?
That same nibbling mouse would be
here to-day.


WHERE THEY GROW.


Down in the valley, deep, deep, deep,
Where little sunbeams wink and peep,
Under the grasses hiding low- -
There's where the dear little violets
grow.


Up in the older tree, tree, tree,
Peep, and a tiny nest you'll see,
Swung by the breezes to and fro -
There's where the dear little hird-
lings grow.






Out in the meadow, bright, bright,
bright,
Close by the clovers red and white -
With heart of gold and a fringe of
snow,
There's where the dear little daisies
grow.




THE LOST
SCLUCK, cluck I cluck, cluck I called
the mother-hen,
"Some harm has come to my
chickens, I fear;
I counted this morning, and then
there were ten ;
Now four are gone, and but six are
here."

* Peep, peep I peep, peep I" four chick-
ens replied,
As they sipped the dew from a
burdock leaf;
"* We must hurry back to our mother's
side,
,She is calling us now with a voice
S of grief."

Then away to her side they ran,
again,


Up in the nursery, neat, neat,
neat,
Hear the patter of wee, wee
feet-
Hear little voices chirp and crow-
There's where the dear little babies
growl




CHICKENS.
Leaving the dainty drink they had
found;


-"ALL SAFE AND SOD.--
"ALL SAFE AND SOUND."


"Cluck, cluck I cluck, cluck said the
mother-hen,
"Here are my ten, all safe and.
sound."












R^I
r, /
[. urn
B a


TH14 VIIY MIMAL4b ikBAY-HOSE IN THE CLORUR BY THE CHEST OF DRAWERS.












am Little Summer,
And I am on my way
To a distant country,
To seek a pleasant day;
But if I do not find it
Be sure I will not stay.




OUR VISITOR.

One lovely May morning so sunny And as bright as the stars; and
and cool, his wise little head
A visitor came to the Primary Nodded this way and that while
School. the little girls read.

He never before had been in a house,
So every one kept just as still as
a mouse.
He looked all about him and then
flew away;
THE VISITOR. And since then we see him almost
every day.
Nobody gave him a chair or a He comes flying in through the-
book, half-open door,
Though his eyes were as brown He picks up the crumbs we have
as the stones in the brook, spilled on the floor.




1 -


THE MOWER AND THE BIRD'S NEST.

A mower comes swinging along with his scythe,
Up springs a brown bird and flies for her life.
He puts down his scythe, he looks on the ground,
Calls Katy, who comes with a skip and a bound.
SFour birds and one round little nest in the grass
0 papal 0 papa! come quick and come fas' "
He takes up his scythe, mows all the way round
The little round. nest lying low on the ground.
The' scared little birdie, perched near on a tree,
Flies down, and is glad as a birdie can be.
A. B.




WHO IS THIS COMING?


Who is.this coming
All dressed in fur,
With a little soft step,
And a little soft purr,


With a little grey coat
All spotted with buff,
With a little brown head
As warm as a muff?


Oh I this is my kitty,
The best pet of all.


He is always ready
To come when I call;


He plays with my thimble;
He tangles my thread;
He hides behind doors
And creeps into my bed.


Oh I he is so cunning,
So pretty and spry,
That if I should lose him
I surely should cry.
M. i. A.







GREAT EXPECTATIONS.


WHEN I grow to twenty-one,
,I will plant a field of corn.


LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE.


When the corn begins to sprout,
Two wee leaves come peeping out.


When the leaves are fresh and green,
A slender stalk shoots up between.
4 -
While the stalk keeps on to grow,
The tiny ears begin to show.

When the ears are long and thin,
The pretty silk,begins to spin.

When the pretty silk is spun,
It turns the color of the sun.

When the summer sun is gone,
It's time to gather in the corn.

When this corn is gathered in,
What a fortune I shall win 1


HARRY'S BIRTHDAY.


"Harry is sevenyears old to-day--
What shall we do to please our
boy?"
Said dear papa in his kindly
way;
"Take him to town and buy him
a toy?"


" Father, some candy said sweet-
tooth Charley,
" Chocolate, almond, and. sticks
of barley,
In a pretty box with a picture
cover -
Harry is such a candy lover I







"Cried Tom, O, father, buy him
a gyn,
And a box of caps-then there'll
be fun I"
"A rocking-horse," said Sister
Sue;
Said Sam, "A flag, red, white
and blue !"


Mother said, "Let us sail down
the harbor,
And see the bright water dance
in the sun,
Come home at six and have tea in
the arbor 1"
Cried all: "That's the very
thing to be done "


NINE LITTLE BIRDIES.


Nine little birdies rocked by the breeze:
First birdie said, I'm tired of these trees;"
Next birdie said, "Where shall we go?"
Third birdie said, "Where red cherries grow I"
Fourth birdie said, Are they ripe, do you think ?"
Fifth birdie laughed with a rogue's own wink;
Sixth birdie said, I'm sure that they are;"
Seventh birdie said, Is it very far ?"
Eighth birdie said, "Who'll leader be? "
Ninth birdie said, "I'm off, follow me "
Whew! Whew!
And away they. all flew
Into Mr. John Lee's
Choice cherry trees I









Unapprecated-

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ijAdeluded youns sossipins Tunny
Thought hi sossip exceedirsly funr
He told an odd story
To sober John Dory
--With 5mile5 that were cheerful and s'u
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iut pfm.n John Dory could never


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S i !e es even when they were clever. .. ,.,
>:i?'~; '-^.The look of 5urpri5e -.
S In hi5 mouth 'nd his eye5 ....
']:i'lnt" thatL poor Tunny Forever .-.
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