• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Other books by Palmer Cox
 Brownies in New York
 Brownies in Rhode Island
 Brownies in Florida
 Brownies in Massachusetts
 Brownies in New Jersey
 Brownies in Connecticut
 Brownies in Texas
 Brownies in Pennsylvania
 Brownies in Illinois
 Brownies in Louisiana
 Brownies in Kentucky
 Brownies in Michigan
 Brownies in Washington
 Brownies in California
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: The brownies through the Union
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083789/00001
 Material Information
Title: The brownies through the Union
Physical Description: 6, ix-xi, 1, 144 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Publisher )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: De Vinne Press
Publication Date: c1895
 Subjects
Subject: Fairies -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Juvenile poetry -- United States   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Citation/Reference: NUC pre-1956 imp.,
Statement of Responsibility: by Palmer Cox.
General Note: "Our fifth book"--cover.
General Note: Wood engravings: text illustrations.
General Note: Date from NUC, cited below.
General Note: Illustrated presentation leaf precedes title-page.
General Note: In verse.
General Note: Includes table of contents.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083789
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223296
notis - ALG3545
oclc - 01099970
lccn - 04019413

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Foreword
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
    Other books by Palmer Cox
        Page xii
    Brownies in New York
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Brownies in Rhode Island
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Brownies in Florida
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Brownies in Massachusetts
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Brownies in New Jersey
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Brownies in Connecticut
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Brownies in Texas
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Brownies in Pennsylvania
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Brownies in Illinois
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Brownies in Louisiana
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Brownies in Kentucky
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Brownies in Michigan
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Brownies in Washington
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Brownies in California
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Back Matter
        Page 147
    Back Cover
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Spine
        Page 150
Full Text




1147\! i






THE BROWNIES
THROUGH THE UNION


BY
PALMER


COX


PUBLISHED BY
THE CENTURY CO.
NEW YORK

































Copyright, 1894, 1895, by THE CURTIS PUBLISHING COMPANY.
Copyright, 1895, by THE CENTURY Co.

























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CONTENTS.


WASHINGTON 5
HEAODqUATERIS





BROWNIES IN RiHODE I


BROWNIES IN MASSACH


BROWNIES IN NEW YORK





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BROWNIES IN FLORIDA




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BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY


BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT


.75


BROWNIES IN TEXAS .


BROWNIES IN PENNSYLVANIA


BROWNIES IN ILLINOIS


BROWNIES IN LOUISIANA


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BROWNIES IN KENTUCKY


BROWNIES IN MICHIGAN


113
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BROWNIES IN WASHINGTON


. 124


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BROWNIES IN CALIFORNIA













OTHER BOOKS BY PALMER COX:
PUBLISHED BY THE CENTURY CO.

THE BROWNIES:
THEIR BOOK
Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50.


ANOTHER
BROWNIE BOOK
Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50.


THE BROWNIES
AT HOME
Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.5o.


THE BROWNIES
AROUND THE WORLD 1


Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50.


~asa~ ----













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THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.

FIRST TOUR.

HE infant year scarce toddled o'er
The threshold of Time's open door,
To show the date that far and near
Must now at letter-heads appear,
SWhen Brownies answered to a call
That promised pleasant times for all.
Said one: "A rest we have enjoyed
Since last onr hands have been employed,
Or since with glee we rambled round
Through many a strange, historic ground.
Here in this leading State we '11 find
Mui.ll that may well .ngr,-.- the mind.
Although no ancient castles throw
Their shadows on the waves below,
As by the Tweed, the Rhine or Rhone, -
Or other streams as widely known,







THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


This land, believe me, is not weak
s 9k In points the tourist well may seek."
Another spoke: "No need have we
For lengthy talk, or special plea;
For all are willing, as we know,
To take the trip on which we go. '<
The Empire State bef'.re: us li, ,
And who that has a heart and eyes
Would for one moment hesitate
To pay respects to such a State. ... ..'
So noted for its mountain-land,
Its lovely bays, and rivers grand, -':. '
Its battle-fields, its brilliant men :-.-' "''.,. -
Who carved such names with sword or pen .- .....
Upon the records of the race ,
As changing years cannot efface."' "" -
Another cried: You speak our minds: ,
One chain of thought the party binds; I' '
So let us every hour improve, '-' '
For time is ever on the move." .' ,,'
They visited Niagara Falls,
Then lost no time to make their calls / -' -
On Watkins Glen, and ran with glee' ..
I:
To stand beside the Genesee: 0
Close to the brink they crawled to peepI "i .-.,-.
Where Sam Patch took the fearful leap. i :': t
The Adirondacks, heaving blue '
Against the sky, attention drew:
The home of fox, of deer and bear,
And sheets of water passing fair,








THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.



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Where gamy fish in waiting lie,
To test the angler's phantom fly.
At old Ticonderoga's site
They moralized in language light.
Said one: That was a grand surprise,
That history's pages memorize,





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THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


When, starting from his bed in fright,
The old commander rose that night,
To gaze on Ethan Allen's band,
And listen to his blunt command,
Which had a sort of business ring,
That spoke small honor for the king."
Said one: "A cruise we ought to take
Upon Champlain's bright, limpid lake,
Whereon McDonough brought in brief
The British squadron all to grief.
There, full in sight of Plattsburg town,
The haughty fleet came sailing down,
The flag-ship moving in the van,
According to the naval plan,
While others, ranged diagonally
To port and starboard, formed a V.
But soon McDonough's broadside broke
. The fine formation, while the smoke
Hid from the gaze of those on shore,
Who gathered at the cannon's roar,
All sign of ships, save masts alone
That still o'er battle-clouds were shown,
And told the watchers full and fair
Which ships were down or which were there."
Another said: "We have n't time;
So let us seek that stream sublime
That first a mountain brooklet leaps,
Then as a river broadly sweeps,
Reflecting scenes on either side
Unequaled in the country wide.










THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


And as we take our seaward way,

Through Catskill Mountains we will stray-

SUp rugged, narrow passes creep,

weyo,, onbi, Where Rip Van Winkle took his sleep,
Climb ftor t skaies,
.alor efrors And woke in wonder to find out
wi' no prize.
What twenty years had brought about."

Ofttimes the Brownies paused to scan

The points of interest, as they ran;

Indeed, at N.\-wl.uiir th-y i,'lnl' l. d I -J,

To venture ii tih liuil,:in l .l -,#. I'


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That is to folk of every zone

As W; ,liii_,ton's headquarters known.

Said one: "Though many towns are blessed

With quarters where the chief found rest,

And sent his couriers to and fro

To watch the actions of the foe,


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THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


This was the
last he
occupied
While in the
field he
stemmed
the tide
Of British
arms and
British gold,
That long
across the
country
rolled.







THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


Th.Lu p rio he bro:: an, a.. li
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Their hands to ax, and plow, and spade;
And from the long-neglected sod
S\rnig up once more the ear and pod;
And children fled no more in fright
F i-m redcoats' guns or bayonets bright."
Times, th youngsters to surprise










T When on the morrow they should rise,
e The Brownies pius-d near some abode,
", ,, ,e -' .. up-once more theiea and pod;











.1'^;' And on a finger-board or wall
S __ th bs of cha i d n or coal wod sw,
At times, the youngsters to su isecw








THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


4




Or in some manner letter out
The hint that they had been about.
Said one, while they
with joyful mien ".
Surveyed each bright
and pleasing scene: -'-. '
"." ', -, -- "

"Here, where between
I ,'; I- -I (i: -- -
the rich display .. -----
The river widens- -
to the bay, ---- ..
Some moments let us --
check our race
At Tarrytown to view :

Where Major Andre was relieved

Of his despatch, and greatly grieved
8


,








THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


To find both purse and prayers were naught
To Paulding, Williams, and Van Wart."
At length that city drew their eyes
Which on Manhattan Island lies.
'Said one: "At last, my comrades true,
That famous city comes in view, M9
So noted for its wondrous dower
Of wealth, and influence, and power;
Its open purse when comes the cry
Of sad distress from far and nigh;
Its millions spent to spread the light
In heathen countries dark as night;
Museums great, its works of art,
Its press, and great commercial mart."
While Brownies passed the city through,
A column tall appeared in view,
And on the top in marble white
Columbus stood with form upright,
While on the sides around the base,
The caravels all found a place.
While round the statue taking rest,
A Brownie thus his mind expressed:
"Columbus in a city old
Did first his mighty scheme unfold;
'T was there for years the sailor brave
Planned how to cross the western wave."
Another answered, while his eye
Glanced o'er the graceful column high:
Thus oft the world is slow to sight
A genius, howsoever bright-


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THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


While living, neither praised
nor prized,
When starved to death he 's
recognized:
Then statues rise, and tombs
are decked
To make amends for cold
neglect."
So thus they passed about
the town
To points of interest, up
and down,
Not checked by either wood
or stone,
But by the light of day
alone.
The pen might run along
for hours
SDescribing still their mystic
1t powers:


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THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


Their way of entering in a store,
Without a key to ope the door,
Or diamond sharp to
cut the glass -.'
And make a hole
through which ,'
to pass;
I -.









Their way to shun each savage beast
Without disturbing it the least;
Their way to reach a treasure-vault,
If so disposed, without a halt,
Though all the locks and bolts are set,
And bars surround it like a net;
Their way to get a cunning peep
At children while they 're fast asleep,
To see how well each golden head
Becomes the pillow and the spread,
Or learn if they, while dreaming sweet,
Will favorite Brownies' names repeat.
To thus enlarge upon their might
So mystical would give delight;
But oft before this pen of mine
Has ventured in descriptive line
11


I. i







THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


The veil that shrouded them to lift,
And publish their surprising gift; ,'
And now indeed it should be known _i
From torrid clime to frigid zone -
That Brownies, if it suit the case, .
Can find their way to any place;
And no one need put costly ware
Or bonds or notes away with care,
And think no other hand than theirs
Will finger o'er the rich affairs.
For if the cunning Brownies wish,
They '11 eat from your best silver dish,
Or keep themselves in
practice right
By counting money
half the night.
S In different ways
they 'll have
their fun,
And laugh and joke when all is done;
But not a spoon, a cup or plate,
A bank-note or a pennyweight
Of coin you '11 miss at break of day,
For Brownies nothing take away.








THE BROWNIES IN NEW YORK.


At last, when morn was drawing nigh,
And purple streaks spread o'er the sky,
A Brownie raised a warning hand,
And thus addressed the busy band:
"Here might we roam for nights and nights,
Still meeting new and wondrous sights.
But hark! the sound that sweetly falls
From Trinity's old belfry walls
Proclaims 't is now the hour of five,
And soon the town will be alive;
So we must quickly turn aside,
And in some cunning manner hide."


a"ame to ma&ke
MPTst be frsI
net last awake


















THE BROWNIES IN
RHODE ISLAND.


SECOND TOUR.


AEN viewed upon the map, we know
Rhode Island makes but little show,
So crowded in between the sea
And other States; but Brownies wee
In justice felt it had a claim
Upon their time, and well might blame
The band if they should fail to call
Because its acreage was small.
Said one, as they paused by a wood
That near the line of boundary stood:
"My friends, although this little place
Is but a speck on Nature's face,
And might be crossed in half a night
From end to end, with effort slight,
When all is told we know full well
It has a right with' pride to swell,
And hold its head up with the best,
As musty records can attest.
14


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THE BROWNIES'IN RHODE ISLAND.


Its roads were staked out by the dint
Of matchlocks and spark-yielding flint;
Its woods, its harbors, streams and rocks,
Won in despite of tomahawks;
And though it now seems small indeed,
Respect the grass
There was a time, as you may read, .,qou; otrea.
T.0I1 bloom aboueyoa
When it seemed large enough to those V)you cead.
Who stood the brunt of battle-blows,
When striving to protect the ground
From painted tribes that hemmed it round."
Another said: "'T is not the size
Of States that proves where honor lies,
But in the way they stand the test
When trumpets sound from east to west,
And banners waving on the wall
A Their valiant sons to duty call."
-L Thus, while they halted there, the band
Spoke of the stru,'-les hand to hand
That in the early days had made
Some points historic; then they paid
A visit to each town of size
That showed the people's enterprise.
To Providence they hastened all,
For well they knew the chimneys tall
That towered o'er the buildings high
Proclaimed that busy city nigh,
That kept so many hands employed,
And such a share of trade enjoyed.
While round about the State they went,
On seeing striking scenes intent,
15








THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.










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And at the twilight hour paid

A visit to the tower strange,
That all who through the State shall range
16







THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


Will find well worth a step aside,
-/. If they are not to business tied.
Said one, as he with earnest gaze
Surveyed the work of ancient days:
"This object here seems out of place
Where lives a free-born, modern race;
'T would better suit the buried site
Of some old city brought to light,
From long repose in depths below,
That worlds might wonder at the show.
But here the ruin stands alone,
Its age and history all unknown,
A wonder to the passer-by,
And puzzle to the one who 'd pry
Into the secrets of its wall,
And why it ever rose at all.
No answer does reward the quest-
All is but guesswork at the best.
'T is thought 't was built long years before
An English tar e'er scraped his oar
Upon the rocks or bars of sand
That border well this Western land."
And thus around the State they ran,
At times to halt, at times to plan;
Or as a unit all agree
What next they'd turn their steps to see.
At times they climbed a tree or hill
To view the country better still,
Or sat on bridges in a row
To watch the tumbling flood below,
17







THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


And talk about the sort of fish
That could supply a savory dish.
From place to place with spirits light
They journeyed on throughout the night;
Where roads were bad through recent rain
That overflowed each ditch and drain
Till mud was more than ankle-deep,
Upon the fences they would keep,
And run like birds upon the rails
Until they crossed the flooded vales.


















Thus ready for whatever fate
May bring around, they travel straight
And take the country or the clime
Just as they find it at the time.
And even should there be a thud
Or splash at times into the mud,
18








THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


Think you a Brownie would retire
Because he rolled in deepest mire,
Or with sad tones bewail his lot,
And wish he ne'er had seen the spot?
No! On his back the mud would dry
As in his place he still would try
With extra efforts to offset
The added weight of garments wet.
What food for pencil or for pen,
Or for the snap-shot toys of men
And women who by waysides aim
To press the button on their game,
If one possessed a gifted eye
To mark them as they travel by!
But power to see the Brownie band
At any time but few connuand: A
The second sight to things of earth
Must be conferred on them at birth.
No after-treatment e'er supplies
The gift that Nature's hand denies.
In vain the nerve is stretched or clipped,
Or eye within its socket tipped--
Men cannot win through surgeon's knife
The boon that glorifies a life;
And not through patient watch or wait
4 Or practice comes the spookish trait;
Time ot not Wait It comes not at the call of art,
for.yourl or o.lc
P;seig:ro;ue.ywnt If it is missing at the start.
as it's toid.
At length, beside the water bright,
The town of Newport came in sight;
19







THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


SAnd, stopping short with one intent,
Each eye upon the place was.bent.
It was the time of summer days
So noted for the golden blaze
That soon makes people seek the shade,
Or call for draughts of lemonade,
Still hoping blessings may bring ease
And rest to those who planted trees.
When there they stood as evening shades
Were settling on the dewy glades,
Said one: "This is the time of year
When people of some means appear
To weary of their homes in town,
Or work, perhaps, that weighs them down,
And closing up their doors, they seek
For pleasure on a mountain-peak,
Or turn their steps in haste to reach
The joys found at an ocean beach."
Another said: "We something know
About the sea, for years ago
We proved the trials, less or more,
Of those who venture from the shore.
But, all the same, there is a charm
About the sea that will disarm
The ready fears that whispering stand,
With 'Praise the sea, but keep on land.'
So I advise without delay
We start upon our seaward way-
Not to a point or shaky pier
Where few convenient things are near,








THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


But to this place of high estate
Where wealthy people congregate
To study fashions, bathe, and pose,
Or ride in traps and tallyhos."
A little speech, a hint or two
Of pleasures that are ever new,
Will always answer like a goad
To start the Brownies on the road.
The miles and leagues that must be crossed,
However rough or well embossed
With stumps and stones, by Brownies bright
Are counted naught but matters light.


.. ,- ..- .. .










Disport themselves as best they may.
.i~~~~ak~- 0-:- "'-




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A ,n .o to view th b--- s grand














21







THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


But night it was,
and they could boast
The right of way,
and that's the most
That Brownies care for.
Well endowed,
Their wants are few,
their spirits proud.
Retire betimes,
and shut your door,


I:


IU i


And they 'll not ask a favor more.
Upon themselves be sure they '11 wait,
And think it not beneath their state.
22








THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


They '11 find their way to every shelf,
Nor ask your servant nor yourself
To set the table, pass the cake,
Or use the corkscrew for their sake.
Said one: "It 's pleasant to abide
In towns where care is laid aside,
Where every thought of morrow lies
In some sport-yielding enterprise.
Here beauty reigns, and rules the hour
While circling subjects own her power.
Here wealth and fashion tread a measure,
And life is one sweet draught of pleasure."
Another said: "While here, we '1l try
The surf, that now is rolling high;
For if I guess the time aright,
We 've reached the middle point of night,
And much we Brownies have to do
Ere dons the East its purple hue."
Io eat nnd sleep for beasts
,tay do, Few minutes passed away before
But flere is something more
for you. The band stood on the sandy shore,
Nor did they listen long with care
To hear what waves were saying there.
Some threw their outer clothes aside,
Some as they were rushed in the tide,
And rather than be last to breast
The wave that came with foaming crest,
Wet every tag and stitch of dress
Their scanty wardrobe did possess.
More chanced to find a fair supply
Of costumes that were left to dry,
23








THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


And soon their tiny forms were lost
Within the garments wrapped and crossed
And gathered to take up the slack
That showed in front and at the back,
And at the sides and feet as well,
Where cloth in great abundance fell.
Sometimes the largest suit on hand
Fell to the smallest in the band,
And here and there he 'd wildly flit
To find a robe of better fit;
While others cared not for the size,
But, though enveloped to the eyes,
Were just as pleased that happy hour
As if it fitted like a dower.
How fortunate the Brownie kind,
Who make the most of what they find,
And pass along their given way
As happily as bees in May.
Some spent the time they had on hand
In learning how to boldly stand
And tread the water there with ease,
While more it seemed to greatly please
To lie and float upon the wave
As buoyant as a chip or stave.
More dived so deep they brought their head
In contact with the ocean's bed,
And had they not been fitted out
To be through life well knocked about,,
And great mishaps still to survive,
Some scarce had left the place alive.
24









THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISlAND.


-



I?'

;7c7.-


" Thus gifted in a manner high

By nature, well may mortals sigh
And gravely ponder on their fate--
Their slighted race and hampered state.
The band has cause to bless the star

-= g----O I i',o zh --t th .-, lu-i-r fir








..... -- -- ... /i





--'"*;; '. 6 .!"
S,,. ,
.. -


. .,. .


--i.-
.- t?:5' A A, I.' '-.





---..- .'.,. -t


Through empty space and midnight shade
When they on earth their entrance made.
No bathers fresh from dusty nooks
Where calicoes, or shoes, or books
Engage their minds from day to day,
Could plunge with such a great display
3 25


.4








THE. BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.


Of joy into the billows white
That broke upon the beach that night.
The wave that tries the vessel's side
When rolling on the ocean wide,
Makes oaken timbers creak and bend,
And sweeps the deck from end to end,
Could hardly force the Brownie band
To quit the sport they had on hand.
Down like great fishes in the swell
The rogues would soon themselves propel,
And out of sight and sound be lost
To every friend, till wildly tossed
Upon a crested wave they 'd rise
To greet the rest with joyful cries.
Could mortals but have gained a peep
At them while in that rolling deep,
They would have been surprised, no doubt,
To see the way they splashed about.
There 's not an art to swimmers known
But cunning Brownies make their own.
They swim like dogs, and swim like fish,
And swim like serpents if they wish,
Where, using neither hands nor feet,
They wriggle through each wave they meet.
Their ways would make those persons sigh
Who scarce could keep a nose or eye
Above the flood, however fast
Their feet and hands through water passed.
Said one: "'T is not in rapid strokes
Or kicks behind that Brownie folks


is; not i n~vn
It is theP sacrifice
NeIt aourlts.





THE BROWNIES IN RHODE ISLAND.

Put all dependence, as you see;
But in peculiar gifts that we
. Could freely use if no set rules
-Were practised in the swimming-schools."
Another said: "'T is not alone
In water that our skill is shown:
But on the skate or wheel as well,
Or prancing horse, as .stories tell,
We hold our own in every case,
And far excel the human race."
Time moves along-though fingers light
May catch at moments in their flight,
Though back the dial's hand we bring,
Or check the pendulum's honest swing,
The sun is far beyond our sway,
And opens wide the gates of day;
So even Brownies don't neglect
To pay the minutes due respect,
But shape their actions to agree
With time that moves so sure and free.
That night presented many a freak
Of which the Brownies long will speak;
For many a ride and many a run
And swim they had ere sport was done,
And they retired from beach and lawn
And roadway at the flush of dawn.



















THE BROWNIES
IN FLORIDA.

THIRD TOUR.

) cunning Brownies ventilate
Their views about a town or State,
Ere they have settled on a place
Where next they must direct their race,
All must be willing and agreed
Through every trial to proceed,
And count the joys before them set
A recompense for dangers met.
But happily the Brownie band
Was under some mild system planned,
With hearts and hopes and aims the same.
One has small reason to declaim
Or speechify to bring about
Sweet harmony ere they set out.
Oh, many a year and trying age
May pass away ere on the stage
Another band like them will rise
To please, to puzzle, and surprise.
28







THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


Those knowing best the Brownies free,
Know best where they are sure to be
When to his bed the sinking sun
Is hastening from his daily run.





















Not in the busy marts of men,
Where people drive the crusty pen,
Or every nerve within them strain
In the o'ermastering thirst for gain;
But in the suburbs of the town,
From dark recesses peeping down
Upon the people homeward bound
To pass the night in slumber sound-
_- :.'-"- '-.. .- ., .. 'f'S 'S ^ ,. "-. ',,.




Not in the busy marts of men,





'T is there people Brownies wait the hourcrusty pe
WhenOr every nerve within their mystic power.
In the o'ermastering thirst for gain;
But in the suburbs of the town,
From dark recesses peeping down
Upon the people homeward bound
To pass the night in slumber sound--
'T is there the Brownies wait the hour
When they can show their mystic power.







THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


They met one evening, by their plan,
And all their conversation ran
On lovely scenes in flood and field
That Southern countries often yield.
Said one: "'T is called the 'Land of Flowers.'
There people doze through sunny hours,
And all the path they care to tread
Is from their table to their bed."
Another cried: "I wonder where
You learned about the people there.
From ignorance your words must rise,
And you should here apologize.
They 're not so prone to eat or doze
As creatures like yourself suppose,
But have an eye that 's quick to light
With fire at insult, wrong, or slight,
And systems that can stand the strain
Of sleepless march, or long campaign;
SWhile at their board the friend or guest
Will fare at all times on the best."
Another said: "It matters not.
Whate'er their nature, cool or hot,
We 'll leave awhile the range of snow,
And down to Dixie's land we 'll go.
We care not what their tables yield,
So long as we have room afield;
We 're not beholden to mankind
For food or raiment, as they '11 find.
The Brownies will not lack a bite
If they feel stings of appetite,








THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


Nor lack a muslin
tt l '.e-:l ,:,r t. w,:,
To fi.ishii:iii out


B it 1_li-- i ,_I Ill 01.-W 1
\vii ti. **l il

with till.- ,:,r tiini.."
At. lefin t.h inothi-r

Tiat brought th
am il t.<-r t ;l "l ,.-'.


(,i '; jII-_'LI-)


::.~' 5' j-y'-4"L'
,~ r' ~'( -'
,,*L
7' :-`:r

"- l.,-~~~(dy .
L1 -- ,-.:.J


... .. i,',, ..... ;*"?'-s-r 1 "*t -- ( .. -.?*' ,
..4..: ..N 1, 1 -'
patriot. l I.3 a A>
.- ,, "^^'N'










.A ,.' A )'
.I -"














a Washington. l,
,,a ,/ W ashington .. .. -; .. ... ,-...













of our own V
Laid such a good fondation-stone,
31
,, .- L c- -. ,il~ 1 . -
-o, ;r" ;:. -. A -,cO # l -t f .. < ,. .. ,


e -.f, 4 .' ."

/ ,.,,.
VV-ho fo ti nain- Iti /"; .
2tl b


Laid~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Suo odfudto-toe y.__,. ,.
31J~








THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


That last of all 't will roll away
When worlds shall crumble in decay-
And Jackson, who from cotton-bales
Made his opponent spread his sails,
And to some safer quarter tack--
Besides 'Old Rough and Ready' Zach,
Who nearly fifty years ago
Made stirring times, in Mexico."
These words, that touched each Brownie's
heart,
Soon brought about an early start.
For Florida the band set out
With nimble feet and courage stout,
And skirted many a cape and bay
And headland, on their Southern way.


r- .--
7rc.iz T- L




1 -.2


They visited St. Augustine,
To feast their eyes on many a scene
32









THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


That left impressions
on the mind
Of the observing
Brownie kind.l.
Old forts that ,.1iI-
were bullet-1-ir f,
And kept the hI:.wvii-
foe aloof,
When it was -:u.:-h
to have a *-'it-

*


2


"-~F I?
Ill
1'1:


BD,-tween one and
a feathered pate,
Were talked about, and stories told
Of wars, until the theme grew old.
It gave them sport to run around
And climb the trees that there they found,
And swing on vines that stretched between
The mossy trunks like hammocks green.
Sometimes a dozen in a row
Would thus be swaying to and fro,
Until a break the swing would end,
And to the ground they 'd all descend.
33


Be fair Iliov~gli o
Yo. may tifn4 gold
by Josiq drros,


; ;;-
--








THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


But what care Brownies for a fall?
To reach another vine they 'd crawl,
And soon be sweeping through the air
Upon some breakneck, frail affair.
Oh, happy Brownies, who can spring
From trouble as with golden wing,
And from their minds forever cast
All thoughts of pain or trials passed!
Where shall a mortal turn his face
To bring in view another race
So full of hope, by nothing bowed,
And with good nature so endowed?
-= Next up the St. John's River wide,
Of Ponce de Leon's State the pride,
The daring Brownies took their course
To trace it fully to its source.
At times they paused, and well they might,
As some bright landscape came in sight,
That could not but awake surprise
In all who have admiring eyes.
Said one: "We Brownies, as you see,
Are gifted in a high degree,
For Nature never knew a band
Or race, or tribe, in any land,
From Sitka Sound to Singapore,
That could appreciate her more.
A scene that dull and dark might fall
On some, perhaps, who coldly crawl
Along through life without a thrill,
With rapture will a Brownie fill.
34







TIHE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


Each stream and grove '.'
attracts the eye,
The flowering vales ...
and sunny sky. "'-
And not alone of '"'
these we speak: ,, ".*, '-
We note the charm .
of beauty's cheek, .:..f ,j..
We mark the eyes -
that have the art .-.
To soon enslave the S
fluttering heart -" ,
And smile to which
the memory .
clings
Through every .
change that
fortune brings."
No cakes of ice nor snow-drifts came
To send a chill through every frame,
And make them wish in language strong
That they had brought their furs along.
But flowers bright, of every hue
To painters known, around them grew.
Those who preferred the crimson flower
Were happy souls in such an hour;
Those who the red or white desired,
Found plenty there to be admired;
Those who the pink or yellow praised,
At their good fortune were amazed.









THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.





ZI
4~~~%~ij 1~'








'JA
"I' ;': Ae


Ke I r IB __i~






J J-1
L1 'I. *,i,
111h


---|
Not one of all J I)
the Brownies there
But had ere long a nosegay rare,
That on the street or in the hall
Would soon bring envious sighs from all.
36








THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


'Tis uot tle nois;iest
talk tlfat tells,
Tle luatic 117l
Iouclet yel Is.
4


At times with kind and careful hand
They crowned some members of the band
With wreaths of flowers nicely made,
With due respect to proper shade.
No milliners, skilled in the art
Of matching colors, could impart
More taste or judgment to the crest,
To show one's beauty at its best.
One well might wonder in what way
They gained the knowledge they display:
Some think by peeping from the shade
At those who in such notions trade,
Or else by watching well their chance
To take at passing folk a glance,
And noting all things new and strange,
That come to light as fashions change.
But, ah, their mystic power so great
Was granted at an earlier date.
'T is not by keeping sharp lookout
Upon the ways of those about
The Brownies have the art acquired
So much in use, and much admired:
But through a natural gift that stands
Them in good stead on all demands.
The tender touch, the jni.lgii'.nt rare,
The skilful stroke, beyond compare,
They carried with them when they came
Attention from the world to claim.
No wonder then some pride we find,
An independence of mankind,
37







THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


In every Brownie of the band,
Wherever found throughout the land.
Some Brownies have an eye that 's bright
To quickly note a pleasing sight,
And love to linger in a place
Where Nature shows her sweetest face,
Where little danger may be met,
And tools and arms aside are set;
While other spirits, wild and strange,
Would rather climb some mountain-range.
The thought that they in such an hour
Can far outdo man's boasted power
Gives pleasure to the Brownies smart,
And fills with pride each daring heart.
Along the slippery crag they move,
Be on your gu-ar As if their native skill to prove;
from day to day:
W~eif.east expected With goats for dangerous points compete,
comes tile fray.
And out of man take all conceit,
Where in each step a danger lies,
And each his skill must exercise.
But in these groves and gardens bright
All were content to spend the night;
In fact, too swift time seemed to go
While they were wandering to and fro-
Now where, all trained to climb or grow,
The plants were making greatest show,
Or where, to beautify the sward,
They flourished of their own accord.
Thick over walls the flowers hung,
Through fences peeped, to hedges clung, T
38







THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


f And rising from the vases high,
Attracted every passing eye;
While birds of plumage bright and gay
S Were resting from their busy day
Is/ T In rows upon the branches green,
^. /q"4t And adding beauty to the scene.
-_ Said one: "No more I want to hear
f .i .. About the valley of Cashmere,
:- Or any Persian product fine
That blossoms in the poet's line.
No garden of a turbaned Turk,
With harem walls, or latticework,
All hemmed around with greatest care,
Can with this lovely scene compare.
If sweeter flowers bloom than these
That here I 've taken from the bees,
They '1l flourish not through man's device,
But grow in vales of Paradise.
Another said: "Much has been told
About the gardens built of old
To hang between the earth and skies,
And cause much wonder and surprise
From kings or tribes of people there
Who to that city chanced to fare.
But at. a great expense, no doubt,
These wondrous things were fashioned out,
And heavy taxes for the plan
Through many generations ran;
While but a king, or some such lord,
Could the delightful scene afford;
39








THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


And gardens blooming
-"- bright and high
Were eye-sores to
',the passers-by.
S' But in this country
Sof our own,
Where no such selfish
work is known,
Where kings cannot build thrones of state,
Nor proclamations promulgate,
Nor with a tax oppress the land
To build a tomb or statue grand,
Nor boldly rifle sacred domes
And altars to enrich their homes,
'T is pleasant to see flowers rare
That flourish with so little care,
And in this soil, so richly spread,
Find through the year a fitting bed.
How blessed are those who on life's stage
Have stumbled in the present age,
And opened first their wondering eyes
Beneath the Union's arching skies,
Where Freedom reigns,
and all mankind
Can lift their voice and '
speak their mind, .
And taste of all '
the gifts that flow '"
From Nature's hand,
both high and low !"
40








THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


Thus freely chatting, as they strayed,
The Brownies tarried while the shade
Of night remained to be a screen
Till purple streaks of morn were seen.
They plaited leaves and hung them round
The oldest trees upon the ground,
In honor of the trunks so strong
That stood and braved the winds so long.
No bees, housed up from wintry air
Away from all that 's bright and fair,
Do more enjoy the balmy spring
That gives them leave their way to wing
Through gardens marked with many a bed,
And fields all yellow, blue, and red,
Than did the Brownies through that night
Enjoy each scene that came in sight.
Said one, as they all turned away
Before the brightening morning ray:
"If Northern people only knew
What generous Nature here can do
To charm the eye, to glad the heart,
And str4itgth to every sense impart,
There 'd be less crowding to the ships
To take long transatlantic trips.
41







THE BROWNIES IN FLORIDA.


But as when birds of passage see
The signs of winter on the tree,
And feel that soon the frosty air
Will creep between their feathers spare,
They haste to lay their plans betime
To journey to a milder clime,
So people to the South 'would hie
To rest beneath its sunny sky."
The State is full of wonders strange
That tempted Brownies still to range.
Through dismal swamp and everglade
Without a guide they onward strayed;
In places where no mortal cares
To set his foot, a Brownie dares
To travel freely in delight,
And study Nature's face aright.













- I~~~Li:;.*


THE BROWNIES IN
MASSACHUSETTS.

FOURTH TOUR.

keeping with the wishes strong
The Brownie band had cherished long,
As shades of evening closed around,
In haste they sought their meeting-ground.
No sooner had the roll been called,
And "here" or "present" each one bawled,
Than one remarked: "'T is well indeed
That all are here now to proceed,
Without delay, to carry through
The plan we long have had in view.
The old 'Bay State' is worthy ground
For us to visit in our round
Of pleasure, traveling here and there
In search of what is strange or fair."
To Boston then the Brownies made
Their way, and soon a visit paid
To Bunker Hill, where one addressed
His comrades when they reached the crest:
43


. I








THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.


This granite monument
so high
That here is pointing to
the sky,
And draws the traveler's eye
long ere
He comes within the
city fair,
Soon calls to mind the clash
and din
That bright June morning
ushered in,
When up the steep and
slippery slope


*.












With leveled steel came Britain's hope
In even lines, with even tread,
And crimson banners overhead."
Another said: "'T is true, indeed,
As one may on the tablet read,
44








THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.


This is the spot where
Warren fell
Upon that day when rang
the bell
Of Freedom through the
startled land,
To call to arms each
valiant band;
Here bravely up the
grassy steep
The British came, in
columns deep,
To backward roll from
volleys hot
Of bullets, slugs, and
partridge-shot,
Or whatsoever men
could pour
Or ram into the
smoking bore."
Soon round and round the
They ran to climb the tall


S--. --- -:


^-^




















affair,
._ aa ir,












affair,


To reach the topmost windows small,
And gain a ,bird's-eye view of all.
How vain are all the arts of man,
However well he lays his plan,
To keep out creatures of the night
And have the sole, exclusive right
To shove a bolt or turn a key
That to the public is not free!
45







THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.


-- This fact is striking when we note
S How easily the Brownies float
S|-,- Through obstacles that are, at best,
J' ''"' To them but subjects for a .jest.
S If mortals had the power that they
-. -.--- Upon their nightly rounds display,
The locksmith might take down his sign,
The janitor his place resign,
The watchman sleep the hours away
And let intruders have full sway;
But only Brownies have the skill
Or gift to go thus where they will.
An hour or more their eyes were bent
On scenes around the monument...
It was, indeed, a pleasing sight:
The city in a blaze of light,
With streets and squares and pleasure-grounds
Marked out with lamps to farthest bounds. ,
They hurried round from place to place
With nimble feet and beaming face;
Now through the Public Gardens strayed, --'
Then on the Boston Common played,
Until a striking clock would prove .
The time had come for them to move. i
Upon the old church spire they gazed 'i
Where long ago the signal blazed
That gave the hint to Paul Revere .
To mount his steed and disappear
Into the darkness, far away
His hasty tidings to convey.







THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.

Not satisfied to simply stare
Upon the church from street or square,
The Brownies to the belfry went
To look around; then, well content,


They started off to make a call
On old time-honored Faneuil Hall.
It gave them great delight to range
In freedom through the building strange.
They stood around and "speechified"
From balconies on either side,
And talked about the times when there
The angry people did repair,
47







THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.

"; Till every nook and foot of space
Was crowded with the populace.
To Cambridge, with inquiring mind,
*\ The Brownies traveled, next, to find
The ancient elm beneath whose shade
Stood Washington to draw his blade,












I-T
'J
-- iv T .




\ I --". F"






..: :- i: ,, .. '..ir



:-_ ... :-- l ,
I-- i -- .'-1-- ; .._-._: --..-/I_ ..' :'
--I _-,..,-- -" ;- -.- :-- .:'- -: ,' .






.... --- ,- ^ r --- .. 1 1.- ,








THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.


With solemn vows to take command
Of his bold, patriotic band.
They tarried there to climb about
And study old inscriptions out,
And then away to Plymouth Rock
The Brownies ran, a lively flock;
For lightly does the Brownie go, H ev
WiteoLtt
And skims the meadow like a crow, Br
When there is need of extra haste,
Or few the minutes he can waste.
When that historic spot was found,
In groups the Brownies stood around
To talk about the daring few
Whose spirit nothing could subdue.
They entered boats,
S ;,nd, lMlli,.. _ut
__-i 1'-1 ', t
~- inL s O .-;e. froi, shore,
... .l i-h tun-i-d -ibout


SIi-





r clark tfe qiqkt
ay be,
a I'aretere.
owliie3 See.


I iI J

.- -
7--7

I~ ~ ~~1 7,_ 1.\~*-


C.~
9Ii~I
i L


And made a rush, to show the way
The Pilgrims acted on that day
49


r







THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.


A el.o..( aan I1idle
tP12ea rblei t sta,.
So to~lble oft ones
Pfeo..re bars.


When it was counted much to be
The first to place a foot or knee
Upon the rough, though welcome beach,
So far from persecution's reach.
Some jumped while water still was deep,
And down they went to take a peep
At submarine attractions spread
Where clams and lobsters make a bed;
But, rising, found a friendly hand
Prepared to drag them to the land;
For Brownies note each other's woe,
And quickly to the rescue go-
Through flood or fire they '11 dash amain,
Nor let companions call in vain.
They don't look round to see who '11 fling
His coat aside, the first to spring
Without a thought but one-to save
A fellow-creature from the grave:
They go themselves. Thus oft you '11 find
A dozen with a single mind-
Each striving to be first to lend
Assistance to a suffering friend.
Said one, when he had gained the ear
Of dripping comrades standing near:
"No wonder that the Pilgrims drew
A lengthy breath when they got through
The jumping in and crawling out
That marked their landing hereabout;
And much the Indians must have been
Surprised to see those stalwart men
50


~IL?---~-~i I --s








THE BROWNIES IN MASSACHUSETTS.


So eager to find footing here
Upon the Western Hemisphere."








The Brownies now to Lowell sped,
And then away to Marblehead;
On Salem next their eyes were thrown-
That has a history of its own.
And then to old Nantucket strand
With eager glances moved the band,
Where they could gain no stinted view
Of ocean rolling deep and blue.




















THE BROWNIES IN
NEW JERSEY.

FIFTH TouR.

thoughtfulness when Brownies planned
To visit States both rich and grand,
In hopes to find where'er they 'd call
Prosperity was blessing all,
New Jersey, as we gladly find,
Was treasured in the Brownies' mind;
And to the thriving State at last
The nimble-footed rovers passed.
No census-taker better knows
How fast a population grows,
How often marriage-knots are tied,
Or babes increase the parents' pride,






52







THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


Than do the cunning Brownies bright,
'". Who still must keep from human sight;
ii Or no assessor passing through
''' The country wide the farms to view,
S.. And fix the value and the size
Of taxes that do men surprise,
Can better tell how values fall,
Or rise, than can the Brownies small.
They traveled many miles around,
And much to praise they quickly found.
When Trenton came at length in sight,
The Brownies paused, as well they might,
To there review like Brownie kind
The battle that it called to mind.
Said one, as he the field surveyed:
'T was here upon this spot, arrayed
In line of battle, bright and red,
With banners streaming overhead,
The Hessian troops were forced to reel
By Continental lead and steel;
For under him who well could lead
Were men prepared for every deed
That seemed the noble cause to aid
For which they buckled on the blade,
And left their plows in furrows fast,
To rally at the bugle-blast."
Then up to Princeton, ere the rise
Of sun, where once again surprise
Brought swift disaster to the foe,
The Brownies all resolved to go.







THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


The distance that the soldiers brave
Had marched that night, to dig a grave
For many of the foreign host,
Was crossed in half an hour at most;
For quick the Brownies skip the mead
When they have reason to proceed
With all the mystic arts they own,
And hours of night are nearly flown.







-^ (-t
To Morristown, an honored name
Through Revolutionary fame,
The Brownies traveled, hiding still
When morning sunlight kissed the hill;
Then creeping out to take their way
When fell the evening shadows gray,
The Boonton Mountain felt their tread
As o'er the wooded heights they sped.
At Newark next they marked with pride
The business plants on every side-



V A 1, ,








THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


Saw where the factory and the mill
Did many homes with comfort till.
At Hackensack they spent a niuht;
Snake Hill they left upon th-ir ri._ht,
As down the steep Weehawki:- .-_11,,r,
They ran, to spend an hour "-r 1rnr-
In viewing that historic grouiil1
That still upon the bank is f...und.
Said one: "Here Hamilton, ind:l'.d,
Met Burr at morn, as was ag'r,-,d,


-~ -.- -


I '''LL A





And fell in that sad, useless strife '





That closed his brght and useful life."
,. ;". A -- -. _' : "

.- .,. .' -- "



And fell in that sad, useless strife -. _,_
That closed his bright and useful life."
55







THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


Now coursing round, good time they made
To Jersey City, and displayed,
As oft they do, their greatest care
To note improvements everywhere.
When all the sights within the town
Were visited and noted down,
The jovial band soon took a race
To other points around the place.
With thoughts of pleasure passing through
Their active minds, the Brownies drew
Together on a rising ground,
As evening shades were closing round.
The bat, the beetle, and the fly
Whose evening lantern charms the eye,
Come not more prompt at Hecate's call
Than Brownies when the shadows fall.
Said one: "Ofttimes at close of day
S I 've watched the light in yonder bay
Proceeding from the statue high
That looms so dark against the sky,
And thought upon the joy in store
For us, could we but venture o'er
The waves that lift their snowy crests
Around the isle whereon it rests.
Although not set on Jersey ground
O'er which we have been rambling round,
The Jersey shore will here bestow
A starting-point from which to go,
And to the State we '11 give our thanks
For having such convenient banks,


earefut tread yt
eartI2 WeloW,
Paftis abouv no
pitfalls kouw.








THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


Or shores, that reach into the bay,
To help us in our bold essay."
Another said: "When Brownies fail
In aught they undertake, bewail
The lost condition of the race--
Till then let fear to nerve give place.
57







THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


This eve, when dew bedecks the wold,
And in the sky the hunter old
Has buckled on his belt of fire,
We '11 take ourselves that island nigher,
To see the statue that does stand
With blazing torch in lifted hand
As Liberty to light the way
For all the world to reach the bay.
There in due time we '11 soon disclose
The liberty a Brownie knows,
And I for one will feel unblessed
Until upon her crown I rest,
A proud and sweeping glance to throw
Upon the shipping moored below."


'.1


Few minutes passed before the band
Was out upon the cape of land
That nearest to the island lay,
Collecting in their lively way
Such things as best would bear them through
The water to the point in view.
Inventors at their task grown gray
Oft leave their toil and pass away,
Nor can they the solutions claim
That might have brought them wealth or
fame;
But Brownies, when it is their lot
To study out a scheme or plot,
All problems soon side-track or shunt,
And bring perfection to the front.


0


It doesn't Lie it? peq
Zdcl iylk
So mu017 as ir a ead
to tip 4








THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


A thing which through the air will sail,
Or plow the waters like a whale,
Is not beyond their mystic might
Or wondrous breadth of genius bright.
Whatever man, however blessed
With special gifts above the rest,
Can conjure up to serve his end,
To spread his fame, or purse extend,
He '11 find the band not at his heels,
Nor studying his spring and wheels,
Nor ll1Loming! to infringe his right,
But in advance clean out of sight.
But little serves to make a boat
On which the Brownies well can float.
At times no better craft they ask
Than just a coop, or empty cask;
And thus they '11 travel, free from care,
Without a wish to better fare.
'T is not in yachts, nor coaches great,
Nor cushions soft, nor chairs of state,
To bring content, or bliss control-
'T is in the nature of the soul;
And often those who smile the most
Are those who have no beef to roast.
And so the Brownies, well content
With what the fates that evening lent,
Set out from shore, with joke and smile,
To work their passage to the isle.
The bay, that night they tempted fish,
Was not as calm as one might wish;
59








THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


* *.

A'-


The gales that swept the sea of late
Had left it in a ruffled state.
Now heaving there and sinking here,
And flinging spray across the pier,







THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


It seemed averse to ways serene,
And anxious to do something mean.
So when the Brownies ventured out
Upon their traps to toss about,
A titter seemed at times to run
From wave to wave until it won
More strength and reached a howl at last
That went out seaward with the blast.
A little giggle passing through
The cherry lips of such as you,
Is sweetest music to the ear;
But laughs like those we mention here
Oft hint of travels submarine,
Of seaweed beds and anguish keen.
They reached, ere long, as best they could,
The island where the statue stood.
With upturned face they gathered all
To gaze upon the figure tall,
That as a work of friendship still
Between two great Republics will
Look out upon the restless sea
Till monarchies shall cease to be.
Not long the Brownies stay below
When there 's a chance to upward go;
Not long an outward look will do,
If there 's a way to travel through;
And soon the band of which we sing
Were wending upward in a string.
The many steps the stair contained
Were left behind as on they strained,
61







THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


--^A~:h--i.S^^

.' ,, : .-



Without a halt, save one alone
Upon the pedestal of stone,
Where they with wondering eyes looked out
Across the waves, then turned about
And, hid beneath the garment's fold,
Still upward climbed the Brownies bold,
And showed the greatest discontent
Till to the highest point they went.
They criticized her Grecian nose,
Her curling lip and graceful pose,
Her eyes that looked so calm and kind,
Her hair rolled in a knot behind;
And then the Brownies all agreed
She rightly represents indeed,
As any practised eye could tell,
That Liberty all love so well.
They ventured up and sat astride
Of finger-tips, and stood with pride
Upon the ornamented head
And torch that light around them spread.
A mortal, howsoever free
From dizziness he claims to be,
Will hardly tempt fate in the way
The Brownies do at work or play;








THE BROWNIES IN NEW JERSEY.


But not without alarms they go
Thus daring fortune, well we know.
SSometimes they slipped
in spite of care,
SAnd life seemed hanging by a hair.
Then hearts sank low in every breast
--____ When valued friends
.-. were sore distressed;
But ready hands were ever near
S. To lift them from the place of fear.
Not long in danger Brownies lie
While close at hand are comrades spry.
Each nerve is strained, each method tried,
That swift relief may be supplied.
What Brownies did not understand
About that statue, great and grand,
Before they left for haunts remote,
Was hardly worthy special note.
The stars on high had banked their fires,
The dawn had tinged the city's spires,
The goddess stood in fuller grace,
The flush of morn upon her face,
Ere Brownies reached the Jersey shore,
And found their hiding- place once more.


















THE BROWNIES IN
CONNECTICUT.

SIXTH TouR.

Brownies bold, in spirits fine,
V~t ; One evening crossed the boundary line,
And that old State with pleasure hailed
Wherein the Blue Laws once prevailed,
That made the people toe the mark
On Sabbath days, and after dark,
And mind with care their P's and Q's,
And not try napping in their pews,
Said one: "This State is not the last
To name when we review the past,
Or call to mind the struggles great
Of those who tried to found the State.
The banks of that long river there,
That 's winding down the valley fair,
Were covered o'er with heavy wood
Wherein the pointed wigwam stood;
While oft upon some jutting height
Was seen the Red Men's signal-light."
64








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


Another answered him the while:
"'T is true, you 'll hardly tread a mile
Along the river, up or down,
Through verdant vales or thriving town,
And not encounter on your way
Some spot that 's marked a savage fray,
When, in the deadly ambuscade,
Or massacre, no hand was stayed
In mercy, but both youth and age
Fell victims to the foeman's rage."
And thus they talked about the State,
While deeper still to penetrate
Into that section of the land
On moved the keen observing band.
All noted points of interest still-
Now in the vale, now on the hill;
Now by some engineering scheme,
Then by the rapid rolling stream;
Small cdees may tun
toe scae at lmt Now by a city paused and spoke
Aic count for more tlar
treasures uaat. About the famous Charter Oak,
Known through the country far and wide,
That was for years the people's pride.
What tourists Brownies prove to be
When they are out to hear and see!
How little can escape the eye
That takes in all from earth to sky!
How faint the sound that does not strike
Upon the ears of all alike,
And waken joy or consternation
According to the situation:
65







THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


The cat that 's out
without a key,
The turkeys roosting
S. in the tree,
Well pleased a soft
"good night" to
throw
S-To Reynard at the
-- .roots below;
SI L 4' The barking dog at
,', some one's gate,
Ai The dim light burning
'' (',>r rather late,
] That hints of youthful
'..' lovers there,
;' Or some one sick
li. and needing care,
". t Are noticed as they
,,, ar (Jtake their way,
-, However near the
-, morning ray.
- -;-, At length they neared
Sthe glittering Sound,
And then New Haven
--- -- -soon was found,
That 's famous for the
elm-trees fine
Which through the city stand in line,
And spreading over street and square
And avenues, form arches fair.
66








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


r, owl t










High o'er the town around it spread,






In memory of the honored dead.
"---"-- :: ;-- + -,






But he who tellsock therownies went every act,
And pictures forth each simple fact,
WillAnd there unitto have in words of praise
Of patience, to do all the column riseght.
High o'er the town around iter spread,
In memory of the honored dead.
But he who tells their every act,
And pictures forth each simple fact,
Will need to have the virtue bright
Of patience, to do all things right.
For though the pen may faster seem
To cross the page when they 're the theme,
07







THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


If work to ot before
you lies
First on yourowti
tuxu yyour ey


Than when a drier subject calls
On inky steel to fashion scrawls,
Still ages seem too short a time
In which to tell their deeds sublime.
Around the desk in circles stand
The well-known members of the band,
All waiting to have special deeds
Recorded ere the light recedes,
And weary fingers drop the pen
That makes their actions known to men.
How might we wish for brighter eyes,
And hands wherein the power lies
That youth can boast, to still pursue
Delightful work that 's ever new-
To tell the pleasure we 've enjoyed
While with the Brownie band employed,
hands And praise the privilege so rare
To make them for so long our care!
While near a college roaming round,
Well noted for the doctrines sound
With which the student must engage, '
Assisted by professors sage,
No less than for the prizes rare
The students win in open air,
When musty books are laid aside
And skill at stirring games is tried,
The Brownies paused, as oft they do,
To talk about some subject new.
It does n't take a massive pile
Or buildings of the grandest style
68


Q








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


To wake new notions in their brain:
A grazing horse upon the plain,
A book, a boat upon the beach,
Or pair of skates, will waken speech


That ends in sport to last a night,
And yield the Brownies great delight.
Poor mortals, seeking something strange
Or far beyond the common range,
Ere they can hope to pleasure find,
Are thus by Brownies left behind,
69








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


Who from all things can pleasure draw,
And nature find without a flaw.
Said one, as he peeped o'er the wall
To view the walks and trees so tall:
" The students here have won great fame e
By playing well the foot-ball game; ofsr
And as JI have the place in mind
Where we the leather ball can find,
This night a fitting place we 'll seek,
And play the game of which I speak."
Ere long the Brownies found their way
To grounds where they could safely play.
Dividing then in iinmii1,i-rs fair,
The band at once for sport prepare,
-4 Each side selecting such as seem
'Best suited to compose a team-
,- 7 Those quick of foot and strong of h
SWho could the roughest treatment s
They rushed, they tackled, tripped, a
And trampled on each other well;
They piled in heaps till scarce a leg
Or hand or head could move a peg;
While here and there a reddened face
Was peeping from some open space;
But he who lay upon the ball
Was under, out of sight of all.
It looked as if each Brownie there
Would surely need a surgeon's care.
They dra._g-ged each other round and round,
And back and forth upon the ground.


>retul of tl;e little
deect
e at ones al tl e
rid takesleed.













and,
tand.
md fell,


S. .
V- ::-*; -'"'" ^ **








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.

You 'd wonder what that had to do
With foot-ball rules-but Brownies knew:
They had their lessons well, no doubt,
SAnd all the points were carried out.




-I- i ._ '- ., :' 4.


S.. -, 7 i '- -' "
T



_:A







-AM
; ..











In spite of all the teams could say
That none except themselves should play,
Sometimes excitement ruled the band
Till every Brownie took a hand
71
71










THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


C3 _- ~
--~-----=--
---~-~--~- ___
----~---
---;Z~ ~1--=--
~
-
------=--=


--: -- .- *... *... ** I.

1 ~1L



K.>.~-~=~ ----= 2".


k1k

Co. -,.: 7 -


II r /'1

4~~d \
I~

k.~~ '-~- j.7 -1. 1-

~s-i--
-r
1?
--i~l~" ..K~;

rc~\,~ZSiji

.


.* .rr*.lrr l. ll.,. -
. I I I -


And pulled and pushed about, and ran

To interfere with some one's plan.


I -i I-, -- _


s I ,, ~


S' t1

. . .. '. .; .,:
-- ... .









*'1 1I,
S. .





:,, ,....1'-.1 ,." ,



*:I: '-":m^^A:i
..^*N ^ :., ,. ; ...
'' / ". 4
,-, ,* .


J~
4..


/








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


A few who stood outside the press
Were interested none the less,
Now tugging at a head with vim,
And now at some projecting limb,
Still keeping this in mind the while:
The ball was somewhere in the pile.
Left-guard, left-end, half-back, and all
The tackling crowd were in the fall.
The center, quarter-back as well,
And right-end in the "touch-down" fell.
Some necks were twisted in a way
'T was hard to reconcile with play,
And more believed the sport would cost
Too much, perhaps, if teeth were lost. '
But others would as freely claim -
'T was all in keeping with the game,..
And none, however bruised or bent,
Should show the slightest discontent.
Sometimes they 'd all commence anew,
And give the ball a kick or two,
When some one, seizing it, would make
From all the rest a sudden break..
In V-shaped wedge some rushed together,
And managed to advance the leather;
But opposition would set in
Ere they a rod of space could win,
And every one upon the ground
In half a minute would be "downed."
At times "touch-downs" would follow fast,
And hard-earned goals be reached at last;
73








THE BROWNIES IN CONNECTICUT.


At times some "fumble" and impair
Their chances of a victory there.
Some by a drop-kick won applause,
And took success from failure's jaws;
While others by a "punt" would raise
From every throat unstinted praise.
Thus Brownies played both fast and free
An even match, as one could see,
Until the light of morning came
Across the sky and stopped the game.
Then those who had not strength to go
Except on crutches bending low,
Or else on stretchers quickly made,
Received at once some friendly aid
From others, mindful of distress,
Who in the game had suffered less.



















THE BROWNIES
IN TEXAS.


SEVENTH TOUR.


eevening shades began to drive
The birds to roost and bees to hive,
And out once more the beetles bring
That through the day kept folded wing,
The Brownies crossed a bridge of wood,
And in the State of Texas stood.
Said one: "Of all the States sd wide
Through which we 've passed with rapid
stride,
The 'Lone Star' State, where now we
make
Our humble bow, can 'take the cake.'
Some States seem but a scraggy patch
That scarce gives room for hens to hatch,
Compared with this tremendous spread
Of acres, from the River Red
Down to the Gulf; and westwardly _
Beyond the Brazos stretching free, :--
75







THE BROWNIES IN TEXAS.


If you wouldct r;se a.
the ground,
-fGtnot you- -lo ll fto
be bound.


Until its distant boundary line
The Rio Grande's banks define."
Another said: And here indeed
All products that the people need
In cultivated fields are found,
Or brought from mines beneath the
ground:
The wood, the coal or iron mine,
The wheat, the cotton, corn, and wine,
The beef, the wool, and horses fleet,
In great abundance here we meet.
If we want sugar-cane or rice,
Or butter, fruit, or aught that's nice,
That people either make or grow, '
Be sure we won't have far to go.
An empire in itself, it lies
Serene beneath its sunny skies."
Then one remarked: "Here drove on drove
The cattle through the country rove,
And horses that can stand the strain
Of lengthy races o'er the plain.
We '11 be of service if we can,
And, acting on the cow-boy plan,
Soon mount some 'broncos,' as they 're
styled,
And round up cattle running wild.
This will be surely, have no fears,
The greatest sport we 've had for years -
boue Across the range the steed to urge,
'""'" Or down the road to make a splurge,


G







THE BROWNIES IN TEXAS.


To catch the steer with horns so wide
They scrape the fence on either side,
Will introduce more fun, you '11 find,
Than you to-night can call to mind."
If there is aught that seems to raise
The Brownies' spirits to a blaze,
It is some plan that does provide
The means whereby they all can ride.
.- ,I 'T was strange to see how quick they found
%' -The ropes and saddles hanging round,
', And bridles made to conquer still
; "'' The horse that scorned the rider's will.
Soon mounted, ready to pursue
The straying stock, away they flew.
S' At times a number on one steed
~R---ode up and down at greatest speed;
'.-' Some by the rein essayed to guide
The horse across the ranges wide,
'While others with the lasso long
Made bold to check the cattle strong.
How they could stick and hang about,
And keep from falling off throughout
Their rough career,- how e'er they raced,
Or wild the beast they rode or chased,-
Is more than those can understand
Who have not studied well the band. .
But not from mortal masters they
Have taken lessons, by the way,-
The band we follow night by night
Through dangers dark and pleasures light,
77









TIMf 13ROWNIES IN TEXAS.


; c,, C:' :i:;`' '' 1-'-


Ti I,


--p~-~
,5~ 5 N


Have gathered all their mystic powers

From other pedagogues than ours.
78










THE BROWNIES IN TEXAS.


They stepped upon the stage to ride,

To sail, to swim, to jump, to slide,

Or turn their hands to skilful stroke

In ways that oft the record broke,

Without instruction from mankind,

Yet leave all human art behind.


II



-, I


"-
' )`I I
4!1
~~?~I~ I~-..
Il :"


I ZLP


Jil/,


7

~k

I''
'":"' '.'."'







THE BROWNIES IN TEXAS.


Some creatures, crazy in their fright,
Ran dragging horses left and right,
While all the Brownies on their back
Were shouting at each turn and tack,
Directing how the beast to throw,
Or how to hold, or let him go.
They found ere long the cow-boy's task
Was not so light as one might ask
Who was not well prepared to face
The dangers of the time and place.
Some, losing hold upon their steed,
Ran here and there in greatest need
Of something that would shelter yield
Till wildest cattle left the field.
There, crouching low on hand and knee,
They formed a picture strange to see,-
Still waiting for the time when they
To different points might slip away.
Thus night was spent with many a race,
And many a fear, and many a case
That tried the courage of the best
Before they sought a place of rest.







TY"



















THE BROWNIES IN
PENNSYLVANIA.

EIGHTH TouR.

talks among the Brownies wee
About the States that should not be
Omitted when they took their way
A friendly call on them to pay,
They did not slight the Keystone State,
In laying plans, nor name it late.
Said one: "'T would hardly be fair play,
To say the least, for us to stray
Around great wonders to behold
And leave the home of Penn untold.
Its mines of coal that more and more
Reveal great nature's ample store,
Its wells of oil, that bubbling rise,
On which the world for light relies,
Have made it famous, not to speak
Of battle-fields that one should seek.
And monuments that mark the spot
Where heroes stood are wanting not,







THE BROWNIES IN PENNSYLVANIA.


S Bt shine on hilltop, ridge, and glen,
.'iR' l:,-alling deeds of bravest men."
The- bIaund was soon upon the road
.. ..- the sights the country showed.
ili' Thle irts were wheeling round at eve,
D- --riined not a fly to leave,
I; I W\Vin Brownies crossed the river deep,
,-.I:F W]:is-A waters seaward proudly sweep,
Made famous by
.a glorious deed
Most welcome in
a time of need.
S I So many scenes spread
f .['' 1- "'- to their view
4--
As they advanced,
I they hardly knew
..'I.. -' Where first to turn
their feet so spry,
Or where to throw
f
a wondering eye.
-,-.' Airound the wells, as one might think,
S.L'' That in the earth so deeply sink,
S"-.. The Brownies stopped to talk about
Their yield, and study matters out;
Or climb upon the frames of wood
That on all sides around them stood.
Some fixture rising in the air,
To form a roost or strange affair,
Soon interests'the Brownies smart,
Who gladly show their climbing art;







THE BROWNIES IN PENNSYLVANIA.


And here a chance was offered all
Who cared to dizzy points to crawl.
The Brownies sat on topmost beams
To talk about their future schemes,
And how the folk were doubly blest
Who in that State a home possessed,
Where wealth was piled above the ground,
And stored below in caves profound.
Around the tanks of oil they played,
Or of the tops a race-track made;
Then at the coal-mines they made bold
To enter where the cars are rolled,
And a new world seems to be run
With fair success without a sun.
In deepest mines, where each must bear
A lamp upon his head with care
To light him on his dark career,
The Brownies went without a fear.
From shaft to shaft,
from drill to drill,
S. Down deeper yert,
'- r and deeper still,
.. j*^i-i ^.,/,,N







THE BROWNIES IN PENNSYLVANIA.


(i


They groped along to find how far
Mankind had gone with pick and bar.
Said one: "We 've gone so deep, I vow,
We can't be far from China now,
And soon her busy sons may see
At work among the rice and tea.
Perhaps the knaves, that still are sly,
Are taking Uncle Sam's supply
Of coal that nature stowed away
To serve him till the final day."
The State is large, as those found out
Who measured it with chains about,
And staked each county, town, and mile,
At risk of being scalped the while:
And Brownies found enough to keep
Them on the move and on the peep,
And then they gladly lingered late
Till forced to leave the Quaker State.
Too many wells, too many mines,
Are found within its boundary lines,
For them to honor each and all
With even an informal call-
Since other wonders, strange to see,
For some regard put in their plea.
84








THE BROWNIES IN PENNSYLVANIA.

The mountain-ranges piled on high,
As if all passage to defy;


The sparkling streams that leap between
The shelving rocks and foliage green;







THE BROWNIES IN PENNSYLVANIA.

The forests deep, where still the bear
In safety makes his winter lair -


All these attractions seemed to stand






About the mines, the wells, and all
The rivers wide, and mountains tall,
-A. '.,- ,.'- ', ,.' i* ..-















The busy towns and quiet nooks,,





Than they had learned by reading books.
About t mines,,the wel",, ls, a al.,
T r w. id, and mo. u nta ins_, -.-- ,- .'. ,- _*.,'< ;,-"









And beckon to the Brownie kand,



And when the hand at length was through oks,1
Their rambling round, far more they knew J

The river-s wide, and mountains tall, ."t --.*_ '.

Than they had learned by.reading books. : *_.. .....--._




















THE BROWNIES IN
ILLINOIS.

.-, NINTH TOUR.

when the Brownies stood beside
..--- An inland sea that stretches wide,
:' ~And helps to form the lengthy chain
Of lakes across the western plain,
They halted on a wooden pier
To gaze upon a schooner near.
Said one: "In Illinois at last
We find ourselves: through much we 've
passed,
And many wonders paused to note
In countries near and lands remote;
But here we might for ages dwell,
And still find scenes to please us well-
Yes, here within this wealthy State,
So famous for the city great
That 's now a household word to all
The races on this earthly ball;







THE BROWNIES IN ILLINOIS.


And long they '11 talk, neathh sunny sky
Or icy hut, of buildings high
And railroads that a center find
Here interlaced and intertwined
In such a way as to amaze
The visitor who hither strays."
Another said: "We 've
sailed the sea,
And on a river, rolling free,
We traveled far,
on pleasure bound,
Till we the Crescent
SCity found;


d in a -as well you knw,









A sail upon this tempting lake,
.- 8
.1. ..' ,.,-







And in a bay, as well you know,
We cruised about some years ago.
Now here we have a chance to take
A sail upon this tempting lake,




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