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 Front Cover
 Tom Thumb
 Back Cover






Group Title: Kriss Kringle series
Title: Tom Thumb
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083393/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tom Thumb
Series Title: Kriss Kringle series
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1897
Copyright Date: 1897
 Subjects
Subject: Folk tales -- 1897   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre: Folk tales   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083393
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001853793
oclc - 28767223
notis - AJS8155

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Tom Thumb
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Back Cover
        Page 12
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0 NCE upon a time a- great ma-
gician went dut for a walk,
and becoming very tired, asked
leave to rest at a laborer's
( cottage. The man and his
Wife brought him food and
Shrink, and he, wishing to
S' reward them, asked them
what they would
/', m.st like to have.
i Well, Sir, said the
laborer we have no
children, and if we
had a son no bigger
Than my thumb, we
OFTE E- would be very proud
THE FULLFILMENT OF THE PROMISE. and happy. You
shall have your wish, said the magician, and when he left
them, he went to a fairy to ask her aid in keeping his
promise. The fairy agreed to assist him.
One day she brought to the wife a tiny baby-boy,
just the size of her husband's thumb, and told her he was
to be called Tom Thumb.
The parents were delighted and soon became very
fond of him, but as he never grew any bigger, his father
began to fear that Tom would not be able to defend

The Baldwin Library
-, -- Univ' sity
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TOM TT-UM B.
himself from the
attacks of larger
boys. But it was
soon plain that ..
what the tiny chap
lacked in strength,
he made up in
cunning. Master .:
Tom used to play
cherry-stones with "
the other boys, and
when he had lost
all he had, he would
creep into the bags INTO THE RED COWS MIOUPTH.
of the others and steal back all his losings. At last he
was caught in the act, and an ugly boy drew the strings
of a bag so tightly around Tom's neck that he was nearly
strangled. When he released him he was glad "to
promise to play fair" the next time.
One day his mother was making a batter-pudding, and
Tom, climbing to the edge of the bowl to look in, his
foot slipped, and into the batter he went head foremost.
His mother was looking another way, so did not see Tom
and stirred him along with the batter into the pudding-bag,
and put it into the pot to boil. When the water grew
hot, he began to kick and plunge so hard that the lid of
the pot flew off. His mother seeing the pudding behave
so strangely, thought it must be bewitched and so threw
it out of doors.
A poor tinker, who was passing at the time, picked


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TOM STIRRED INTO TH& BATTER PUDDING,





























GRUMBO SWALLOWS TOM LIKE A PILL.


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TOM THUMB

up the pudding and
sat down by the
way-side to eat it.
At this Tom began
to cry. Let me
out! let me out!
^ mThe tinker was so
)- T7 frightenedd that he
flung the pudding
'over the hedge and
,, .., z. ran away. Tom
ran home to his
B- mother, who, with
a great deal of
trouble, washed off
TOM DISAGREES WITH GRUMBO.be, a e
the batter.
Not long after, his mother took him with her to milk
the cow, and as it was a windy day, she tied him to a
thistle with a bit of thr.d. The cow bit off the thistle,
and all at once Tom found himself in a big red cave,
with two rows of white pillars, going champ! champ!
Tom roared at the top of his little voice, for his
mother. Where are you, my dear son, cried the good
wI.pan in great alarm. Here, in the red cow's mouth,
cried Tom. The mother wept and wrung her hands, for
she thought he would be 'killed, but the cow opened her
mouth and dropped him out on the grass without hurting
himat all. His father sometimes took Tom with him,
when he went to plough, and gave him a barley-straw
to drive the horses. He felt very grand and would hallo.





TOM T UMB,


and crack his whip
in fine style. One
day, a raven hov-
ering near, picked
up the barley-straw
whip, and Tom,
together; luckily,
the raven dropped
Tom on the terrace t
of giant Grumbo's _____
castle. --
Soon'old Grum-
bo came on the ter-
raie for a walk, and A SURPRISE FOR THE COOK.
seeing Master Tom, picked him. up and swallowed him
as if he had been a pill. Tom made the greedy giant
so sick, that he opened his mouth, and Tom came flying
out, over the terrace into the sea, where a big fish swal
lowed him. It was a fine fish when .caught, and was
bought for the table of King Arthur. The cook took
knife to open it, and what was her surprise when Tom
popped up his head, and politely said, How d'ye do,
ma'am?" It was soon known that a wee knight had
come to court, and the King made him his dwarf, and
the whole court thought him the funniest and merriest
little fellow that had ever been seen there. The king
asked Tom- about his parents, Tom told him they were
poor people, and that he should like to see them again.
The king gave him leave to visit them and take them
as much money as he could carry. The poor little fellow











































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TOM THUMB RIDING THE MOUSE.


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TOM THUMB KNIGHTED BY THE KING,





TOM THUMB.

could only carry a sil-
ver three-penny piece.
.-< ; His parents were glad
to see him, but when
he had stayed
three days he
thought he
S.r .... ought to
return. His
'mother, who





MOTHER DISPATCHING HIM TO and string,
THE KING'S PALACE. and tying
Tom to it,
blew him away into the air to the king's palace. Instead
of alighting in the court, he fell into a bowl of broth
which the royal cook was carrying across the court-yard.
The bowl was dropped and broken. The cook in a
rage, picked up Tom, and ran with him to the king, and
charged him with jumping into the royal broth, out of
mere mischief. The king was angry, but very busy, and
ordered Tom to be kept under arrest till ie had more
leisure. He was shut in a mouse-trap for a week; at
the end of the week the king's anger was gone, and he
ordered Tom a new suit of clothes, and a good sized
mouse to ride on.
mouse to ride on.





TOM THUMB.

One day when Tom was riding past a farm-house, a
large cat, seeing the mouse, rushed out upon it. Tom
drew his sword and defended himself bravely, until King
Arthur and his followers came up, but he was so
seriously wounded that his life was despaired of.
The Queen of the Fairies, bore Tom away to'fairyland,
and kept him several years. When he returned to court
King Arthur was dead, but Tom was cordially welcomed
by his successor, King Thunston. Here he spent many
happy years and met many wonderful adventures. 'But
I must tell of
poor little --
Tom's death. ^,
One day he
was attacked

spider, and
although Tom
succeeded in
killing him
his poisonous
breath was too
much for the THE COMBAT WITH THE SPIDER.
brave little hero, and he fell into a wasting sickness
from which he never recovered.
A neat little slab was raised to his memory, and this
was part of the epitaph!-
HERE LIES TOM THUMB, KING ARTHUR'S KNIGHT
WHO DIED BY CRUEL SPIDER'S BITE!




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